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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

2

Facility “wellness”: health facilities management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospitals and health-care facilities are among the most complex, costly, and challenging buildings to design, construct and manage. To become a health facilities manager of a hospital or other medical centre in the USA, one requires knowledge not only of how to manage people, but also of how to deal with government agencies and all kinds of regulations and inspections.

Frank Moy Jr

1995-01-01

3

Optimization of preventive health care facility locations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility Location (PHCFL) problem is to identify optimal locations for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying locations for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of

Wei Gu; Xin Wang; S. Elizabeth McGregor

2010-01-01

4

Industrial Sanitation and Personal Facilities. Module SH-13. Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student module on industrial sanitation and personal facilities is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module deals wth many facets of industrial sanitation and the facilities industries should provide so that proper health procedures may be followed. Following the introduction, 14 objectives (each keyed to a page in…

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

5

Development Fees for Health Facilities Construction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study describes the many financial, legal, planning, and design services that may be used in the development of a complex modern health facility like a hospital. in addition to describing each development service, the study identifies those variables...

1983-01-01

6

Enriching the trustworthiness of health-related web pages.  

PubMed

We present an experimental mechanism for enriching web content with quality metadata. This mechanism is based on a simple and well-known initiative in the field of the health-related web, the HONcode. The Resource Description Framework (RDF) format and the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set were used to formalize these metadata. The model of trust proposed is based on a quality model for health-related web pages that has been tested in practice over a period of thirteen years. Our model has been explored in the context of a project to develop a research tool that automatically detects the occurrence of quality criteria in health-related web pages. PMID:21712355

Gaudinat, Arnaud; Cruchet, Sarah; Boyer, Celia; Chrawdhry, Pravir

2011-06-01

7

VA Health Care Facilities Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... Vet Success Dependents' Educational Assistance Survivor Benefits Home Loans Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Insurance Health & Well-Being ... and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact Us FAQs Ask a ...

8

Newborn care at peripheral health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary health centres, sub-district hospitals (first referral units) and district hospitals constitute the backbone of the\\u000a health services in the country. These facilities are expected to cater to the care of the newborn infants who are delivered\\u000a there, as well as those brought from the community with sickness. This paper, based on a survey in Orissa, and studies in\\u000a a

Vinod K. Paul; A. V. Ramani

2000-01-01

9

EVALUATION OF LITERACY LEVEL OF PATIENT EDUCATION PAGES IN HEALTH-RELATED JOURNALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reading level of patient education material from selected current health care journals. Ten patient education pages from a variety of health care journals were entered into a Microsoft Word program. Applying the Flesch–Kincaid readability formula available from Microsoft Word, a reading level for each page was established and compared to recommended

Nancy Cotugna; Connie E. Vickery; Kara M. Carpenter-Haefele

2005-01-01

10

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesMany adolescents admitted to detention facilities have serious mental and physical health problems. Little is known about policies for the delivery of mental and physical health care in these settings. Our objective was to describe current health care policies in U.S. detention facilities.

KATHLEEN A. PAJER; KELLY KELLEHER; RAVINDRA A. GUPTA; JENNIFER ROLLS; WILLIAM GARDNER

2007-01-01

11

Health Facility Reuse, Retrofit, and Reconfiguration. NCHSR Research Proceedings Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In addition to publishing the papers given at key meetings, this series on health facilities includes discussions and responses. The series is intended to help meet the information needs of health service providers and others who require direct access to concepts and ideas evolving from the exchange of research results. Health facility reuse is an…

National Center for Health Services Research (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

12

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.|

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

13

Health care facility preparation for weapons of mass destruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) are a threat that all health care facilities must be prepared for. Every health care facility is a vital part of the community response system and must be ready to respond. A terrorist attack using WMD can occur in any location, urban or rural. Private vehicles or buses may transport the majority of patients, with

Richard Neville Bradley

2000-01-01

14

Health facilities at the district level in Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background At Independence the Government of Indonesia inherited a weak and unevenly distributed health system to which much of the population had only limited access. In response, the government decided to increase the number of facilities and to locate them closer to the people. To staff these health facilities the government introduced obligatory government service for all new graduates in medicