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Sample records for pages health facilities

  1. Health Facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you choose ...

  2. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to start search site map [a-z] Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... General QUICK LIST Apply for Benefits Apply for Health Care Prescriptions My Health e Vet eBenefits Life Insurance ...

  3. Page 1 of 74 Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Bearhop, Stuart

    Page 1 of 74 Health and Safety Executive EH40/2005 Workplace exposure limits Containing the list HSE Books #12;Health and Safety Executive EH40/2005 Workplace Exposure Limits Page 2 of 74 © Crown to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email psi

  4. Peer Health Education Internship Application Page 1 Peer Health Education

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    -2016 Overview Peer Health Educators (PHEs) are an essential part of the Center for Health Promotion's work. WeName: Peer Health Education Internship Application Page 1 Peer Health Education Internship 2015're looking for students committed to making a difference in their community through education, connection

  5. Health and Safety Page 1 of 59

    E-print Network

    Bearhop, Stuart

    Health and Safety Executive Page 1 of 59 HSG53 (Fourth edition, published 2013). You can buy This is a web-friendly version of HSG53 published 05/13 #12;Health and Safety Executive Respiratory protective.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/opengovernment-licence/, write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email psi

  6. The health risks of decommissioning nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Dodic-Fikfak, M; Clapp, R; Kriebel, D

    1999-01-01

    The health risks facing workers involved in decommissioning nuclear facilities are a critical concern as the nuclear weapons complex and nuclear power plants begin to be dismantled. In addition to risks from exposure to radioactive materials, there are risks from other common industrial materials like crystalline silica dust and asbestos. We discuss these issues in the context of recent research on the risk of low-level ionizing radiation, the classification of crystalline silica as a carcinogen, and early experience with decommissioning nuclear facilities in the United States. Health and safety advocates will need to be vigilant to prevent worker exposure. PMID:17208791

  7. Industrial Sanitation and Personal Facilities. Module SH-13. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on industrial sanitation and personal facilities is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module deals wth many facets of industrial sanitation and the facilities industries should provide so that proper health procedures may be followed. Following the introduction, 14 objectives (each keyed to a page in…

  8. Selecting and Effectively Using a Health/Fitness Facility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information On… Selecting and Effectively Using A Health/Fitness Facility The health/fitness facility should provide a variety of equipment and programs to meet your personal fitness goals and interests. First, be sure to establish ...

  9. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities. Before implementation of review, a QIO must make...

  10. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... QIO's administrative and review procedures with each involved health care facility....

  11. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities. Before implementation of review, a QIO must make...

  12. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities. Before implementation of review, a QIO must make...

  13. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities. Before implementation of review, a QIO must make...

  14. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Internal Software Review

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    -003. Updated to new clas-io libraries, bank definitions. New test version for event builder development. FirstThomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Internal Software Review Jefferson Lab November 6-7, 2014 Hall B:User Software Contributions Gerard Gilfoyle University of Richmond #12;Thomas

  15. The SAS System PHYSICAL FACILITIES SPACE FILE PAGE: 1

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    SQUARE FT RUN DATE/TIME: 07/02/2014 8:10 SITE: 0004 PINE JOG CENTER TEACHING RESEARCH OFFICE AUD INSTRUCT SQUARE FT RUN DATE/TIME: 07/02/2014 8:10 SITE: 0005 FAU FT LAU TEACHING RESEARCH OFFICE AUD INSTRUCT STUThe SAS System PHYSICAL FACILITIES SPACE FILE PAGE: 1 PGM = SPAIC V01 - 2014 FLORIDA ATLANTIC

  16. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Responsibilities of health care facilities. 476.78... § 476.78 Responsibilities of health care facilities. (a) Every hospital seeking payment for services.... (b) Cooperation with QIOs. Health care providers that submit Medicare claims must cooperate in...

  17. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibilities of health care facilities. 476.78... § 476.78 Responsibilities of health care facilities. (a) Every hospital seeking payment for services.... (b) Cooperation with QIOs. Health care providers that submit Medicare claims must cooperate in...

  18. A health maintenance facility for space station freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, R. D.; Doarn, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a health care facility to be built and used on an orbiting space station in low Earth orbit. This facility, called the health maintenance facility, is based on and modeled after isolated terrestrial medical facilities. It will provide a phased approach to health care for the crews of Space Station Freedom. This paper presents the capabilities of the health maintenance facility. As Freedom is constructed over the next decade there will be an increase in activities, both construction and scientific. The health maintenance facility will evolve with this process until it is a mature, complete, stand-alone health care facility that establishes a foundation to support interplanetary travel. As our experience in space continues to grow so will the commitment to providing health care.

  19. Design Strategy for Flexible Health Sciences Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, John; Best, Gordon

    1970-01-01

    A statistical analysis of spatial allocations in university teaching hospitals and medical schools in three countries supports the hypothesis that on the “macro” level of major functional zones there is a considerable degree of invariance in space ratios, despite wide divergence in size, organization, and operating policies. On the basis of these findings a model is developed that makes it possible to predict, from a variety of indicators of space “needs,” the total area of a health sciences facility defined by levels of support servicing. The outputs of the model are seen as the inputs to a design strategy for potentially flexible medical facilities served by a communication lattice capable of indefinite extension. Images Fig. 9 PMID:5494269

  20. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Section 476.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Organizations (QIOs) General Provisions § 476.78 Responsibilities of health care facilities....

  1. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Organizations (QIOs) General Provisions § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities....

  2. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Organizations (QIOs) General Provisions § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities....

  3. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01...false Responsibilities of health care facilities. 476.78 Section 476.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...determination to the QIO within 3 working days. (5)...

  4. Manned Mars mission health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioanni, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) requirements which enable/enhance manned Mars missions (MMMs) are addressed. It does not attempt to resolve any issues that may affect the feasibility of any given element in the HMF. Reference is made to current work being conducted in the design of the space station HMF. The HMF requirements are discussed within the context of two distinctly different scenarios: HMF as part of the Mars surface infrastructure, and HMF as part of the nine months translation from low Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Requirements for an HMF are provided, and a concept of HMF is shown.

  5. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  6. Establishing and training health care facility decontamination teams.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Hick JL; Penn P; Hanfling D; Lappe MA; O'laughlin D; Burstein JL

    2003-09-01

    Recent terrorist events, changes in Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations requirements, and availability of grant funding have focused health care facility attention on emergency preparedness. Health care facilities have historically been underprepared for contaminated patients presenting to their facilities. These incidents must be properly managed to reduce the health risks to the victims, providers, and facility. A properly equipped and well-trained health care facility team is a prerequisite for rapid and effective decontamination response. This article reviews Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) training requirements for personnel involved with decontamination responses, as well as issues of team selection and training. Sample OSHA operations-level training curricula tailored to the health care environment are outlined. Initial and ongoing didactic and practical training can be implemented by the health care facility to ensure effective response when contaminated patients arrive seeking emergency medical care.

  7. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  8. June 2005 Page 1 of 7 Environmental Public Health Tracking

    E-print Network

    must include data on environmental hazards, human exposure, and health effects. The most healthJune 2005 Page 1 of 7 Environmental Public Health Tracking and Biomonitoring What is environmental public health tracking? · Environmental public health tracking (EPHT) is the ongoing collection

  9. Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

  10. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b.38... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care... impaired. A recipient hospital that provides health services or benefits shall establish a procedure...

  11. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b.38... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care... impaired. A recipient hospital that provides health services or benefits shall establish a procedure...

  12. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b.38... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care... impaired. A recipient hospital that provides health services or benefits shall establish a procedure...

  13. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b.38... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care... impaired. A recipient hospital that provides health services or benefits shall establish a procedure...

  14. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b.38... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care... impaired. A recipient hospital that provides health services or benefits shall establish a procedure...

  15. 77 FR 21580 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...market-rate multifamily housing, health care facility, and hospital...

  16. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  17. Health Care Facilities Resilient to Climate Change Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator’s guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned areas were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25522050

  18. Health care facilities resilient to climate change impacts.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

    2014-12-01

    Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator's guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned are as were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25590098

  19. Health care facilities resilient to climate change impacts.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator's guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned areas were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25522050

  20. Development of a Master Health Facility List in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Azeez, Aderemi; Bamidele, Samson; Oyemakinde, Akin; Oyediran, Kolawole Azeez; Adebayo, Wura; Fapohunda, Bolaji; Abioye, Abimbola; Mullen, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Routine Health Information Systems (RHIS) are increasingly transitioning to electronic platforms in several developing countries. Establishment of a Master Facility List (MFL) to standardize the allocation of unique identifiers for health facilities can overcome identification issues and support health facility management. The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) recently developed a MFL, and we present the process and outcome. Methods The MFL was developed from the ground up, and includes a state code, a local government area (LGA) code, health facility ownership (public or private), the level of care, and an exclusive LGA level health facility serial number, as part of the unique identifier system in Nigeria. To develop the MFL, the LGAs sent the list of all health facilities in their jurisdiction to the state, which in turn collated for all LGAs under them before sending to the FMOH. At the FMOH, a group of RHIS experts verified the list and identifiers for each state. Results The national MFL consists of 34,423 health facilities uniquely identified. The list has been published and is available for worldwide access; it is currently used for planning and management of health services in Nigeria. Discussion Unique identifiers are a basic component of any information system. However, poor planning and execution of implementing this key standard can diminish the success of the RHIS. Conclusion Development and adherence to standards is the hallmark for a national health information infrastructure. Explicit processes and multi-level stakeholder engagement is necessary to ensuring the success of the effort. PMID:25422720

  1. JISAO Health & Safety Plan 2 February 2015 Page 1

    E-print Network

    Frierson, Dargan

    at 206.526.6210 dmalarek@uw.edu Achim.H.Nicklis@noaa.gov #12;3 EH&S Occupational Health and Safety OfficeJISAO Health & Safety Plan 2 February 2015 Page 1 University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere & Ocean HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN A. Introduction 1. Scope

  2. Interstitial space in health care facilities : planning for change & evolution

    E-print Network

    Garcia Alvarez, Angel

    1989-01-01

    Hospitals are most useful material for architectural research for they exhibit all the problems encountered in other building types in an acute and easily measurable form. Health Care Facilities house the greatest range ...

  3. Health care providers and facilities: health facilities--2005. End of Year Issue Brief.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Andrew

    2005-12-31

    The mission of every hospital in America is to serve the health care needs of individuals in their communities, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Their task, and the task of their medical staff, is to continually care for and to cure their patients. American health facilities are said to provide the best, most sophisticated, and most beneficial health care in the world. However, a hospital's ability to care for each patient who walks through their doors is continuously challenged on numerous fronts--the shortage of key hospital personnel, the increased cost of caring for the uninsured, the continued problem of medical errors, and the growth of niche and specialty hospitals. As of 2002, there were 5,794 registered hospitals in the United States, according to the most recent data available from the American Hospital Association (AHA). The AHA also states that there are 4,927 community hospitals, which includes nongovernmental, non-profit hospitals, investor-owned (for-profit) hospitals, and hospitals owned by state and local governments. The AHA defines community hospitals as all non-federal, short-term general and other specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals include obstetrics and gynecology, rehabilitation, orthopedic and other individually described specialty services. Statistics provided by the AHA indicate that the number of rural and urban community hospitals is approximately equal--2,178 rural hospitals compared to 2,749 urban hospitals. PMID:16708445

  4. Health Information Exchange Capabilities in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Anna A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the levels at which health information exchange is used by skilled nursing facilities for clinical functions, the benefits and barriers associated with health information exchange and telehealth/telemonitoring capabilities, and the facility characteristics associated with health information exchange capabilities. A cross-sectional design was implemented. Data were collected from nursing home administrators, using a mail and online survey approach. A total of 156 usable questionnaires were returned of 397 distributed—a 39.30% response rate. The highest level of electronic exchange for clinical functions was within the facility than within corporation/affiliated organization or with nonaffiliated providers. It was also more prevalent in for-profit skilled nursing facilities than nonprofit skilled nursing facilities. More than half of the facilities reported no electronic exchange for functions, such as public health reporting, diagnostic test orders/results, medical orders/e-prescribing, advance directives, lab orders/results, and radiology orders/ results. Similarly, telehealth/telemonitoring was not in wide use by facilities in the state. The greatest barriers to electronic exchange of clinical functions were financial barriers, technological barriers, and connectivity barriers. Faster and accurate billing, improved care planning, and improved quality of documentation were reported as benefits of electronic information exchange of clinical data with affiliated and nonaffiliated providers. PMID:26200900

  5. Human health risk characterization of petroleum coke calcining facility emissions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Davinderjit; Johnson, Giffe T; Harbison, Raymond D

    2015-12-01

    Calcining processes including handling and storage of raw petroleum coke may result in Particulate Matter (PM) and gaseous emissions. Concerns have been raised over the potential association between particulate and aerosol pollution and adverse respiratory health effects including decrements in lung function. This risk characterization evaluated the exposure concentrations of ambient air pollutants including PM10 and gaseous pollutants from a petroleum coke calciner facility. The ambient air pollutant levels were collected through monitors installed at multiple locations in the vicinity of the facility. The measured and modeled particulate levels in ambient air from the calciner facility were compared to standards protective of public health. The results indicated that exposure levels were, on occasions at sites farther from the facility, higher than the public health limit of 150 ?g/m(3) 24-h average for PM10. However, the carbon fraction demonstrated that the contribution from the calciner facility was de minimis. Exposure levels of the modeled SO2, CO, NOx and PM10 concentrations were also below public health air quality standards. These results demonstrate that emissions from calcining processes involving petroleum coke, at facilities that are well controlled, are below regulatory standards and are not expected to produce a public health risk. PMID:26520182

  6. Updated Feb 10, 2014 Shared Facilities and Cores Guidelines & Policies Page 1 of 6 Einstein Shared Facilities and Cores

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    and guidelines for the fiscal and administrative operations of Albert Einstein College of Medicine (EinsteinUpdated Feb 10, 2014 Shared Facilities and Cores Guidelines & Policies Page 1 of 6 Einstein Shared and accounting practices within Einstein shared facilities and cores. · Ensure compliance with federal

  7. Housekeeper in Health Care Facilities. Student Manual [and] Instructor Key.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jane

    This packet contains a student manual and instructor key for a course in housekeeping for health care facilities in secondary health occupations programs. The student manual is divided into six units: (1) introduction to housekeeping; (2) interpersonal relations; (3) infection control and safety; (4) general cleaning procedures; (5) cleaning areas…

  8. Qualified Environmentalist/Sanitarian Needed in Every Health Care Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Environmental Health, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This article is concerned with the need for a qualified professional environmentalist/sanitarian to be employed full time at all health care facilities. Rising hospital costs and increasingly sophisticated procedures point out the need for professionals trained to carry out a positive environmental health program. (MA)

  9. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids Pages skip navigation Home Discover & Explore What's That Word Scientific Kids Fun & Games Parents & Teachers About Contact Oil Spills No one really ...

  10. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  11. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  12. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  13. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  14. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  15. Code JEF Facilities Engineering Home Page for the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffey, Valerie A.; Harrison, Marla J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    There are always many activities going on in JEF. We work on and manage the Construction of Facilities (C of F) projects at NASA-Ames. We are constantly designing or analyzing a new facility or project, or a modification to an existing facility. Every day we answer numerous questions about engineering policy, codes and standards, we attend design reviews, we count dollars and we make sure that everything at the Center is designed and built according to good engineering judgment. In addition, we study literature and attend conferences to make sure that we keep current on new legislation and standards.

  16. Page 1 of 1 Environmental Health and Safety Department

    E-print Network

    Page 1 of 1 Environmental Health and Safety Department 1500 Illinois St, Golden, CO 80401 (303) 273-3316 REQUEST FOR RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY Organization: Previous employer or institution where radiation School of Mines Environmental Health & Safety Attn: Radiation Safety Officer 1015 14th Street Golden

  17. HealthPoint Occupational Health Program (OHP) Page 1, rv2012

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    . According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), when no preventionHealthPoint Occupational Health Program (OHP) Page 1, rv2012 Laboratory Animal Allergy Prevention - Information Guide Introduction The University of Texas at Austin has an occupational health program in place

  18. 13.16 Public/Student Health Page 1 of 2 Public/Student Health

    E-print Network

    Hung, I-Kuai

    13.16 Public/Student Health Page 1 of 2 Public/Student Health Original Implementation: February 29 to promote public health on campus by protecting students, faculty, and staff from the spread of contagious and infectious diseases. An effective and responsible approach to safeguarding public health on campus requires

  19. 13.10 Health and Safety Page 1 of 3 Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Hung, I-Kuai

    13.10 Health and Safety Page 1 of 3 Health and Safety Original Implementation: February 11, 1977 of a safe and healthful environment complementary to the university's needs and the accomplishment of its reduction of accidents and risk. III. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, & RISK MANAGEMENT Responsibility

  20. 42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities, affiliates, and payor organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care... contracting with health care facilities, affiliates, and payor organizations. (a) Basic rule. Except as... health care facility in the QIO area. (2) A health care facility affiliate; that is, an organization...

  1. Health care providers and facilities issue brief: health facilities: year end report-2004.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Andrew

    2004-12-31

    American health facilities are said to provide the best health care in the world. But hospitals are continually challenged by staff shortages, patient safety and medical errors, uninsured patients, and the growth of specialty hospitals. This issue brief provides an analysis of the issues that challenge hospitals' ability to provide quality care for patients. Moreover, the issue brief defines each issue, including staffing mandates, patient safety and medical errors, emergency hospitals, billing practices, and niche and specialty hospitals, outlines the arguments for and against each issue, and finally details and characterizes state legislative activity in regard to each issue. As of 2002, the most recent data available from the American Hospital Association (AHA), there were 5,794 registered hospitals in the United States. The AHA also states that there are 4,927 community hospitals, which includes non-governmental non-profit hospitals, investor-owned (for-profit) hospitals, and hospitals owned by state and local governments. The AHA defines community hospitals as all non-federal, short-term general, and other specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals include obstetrics and gynecology, rehabilitation, orthopedic, and other individually described specialty services. Statistics provided by the AHA indicate that the number of rural and urban community hospitals is approximately equal--2,178 rural hospitals compared to 2,749 urban hospitals. However, this statistic alone does not address the quality of care in urban and rural settings. It does not address the total expenditures in rural and urban hospitals, nor does it address staffing levels. PMID:15768467

  2. 77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance... premiums (MIPs) for certain Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care... active mortgage insurance programs for multifamily housing or health care facilities. This...

  3. Video Surveillance in Mental Health Facilities: Is it Ethical?

    PubMed

    Stolovy, Tali; Melamed, Yuval; Afek, Arnon

    2015-05-01

    Video surveillance is a tool for managing safety and security within public spaces. In mental health facilities, the major benefit of video surveillance is that it enables 24 hour monitoring of patients, which has the potential to reduce violent and aggressive behavior. The major disadvantage is that such observation is by nature intrusive. It diminishes privacy, a factor of huge importance for psychiatric inpatients. Thus, an ongoing debate has developed following the increasing use of cameras in this setting. This article presents the experience of a medium-large academic state hospital that uses video surveillance, and explores the various ethical and administrative aspects of video surveillance in mental health facilities. PMID:26137651

  4. Identifying health facilities outside the enterprise: challenges and strategies for supporting health reform and meaningful use.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Colvard, Cyril; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-24

    Objective: To support collation of data for disability determination, we sought to accurately identify facilities where care was delivered across multiple, independent hospitals and clinics. Methods: Data from various institutions' electronic health records were merged and delivered as continuity of care documents to the United States Social Security Administration (SSA). Results: Electronic records for nearly 8000 disability claimants were exchanged with SSA. Due to the lack of standard nomenclature for identifying the facilities in which patients received the care documented in the electronic records, SSA could not match the information received with information provided by disability claimants. Facility identifiers were generated arbitrarily by health care systems and therefore could not be mapped to the existing international standards. Discussion: We propose strategies for improving facility identification in electronic health records to support improved tracking of a patient's care between providers to better serve clinical care delivery, disability determination, health reform and meaningful use. Conclusion: Accurately identifying the facilities where health care is delivered to patients is important to a number of major health reform and improvement efforts underway in many nations. A standardized nomenclature for identifying health care facilities is needed to improve tracking of care and linking of electronic health records. PMID:24960540

  5. Offsite intravenous admixture center shared by health-system facilities.

    PubMed

    Fauber, W S; Cosnotti, S J; Mady, R L

    1995-11-15

    The creation of an offsite i.v. admixture center shared by four affiliated health care facilities is described. The i.v. admixture center was developed to consolidate the admixture services of four Carilion Health System (Roanoke, Virginia)-affiliated facilities: Roanoke Memorial Hospital (RMH), RMH's Cancer and Rehabilitation Center, Community Hospital of Roanoke Valley (CHRV), and the Roanoke Memorial Home Health Parenteral Therapy Program. The proposed advantages of a shared i.v. admixture service included providing full i.v. services for CHRV, increasing the ability to prepare home i.v. admixtures on a daily basis, increasing space for preparing i.v. admixtures, avoiding adding admixture staff members at any of the facilities, reducing supply duplication and admixture waste, and standardizing and improving quality. The Carilion Admixture Center was built in Carilion's materials management building at a total cost for construction and new equipment of $80,000; it opened in April 1992. The facility is responsible for providing piggyback admixtures, premixed piggyback solutions, injectable antineoplastic agents, total parenteral nutrient solutions, prefilled syringes for pediatric patients, large-volume solutions containing additives, and all admixtures required for the home health care patients. The facility was certified as a Class 20,000 environment. Start-up problems included computer glitches and a heavier-than-anticipated workload during the first year of operation. Nearly 700,000 i.v. admixtures were compounded at the center between October 1992 and September 1994. There were 95 reports of missing doses during the day shift at RMH between November 1992 and January 1993; only 6% were due to errors at the admixture center. The estimated total cost avoidance for salaries, benefits, and nonbillable supplies for October 1992 through September 1994 was $437,000. Intravenous admixture services provided by three hospital facilities and one home health agency were successfully consolidated into one shared offsite center. PMID:8590238

  6. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  7. Key-phrase based classification of public health web pages.

    PubMed

    Dolamic, Ljiljana; Boyer, Célia

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the public health web pages classification model based on key phrase extraction and matching. Easily extendible both in terms of new classes as well as the new language this method proves to be a good solution for text classification faced with the total lack of training data. To evaluate the proposed solution we have used a small collection of public health related web pages created by a double blind manual classification. Our experiments have shown that by choosing the adequate threshold value the desired value for either precision or recall can be achieved. PMID:23920907

  8. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or...) Qio Review Functions § 476.90 Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. (a) If a health care facility or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to enter and perform the duties and...

  9. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or...) Qio Review Functions § 476.90 Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. (a) If a health care facility or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to enter and perform the duties and...

  10. Animal Health Diagnostic Center Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology Page 1 of 2 Issue Date: 5/25/2012 Document Title: Histology Laboratory Research Prices Document Code: AP-HISTO-CHT-010-V.01 Histology Laboratory Research Prices Prepared/Reviewed by: Martin Slade, Technical Service Supervisor, Histology Laboratory Tissues

  11. Community health facility preparedness for a cholera surge in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Mobula, Linda Meta; Jacquet, Gabrielle A; Weinhauer, Kristin; Alcidas, Gladys; Thomas, Hans-Muller; Burnham, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    With increasing population displacement and worsening water insecurity after the 2010 earthquake, Haiti experienced a large cholera outbreak. Our goal was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of seven community health facilities' ability to respond to a surge in cholera cases. Since 2010, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with a number of public and private donors has been working with seven health facilities in an effort to reduce morbidity and mortality from cholera infection. In November 2012, CRS through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s support, asked the Johns Hopkins Center for Refugee and Disaster Response to conduct a cholera surge simulation tabletop exercise at these health facilities to improve each facility's response in the event of a cholera surge. Using simulation development guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization and others, a simulation scenario script was produced that included situations of differing severity, supply chain, as well as a surge of patients. A total of 119 hospital staff from seven sites participated in the simulation exercise including community health workers, clinicians, managers, pharmacists, cleaners, and security guards. Clinics that had challenges during the simulated clinical care of patients were those that did not appropriately treat all cholera patients according to protocol, particularly those that were vulnerable, those that would need additional staff to properly treat patients during a surge of cholera, and those that required a better inventory of supplies. Simulation-based activities have the potential to identify healthcare delivery system vulnerabilities that are amenable to intervention prior to a cholera surge. PMID:24481887

  12. Trends in antenatal care attendance and health facility delivery following community and health facility systems strengthening interventions in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity and mortality remains high in Uganda; largely due to inadequate antenatal care (ANC), low skilled deliveries and poor quality of other maternal health services. In order to address both the demand and quality of ANC and skilled deliveries, we introduced community mobilization and health facility capacity strengthening interventions. Methods Interventions were introduced between January 2010 and September 2011. These included: training health workers, provision of medical supplies, community mobilization using village health teams, music dance and drama groups and male partner access clubs. These activities were implemented at Kitgum Matidi health center III and its catchment area. Routinely collected health facility data on selected outcomes in the year preceding the interventions and after 21 months of implementation of the interventions was reviewed. Trend analysis was performed using excel and statistical significance testing was performed using EPINFO StatCal option. Results The number of pregnant women attending the first ANC visit significantly increased from 114 to 150 in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.39–2.12) and to 202 in the third quarter of 2011(OR 11.41; 95% CI 7.97–16.34). The number of pregnant women counselled, tested and given results for HIV during the first ANC attendance significantly rose from 92 (80.7%) to 146 (97.3%) in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 and then to 201 (99.5%) in the third quarter of 2011. The number of male partners counseled, tested and given results together with their wives at first ANC visit rose from 13 (16.7%) in the fourth quarter of 2009 to 130 (89%) in the fourth quarter of 2010 and to 180 (89.6%) in the third quarter of 2011. There was a significant rise in the number of pregnant women delivering in the health facility with provision of mama-kits (delivery kits), from 74 (55.2%) to 149 (99.3%) in the second and fourth quarter of 2010. Conclusions Combined community and facility systems strengthening interventions led to increased first ANC visits by women and their partners, and health facility deliveries. Interventions aimed at increasing uptake of maternal health services should address both the demand and availability of quality services. PMID:24134717

  13. A spatial national health facility database for public health sector planning in Kenya in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Abdisalan M; Alegana, Victor A; Gething, Peter W; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to tackle the enormous burden of ill-health in low-income countries are hampered by weak health information infrastructures that do not support appropriate planning and resource allocation. For health information systems to function well, a reliable inventory of health service providers is critical. The spatial referencing of service providers to allow their representation in a geographic information system is vital if the full planning potential of such data is to be realized. Methods A disparate series of contemporary lists of health service providers were used to update a public health facility database of Kenya last compiled in 2003. These new lists were derived primarily through the national distribution of antimalarial and antiretroviral commodities since 2006. A combination of methods, including global positioning systems, was used to map service providers. These spatially-referenced data were combined with high-resolution population maps to analyze disparity in geographic access to public health care. Findings The updated 2008 database contained 5,334 public health facilities (67% ministry of health; 28% mission and nongovernmental organizations; 2% local authorities; and 3% employers and other ministries). This represented an overall increase of 1,862 facilities compared to 2003. Most of the additional facilities belonged to the ministry of health (79%) and the majority were dispensaries (91%). 93% of the health facilities were spatially referenced, 38% using global positioning systems compared to 21% in 2003. 89% of the population was within 5 km Euclidean distance to a public health facility in 2008 compared to 71% in 2003. Over 80% of the population outside 5 km of public health service providers was in the sparsely settled pastoralist areas of the country. Conclusion We have shown that, with concerted effort, a relatively complete inventory of mapped health services is possible with enormous potential for improving planning. Expansion in public health care in Kenya has resulted in significant increases in geographic access although several areas of the country need further improvements. This information is key to future planning and with this paper we have released the digital spatial database in the public domain to assist the Kenyan Government and its partners in the health sector. PMID:19267903

  14. Health Resources Statistics; Health Manpower and Health Facilities, 1968. Public Health Service Publication No. 1509.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    This report is a part of the program of the National Center for Health Statistics to provide current statistics as baseline data for the evaluation, planning, and administration of health programs. Part I presents data concerning the occupational fields: (1) administration, (2) anthropology and sociology, (3) data processing, (4) basic sciences,…

  15. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...keep the hospital or health care facility in operation...interest rate in effect on community and business programs...facility continuing to offer health care services which may...the projected amount of funds anticipated to be spent...would be for smaller health care facilities...

  16. 77 FR 21580 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance...) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage Insurance programs for commitments to be... multifamily housing, health care facility, and hospital loans. The increases will not apply to Low...

  17. HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 9 Facilities Effective: June 2000

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 9 Facilities Effective: June 2000 Policy Health Science Center facilities may be used by outside organizations with the joint sponsorship) of the Regents' Rules #12;HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 9 Facilities Effective

  18. Health facility committees and facility management - exploring the nature and depth of their roles in Coast Province, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community participation has been emphasized internationally as a way of enhancing accountability, as well as a means to enhance health goals in terms of coverage, access and effective utilization. In rural health facilities in Kenya, initiatives to increase community accountability have focused on Health Facility Committees (HFCs). In Coast Province the role of HFCs has been expanded with the introduction of direct funding of rural facilities. We explored the nature and depth of managerial engagement of HFCs at the facility level in two rural districts in this Coastal setting, and how this has contributed to community accountability Methods We conducted structured interviews with the health worker in-charge and with patients in 30 health centres and dispensaries. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with district managers, and with health workers and HFC members in 12 health centres and dispensaries. In-depth interviews with health workers and HFC members included a participatory exercise to stimulate discussion of the nature and depth of their roles in facility management. Results HFCs were generally functioning well and played an important role in facility operations. The breadth and depth of engagement had reportedly increased after the introduction of direct funding of health facilities which allowed HFCs to manage their own budgets. Although relations with facility staff were generally good, some mistrust was expressed between HFC members and health workers, and between HFC members and the broader community, partially reflecting a lack of clarity in HFC roles. Moreover, over half of exit interviewees were not aware of the HFC's existence. Women and less well-educated respondents were particularly unlikely to know about the HFC. Conclusions There is potential for HFCs to play an active and important role in health facility management, particularly where they have control over some facility level resources. However, to optimise their contribution, efforts are needed to improve their training, clarify their roles, and improve engagement with the wider community. PMID:21936958

  19. 42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care... with health care facilities. (a) Basic rule. Except as permitted under paragraph (b) of this section, the following are not eligible for QIO contracts: (1) A health care facility in the QIO area. (2)...

  20. 42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care... with health care facilities. (a) Basic rule. Except as permitted under paragraph (b) of this section, the following are not eligible for QIO contracts: (1) A health care facility in the QIO area. (2)...

  1. 42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care... with health care facilities. (a) Basic rule. Except as permitted under paragraph (b) of this section, the following are not eligible for QIO contracts: (1) A health care facility in the QIO area. (2)...

  2. 42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care... with health care facilities. (a) Basic rule. Except as permitted under paragraph (b) of this section, the following are not eligible for QIO contracts: (1) A health care facility in the QIO area. (2)...

  3. Does the Health Maintenance Facility Provide Speciality Capabilities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joey; Wurgler, James; Broadwell, Kim; Martin, William; Stiernberg, Charles M.; Bove, Alfred; Fromm, Rob; O'Neill, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) is capable of handling all minor illnesses, most moderate illnesses, and some major illnesses on board a space station. Its primary purpose should be to treat problems that are mission threatening, not life threatening. The HMF will have greater medical capabilities than those currently on Navy submarines. Much of the discussion in this document focuses on the possibilities of treating specific medical conditions on board a space station. The HMF will be limited to caring for critically ill patients for a few days, so a crew return vehicle will be important.

  4. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 12 GeV Software and Computing Review

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    Documentation: CLAS12-NOTE 2014-003. Updated to new clas-io libraries, bank definitions. New test versionThomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 12 GeV Software and Computing Review mechanisms to support utilization of the software by the entire collaboration? o Is the level of user

  5. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  6. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  7. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  8. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...will: (1) Within 15 days of receipt of debtor's...would be for smaller health care facilities or facilities...Law 103-354 within 60 days of the award date. ...number of beds, patient days of care, outpatient visits,...

  9. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...will: (1) Within 15 days of receipt of debtor's...would be for smaller health care facilities or facilities...Law 103-354 within 60 days of the award date. ...number of beds, patient days of care, outpatient visits,...

  10. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...will: (1) Within 15 days of receipt of debtor's...would be for smaller health care facilities or facilities...Law 103-354 within 60 days of the award date. ...number of beds, patient days of care, outpatient visits,...

  11. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...will: (1) Within 15 days of receipt of debtor's...would be for smaller health care facilities or facilities...Law 103-354 within 60 days of the award date. ...number of beds, patient days of care, outpatient visits,...

  12. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  13. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  14. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  15. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  16. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  17. School Health Services: A Facility Planning and Design Guide for School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This guide for Maryland schools outlines the role of school health services and proper facility design for these services. Chapter 1 provides an overview, describing coordinated school health programs, school health services programs, school health services programs in Maryland, how school health services are delivered, trends, the number of…

  18. The use of exit interviews in health service facilities.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, J

    1992-04-01

    Exit Interviews, also known as termination or separation interviews, are conducted in some hospitals and other health service agencies as a routine procedure when staff are ending their period of employment. The major purpose of these interviews is to elicit data regarding the employee's working experience in the organization and hence identify those factors that enhance retention of staff, for example, job satisfaction, study opportunity, challenging milieu, and those that are contributory factors to the decision to resign, such as, dissatisfaction due to poor standards of care becoming the norm and lack of autonomy in planning and implementing nursing care. As a recent study indicated, the hierarchical level of the Exit Interviewer could have a significant effect on the amount and accuracy of the data so obtained. While applicable to all departments of a facility, comments herein are largely concerned with nursing and are based on a thesis by the author. PMID:1596608

  19. G:/OccHealth/Paperwork/Forms/HepBVaccination 5-10-2011 Page 1 of 1 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CENTER

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    G:/OccHealth/Paperwork/Forms/HepBVaccination 5-10-2011 Page 1 of 1 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CENTER University Occupational Health Center (SUOHC) provides oversight of the HBV vaccination program for personnel ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ESF ­ 480 Oak Road Stanford, CA 94305-8007 650.725.5308; fax: 650.725.9218 www

  20. Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms

    E-print Network

    Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical health care services. This may be called "eligible expense," "payment allowance" or "negotiated rate Billing.) Appeal A request for your health insurer or plan to review a decision or a grievance again

  1. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  2. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  3. HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 9 Facilities Effective: June 2000

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 9 Facilities Effective: June 2000 Section 9.1 University Facilities Revised: March 2012 Policy 9.1.7 Solicitation Responsibility: Vice of the Health Science Center with the following exceptions: 1. Registered student organizations may collect

  4. Assessing Organizational Readiness for a Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Intervention in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; West, Cheryl; Punnett, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The long-term care sector is characterized by high morbidity and employee turnover, along with associated costs. Effective health protection and health promotion are important to improve physical and psychosocial well-being of caregivers. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is an essential precursor to the successful implementation of workplace programs addressing work climate, structure of tasks and relationships, and other issues that may be perceived as challenging by some within the institution. This study qualitatively assessed readiness of five skilled nursing facilities for a participatory occupational health/health promotion intervention. Selection criteria were developed to screen for program feasibility and ability to conduct prospective evaluations, and information was collected from managers and employees (interviews and focus groups). Three centers were selected for the program, and the first year of formative evaluation and intervention experience was then reviewed to evaluate and modify our selection criteria after the fact. Lessons learned include adding assessment of communication and the structure of problem solving to our selection criteria, improving methods to assess management support in a concrete (potentially nonverbal) form, and obtaining a stated financial commitment and resources to enable the team to function. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is challenging, although necessary to implement effective and sustainable health promotion programs in specific organizations. PMID:25715335

  5. Uses of inorganic hypochlorite (bleach) in health-care facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Rutala, W A; Weber, D J

    1997-01-01

    Hypochlorite has been used as a disinfectant for more than 100 years. It has many of the properties of an ideal disinfectant, including a broad antimicrobial activity, rapid bactericidal action, reasonable persistence in treated potable water, ease of use, solubility in water, relative stability, relative nontoxicity at use concentrations, no poisonous residuals, no color, no staining, and low cost. The active species is undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Hypochlorites are lethal to most microbes, although viruses and vegetative bacteria are more susceptible than endospore-forming bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Activity is reduced by the presence of heavy metal ions, a biofilm, organic material, low temperature, low pH, or UV radiation. Clinical uses in health-care facilities include hyperchlorination of potable water to prevent Legionella colonization, chlorination of water distribution systems used in hemodialysis centers, cleaning of environmental surfaces, disinfection of laundry, local use to decontaminate blood spills, disinfection of equipment, decontamination of medical waste prior to disposal, and dental therapy. Despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants, hypochlorites continue to find wide use in hospitals. PMID:9336664

  6. Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response

    PubMed Central

    Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system. PMID:25276595

  7. Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response.

    PubMed

    Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

    2014-08-01

    Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system. PMID:25276595

  8. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC), a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Given the current maternal and child mortality in Bangladesh and the challenges to addressing health-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets the financial sustainability of such facilities is crucial. Methods The study was designed as a case study covering a single facility. The methodology was based on the 'ingredient approach' using the allocation techniques by inpatient and outpatient services. Cost recovery of the facility was estimated from the provider's perspective. The value of capital items was annualized using 5% discount rate and its market price of 2004 (replacement value). Sensitivity analysis was done using 3% discount rate. Results The cost recovery ratio of the BRAC primary care facility was 59%, and if excluding all capital costs, it increased to 72%. Of the total costs, 32% was for personnel while drugs absorbed 18%. Capital items were17% of total costs while operational cost absorbed 12%. Three-quarters of the total cost was variable costs. Inpatient services contributed 74% of total revenue in exchange of 10% of total utilization. An average cost per patient was US$ 10 while it was US$ 67 for inpatient and US$ 4 for outpatient. Conclusion The cost recovery of this NGO primary care facility is important for increasing its financial sustainability and decreasing donor dependency, and achieving universal health coverage in a developing country setting. However, for improving the cost recovery of the health facility, it needs to increase utilization, efficient planning, resource allocation and their optimum use. It also requires controlling variable costs and preventing any wastage of resources. PMID:20529379

  9. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section...-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. (a... facility may apply to be accredited to perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

  10. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section...-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. (a... facility may apply to be accredited to perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

  11. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section...-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. (a... facility may apply to be accredited to perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

  12. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section...-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. (a... facility may apply to be accredited to perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

  13. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section...-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. (a... facility may apply to be accredited to perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

  14. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  15. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  16. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  17. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Socio-Demographic Factors Predicting Birth in Health Facility

    PubMed Central

    Berhan, Yifru; Berhan, Asres

    2014-01-01

    Background The low proportion of health facility delivery in developing countries is one of the main challenges in achieving the Millennium Development Goal of a global reduction of maternal deaths by 75% by 2015. There are several primary studies which identified socio-demographic and other predictors of birth in health facility. However, there are no efforts to synthesis the findings of these studies. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the strength of the association of birth in the health facility with selected sociodemographic factors. Methods A meta-analysis of Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios was conducted by including 24 articles which were reported between 2000 and 2013 from developing countries. A computer-based search was done from MEDLINE, African Journals Online, Google Scholar and HINARI databases. Included studies did compare the women's' health facility delivery in relation to their selected socio-demographic characteristics. Results The pooled analysis demonstrated association of health facility delivery with living in urban areas (OR = 9.8), secondary and above educational level of the parents (OR = 5.0), middle to high wealth status (OR = 2.3) and first time pregnancy (OR = 2.8). The risk of delivering outside the health facility was not significantly associated with maternal age (teenage vs 20 years and above) and marital status. The distance of pregnant women's residence from the health facility was found to have an inverse relation to the proportion of health facility delivery. Conclusion Although the present meta-analysis identified several variables which were associated with an increase in health facility delivery, the most important predictor of birth in the health facility amenable to intervention is educational status of the parents to be. Therefore, formal and informal education to women and family members on the importance of health facility delivery needs to be strengthened. Improving the wealth status of the population across the world may not be achieved soon, but should be in the long-term strategy to increase the birth rate in the health facility. PMID:25489185

  19. Health and Safety Management for Small-scale Methane Fermentation Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Masaru; Yuyama, Yoshito; Nakamura, Masato; Oritate, Fumiko

    In this study, we considered health and safety management for small-scale methane fermentation facilities that treat 2-5 ton of biomass daily based on several years operation experience with an approximate capacity of 5 t·d-1. We also took account of existing knowledge, related laws and regulations. There are no qualifications or licenses required for management and operation of small-scale methane fermentation facilities, even though rural sewerage facilities with a relative similar function are required to obtain a legitimate license. Therefore, there are wide variations in health and safety consciousness of the operators of small-scale methane fermentation facilities. The industrial safety and health laws are not applied to the operation of small-scale methane fermentation facilities. However, in order to safely operate a small-scale methane fermentation facility, the occupational safety and health management system that the law recommends should be applied. The aims of this paper are to clarify the risk factors in small-scale methane fermentation facilities and encourage planning, design and operation of facilities based on health and safety management.

  20. PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.13 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1

    E-print Network

    SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU) System health care facilities and providers including the privacy of protected health information and to minimize the risk of unauthorized access, use verbal exchanges or discussions of confidential information, regardless of where the discussion occurs

  1. Differences in essential newborn care at birth between private and public health facilities in eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Waiswa, Peter; Akuze, Joseph; Peterson, Stefan; Kerber, Kate; Tetui, Moses; Forsberg, Birger C.; Hanson, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background In Uganda and elsewhere, the private sector provides an increasing and significant proportion of maternal and child health services. However, little is known whether private care results in better quality services and improved outcomes compared to the public sector, especially regarding care at the time of birth. Objective To describe the characteristics of care-seekers and assess newborn care practices and services received at public and private facilities in rural eastern Uganda. Design Within a community-based maternal and newborn care intervention with health systems strengthening, we collected data from mothers with infants at baseline and endline using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate data analysis comparing nine newborn care practices and three composite newborn care indicators among private and public health facilities was conducted. Results The proportion of women giving birth at private facilities decreased from 25% at baseline to 17% at endline, whereas overall facility births increased. Private health facilities did not perform significantly better than public health facilities in terms of coverage of any essential newborn care interventions, and babies were more likely to receive thermal care practices in public facilities compared to private (68% compared to 60%, p=0.007). Babies born at public health facilities received an average of 7.0 essential newborn care interventions compared to 6.2 at private facilities (p<0.001). Women delivering in private facilities were more likely to have higher parity, lower socio-economic status, less education, to seek antenatal care later in pregnancy, and to have a normal delivery compared to women delivering in public facilities. Conclusions In this setting, private health facilities serve a vulnerable population and provide access to service for those who might not otherwise have it. However, provision of essential newborn care practices was slightly lower in private compared to public facilities, calling for quality improvement in both private and public sector facilities, and a greater emphasis on tracking access to and quality of care in private sector facilities. PMID:25843495

  2. Older Adult Participation in Health Promotion Programs: Perspectives of Facility Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tim; Hyner, Gerald C.

    2011-01-01

    Administrators of older adult-centered facilities must identify barriers to the planning and implementation of health promotion programs. In this qualitative research those barriers were identified through in-depth interviews with administrators of older adult-centered facilities. As identified by administrators, the predominant barriers to the…

  3. Bloodborne pathogens. -1910.1030 Page 1 of 33 Occupational Safety & Health Administration

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Bloodborne pathogens. - 1910.1030 Page 1 of 33 Occupational Safety & Health Administration www of Contents · Part Number: 1910 · Part Title: Occupational Safety and Health Standards · Subpart: Z · Subpart Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, or designated representative. Blood means human blood

  4. Human Resources hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Human Resources ­ hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing Protocol: Contractor Management Last Modified: September 2014 Review Date: March2015 Approved By: Sharon Butt, Health & Safety Manager Contact: Health & Safety Team Table of Contents Introduction

  5. RIC Call for Grants vfinalPage 1 Continuing Health Science Education Program (CHSE)

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    RIC Call for Grants vfinalPage 1 Continuing Health Science Education Program (CHSE) Research and Innovation Fund CALL FOR RESEARCH PROPOSALS The Continuing Health Science Education Program (CHSE) seeks Continuing Health Sciences Education Department MDCL, Rm 3510 Phone: 905-525-9140 x22671 1280 Main Street

  6. Using Facebook Page Insights Data to Determine Posting Best Practices in an Academic Health Sciences Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houk, Kathryn M.; Thornhill, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library created a Facebook page and a corresponding managing committee in March 2010. Facebook Page Insights data collected from the library's Facebook page were statistically analyzed to investigate patterns of user engagement. The committee hoped to improve posting practices and increase user…

  7. Academic Handbook, Admission, Health Risks Page 1 Issued: 2013 11

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    with infectious diseases (including Hepatitis B and HIV) should they be assigned to them. Students accepted to the Faculty will be sent complete documentation regarding health status policies and immunization requirements will be required to care for persons with infectious diseases which could include Hepatitis B and HIV. Students

  8. 041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY WOMEN'S HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Maroncelli, Mark

    041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY ­ WOMEN'S HEALTH [ ]. Do you currently or have you ever had any of the following conditions? PAST MEDICAL HISTORY: Yes: _____________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ OTHER SIGNIFICANT PAST MEDICAL HISTORY: Have you ever been pregnant? If yes, # of times

  9. A checklist for planning and designing audiovisual facilities in health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, G J; Bischoff, F A; Foxman, D S

    1984-01-01

    Developed by an MLA/HeSCA (Health Sciences Communications Association) joint committee, this checklist is intended to serve as a conceptual framework for planning a new or renovated audiovisual facility in a health sciences library. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical and organizational decisions that must be made about an audiovisual facility before the technical or spatial decisions can be wisely made. Specific standards for facilities or equipment are not included. The first section focuses on health sciences library settings. Ideas presented in the remaining sections could apply to academic learning resource center environments as well. A bibliography relating to all aspects of audiovisual facilities planning and design is included with references to specific sections of the checklist. PMID:6208957

  10. Health Professions Education Facilities in the Non-Profit Sector. 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    In this study of the physical facilities of the nation's health professions schools, all schools of dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, public health, and veterinary medicine, and all parent institutions of the schools, were surveyed in May of 1973. The major goals of this pioneering survey were to assess the nature and…

  11. Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

  12. Healthy Firms: Constraints to Growth among Private Health Sector Facilities in Ghana and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Nicholas E.; Kopf, Daniel; Spreng, Connor P.; Yoong, Joanne; Sood, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Background Health outcomes in developing countries continue to lag the developed world, and many countries are not on target to meet the Millennium Development Goals. The private health sector provides much of the care in many developing countries (e.g., approximately 50 percent in Sub-Saharan Africa), but private providers are often poorly integrated into the health system. Efforts to improve health systems performance will need to include the private sector and increase its contributions to national health goals. However, the literature on constraints private health care providers face is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze data from a survey of private health facilities in Kenya and Ghana to evaluate growth constraints facing private providers. A significant portion of facilities (Ghana: 62 percent; Kenya: 40 percent) report limited access to finance as the most significant barrier they face; only a small minority of facilities report using formal credit institutions to finance day to day operations (Ghana: 6 percent; Kenya: 11 percent). Other important barriers include corruption, crime, limited demand for goods and services, and poor public infrastructure. Most facilities have paper-based rather than electronic systems for patient records (Ghana: 30 percent; Kenya: 22 percent), accounting (Ghana: 45 percent; Kenya: 27 percent), and inventory control (Ghana: 41 percent; Kenya: 24 percent). A majority of clinics in both countries report undertaking activities to improve provider skills and to monitor the level and quality of care they provide. However, only a minority of pharmacies report undertaking such activities. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that improved access to finance and improving business processes especially among pharmacies would support improved contributions by private health facilities. These strategies might be complementary if providers are more able to take advantage of increased access to finance when they have the business processes in place for operating a successful business and health facility. PMID:22383944

  13. Impacts of Natural Hazards on Primary Health Care Facilities of Iran: A 10-Year Retrospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Ali; Mowafi, Hani; Yousefi, Homa

    2013-01-01

    Public health facilities in Iran are exposed to a wide range of natural hazards. This article presents the first survey of the impacts of such natural hazards on primary health care (PHC) centers in Iran from 2001 to 2011. A retrospective survey was conducted in 25 out of 30 provinces of Iran. Archival reports at provincial public health departments were cross-referenced with key informant interviews. During a 10-year period, 119 natural hazard events were recorded that led to physical damage and/or functional failure in 1,401 health centers, 127 deaths and injury or illness in 644 health staff. Earthquakes accounted for the most physical damage and all health-worker deaths. However, there was an increasing trend of impacts due to hydro-meteorological hazards. Iran’s health system needs to establish a registry to track the impact of natural hazards on health facilities, conduct regular hazard and vulnerability assessments and increase mitigation and preparedness measures. Keywords: Disaster, primary health care, facility, Iran, natural hazard Corresponding author: Ali Ardalan MD, PhD. Iran’s National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Email: aardalan@tums.ac.ir PMID:23863871

  14. Health sciences libraries in Kuwait: a study of their resources, facilities, and services

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Husain A.; Al-Enezi, Sana

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of health sciences libraries in Kuwait in terms of their staff, collections, facilities, use of information technology, information services, and cooperation. Seventeen libraries participated in the study. Results show that the majority of health sciences libraries were established during the 1980s. Their collections are relatively small. The majority of their staff is nonprofessional. The majority of libraries provide only basic information services. Cooperation among libraries is limited. Survey results also indicate that a significant number of health sciences libraries are not automated. Some recommendations for the improvement of existing resources, facilities, and services are made. PMID:11465688

  15. The Legal Implications of HIPAA Privacy and Public Health Reporting for Correctional Facilities.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Leila; Collmer, Veda; Meza, Nick; Penunuri, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    Inmates in cramped living quarters, a situation common to correctional facilities, are especially vulnerable to disease. Cramped living conditions, coupled with above-average rates of HIV, tuberculosis, and other communicable diseases, increase inmates' risk of problematic health outcomes. Thus, high-quality health care and sustained efforts to prevent disease are especially important to improve inmate health within correctional facilities. Compliance with federal privacy restrictions pursuant to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule and state disease reporting requirements will foster inmate health and assist efforts to prevent the spread of disease. This article examines the interplay between HIPAA rules and state reporting laws to preserve health information privacy and to control the spread of disease. PMID:25953838

  16. Statistical Inference for Ranks of Health Care Facilities

    E-print Network

    Xie, Minge

    function Gn(t) ! 0(Xie, Singh and Zhang, 2009) #12;3 Smooth Rank Definition Define smooth population for diabetes patients in VA hospitals across the US Study population Veterans who used the VHA facilities). Population and Sample ranks Interested to rank k institutions through a specific characteristic described

  17. New Sports Hall and Health and Fitness Facility

    E-print Network

    Abrahams, I. David

    Park and Run Trails Loughborough University Stadium Holywell American Football Holywell 1 Football Pitch Holywell 2 Football Pitch Holywell 3 Football Pitch Holywell 4 Football Pitch Beach Park MultiVehicle Charging Point HOLYWELL PITCHES 5,6 & 7 OUTDOOR SPORT FACILITIES Beach Park HolywellAmerican Football

  18. Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program

    E-print Network

    of Mines research and teaching laboratories. Principal Investigators and Faculty are responsible responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmentalPage 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators

  19. Strengthening health facilities for maternal and newborn care: experiences from rural eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Namazzi, Gertrude; Waiswa, Peter; Nakakeeto, Margaret; Nakibuuka, Victoria K.; Namutamba, Sarah; Najjemba, Maria; Namusaabi, Ruth; Tagoola, Abner; Nakate, Grace; Ajeani, Judith; Peterson, Stefan; Byaruhanga, Romano N.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Uganda maternal and neonatal mortality remains high due to a number of factors, including poor quality of care at health facilities. Objective This paper describes the experience of building capacity for maternal and newborn care at a district hospital and lower-level health facilities in eastern Uganda within the existing system parameters and a robust community outreach programme. Design This health system strengthening study, part of the Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST), aimed to increase frontline health worker capacity through district-led training, support supervision, and mentoring at one district hospital and 19 lower-level facilities. A once-off supply of essential medicines and equipment was provided to address immediate critical gaps. Health workers were empowered to requisition subsequent supplies through use of district resources. Minimal infrastructure adjustments were provided. Quantitative data collection was done within routine process monitoring and qualitative data were collected during support supervision visits. We use the World Health Organization Health System Building Blocks to describe the process of district-led health facility strengthening. Results Seventy two per cent of eligible health workers were trained. The mean post-training knowledge score was 68% compared to 32% in the pre-training test, and 80% 1 year later. Health worker skills and competencies in care of high-risk babies improved following support supervision and mentoring. Health facility deliveries increased from 3,151 to 4,115 (a 30% increase) in 2 years. Of 547 preterm babies admitted to the newly introduced kangaroo mother care (KMC) unit, 85% were discharged alive to continue KMC at home. There was a non-significant declining trend for in-hospital neonatal deaths across the 2-year study period. While equipment levels remained high after initial improvement efforts, maintaining supply of even the most basic medications was a challenge, with less than 40% of health facilities reporting no stock-outs. Conclusion Health system strengthening for care at birth and the newborn period is possible even in low-resource settings and can be associated with improved utilisation and outcomes. Through a participatory process with wide engagement, training, and improvements to support supervision and logistics, health workers were able to change behaviours and practices for maternal and newborn care. Local solutions are needed to ensure sustainability of medical commodities. PMID:25843496

  20. Factors associated with delivery outside a health facility: cross-sectional study in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Mazalale, Jacob; Kambala, Christabel; Brenner, Stephan; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Lohmann, Julia; Mathanga, Don P; Robberstad, Bjarne; Muula, Adamson S; De Allegri, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with delivery outside a health facility in rural Malawi. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Balaka, Dedza, Mchinji and Ntcheu districts in Malawi in 2013 among women who had completed a pregnancy 12 months prior to the day of the survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with delivery outside a facility. Results Of the 1812 study respondents, 9% (n = 159) reported to have delivered outside a facility. Unmarried women were significantly more likely [OR = 1.88; 95% CI (1.086–3.173)] to deliver outside a facility, while women from households with higher socio-economic status [third-quartile OR = 0.51; 95% CI (0.28–0.95) and fourth-quartile OR = 0.48; 95% CI (0.29–0.79)] and in urban areas [OR = 0.39; 95%-CI (0.23–0.67)] were significantly less likely to deliver outside a facility. Women without formal education [OR 1.43; 95% CI (0.96–2.14)] and multigravidae [OR = 1.14; 95% CI (0.98–1.73)] were more likely to deliver outside a health facility at 10% level of significance. Conclusion About 9% of women deliver outside a facility. Policies to encourage facility delivery should not only focus on health systems but also be multisectoral to address women's vulnerability and inequality. Facility-based delivery can contribute to curbing the high maternal illness burden if authorities provide incentives to those not delivering at the facility without losing existing users. PMID:25656750

  1. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

  2. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary...Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary...ordinances; and (iii) Provide a work area that is dedicated...

  3. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Functions § 476.88 Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners. (a... examine its operation and records (including information on charges) that are pertinent to health...

  4. Keeping health facilities safe: one way of strengthening the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health systems.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Schouten, Erik J; Chimbwandira, Frank; Van Damme, Wim; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2010-12-01

    The debate on the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health system strengthening in the last few years has intensified as experts seek to tease out common ground and find solutions and synergies to bridge the divide. Unfortunately, the debate continues to be largely academic and devoid of specificity, resulting in the issues being irrelevant to health care workers on the ground. Taking the theme 'What would entice HIV- and tuberculosis (TB)-programme managers to sit around the table on a Monday morning with health system experts', this viewpoint focuses on infection control and health facility safety as an important and highly relevant practical topic for both disease-specific programmes and health system strengthening. Our attentions, and the examples and lessons we draw on, are largely aimed at sub-Saharan Africa where the great burden of TB and HIV ? AIDS resides, although the principles we outline would apply to other parts of the world as well. Health care infections, caused for example by poor hand hygiene, inadequate testing of donated blood, unsafe disposal of needles and syringes, poorly sterilized medical and surgical equipment and lack of adequate airborne infection control procedures, are responsible for a considerable burden of illness amongst patients and health care personnel, especially in resource-poor countries. Effective infection control in a district hospital requires that all the components of a health system function well: governance and stewardship, financing,infrastructure, procurement and supply chain management, human resources, health information systems, service delivery and finally supervision. We argue in this article that proper attention to infection control and an emphasis on safe health facilities is a concrete first step towards strengthening the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health systems where it really matters – for patients who are sick and for the health care workforce who provide the care and treatment. PMID:21137105

  5. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 91-0366-2453, Delaware County Resource Recovery Facility, Chester, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, E.J.; Tepper, A.

    1994-09-01

    In response to a confidential request, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Delaware County Resource Recovery Facility (SIC-4053), Chester, Pennsylvania. The facility was a waste to energy incinerator employing 91 persons. The facility incinerated municipal solid waste and refuse derived fuel to produce electrical power. The request was made in response to concern regarding exposure to lead (7439921), incinerator ash dust, and heat stress. Health concerns included ear, nose and throat problems, eye irritation, and skin rash. The authors conclude that a possible occupational health hazard existed due to heat exposure in some areas of the facility. The presence of metal in dust on workers' hands and surfaces presented a risk of ingestion.

  6. National Plant Disease Recovery System PLANT HEALTH PROGRESS Vol. 16, No. 4, 2015 Page 173

    E-print Network

    Etxeberria, Edgardo

    National Plant Disease Recovery System PLANT HEALTH PROGRESS Vol. 16, No. 4, 2015 Page 173, Forest Health Section, Florida Forest Service, Gainesville, FL 32608; T. Pernas, National Park Service of several disease-specific documents produced as part of the National Plant Disease Recovery System (NPDRS

  7. Page 1 of 5 Safety and Health Services Ebola outbreak information for members of the University

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Page 1 of 5 Safety and Health Services Ebola outbreak information for members of the University Version 4.0 Safety and Health Services Ebola outbreak: information for members of the University Document control information Published document name: ohs-ebola-gn.pdf Date issued: January 2015 Version: 4

  8. Page 1 of 5 Safety and Health Services Ebola: advice and risk assessment for first responders

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Page 1 of 5 Safety and Health Services Ebola: advice and risk assessment for first responders Version 1.1 Safety and Health Services Ebola: advice and risk assessment for security staff, managers of residences and first aiders. Document control information Published document name: ebola-fa-gn.pdf Date

  9. Exposure Control Plan Page 38 of 45 Environmental Health & Safety Department Revised: November 2007

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Exposure Control Plan Page 38 of 45 Environmental Health & Safety Department Revised: November 2007 APPENDIX G EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE NOTIFICATION AND MEDICAL EVALUATION OPTION FORM This form is to be completed membrane exposure, or non-intact skin exposure during my employment with The University of Texas Health

  10. Bioaerosol in composting facilities: occupational health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Olivier; Huyard, Alain; Cartnick, Keith; Yañez, Adela; Catalán, Vicente; Quang, Zdravka Do

    2009-01-01

    This research found evidence of an association between occupational exposure to bioaerosols in composting plants and health outcome occurrence in exposed workers. An occupational exposure assessment in six composting plants was performed to better characterize personal exposure levels and evaluate associated health risk in workers. Sampling results showed large ranges of concentrations of dust, bacteria, molds, and endotoxin in ambient air and in personal samples, both when driving a front-end loader and when cleaning, monitoring, and performing maintenance tasks. Mean personal exposure levels were high at 100 to more than 10,000 times higher than outdoor background levels and fully consistent with occurrence of inflammatory and allergic respiratory outcomes among workers. Engineering control, personal protection, and education and training programs for employees, health, and safety officials, and occupational physicians are being developed and implemented. PMID:19860143

  11. Preventing Airborne Disease Transmission: Review of Methods for Ventilation Design in Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadi, Amir A.; Rogak, Steven N.; Bartlett, Karen H.; Green, Sheldon I.

    2011-01-01

    Health care facility ventilation design greatly affects disease transmission by aerosols. The desire to control infection in hospitals and at the same time to reduce their carbon footprint motivates the use of unconventional solutions for building design and associated control measures. This paper considers indoor sources and types of infectious aerosols, and pathogen viability and infectivity behaviors in response to environmental conditions. Aerosol dispersion, heat and mass transfer, deposition in the respiratory tract, and infection mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on experimental and modeling approaches. Key building design parameters are described that include types of ventilation systems (mixing, displacement, natural and hybrid), air exchange rate, temperature and relative humidity, air flow distribution structure, occupancy, engineered disinfection of air (filtration and UV radiation), and architectural programming (source and activity management) for health care facilities. The paper describes major findings and suggests future research needs in methods for ventilation design of health care facilities to prevent airborne infection risk. PMID:22162813

  12. Intelligent 3D Sensing for Robotic Inspection of Hazardous Facilities Sreenivas Sukumar, David Page, Andrei Gribok, Andreas Koschan, Mongi Abidi

    E-print Network

    Koschan, Andreas

    WORK We have deployed laser scanners on a robotic platform to provide us with high fidelity 3D shape and triangulation) of 3D laser scanners mounted on a mobile platform. To interpret such a real-world sceneIntelligent 3D Sensing for Robotic Inspection of Hazardous Facilities Sreenivas Sukumar, David Page

  13. Health and Safety Policy Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No.1005 Rev.: 3

    E-print Network

    Zallen, Richard

    Health and Safety Policy Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No.1005 __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Health and Safety Policy safety awareness; meet requirements of environmental, occupational health, and safety laws

  14. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

    2008-01-01

    Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility-based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including crowd control, triage, removal of contaminated garments, cleaning of body contaminants, and management of contaminated materials and equipment), and a discussion of methods to achieve preparedness. PMID:18082785

  15. A ‘Mystery Client’ Evaluation of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health services in Health Facilities from Two Regions in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mchome, Zaina; Richards, Esther; Nnko, Soori; Dusabe, John; Mapella, Elizabeth; Obasi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcoming behaviours and judgemental attitudes have long been recognised as a barrier to young people’s access to reproductive health services. Over the last decade youth friendly reproductive health services have been promoted and implemented world-wide. However, long term evidence of the impact of these programmes is lacking. We report the results of a large mystery client evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in Tanzania, a country that has had a long established youth friendly policy. Forty-eight visits made to thirty-three health facilities were conducted by twelve young people (six in each region) trained to perform three different scripted scenarios (i.e., condom request, information on sexually transmitted infections and family planning). The study revealed barriers in relation to poor signage and reception for services. In addition health workers demonstrated paternalistic attitudes as well as lack of knowledge about adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. In some cases, health workers discouraged young people from using services such as condoms and family planning methods. Lack of confidentiality and privacy were also noted to be common challenges for the young people involved. Intervention strategies that focus on changing health workers’ mind-set in relation to adolescent sexual and reproductive health are crucial for ensuring quality provision of sexual and reproductive health services to young people. The study identified the importance of reception or signs at the health units, as this can facilitate young people’s efforts in seeking sexual and reproductive health services. Likewise, improvement of health workers knowledge of existing policy and practice on sexual and reproductive health services and youth friendly services is much needed. PMID:25803689

  16. Laser programs facility management plan for environment, safety, and health

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Laser Programs ES&H policy is established by the Associate Director for Laser Programs. This FMP is one component of that policy. Laser Programs personnel design, construct and operate research and development equipment located in various Livermore and Site 300 buildings. The Programs include a variety of activities, primarily laser research and development, inertial confinement fusion, isotope separation, and an increasing emphasis on materials processing, imaging systems, and signal analysis. This FMP is a formal statement of responsibilities and controls to assure operational activities are conducted without harm to employees, the general public, or the environment. This plan identifies the hazards associated with operating a large research and development facility and is a vehicle to control and mitigate those hazards. Hazards include, but are not limited to: laser beams, hazardous and radioactive materials, criticality, ionizing radiation or x rays, high-voltage electrical equipment, chemicals, and powered machinery.

  17. Food security practice in Kansas schools and health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eunju; Shanklin, Carol W

    2007-02-01

    This pilot study investigated perceived importance and frequency of specific preventive measures, and food and nutrition professionals' and foodservice directors' willingness to develop a food defense management plan. A mail questionnaire was developed based on the US Department of Agriculture document, Biosecurity Checklist for School Foodservice Programs--Developing a Biosecurity Management Plan. The survey was sent to food and nutrition professionals and foodservice operators in 151 acute care hospitals, 181 long-term-care facilities, and 450 school foodservice operations. Chemical use and storage was perceived as the most important practice to protect an operation and was the practice implemented most frequently. Results of the study indicate training programs on food security are needed to increase food and nutrition professionals' motivation to implement preventive measures. PMID:17258972

  18. Page 1 | B.S. in Public Health | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Public Health

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yongge

    Academic Plan of Study College of Health & Human Services Department of Public Health Sciences publichealthPage 1 | B.S. in Public Health | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Public Health-Public Health (PRPH) pre-major: Change of Major form accepted year-round; advising in CHHS Advising Center

  19. Guiding Ebola patients to suitable health facilities: an SMS-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Mohamad-Ali; Jurdak, Raja; Rana, Rajib

    2015-01-01

    Access to appropriate health services is a fundamental problem in developing countries, where patients do not have access to information and to the nearest health service facility. We propose building a recommendation system based on simple SMS text messaging to help Ebola patients readily find the closest health service with available and appropriate resources. The system will map people’s reported symptoms to likely Ebola case definitions and suitable health service locations. In addition to providing a valuable individual service to people with curable diseases, the proposed system will also predict population-level disease spread risk for infectious diseases using crowd-sourced symptoms from the population. Health workers will be able to better plan and anticipate responses to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Patients will have improved access to appropriate health care. This system could also be applied in other resource poor or rich settings. PMID:25789162

  20. Lessons Learned from the On-Site Distillation of Used Solvents Generated by Health Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ching-San; Ciesla, John

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the sources of contaminants found in used solvents generated by the histopathological laboratories at health care facilities and the technical problems, corrective measures, and economic analysis associated with the on-site recycling and reusing of these solvents. An appendix contains an economic analysis for a used-solvent recycling…

  1. [3D printing in health care facilities: What legislation in France?].

    PubMed

    Montmartin, M; Meyer, C; Euvrard, E; Pazart, L; Weber, E; Benassarou, M

    2015-11-01

    Health care facilities more and more use 3D printing, including making their own medical devices (MDs). However, production and marketing of MDs are regulated. The goal of our work was to clarify what is the current French regulation that should be applied concerning the production of custom-made MDs produced by 3D printing in a health care facility. MDs consist of all devices used for diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of diseases in patients. Prototypes and anatomic models are not considered as MDs and no specific laws apply to them. Cutting guides, splints, osteosynthesis plates or prosthesis are MDs. In order to become a MD manufacturer in France, a health care facility has to follow the requirements of the 93/42/CEE directive. In addition, custom-made 3D-printed MDs must follow the annex VIII of the directive. This needs the writing of a declaration of conformity and the respect of the essential requirements (proving that a MD is secure and conform to what is expected), the procedure has to be qualified, a risk analysis and a control of the biocompatibility of the material have to be fulfilled. The documents proving that these rules have been respected have to be available. Becoming a regulatory manufacturer of MD in France is possible for a health care facility but the specifications have to be respected. PMID:26071022

  2. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities. 1956.143 Section 1956.143 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  3. Adoption factors associated with electronic health record among long-term care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Mileski, Michael; Alaytsev, Vyachelslav; Carol, Elizabeth; Williams, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act created incentives for adopting electronic health records (EHRs) for some healthcare organisations, but long-term care (LTC) facilities are excluded from those incentives. There are realisable benefits of EHR adoption in LTC facilities; however, there is limited research about this topic. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to identify EHR adoption factors for LTC facilities that are ineligible for the HITECH Act incentives. Setting We conducted systematic searches of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete via Ebson B. Stephens Company (EBSCO Host), Google Scholar and the university library search engine to collect data about EHR adoption factors in LTC facilities since 2009. Participants Search results were filtered by date range, full text, English language and academic journals (n=22). Interventions Multiple members of the research team read each article to confirm applicability and study conclusions. Primary and secondary outcome measures Researchers identified common themes across the literature: specifically facilitators and barriers to adoption of the EHR in LTC. Results Results identify facilitators and barriers associated with EHR adoption in LTC facilities. The most common facilitators include access to information and error reduction. The most prevalent barriers include initial costs, user perceptions and implementation problems. Conclusions Similarities span the system selection phases and implementation process; of those, cost was the most common mentioned. These commonalities should help leaders in LTC facilities align strategic decisions to EHR adoption. This review may be useful for decision-makers attempting successful EHR adoption, policymakers trying to increase adoption rates without expanding incentives and vendors that produce EHRs. PMID:25631311

  4. Effects of health and safety problem recognition on small business facility investment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study involved a survey of the facility investment experiences, which was designed to recognize the importance of health and safety problems, and industrial accident prevention. Ultimately, we hope that small scale industries will create effective industrial accident prevention programs and facility investments. Methods An individual survey of businesses’ present physical conditions, recognition of the importance of the health and safety problems, and facility investment experiences for preventing industrial accidents was conducted. The survey involved 1,145 business operators or management workers in small business places with fewer than 50 workers in six industrial complexes. Results Regarding the importance of occupational health and safety problems (OHS), 54.1% said it was “very important”. Received technical and financial support, and industrial accidents that occurred during the past three years were recognized as highly important for OHS. In an investigation regarding facility investment experiences for industrial accident prevention, the largest factors were business size, greater numbers of industrial accidents, greater technical and financial support received, and greater recognition of the importance of the OHS. The related variables that decided facility investment for industry accident prevention in a logistic regression analysis were the experiences of business facilities where industrial accidents occurred during the past three years, received technical and financial support, and recognition of the OHS. Those considered very important were shown to be highly significant. Conclusions Recognition of health and safety issues was higher when small businesses had experienced industrial accidents or received financial support. The investment in industrial accidents was greater when health and safety issues were recognized as important. Therefore, the goal of small business health and safety projects is to prioritize health and safety issues in terms of business management and recognition of importance. Therefore, currently various support projects are being conducted. However, there are issues regarding the limitations of the target businesses and inadequacies in maintenance and follow-up. Overall, it is necessary to provide various incentives for onsite participation that can lead to increased recognition of health and safety issues and practical investments, while perfecting maintenance and follow up measures by thoroughly revising existing operating systems. PMID:24472180

  5. Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

  6. Health Facilities Safety in Natural Disasters: Experiences and Challenges from South East Europe

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Vesela; Vitale, Ksenija; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations. PMID:22754465

  7. Evaluation of literacy level of patient education pages in health-related journals.

    PubMed

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E; Carpenter-Haefele, Kara M

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reading level of patient education material from selected current health care journals. Ten patient education pages from a variety of health care journals were entered into a Microsoft Word program. Applying the Flesch-Kincaid readability formula available from Microsoft Word, a reading level for each page was established and compared to recommended standards. Only 2 of 10 patient education pages fell within the recommended reading levels for health-related materials, and 5 of 10 were above the estimated mean U.S. reading level of 8th grade. A 5th to 6th grade level is recommended for patient education materials. This study suggests that although it is known that low health literacy is a widespread problem, it is not always considered when patient-targeted materials are developed. Health care professionals need to become more active in addressing the literacy needs of the intended receiver of written health-related information. PMID:15847246

  8. The Mistreatment of Women during Childbirth in Health Facilities Globally: A Mixed-Methods Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bohren, Meghan A.; Vogel, Joshua P.; Hunter, Erin C.; Lutsiv, Olha; Makh, Suprita K.; Souza, João Paulo; Aguiar, Carolina; Saraiva Coneglian, Fernando; Diniz, Alex Luíz Araújo; Tunçalp, Özge; Javadi, Dena; Oladapo, Olufemi T.; Khosla, Rajat; Hindin, Michelle J.; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite growing recognition of neglectful, abusive, and disrespectful treatment of women during childbirth in health facilities, there is no consensus at a global level on how these occurrences are defined and measured. This mixed-methods systematic review aims to synthesize qualitative and quantitative evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth in health facilities to inform the development of an evidence-based typology of the phenomenon. Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, CINAHL, and Embase databases and grey literature using a predetermined search strategy to identify qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies on the mistreatment of women during childbirth across all geographical and income-level settings. We used a thematic synthesis approach to synthesize the qualitative evidence and assessed the confidence in the qualitative review findings using the CERQual approach. In total, 65 studies were included from 34 countries. Qualitative findings were organized under seven domains: (1) physical abuse, (2) sexual abuse, (3) verbal abuse, (4) stigma and discrimination, (5) failure to meet professional standards of care, (6) poor rapport between women and providers, and (7) health system conditions and constraints. Due to high heterogeneity of the quantitative data, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis; instead, we present descriptions of study characteristics, outcome measures, and results. Additional themes identified in the quantitative studies are integrated into the typology. Conclusions This systematic review presents a comprehensive, evidence-based typology of the mistreatment of women during childbirth in health facilities, and demonstrates that mistreatment can occur at the level of interaction between the woman and provider, as well as through systemic failures at the health facility and health system levels. We propose this typology be adopted to describe the phenomenon and be used to develop measurement tools and inform future research, programs, and interventions. PMID:26126110

  9. Reasons rural Laotians choose home deliveries over delivery at health facilities: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality among poor rural women in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is among the highest in Southeast Asia, in part because only 15% give birth at health facilities. This study explored why women and their families prefer home deliveries to deliveries at health facilities. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from December 2008 to February 2009 in two provinces of Lao PDR. Data was collected through eight focus group discussions (FGD) as well as through in-depth interviews with 12 mothers who delivered at home during the last year, eight husbands and eight grandmothers, involving a total of 71 respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze the FGD and interview transcripts. Results Obstacles to giving birth at health facilities included: (1) Distance to the health facilities and difficulties and costs of getting there; (2) Attitudes, quality of care, and care practices at the health facilities, including a horizontal birth position, episiotomies, lack of privacy, and the presence of male staff; (3) The wish to have family members nearby and the need for women to be close to their other children and the housework; and (4) The wish to follow traditional birth practices such as giving birth in a squatting position and lying on a “hot bed” after delivery. The decision about where to give birth was commonly made by the woman’s husband, mother, mother-in-law or other relatives in consultation with the woman herself. Conclusion This study suggests that the preference in rural Laos for giving birth at home is due to convenience, cost, comfort and tradition. In order to assure safer births and reduce rural Lao PDR’s high maternal mortality rate, health centers could consider accommodating the wishes and traditional practices of many rural Laotians: allowing family in the birthing rooms; allowing traditional practices; and improving attitudes among staff. Traditional birth attendants, women, and their families could be taught and encouraged to recognize the signs of at-risk pregnancies so as to be able to reach health facilities on time. PMID:22925107

  10. Public perception of health-risks from a MSW resource recovery facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, R.K.; Balmer, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    Within the last decade, the siting of a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) has become a very difficult, complex and controversial process. As in many communities across the nation, opposition to the siting of MSW RRFs has been largely due to public perception that organics, primarily dioxins, that are released in minute quantities from the stacks of the RRFs, create the risk of potential health effects including cancer. This has been underscored by the degree of dissension within the scientific community on this matter. In response to citizen concerns, Montgomery County, maryland conducted several health risk studies prior to applying for a Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) of air quality permit for the facility. Although the results of these studies indicated that the health risks from stack emissions of the RRF are within acceptable levels as defined by regulatory agencies, County`s citizen advisory committees and people living in the townships near the site suggested that the County conduct an ambient monitoring program to collect baseline data on dioxins and other chemicals before making a decision to build the facility. This paper discusses public participation activities in the conduct of the health risk studies and the baseline environmental monitoring program, and presents some baseline data collected in the air and non-air media.

  11. Forest Health: Texas Leaf-Cutting Ant http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Forest Health: Texas Leaf-Cutting Ant http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2 Texas leaf-cutting ant material and construct tunnels and chambers, and the small workers maintain fungal gardens and care garden. The nest area of the Texas leaf-cutting ant is marked by characteristic crescent-shaped mounds

  12. The Backyard Geneticist 2014 C.A. Sharp Page 1 Australian Shepherd Health & Genetics Institute, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Lacy, Bob

    's Roadmap 53 Science & Your Dogs Alphabet Soup: Why genes have weird names 58 Genetic Counseling 60 WhenThe Backyard Geneticist © 2014 C.A. Sharp Page 1 Australian Shepherd Health & Genetics Institute@ashgi.org www.ashgi.org The Backyard Geneticist by C.A. Sharp A collection of articles on the applied genetics

  13. Office of Environmental Health and Safety Page 1 of 8 Foot Protection Standard: Selection and Use

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    Office of Environmental Health and Safety Page 1 of 8 Foot Protection Standard: Selection and Use September 2014 Foot Protection Standard: Selection and Use In University workplaces, falling or rolling for foot injury. Whenever practicable, these hazards shall be eliminated or reduced through the use

  14. Forest Health: Nantucket Pine Tip Moth http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Forest Health: Nantucket Pine Tip Moth http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 weeks, but cool.usda.gov/pubs/rp/rp_srs032.pdf The Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana) can cause severe damage to buds and shoots, especially on poor sites. Tree mortality is rare and tip moth attacks are seldom a concern once trees reach

  15. Forest Health: Elm Leaf Beetle http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    gallon of water. Cover foliage well with spray. The elm leaf beetle (Pyrrhalta luteola) can stripForest Health: Elm Leaf Beetle http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 Control: No chemical controls trees, the homeowner may wish to use insecticides to control the pest. Adult beetles and lar- vae

  16. Forest Health: Fusiform Rust http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    depressed on one side. Black turpentine beetles (Dendroctonus terebrans), coneworms (Dioryctria spp to in- fect newly formed oak leaves, especially water oak. In turn, oaks produce basidiospores in tiny Health: Fusiform Rust http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 2 of 2 water oak) in and immediately adjacent to pine

  17. Forest Health: Forest Tent Caterpillar http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Forest Health: Forest Tent Caterpillar http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 coons in any sheltered, periodic and localized outbreaks of the forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) may occur. They are particularly fond of the leaves of oaks and gums. The ma- jor impact from these caterpillars is slower tree

  18. Forest Health: Eastern Tent Caterpillar http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Forest Health: Eastern Tent Caterpillar http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 leaves. Larvae popu- lations at low levels. Shade tree control: Tents containing caterpillars may be picked off are aggressive in their feeding habits. They start building the silken tent almost immediately, enlarg- ing

  19. Delivering enhanced cardiovascular (Hypertension) disease care through private health facilities in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are one of the leading causes of death and disability in the world. Over 80% of CVD deaths take place in low-and middle-income countries. One-third of the population aged above 40 years suffers from Hypertension (HTN) and this is largely unreported as there is no registry for CVDs. No guidelines are available for use in health care facilities, especially private health facilities where practice among GPs varies considerably. We aim to conduct a Cluster Randomized Controlled trial delivering a quality HTN-CVD care package at strengthened private health facilities as compared to current practice at private health facilities. Methods/Design A pragmatic cluster randomized trial, with qualitative and economic studies, will be conducted in Sargodha district of Punjab, Pakistan, from January 2012 to December 2016. At least 912 hypertensives will be registered in the two arms, six clusters per arm. The proposed cluster randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effects of delivering quality HTN-CVD care, through enabled private health care facilities, to achieve better case registration, adherence and hypertension control also blood glucose and serum cholesterol control. The trial will be conducted through the doctors and paramedics at private health facilities. Main outcomes are mean difference in Systolic blood pressure among the two arms. Secondary outcomes are mean change in total serum cholesterol levels and mean change in glycaemic control achieved in the adult hypertensive patients. Individual and Cluster level analysis will be done according to intention-to-treat. Discussion Due to the high burden of disease where 1 in 3 individuals aged above 45 suffers from hypertension, topped with the fact that there is a dearth of a set of available, standardised guidelines for management, the disease is constantly on a hike in Pakistan. The government has made no effort to issue a set of guidelines adapted specifically for our population and this becomes more of a problem when managing CVD in urban population through private practitioners whose practices vary widely.If our set of context sensitive guidelines show an effectiveness in the proposed intervention districts it will be replicated in other such settings. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN34381594 PMID:24066730

  20. Annotated References on: Engineering Maintenance, Sanitation Public Health, Sanitation Health Care Facility, Housekeeping, and Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    Developed as part of the Allied Health Professions Projects, these five annotated bibliographies contain resource materials from the following areas: (1) Engineering Maintenance, 13 entries, (2) Sanitation and Public Health, 15 entries, (3) Hospital and Nursing Home Administration, 12 entries, (4) Hospital Housekeeping, 43 entries, and (5)…

  1. Page 1 D. Dilling, T. Brown FIRE FACILITIES AND SITE REQUIREMENTS

    E-print Network

    of remote handling systems to remove and transport tokamak parts to hot cell facilities. Major tokamak test cell, hot cells, structures to house key services, and routing of service connections-T shots, will be about 1.5 kg. All fuel reprocessing equipment will be doubly confined, by gloveboxes

  2. Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

  3. Collaboration With Behavioral Health Care Facilities to Implement Systemwide Tobacco Control Policies — California, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lauren; Modayil, Mary V.; Pavlik, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) administered 4 regional trainings in 2012 to staffers at CTCP-funded projects, tobacco control coalitions, several county departments of mental health and alcohol and drug, and administrators and providers from behavioral health care facilities. These trainings focused on the special tobacco use cessation needs and opportunities for cessation among persons with mental illness or substance abuse disorders, and they provided information about cessation and smoke-free policies. CTCP surveyed county and private behavioral health care programs to assess their readiness for adopting tobacco control strategies at treatment facilities. Between baseline and follow-up we found a decrease in the proportion of organizations at the precontemplation or contemplation stages of change and twice as many organizations at the action and maintenance stages of change. Significant obstacles remain to implementing policy: many agencies have concerns about going tobacco-free. But significant progress has been made, as evidenced by new policies and a growing number of tobacco-free coalitions consisting of public health agencies, behavioral health care agencies, and local hospitals. PMID:25654218

  4. Physical Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S. M.; Novelo Casanova, D.

    2010-12-01

    Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

  5. Occupational traumatic injuries among workers in health care facilities - United States, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ahmed E; Tapp, Loren C; Luckhaupt, Sara E; Vanoli, Kelly; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Raudabaugh, William M; Nowlin, Susan; Sprigg, Susan M

    2015-04-24

    In 2013, one in five reported nonfatal occupational injuries occurred among workers in the health care and social assistance industry, the highest number of such injuries reported for all private industries. In 2011, U.S. health care personnel experienced seven times the national rate of musculoskeletal disorders compared with all other private sector workers. To reduce the number of preventable injuries among health care personnel, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), with collaborating partners, created the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN) to collect detailed injury data to help target prevention efforts. OHSN, a free, voluntary surveillance system for health care facilities, enables prompt and secure tracking of occupational injuries by type, occupation, location, and risk factors. This report describes OHSN and reports on current findings for three types of injuries. A total of 112 U.S. facilities reported 10,680 OSHA-recordable* patient handling and movement (4,674 injuries); slips, trips, and falls (3,972 injuries); and workplace violence (2,034 injuries) injuries occurring from January 1, 2012-September 30, 2014. Incidence rates for patient handling; slips, trips, and falls; and workplace violence were 11.3, 9.6, and 4.9 incidents per 10,000 worker-months,† respectively. Nurse assistants and nurses had the highest injury rates of all occupations examined. Focused interventions could mitigate some injuries. Data analyzed through OHSN identify where resources, such as lifting equipment and training, can be directed to potentially reduce patient handling injuries. Using OHSN can guide institutional and national interventions to protect health care personnel from common, disabling, preventable injuries. PMID:25905893

  6. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

  7. Health workers, health facilities and penile cutting in papua new guinea: implications for male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Tynan, A; Vallely, A; Kelly, A; Kupul, M; Law, G; Millan, J; Siba, P; Kaldor, J; Hill, P S

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in male circumcision (MC) for HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) prevention following compelling evidence from ecological studies and clinical trials in Africa, and the World Health Organization's recommendation in 2007 that MC be considered part of comprehensive HIV prevention programs in high-prevalence settings. Though no national policy has been established in PNG, East Sepik Province (ESP) commenced a formal program of MC in 2006, and there is evidence that PNG health workers are involved in other penile foreskin cutting activities in many areas. As part of a wider Male Circumcision Acceptability and Impact Study in PNG, we conducted an audit at a sample of PNG health facilities to assess their suitability for implementing a national MC program, and to identify issues that may arise in any future roll-out. The clinical audits demonstrated the difficulties with procurement and availability of equipment for general services around PNG, shortage of staff and capacity, and limitations of available clinical space. Results show that the ESP program has been successful; however, the success relies heavily on commitment from key workers to volunteer their time and services. A review of penile cutting activities by health care workers outside of the ESP program showed that the PNG health system is already involved in contemporary and traditional penile cutting practices via formal and informal arrangements: for example, by responding to complications from penile cuts performed by non-health workers, assisting community members to perform penile cutting through provision of equipment and advice, or providing regular penile foreskin cutting services for contemporary and traditional practices. PMID:24494507

  8. Competence of health care providers on care of newborns at birth in a level-1 health facility in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Monebenimp, Francisca; Tenefopa, Makudjou; Mve Koh, Valere; Kago, Innocent

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This is an observational study which was carried out at a level one health facility in Yaoundé from June to July 2009. The aim was to evaluate the competence of health care providers towards newborns’ care at birth Methods Ten health care providers took care of three hundred and thirty-five pregnant women who were enrolled for the study after informed verbal consent in the delivery room. Results Out of 340 offspring delivered and taken care of, 179 (52.6%) were male and 161 (47.4%) were female. Only two out of ten health workers had a WHO Essential Newborn Care (ENC) training. None of them had received any refresher course for the past two years. The mean gestational age of women was 39.5±3.5 weeks. Resuscitation was carried out on 21 (6.2%) of the newborns including 7 (33.3%) who had birth asphyxia. Health care providers scored 100% in performing the following tasks: warming up the baby, applying eye drops, injecting vitamin K, identifying the neonate, searching for any apparent life threatening congenital malformations, preventing for infection after procedures and initiating breastfeeding. The score was 24% at neonatal resuscitation tasks. Low level of education was associated with poor competence on applying ENC tasks (p<0.001). Lack of WHO ENC training was associated with poor competence on ENC tasks (p<0.001) and poor skills on resuscitation (p=0.03). Conclusion There is a need to reinforce the capacity of health care providers by training in WHO ENC course with emphasis on providing skills on resuscitation in order to reduce the burden of neonatal intrapartum-related deaths. PMID:22593781

  9. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances. PMID:25599637

  10. Health, Safety & Wellbeing Training 2012-2013 Further details on all the courses listed below appear on the University's Health, Safety & Wellbeing web pages go

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    of these specialists Health and Safety training courses. Asbestos Awareness Biological Safety Officer Food HygieneHealth, Safety & Wellbeing Training 2012-2013 Further details on all the courses listed below appear on the University's Health, Safety & Wellbeing web pages ­ go to www.sussex.ac.uk/hso/ To reserve

  11. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

  12. Ready, aim fire! Mental health nurses under siege in acute inpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ward, Louise

    2013-04-01

    It has been clearly acknowledged and well-documented that physical, emotional, and psychological violence is a central theme and an expected workplace hazard for registered nurses working in acute inpatient mental health care facilities. Limited research, however, has focused on how registered nurses have been able to cope within this environment and adequately protect themselves from harm. A critical feminist research project recently explored the lived experience of 13 Australian, female, registered nurses working in a busy metropolitan acute inpatient mental health care facility. "Fear" was exposed as the precursor to violence and aggression, both "fear as experienced by the nurse" and "fear as experienced by the patient." The participants reported experiencing a sense of fear when they could not accurately or confidently anticipate a patient response or reaction. They identified this relationship with fear as being "part of the job" and part of the unpredictable nature of caring for people experiencing complex distortions in thinking and behavior. The participants believed, however, that additional workplace pressures complicated the therapeutic environment, resulting in a distraction from patient care and observation. This distraction could lead to nurse-patient miscommunication and the potential for violence. This article discusses a major theme to emerge from this study, "Better the devil you know!" The theme highlights how mental health nurses cope with violence and why they choose to continue working in this complex care environment. PMID:23566191

  13. Drug utilization in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Mengistu; Kebebe Borga, Dereje; Mulisa Bobasa, Eshetu

    2015-01-01

    Background Sustaining the availability and rational use of safe and effective drugs is a major problem in developing countries. Irrational drug use affects quality of health care more than accessibility of drugs. Objective To assess drug utilization in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone from January 21–28, 2012 by using structured questionnaires. Results Of 50 prescribers and 30 dispensers, 58% and 83.3% were males, respectively. The result showed that majority of prescribers agreed on availability of essential drugs (72%) and had access to up-to-date drug information (76%). However, 43.3% of dispensers didn’t get access to up-to-date drug information. 86% and 88% of prescribers note cost of drugs and stick to standard treatment guidelines of Ethiopia during prescription, respectively. All drug dispensers check the name of the drug (100%), age of the patient (90%), the dosage form of drug (96.7%), the route of administration (90%), the duration of therapy (86.7%), and frequency of administration (86.7%) for prescription papers. Conclusion In general, drug utilization at the study sites was found to be good, although there are major deviations from the concept of rational drug use. PMID:26229506

  14. Revolving drug funds at front-line health facilities in Vientiane, Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Murakami, H; Phommasack, B; Oula, R; Sinxomphou, S

    2001-03-01

    Pharmaceutical cost recovery programmes, which have been mainly implemented in Africa, are gradually spreading to Southeast Asian countries that formerly belonged to the socialist bloc. This report describes the economic and operational realities of revolving drug funds (RDFs) at district hospitals and health centres in the capital of the Lao PDR by reviewing research conducted by the implementing department. People in the municipality spent an average of US$11 on drugs in 1996. The RDFs comprised only 3% of the total yearly drug sales in the municipality, whereas private pharmacies accounted for 75%. The RDFs were forced to operate in conjunction with the remaining government drug endowment and the thriving private pharmacies. This scheme has provided a stable supply of essential drugs. The assurance of drug availability at the front-line health facilities has resulted in increased utilization of the facilities despite the introduction of a drug fee. The cost recovery rate was 107% at health centres and 108% at district hospitals in two monitored districts during the 10 months from November 1997. Decentralized financial management was essential for cost recovery, allowing timely adjustment of selling prices as purchase prices rapidly inflated after the Asian economic crisis. The health staff observed that the people perceived drugs as everyday commodities that they should buy and take based on self-diagnosis and personal preference. Adaptation of the public health authorities to market-oriented thinking along with the establishment of pharmaceutical cost recovery occurred with few problems. However, both financial and operational management capacity at the municipal level pose a major challenge to policy clarification and scheme setting, especially in procurement, control of prescribing practices and the integration of drug dispensing with other components of quality clinical care. PMID:11238436

  15. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  16. Why give birth in health facility? Users’ and providers’ accounts of poor quality of birth care in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, half of all pregnant women access a health facility for delivery. The proportion receiving skilled care at birth is even lower. In order to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, the government has set out to increase health facility deliveries by skilled care. The aim of this study was to describe the weaknesses in the provision of acceptable and adequate quality care through the accounts of women who have suffered obstetric fistula, nurse-midwives at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities and local community members. Methods Semi-structured interviews involving 16 women affected by obstetric fistula and five nurse-midwives at maternity wards at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities, and Focus Group Discussions with husbands and community members were conducted between October 2008 and February 2010 at Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania and Temeke hospitals in Dar es Salaam, and Mpwapwa district in Dodoma region. Results Health care users and health providers experienced poor quality caring and working environments in the health facilities. Women in labour lacked support, experienced neglect, as well as physical and verbal abuse. Nurse-midwives lacked supportive supervision, supplies and also seemed to lack motivation. Conclusions There was a consensus among women who have suffered serious birth injuries and nurse midwives staffing both BEmOC and CEmOC maternity wards that the quality of care offered to women in birth was inadequate. While the birth accounts of women pointed to failure of care, the nurses described a situation of disempowerment. The bad birth care experiences of women undermine the reputation of the health care system, lower community expectations of facility birth, and sustain high rates of home deliveries. The only way to increase the rate of skilled attendance at birth in the current Tanzanian context is to make facility birth a safer alternative than home birth. The findings from this study indicate that there is a long way to go. PMID:23663299

  17. Capacity of Health Facilities to Manage Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe Districts in Uganda: Challenges and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Musinguzi, Geofrey; Bastiaens, Hilde; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.; Mukose, Aggrey; Van geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nuwaha, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic diseases is increasing in both low- and middle-income countries. However, healthcare systems in low-income countries are inadequately equipped to deal with the growing disease burden, which requires chronic care for patients. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of health facilities to manage hypertension in two districts in Uganda. Methods In a cross-sectional study conducted between June and October 2012, we surveyed 126 health facilities (6 hospitals, 4 Health Center IV (HCIV), 23 Health Center III (HCIII), 41 Health Center II (HCII) and 52 private clinics/dispensaries) in Mukono and Buikwe districts in Uganda. We assessed records, conducted structured interviews with heads of facilities, and administered questionnaires to 271 health workers. The study assessed service provision for hypertension, availability of supplies such as medicines, guidelines and equipment, in-service training for hypertension, knowledge of hypertension management, challenges and recommendations. Results Of the 126 health facilities, 92.9% reported managing (diagnosing/treating) patients with hypertension, and most (80.2%) were run by non-medical doctors or non-physician health workers (NPHW). Less than half (46%) of the facilities had guidelines for managing hypertension. A 10th of the facilities lacked functioning blood pressure devices and 28% did not have stethoscopes. No facilities ever calibrated their BP devices except one. About a half of the facilities had anti-hypertensive medicines in stock; mainly thiazide diuretics (46%), beta blockers (56%) and calcium channel blockers (48.4%). Alpha blockers, mixed alpha & beta blockers and angiotensin II receptor antagonists were only stocked by private clinics/dispensaries. Most HCIIs lacked anti-hypertensive medicines, including the first line thiazide diuretics. Significant knowledge gaps in classification of patients as hypertensive were noted among respondents. All health workers (except 5, 1.9%) indicated that they needed additional training in hypertension management. Several provider and patient related challenges were also observed in this study. Conclusions Health facilities in this setting are inadequately equipped to provide services for management of hypertension. Diagnostic equipment, anti-hypertensive drugs and personnel present great challenges. To address the increasing burden of hypertension and other chronic diseases, measures are needed to substantially strengthen the healthcare facilities, including training of personnel in management of hypertension and other chronic diseases, and improving diagnostic and treatment supplies. PMID:26560131

  18. An assessment of clinical chemical sensing technology for potential use in space station health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Health Maintenance Facility is currently under development for space station application which will provide capabilities equivalent to those found on Earth. This final report addresses the study of alternate means of diagnosis and evaluation of impaired tissue perfusion in a microgravity environment. Chemical data variables related to the dysfunction and the sensors required to measure these variables are reviewed. A technology survey outlines the ability of existing systems to meet these requirements. How the candidate sensing system was subjected to rigorous testing is explored to determine its suitability. Recommendations for follow-on activities are included that would make the commercial system more appropriate for space station applications.

  19. IN.2.3 Guidelines on Issuing Health Certificates for Animals Leaving U of I Laboratory Animal Facilities

    E-print Network

    Chen, Deming

    IN.2.3 Guidelines on Issuing Health Certificates for Animals Leaving U of I Laboratory Animal Facilities Health certificates are required for many animal species when transporting them across state animals even when not required by state or federal regulations. Many institutions request/require a prior

  20. Utilisation of health services and geography: deconstructing regional differences in barriers to facility-based delivery in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Andrew; Byrne, Abbey; Morgan, Alison; Jimenez-Soto, Eliana

    2015-03-01

    While established that geographical inaccessibility is a key barrier to the utilisation of health services, it remains unknown whether disparities are driven only by limited access to these services, or are also attributable to health behaviour. Significant disparities exist in health outcomes and the coverage of many critical health services between the mountains region of Nepal and the rest of the country, yet the principal factors driving these regional disparities are not well understood. Using national representative data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey, we examine the extent to which observable factors explain the overall differences in the utilisation of maternal health services. We apply nonlinear Blinder-Oaxaca-type decomposition methods to quantify the effect that differences in measurable characteristics have on the regional coverage gap in facility-based delivery. The mean coverage of facility-based deliveries was 18.6 and 36.3 % in the mountains region and the rest of Nepal, respectively. Between 54.8 and 74.1 % of the regional coverage gap was explained by differences in observed characteristics. Factors influencing health behaviours (proxied by mothers' education, TV viewership and tobacco use, and household wealth) and subjective distance to the health facility were the major factors, contributing between 52.9 and 62.5 % of the disparity. Mothers' birth history was also noteworthy. Policies simultaneously addressing access and health behaviours appear necessary to achieve greater coverage and better health outcomes for women and children in isolated areas. PMID:24927787

  1. Quality of care in public and private primary health care facilities: structural comparisons in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Peabody, J W; Rahman, O; Fox, K; Gertler, P

    1994-06-01

    This article examines the quality of care provided by Jamaican primary health care clinics by comparing various structural quality indexes derived from a nationwide 1990 survey of 366 public clinics and 189 private clinics. This comparison points up important differences in the quality of care being provided by public versus private and urban versus rural facilities that might not have been anticipated. Among other things, the study found that the public clinics provided better prenatal diagnosis and counseling and more family planning services than the private clinics. However, the private clinics tended to be better condition, better equipped and supplied, and better able to provide certain laboratory test results in a timely manner. Comparison of urban and rural public clinics indicated that the urban clinics were somewhat better provisioned with equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals. However, the rural clinics appeared to be in better repair. Comparison of basic and higher-level public clinics showed the basic clinics to be in better condition and more fully staffed than the higher-level clinics while having similar perinatal diagnostic capabilities. However, the higher-level public clinics tended to have an overall profile more resembling that of the private clinics, being better equipped and supplied than the basic clinics. While structural measures of quality such as those employed here tend to poorly estimate health outcomes, they do serve as good indicators of access to services where resources are severely constrained. For policy-makers, the results presented here could prove useful in guiding concrete interventions, summarizing the structural elements of health care quality at different types of facilities, and providing a method for less costly evaluation of programs designed to improve services at primary health care clinics. PMID:8069333

  2. Comparison of Perceived and Technical Healthcare Quality in Primary Health Facilities: Implications for a Sustainable National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Duku, Stephen Opoku; Janssens, Wendy; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Spieker, Nicole; van Ostenberg, Paul; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Pradhan, Menno; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality care in health facilities is critical for a sustainable health insurance system because of its influence on clients’ decisions to participate in health insurance and utilize health services. Exploration of the different dimensions of healthcare quality and their associations will help determine more effective quality improvement interventions and health insurance sustainability strategies, especially in resource constrained countries in Africa where universal access to good quality care remains a challenge. Purpose To examine the differences in perceptions of clients and health staff on quality healthcare and determine if these perceptions are associated with technical quality proxies in health facilities. Implications of the findings for a sustainable National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana are also discussed. Methods This is a cross-sectional study in two southern regions in Ghana involving 64 primary health facilities: 1,903 households and 324 health staff. Data collection lasted from March to June, 2012. A Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test was performed to determine differences in client and health staff perceptions of quality healthcare. Spearman’s rank correlation test was used to ascertain associations between perceived and technical quality care proxies in health facilities, and ordered logistic regression employed to predict the determinants of client and staff-perceived quality healthcare. Results Negative association was found between technical quality and client-perceived quality care (coef. = -0.0991, p<0.0001). Significant staff-client perception differences were found in all healthcare quality proxies, suggesting some level of unbalanced commitment to quality improvement and potential information asymmetry between clients and service providers. Overall, the findings suggest that increased efforts towards technical quality care alone will not necessarily translate into better client-perceived quality care and willingness to utilize health services in NHIS-accredited health facilities. Conclusion There is the need to intensify client education and balanced commitment to technical and perceived quality improvement efforts. This will help enhance client confidence in Ghana’s healthcare system, stimulate active participation in the national health insurance, increase healthcare utilization and ultimately improve public health outcomes. PMID:26465935

  3. Are Health Facility Management Committees in Kenya ready to implement financial management tasks: findings from a nationally representative survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community participation in peripheral public health facilities has in many countries focused on including community representatives in Health Facility Management Committees (HFMCs). In Kenya, HFMC roles are being expanded with the phased implementation of the Health Sector Services Fund (HSSF). Under HSSF, HFMCs manage facility funds which are dispersed directly from central level into facility bank accounts. We assessed how prepared HFMCs were to undertake this new role in advance of HSSF roll out, and considered the implications for Kenya and other similar settings. Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative sample of 248 public health centres and dispensaries in 24 districts in 2010. Data collection included surveys with in-charges (n?=?248), HFMC members (n?=?464) and facility users (n?=?698), and record reviews. These data were supplemented by semi-structured interviews with district health managers in each district. Results Some findings supported preparedness of HFMCs to take on their new roles. Most facilities had bank accounts and HFMCs which met regularly. HFMC members and in-charges generally reported positive relationships, and HFMC members expressed high levels of motivation and job satisfaction. Challenges included users’ low awareness of HFMCs, lack of training and clarity in roles among HFMCs, and some indications of strained relations with in-charges. Such challenges are likely to be common to many similar settings, and are therefore important considerations for any health facility based initiatives involving HFMCs. Conclusion Most HFMCs have the basic requirements to operate. However to manage their own budgets effectively and meet their allocated roles in HSSF implementation, greater emphasis is needed on financial management training, targeted supportive supervision, and greater community awareness and participation. Once new budget management roles are fully established, qualitative and quantitative research on how HFMCs are adapting to their expanded roles, especially in financial management, would be valuable in informing similar financing mechanisms in Kenya and beyond. PMID:24107094

  4. Coverage and Quality of Antenatal Care Provided at Primary Health Care Facilities in the ‘Punjab’ Province of ‘Pakistan’

    PubMed Central

    Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif; Memon, Zahid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In ‘Pakistan’ antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to ‘Divisions’ and ‘Districts’. By population ‘Punjab’ is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in ‘Punjab’ province of ‘Pakistan’. Methods Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. Results The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. Conclusion The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in ‘Punjab’ are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and out of those 1/3 drop out in follow-up visits. PMID:25409502

  5. IGP Policies and Procedures Manual: Approved 6/14/12 Page 1 University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    IGP Policies and Procedures Manual: Approved 6/14/12 Page 1 University of Connecticut Health Center............................................................................................................ 8 VE3. Oral Defense............................................................................10 VF4. The Public (Oral) Defense

  6. Applications of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation disinfection in health care facilities: effective adjunct, but not stand-alone technology.

    PubMed

    Memarzadeh, Farhad; Olmsted, Russell N; Bartley, Judene M

    2010-06-01

    This review evaluates the applicability and relative contribution of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) to disinfection of air in health care facilities. A section addressing the use of UVGI for environmental surfaces is also included. The germicidal susceptibility of biologic agents is addressed, but with emphasis on application in health care facilities. The balance of scientific evidence indicates that UVGI should be considered as a disinfection application in a health care setting only in conjunction with other well-established elements, such as appropriate heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems; dynamic removal of contaminants from the air; and preventive maintenance in combination with through cleaning of the care environment. We conclude that although UVGI is microbiocidal, it is not "ready for prime time" as a primary intervention to kill or inactivate infectious microorganisms; rather, it should be considered an adjunct. Other factors, such as careful design of the built environment, installation and effective operation of the HVAC system, and a high level of attention to traditional cleaning and disinfection, must be assessed before a health care facility can decide to rely solely on UVGI to meet indoor air quality requirements for health care facilities. More targeted and multiparameter studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and incremental benefit of UVGI for mitigating reservoirs of microorganisms and ultimately preventing cross-transmission of pathogens that lead to health care-associated infections. PMID:20569852

  7. Primary Headache Disorders at a Tertiary Health Facility in Lagos, Nigeria: Prevalence and Consultation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Okubadejo, Njideka; Ojelabi, Olaitan; Dada, Akinola

    2014-01-01

    Background. Primary headaches are underdiagnosed and undertreated, with a significant impact on social activities and work. Aim. To determine the last-year prevalence and health care utilization pattern of primary headaches at a tertiary centre. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out amongst staff of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. 402 staff members were selected by simple random sampling and administered a detailed structured headache assessment questionnaire. Migraine and tension-type headache were diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Headache Society (2004). Results. The participants comprised 168 males and 234 females. The mean age was 36.9 ± 7.9 years. The overall headache prevalence was 39.3% with female predominance (P < 0.0001). Tension-type headache was the most prevalent at 72.8% and migraine at 18.9%. Unclassifiable headache constituted 8.2%. Migraine headache showed female preponderance (P = 0.000). 80.4% of participants did not seek medical consultation compared with 19.6% who did (P = 0.000). Of the latter, 83.9% consulted the general practitioner (GP), whilst 16.1% consulted the neurologist. Conclusions. Primary headache prevalence is high in our population. It is not recognised as that requiring care by most of the staff of this tertiary health facility; thus education is required to increase health care utilization. PMID:24587991

  8. Challenges, alternatives, and paths to sustainability: better public health promotion using social networking pages as key tools.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kadhem, Z; Larbani, M; Lakulu, M B; Hashim, M

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of promoting public health and implementing educational health services using Facebook. We discuss the challenges and strengths of using such a platform as a tool for public health care systems from two different perspectives, namely, the view of IT developers and that of physicians. We present a new way of evaluating user interactivity in health care systems from tools provided by Facebook that measure statistical traffic in the Internet. Findings show that Facebook is a very promising tool in promoting e-health services in Web 2.0. Results from statistical traffic show that a Facebook page is more efficient than other pages in promoting public health. PMID:25631841

  9. Direct facility funding as a response to user fee reduction: implementation and perceived impact among Kenyan health centres and dispensaries.

    PubMed

    Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

    2010-09-01

    There is increasing pressure for reduction of user fees, but this can have adverse effects by decreasing facility-level funds. To address this, direct facility funding (DFF) was piloted in Coast Province, Kenya, with health facility committees (HFCs) responsible for managing the funds. We evaluated the implementation and perceived impact 2.5 years after DFF introduction. Quantitative data collection at 30 public health centres and dispensaries included a structured interview with the in-charge, record reviews and exit interviews. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with the in-charge and HFC members at 12 facilities, and with district staff and other stakeholders. DFF procedures were well established: HFCs met regularly and accounting procedures were broadly followed. DFF made an important contribution to facility cash income, accounting for 47% in health centres and 62% in dispensaries. The main items of expenditure were wages for support staff (32%), travel (21%), and construction and maintenance (18%). DFF was perceived to have a highly positive impact through funding support staff such as cleaners and patient attendants, outreach activities, renovations, patient referrals and increasing HFC activity. This was perceived to have improved health worker motivation, utilization and quality of care. A number of problems were identified. HFC training was reportedly inadequate, and no DFF documentation was available at facility level, leading to confusion. Charging user fees above those specified in the national policy remained common, and understanding of DFF among the broader community was very limited. Finally, relationships between HFCs and health workers were sometimes characterized by mistrust and resentment. Relatively small increases in funding may significantly affect facility performance when the funds are managed at the periphery. Kenya plans to scale up DFF nationwide. Our findings indicate this is warranted, but should include improved training and documentation, greater emphasis on community engagement, and insistence on user fee adherence. PMID:20211967

  10. Quality of care for under-fives in first-level health facilities in one district of Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Arifeen, S. E.; Bryce, J.; Gouws, E.; Baqui, A. H.; Black, R. E.; Hoque, D. M. E.; Chowdhury, E. K.; Yunus, M.; Begum, N.; Akter, T.; Siddique, A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The multi-country evaluation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) effectiveness, cost and impact (MCE) is a global evaluation to determine the impact of IMCI on health outcomes and its cost-effectiveness. MCE studies are under way in Bangladesh, Brazil, Peru, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania. The objective of this analysis from the Bangladesh MCE study was to describe the quality of care delivered to sick children under 5 years old in first-level government health facilities, to inform government planning of child health programmes. METHODS: Generic MCE Health Facility Survey tools were adapted, translated and pre-tested. Medical doctors trained in IMCI and these tools conducted the survey in all 19 health facilities in the study areas. The data were collected using observations, exit interviews, inventories and interviews with facility providers. FINDINGS: Few of the sick children seeking care at these facilities were fully assessed or correctly treated, and almost none of their caregivers were advised on how to continue the care of the child at home. Over one-third of the sick children whose care was observed were managed by lower-level workers who were significantly more likely than higher-level workers to classify the sick child correctly and to provide correct information on home care to the caregiver. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate an urgent need for interventions to improve the quality of care provided for sick children in first-level facilities in Bangladesh, and suggest that including lower-level workers as targets for IMCI case-management training may be beneficial. The findings suggest that the IMCI strategy offers a promising set of interventions to address the child health service problems in Bangladesh. PMID:15868016

  11. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

  12. Evaluation of prototype air/fluid separator for Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Smith, Maureen; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype air/fluid separator suction apparatus proposed as a possible design for use with the Health Maintenance Facility aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF) was evaluated. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed for this purpose. The flights followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. A protocol was prepared to evaluate the prototype device in several regulator modes (or suction force), using three fluids of varying viscosity, and using either continuous or intermittent suction. It was felt that a matrixed approach would best approximate the range of utilization anticipated for medical suction on SSF. The protocols were performed in one-gravity in a lab setting to familiarize the team with procedures and techniques. Identical steps were performed aboard the KC-135 during parabolic flight.

  13. Expansion of health facilities in Iraq a decade after the US-led invasion, 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the last few decades, Iraq’s health care capacity has been severely undermined by the effects of different wars, international sanctions, sectarian violence and political instability. In the aftermath of the 2003 US-led invasion, the Ministry of Health has set plans to expand health service delivery, by reorienting the public sector towards primary health care and attributing a larger role to the private sector for hospital care. Quantitative assessments of the post-2003 health policy outcomes have remained scant. This paper addresses this gap focusing on a key outcome indicator that is the expansion of health facilities. Methods The analysis is based on data on health facilities provided by the World Health Organisation and Iraq’s Ministry of Health. For each governorate, we calculated the change in the absolute number of facilities by type from early 2003 to the end of 2012. To account for population growth, we computed the change in the number of facilities per 100,000 population. We compared trends in the autonomous northern Kurdistan region, which has been relatively stable from 2003 onwards, and in the rest of Iraq (centre/south), where fragile institutions and persistent sectarian strife have posed major challenges to health system recovery. Results The countrywide number of primary health care centres per 100,000 population rose from 5.5 in 2003 to 7.4 in 2012. The extent of improvement varied significantly within the country, with an average increase of 4.3 primary health care centres per 100,000 population in the Kurdistan region versus an average increase of only 1.4 in central/southern Iraq. The average number of public hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 1.3 to 1.5 in Kurdistan, whereas it remained at 0.6 in centre/south. The average number of private hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 0.2 to 0.6 in Kurdistan, whereas it declined from 0.3 to 0.2 in centre/south. Conclusions The expansion of both public and private health facilities in the Kurdistan region appears encouraging, but still much should be done to reach the standards of neighbouring countries. The slow pace of improvement in the rest of Iraq is largely attributable to the dire security situation and should be a cause for major concern. PMID:25221620

  14. Paediatric liver transplantation for children treated at public health facilities in South Africa: time for change.

    PubMed

    Lala, S G; Britz, R; Botha, J; Loveland, J

    2014-11-01

    Paediatric liver transplantation (PLT) is the only therapeutic option for many children with end-stage chronic liver disease or irreversible fulminant hepatic failure, and is routinely considered as a therapy by paediatric gastroenterologists and surgeons working in developed countries. In South Africa (SA), a PLT programme has been available at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town since November 1991, and another has rapidly developed at the Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre in Johannesburg over the past decade. However, for most children with progressive chronic liver disease who are reliant on the services provided at state facilities in SA, PLT is not an option because of a lack of resources in a mismanaged public health system. This article briefly outlines the services offered at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital--which is typical of state facilities in SA--and proposes that resources be allocated to establish an innovative, nationally funded centre that would enable greater numbers of children access to a PLT programme. PMID:26038799

  15. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  16. Differential utilisation of health facilities and services for childbirth in Peninsula Malaysia--the ethnic factor.

    PubMed

    Arhsat, H; Tan Boon Ann; Tey Nai Peng

    1985-12-01

    The ethnic factor in the differential utilization of the health facilities in Peninsular Malaysia is examined. Data from the Malaysian Population and Family Survey 1984/85 show that about 45% of the births were delivered in the government hospitals, 15% in the private hospitals/clinics and the remaining 40% were delivered at home. Utilisation of these facilities varies greatly by ethnicity. The Malays have the greatest tendency to choose home delivery (60%), as opposed to institutional delivery (40%). Although urbanization and better socioeconomic conditions have led to an increase in institutional delivery, social customs continue to exert an influence on their behavior in favor of home delivery. Almost all Chinese babies are delivered in hospitals or clinics, with those from the higher social class showing a tendency to resort to the use of private hospitals/clinics for delivery. Indians were the most frequent users of government hospital across nearly all the social strata. While institutional deliveries were all attended by trained personnel, about 71% of the home deliveries were attended by government midwives and 24% by village midwives or other untrained persons, and only 5% were delivered by a doctor or a nurse. PMID:12314737

  17. Piloting Laboratory Quality System Management in Six Health Facilities in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Henry; Ojo, Emmanuel; Ameh, James; Musuluma, Humphrey; Negedu-Momoh, Olubunmi Ruth; Jegede, Feyisayo; Ojo, Olufunmilayo; Uwakwe, Nkem; Ochei, Kingsley; Dada, Michael; Udah, Donald; Chiegil, Robert; Torpey, Kwasi

    2014-01-01

    Background Achieving accreditation in laboratories is a challenge in Nigeria like in most African countries. Nigeria adopted the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory (Quality) Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA) in 2010. We report on FHI360 effort and progress in piloting WHO-AFRO recognition and accreditation preparedness in six health facility laboratories in five different states of Nigeria. Method Laboratory assessments were conducted at baseline, follow up and exit using the WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA checklist. From the total percentage score obtained, the quality status of laboratories were classified using a zero to five star rating, based on the WHO/AFRO quality improvement stepwise approach. Major interventions include advocacy, capacity building, mentorship and quality improvement projects. Results At baseline audit, two of the laboratories attained 1- star while the remaining four were at 0- star. At follow up audit one lab was at 1- star, two at 3-star and three at 4-star. At exit audit, four labs were at 4- star, one at 3-star and one at 2-star rating. One laboratory dropped a ‘star’ at exit audit, while others consistently improved. The two weakest elements at baseline; internal audit (4%) and occurrence/incidence management (15%) improved significantly, with an exit score of 76% and 81% respectively. The elements facility and safety was the major strength across board throughout the audit exercise. Conclusion This effort resulted in measurable and positive impact on the laboratories. We recommend further improvement towards a formal international accreditation status and scale up of WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA implementation in Nigeria. PMID:25542022

  18. Evaluation of Spatial Relationships between Health and the Environment: The Rapid Inquiry Facility

    PubMed Central

    Beale, Linda; Hodgson, Susan; Abellan, Juan Jose; LeFevre, Sam; Jarup, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background The initiation of environmental public health tracking systems in the United States and the United Kingdom provided an opportunity to advance techniques and tools available for spatial epidemiological analysis integrating both health and environmental data. Objective The Rapid Inquiry Facility (RIF) allows users to calculate adjusted and unadjusted standardized rates and risks. The RIF is embedded in ArcGIS so that further geographical information system (GIS) spatial functionality can be exploited or results can be exported to statistical packages for further tailored analyses where required. The RIF also links directly to several statistical packages and displays the results in the GIS. Methods The value of the RIF is illustrated here with two case studies: risk of leukemia in areas surrounding oil refineries in the State of Utah (USA) and an analysis of the geographical variation of risk of esophageal cancer in relation to zinc cadmium sulfide exposure in Norwich (United Kingdom). Results The risk analysis study in Utah did not suggest any evidence of increased relative risk of leukemia, multiple myeloma, or Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the populations around the five oil-refining facilities but did reveal an excess risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that might warrant further investigation. The disease-mapping study in Norwich did not reveal any areas with higher relative risks of esophageal cancer common to both males and females, suggesting that a common geographically determined exposure was unlikely to be influencing cancer risk in the area. Conclusion The RIF offers a tool that allows epidemiologists to quickly carry out ecological environmental epidemiological analysis such as risk assessment or disease mapping. PMID:20457552

  19. [A guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel in ambulatory care facilities].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Henarejos, Ana; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Hernández-Hernández, Isabel; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Carrillo de Gea, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The appearance of electronic health records has led to the need to strengthen the security of personal health data in order to ensure privacy. Despite the large number of technical security measures and recommendations that exist to protect the security of health data, there is an increase in violations of the privacy of patients' personal data in healthcare organizations, which is in many cases caused by the mistakes or oversights of healthcare professionals. In this paper, we present a guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel, drawn from recommendations, regulations and national and international standards. The material presented in this paper can be used in the security audit of health professionals, or as a part of continuing education programs in ambulatory care facilities. PMID:24582808

  20. Improving district facility readiness: a 12-month evaluation of a data-driven health systems strengthening intervention in rural Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Hari S.; Kamanzi, Emmanuel; Mugunga, Jean Claude; Finnegan, Karen; Uwingabiye, Alice; Shyaka, Edward; Niyonzima, Saleh; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Drobac, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Background While health systems strengthening (HSS) interventions are recommended by global health policy experts to improve population health in resource-limited settings, few examples exist of evaluations of HSS interventions conducted at the district level. In 2009, a partnership between Partners In Health (PIH), a non-governmental organization, and the Rwandan Ministry of Health (RMOH) was provided funds to implement and evaluate a district-level HSS intervention in two rural districts of Rwanda. Design The partnership provided limited funds to 14 health centers for targeted systems support in 2010; six others received support prior to the intervention (reference). RMOH health systems norms were mapped across the WHO HSS framework, scored from 0 to 10 and incorporated into a rapid survey assessing 11 domains of facility readiness. Stakeholder meetings allowed partnership leaders to review results, set priorities, and allocate resources. Investments included salary support, infrastructure improvements, medical equipment, and social support for patients. We compared facility domain scores from the start of the intervention to 12 months and tested for correlation between change in score and change in funding allocation to assess equity in our approach. Results We found significant improvements among intervention facilities from baseline to 12 months across several domains [infrastructure (+4, p=0.0001), clinical services (+1.2, p=0.03), infection and sanitation control (+0.6, p=0.03), medical equipment (+1.0, p=0.02), information use (+2, p=0.002)]. Composite score across domains improved from 6.2 at baseline to 7.4 at 12 months (p=0.002). Across facilities, 50% had composite scores greater than the average score among reference facilities (7.4) at 12 months compared to none at baseline. Conclusions Rapid facility surveys, stakeholder engagement, and information feedback can be used for gap analysis and resource allocation. This approach can achieve effective use of limited resources, improve facility readiness, and ensure consistency of facility capacity to provide quality care at the district level. PMID:26140729

  1. Quality of malaria case management at outpatient health facilities in Angola

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Angola's malaria case-management policy recommends treatment with artemether-lumefantrine (AL). In 2006, AL implementation began in Huambo Province, which involved training health workers (HWs), supervision, delivering AL to health facilities, and improving malaria testing with microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Implementation was complicated by a policy that was sometimes ambiguous. Methods Fourteen months after implementation began, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 33 outpatient facilities in Huambo Province to assess their readiness to manage malaria and the quality of malaria case-management for patients of all ages. Consultations were observed, patients were interviewed and re-examined, and HWs were interviewed. Results Ninety-three HWs and 177 consultations were evaluated, although many sampled consultations were missed. All facilities had AL in-stock and at least one HW trained to use AL and RDTs. However, anti-malarial stock-outs in the previous three months were common, clinical supervision was infrequent, and HWs had important knowledge gaps. Except for fever history, clinical assessments were often incomplete. Although testing was recommended for all patients with suspected malaria, only 30.7% of such patients were tested. Correct testing was significantly associated with caseloads < 25 patients/day (odds ratio: 18.4; p < 0.0001) and elevated patient temperature (odds ratio: 2.5 per 1°C increase; p = 0.007). Testing was more common among AL-trained HWs, but the association was borderline significant (p = 0.072). When the malaria test was negative, HWs often diagnosed patients with malaria (57.8%) and prescribed anti-malarials (60.0%). Sixty-six percent of malaria-related diagnoses were correct, 20.1% were minor errors, and 13.9% were major (potentially life-threatening) errors. Only 49.0% of malaria treatments were correct, 5.4% were minor errors, and 45.6% were major errors. HWs almost always dosed AL correctly and gave accurate dosing instructions to patients; however, other aspects of counseling needed improvement. Conclusion By late-2007, substantial progress had been made to implement the malaria case-management policy in a setting with weak infrastructure. However, policy ambiguities, under-use of malaria testing, and distrust of negative test results led to many incorrect malaria diagnoses and treatments. In 2009, Angola published a policy that clarified many issues. As problems identified in this survey are not unique to Angola, better strategies for improving HW performance are urgently needed. PMID:19954537

  2. Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in rural health facilities in southern Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Sayang, Collins; Gausseres, Mathieu; Vernazza-Licht, Nicole; Malvy, Denis; Bley, Daniel; Millet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background One year after the adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, this study was designed to assess the treatment practices regarding anti-malarial drugs at health facilities in four rural areas in southern Cameroon. Methods Between April and August 2005, information was collected by interviewing fifty-two health professionals from twelve rural health facilities, using a structured questionnaire. Results In 2005, only three anti-malarial drugs were used in rural health facilities, including: amodiaquine, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. Only 2.0% of the health professionals prescribed the recommended AS/AQ combination. After reading the treatment guidelines, 75.0% were in favour of the treatment protocol with the following limitations: lack of paediatric formulations, high cost and large number of tablets per day. Up to 21.0% of professionals did not prescribe AS/AQ because of the level of adverse events attributed to the use of amodiaquine as monotherapy. Conclusion The present study indicates that AS/AQ was not available in the public health facilities at the time of the study, and health practitioners were not informed about the new treatment guidelines. Results of qualitative analysis suggest that prescribers should be involved as soon as possible in projects related to the optimization of treatment guidelines and comply with new drugs. Adapted formulations should be made available at the international level and implemented locally before new drugs and treatments are proposed through a national control programme. This baseline information will be useful to monitor progresses in the implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Cameroon. PMID:19640283

  3. Challenges to improving case management of childhood pneumonia at health facilities in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stephen M; English, Mike; Hazir, Tabish; Enarson, Penny; Duke, Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Effective case management is an important strategy to reduce pneumonia-related morbidity and mortality in children. Guidelines based on sound evidence are available but are used variably. This review outlines current guidelines for childhood pneumonia management in the setting where most child pneumonia deaths occur and identifies challenges for improved management in a variety of settings and different "at-risk" groups. These include appropriate choice of antibiotic, clinical overlap with other conditions, prompt and appropriate referral for inpatient care, and management of treatment failure. Management of neonates, and of HIV-infected or severely malnourished children is more complicated. The influence of co-morbidities on pneumonia outcome means that pneumonia case management must be integrated within strategies to improve overall paediatric care. The greatest potential for reducing pneumonia-related deaths in health facilities is wider implementation of the current guidelines built around a few core activities: training, antibiotics and oxygen. This requires investment in human resources and in equipment for the optimal management of hypoxaemia. It is important to provide data from a variety of epidemiological settings for formal cost-effectiveness analyses. Improvements in the quality of case management of pneumonia can be a vehicle for overall improvements in child health-care practices. PMID:18545737

  4. Health Facility Graduation from Donor-Supported Intensive Technical Assistance and Associated Factors in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Koni, Phillip; Chishinga, Nathaniel; Nyirenda, Lameck; Kasonde, Prisca; Nsakanya, Richard; Welsh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The FHI360-led Zambia Prevention Care and Treatment partnership II (ZPCT II) with funding from United States Agency for International Development, supports the Zambian Ministry of Health in scaling up HIV/AIDS services. To improve the quality of HIV/AIDS services, ZPCT II provides technical assistance until desired standards are met and districts are weaned-off intensive technical support, a process referred to as district graduation. This study describes the graduation process and determines performance domains associated with district graduation. Methods Data were collected from 275 health facilities in 39 districts in 5 provinces of Zambia between 2008 and 2012. Performance in technical capacity, commodity management, data management and human resources domains were assessed in the following services areas: HIV counselling and testing and prevention of mother to child transmission, antiretroviral therapy/clinical care, pharmacy and laboratory. The overall mean percentage score was calculated by obtaining the mean of mean percentage scores for the four domains. Logistic regression models were used to obtain odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the domain mean percentage scores in graduated versus non-graduated districts; according to rural-urban, and province strata. Results 24 districts out of 39 graduated from intensive donor supported technical assistance while 15 districts did not graduate. The overall mean percentage score for all four domains was statistically significantly higher in graduated than non-graduated districts (93.2% versus 91.2%, OR = 1.34, 95%CI:1.20–1.49); including rural settings (92.4% versus 89.4%, OR = 1.43,95%CI:1.24–1.65). The mean percentage score in human resource domain was statistically significantly higher in graduated than non-graduated districts (93.6% versus 71.6%, OR = 5.81, 95%CI: 4.29–7.86) and in both rural and urban settings. Conclusions QA/QI tools can be used to assess performance at health facilities and determine readiness for district graduation. Human resources management domain was found to be an important factor associated with district graduation. PMID:26098555

  5. A retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at twelve health facilities in four districts in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Chanda, Emmanuel; Masaninga, Freddie; Habluetzel, Annette; Masiye, Felix; Fall, Ibrahima Soce

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish the appropriateness of malaria case management at health facility level in four districts in Zambia. Methods This study was a retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at health facilities in four districts conveniently sampled to represent both urban and rural settings in different epidemiological zones and health facility coverage. The review period was from January to December 2008. The sample included twelve lower level health facilities from four districts. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to identify characteristics which affected the quality of case management. Results Out of 4?891 suspected malaria cases recorded at the 12 health facilities, more than 80% of the patients had a temperature taken to establish their fever status. About 67% (CI95 66.1-68.7) were tested for parasitemia by either rapid diagnostic test or microscopy, whereas the remaining 22.5% (CI95 21.3.1-23.7) were not subjected to any malaria test. Of the 2?247 malaria cases reported (complicated and uncomplicated), 71% were parasitologically confirmed while 29% were clinically diagnosed (unconfirmed). About 56% (CI95 53.9-58.1) of the malaria cases reported were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (AL), 35% (CI95 33.1-37.0) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, 8% (CI95 6.9-9.2) with quinine and 1% did not receive any anti-malarial. Approximately 30% of patients WHO were found negative for malaria parasites were still prescribed an anti-malarial, contrary to the guidelines. There were marked inter-district variations in the proportion of patients in WHOm a diagnostic tool was used, and in the choice of anti-malarials for the treatment of malaria confirmed cases. Association between health worker characteristics and quality of case malaria management showed that nurses performed better than environmental health technicians and clinical officers on the decision whether to use the rapid diagnostic test or not. Gender, in service training on malaria, years of residence in the district and length of service of the health worker at the facility were not associated with diagnostic and treatment choices. Conclusions Malaria case management was characterised by poor adherence to treatment guidelines. The non-adherence was mainly in terms of: inconsistent use of confirmatory tests (rapid diagnostic test or microscopy) for malaria; prescribing anti-malarials which are not recommended (e.g. sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine) and prescribing anti-malarials to cases testing negative. Innovative approaches are required to improve health worker adherence to diagnosis and treatment guidelines. PMID:25182953

  6. Developing a Performance Measurement Framework and Indicators for Community Health Service Facilities in Urban China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background China has had no effective and systematic information system to provide guidance for strengthening PHC (Primary Health Care) or account to citizens on progress. We report on the development of the China results-based Logic Model for Community Health Facilities and Stations (CHS) and a set of relevant PHC indicators intended to measure CHS priorities. Methods We adapted the PHC Results Based Logic Model developed in Canada and current work conducted in the community health system in China to create the China CHS Logic Model framework. We used a staged approach by first constructing the framework and indicators and then validating their content through an interactive process involving policy analysis, critical review of relevant literature and multiple stakeholder consultation. Results The China CHS Logic Model includes inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes with a total of 287 detailed performance indicators. In these indicators, 31 indicators measure inputs, 64 measure activities, 105 measure outputs, and 87 measure immediate (n = 65), intermediate (n = 15), or final (n = 7) outcomes. Conclusion A Logic Model framework can be useful in planning, implementation, analysis and evaluation of PHC at a system and service level. The development and content validation of the China CHS Logic Model and subsequent indicators provides a means for stronger accountability and a clearer sense of overall direction and purpose needed to renew and strengthen the PHC system in China. Moreover, this work will be useful in moving towards developing a PHC information system and performance measurement across districts in urban China, and guiding the pursuit of quality in PHC. PMID:21087516

  7. An Examination of Health Profile, Service Use and Care Needs of Older Adults in Residential Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminzadeh, F.; Salziel, William B.; Molnar, F. J.; Alie, J.

    2004-01-01

    Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile,…

  8. Linkage strategies of rural hospitals--independent hospital, local health system, and/or externally linked facility.

    PubMed

    Gamm, L D; Kassab, C D; Brannon, S D; Fennell, M L

    1996-01-01

    Strategies associated with ownership or management of a range of health service facilities, service sharing, and other coordination activities are important to the viability of many rural hospitals. This article articulates a set of linkage strategies employed by rural hospitals. Such strategies and their environmental and organizational correlates are assessed in a sample of 46 rural Pennsylvania hospitals. PMID:10157965

  9. Factors associated with health facility childbirth in districts of Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia: a population based survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality continues to be a heavy burden in low and middle income countries where half of all deliveries take place in homes without skilled attendance. The study aimed to investigate the underlying and proximate determinants of health facility childbirth in rural and urban areas of three districts in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. Methods A population-based survey was conducted in 2007 as part of the ‘REsponse to ACcountable priority setting for Trust in health systems’ (REACT) project. Stratified random cluster sampling was used and the data included information on place of delivery and factors that might influence health care seeking behaviour. A total of 1800 women who had childbirth in the previous five years were analysed. The distal and proximate conceptual framework for analysing determinants of maternal mortality was modified for studying factors associated with place of delivery. Socioeconomic position was measured by employing a construct of educational attainment and wealth index. All analyses were stratified by district and urban–rural residence. Results There were substantial inter-district differences in proportion of health facility childbirth. Facility childbirth was 15, 70 and 37% in the rural areas of Malindi, Mbarali and Kapiri Mposhi respectively, and 57, 75 and 77% in the urban areas of the districts respectively. However, striking socio-economic inequities were revealed regardless of district. Furthermore, there were indications that repeated exposure to ANC services and HIV related counselling and testing were positively associated with health facility deliveries. Perceived distance was negatively associated with facility childbirth in rural areas of Malindi and urban areas of Kapiri Mposhi. Conclusion Strong socio-economic inequities in the likelihood of facility childbirths were revealed in all the districts added to geographic inequities in two of the three districts. This strongly suggests an urgent need to strengthen services targeting disadvantaged and remote populations. The finding of a positive association between HIV counselling/testing and odds in favor of giving birth at a health facility suggests potential positive effects can be achieved by strengthening integrated approaches in maternal health service delivery. PMID:24996456

  10. National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services newsinhealth.nih.gov continued on page 2

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    National Institutes of Health · Department of Health and Human Services · newsinhealth from infecting their sexual partners,"Fauci says. Keeping HIV infections in check requires early health regimen can be a challenge. Nationwide, fewer than 1 in 3 people with HIV takes antiretro- viral

  11. Monitoring System for Storm Readiness and Recovery of Test Facilities: Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Walker, Mark; Kapadia, Ravi; Venkatesh, Meera; Schmalzel, John

    2010-01-01

    Severe weather events are likely occurrences on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. It is important to rapidly diagnose and mitigate the effects of storms on Stennis Space Center's rocket engine test complex to avoid delays to critical test article programs, reduce costs, and maintain safety. An Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) approach and technologies are employed to integrate environmental (weather) monitoring, structural modeling, and the suite of available facility instrumentation to provide information for readiness before storms, rapid initial damage assessment to guide mitigation planning, and then support on-going assurance as repairs are effected and finally support recertification. The system is denominated Katrina Storm Monitoring System (KStorMS). Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) describes a comprehensive set of capabilities that provide insight into the behavior the health of a system. Knowing the status of a system allows decision makers to effectively plan and execute their mission. For example, early insight into component degradation and impending failures provides more time to develop work around strategies and more effectively plan for maintenance. Failures of system elements generally occur over time. Information extracted from sensor data, combined with system-wide knowledge bases and methods for information extraction and fusion, inference, and decision making, can be used to detect incipient failures. If failures do occur, it is critical to detect and isolate them, and suggest an appropriate course of action. ISHM enables determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system-of-systems or SoS (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, predict future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) to control systems for safe and effective operation. ISHM capability is achieved by using a wide range of technologies that enable anomaly detection, diagnostics, prognostics, and advise for control: (1) anomaly detection algorithms and strategies, (2) fusion of DIaK for anomaly detection (model-based, numerical, statistical, empirical, expert-based, qualitative, etc.), (3) diagnostics/prognostics strategies and methods, (4) user interface, (5) advanced control strategies, (6) integration architectures/frameworks, (7) embedding of intelligence. Many of these technologies are mature, and they are being used in the KStorMS. The paper will describe the design, implementation, and operation of the KStorMS; and discuss further evolution to support other needs such as condition-based maintenance (CBM).

  12. Hazardous medical waste generation rates of different categories of health-care facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Komilis, Dimitrios; Fouki, Anastassia; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculated hazardous medical waste generation rates (HMWGR) from 132 hospitals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Based on a 22-month study period, HMWGR were highly skewed to the right. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HMWGR varied from 0.00124 to 0.718 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A positive correlation existed between the HMWGR and the number of hospital beds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used non-parametric statistics to compare rates among hospital categories. - Abstract: Goal of this work was to calculate the hazardous medical waste unit generation rates (HMWUGR), in kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, using data from 132 health-care facilities in Greece. The calculations were based on the weights of the hazardous medical wastes that were regularly transferred to the sole medical waste incinerator in Athens over a 22-month period during years 2009 and 2010. The 132 health-care facilities were grouped into public and private ones, and, also, into seven sub-categories, namely: birth, cancer treatment, general, military, pediatric, psychiatric and university hospitals. Results showed that there is a large variability in the HMWUGR, even among hospitals of the same category. Average total HMWUGR varied from 0.012 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the public psychiatric hospitals, to up to 0.72 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the public university hospitals. Within the private hospitals, average HMWUGR ranged from 0.0012 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the psychiatric clinics, to up to 0.49 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the birth clinics. Based on non-parametric statistics, HMWUGR were statistically similar for the birth and general hospitals, in both the public and private sector. The private birth and general hospitals generated statistically more wastes compared to the corresponding public hospitals. The infectious/toxic and toxic medical wastes appear to be 10% and 50% of the total hazardous medical wastes generated by the public cancer treatment and university hospitals, respectively.

  13. Impact of Free Delivery Care on Health Facility Delivery and Insurance Coverage in Ghana’s Brong Ahafo Region

    PubMed Central

    Dzakpasu, Susie; Soremekun, Seyi; Manu, Alexander; ten Asbroek, Guus; Tawiah, Charlotte; Hurt, Lisa; Fenty, Justin; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Hill, Zelee

    2012-01-01

    Background Many sub-Saharan countries, including Ghana, have introduced policies to provide free medical care to pregnant women. The impact of these policies, particularly on access to health services among the poor, has not been evaluated using rigorous methods, and so the empirical basis for defending these policies is weak. In Ghana, a recent report also cast doubt on the current mechanism of delivering free care – the National Health Insurance Scheme. Longitudinal surveillance data from two randomized controlled trials conducted in the Brong Ahafo Region provided a unique opportunity to assess the impact of Ghana’s policies. Methods We used time-series methods to assess the impact of Ghana’s 2005 policy on free delivery care and its 2008 policy on free national health insurance for pregnant women. We estimated their impacts on facility delivery and insurance coverage, and on socioeconomic differentials in these outcomes after controlling for temporal trends and seasonality. Results Facility delivery has been increasing significantly over time. The 2005 and 2008 policies were associated with significant jumps in coverage of 2.3% (p?=?0.015) and 7.5% (p<0.001), respectively after the policies were introduced. Health insurance coverage also jumped significantly (17.5%, p<0.001) after the 2008 policy. The increases in facility delivery and insurance were greatest among the poorest, leading to a decline in socioeconomic inequality in both outcomes. Conclusion Providing free care, particularly through free health insurance, has been effective in increasing facility delivery overall in the Brong Ahafo Region, and especially among the poor. This finding should be considered when evaluating the impact of the National Health Insurance Scheme and in supporting the continuation and expansion of free delivery care. PMID:23173061

  14. Use of a Balanced Scorecard in strengthening health systems in developing countries: an analysis based on nationally representative Bangladesh Health Facility Survey.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Mahmud; Hotchkiss, David R; Dmytraczenko, Tania; Zunaid Ahsan, Karar

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of collecting facility-based data through regular surveys to supplement the administrative data, especially for developing countries of the world. In Bangladesh, measures based on facility survey indicate that only 70% of very basic medical instruments and 35% of essential drugs were available in health facilities. Less than 2% of officially designated obstetric care facilities actually had required drugs, injections and personnel on-site. Majority of (80%) referral hospitals at the district level were not ready to provide comprehensive emergency obstetric care. Even though the Management Information System reports availability of diagnostic machines in all district-level and sub-district-level facilities, it fails to indicate that 50% of these machines are not functional. In terms of human resources, both physicians and nurses are in short supply at all levels of the healthcare system. The physician-nurse ratio also remains lower than the desirable level of 3.0. Overall job satisfaction index was less than 50 for physicians and 66 for nurses. Patient satisfaction score, however, was high (86) despite the fact that process indicators of service quality were poor. Facility surveys can help strengthen not only the management decision-making process but also the quality of administrative data. PMID:22887590

  15. Promoting universal financial protection: contracting faith-based health facilities to expand access – lessons learned from Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Public-private collaborations are increasingly being utilized to universalize health care. In Malawi, the Ministry of Health contracts selected health facilities owned by the main faith-based provider, the Christian Health Association of Malawi (CHAM), to deliver care at no fee to the most vulnerable and underserved populations in the country through Service Level Agreements (SLAs). This study examined the features of SLAs and their effectiveness in expanding universal coverage. The study involved a policy analysis focusing on key stakeholders around SLAs as well as a case study approach to analyse how design and implementation of SLAs affect efficiency, equity and sustainability of services delivered by SLAs. Methods The study employed both qualitative and quantitative research methods to address the research questions and was conducted in five CHAM health facilities: Mulanje Mission, Holy Family, and Mtengowanthenga Hospitals, and Mabiri and Nkope Health Centres. National and district level decision makers were interviewed while providers and clients associated with the health facilities were surveyed on their experiences. A total of 155 clients from an expected 175 were recruited in the study. Results The study findings revealed key aspects of how SLAs were operating, the extent to which their objectives were being attained and why. In general, the findings demonstrated that SLAs had the potential to improve health and universal health care coverage, particularly for the vulnerable and underserved populations. However, the findings show that the performance of SLAs in Malawi were affected by various factors including lack of clear guidelines, non-revised prices, late payment of bills, lack of transparency, poor communication, inadequate human and material resources, and lack of systems to monitor performance of SLAs, amongst others. Conclusions There was strong consensus and shared interest between the government and CHAM regarding SLAs. It was clear that free services provided by SLAs had a great impact on the impoverished locals that used the facilities. However, lack of supporting systems, inadequate infrastructure and shortage of health care providers affected SLA performance. The paper provides recommendations to policy makers for the replication and strengthening of SLA implementation in the roll-out of universalization policy. PMID:23958156

  16. Implementing a facility-based maternal and perinatal health care surveillance system in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Dott, Mary M; Orakail, Nasreen; Ebadi, Hameeda; Hernandez, Filiberto; MacFarlane, Kitty; Riley, Patricia L; Prepas, Roberta; McCarthy, Brian J

    2005-01-01

    Afghanistan has one of the highest maternal and perinatal mortality rates in the world. Lack of a health information system presented obstacles to efforts to improve the quality of care and reduce mortality. To rapidly overcome this deficit in a large women's hospital, staff implemented a facility-based maternal and perinatal surveillance system known as "BABIES," which is specially designed for intervention and evaluation in low-resource settings. During a 12-month period, 15,509 deliveries resulted in 28 maternal deaths and a perinatal mortality rate of 56 per 1000 births. When stratified by birth weight and perinatal period of death, fetuses weighing at least 2500 g who died during the antepartum period contributed the most cases of perinatal death. This finding suggests that the greatest reduction in perinatal mortality would be realized by increasing access to high-quality antepartum care. Among fetuses weighing at least 2500 g, 93 deaths occurred during the intrapartum period. These deaths will continue to be monitored to ensure that the chosen interventions are improving intrapartum care for mothers and newborns. Because of its simplicity, flexibility, and ability to identify interventions, BABIES is a valuable tool that enables clinicians and program managers to prioritize resources. PMID:15973266

  17. Evidence from facility level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Most of the maternal and newborn deaths occur at birth or within 24 hours of birth. Therefore, essential lifesaving interventions need to be delivered at basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care facilities. Facilities provide complex interventions including advice on referrals, post discharge care, long-term management of chronic conditions along with staff training, managerial and administrative support to other facilities. This paper reviews the effectiveness of facility level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined facility level interventions and included 32 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that additional social support during pregnancy and labour significantly decreased the risk of antenatal hospital admission, intrapartum analgesia, dissatisfaction, labour duration, cesarean delivery and instrumental vaginal birth. However, it did not have any impact on pregnancy outcomes. Continued midwifery care from early pregnancy to postpartum period was associated with reduced medical procedures during labour and shorter length of stay. Facility based stress training and management interventions to maintain well performing and motivated workforce, significantly reduced job stress and improved job satisfaction while the interventions tailored to address identified barriers to change improved the desired practice. We found limited and inconclusive evidence for the impacts of physical environment, exit interviews and organizational culture modifications. At the facility level, specialized midwifery teams and social support during pregnancy and labour have demonstrated conclusive benefits in improving maternal newborn health outcomes. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited to high income countries. Future programs in resource limited settings should utilize these findings to implement relevant interventions tailored to their needs. PMID:25208539

  18. Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed.

  19. Monitoring the ability to deliver care in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of health facility assessment tools

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Jason W; Adams, Orvill; Attaran, Amir; Hatcher-Roberts, Janet; Tugwell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Health facilities assessments are an essential instrument for health system strengthening in low- and middle-income countries. These assessments are used to conduct health facility censuses to assess the capacity of the health system to deliver health care and to identify gaps in the coverage of health services. Despite the valuable role of these assessments, there are currently no minimum standards or frameworks for these tools. Methods We used a structured keyword search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE and HealthStar databases and searched the websites of the World Health Organization, the World Bank and the International Health Facilities Assessment Network to locate all available health facilities assessment tools intended for use in low- and middle-income countries. We parsed the various assessment tools to identify similarities between them, which we catalogued into a framework comprising 41 assessment domains. Results We identified 10 health facility assessment tools meeting our inclusion criteria, all of which were included in our analysis. We found substantial variation in the comprehensiveness of the included tools, with the assessments containing indicators in 13 to 33 (median: 25.5) of the 41 assessment domains included in our framework. None of the tools collected data on all 41 of the assessment domains we identified. Conclusions Not only do a large number of health facility assessment tools exist, but the data they collect and methods they employ are very different. This certainly limits the comparability of the data between different countries’ health systems and probably creates blind spots that impede efforts to strengthen those systems. Agreement is needed on the essential elements of health facility assessments to guide the development of specific indicators and for refining existing instruments. PMID:24895350

  20. The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre — Community Health Agents (CHA) — who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connect’s district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzania’s need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844 PMID:23819587

  1. Forest Health: Common Invasive Plants in East Texas http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Fern #12;Forest Health: Common Invasive Plants in East Texas http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 2 of 2. Japanese Climbing Fern: Lygodium japonicum. Native to Asia and Australia and brought to the U.S. in the 1930s as an ornamental plant. Climbing, twining, mat-forming fern that invades open forests, road edges

  2. Amino Acids In Health and Disease: New Perspectives, pages 369-382 @ 1987 Alan R. Liss, Inc. )

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    Amino Acids In Health and Disease: New Perspectives, pages 369-382 @ 1987 Alan R. Liss, Inc. ) PLASMA AMINO ACID LEVELS IN OBESITY: EFFECTS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE Benjamin Caballero, Nicholas Finer1, lsoleucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine. The plasma amino acid response t(f. food Intake is also different

  3. Chapter to appear in book "Future of Health Technology", 2001, OIS Press. Page 1 Affective Medicine: Technology with

    E-print Network

    Chapter to appear in book "Future of Health Technology", 2001, OIS Press. Page 1 Affective Medicine 02139, USA; http://www.media.mit.edu/affect Abstract. For a long time people have kept emotions out expressed emotion, but no tools could sense, measure, and respond to their affective information. A series

  4. hs building_warden_instructions Page 1 of 3 Date issued: 17-Feb-12 Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    hs ­ building_warden_instructions Page 1 of 3 Date issued: 17-Feb-12 Health and Safety Instructions for Building Wardens ON HEARING THE ALARM SOUND OR WHEN NOTIFIED OF AN EMERGENCY EVACUATION · Make sure staff do not re-enter buildings until authorised. vi. Debrief staff following the incident. vii. Take

  5. Rotordynamic Analysis and Feasibility Study of a Disk Spin Test Facility for Rotor Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) initiated a program to achieve the significant improvement in aviation safety. One of the technical challenges is the design and development of accelerated experiments that mimic critical damage cases encountered in engine components. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently addressing the goal concerning propulsion health management and the development of propulsion system specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe. For this goal the unique disk spin simulation system was assembled at NASA GRC, which allows testing of rotors with the spinning speeds up to 10K RPM, and at the elevated temperature environment reaching 540 C (1000 F). It is anticipated that the facility can be employed for detection of Low Cycle Fatigue disk cracking and further High Cycle Fatigue blade vibration. The controlled crack growth studies at room and elevated temperatures can be conducted on the turbine wheels, and various NDE techniques can be integrated and assessed as in-situ damage monitoring tools. Critical rotating parts in advanced gas turbine engines such as turbine disks frequently operate at high temperature and stress for long periods of time. The integrity of these parts must be proven by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during various machining steps ranging from forging blank to finished shape, and also during the systematic overhaul inspections. Conventional NDE methods, however, have unacceptable limits. Some of these techniques are time-consuming and inconvenient for service aircraft testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage is known in advance. These experimental techniques can provide only local information and no indication of the structural strength at a component and/or system level. The shortcomings of currently available NDE methods lead to the requirement of new damage detection techniques that can provide global information on the rotating components/system, and, in addition, they do not require direct human access to the operating system. During this period of research considerable effort was directed towards the further development of experimental facility and development of the vibration-based crack detection methodology for rotating disks and shafts. A collection of papers and reports were written to describe the results of this work. The attached captures that effort and represents the research output during the grant period.

  6. PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.14 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1

    E-print Network

    of the patient. Psychotherapy Notes ­ means notes recorded by a health care provider who is a mental health's record. Psychotherapy notes do not include: · medication prescription and monitoring · counseling session

  7. Effect of Community Engagement Interventions on Patient Safety and Risk Reduction Efforts in Primary Health Facilities: Evidence from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Spieker, Nicole; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Ogink, Alice; van Ostenberg, Paul; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient safety and quality care remain major challenges to Ghana’s healthcare system. Like many health systems in Africa, this is largely because demand for healthcare is outstripping available human and material resource capacity of healthcare facilities and new investment is insufficient. In the light of these demand and supply constraints, systematic community engagement (SCE) in healthcare quality assessment can be a feasible and cost effective option to augment existing quality improvement interventions. SCE entails structured use of existing community groups to assess healthcare quality in health facilities. Identified quality gaps are discussed with healthcare providers, improvements identified and rewards provided if the quality gaps are closed. Purpose This paper evaluates whether or not SCE, through the assessment of health service quality, improves patient safety and risk reduction efforts by staff in healthcare facilities. Methods A randomized control trail was conducted in 64 primary healthcare facilities in the Greater Accra and Western regions of Ghana. Patient risk assessments were conducted in 32 randomly assigned intervention and control facilities. Multivariate multiple regression test was used to determine effect of the SCE interventions on staff efforts towards reducing patient risk. Spearman correlation test was used to ascertain associations between types of community groups engaged and risk assessment scores of healthcare facilities. Findings Clinic staff efforts towards increasing patient safety and reducing risk improved significantly in intervention facilities especially in the areas of leadership/accountability (Coef. = 10.4, p<0.05) and staff competencies (Coef. = 7.1, p<0.05). Improvement in service utilization and health resources could not be attributed to the interventions because these were outside the control of the study and might have been influenced by institutional or national level developments between the baseline and follow-up period. Community groups that were gender balanced, religious/faith-based, and had structured leadership appeared to be better options for effective SCE in healthcare quality assessment. Conclusion Community engagement in healthcare quality assessment is a feasible client-centered quality improvement option that should be discussed for possible scale-up in Ghana and other resource poor countries in Africa. PMID:26619143

  8. UC Davis Medical Center Community Health Needs Assessment Implementation Plan Page 2 Introduction

    E-print Network

    Ullrich, Paul

    , the region's only National Cancer Institute- designated comprehensive cancer center, and innovative stem cell center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health. UC Davis Health, and uncovered the underlying social determinants of health care. Both qualitative and quantitative research

  9. PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.16 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1

    E-print Network

    and Accountability Act, Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information (HIPAA Privacy insurance or health benefits, and ceding, securing or placing a contract for reinsurance of risk relating to claims for health care; · Conducting or arranging for medical review, legal services, and auditing

  10. A Multidisciplinary Paradigm and Approach to Protecting Human Health and the Environment, Society, and Stakeholders at Nuclear Facilities - 12244

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Clarke, James; Powers, Charles W.; Kosson, David

    2012-07-01

    As the Department of Energy (DOE) continues to remediate its lands, and to consider moving toward long-term stewardship and the development of energy parks on its industrial, remediated land, it is essential to adequately characterize the environment around such facilities to protect society, human health, and the environment. While DOE sites re considering several different land-use scenarios, all of them require adequate protection of the environment. Even if DOE lands are developed for energy parks that are mainly for industrializes sections of DOE lands that will not be remediated to residential standards, there is still the need to consider the protection of human health and the environment. We present an approach to characterization and establishment of teams that will gather the information, and integrate that information for a full range of stakeholders from technical personnel, to public policy makers, and that public. Such information is needed to establish baselines, site new energy facilities in energy parks, protect existing nuclear facilities and nuclear wastes, improve the basis for emergency planning, devise suitable monitoring schemes to ensure continued protection, provide data to track local and regional response changes, and for mitigation, remediation and decommissioning planning. We suggest that there are five categories of information or data needs, including 1) geophysical, sources, fate and transport, 2) biological systems, 3) human health, 4) stakeholder and environmental justice, and 5) societal, economic, and political. These informational needs are more expansive than the traditional site characterization, but encompass a suite of physical, biological, and societal needs to protect all aspects of human health and the environment, not just physical health. We suggest a Site Committee be established that oversees technical teams for each of the major informational categories, with appropriate representation among teams and with a broad involvement of a range of governmental personnel, natural and social scientists, Native Americans, environmental justice communities, and other stakeholders. Such informational teams (and Oversight Committee) would report to a DOE-designated authority or Citizen's Advisory Board. Although designed for nuclear facilities and energy parks on DOE lands, the templates and information teams can be adapted for other hazardous facilities, such as a mercury storage facility at Oak Ridge. (authors)

  11. Exposures and health outcomes in relation to bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities: a systematic review of occupational and community studies.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Clare; Littlewood, Emma; Douglas, Philippa; Robertson, Sarah; Gant, Timothy W; Hansell, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    The number of composting sites in Europe is rapidly increasing, due to efforts to reduce the fraction of waste destined for landfill, but evidence on possible health impacts is limited. This article systematically reviews studies related to bioaerosol exposures within and near composting facilities and associated health effects in both community and occupational health settings. Six electronic databases and bibliographies from January 1960 to July 2014 were searched for studies reporting on health outcomes and/or bioaerosol emissions related to composting sites. Risk of bias was assessed using a customized score. Five hundred and thirty-six papers were identified and reviewed, and 66 articles met the inclusion criteria (48 exposure studies, 9 health studies, 9 health and exposure studies). Exposure information was limited, with most measurements taken in occupational settings and for limited time periods. Bioaerosol concentrations were highest on-site during agitation activities (turning, shredding, and screening). Six studies detected concentrations of either Aspergillus fumigatus or total bacteria above the English Environment Agency's recommended threshold levels beyond 250 m from the site. Occupational studies of compost workers suggested elevated risks of respiratory illnesses with higher bioaerosol exposures. Elevated airway irritation was reported in residents near composting sites, but this may have been affected by reporting bias. The evidence base on health effects of bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities is still limited, although there is sufficient evidence to support a precautionary approach for regulatory purposes. While data to date are suggestive of possible respiratory effects, further study is needed to confirm this and to explore other health outcomes. PMID:25825807

  12. Exposures and Health Outcomes in Relation to Bioaerosol Emissions From Composting Facilities: A Systematic Review of Occupational and Community Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Clare; Littlewood, Emma; Douglas, Philippa; Robertson, Sarah; Gant, Timothy W.; Hansell, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    The number of composting sites in Europe is rapidly increasing, due to efforts to reduce the fraction of waste destined for landfill, but evidence on possible health impacts is limited. This article systematically reviews studies related to bioaerosol exposures within and near composting facilities and associated health effects in both community and occupational health settings. Six electronic databases and bibliographies from January 1960 to July 2014 were searched for studies reporting on health outcomes and/or bioaerosol emissions related to composting sites. Risk of bias was assessed using a customized score. Five hundred and thirty-six papers were identified and reviewed, and 66 articles met the inclusion criteria (48 exposure studies, 9 health studies, 9 health and exposure studies). Exposure information was limited, with most measurements taken in occupational settings and for limited time periods. Bioaerosol concentrations were highest on-site during agitation activities (turning, shredding, and screening). Six studies detected concentrations of either Aspergillus fumigatus or total bacteria above the English Environment Agency’s recommended threshold levels beyond 250 m from the site. Occupational studies of compost workers suggested elevated risks of respiratory illnesses with higher bioaerosol exposures. Elevated airway irritation was reported in residents near composting sites, but this may have been affected by reporting bias. The evidence base on health effects of bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities is still limited, although there is sufficient evidence to support a precautionary approach for regulatory purposes. While data to date are suggestive of possible respiratory effects, further study is needed to confirm this and to explore other health outcomes. PMID:25825807

  13. Do Physical Proximity and Availability of Adequate Infrastructure at Public Health Facility Increase Institutional Delivery? A Three Level Hierarchical Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rachana; Ladusingh, Laishram

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the inter-district and inter-village variation of utilization of health services for institutional births in EAG states in presence of rural health program and availability of infrastructures. District Level Household Survey-III (2007–08) data on delivery care and facility information was used for the purpose. Bivariate results examined the utilization pattern by states in presence of correlates of women related while a three-level hierarchical multilevel model illustrates the effect of accessibility, availability of health facility and community health program variables on the utilization of health services for institutional births. The study found a satisfactory improvement in state Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa, importantly, in Bihar and Uttaranchal. The study showed that increasing distance from health facility discouraged institutional births and there was a rapid decline of more than 50% for institutional delivery as the distance to public health facility exceeded 10 km. Additionally, skilled female health worker (ANM) and observed improved public health facility led to significantly increase the probability of utilization as compared to non-skilled ANM and not-improved health centers. Adequacy of essential equipment/laboratory services required for maternal care significantly encouraged deliveries at public health facility. District/village variables neighborhood poverty was negatively related to institutional delivery while higher education levels in the village and women’s residing in more urbanized districts increased the utilization. “Inter-district” variation was 14 percent whereas “between-villages” variation for the utilization was 11 percent variation once controlled for all the three-level variables in the model. This study suggests that the mere availability of health facilities is necessary but not sufficient condition to promote utilization until the quality of service is inadequate and inaccessible considering the inter-districts variation for the program implementation. PMID:26689199

  14. Findings from a hepatitis B birth dose assessment in health facilities in the Philippines: opportunities to engage the private sector

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minal K.; Capeding, Rosario Z.; Ducusin, Joyce U.; de Quiroz Castro, Maricel; Garcia, Luzviminda C.; Hennessey, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B vaccination in the Philippines was introduced in 1992 to reduce the high burden of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the population; in 2007, a birth dose (HepB-BD) was introduced to decrease perinatal HBV transmission. Timely HepB-BD coverage, defined as doses given within 24 hours of birth, was 40% nationally in 2011. A first step in improving timely HepB-BD coverage is to ensure that all newborns born in health facilities are vaccinated. Methods In order to assess ways of improving the Philippines’ HepB-BD program, we evaluated knowledge, attitudes, and practices surrounding HepB-BD administration in health facilities. Teams visited selected government clinics, government hospitals, and private hospitals in regions with low reported HepB-BD coverage and interviewed immunization and maternity staff. HepB-BD coverage was calculated in each facility for a 3 month period in 2011. Results Of the 142 health facilities visited, 12 (8%) did not provide HepB-BD; seven were private hospitals and five were government hospitals. Median timely HepB-BD coverage was 90% (IQR 80%–100%) among government clinics, 87% (IQR 50%–97%) among government hospitals, and 50% (IQR 0%–90%) among private hospitals (p=0.02). The private hospitals were least likely to receive supervision (53% versus 6%–31%, p=0.0005) and to report vaccination data to the national Expanded Programme on Immunization (36% vs. 96%–100%, p<0.0001). Conclusions Private sector hospitals in the Philippines, which deliver 18% of newborns, had the lowest timely HepB-BD coverage. Multiple avenues exist to engage the private sector in hepatitis B prevention including through existing laws, newborn health initiatives, hospital accreditation processes, and raising awareness of the government’s free vaccine program. PMID:24361121

  15. Spatial Analysis of the Level of Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

  16. Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, N; Gotestrand, S A; Ombeki, S; Oluoch, G; Fischer, T K; Quick, R

    2015-03-01

    Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years. PMID:24865584

  17. HEALTH AND SAFETY MANUAL School of Physics Published: August 2014 Version 2.4 Authorised by the Physics Health and Safety Committee Review: February 2015 Page 1 of 68

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    HEALTH AND SAFETY MANUAL ­ School of Physics Published: August 2014 Version 2.4 Authorised by the Physics Health and Safety Committee Review: February 2015 Page 1 of 68 This document is uncontrolled when printed. HEALTH AND SAFETY MANUAL General Statement on Health and Safety Management The School of Physics

  18. Page 156 Health Professions Advisory Program Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    semesters with lab 8 Mathematics Some schools require a year of college mathematics and/or a calculus course-baccalaureate students preparing for careers in various health professions, including allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physi- cian assistant

  19. [page 24] [Nursing Reports 2011; 1:e6] Respecting a Korean health

    E-print Network

    Cooper, Robin L.

    providers to keep an open mind in the clinics or with home health care when treating clients with diverse. But today my wife was a busy translating to explain why the kids are saying Grandma made them bleed and took health matters. The kids are showing me the small pricks in their skin right between the nail bed

  20. PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.10 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1

    E-print Network

    Health Information except as otherwise statutorily excluded. Such exclusions consists of psychotherapy and billing records of a patient. Psychotherapy Notes ­ means notes recorded by a health care provider who of the individual's record. Psychotherapy notes do not include: medication prescription and monitoring, counseling

  1. Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  2. Diversion of Drugs Within Health Care Facilities, a Multiple-Victim Crime: Patterns of Diversion, Scope, Consequences, Detection, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Keith H.; Dillon, Kevin R.; Sikkink, Karen M.; Taylor, Timothy K.; Lanier, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Mayo Clinic has been involved in an ongoing effort to prevent the diversion of controlled substances from the workplace and to rapidly identify and respond when such diversion is detected. These efforts have found that diversion of controlled substances is not uncommon and can result in substantial risk not only to the individual who is diverting the drugs but also to patients, co-workers, and employers. We believe that all health care facilities should have systems in place to deter controlled substance diversion and to promptly identify diversion and intervene when it is occurring. Such systems are multifaceted and require close cooperation between multiple stakeholders including, but not limited to, departments of pharmacy, safety and security, anesthesiology, nursing, legal counsel, and human resources. Ideally, there should be a broad-based appreciation of the dangers that diversion creates not only for patients but also for all employees of health care facilities, because diversion can occur at any point along a long supply chain. All health care workers must be vigilant for signs of possible diversion and must be aware of how to engage a preexisting group with expertise in investigating possible diversions. In addition, clear policies and procedures should be in place for dealing with such investigations and for managing the many possible outcomes of a confirmed diversion. This article provides an overview of the multiple types of risk that result from drug diversion from health care facilities. Further, we describe a system developed at Mayo Clinic for evaluating episodes of potential drug diversion and for taking action once diversion is confirmed. PMID:22766087

  3. Diversion of drugs within health care facilities, a multiple-victim crime: patterns of diversion, scope, consequences, detection, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Berge, Keith H; Dillon, Kevin R; Sikkink, Karen M; Taylor, Timothy K; Lanier, William L

    2012-07-01

    Mayo Clinic has been involved in an ongoing effort to prevent the diversion of controlled substances from the workplace and to rapidly identify and respond when such diversion is detected. These efforts have found that diversion of controlled substances is not uncommon and can result in substantial risk not only to the individual who is diverting the drugs but also to patients, co-workers, and employers. We believe that all health care facilities should have systems in place to deter controlled substance diversion and to promptly identify diversion and intervene when it is occurring. Such systems are multifaceted and require close cooperation between multiple stakeholders including, but not limited to, departments of pharmacy, safety and security, anesthesiology, nursing, legal counsel, and human resources. Ideally, there should be a broad-based appreciation of the dangers that diversion creates not only for patients but also for all employees of health care facilities, because diversion can occur at any point along a long supply chain. All health care workers must be vigilant for signs of possible diversion and must be aware of how to engage a preexisting group with expertise in investigating possible diversions. In addition, clear policies and procedures should be in place for dealing with such investigations and for managing the many possible outcomes of a confirmed diversion. This article provides an overview of the multiple types of risk that result from drug diversion from health care facilities. Further, we describe a system developed at Mayo Clinic for evaluating episodes of potential drug diversion and for taking action once diversion is confirmed. PMID:22766087

  4. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials

    E-print Network

    Koenig, Kristi L MD

    2008-01-01

    pesticides, fungicides, chlorinated phenols, dioxins, cyanides, ammonia, and other non-acidic inorganic waste Health carePesticides, persistent and non-persistent Dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Explosive nitro compounds and oxidizers Ammonium nitrate Health care

  5. [Medicine on mission: The international health reform of Seventh-Day Adventists and their health care facilities in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Eklöf, Motzi

    2008-01-01

    The international non-conformist denomination, Seventh-day Adventists, have since their foundation in 1863, had a distinctive health care model for their members. The life-style has included vegetarian diet, abstinence from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and the observance of a day of rest once a week. The health policy has striven to care for God's creation in the hope of resurrection at the Day of Judgment and to reform the conventional medical practice. The Adventists have pursued an extensive international health care system--from the start based on dietary and physical treatment methods, such as hydrotherapy, massage and physiotherapy--in line with the Christian mission. Health care establishments have been inaugurated around the world as a vehicle for enabling the Christian health care message to reach the upper classes. With Adventist and Doctor, John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanatorium in Michigan as both inspirational source and educational institution, the health care mission--including a vegetarian health food industry, following in the footsteps of cornflakes--spread to the Nordic countries by the turn of the century, 1900. Skodsborgs Badesanatorium near Copenhagen became the model institution for several health care establishments in Sweden during the 1900's, such as Hultafors Sanatorium. The American-Nordic link has manifested itself through co-publication of papers, exchange of health care personnel and reporting to the central Adventist church. The American non-conformist domain as well as a private sphere of activity, aiming mainly from the outset at society's upper classes, has encountered certain difficulties in maintaining this distinction in Sweden's officially increasing secularised society, and in relation to a state health insurance and a publicly financed health care system. With the passing of time, the socioeconomic composition of patients at Hultafors became more heterogeneous, and conventional medical procedures were increasingly incorporated into the array of treatment resources. The successful enterprises--as they had been for a considerable time--could not, at the end of the 20th century, continue to be self financing or fulfil the missionary objectives among the upper classes. The institutionalised health care apparatus came to an end around the turn of the century, which also included the sale of health associated food product companies. The Seventh-day Adventist's combination of medicine and religion with Christian missionary aims have indeed, not only steered health care models and institutions worldwide, but also which target groups to mainly turn to, the specific treatment philosophy, desirable working environment and which medical technologies to use. Furthermore, the Adventist's health reform and care of the sick provide an example for how different medical cultures influence each other and develop in relation to one another in a pluralistic medical market. The developments are not merely a reflection of the medical, scientific and technical advancements, but also of the medical market's structure, financing and (inter)national connections, of religion, culture and not least of all, patients' options and their choices. PMID:19848037

  6. Page 1 of 15 Infectious Diseases Policy for Health Professional Students

    E-print Network

    offered by the Division: Bachelor of Dental Surgery, Bachelor of Dental Surgery and Bachelor of Surgery, Bachelor of Pharmacy, Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science, Bachelor of Radiation Therapy, Bachelor of Oral Health, Master of Nursing Science

  7. Community accountability at peripheral health facilities: a review of the empirical literature and development of a conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Sassy; Atela, Martin; Angwenyi, Vibian; Goodman, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Public accountability has re-emerged as a top priority for health systems all over the world, and particularly in developing countries where governments have often failed to provide adequate public sector services for their citizens. One approach to strengthening public accountability is through direct involvement of clients, users or the general public in health delivery, here termed ‘community accountability’. The potential benefits of community accountability, both as an end in itself and as a means of improving health services, have led to significant resources being invested by governments and non-governmental organizations. Data are now needed on the implementation and impact of these initiatives on the ground. A search of PubMed using a systematic approach, supplemented by a hand search of key websites, identified 21 papers from low- or middle-income countries describing at least one measure to enhance community accountability that was linked with peripheral facilities. Mechanisms covered included committees and groups (n?=?19), public report cards (n?=?1) and patients’ rights charters (n?=?1). In this paper we summarize the data presented in these papers, including impact, and factors influencing impact, and conclude by commenting on the methods used, and the issues they raise. We highlight that the international interest in community accountability mechanisms linked to peripheral facilities has not been matched by empirical data, and present a conceptual framework and a set of ideas that might contribute to future studies. PMID:22279082

  8. A systematic review of the literature for evidence on health facility committees in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    McCoy, David C; Hall, Jennifer A; Ridge, Melanie

    2012-09-01

    Community participation in health (CPH) has been advocated as a health-improving strategy for many decades. However, CPH comes in many different forms, one of which is the use of health facility committees (HFCs) on which there is community representation. This paper presents the findings of a systematic literature review of: (a) the evidence of HFCs' effectiveness, and (b) the factors that influence the performance and effectiveness of HFCs. Four electronic databases and the websites of eight key organizations were searched. Out of 341 potentially relevant publications, only four provided reasonable evidence of the effectiveness of HFCs. A further 37 papers were selected and used to draw out data on the factors that influence the functioning of HFCs. A conceptual model was developed to describe the key factors. It consists of, firstly, the features of the HFC, community and facility, and their interactions; secondly, process factors relating to the way HFCs are established and supported; and finally, a set of contextual factors. The review found some evidence that HFCs can be effective in terms of improving the quality and coverage of health care, as well as impacting on health outcomes. However, the external validity of these studies is inevitably limited. Given the different potential roles/functions of HFCs and the complex and multiple set of factors influencing their functioning, there is no 'one size fits all' approach to CPH via HFCs, nor to the evaluation of HFCs. However, there are plenty of experiences and lessons in the literature which decision makers and managers can use to optimize HFCs. PMID:22155589

  9. 77 FR 1495 - Criteria for Determining Priorities Among Correctional Facility Health Professional Shortage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ...In accordance with the requirements of section 333A(b)(1) of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as amended by the Health Care Safety Net Amendments of 2002, 42 U.S.C. 254f-1(b)(1), the Secretary of HHS shall establish the criteria which she will use to make determinations under section 333A(a)(1)(A) of the health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) with the greatest shortages. This notice......

  10. Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health; Final Report of the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander,J; Brooks,B; Erwin,P; Hamilton,J; Holloway,J; Lipford,P; Morin,N; Peelle,R; Smith,J; Voilleque,P; Zawia,N. Edited by Williams,L.

    1999-12-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee?s public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The following report, "Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health," was written by the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel (ORHASP) for the following purposes: (1) to explain the components and process of the lengthy, complex study; (2) to summarize important study results in less technical language; and (3) to provide the State with the Panel's recommendations for future actions concerning the Oak Ridge communities. The dose reconstruction process involved the examination of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility. It resulted in hundreds of documents being declassified and provided an avenue for a complete public accounting of past practices and releases. Researchers used this information to identify released contaminants of concern, to estimate the quantity and timing of these releases, to evaluate the routes taken by contaminants through the environment to nearby populations, and to estimate the doses and health risks to exposed groups. The results suggest it is likely that some people's risks of developing various types of cancers or other health effects were increased because of the releases. Two groups were most likely to have been harmed: local children drinking milk, in the early 1950's, from a ?backyard? cow or goat that had grazed on pastures contaminated with iodine-131, and fetuses carried in the 1950's and early 1960's by women who routinely ate fish taken from nearby creeks and rivers contaminated with mercury and PCBs. More detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, are presented in seven technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the "author field" for the name "Widner," since Mr. T.E. Widner was the principal investigator on this project.

  11. Forest Health: Hardwood Decay http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    to reduce inoculum dispersal. This also allows decay fungi to be over-taken by decomposing fungi. Never put, fire, animals, and hu- man activity such as logging predisposed trees to various decay fungi. Rate of decay and spread of decay fungi can be greatly influenced by tree species and overall forest health

  12. Critical Factors in Mental Health Programming for Juveniles in Corrections Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Lee A.; Phillips, Annie; von Dresner, Kara; Knight, Pamela D.

    2006-01-01

    Juveniles with mental health and other specialized needs are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, and while juvenile corrections have not historically provided standardized and evidence-based mental health services for its incarcerated youth, the demand is evident. The reality is that juveniles with serious mental illness are committed…

  13. New York State School Facilities and Student Health, Achievement, and Attendance: A Data Analysis Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boese, Stephen; Shaw, John

    2005-01-01

    Students who attend schools with environmental hazards that impact indoor air quality are more likely to miss class, and therefore lose learning opportunities. Yet school environmental health and safety remains largely unregulated and there is no state or federal agency in charge of protecting children's environmental health in schools. This…

  14. 77 FR 1495 - Criteria for Determining Priorities Among Correctional Facility Health Professional Shortage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ...b)(1) of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as amended by the Health Care Safety...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 332 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C. 254e, provides that...Section 333A(a)(1)(A) of the PHS Act requires that the Secretary give...

  15. 10/11/2007 06:06 PMSoon, robots with human gaze-Health/Science-The Times of India Page 1 of 2http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/HealthScience/Soon_robots_with_human_gaze/articleshow/2449375.cms

    E-print Network

    Itti, Laurent

    10/11/2007 06:06 PMSoon, robots with human gaze-Health/Science-The Times of India Page 1 of 2http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/HealthScience/Soon_robots_with_human_gaze/articleshow/2449375.cms Home Cities India Indians Abroad World Business Sports Health/Science Infotech Education Opinion Entertainment Classifieds

  16. Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed -Print -MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM

    E-print Network

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM] Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed In 3 of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http

  17. Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite. PMID:20140506

  18. Community and facility-level engagement in planning and budgeting for the government health sector--a district perspective from Kenya.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme; Tsofa, Benjamin; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine; McKenzie, F Ellis

    2011-03-01

    Health systems reform processes have increasingly recognized the essential contribution of communities to the success of health programs and development activities in general. Here we examine the experience from Kilifi district in Kenya of implementing annual health sector planning guidelines that included community participation in problem identification, priority setting, and planning. We describe challenges in the implementation of national planning guidelines, how these were met, and how they influenced final plans and budgets. The broad-based community engagement envisaged in the guidelines did not take place due to the delay in roll out of the Ministry of Health-trained community health workers. Instead, community engagement was conducted through facility management committees, though in a minority of facilities, even such committees were not involved. Some overlap was found in the priorities highlighted by facility staff, committee members and national indicators, but there were also many additional issues raised by committee members and not by other groups. The engagement of the community through committees influenced target and priority setting, but the emphasis on national health indicators left many local priorities unaddressed by the final work plans. Moreover, it appears that the final impact on budgets allocated at district and facility level was limited. The experience in Kilifi highlights the feasibility of engaging the community in the health planning process, and the challenges of ensuring that this engagement feeds into consolidated plans and future implementation. PMID:20888061

  19. 77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...this notice. The commenters also submitted a report prepared by the Federal Practice Group, LLC entitled ``Analysis of Unassisted Multifamily Housing and Health Care Loans Insured by the Federal Housing Administration'' dated November 2011 to...

  20. Theoretically-driven infrastructure for supporting health care teams training at a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Turner, T Robert; Parodi, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Designated a Department of Defense Team Resource Center (TRC) in 2008, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts three tri-service health care teams training courses annually. Each consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation-based training exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for health care professionals. Simulated cases are developed to reinforce specific teamwork skills and behaviors, and to incorporate a variety of technologies including standardized patients, manikins, and virtual reality. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore applications of modeling and simulation for enhanced team training in health care. The TRC has adopted two theoretical frameworks for evaluating training efficacy and outcomes, and has used these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting health care teams training at NMCP. PMID:22360057

  1. Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Patricia P

    2003-07-01

    Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings. PMID:12883559

  2. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory mechanisms. Measures to stop the availability of poor-quality medicines should include limiting procurement to WHO prequalified products and implementing routine quality testing. PMID:24828338

  3. Soil metal concentrations and toxicity: associations with distances to industrial facilities and implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Aelion, C Marjorie; Davis, Harley T; McDermott, Suzanne; Lawson, Andrew B

    2009-03-15

    Urban and rural areas may have different levels of environmental contamination and different potential sources of exposure. Many metals, i.e., arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), have well-documented negative neurological effects, and the developing fetus and young children are particularly at risk. Using a database of mother and child pairs, three areas were identified: a rural area with no increased prevalence of mental retardation and developmental delay (MR/DD) (Area A), and a rural area (Area B) and an urban area (Area C) with significantly higher prevalence of MR/DD in children as compared to the state-wide average. Areas were mapped and surface soil samples were collected from nodes of a uniform grid. Samples were analyzed for As, barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), Pb, manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and Hg concentrations and for soil toxicity, and correlated to identify potential common sources. ArcGIS was used to determine distances between sample locations and industrial facilities, which were correlated with both metal concentrations and soil toxicity. Results indicated that all metal concentrations (except Be and Hg) in Area C were significantly greater than those in Areas A and B (p< or =0.0001) and that Area C had fewer correlations between metals suggesting more varied sources of metals than in rural areas. Area C also had a large number of facilities whose distances were significantly correlated with metals, particularly Cr (maximum r=0.33; p=0.0002), and with soil toxicity (maximum r=0.25; p=0.007) over a large spatial scale. Arsenic was not associated with distance to any facility and may have a different anthropogenic, or natural source. In contrast to Area C, both rural areas had lower concentrations of metals, lower soil toxicity, and a small number of facilities with significant associations between distance and soil metals. PMID:19155049

  4. Implementation of Home based management of malaria in children reduces the work load for peripheral health facilities in a rural district of Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Tiono, Alfred B; Kaboré, Youssouf; Traoré, Abdoulaye; Convelbo, Nathalie; Pagnoni, Franco; Sirima, Sodiomon B

    2008-01-01

    Background Home Management of Malaria (HMM) is one of the key strategies to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable population in endemic countries. It is based on the evidence that well-trained communities health workers can provide prompt and adequate care to patients close to their homes. The strategy has been shown to reduce malaria mortality and severe morbidity and has been adopted by the World Health Organization as a cornerstone of malaria control in Africa. However, the potential fall-out of this community-based strategy on the work burden at the peripheral health facilities level has never been investigated. Methods A two-arm interventional study was conducted in a rural health district of Burkina Faso. The HMM strategy has been implemented in seven community clinics catchment's area (intervention arm). For the other seven community clinics in the control arm, no HMM intervention was implemented. In each of the study arms, presumptive treatment was provided for episodes of fevers/malaria (defined operationally as malaria). The study drug was artemether-lumefantrine, which was sold at a subsidized price by community health workers/Key opinion leaders at the community level and by the pharmacists at the health facility level. The outcome measured was the proportion of malaria cases among all health facility attendance (all causes diseases) in both arms throughout the high transmission season. Results A total of 7,621 children were enrolled in the intervention arm and 7,605 in the control arm. During the study period, the proportions of malaria cases among all health facility attendance (all causes diseases) were 21.0%, (445/2,111, 95% CI [19.3%–22.7%]) and 70.7% (2,595/3,671, 95% CI 68.5%–71.5%), respectively in the intervention and control arms (p << 0.0001). The relative risk ratio for a fever/malaria episode to be treated at the HF level was 30% (0.30 < RR < 0.32). The number of malaria episodes treated in the intervention arm was much higher than in the control arm (6,661 vs. 2,595), with malaria accounting for 87.4% of all disease episodes recorded in the intervention area and for 34.1% in the control area (P < 0.0001). Of all the malaria cases treated in the intervention arm, only 6.7% were treated at the health facility level. Conclusion These findings suggest that implementation of HMM, by reducing the workload in health facilities, might contributes to an overall increase of the performance of the peripheral health facilities. PMID:18834504

  5. Vital Signs: Estimated Effects of a Coordinated Approach for Action to Reduce Antibiotic-Resistant Infections in Health Care Facilities — United States

    PubMed Central

    Slayton, Rachel B.; Toth, Damon; Lee, Bruce Y.; Tanner, Windy; Bartsch, Sarah M.; Khader, Karim; Wong, Kim; Brown, Kevin; McKinnell, James A.; Ray, William; Miller, Loren G.; Rubin, Michael; Kim, Diane S.; Adler, Fred; Cao, Chenghua; Avery, Lacey; Stone, Nathan T.B.; Kallen, Alexander; Samore, Matthew; Huang, Susan S.; Fridkin, Scott; Jernigan, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatments for health care–associated infections (HAIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile are limited, and some patients have developed untreatable infections. Evidence-supported interventions are available, but coordinated approaches to interrupt the spread of HAIs could have a greater impact on reversing the increasing incidence of these infections than independent facility-based program efforts. Methods Data from CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network and Emerging Infections Program were analyzed to project the number of health care–associated infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria or C. difficile both with and without a large scale national intervention that would include interrupting transmission and improved antibiotic stewardship. As an example, the impact of reducing transmission of one antibiotic-resistant infection (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae [CRE]) on cumulative prevalence and number of HAI transmission events within interconnected groups of health care facilities was modeled using two distinct approaches, a large scale and a smaller scale health care network. Results Immediate nationwide infection control and antibiotic stewardship interventions, over 5 years, could avert an estimated 619,000 HAIs resulting from CRE, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), or C. difficile. Compared with independent efforts, a coordinated response to prevent CRE spread across a group of inter-connected health care facilities resulted in a cumulative 74% reduction in acquisitions over 5 years in a 10-facility network model, and 55% reduction over 15 years in a 102-facility network model. Conclusions With effective action now, more than half a million antibiotic-resistant health care–associated infections could be prevented over 5 years. Models representing both large and small groups of interconnected health care facilities illustrate that a coordinated approach to interrupting transmission is more effective than historical independent facility-based efforts. Implications for Public Health Public health–led coordinated prevention approaches have the potential to more completely address the emergence and dissemination of these antibiotic-resistant organisms and C. difficile than independent facility–based efforts. PMID:26247436

  6. Measuring client satisfaction and the quality of family planning services: A comparative analysis of public and private health facilities in Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Public and private family planning providers face different incentive structures, which may affect overall quality and ultimately the acceptability of family planning for their intended clients. This analysis seeks to quantify differences in the quality of family planning (FP) services at public and private providers in three representative sub-Saharan African countries (Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana), to assess how these quality differentials impact upon FP clients' satisfaction, and to suggest how quality improvements can improve contraceptive continuation rates. Methods Indices of technical, structural and process measures of quality are constructed from Service Provision Assessments (SPAs) conducted in Tanzania (2006), Kenya (2004) and Ghana (2002) using direct observation of facility attributes and client-provider interactions. Marginal effects from multivariate regressions controlling for client characteristics and the multi-stage cluster sample design assess the relative importance of different measures of structural and process quality at public and private facilities on client satisfaction. Results Private health facilities appear to be of higher (interpersonal) process quality than public facilities but not necessarily higher technical quality in the three countries, though these differentials are considerably larger at lower level facilities (clinics, health centers, dispensaries) than at hospitals. Family planning client satisfaction, however, appears considerably higher at private facilities - both hospitals and clinics - most likely attributable to both process and structural factors such as shorter waiting times and fewer stockouts of methods and supplies. Conclusions Because the public sector represents the major source of family planning services in developing countries, governments and Ministries of Health should continue to implement and to encourage incentives, perhaps performance-based, to improve quality at public sector health facilities, as well as to strengthen regulatory and monitoring structures to ensure quality at both public and private facilities. In the meantime, private providers appear to be fulfilling an important gap in the provision of FP services in these countries. PMID:21864335

  7. Knowledge and Practice of Clinicians regarding Syndromic Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Public Health Facilities of Gamo Gofa Zone, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alemayehu, Addisu; Godana, Wanzahun

    2015-01-01

    Background. Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are the leading causes of morbidity among young adults. This study assessed the knowledge and practice of clinicians regarding syndromic management of STIs in public health facilities of Gamo Gofa Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study with mixed methods of data collection was conducted in public health facilities of Gamo Gofa Zone. The study included 250 clinicians and 12 health facilities, 26 mystery clients were hired, and 120 STI patient cards were reviewed. Data was entered in EPI info version 7.0.1 and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results. Of the participated clinicians, 32 (12.8%) were trained on syndromic management of STIs. Highest knowledge of clinicians was for urethral discharge (27.2%). Professional category of clinicians and type of health facility (AOR = 0.194; 95% CI = 0.092, 0.412) were determinants of urethral discharge knowledge. Of the cards reviewed, only in 8.3% of cards and 19.23% of mystery clients did the clinicians correctly follow the guideline. Conclusion. Knowledge and practice of clinicians regarding syndromic management of STIs in study area were poor. Efforts should be made to increase the knowledge of clinicians by providing training on syndromic management of STIs and supportive supervision should be regular. PMID:26605102

  8. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  9. A hospital-based estimate of major causes of death among under-five children from a health facility in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria: possible indicators of health inequality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Current evidence on the root-causes of deaths among children younger than 5years is critical to direct international efforts to improve child survival, focus on health promotion and achieve Millennium Development Goal 4. We report a hospital-based estimate for 2005-2007 of the major causes of death in children in this age-group in south-west Nigeria. Methods We used retrospective data from the intensive care unit of a second-tier health facility to extract the presenting complaints, clinical diagnosis, treatment courses, prognosis and outcome among children aged 6—59months. SPSS-19 was used for data analysis. Results Of the 301 children (58% males, 42% females) admitted into the ICU within the period of study, 173 (26%) presented with complaints related to the gastrointestinal system, 138 (21%) with respiratory symptoms and 196 (29%) with complaints of fever. Overall, 708 investigations were requested for among which were full blood count (215, 30%) and blood slides for malaria parasite (166, 23%). Infection ranked highest (181, 31%) in clinicians’ diagnosis, followed by haematological health problems (109, 19%) and respiratory illnesses (101, 17%). There were negative correlations between outcome of the illness and patient’s weight (r=-0.195, p=0.001) and a strong positive correlation between prognosis and outcome of admission (r=0.196, p=0.001). Of the 59 (20%) children that died, presentation of respiratory tract illnesses were significantly higher in females (75%) than in males (39%) (?²=7.06; p=0.008) and diagnoses related to gastrointestinal pathology were significantly higher in males (18%) than in females (0%) (?²=4.07; p=0.05). Majority of the deaths (21%) occurred among children aged 1.0 to 1.9years old and among weight group of 5.1-15.0kg. Conclusion The major causes of deaths among under-five years old originate from respiratory, gastrointestinal and infectious diseases – diseases that were recognized as major causes of childhood mortality about half a century earlier. Realization of MDG4 - to reduce child mortality by two-thirds – is only possible if the government and donor agencies look beyond the health sector to find hidden causative factors such as education and housing and within the health sector such as vibrant maternal, new-born, and child health interventions. PMID:22873746

  10. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  11. An overview of the space medicine program and development of the Health Maintenance Facility for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam Lee

    1988-01-01

    Because the prolonged stay on board the Space Station will increase the risk of possible inflight medical problems from that on Skylab missions, the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) planned for the Space Station is much more sophisticated than the small clinics of the Skylab missions. The development of the HMF is directed by the consideration of three primary factors: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries and illnesses that may occur in flight. The major components of the HMF include the clinical laboratory, pharmacy, imaging system, critical-care system, patient-restraint system, data-management system, exercise system, surgical system, electrophysiologic-monitoring system, introvenous-fluid system, dental system, and hyperbaric-treatment-support system.

  12. South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control federal facility agreement. Annual progress report, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hucks, R.L.

    1996-01-30

    South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) reviewed 105 primary documents during fiscal year 1995 (October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995). The primary documents reviewed consisted of 27 RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) workplans, 13 RFI/RI Reports, 12 Baseline Risk Assessments (BRA`s), 27 Site Evaluation (SE) Reports, 8 Proposed Plans, 5 Record of Decisions (ROD`s), 6 Remedial Design Workplans, 6 Remedial Action Workplans and 10 miscellaneous primary documents. Numerous other administrative duties were conducted during the reporting period that are not accounted for above. These included, but were not limited to, extension requests, monitoring well approvals, and Treatability Studies. The list of outgoing correspondence from SCDHEC to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is attached.

  13. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in US Correctional Facilities: A Review of Diagnosis, Management, and Public Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Altice, Frederick L.

    2009-01-01

    Among the blood-borne chronic viral infections, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one that is not only treatable but also preventable by provision of vaccination. Despite the availability of HBV vaccine for the last 15 years, more than 1.25 million individuals in the USA have chronic HBV infection, and about 5,000 die each year from HBV-related complications. From a societal perspective, access to treatment of chronic viral infections, like HIV and viral hepatitis, is highly cost-effective and has lasting benefits by reducing risk behaviors, morbidity, mortality, as well as disease transmission in the community. Individuals in correctional facilities are specially predisposed to such chronic viral infections because of their high-risk behaviors. The explosion of incarceration in the USA over the last few decades and the disproportionate burden of morbidity and mortality from chronic infections among the incarcerated have put incredible strains on an overcrowded system that was not originally designed to provide comprehensive medical care for chronic illnesses. Recently, there has been a call to address medical care for individuals with chronic medical conditions in correctional settings, including those with infectious diseases. The economic and public health burden of chronic hepatitis B and its sequelae, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is felt most prominently in managed care settings with limited budgets, like correctional facilities. Prevalence of HBV infection among the incarcerated in the USA is fivefold that of the general population. We present a review of diagnosis, prevention, and the recently streamlined treatment guidelines for management of HBV infection in correctional settings, and discuss the implications and public health impact of these measures. PMID:19184447

  14. In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

  15. Automated follow-up facilities in Canada for monitoring delayed health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M E; Newcombe, H B

    1980-01-01

    Increased public awareness of the possible presence of carcinogens and other potentially harmful agents in the workplace and in other areas of the environment has created a demand for studies to determine the extent of the risks associated with exposure to such agents. These studies require large numbers of individuals in various "control" populations to be followed-up over long periods of time. Such large-scale follow-up can be greatly facilitated where information on all deaths and on cases of serious morbidity is accumulated centrally, for a whole country, in a form that permits rapid searching by computer and in which individuals are well enough identified to minimize the possibility of mistaken identity. The Canadian Mortality Data Base and the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System are two such centralized follow-up facilities which have been developed in Canada. We describe here the manner in which these files are used, the problems encountered, and their solutions. PMID:7435743

  16. Health impact assessment of waste management facilities in three European countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Policies on waste disposal in Europe are heterogeneous and rapidly changing, with potential health implications that are largely unknown. We conducted a health impact assessment of landfilling and incineration in three European countries: Italy, Slovakia and England. Methods A total of 49 (Italy), 2 (Slovakia), and 11 (England) incinerators were operating in 2001 while for landfills the figures were 619, 121 and 232, respectively. The study population consisted of residents living within 3 km of an incinerator and 2 km of a landfill. Excess risk estimates from epidemiological studies were used, combined with air pollution dispersion modelling for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). For incinerators, we estimated attributable cancer incidence and years of life lost (YoLL), while for landfills we estimated attributable cases of congenital anomalies and low birth weight infants. Results About 1,000,000, 16,000, and 1,200,000 subjects lived close to incinerators in Italy, Slovakia and England, respectively. The additional contribution to NO2 levels within a 3 km radius was 0.23, 0.15, and 0.14 ?g/m3, respectively. Lower values were found for PM10. Assuming that the incinerators continue to operate until 2020, we are moderately confident that the annual number of cancer cases due to exposure in 2001-2020 will reach 11, 0, and 7 in 2020 and then decline to 0 in the three countries in 2050. We are moderately confident that by 2050, the attributable impact on the 2001 cohort of residents will be 3,621 (Italy), 37 (Slovakia) and 3,966 (England) YoLL. The total exposed population to landfills was 1,350,000, 329,000, and 1,425,000 subjects, respectively. We are moderately confident that the annual additional cases of congenital anomalies up to 2030 will be approximately 2, 2, and 3 whereas there will be 42, 13, and 59 additional low-birth weight newborns, respectively. Conclusions The current health impacts of landfilling and incineration can be characterized as moderate when compared to other sources of environmental pollution, e.g. traffic or industrial emissions, that have an impact on public health. There are several uncertainties and critical assumptions in the assessment model, but it provides insight into the relative health impact attributable to waste management. PMID:21635784

  17. Home Page

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Home Page Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  18. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures were recommended. PMID:24106574

  19. Barriers and Facilitators of Compliance with Universal Precautions at First Level Health Facilities in Northern Rural Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Yousafzai, Mohammad Tahir; Janjua, Naveed Zafar; Siddiqui, Amna Rehana; Rozi, Shafquat

    2015-01-01

    Aim We assessed the compliance at first level care facilities (FLCF) with universal precautions (UP) and its behavioral predictors using Health Belief Model (HBM). Methods A sample of FLCF from public clinic (PC), privately owned licensed practitioners’ clinic (LPC) and non-licensed practitioners’ clinic (NLPC) was obtained. Health Care Workers (HCW) who diagnose and prescribe medication was termed as Prescriber and that carries out prescriber’s order was defined Assistant. Compliance to UP was measured on 11 items Likert scale. HCW responded “always” or “often” to all items of UP were added to compute a binary variable of overall compliance. We used linear regression to assess association between HBM and UP score. Results We interviewed 485 HCW (75% prescribers) from 365 clinics; mean age 38±10.4 years. Overall, compliance to UP was 6.6%; 11.6% LPC, 5.3% PC, and 4.4% NLPC. Prescribers were less compliant than Assistants. Compliance with not recapping contaminated needle was poor (PC=32%, LPC=33%, NLPC=15%). Compliance with wearing gloves during blood or body fluid exposure was lowest (30%) at PC. Modes of transmission knowledge, self-efficacy and perceived benefits of safe practice, and susceptibility to blood borne infections were positively associated with UP score. Conclusion Higher perception of barriers and severity of blood borne infection result in lower compliance. PMID:26715918

  20. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.; Shan, C.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  1. Improving antimicrobial use among health workers in first-level facilities: results from the multi-country evaluation of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Gouws, Eleanor; Bryce, Jennifer; Habicht, Jean-Pierre; Amaral, João; Pariyo, George; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong; Fontaine, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) case management training on the use of antimicrobial drugs among health-care workers treating young children at first-level facilities. Antimicrobial drugs are an essential child-survival intervention. Ensuring that children younger than five who need these drugs receive them promptly and correctly can save their lives. Prescribing these drugs only when necessary and ensuring that those who receive them complete the full course can slow the development of antimicrobial resistance. METHODS: Data collected through observation-based surveys in randomly selected first-level health facilities in Brazil, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania were statistically analysed. The surveys were carried out as part of the multi-country evaluation of IMCI effectiveness, cost and impact (MCE). FINDINGS: Results from three MCE sites show that children receiving care from health workers trained in IMCI are significantly more likely to receive correct prescriptions for antimicrobial drugs than those receiving care from workers not trained in IMCI.They are also more likely to receive the first dose of the drug before leaving the health facility, to have their caregiver advised how to administer the drug, and to have caregivers who are able to describe correctly how to give the drug at home as they leave the health facility. CONCLUSIONS: IMCI case management training is an effective intervention to improve the rational use of antimicrobial drugs for sick children visiting first-level health facilities in low-income and middle-income countries. PMID:15508195

  2. Severe malnutrition in children presenting to health facilities in an urban slum in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, R.; Enarson, D. A.; Satyanarayana, S.; Van den Bergh, R.; Ali, E.; Alders, P.; Manzi, M.; Allaouna, M.; Draguez, B.; Delchevalerie, P.; Vernaeve, L.; Harries, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Setting: An urban slum in Kamrangirchar, Bangladesh. Objectives: Among children aged 6–59 months seeking medical care from the two Médecins Sans Frontières-supported primary health centres, to determine 1) the prevalence of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and severe chronic malnutrition (SCM), and 2) the extent of overlap between SAM and SCM. Design: In a retrospective record review, data were analysed from out-patient registers on age, sex, height, weight and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of children attending for medical care from April to September 2011. SAM was defined as weight for height < ?3 Z scores of the median and/or MUAC <115 mm. SCM was defined as height for age < ?3 Z scores of the median. World Health Organization growth standards were used as reference. Results: Data were complete in the records of 7318 (98%) children, of whom 322 (4%) had SAM and 1698 (23%) had SCM. Among the 322 children with SAM, 162 (50%) also had SCM. Conclusion: In an urban Bangladesh slum, SAM and SCM co-exist, with a predominance of SCM. The current national guidelines for severe malnutrition, which focus on identification and management only for SAM, urgently need to be expanded to include SCM if substantial childhood morbidity and mortality are to be reduced. PMID:26392966

  3. Health risks associated with ingesting venison from a uranium enrichment facility with multiple operable units

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.; Welsh, C.

    1995-12-31

    Ingestion of game, including venison, may be a significant exposure pathway in human health risk assessments at hazardous waste sites. The difficulty associated with modeling contaminant tissue concentrations in a wide-ranging herbivorous mammal is compounded when the home range of the mammal extends over multiple operable units (OUs) of varying size and media contaminant concentration. Using biotransfer factors extracted from the literature and species-specific parameter information (e.g., home range size, diet, forage and water ingestion rates) the authors estimate contaminant concentrations in venison based on soil and surface water contaminant concentrations and determine the contribution of individual OUs to modeled venison tissue concentrations. Estimated tissue concentrations are calculated through the use of site foraging factors (SFFS) that adjust exposure contributions from individual OUs to account for the size of the OU in relation to the animals home range. The authors then use the venison tissue concentrations to estimate human health risk associated with ingesting venison under both a current and future exposure scenario.

  4. Health risks for the population living in the vicinity of an Integrated Waste Management Facility: screening environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Rovira, Joaquim; Vilavert, Lolita; Nadal, Martí; Figueras, María J; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2015-06-15

    We performed a screening investigation to assess the human health risks of the Integrated Waste Management Facility (IWMF: mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant plus municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI); Ecoparc-3) of Barcelona (Spain). Air concentrations of pollutants potentially released by the MBT plant (VOCs and bioaerosols) and the MSWI (trace elements, PCDD/Fs and PCBs) were determined. Trace elements, PCDD/Fs and PCBs were also analyzed in soil samples. The concentrations of trace elements and bioaerosols were similar to those previously reported in other areas of similar characteristics, while formaldehyde was the predominant VOC. Interestingly, PCDD/F concentrations in soil and air were the highest ever reported near a MSWI in Catalonia, being maximum concentrations 10.8 ng WHO-TEQ/kg and 41.3 fg WHO-TEQ/m(3), respectively. In addition, there has not been any reduction in soils, even after the closure of a power plant located adjacently. Human health risks of PCDD/F exposure in the closest urban nucleus located downwind the MSWI are up to 10-times higher than those nearby other MSWIs in Catalonia. Although results must be considered as very preliminary, they are a serious warning for local authorities. We strongly recommend to conduct additional studies to confirm these findings and, if necessary, to implement measures to urgently mitigate the impact of the MSWI on the surrounding environment. We must also state the tremendous importance of an individual evaluation of MSWIs, rather than generalizing their environmental and health risks. PMID:25770949

  5. Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Romero, Camila X.; Aguilera, Hernán; Ahlers, Ivonne

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Methods Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957–2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. Results During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (?13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (?1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (?69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Conclusion Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion. PMID:22574194

  6. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Hong Kong's Residential Care Facilities: A Descriptive Analysis of Health and Disease Patterns by Sex, Age, and Presence of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Chi Wai

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the health status profile and identify the healthcare needs of adults with intellectual disability (ID) residing in 18 of Hong Kong's residential care facilities. The author employed a cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire survey to collect data on 811 persons with ID (432 males, 53.3%, and…

  7. The food and beverage vending environment in health care facilities participating in the healthy eating, active communities program. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  8. Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Health and safety plan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.; McKown, G.; Waugh, J.; Houser, W.; Joy, G.

    1995-09-01

    The requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1910.120(f), shall be met for all employees performing or supervising hazardous waste operations. Medical exams shall be conducted as soon as possible upon notification by an employee that he/she has developed signs or symptoms indicating possible health hazards or overexposure to hazardous substances. Subcontractor personnel shall provide documentation of current status of participation in a medical surveillance program as required by 29 CFR 1910.120(f). Subcontractors unable to provide such documentation shall have successfully completed a medical examination as described in the above referenced OSHA standard prior to beginning work in a contaminated zone. Specific protocols for medical examinations are designed by an occupational physician. Common components include: (a) medical history and physical examination; (b) dipstick urinalysis, vision screen and vital signs; (c) spirometry ;(d) audiometry; (e) blood chemistry (complete blood count, liver function, kidney function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism); (f) resting EkG (with approval); (g) chest radiograph (P/A). No project-specific medical examinations, or biological monitoring is required for this project.

  9. Factors affecting acceptance of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling services among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar Town, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abdurahman, Sami; Seyoum, Berhanu; Oljira, Lemessa; Weldegebreal, Fitsum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To improve the slow uptake of HIV counseling and testing, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) have developed draft guidelines on provider-initiated testing and counseling (PITC). Both in low- and high-income countries, mainly from outpatient clinics and tuberculosis settings, indicates that the direct offer of HIV testing by health providers can result in significant improvements in test uptake. In Ethiopia, there were limited numbers of studies conducted regarding PITC in outpatient clinics. Therefore, in this study, we have assessed the factors affecting the acceptance of PITC among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. Materials and methods Institutional-based, cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative studies were conducted from February 12–30, 2011 in selected health facilities in Harar town, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. The study participants were recruited from the selected health facilities of Harar using a systematic random sampling technique. The collected data were double entered into a data entry file using Epi Info version 3.5.1. The data were transferred to SPSS software version 16 and analyzed according to the different variables. Results A total of 362 (70.6%) clients accepted PITC, and only 39.4% of clients had heard of PITC in the outpatient department service. Age, occupation, marital status, anyone who wanted to check their HIV status, and the importance of PITC were the variables that showed significant associations with the acceptance of PITC upon bivariate and multivariate analyses. The main reasons given for not accepting the tests were self-trust, not being at risk for HIV, not being ready, needing to consult their partners, a fear of the results, a shortage of staff, a busy work environment, a lack of private rooms, and a lack of refresher training, which were identified as the main barriers for PITC. Conclusion There is evidence of the relatively increased acceptability of PITC services by outpatient department clients. A program needs to be strengthened to enhance the use of PITC; the Ministry of Health, Regional Health Bureau, and other responsible bodies – including health facilities – should design and strengthen information education and communication/behavioral change and communication interventions and promote activities related to PITC and HIV counseling and testing in both health facilities and the community at large. PMID:26028979

  10. Facilities Management Services Policy

    E-print Network

    in the facility or on the grounds. 2.2 Facilities Management Source of Funding: The budget required to maintainFacilities Management Services Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration Policy Contact: Director of Facilities Management gbowerso@mines.edu Issued: November 2009 Revised: Page

  11. Improving neonatal care in district and community health facilities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Woods, David Lawrance

    2015-08-01

    A high standard of newborn care, especially at a primary level, is needed to address the neonatal mortality rate in South Africa. The current approach to continuing training of health-care workers uses traditional methods of centralised teaching by formal tutors away from the place of work. This is no longer affordable, achievable or desirable, particularly in rural areas. An innovative system of self-directed learning by groups of nurses caring for mothers and their newborn infants uses specially prepared course books without the need for trainers. Using self-study supported by peer discussion groups, nurses can take responsibility for their own professional growth. This builds competence, confidence and a sense of pride. Since 1993, the Perinatal Education Programme has provided continuing learning opportunities for thousands of nurses in Southern Africa. A number of prospective trials have demonstrated that study groups can significantly improve knowledge and understanding, attitudes, clinical skills and quality of care provided to mothers and infants. A recent review of 10,000 successful participants across a wide range of provinces, ages and home languages documented the success of the project. Using a question-and-answer format to promote problem-solving, case studies, simple skills workshops and multiple choice tests, each module addresses common conditions with appropriate care practices such as thorough drying at birth, delayed cord-clamping, skin-to-skin care, breast feeding, basic resuscitation, correct use of oxygen therapy, hand-washing, blood glucose monitoring and promotion of parental bonding. The training material is now also available free of charge on an on-line website as well as being presented as e-books which can be downloaded onto personal computers, tablet readers and smart phones. This is supplemented by regular SMS text messages providing nurses with relevant 'knowledge bites'. All nurses caring for newborn infants now have easy, affordable access to continuing education which promises nationwide improvements in newborn care. PMID:25948148

  12. Environment, safety, health at DOE Facilities. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy's occupational safety and property protection performance in fiscal year 1980 was excellent in all reported categories with loss rates generally less than one-third of comparable industry figures. The Department of Energy's fiscal year 1980 incidence rate per 200,000 work hours was 1.1 lost workday cases and 18.2 lost workdays compared to 1.1 lost workday cases and 17.2 lost workdays during fiscal year 1979. The recorded occupational illness rate, based on only 70 cases, was 0.05 cases per 200,000 work hours compared to 0.06 cases per 200,000 work hours for fiscal year 1979. Ten fatalities involving Federal or contractor employees occurred in fiscal year 1980 compared to nine for fiscal year 1979. Four of those in fiscal year 1980 resulted from two aircraft accidents. Total reported property loss during fiscal year 1980 was $7.1 million with $3.5 million attributable to earthquake damage sustained by the Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories on January 24, 1980. A total of 131 million vehicle miles of official vehicular travel during fiscal year 1980 resulted in 768 accidents and $535,145 in property damages. The 104,986 monitored Department of Energy and Department of Energy contractor employees received a total dose of 9040 REM in calendar year 1979. Both the total dose and the 1748 employees receiving radiation exposures greater than 1 REM in 1979 represent a continuing downward trend from the calendar year 1978 total dose of 9380 REM and the 1826 employees who received radiation exposures greater than 1 REM. The fifty-nine appraisals conducted indicate that generally adequate plans have been developed and effective organizational structures have been established to carry out the Department of Energy's Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection (ES and H) Program.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Health Care Waste Treatment Facilities in Iran Hospitals; a Provider Perspective

    PubMed Central

    RASHIDIAN, Arash; ALINIA, Cyrus; MAJDZADEH, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to make right and informative decision about choosing the most cost-effectiveness heterogeneous infectious waste treatment methods and devices. Methods: In this descriptive study, decision tree analysis, with 10-yr time horizon in bottom-up approach was used to estimate the costs and effectiveness criteria of the employed devices at provider perspective in Iranian hospitals. We used the one-way and scenario sensitivity analysis to measure the effects of variables with uncertainty. The resources of data were national Environmental and Occupational Health Center Survey (EOHCS) in 2012, field observation and completing questionnaire by relevant authorities in mentioned centers. Results: Devices called Saray 2, Autoclave based, and Newster 10, Hydroclave based, with 92032.4 (±12005) and 6786322.9 (±826453) Dollars had the lowest and highest costs respectively in studied time period and given the 5–10% discount rate. Depending on effectiveness factor type, Newster 10 with Ecodas products and Saray products respectively had the highest and lowest effectiveness. In most considered scenarios, Caspian-Alborz device was the most cost-effectiveness alternative, so for the treatment of each adjusted unit of volume and weight of infectious waste in a 10 year period and in different conditions, between 39.4 (±5.1) to 915 (±111.4) dollars must be spent. Conclusion: The findings indicate the inefficiency and waste of resources, so in order to efficient resource allocation and to encourage further cost containment in infectious waste management we introduce policy recommendation that be taken in three levels. PMID:25905078

  14. Periodontal conditions, low birth weight and preterm birth among postpartum mothers in two tertiary health facilities in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Literature reports have indicated an increase in research evidence suggesting association between periodontal disease and the risk of pre-term birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). Periodontal diseases in Uganda have been documented as a public health problem, but their association to adverse pregnancy outcomes is unknown. This study was conducted to assess the association between periodontital diseases in postpartum mothers and PTB and LBW of babies in Mulago and Mbarara referral hospitals. Methods This was a cross sectional study using medical records, clinical examination and oral interview of mothers at the two tertiary health facilities. Mothers with singleton babies from Mulago (n?=?300) and Mbarara Hospital (n?=?100) were recruited for the study. The women were clinically examined for periodontal disease by 2 trained and calibrated dentists. Data on PTB and LBW were retrieved from medical records. The data were analyzed to determine the relationship between the four parameters for periodontal disease (bleeding gingiva, periodontal pockets, gingival recession and calculus with plaque deposits) and the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Frequency distribution was used to describe the data. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to study the association between the periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Results Approximately 26% and 29% of the postpartum mothers examined had bleeding gingiva and periodontal pockets of 4 mm or more deep, respectively. Advanced periodontitis i.e. pocket depth???6 mm was recorded in 13 (3.6%) of the mothers. Calculus with plaque deposits were recorded in 86% (n?=?343) of the mothers. Gingival recession was recorded in 9.0% of the mothers and significantly and directly related to birth weight (p?

  15. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  16. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Council on Education for Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Between 1945-1973, the American Public Health Association (APHA), a membership organization for public professionals, accredited graduate programs in public health. In 1974, the APHA and the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), a national association representing deans, faculty, and students of accredited schools of public health,…

  17. Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover among Nurses in Sidama Zone Public Health Facilities, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belachew, Tefera; Yimam, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Workplace turnover is destructive to nursing and patient outcomes as it leads to losing competent and qualified nurses. However, developments of coping strategies demand a clear understanding of workplace variables that either motivate nurses to remain employed or lead them to leave their current jobs. Objective. This study was designed toassess factors influencing job satisfaction and intention to turnover among nurses in Sidama zone public health facilities, in Southern Ethiopia. Method. Cross-sectional study design was carried out on 278 nurses using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods from May 12 to June 05, 2010. Result. A total of 242 nurses were interviewed giving a response rate of 87%. Nearly two-third (68.6%) of the participants were female, and the mean age was 28 (±6.27) years for both sexes. All job satisfaction subscale except benefit and salary subscale were significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Satisfactions with work environment and group cohesion (AOR: 0.25 [95% CI: 0.12, 0.51]), single cohesion (AOR: 2.56 [95% CI: 1.27, 5.13]), and working in hospital (AOR: 2.19 [95% CI: 1.12, 4.30]) were the final significant predictors of anticipated turnover of Sidama zone nurses. Conclusions. More than any factors managers should consider the modification of working environment and group cohesions rather than trying to modify nurses to retain and maintain more experienced nurses for the organizations. PMID:24707397

  18. Europe sees mixed results from public-private partnerships for building and managing health care facilities and services.

    PubMed

    Barlow, James; Roehrich, Jens; Wright, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Prompted in part by constrained national budgets, European governments are increasingly partnering with the private sector to underwrite the costs of constructing and operating public hospitals and other health care facilities and delivering services. Through such public-private partnerships, governments hope to avoid up-front capital expenditure and to harness private-sector efficiencies, while private-sector partners aim for a return on investment. Our research indicates that to date, experience with these partnerships has been mixed. Early models of these partnerships-for example, in which a private firm builds a hospital and carries out building maintenance, which we term an "accommodation-only" model-arguably have not met expectations for achieving greater efficiencies at lower costs. Newer models described in this article offer greater opportunities for efficiency gains but are administratively harder to set up and manage. Given the shortages in public capital for new infrastructure, it seems likely that the attractiveness of these partnerships to European governments will grow. PMID:23297282

  19. Educational needs of health care providers working in long-term care facilities with regard to pain management

    PubMed Central

    Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Tousignant, Michel; Lussier, David; Lebel, Paule; Savoie, Maryse; Lalonde, Lyne; Choinière, Manon

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chronic pain ranges from 40% to 80% in long-term care facilities (LTCF), with the highest proportion being found among older adults and residents with dementia. Unfortunately, pain in older adults is underdiagnosed, undertreated, inadequately treated or not treated at all. A solution to this problem would be to provide effective and innovative interdisciplinary continuing education to health care providers (HCPs). OBJECTIVE: To identify the educational needs of HCPs working in LTCF with regard to pain management. METHODS: A qualitative research design using the nominal group technique was undertaken. Seventy-two HCPs (21 physicians/pharmacists, 15 occupational/physical therapists, 24 nurses and 21 orderlies) were recruited from three LTCF in Quebec. Each participant was asked to provide and prioritize a list of the most important topics to be addressed within a continuing education program on chronic pain management in LTCF. RESULTS: Forty topics were generated across all groups, and six specific topics were common to at least three out of the four HCP groups. Educational need in pain assessment was ranked the highest by all groups. Other highly rated topics included pharmacological treatment of pain, pain neurophysiology, nonpharmacological treatments and how to distinguish pain expression from other behaviours. CONCLUSION: The present study showed that despite an average of more than 10 years of work experience in LTCF, HCPs have significant educational needs in pain management, especially pain assessment. These results will help in the development of a comprehensive pain management educational program for HCPs in LTCF. PMID:23061085

  20. Recovery in the health of fish populations and communities following remedial activities at a bleached kraft mill facility

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Adams, S.M.; Saylor, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    Fish populations and communities were studied over a seven year period in a river receiving bleached kraft mill effluent (BKME). The period of these investigations preceded and accompanied the extensive modernization of mill facilities and the implementation of design changes to reduce contaminant discharges and minimize impacts on the river ecology. Before modernization, reaches of the river downstream of the discharges were characterized by depauperate fish communities and severely skewed population distributions. The relative condition of both individual fish and fish populations in the river prior to remediation was consistent with effects frequently attributed to exposure to endocrine disrupting agents, including a sex ratio strongly skewed towards male fish, alterations in reproductive hormone levels, pronounced atresia of the developing oocytes in female fish, and a general absence of young fish suggesting near total reproductive failure in a sentinel fish population. Following modernization, sex ratios have trended towards normality, young fish have returned to the mainstream river, and fish communities have become more diverse coincident with corresponding decreases in body burdens of dioxin and other indirect indicators of contaminant exposure, including liver detoxification enzyme activity. The significance of these studies lie in the establishment of distinct links between both: (1) the exposure of individual wild fish to BKME and alterations in fish population and community structure, and (2) the implementation of process changes in a mill producing BKME and noticeable improvements in fish health from the individual to community levels of biological organization.

  1. 'I was raped by Santa Claus': responding to disclosures of sexual assault in mental health inpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Toni; Spangaro, Jo; McNamara, Lorna

    2015-04-01

    Sexual violence is significantly higher among those with mental illness than the rest of the population. The risk of sexual violence posed to patients during inpatient admissions is now also beginning to be recognized, but remains a challenging area of practice. This paper introduces a trauma-informed care approach for responding to disclosures of sexual violence by people with serious mental illness, taking into account the complexities of caring for individuals who might be unable to provide coherent accounts of assaults and/or who might be experiencing varying degrees of psychosis. A framework for understanding and responding to disclosures of sexual violence that occur in mental health facilities is described, recognizing that such disclosures take many forms, including plausible and implausible accounts of recent sexual violence, as well as disclosures of past abuse triggered by current traumatic experiences. Illustrated by case studies, the practice implications for each type of disclosure described in the framework are explored in relation to investigation, care planning, and prevention. PMID:25582409

  2. Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Services Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the drug and ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

  3. Systematic review of facility-based sexual and reproductive health services for female sex workers in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several biological, behavioural, and structural risk factors place female sex workers (FSWs) at heightened risk of HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and other adverse sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes. FSW projects in many settings have demonstrated effective ways of altering this risk, improving the health and wellbeing of these women. Yet the optimum delivery model of FSW projects in Africa is unclear. This systematic review describes intervention packages, service-delivery models, and extent of government involvement in these services in Africa. Methods On 22 November 2012, we searched Web of Science and MEDLINE, without date restrictions, for studies describing clinical and non-clinical facility-based SRH prevention and care services for FSWs in low- and middle-income countries in Africa. We also identified articles in key non-indexed journals and on websites of international organizations. A single reviewer screened titles and abstracts, and extracted data from articles using standardised tools. Results We located 149 articles, which described 54 projects. Most were localised and small-scale; focused on research activities (rather than on large-scale service delivery); operated with little coordination, either nationally or regionally; and had scanty government support (instead a range of international donors generally funded services). Almost all sites only addressed HIV prevention and STIs. Most services distributed male condoms, but only 10% provided female condoms. HIV services mainly encompassed HIV counselling and testing; few offered HIV care and treatment such as CD4 testing or antiretroviral therapy (ART). While STI services were more comprehensive, periodic presumptive treatment was only provided in 11 instances. Services often ignored broader SRH needs such as family planning, cervical cancer screening, and gender-based violence services. Conclusions Sex work programmes in Africa have limited coverage and a narrow scope of services and are poorly coordinated with broader HIV and SRH services. To improve FSWs’ health and reduce onward HIV transmission, access to ART needs to be addressed urgently. Nevertheless, HIV prevention should remain the mainstay of services. Service delivery models that integrate broader SRH services and address structural risk factors are much needed. Government-led FSW services of high quality and scale would markedly reduce SRH vulnerabilities of FSWs in Africa. PMID:24916010

  4. Crises and Resilience at the Frontline—Public Health Facility Managers under Devolution in a Sub-County on the Kenyan Coast

    PubMed Central

    Nyikuri, Mary; Tsofa, Benjamin; Barasa, Edwine; Okoth, Philip; Molyneux, Sassy

    2015-01-01

    Background Public primary health care (PHC) facilities are for many individuals the first point of contact with the formal health care system. These facilities are managed by professional nurses or clinical officers who are recognised to play a key role in implementing health sector reforms and facilitating initiatives aimed at strengthening community involvement. Little in-depth research exists about the dimensions and challenges of these managers’ jobs, or on the impact of decentralisation on their roles and responsibilities. In this paper, we describe the roles and responsibilities of PHC managers–or ‘in-charges’ in Kenya, and their challenges and coping strategies, under accelerated devolution. Methods The data presented in this paper is part of a wider set of activities aimed at understanding governance changes under devolution in Kenya, under the umbrella of a ‘learning site’. A learning site is a long term process of collaboration between health managers and researchers deciding together on key health system questions and interventions. Data were collected through seven formal in depth interviews and observations at four PHC facilities as well as eight in depth interviews and informal interactions with sub-county managers from June 2013 to July 2014. Drawing on the Aragon framework of organisation capacity we discuss the multiple accountabilities, daily routines, challenges and coping strategies among PHC facility managers. Results PHC in-charges perform complex and diverse roles in a difficult environment with relatively little formal preparation. Their key concerns are lack of job clarity and preparedness, the difficulty of balancing multidirectional accountability responsibilities amidst significant resource shortages, and remuneration anxieties. We show that day-to-day management in an environment of resource constraints and uncertainty requires PHC in-charges who are resilient, reflective, and continuously able to learn and adapt. We highlight the importance of leadership development including the building of critical soft skills such as relationship building. PMID:26696096

  5. Parent and Health Care Professional Perspectives on Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We on the Same Page?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellin, Melissa H.; Osteen, Philip; Heffernan, Caitlin; Levy, Judy M.; Snyder-Vogel, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    A family-centered approach to health care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) is widely acknowledged as the ideal model of service delivery, but less is known about the actual practice of family-centered care (FCC), especially from the viewpoints of parents and health care professionals. This cross-sectional research compared…

  6. Respectful maternity care in three health facilities in Burkina Faso: the experience of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, Ali; Kiemtoré, Sibraogo; Zamané, Hyacinthe; Bonané, Blandine T; Akotionga, Michel; Lankoande, Jean

    2014-10-01

    The Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Burkina Faso (SOGOB) conducted a project to reinforce skills in respectful maternity care among its members and health workers at three facilities. The participatory process allowed health workers to self-diagnose quality of care, recognize their own responsibility, propose solutions, and pledge respectful care commitments that were specific for each unit. Key commitments included good reception; humanistic clinical examination; attentive listening and responsiveness to patient needs; privacy, discretion, and confidentiality; availability; and comfort. These commitments can potentially be modified after each evaluation by SOGOB. Poor working conditions were found to negatively impact on quality of care. High staff turnover, frequent technical malfunctions, and inadequate infrastructure were identified as issues that require future focus to ensure improvements in quality of care are sustainable. Programs that aim to improve the maternity experience by linking good practice with humanistic care merit rollout to all healthcare facilities in Burkina Faso. PMID:25087176

  7. Last updated: August 21, 2013 Page 1 CUNY's Procedures for Complying with 2011 Public Health Service (PHS)

    E-print Network

    Artemov, Sergei N.

    (BARDA) - Office of Global Affairs (OGA) - Substance Abuse & Mental Health with 2011 Public Health Service (PHS) Regulations: Responsibility of Applicants for Promoting Objectivity in Research for which PHS Funding is Sought (42 CFR 50

  8. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  9. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  10. Comparing the knowledge, attitude and practices of health care workers in public and private primary care facilities in Lagos State on Ebola virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Bilqisu Jibril; Inem, Victor; Balogun, Mobolanle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The West African sub-region is currently witnessing an outbreak of EVD that began in December 2013. The first case in Nigeria was diagnosed in Lagos, at a private medical facility in July 2014. Health care workers are known amplifiers of the disease. The study aimed to determine and compare EVD knowledge, attitude and practices among HCWs in public and private primary care facilities in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods This was a comparative cross-sectional study. Seventeen public and private primary care facilities were selected from the 3 senatorial districts that make up Lagos State. 388 respondents from these facilities were selected at random and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results Proportion of respondents with good knowledge and practice among public HCWs was 98.5% and 93.8%; and among private HCW, 95.9% and 89.7%. Proportion of respondents with positive attitude was 67% (public) and 72.7% (private). Overall, there were no statistically significant differences between the knowledge, attitude and preventive practices of public HCWs and that of private HCWs, (p?0.05). Conclusion Timely and intense social mobilization and awareness campaigns are the best tools to educate all segments of the community about public health emergencies. There exists significant surmountable gaps in EVD knowledge, negative attitude and sub-standard preventive practices that can be eliminated through continued training of HCW and provision of adequate material resources.

  11. The electronic version is the official version of this policy. Page 1 of 4 Occupational Health and Safety Policy

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    of this policy is to: a) define the roles and responsibilities for occupational health and safety within" means the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code (as amended from time to time). c) "Contractor" means the Occupational Health and Safety Act of Alberta (as amended from time to time). g) "OHSMS" means

  12. Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories. -1910.1450 Page 1 of 14 Occupational Safety & Health Administration

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    : 1910 · Part Title: Occupational Safety and Health Standards · Subpart: Z · Subpart Title: Toxic Secretary means the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department Safety & Health Administration www.osha.gov MyOSHA | U.S. Department of Labor [skip navigational links

  13. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  14. 2-75 Page 1 of 4 Revised 7/12/12

    E-print Network

    /12/12 The Environmental Health and Safety Department is responsible for the following: Lead Hazard Awareness Training2-75 Page 1 of 4 Revised 7/12/12 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Environmental Program: Lead Paint Purpose/General Discussion: Some facilities and equipment at the Colorado School of Mines have surfaces

  15. Child Mortality after Discharge from a Health Facility following Suspected Pneumonia, Meningitis or Septicaemia in Rural Gambia: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Aakash Varun; Hill, Philip C.; Jafali, James; Jasseh, Momodou; Hossain, Mohammad Ilias; Ndiaye, Malick; Pathirana, Jayani C.; Greenwood, Brian; Mackenzie, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure mortality and its risk factors among children discharged from a health centre in rural Gambia. Methods We conducted a cohort study between 12 May 2008 and 11 May 2012. Children aged 2–59 months, admitted with suspected pneumonia, sepsis, or meningitis after presenting to primary and secondary care facilities, were followed for 180 days after discharge. We developed models associating post-discharge mortality with clinical syndrome on admission and clinical risk factors. Findings One hundred and five of 3755 (2.8%) children died, 80% within 3 months of discharge. Among children aged 2–11 and 12–59 months, there were 30 and 29 deaths per 1000 children per 180 days respectively, compared to 11 and 5 respectively in the resident population. Children with suspected pneumonia unaccompanied by clinically severe malnutrition (CSM) had the lowest risk of post-discharge mortality. Mortality increased in children with suspected meningitis or septicaemia without CSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6 and 2.2 respectively). The risk of mortality greatly increased with CSM on admission: CSM with suspected pneumonia (HR 8.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4 to 15), suspected sepsis (HR 18.4; 95% CI 11.3 to 30), or suspected meningitis (HR 13.7; 95% CI 4.2 to 45). Independent associations with mortality were: mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of 11.5–13.0 cm compared to >13.0 cm (HR 7.2; 95% CI 3.0 to 17.0), MUAC 10.5–11.4 cm (HR 24; 95% CI 9.4 to 62), and MUAC <10.5 cm (HR 44; 95% CI 18 to 108), neck stiffness (HR 10.4; 95% CI 3.1 to 34.8), non-medical discharge (HR 4.7; 95% CI 2.0 to 10.9), dry season discharge (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), while greater haemoglobin (HR 0.82; 0.73 to 0.91), axillary temperature (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.58 to 0.87), and oxygen saturation (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.99) were associated with reduced mortality. Conclusion Gambian children experience increased mortality after discharge from primary and secondary care. Interventions should target both moderately and severely malnourished children. PMID:26353110

  16. Prevalence and determinants of caesarean section in private and public health facilities in underserved South Asian communities: cross-sectional analysis of data from Bangladesh, India and Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Melissa; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Osrin, David; More, Neena Shah; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Sikorski, Catherine; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Colbourn, Tim; Houweling, Tanja A J; Seward, Nadine; Manandhar, Dharma S; Shrestha, Bhim P; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and determinants of births by caesarean section in private and public health facilities in underserved communities in South Asia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 81 community-based geographical clusters in four locations in Bangladesh, India and Nepal (three rural, one urban). Participants 45?327 births occurring in the study areas between 2005 and 2012. Outcome measures Proportion of caesarean section deliveries by location and type of facility; determinants of caesarean section delivery by location. Results Institutional delivery rates varied widely between settings, from 21% in rural India to 90% in urban India. The proportion of private and charitable facility births delivered by caesarean section was 73% in Bangladesh, 30% in rural Nepal, 18% in urban India and 5% in rural India. The odds of caesarean section were greater in private and charitable health facilities than in public facilities in three of four study locations, even when adjusted for pregnancy and delivery characteristics, maternal characteristics and year of delivery (Bangladesh: adjusted OR (AOR) 5.91, 95% CI 5.15 to 6.78; Nepal: AOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.62 to 3.44; urban India: AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.38). We found that highly educated women were particularly likely to deliver by caesarean in private facilities in urban India (AOR 2.10; 95% CI 1.61 to 2.75) and also in rural Bangladesh (AOR 11.09, 95% CI 6.28 to 19.57). Conclusions Our results lend support to the hypothesis that increased caesarean section rates in these South Asian countries may be driven in part by the private sector. They also suggest that preferences for caesarean delivery may be higher among highly educated women, and that individual-level and provider-level factors interact in driving caesarean rates higher. Rates of caesarean section in the private sector, and their maternal and neonatal health outcomes, require close monitoring. PMID:25550293

  17. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume III, facilities and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This is the third in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume M is to describe record series pertaining to facilities and equipment at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of facilities and equipment practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to facilities and equipment policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, production and materials handling, workplace and environmental monitoring, employee health, and waste management. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  18. 10/17/2006 04:25 PMOccupational Health & Safety -The National Magazine for Safety, Ergonomic, and Occupational Health Professionals Page 1 of 3http://www.ohsonline.com/Stevens/OHSPub.nsf/frame?open&redirect...e8625670c006dbc58/5b592c418518c7ba862571e00048

    E-print Network

    Siegelmann , Hava T

    & Safety - The National Magazine for Safety, Ergonomic, and Occupational Health Professionals Page 2 of 310/17/2006 04:25 PMOccupational Health & Safety - The National Magazine for Safety, Ergonomic, and Occupational Health Professionals Page 1 of 3http://www

  19. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...action and fraud and abuse prevention activities; (2) Evaluate cases that have been identified as deviating from the QIO norms and criteria, or standards; and (3) Evaluate the capability of the facility to perform quality review functions...

  20. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...action and fraud and abuse prevention activities; (2) Evaluate cases that have been identified as deviating from the QIO norms and criteria, or standards; and (3) Evaluate the capability of the facility to perform quality review functions...

  1. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...action and fraud and abuse prevention activities; (2) Evaluate cases that have been identified as deviating from the QIO norms and criteria, or standards; and (3) Evaluate the capability of the facility to perform quality review functions...

  2. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...action and fraud and abuse prevention activities; (2) Evaluate cases that have been identified as deviating from the QIO norms and criteria, or standards; and (3) Evaluate the capability of the facility to perform quality review functions...

  3. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...action and fraud and abuse prevention activities; (2) Evaluate cases that have been identified as deviating from the QIO norms and criteria, or standards; and (3) Evaluate the capability of the facility to perform quality review functions...

  4. Health Intervention Research: Understanding Research Design & Methods Sidani Souraya Health Intervention Research: Understanding Research Design & Methods 264 pages £26.99 Sage 9781446256176 1446256170 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2015-11-25

    This book describes the rationale of different research designs and methods clearly and simply, and then examines their effectiveness in the context of health intervention. The practical descriptions for implementing different research methods are also helpful. PMID:26602665

  5. Set home page Bookmark site Add search Latest News Browse Topics Encyclopedia Health Center Videos Amazon Store

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    > Fossils & Ruins Science Topics > Agriculture > Astronomy > Biology > Chemistry > Earth Sciences > Mind & Brain > Plants & Animals > Space & Time > Earth & Climate > Matter & Energy > Computers & Math > Environment > Mathematics > Physics > Social Sciences > Technology > more topics Health Topics > Aging

  6. CHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Population and Public Health PPH Competencies Revised June 2015 --Page 1 of 5

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    as the science and art of promoting health, preventing disease, prolonging life and improving quality of life of physical and social environments with genetic predispositions, over the life-course, at both individual

  7. A brief, standardized tool for measuring HIV-related stigma among health facility staff: results of field testing in China, Dominica, Egypt, Kenya, Puerto Rico and St. Christopher & Nevis

    PubMed Central

    Nyblade, Laura; Jain, Aparna; Benkirane, Manal; Li, Li; Lohiniva, Anna-Leena; McLean, Roger; Turan, Janet M; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska; Guan, Jihui; Kwena, Zachary; Thomas, Wendell

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Within healthcare settings, HIV-related stigma is a recognized barrier to access of HIV prevention and treatment services and yet, few efforts have been made to scale-up stigma reduction programs in service delivery. This is in part due to the lack of a brief, simple, standardized tool for measuring stigma among all levels of health facility staff that works across diverse HIV prevalence, language and healthcare settings. In response, an international consortium led by the Health Policy Project, has developed and field tested a stigma measurement tool for use with health facility staff. Methods Experts participated in a content-development workshop to review an item pool of existing measures, identify gaps and prioritize questions. The resulting questionnaire was field tested in six diverse sites (China, Dominica, Egypt, Kenya, Puerto Rico and St. Christopher & Nevis). Respondents included clinical and non-clinical staff. Questionnaires were self- or interviewer-administered. Analysis of item performance across sites examined both psychometric properties and contextual issues. Results The key outcome of the process was a substantially reduced questionnaire. Eighteen core questions measure three programmatically actionable drivers of stigma within health facilities (worry about HIV transmission, attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLHIV), and health facility environment, including policies), and enacted stigma. The questionnaire also includes one short scale for attitudes towards PLHIV (5-item scale, ? = 0.78). Conclusions Stigma-reduction programmes in healthcare facilities are urgently needed to improve the quality of care provided, uphold the human right to healthcare, increase access to health services, and maximize investments in HIV prevention and treatment. This brief, standardized tool will facilitate inclusion of stigma measurement in research studies and in routine facility data collection, allowing for the monitoring of stigma within healthcare facilities and evaluation of stigma-reduction programmes. There is potential for wide use of the tool either as a stand-alone survey or integrated within other studies of health facility staff. PMID:24242266

  8. The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST): an effectiveness study on improving newborn health and survival in rural Uganda through a community-based intervention linked to health facilities - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reducing neonatal-related deaths is one of the major bottlenecks to achieving Millennium Development Goal 4. Studies in Asia and South America have shown that neonatal mortality can be reduced through community-based interventions, but these have not been adapted to scalable intervention packages for sub-Saharan Africa where the culture, health system and policy environment is different. In Uganda, health outcomes are poor for both mothers and newborn babies. Policy opportunities for neonatal health include the new national Health Sector Strategic Plan, which now prioritizes newborn health including use of a community model through Village Health Teams (VHT). The aim of the present study is to adapt, develop and cost an integrated maternal-newborn care package that links community and facility care, and to evaluate its effect on maternal and neonatal practices in order to inform policy and scale-up in Uganda. Methods/Design Through formative research around evidence-based practices, and dialogue with policy and technical advisers, we constructed a home-based neonatal care package implemented by the responsible VHT member, effectively a Community Health Worker (CHW). This CHW was trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits - two before and three just after birth - so that linkages will be made to facility care and targeted messages for home-care and care-seeking delivered. The project is improving care in health units to provide standardized care for the mother and the newborn in both intervention and comparison areas. The study is taking place in a new Demographic Surveillance Site in two rural districts, Iganga and Mayuge, in Uganda. It is a two-arm cluster randomized controlled design with 31 intervention and 32 control areas (villages). The comparison parishes receive the standard care already being provided by the district, but to the intervention villages are added a system for CHWs to visit the mother five times in her home during pregnancy and the neonatal period. Both areas benefit from a standardized strengthening of facility care for mothers and neonates. Discussion UNEST is designed to directly feed into the operationalization of maternal and newborn care in the national VHT strategy, thereby helping to inform scale-up in rural Uganda. The study is registered as a randomized controlled trial, number ISRCTN50321130. PMID:23153395

  9. 42 CFR 37.42 - Approval of roentgenographic facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health information, including, as applicable, the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules (45 CFR part 160 and... centimeters with a minimum width of 35cm. The imaging plate must have a maximum pixel pitch of 200µm, with a... parameters used at the facility for chest imaging, using methods recommended in AAPM Report No. 74, pages...

  10. Challenges facing effective implementation of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in children born to HIV-infected mothers in the public health facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kamuhabwa, Appolinary AR; Manyanga, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Background If children born to HIV-infected mothers are not identified early, approximately 30% of them will die within the first year of life due to opportunistic infections. In order to prevent morbidity and mortality due to opportunistic infections in children, the World Health Organization recommends the use of prophylaxis using co-trimoxazole. However, the challenges affecting effective implementation of this policy in Tanzania have not been documented. Aim In this study, we assessed the challenges facing the provision of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis among children born to HIV-infected mothers in the public hospitals of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methodology Four hundred and ninety-eight infants’ PMTCT (Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV) register books for the past 2 years were reviewed to obtain information regarding the provision of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. One hundred and twenty-six health care workers were interviewed to identify success stories and challenges in the provision of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in children. In addition, 321 parents and guardians of children born to HIV-infected mothers were interviewed in the health facilities. Results Approximately 80% of children were initiated with co-trimoxazole prophylaxis within 2 months after birth. Two hundred and ninety-one (58.4%) children started using co-trimoxazole within 4 weeks after birth. Majority (n=458, 91.8%) of the children were prescribed 120 mg of co-trimoxazole per day, whereas 39 (7.8%) received 240 mg per day. Only a small proportion (n=1, 0.2%) of children received 480 mg/day. Dose determination was based on the child’s age rather than body weight. Parents and guardians reported that 42 (13.1%) children had missed one or more doses of co-trimoxazole during the course of prophylaxis. The majority of health care workers (89.7%) reported that co-trimoxazole is very effective for the prevention of opportunistic infections among children, but frequent shortage of co-trimoxazole in the health facilities was the main challenge. Conclusion Most children who were initiated with co-trimoxazole prophylaxis did not experience significant opportunistic infections, and the drug was well tolerated. The major barrier for co-trimoxazole prophylaxis was due to frequent out-of-stocks of pediatric co-trimoxazole formulations in the health facilities. Dose determination was based on the age rather than the weight of children, thus creating potential for under- or over-dosing of children. PMID:26604825

  11. Strengthening the delivery of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care at primary health-care facilities: study design of a cluster randomized controlled trial in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Amir; Ahmed, Maqsood; Anil, Shirin; Walley, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), account for one-fourth of the patients at the primary health-care (PHC) facilities in Pakistan. Standard care practices to manage these diseases are necessary to reduce the morbidity and mortality rate associated with non-communicable diseases in developing countries. Objective To develop and measure the effectiveness of operational guidelines and implementation materials, with sound scientific evidence, for expanding lung health care, especially asthma and COPD through PHC facilities already strengthened for tuberculosis (TB) care in Pakistan. Design A cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms (intervention and control), with qualitative and costing study components, is being conducted in 34 clusters; 17 clusters per arm (428 asthma and 306 COPD patients), in three districts in Pakistan from October 2014 to December 2016. The intervention consists of enhanced case management of asthma and COPD patients through strengthening of PHC facilities. The main outcomes to be measured are asthma and COPD control among the registered cases at 6 months. Cluster- and individual-level analyses will be done according to intention to treat. Residual confounding will be addressed by multivariable logistic and linear regression models for asthma and COPD control, respectively. The trial is registered with ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN 17409338). Conclusions Currently, only about 20% of the estimated prevalent asthma and COPD cases are being identified and reported through the respective PHC network. Lung health care and prevention has not been effectively integrated into the core PHC package, although a very well-functioning TB program exists at the PHC level. Inclusion of these diseases in the already existent TB program is expected to increase detection rates and care for asthma and COPD. PMID:26578109

  12. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  13. REVISION DATE 06/12/2014 PAGE 1 OF 6 TITLE: Health Assessment Questionnaire for Personnel Working with

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    Working with Research Animals and Other Hazards OHP FORM Personnel working with research animals.302 Mail to the University of Texas at Austin, OHP, 101 E. 27th Street, Stop A9250, Austin, TX 78712 OHP occupational health risks. A current TB screening test, which includes a 2-step screening at baseline

  14. Table of Contents Our Season Page 3

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1 #12;2 Table of Contents 2011-2012 Our Season Page 3 People Page 8 Outreach Page 11 Curricular-2013 Our Season Page 22 People Page 25 Outreach Page 27 Development Page 28 Facility Page 29 #12;3 2011-2012 Our Season The 2011-2012 season was one that took us from the Deep South to the Greek Islands

  15. Energy management system optimization for on-site facility staff - a case history of the New York State Office of Mental Health

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdon, M.J.; Martin, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    In 1994, Novus Engineering and EME Group began a project for the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) to maximize the use and benefit of energy management systems (EMS) installed at various large psychiatric hospitals throughout New York State. The project, which was funded and managed by the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY), had three major objectives: (1) Maximize Energy Savings - Novus staff quickly learned that EMS systems as set up by contractors are far from optimal for generating energy savings. This part of the program revealed numerous opportunities for increased energy savings, such as: fine tuning proportional/integral/derivative (PID) loops to eliminate valve and damper hunting; adjusting temperature reset schedules to reduce energy consumption and provide more uniform temperature conditions throughout the facilities; and modifying equipment schedules. (2) Develop Monitoring Protocols - Large EMS systems are so complex that they require a systematic approach to daily, monthly and seasonal monitoring of building system conditions in order to locate system problems before they turn into trouble calls or equipment failures. In order to assist local facility staff in their monitoring efforts, Novus prepared user-friendly handbooks on each EMS. These included monitoring protocols tailored to each facility. (3) Provide Staff Training - When a new EMS is installed at a facility, it is frequently the maintenance staffs first exposure to a complex computerized system. Without proper training in what to look for, staff use of the EMS is generally very limited. With proper training, staff can be taught to take a pro-active approach to identify and solve problems before they get out of hand. The staff then realize that the EMS is a powerful preventative maintenance tool that can be used to make their work more effective and efficient. Case histories are presented.

  16. Please cite this article in press as: Y. Zhang, et al., The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.013

    E-print Network

    Yu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012.ijmijournal.com The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case Electronic health records (EHR) Electronic nursing documentation Interview Nursing home Residential aged care

  17. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Facility Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

  18. The Utah Beacon Experience: Integrating Quality Improvement, Health Information Technology, and Practice Facilitation to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Small Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Tennison, Janet; Rajeev, Deepthi; Woolsey, Sarah; Black, Jeff; Oostema, Steven J.; North, Christie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Utah Improving Care through Connectivity and Collaboration (IC3) Beacon community (2010–2013) was spearheaded by HealthInsight, a nonprofit, community-based organization. One of the main objectives of IC3 was to improve health care provided to patients with diabetes in three Utah counties, collaborating with 21 independent smaller clinics and two large health care enterprises. This paper will focus on the use of health information technology (HIT) and practice facilitation to develop and implement new care processes to improve clinic workflow and ultimately improve patients’ diabetes outcomes at 21 participating smaller, independent clinics. Innovation: Early in the project, we learned that most of the 21 clinics did not have the resources needed to successfully implement quality improvement (QI) initiatives. IC3 helped clinics effectively use data generated from their electronic health records (EHRs) to design and implement interventions to improve patients’ diabetes outcomes. This close coupling of HIT, expert practice facilitation, and Learning Collaboratives was found to be especially valuable in clinics with limited resources. Findings: Through this process we learned that (1) an extensive readiness assessment improved clinic retention, (2) clinic champions were important for a successful collaboration, and (3) current EHR systems have limited functionality to assist in QI initiatives. In general, smaller, independent clinics lack knowledge and experience with QI and have limited HIT experience to improve patient care using electronic clinical data. Additionally, future projects like IC3 Beacon will be instrumental in changing clinic culture so that QI is integrated into routine workflow. Conclusion and Discussion: Our efforts led to significant changes in how practice staff optimized their EHRs to manage and improve diabetes care, while establishing the framework for sustainability. Some of the IC3 Beacon practices are currently smoothly transitioning to new models of care such as Patient-Centered Medical Homes. Thus, IC3 Beacon has been instrumental in creating a strong community partnership among various organizations to meet the shared vision of better health and lower costs, and the experience over the last few years has helped the community prepare for the changing health care landscape. PMID:25848624

  19. 'High profile health facilities can add to your trouble': Women, stigma and un/safe abortion in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Izugbara, Chimaraoke O; Egesa, Carolyne; Okelo, Rispah

    2015-09-01

    Public health discourses on safe abortion assume the term to be unambiguous. However, qualitative evidence elicited from Kenyan women treated for complications of unsafe abortion contrasted sharply with public health views of abortion safety. For these women, safe abortion implied pregnancy termination procedures and services that concealed their abortions, shielded them from the law, were cheap and identified through dependable social networks. Participants contested the notion that poor quality abortion procedures and providers are inherently dangerous, asserting them as key to women's preservation of a good self, management of stigma, and protection of their reputation, respect, social relationships, and livelihoods. Greater public health attention to the social dimensions of abortion safety is urgent. PMID:26233296

  20. Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

    2010-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

  1. Effect of health insurance and facility quality improvement on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in Nigeria: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Marleen E; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Akande, Tanimola M; Kramer, Berber; Osagbemi, Gordon K; Tanovic, Zlata; Gustafsson-Wright, Emily; Brewster, Lizzy M; Lange, Joep M A; Schultsz, Constance

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Hypertension is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, but the lack of affordable treatment and the poor quality of health care compromise antihypertensive treatment coverage and outcomes. OBJECTIVE To report the effect of a community-based health insurance (CBHI) program on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in rural Nigeria. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We compared changes in outcomes from baseline (2009) between the CBHI program area and a control area in 2011 through consecutive household surveys. Households were selected from a stratified random sample of geographic areas. Among 3023 community-dwelling adults, all nonpregnant adults (aged ?18 years) with hypertension at baseline were eligible for this study. INTERVENTION Voluntary CBHI covering primary and secondary health care and quality improvement of health care facilities. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The difference in change in blood pressure from baseline between the program and the control areas in 2011, which was estimated using difference-in-differences regression analysis. RESULTS Of 1500 eligible households, 1450 (96.7%) participated, including 564 adults with hypertension at baseline (313 in the program area and 251 in the control area). Longitudinal data were available for 413 adults (73.2%) (237 in the program area and 176 in the control area). Baseline blood pressure in respondents with hypertension who had incomplete data did not differ between areas. Insurance coverage in the hypertensive population increased from 0% to 40.1% in the program area (n?=?237) and remained less than 1% in the control area (n?=?176) from 2009 to 2011. Systolic blood pressure decreased by 10.41 (95% CI, -13.28 to -7.54) mm Hg in the program area, constituting a 5.24 (-9.46 to -1.02)-mm Hg greater reduction compared with the control area (P?=?.02), where systolic blood pressure decreased by 5.17 (-8.29 to -2.05) mm Hg. Diastolic blood pressure decreased by 4.27 (95% CI, -5.74 to -2.80) mm Hg in the program area, a 2.16 (-4.27 to -0.05)-mm Hg greater reduction compared with the control area, where diastolic blood pressure decreased by 2.11 (-3.80 to -0.42) mm Hg (P?=?.04). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Increased access to and improved quality of health care through a CBHI program was associated with a significant decrease in blood pressure in a hypertensive population in rural Nigeria. Community-based health insurance programs should be included in strategies to combat cardiovascular disease in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24534947

  2. A Survey of the Quality ofWater Drawn from Domestic Wells in Nine Midwest States Page 1 of 2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)

    E-print Network

    Control and Prevention ( CDC) ... National Center for Environmental Health ( NCEH) A Survey of the QualityA Survey of the Quality ofWater Drawn from Domestic Wells in Nine Midwest States Page 1 of 2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH

  3. Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 10/06/2014 Page 1 of 3

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    '. The form can be found at http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools- departments/health-safety/occupational-health/ill-health, Occupational Ill Health Report Book (available from the Health and Safety Department, email health.safetyProduced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 10

  4. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  5. Impact of an electronic clinical decision support system on workflow in antenatal care: the QUALMAT eCDSS in rural health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Nathan; Sukums, Felix; Awine, Timothy; Meid, Andreas; Williams, John; Akweongo, Patricia; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E.; Blank, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background The implementation of new technology can interrupt established workflows in health care settings. The Quality of Maternal Care (QUALMAT) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (eCDSS) for antenatal care (ANC) and delivery in rural primary health care facilities in Africa. Objective This study was carried out to investigate the influence of the QUALMAT eCDSS on the workflow of health care workers in rural primary health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania. Design A direct observation, time-and-motion study on ANC processes was conducted using a structured data sheet with predefined major task categories. The duration and sequence of tasks performed during ANC visits were observed, and changes after the implementation of the eCDSS were analyzed. Results In 24 QUALMAT study sites, 214 observations of ANC visits (144 in Ghana, 70 in Tanzania) were carried out at baseline and 148 observations (104 in Ghana, 44 in Tanzania) after the software was implemented in 12 of those sites. The median time spent combined for all centers in both countries to provide ANC at baseline was 6.5 min [interquartile range (IQR) =4.0–10.6]. Although the time spent on ANC increased in Tanzania and Ghana after the eCDSS implementation as compared to baseline, overall there was no significant increase in time used for ANC activities (0.51 min, p=0.06 in Ghana; and 0.54 min, p=0.26 in Tanzania) as compared to the control sites without the eCDSS. The percentage of medical history taking in women who had subsequent examinations increased after eCDSS implementation from 58.2% (39/67) to 95.3% (61/64) p<0.001 in Ghana but not in Tanzania [from 65.4% (17/26) to 71.4% (15/21) p=0.70]. Conclusions The QUALMAT eCDSS does not increase the time needed for ANC but partly streamlined workflow at sites in Ghana, showing the potential of such a system to influence quality of care positively. PMID:25630707

  6. Reported Sexual Violence among Women and Children Seen at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Rural Tertiary Health Facility, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ashimi, AO; Amole, TG; Ugwa, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various forms of sexual violence including: Coerced marriage or wife inheritance, female genital mutilation, forced exposure to pornography, rape by intimate partner or strangers, unwanted sexual advances, and sexual abuse occurs, especially in vulnerable groups. However, most of these cases are not reported. Aim: The aim was to review reported cases in the facility, determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective longitudinal study undertaken at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Health Facility in a rural setting Northwest Nigeria. A study of survivors of alleged sexual violence who presented to the hospital from the September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2013. Results: During the study period, there were 24 cases of sexual violence (22 were alleged rape and 2 were others) of 973 gynecological consultations at the emergency unit, giving a prevalence of 3% (24/973) for sexual violence and 2.3% (22/973) for alleged rape. Majority 91.7% (22/24) of the cases were children < 16 years; 45.8% (11/24) had no formal education while 33.3% (8/24) hawked homemade drinks and snacks. The assailants were known in 83.3% (20/24) of the cases; of which 45.8% (11/24) were neighbors, 29.2% (7/24) were buyers of snacks and drinks while 8.3% (2/24) were family members. Conclusion: The prevalence of reported sexual violence in this facility was low with the majority of the survivors being children and nonstranger assailants’, mostly neighbors. PMID:25745572

  7. The green shoots of a novel training programme: progress and identified key actions to providing services to MSM at Kenyan health facilities

    PubMed Central

    van der Elst, Elise M; Kombo, Bernadette; Gichuru, Evans; Omar, Anisa; Musyoki, Helgar; Graham, Susan M; Smith, Adrian D; Sanders, Eduard J; Operario, Don

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although men who have sex with men (MSM) in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk for HIV acquisition, access to and quality of health and HIV services within this population are negatively affected by stigma and capacity within the health sector. A recently developed online MSM training programme (www.marps-africa.org) was shown to contribute to reductions in MSM prejudice among healthcare providers (HCPs) in coastal Kenya. In this study, we used qualitative methods to explore the provision of MSM healthcare services two years post-training in coastal Kenya. Methods From February to July 2014, we held 10 focus group discussions (FGD) with 63 participants, including HCP from 25 facilities, county AIDS coordinators and MSM from local support groups. Participants discussed availability, acceptability and accessibility of HIV healthcare for MSM. HCP also discussed changes in their health service practices after completing the training. FGD were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Ritchie and Spencer's “framework approach” for qualitative data. Results HCPs described continued improvements in their ability to provide service in a non-stigmatizing way to MSM patients since completing the training programme and expressed comfort engaging MSM patients in care. Four additional recommendations for improving MSM healthcare services were identified: 1) expanding the reach of MSM sensitivity training across the medical education continuum; 2) establishing guidelines to manage sexually transmitted anal infections; 3) promoting legal and policy reforms to support integration of MSM-appropriate services into healthcare; and 4) including MSM information in national reporting tools for HIV services. Conclusions Positive impacts of this sensitivity and skills training programme were reflected in HCP attitudes two years post-intervention. Scaling-up of efforts will rely on continued policies to include MSM in healthcare programmes to reduce stigma in health settings and guidelines for MSM STI service delivery. PMID:26493863

  8. A Method for the Design and Development of Medical or Health Care Information Websites to Optimize Search Engine Results Page Rankings on Google

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Niamh Maria; Hannigan, Ailish; Shannon, Bill; Dunne, Colum; Cullen, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background The Internet is a widely used source of information for patients searching for medical/health care information. While many studies have assessed existing medical/health care information on the Internet, relatively few have examined methods for design and delivery of such websites, particularly those aimed at the general public. Objective This study describes a method of evaluating material for new medical/health care websites, or for assessing those already in existence, which is correlated with higher rankings on Google's Search Engine Results Pages (SERPs). Methods A website quality assessment (WQA) tool was developed using criteria related to the quality of the information to be contained in the website in addition to an assessment of the readability of the text. This was retrospectively applied to assess existing websites that provide information about generic medicines. The reproducibility of the WQA tool and its predictive validity were assessed in this study. Results The WQA tool demonstrated very high reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.95) between 2 independent users. A moderate to strong correlation was found between WQA scores and rankings on Google SERPs. Analogous correlations were seen between rankings and readability of websites as determined by Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level scores. Conclusions The use of the WQA tool developed in this study is recommended as part of the design phase of a medical or health care information provision website, along with assessment of readability of the material to be used. This may ensure that the website performs better on Google searches. The tool can also be used retrospectively to make improvements to existing websites, thus, potentially enabling better Google search result positions without incurring the costs associated with Search Engine Optimization (SEO) professionals or paid promotion. PMID:23981848

  9. Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-17

    International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

  10. Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

  11. Attributes and perspectives of public providers related to provision of medical abortion at public health facilities in Vietnam: a cross-sectional study in three provinces

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thoai D; Free, Caroline; Le, Hoan T; Edwards, Phil; Pham, Kiet HT; Nguyen, Yen BT; Nguyen, Thang H

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate attributes of public service providers associated with the provision of medical abortion in Vietnam. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study via interviewer-administered questionnaire among abortion providers from public health facilities in Hanoi, Khanh Hoa, and Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam between August 2011 and January 2012. We recruited abortion providers at all levels of Vietnam’s public health service delivery system. Participants were questioned about their medical abortion provision practices and perspectives regarding abortion methods. Results A total of 905 providers from 62 health facilities were included, comprising 525 (58.0%) from Hanoi, 122 (13.5%) from Khanh Hoa, and 258 (28.5%) from Ho Chi Minh City. The majority of providers were female (96.7%), aged ?25 years (94%), married (84.4%), and had at least one child (89%); 68.9% of providers offered only manual vacuum aspiration and 31.1% performed both medical abortion and manual vacuum aspiration. Those performing both methods included physicians (74.5%), midwives (21.7%), and nurses (3.9%). Unadjusted analyses showed that female providers (odds ratio 0.1; 95% confidence interval 0.01–0.30) and providers in rural settings (odds ratio 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.08–0.79) were less likely to provide medical abortion than their counterparts. Obstetricians and gynecologists were more likely to provide medical abortion than providers with nursing/midwifery training (odds ratio 22.2; 95% confidence interval 3.81–129.41). The most frequently cited advantages of medical abortion for providers were that no surgical skills are required (61.7%) and client satisfaction is better (61.0%). Conclusion Provision of medical abortion in Vietnam is lower than provision of manual vacuum aspiration. While the majority of abortion providers are female midwives in Vietnam, medical abortion provision is concentrated in urban settings among physicians. Individuals providing medical abortion found that the method yields high client satisfaction. PMID:25152635

  12. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  13. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  14. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  15. Overview of Dose Assessment Developments and the Health of Riverside Residents Close to the “Mayak” PA Facilities, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Standring, William J.F.; Dowdall, Mark; Strand, Per

    2009-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) has been involved in studies related to the Mayak PA and the consequences of activities undertaken at the site for a number of years. This paper strives to present an overview of past and present activities at the Mayak PA and subsequent developments in the quantification of health effects on local populations caused by discharges of radioactive waste into the Techa River. Assessments of doses to affected populations have relied on the development of dose reconstruction techniques for both external and internal doses. Contamination levels are typically inhomogeneous and decrease with increasing distance from the discharge point. Citations made in this paper give a comprehensive, though not exhaustive, basis for further reading about this topic. PMID:19440276

  16. 42 CFR 9.9 - Facility staffing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facility staffing. 9.9 Section 9.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS STANDARDS OF CARE FOR CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.9 Facility staffing. How many personnel...

  17. Wind-Driven Roof Turbines: A Novel Way to Improve Ventilation for TB Infection Control in Health Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Escombe, Rod; McDermid, Cheryl; Mtshemla, Yolanda; Spelman, Tim; Azevedo, Virginia; London, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Objective Tuberculosis transmission in healthcare facilities contributes significantly to the TB epidemic, particularly in high HIV settings. Although improving ventilation may reduce transmission, there is a lack of evidence to support low-cost practical interventions. We assessed the efficacy of wind-driven roof turbines to achieve recommended ventilation rates, compared to current recommended practices for natural ventilation (opening windows), in primary care clinic rooms in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Methods Room ventilation was assessed (CO2 gas tracer technique) in 4 rooms where roof turbines and air-intake grates were installed, across three scenarios: turbine, grate and window closed, only window open, and only turbine and grate open, with concurrent wind speed measurement. 332 measurements were conducted over 24 months. Findings For all 4 rooms combined, median air changes per hour (ACH) increased with wind speed quartiles across all scenarios. Higher median ACH were recorded with open roof turbines and grates, compared to open windows across all wind speed quartiles. Ventilation with open turbine and grate exceeded WHO-recommended levels (60 Litres/second/patient) for 95% or more of measurements in 3 of the 4 rooms; 47% in the remaining room, where wind speeds were lower and a smaller diameter turbine was installed. Conclusion High room ventilation rates, meeting recommended thresholds, may be achieved using wind-driven roof turbines and grates, even at low wind speeds. Roof turbines and air-intake grates are not easily closed by staff, allowing continued ventilation through colder periods. This simple, low-cost technology represents an important addition to our tools for TB infection control. PMID:22253742

  18. Efficacy of Hospital Germicides against Adenovirus 8, a Common Cause of Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Rutala, William A.; Peacock, Jeffrey E.; Gergen, Maria F.; Sobsey, Mark D.; Weber, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The inactivation of virus-contaminated nonporous inanimate surfaces was investigated using adenovirus type 8, a common cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. A 10-?l inoculum of adenovirus was placed onto each stainless steel disk (1-cm diameter), and the inoculum was allowed to air dry for 40 min. Twenty-one different germicides (including disinfectants and antiseptics) were selected for this study based on their current uses in health care. After a 1- or 5-minute exposure to 50 ?l of the germicide, the virus-germicide test mixture was neutralized and assayed for infectivity. Using an efficacy criterion of a 3-log10 reduction in the titer of virus infectivity and regardless of the virus suspending medium (i.e., hard water, sterile water, and hard water with 5% fetal calf serum), only five disinfectants proved to be effective against the test virus at 1 min: 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde, 2.4% glutaraldehyde, 2.65% glutaraldehyde, ?6,000 ppm chlorine, and ?1,900 ppm chlorine. Four other disinfectants showed effectiveness under four of the five testing conditions: 70% ethanol, 65% ethanol with 0.63% quaternary ammonium compound, 79.6% ethanol with 0.1% quaternary ammonium compound, and 0.2% peracetic acid. Of the germicides suitable for use as an antiseptic, 70% ethanol achieved a 3-log10 reduction under four of the five test conditions. These results emphasize the need for proper selection of germicides for use in disinfecting noncritical surfaces and semicritical medical devices, such as applanation tonometers, in order to prevent outbreaks of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:16569860

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of bleach routinely used in health facilities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Daniel; Admassu, Aschalew; Wassie, Belaynew; Biadglegne, Fantahun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Ethiopia, the most widely used disinfectant is 5% Hypochlorites. However, Ethiopian national health safety and infection prevention guideline recommendation on the use of bleach is not consistent and varying from 0.1%-4%. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the effective time-concentration relationship of sodium hypochlorite against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the absence of any organic load. Methods This experimental study was conducted in Bahir Dar Regional laboratory from February-June 2013. Test suspensions of 1.5 X 108 CFU/ml prepared using normal saline containing 0.5% tween 80. From 5% stock, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% bleach was prepared. A 1ml of test strain suspension and 1ml of bleach mixed and allowed to stand until the specified time achieved, neutralized by 48 ml phosphate buffer. 100µl from the diluted sediment were spread on two L-J mediums and incubated at 37°C for 8 weeks. Results When 0. 1% bleach was used for 10 min, majority 11/20 of isolates showed 3 x 103 CFU/ml growth (ME = 4.4) which was inefficient. However, when the time increased, the log10 reduction was acceptable, ME >5 and it was effective. The bleach solution containing 0.5% and above was effective in all respective times. In this study, there is no difference observed in the tuberculocidal activity of bleach against resistant and sensitive strains. Conclusion Our study showed that in the absence of any organic load, 0.1% bleaches over 15 min and 0.5% bleaches over 10 min was found to be tuberculocidal. PMID:26668688

  20. Acceptability and Use of Portable Drinking Water and Hand Washing Stations in Health Care Facilities and Their Impact on Patient Hygiene Practices, Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Ronald; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H.

    2015-01-01

    Many health care facilities (HCF) in developing countries lack access to reliable hand washing stations and safe drinking water. To address this problem, we installed portable, low-cost hand washing stations (HWS) and drinking water stations (DWS), and trained healthcare workers (HCW) on hand hygiene, safe drinking water, and patient education techniques at 200 rural HCFs lacking a reliable water supply in western Kenya. We performed a survey at baseline and a follow-up evaluation at 15 months to assess the impact of the intervention at a random sample of 40 HCFs and 391 households nearest to these HCFs. From baseline to follow-up, there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of dispensaries with access to HWSs with soap (42% vs. 77%, p<0.01) and access to safe drinking water (6% vs. 55%, p<0.01). Female heads of household in the HCF catchment area exhibited statistically significant increases from baseline to follow-up in the ability to state target times for hand washing (10% vs. 35%, p<0.01), perform all four hand washing steps correctly (32% vs. 43%, p = 0.01), and report treatment of stored drinking water using any method (73% vs. 92%, p<0.01); the percentage of households with detectable free residual chlorine in stored drinking water did not change (6%, vs. 8%, p = 0.14). The installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs without access to 24-hour piped water helped assure that health workers had a place to wash their hands and provide safe drinking water. This HCF intervention may have also contributed to the improvement of hand hygiene and reported safe drinking water behaviors among households nearest to HCFs. PMID:25961293

  1. Prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV in a tertiary health facility in south-south Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a major predictor of the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Good adherence to HAART is necessary to achieve the best virologic response, lower the risk of drug resistance and reduce morbidity and mortality. This study therefore aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV accessing treatment in a tertiary location in Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients on HAART attending the Presidential Emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital between October–December 2011. A total of 411 PLHIV visiting the study site during the study period were interviewed. PLHIV who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively recruited into the study till the desired sample size was attained. Information was obtained from participants using a semi-structured, pretested, interviewer administered questionnaire. Adherence was measured via patients self report and were termed adherent if they took at least 95% of prescribed medication in the previous week prior to the study. Data were summarized using proportions, and ?2 test was used to explore associations between categorical variables. Predictors of adherence to HAART were determined by binary logistic regression. Level of significance was set at p?health status [OR 3.11; CI: 1.58-6.11], reduced pill load [OR 1.25; 95% CI: 0.46-2.72] and non-use of herbal remedies [OR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.22-2.72] were the major predictors for adherence to HAART. However, payment for ART services significantly decreased the likelihood of adherence to HAART. [OR 0.46; 95% CI: 0.25-0.87.]. Conclusions The adherence rate reported in this study was quite low. Appropriate adherence enhancing intervention strategies targeted at reducing pill load and ensuring an uninterrupted access to free services regimen is strongly recommended. PMID:24229404

  2. Malaria Parasitemia Among Febrile Patients Seeking Clinical Care at an Outpatient Health Facility in an Urban Informal Settlement Area in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Njuguna, Henry N; Montgomery, Joel M; Cosmas, Leonard; Wamola, Newton; Oundo, Joseph O; Desai, Meghna; Buff, Ann M; Breiman, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Nairobi is considered a low-risk area for malaria transmission, but travel can influence transmission of malaria. We investigated the demographic characteristics and travel history of patients with documented fever and malaria in a study clinic in a population-based surveillance system over a 5-year period, January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. During the study period, 11,480 (68%) febrile patients had a microscopy test performed for malaria, of which 2,553 (22%) were positive. Malaria was detected year-round with peaks in January, May, and September. Children aged 5-14 years had the highest proportion (28%) of positive results followed by children aged 1-4 years (23%). Almost two-thirds of patients with malaria reported traveling outside Nairobi; 79% of these traveled to three counties in western Kenya. History of recent travel (i.e., in past month) was associated with malaria parasitemia (odds ratio: 10.0, 95% confidence interval: 9.0-11.0). Malaria parasitemia was frequently observed among febrile patients at a health facility in the urban slum of Kibera, Nairobi. The majority of patients had traveled to western Kenya. However, 34% reported no travel history, which raises the possibility of local malaria transmission in this densely populated, urban setting. These findings have important implications for malaria control in large Nairobi settlements. PMID:26598567

  3. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.4 Use of Library facilities. (a) General. The Library facilities are available to...

  4. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.4 Use of Library facilities. (a) General. The Library facilities are available to...

  5. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.51 Section 3.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.51 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities...

  6. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...assessments and health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  7. Safe design of healthcare facilities

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, J

    2006-01-01

    The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety?driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety?driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety. PMID:17142606

  8. Medicare and Skilled Nursing Facility Care Benefits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... re getting Medicare-covered services from a skilled nursing facility (SNF), you may have the right to ... read the free booklet “Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility Care.” • For free health insurance counseling and ...

  9. Page 1 of 5 ATTACHMENT 4

    E-print Network

    of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970 do not apply since the NREL facilities are Government will comply with the OSHA Safety and Health Standards for General Industry (29 CFR 1910) and Construction (29

  10. Workshop Adaptation of Language Resources and Technology to New Domains 2009 -Borovets, Bulgaria, pages 5869 Personal Health Information Leak Prevention in

    E-print Network

    ,srose,schowdhury,eneri,ejonker}@ehealthinformation.ca lpeyton@site.uottawa.ca Abstract We built a system which prevents leaks of per- sonal health information network [24]. In this work, we present a system which detects personal health information (PHI) in free leak detection. Texts which contain personal health information can be written by doctors, nurses

  11. DHHS, NIH, Report to the United States Congress, NIH Response to the Conference Rep... Page 1 of 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    of increased life expectancy in the U.S. as a result of advances in health care creates annual net gains 1 of 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH Response of the Edison Database 7. List of 47 FDA-approved Drugs 8. Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Paper

  12. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.4 Use of Library facilities. (a) General. The Library facilities are available to...effective use of facilities by health-sciences professionals and to...

  13. Survey of Facilities for Testing Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    42-page report describes facilities capable of testing complete photovoltaic systems, subsystems, or components. Compilation includes facilities and capabilities of five field centers of national photovoltaics program, two state-operated agencies, and five private testing laboratories.

  14. 42 CFR 31.12 - Use of Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...facilities. 31.12 Section 31.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE...

  15. 42 CFR 31.12 - Use of Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...facilities. 31.12 Section 31.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE...

  16. FACILITY SAFETY PLAN Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-print Network

    Dandy, David

    FACILITY SAFETY PLAN Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Colorado State University Payroll On Campus: Hartshorn Health Service, Hartshorn Health Center #12;#12;Facility Safety Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS General Safety Plan

  17. Successes and failures of using the cell phone as a main mode of communication between participants and facilitators from a distance: an innovative method of training rural health facility managers in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Au, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Rural Health Facility Management Training is a training program developed by the National Department of Health in collaboration with AUSAID through the office of the Capacity Building Service Centre. The purpose of the training is to train officers-in-charge who did not acquire knowledge and skills of managing a health facility. As part of this study, it is essential to assess whether the cell phone is a better mode of communication between the participants and the facilitators compared with other modes of communication from a distance. The study used the cross-sectional method to collect 160 samples from 12 provinces and the statistical software Stata (version 8) was used to analyse the data. The results showed that mobile coverage is not very effective in most rural areas, though, it is efficient and accessible. Furthermore, it is expensive to make a call compared with sending text massages. In spite of the high cost involved, most health managers prefer to use the cell phone compared to normal post, email, or fax. This clearly shows that the mobile phone is a better device for distant learning in rural Papua New Guinea compared to other modes of communication. PMID:23138075

  18. Do loss to follow-up and death rates from ART care vary across primary health care facilities and hospitals in south Ethiopia? A retrospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Teshome, Wondu; Belayneh, Mehretu; Moges, Mathewos; Mekonnen, Emebet; Endrias, Misganu; Ayele, Sinafiksh; Misganaw, Tebeje; Shiferaw, Mekonnen; Tesema, Tigist

    2015-01-01

    Background Decentralization and task shifting has significantly improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Many studies conducted to determine the attrition rate in Ethiopia have not compared attrition rates between hospitals and health centers in a relatively recent cohort of patients. This study compared death and loss to follow-up (LTFU) rates among ART patients in hospitals and health centers in south Ethiopia. Methods Data routinely collected from patients aged older than 15 years who started ART between July 2011 and August 2012 in 20 selected health facilities (12 being hospitals) were analyzed. The outcomes of interest were LTFU and death. The data were entered, cleaned, and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0 and Stata version 12.0. Competing-risk regression models were used. Results The service years of the facilities were similar (median 8 and 7.5 for hospitals and health centers, respectively). The mean patient age was 33.7±9.6 years. The median baseline CD4 count was 179 (interquartile range 93–263) cells/mm3. A total of 2,356 person-years of observation were made with a median follow-up duration of 28 (interquartile range 22–31) months; 24.6% were either dead or LTFU, resulting in a retention rate of 75.4%. The death rates were 3.0 and 1.5 and the LTFU rate were 9.0 and 10.9 per 100 person-years of observation in health centers and hospitals, respectively. The competing-risk regression model showed that the gap between testing and initiation of ART, body mass index, World Health Organization clinical stage, isoniazid prophylaxis, age, facility type, and educational status were independently associated with LTFU. Moreover, baseline tuberculous disease, poor functional status, and follow-up at a health center were associated with an elevated probability of death. Conclusion We observed a higher death rate and a lower LTFU rate in health centers than in hospitals. Most of the associated variables were also previously documented. Higher LTFU was noticed for patients with a smaller gap between testing and initiation of treatment. PMID:26064071

  19. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility...

  20. PLUMBING FIXTURES FOR EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MACCONNELL, JAMES D.; ODELL, WILLIAM R.

    A STUDY OF PLUMBING FIXTURES FOR USE IN EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES WAS MADE TO PROVIDE MANUFACTURERS, ARCHITECTS, AND EDUCATORS WITH A GUIDE TO THE NECESSARY SANITARY FACILITIES REQUIRED FOR--(1) MAINTENANCE OF HEALTH STANDARDS, (2) IMPROVED SUPERVISION, (3) REDUCED MAINTENANCE, AND (4) ENRICHMENT OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM. THE STUDY IS PRESENTED IN…

  1. 42 CFR 483.13 - Resident behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resident behavior and facility practices. 483.13 Section 483.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.13 Resident behavior and facility practices. (a)...

  2. 42 CFR 483.13 - Resident behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resident behavior and facility practices. 483.13 Section 483.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.13 Resident behavior and facility practices. (a)...

  3. Facilities Management Floor Plans

    E-print Network

    Facilities Management Single Student Housing Floor Plans #12;Directions: To find a floor plan will be directed to the correct floor plan for that room To find all rooms that are for a certain floor plan: o Select the style of housing floor plan link on the right side of the Index Page o Rooms are sorted

  4. A Cluster Randomised Trial on the Impact of Integrating Early Infant HIV Diagnosis with the Expanded Programme on Immunization on Immunization and HIV Testing Rates in Rural Health Facilities in Southern Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Moberley, Sarah; Brockman, Benjamin J.; Connor, Alison L.; Kalesha-Masumbu, Penelope; Mutembo, Simon; Bweupe, Maximillian; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Biemba, Godfrey; Hamer, Davidson H.; Chibuye, Benjamin; McCarthy, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the integration of early infant HIV diagnosis with the expanded programme for immunization in a rural Zambian setting with the aim of determining whether infant and postpartum maternal HIV testing rates would increase without harming immunization uptake. Methods In an unblinded, location stratified, cluster randomised controlled trial, 60 facilities in Zambia’s Southern Province were equally allocated to a control group, Simple Intervention group that received a sensitization meeting and the resupply of HIV testing commodities in the event of a stock-out, and a Comprehensive Intervention group that received the Simple Intervention as well as on-site operational support to facilitate the integration of HIV testing services with EPI. Findings The average change in number of first dose diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccine (DPT1) provided per month, per facility was approximately 0.86 doses higher [90% confidence interval (CI) -1.40, 3.12] in Comprehensive Intervention facilities compared to the combined average change in the Simple Intervention and control facilities. The interventions resulted in a 16.6% [90% CI: -7%, 46%, P-value = 0.26] and 10% [90% CI: -10%, 36%, P-value = 0.43] greater change in average monthly infant DBS testing compared to control for the Simple and Comprehensive facilities respectively. We also found 15.76 (90% CI: 7.12, 24.41, P-value < 0.01) and 10.93 (90% CI: 1.52, 20.33, P-value = 0.06) additional total maternal re-tests over baseline for the Simple and Comprehensive Facilities respectively. Conclusions This study provides strong evidence to support Zambia’s policy of integration of HIV testing and EPI services. Actions in line with the interventions, including HIV testing material supply reinforcement, can increase HIV testing rates without harming immunization uptake. In response, Zambia’s Ministry of Health issued a memo to remind health facilities to provide HIV testing at under-five clinics and to include under-five HIV testing as part of district performance assessments. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02479659 PMID:26513240

  5. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--U.S. 2013

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health LGBT Health Disability & Health Tribal Support CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report (CHDIR) On this Page CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report 2013 Introduction The 2013 Report Disparities Analytics ...

  6. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  8. 42 CFR 90.9 - Public health advisory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Public health advisory. 90.9 Section 90.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  9. 42 CFR 90.3 - Procedures for requesting health assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Procedures for requesting health assessments. 90.3 Section 90.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  10. 42 CFR 90.3 - Procedures for requesting health assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Procedures for requesting health assessments. 90.3 Section 90.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  11. 42 CFR 90.9 - Public health advisory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Public health advisory. 90.9 Section 90.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  12. 42 CFR 90.9 - Public health advisory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Public health advisory. 90.9 Section 90.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  13. 42 CFR 90.3 - Procedures for requesting health assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Procedures for requesting health assessments. 90.3 Section 90.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  14. 42 CFR 90.3 - Procedures for requesting health assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Procedures for requesting health assessments. 90.3 Section 90.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  15. 42 CFR 90.9 - Public health advisory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Public health advisory. 90.9 Section 90.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  16. 42 CFR 90.9 - Public health advisory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Public health advisory. 90.9 Section 90.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  17. 42 CFR 90.3 - Procedures for requesting health assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Procedures for requesting health assessments. 90.3 Section 90.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  18. Hanford facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.

    1996-07-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

  19. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI.

  20. Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of blindness among adults. 6 Top of Page Health Risk Behaviors that Cause Chronic Diseases Health risk behaviors ... of Page The Cost of Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Behaviors In the United States, chronic diseases and ...

  1. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (h) Information must be provided on the need to manage IAEA access to the facility to protect health... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR... and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  2. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... (h) Information must be provided on the need to manage IAEA access to the facility to protect health... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR... and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  3. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (h) Information must be provided on the need to manage IAEA access to the facility to protect health... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR... and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  4. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (h) Information must be provided on the need to manage IAEA access to the facility to protect health... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR... and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  5. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  6. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  7. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  8. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  9. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1101 - Standard: Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Facilities. 493.1101 Section 493.1101... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Facility Administration for Nonwaived Testing § 493.1101 Standard: Facilities. (a) The laboratory must be constructed, arranged, and maintained...

  11. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure that food storage, preparation and service is in accordance with the sanitation and health standards... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section...

  12. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure that food storage, preparation and service is in accordance with the sanitation and health standards... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section...

  13. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure that food storage, preparation and service is in accordance with the sanitation and health standards... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section...

  14. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure that food storage, preparation and service is in accordance with the sanitation and health standards... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section...

  15. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  16. Designing of High-Volume PET/CT Facility with Optimal Reduction of Radiation Exposure to the Staff: Implementation and Optimization in a Tertiary Health Care Facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Mithun, Sneha; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu C.; Shetye, Bhakti; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been in use for a few decades but with its fusion with computed tomography (CT) in 2001, the new PET/CT integrated system has become very popular and is now a key influential modality for patient management in oncology. However, along with its growing popularity, a growing concern of radiation safety among the radiation professionals has become evident. We have judiciously developed a PET/CT facility with optimal shielding, along with an efficient workflow to perform high volume procedures and minimize the radiation exposure to the staff and the general public by reducing unnecessary patient proximity to the staff and general public. PMID:26420990

  17. RCRA FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

  18. Health YorkU? Kinesiology & Health Science | Psychology | Nursing | Global Health

    E-print Network

    Studies (Management, Policy, Informatics, Health Studies) @ #12;State-of-the-Art Labs and Facilities #12 Science and in Health Policy and Management. Hands on, experiential education opportunities in all of ourWhy choose Health YorkU? Kinesiology & Health Science | Psychology | Nursing | Global Health Health

  19. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 124.513 Section 124.513 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Reasonable Volume of Uncompensated Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.513 Public facility compliance...

  20. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 124.513 Section 124.513 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Reasonable Volume of Uncompensated Services to Persons Unable To Pay § 124.513 Public facility compliance...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 62 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities. Health Care Providers can Know if patients in your facility ...

  2. Health facility-based data on women receiving sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy in Tanzania: lessons to learn from a cross-sectional survey in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts and other national survey reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A study of health facility (HF) data on women receiving sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) was carried out at antenatal care clinics in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods A review of health management information system (HMIS) registers, interviews with health-care workers (HWs) and district and national level malaria control program managers corroborated by inter-temporal assessment through observations at HF levels. Statistical data were analyzed in Excel and interpreted in triangulation with qualitative data from interviews and observations. Results Data indicated that IPTp doses administered to women were inadequate and partly inconsistent. HMIS registers lacked space for IPT records, forcing HWs to manipulate their record-keeping. The proportion/number of IPTp recipients in related to the supply of SP for free delivery, to women’s attendance behaviours, showed variation by quarter and year of reporting. Conclusion It is impossible to achieve rational health service planning when the HMIS is weak. Whilst it is acknowledged that the HMIS is already overloaded, concerted measures are urgently needed to accommodate data on new interventions and other vertical programs if malaria programs are to achieve their goals. PMID:24433529

  3. Health Ethics Education for Health Administration Chaplains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Russell; Broussard, Amelia; Duckett, Todd

    2008-01-01

    It is imperative for divinity and health administration programs to improve their level of ethics education for their graduates who work as health administration chaplains. With an initial presentation of the variation of ethical dilemmas presented in health care facilities covering social, organizational, and patient levels, we indicate the need…

  4. Health Service Areas used in SEER*Stat

    Cancer.gov

    Health Service AreaPage ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17 excl AK)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 13)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 9)Page ofHSA # (NCI Modified) Health Service Area (NCI Modified) Description State-county FIPS Butler,

  5. Page 1 of 6 Constitution

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Page 1 of 6 Constitution http://www.dlc.chhs.colostate.edu/ Approved September 2009 ­ updated non-discrimination the departments/units of: Design and Merchandising Food Science and Human Nutrition Health and Exercise Science

  6. FACILITY DATABASE

    Cancer.gov

    LASP Administrative Use Only Data Entry Start Date _______________ July 2007 LASP FACILTY Database Form 1.000 FACILITY DATABASE Principal Investigator – Data Entry Requirements This form is used to identify the level of data that each investigator

  7. Using business intelligence for efficient inter-facility patient transfer.

    PubMed

    Haque, Waqar; Derksen, Beth Ann; Calado, Devin; Foster, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In the context of inter-facility patient transfer, a transfer operator must be able to objectively identify a destination which meets the needs of a patient, while keeping in mind each facility's limitations. We propose a solution which uses Business Intelligence (BI) techniques to analyze data related to healthcare infrastructure and services, and provides a web based system to identify optimal destination(s). The proposed inter-facility transfer system uses a single data warehouse with an Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) cube built on top that supplies analytical data to multiple reports embedded in web pages. The data visualization tool includes map based navigation of the health authority as well as an interactive filtering mechanism which finds facilities meeting the selected criteria. The data visualization is backed by an intuitive data entry web form which safely constrains the data, ensuring consistency and a single version of truth. The overall time required to identify the destination for inter-facility transfers is reduced from hours to a few minutes with this interactive solution. PMID:25676968

  8. Health Facility Utilisation Changes during the Introduction of Community Case Management of Malaria in South Western Uganda: An Interrupted Time Series Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Alexander, Neal D.; Lagarde, Mylene; Paintain, Lucy; Magnussen, Pascal; Chandramohan, Daniel; Clarke, Siân E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria endemic countries have scaled-up community health worker (CHW) interventions, to diagnose and treat malaria in communities with limited access to public health systems. The evaluations of these programmes have centred on CHW’s compliance to guidelines, but the broader changes at public health centres including utilisation and diagnoses made, has received limited attention. Methods This analysis was conducted during a CHW–intervention for malaria in Rukungiri District, Western Uganda. Outpatient department (OPD) visit data were collected for children under-5 attending three health centres one year before the CHW-intervention started (pre-intervention period) and for 20 months during the intervention (intervention-period). An interrupted time series analysis with segmented regression models was used to compare the trends in malaria, non-malaria and overall OPD visits during the pre-intervention and intervention-period. Results The introduction of a CHW-intervention suggested the frequency of diagnoses of diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and helminths increased, whilst the frequency of malaria diagnoses declined at health centres. In May 2010 when the intervention began, overall health centre utilisation decreased by 63% compared to the pre-intervention period and the health centres saw 32 fewer overall visits per month compared to the pre-intervention period (p<0.001). Malaria visits also declined shortly after the intervention began and there were 27 fewer visits per month during the intervention-period compared with the pre-intervention period (p<0.05). The declines in overall and malaria visits were sustained for the entire intervention-period. In contrast, there were no observable changes in trends of non-malarial visits between the pre-intervention and intervention-period. Conclusions This analysis suggests introducing a CHW-intervention can reduce the number of child malaria visits and change the profile of cases presenting at health centres. The reduction in workload of health workers may allow them to spend more time with patients or undertake additional curative or preventative roles. PMID:26356099

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  10. Salivary factors and dental plaque levels in relation to the general health of elderly residents in a long-term care facility: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brukien?, Vilma; Aleksej?nien?, Jolanta; Gairionyt?, Agn?

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine salivary factors and formation of dental plaque in elderly subjects who were institutionalized and to relate these factors to general health and medication use. This cross-sectional study consisted of 50 elderly individuals who were institutionalized and 25 healthy young volunteers who served as a reference group. For each subject, salivary flow rates, salivary pH, and buffering capacity were assessed. Baseline Plaque Index and Plaque Formation Rate Index were used as a measure of oral hygiene. Information on each patient's general health and medication use was acquired from the institution. An evaluation of the results of this study suggests that salivary protective qualities and dental plaque levels in the elderly subjects who were institutionalized were worse than in healthy young individuals. An association between the general health of the elderly and salivary flow rate was found. PMID:21235611

  11. University of Toronto Control Program for Liquid Cryogenic Transfer Facilities

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    | 1 CONTROL PROGRAM for LIQUID CRYOGENIC TRANSFER FACILITIES / OTHER LOW OXYGEN HAZARDOUS ROOMS 1 Control Program for Liquid Cryogenic Transfer Facilities February 2014 Page | 3 3.1 Oxygen DeficiencyUniversity of Toronto Control Program for Liquid Cryogenic Transfer Facilities February 2014 Page

  12. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...National Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable...

  13. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...National Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable...

  14. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...National Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable...

  15. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...National Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable...

  16. Facility-Level Characteristics Associated with Serious Suicide Attempts and Deaths from Suicide in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about how facility-level characteristics affect the risk of suicide and suicide attempts in juvenile justice residential facilities. This leaves facility administrators and mental health providers without evidence-based guidance on how the facility itself affects risks. The current study uses data from two recently developed…

  17. 42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in the procurement standards for HHS grantees made applicable by subpart P of 45 CFR part 74. (4... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136.110..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation...

  18. Maternal Satisfaction on Delivery Service and Its Associated Factors among Mothers Who Gave Birth in Public Health Facilities of Debre Markos Town, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bitew, Kurabachew; Ayichiluhm, Mekonnen; Yimam, Kedir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The existence of maternal health service does not guarantee its use by women; neither does the use of maternal health service guarantee optimal outcomes for women. The World Health Organization recommends monitoring and evaluation of maternal satisfaction to improve the quality and efficiency of health care during childbirth. Thus, this study aimed at assessing maternal satisfaction on delivery service and factors associated with it. Methods. Community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Debre Markos town from March to April 2014. Systematic random sampling technique were used to select 398 mothers who gave birth within one year. The satisfaction of mothers was measured using 19 questions which were adopted from Donabedian quality assessment framework. Binary logistic regression was fitted to identify independent predictors. Result. Among mothers, the overall satisfaction on delivery service was found to be 318 (81.7%). Having plan to deliver at health institution (AOR = 3.30, 95% CI: 1.38–7.9) and laboring time of less than six hours (AOR = 4.03, 95% CI: 1.66–9.79) were positively associated with maternal satisfaction on delivery service. Those mothers who gave birth using spontaneous vaginal delivery (AOR = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.023–0.51) were inversely related to maternal satisfaction on delivery service. Conclusion. This study revealed that the overall satisfaction of mothers on delivery service was found to be suboptimal. Reasons for delivery visit, duration of labor, and mode of delivery are independent predictors of maternal satisfaction. Thus, there is a need of an intervention on the independent predictors. PMID:26347882

  19. MAIN DISTRIBUTION FACILITY (MDF)

    E-print Network

    Matrajt, Graciela

    MAIN DISTRIBUTION FACILITY (MDF) ELECTRICAL ENTRANCE FACILITY (EF) INTERMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION FACILITY (IDF) INTERMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION FACILITY (IDF) INTERMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION FACILITY (IDF) GROUNDING TMGB TGB TGB TGB primary cable protection EGC EGC = Equipment Grounding Connector Panel Board Typical

  20. 42 CFR 483.430 - Condition of participation: Facility staffing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Facility staffing. 483.430 Section 483.430 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Conditions of Participation...

  1. Exploring the Role of the Public and Private Funded Primary Health Care Facilities for Children in a Pluralistic Health Care Setting of Barbados: One of the English Caribbean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Singh, Keerti; Krishnamurthy, Kandamaran; Nielson, Anders L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The major objectives of this study were to evaluate the existing primary health care service provisions in the public and private sector and utilization of the services, and to assess the existing manpower and material resources. Methods: Data were collected through interviews with the primary health care providers. Data were also collected from the records maintained at the polyclinics and the Ministry of Health Statistics. An analysis and discussion of all the available data was conducted to develop a comprehensive primary health care service utilization and resources inventory at the polyclinics. Similar data were collected from the primary care providers in the private sector. Results: In the public sector, there are 8 polyclinics that provide primary health care to the children. All the polyclinics have immunization services and curative acute care. Some of the polyclinics have a range of services, including dental care, eye care, and rehabilitative care services that common to both adults and children. In the private sector, primary health care is delivered through the 76 private office and of the individual physicians and 11 grouped private practices. All of the private offices and group practices have curative acute care for children and some of the offices have immunization services. Over all 87.5% of all the immunizations were done at the polyclinics. Over all 60.1% of acute care visits were to the private sector and 39.9% to the public sector. In the public sector, 59.5% were under 5 years children while 40.5% were 5 years or older. The corresponding figures in the private care settings were 80.9% and 11.9%. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate the complimentary role of the public and the private sector in the primary health care of children in this country. While the private sector has a major role in the curative acute care of children, the public sector plays a pivotal role in the immunization services. PMID:26682029

  2. 42 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Interim Procedures and Criteria for Review by Health Systems Agencies of Applications Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Part 124 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Community Service Pt. 124, Subpt. G, App....

  3. 42 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Interim Procedures and Criteria for Review by Health Systems Agencies of Applications Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Part 124 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Community Service Pt. 124, Subpt. G, App....

  4. 42 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Interim Procedures and Criteria for Review by Health Systems Agencies of Applications Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Part 124 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Community Service Pt. 124, Subpt. G, App....

  5. 42 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Interim Procedures and Criteria for Review by Health Systems Agencies of Applications Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Part 124 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Community Service Pt. 124, Subpt. G, App....

  6. 42 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Interim Procedures and Criteria for Review by Health Systems Agencies of Applications Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Part 124 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Community Service Pt. 124, Subpt. G, App....

  7. What Are the Factors That Interplay From Normal Pregnancy to Near Miss Maternal Morbidity in a Nigerian Tertiary Health Care Facility?

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Ikeola A.; Ijarotimi, Omotade O.; Fatusi, Adesegun O.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in Nigeria examined the epidemiological characteristics and factors associated with maternal outcomes using a mixed method approach: a prospective case control study design involving 375 pregnant women who received maternal care from a tertiary facility and in-depth interviews reporting the experience of near-miss survivors. A generalized ordered logit model was used to generate the estimates of partial proportional odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) across categories of the outcome variable. Factors strongly associated with maternal morbidity were late referral of women, presence of complications at booking antenatal visits, low birth weight, and severe birth asphyxia. The nearmiss women were further characterized, and a low proportion (25%) had organ dysfunction or failure. The challenge of such diagnoses in resource-constrained settings raises questions about the appropriateness of using organ dysfunction criteria in developing countries. PMID:25119488

  8. Diarrheal Disease in Rural Mozambique: Burden, Risk Factors and Etiology of Diarrheal Disease among Children Aged 0–59 Months Seeking Care at Health Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Nhampossa, Tacilta; Mandomando, Inacio; Acacio, Sozinho; Quintó, Llorenç; Vubil, Delfino; Ruiz, Joaquin; Nhalungo, Delino; Sacoor, Charfudin; Nhabanga, Arnaldo; Nhacolo, Ariel; Aide, Pedro; Machevo, Sónia; Sigaúque, Betuel; Nhama, Abel; Kotloff, Karen; Farag, Tamer; Nasrin, Dilruba; Bassat, Quique; Macete, Eusebio; Levine, Myron M.; Alonso, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrheal disease remains a leading cause of illness and death, particularly in low-income countries. Its burden, microbiological causes and risk factors were examined in children aged 0–59 months living in Manhiça, rural southern Mozambique. Methods Trends of diarrhea-related burden of disease were estimated during the period 2001–2012. A prospective, age-stratified and matched (by age, gender and geographical origin), case-control study was conducted during 2007–2011. Clinical, epidemiology, anthropometric measurement and fecal samples obtained from recruited children were used to estimate moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) weighted attributable fractions. Results Over the last decade the incidence of acute diarrhea has dropped by about 80%. Incidence of MSD per 100 child years at risk for the period 2007–2011 was 9.85, 7.73 and 2.10 for children aged 0–11, 12–23 and 24–59 months respectively. By adjusted population attributable fractions, most cases of MSD were due to rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, ETEC ST (ST only or ST/LT), Shigella and Adenovirus 40/41. Washing hands and having facilities to dispose child’s stools were associated with a reduced risk of MSD, while giving stored water to the child was associated with an increased risk of MSD. Conclusions Despite the predominantly decreasing trends observed throughout the last decade, diarrheal diseases remain today a major cause of morbidity among children aged 0–59 months living in this rural Mozambican area. Rotavirus, cryptosporidium, Shigella, ETEC ST and Adenovirus 40/41 were the most important aetiologies of MSD. Thus, well-known preventive strategies such as washing hands, improving the treatment of stored water, having facilities to dispose children stools, and accelerating the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine should be promoted on a wider scale to reduce the current burden of diarrheal diseases. PMID:25973880

  9. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find a pressing…

  10. Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan

    This paper discusses the components of key spaces found within elementary and secondary school science facilities, and highlights the common design features that facilitate quality science instruction in these areas. Three educational trends that have shaped today's school science education are also examined. Common design features highlighted…

  11. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ... about lower-cost facilities and medicines. Understanding your health care costs can help you save money when managing ...

  12. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    MedlinePLUS

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Public Health Genomics Share Compartir This page no longer exists in ... Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (CSELS) , Public Health Genomics Home A-Z Index Policies Using this Site ...

  13. 42 CFR 90.7 - Decision to conduct health effects study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Decision to conduct health effects study. 90.7 Section 90.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES...

  14. Health Effects of Exposure to Asbestos

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Asbestos Exposure, and your Health . Top of Page Health Risks of Asbestos Exposure Chronic exposure to asbestos may ... action that you can take to improve your health and decrease your risk of cancer. Top of Page Conditions Associated with ...

  15. 9 CFR 3.101 - Facilities, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...constitute a health hazard to animals. (4) Facilities that utilize natural water areas, such as tidal basins, bays, or estuaries (subject to natural tidewater action), for housing marine mammals are exempt from the drainage requirements of...

  16. 9 CFR 3.101 - Facilities, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...constitute a health hazard to animals. (4) Facilities that utilize natural water areas, such as tidal basins, bays, or estuaries (subject to natural tidewater action), for housing marine mammals are exempt from the drainage requirements of...

  17. 9 CFR 3.101 - Facilities, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...constitute a health hazard to animals. (4) Facilities that utilize natural water areas, such as tidal basins, bays, or estuaries (subject to natural tidewater action), for housing marine mammals are exempt from the drainage requirements of...

  18. 9 CFR 3.102 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.102 Section 3.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine Mammals Facilities and...

  19. Flexible Educational Facilities. An Annotated Reference List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Howard E.

    These references on flexible educational facilities are abstracted by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Facilities. College material includes an experimental learning center, a college health center, a fine arts center, and university library design. References on schools include secondary school design, flexible high school design, standard…

  20. 9 CFR 3.101 - Facilities, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facilities, general. 3.101 Section 3.101 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine Mammals Facilities and...

  1. 29 CFR 1917.17 - Railroad facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Railroad facilities. 1917.17 Section 1917.17 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.17 Railroad facilities. (a) Work shall be performed in railcars only if floors of...

  2. Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The model MFFRST, short for Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool, is a user-friendly pc-based computer tool which allows an individual to evaluate the potential exposures and health risks to workers and nearby residents from emissions from individual metal finishing facil...

  3. Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

    2006-01-01

    A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans…

  4. 9 CFR 3.103 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facilities, outdoor. 3.103 Section 3.103 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine Mammals Facilities and...

  5. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section 210.13... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 66216, Dec. 15, 2009. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure that food storage, preparation and service is...

  6. Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool (Mffrst)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool (MFFRST) is a user-friendly pc-based computer tool which allows an individual to evaluate the potential exposures and health risks to workers and nearby residents from emissions from individual metal finishing facilities. Emission...

  7. Health Data Interactive

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Data Access Data Access Data Linkage Mortality Data Medicare ... Related Sites Research Data Center NCHS Home Health Data Interactive Welcome! Health Data Interactive presents tables with ...

  8. Humidifiers and health

    MedlinePLUS

    Health and humidifiers; Using a humidifier for colds; Humidifiers and colds ... Commission. CPSC safety alert: dirty humidifiers may cause health problems. Available at: www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/121804/ ...

  9. Seroprevalence and transmission of Hepatitis B virus among delivering women and their new born in selected health facilities, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B Virus is a major public health problem worldwide. In 2012 alone, over 350 million chronic carriers and 1. 2 million annual deaths were occurred. Hepatitis B Virus causes 60 to 80% of the world’s primary liver cancer and nearly 90% infants infected due to vertical transmission are at higher risk of developing chronic liver disease and cancer. Hence determining the burden of maternal and neonatal Hepatitis B Virus infection is a priority. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from July – September 2012 at St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College and Selam Health Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Blood samples from delivering mothers (n = 265) and their corresponding cords (n = 265) were collected. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data. Hepatitis B Virus surface antigen was detected using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Frequency analysis and logistic regression test was used to identify the potential risk factors associated with Hepatitis B Virus positivity using SPSS Version -15. Results A total of 265 delivering women with the mean age of 25.8 years were enrolled in the study. Of these delivering women, 8 (3.0%) of mothers were positive for Hepatitis B Virus surface antigen, whereas 6 (2.3%) of cord bloods were positives with 75% concordance rate of exposed infants with sero-positive mothers. However, only one maternal positive case was observed for Hepatitis B e Ag test. Only 11% of the mothers know their Hepatitis B Virus status. Of the total mothers assessed for possible risk factors, 69 (26%) had only one type, while 161 (60.8%) had multiple exposure factors such as ear pricing, history of tribal marks, abortion, multiple-sexual partner and history of surgical procedures experienced from high to low frequency. The remaining 35 (13.2%) of the participants had not experienced possible risk factors. Conclusion Though the maternal positivity rate was low, the rate of positivity in cord bloods was almost equal to those infected mothers. Therefore, screening of pregnant mothers and vaccination of infants could help to reduce the transmission. To minimize the higher overall risk exposure status of mothers, increasing awareness and intensive public health education is also recommended. PMID:24731794

  10. Kazakhkstan health system review.

    PubMed

    Katsaga, Alexandr; Kulzhanov, Maksut; Karanikolos, Marina; Rechel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Since becoming independent, Kazakhstan has undertaken major efforts in reforming its post-Soviet health system. Two comprehensive reform programmes were developed in the 2000s: the National Programme for Health Care Reform and Development 2005-2010 and the State Health Care Development Programme for 2011-2015 Salamatty Kazakhstan. Changes in health service provision included a reduction of the hospital sector and an increased emphasis on primary health care. However, inpatient facilities continue to consume the bulk of health financing. Partly resulting from changing perspectives on decentralization, levels of pooling kept changing. After a spell of devolving health financing to the rayon level in 2000-2003, beginning in 2004 a new health financing system was set up that included pooling of funds at the oblast level, establishing the oblast health department as the single-payer of health services. Since 2010, resources for hospital services under the State Guaranteed Benefits Package have been pooled at the national level within the framework of implementing the Concept on the Unified National Health Care System. Kazakhstan has also embarked on promoting evidence-based medicine and developing and introducing new clinical practice guidelines, as well as facility-level quality improvements. However, key aspects of health system performance are still in dire need of improvement. One of the key challenges is regional inequities in health financing, health care utilization and health outcomes, although some improvements have been achieved in recent years. Despite recent investments and reforms, however, population health has not yet improved substantially. PMID:22894852

  11. HEALTH AND MEDICAL ANNEX H -HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES

    E-print Network

    ANNEX H HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES #12;ANNEX H - HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES 07/25/2012 v.1.0 Page H-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex H: Health and Medical Services, and contents within, is a guide and Security Texas A&M University #12;ANNEX H - HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES 07/25/2012 v.1.0 Page H-2 TABLE

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    Cancer.gov

    PAGE STUDY Control letter Revised 6/16/2006 1.National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services Name ***, 2006 Address Address Dear (Title/Name), As a participant

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    E-print Network

    Abhijit Banerjee

    2007-10-05

    This data set contains data on the health histories of, and access to healthcare facilities for, individuals located in the Udaipur districts of Rajasthan, India. Data was collected at the household level, as well as at ...

  14. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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    2012-10-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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  18. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  19. WHAT CAN I DO WITH MY HEALTH ADMINISTRATION & POLICY

    E-print Network

    Suri, Manil

    Health Information Technician Administrative Assistant Recruiter LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES/ HOME HEALTH CARE SERVICES Nursing Homes, Retirement Centers, Adult Day Care Centers, Home Health Care Agencies Educator Health-Related Professional Associations, National Organizations AMA, AARP, American Lung

  20. Page 1 of 4 GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH

    E-print Network

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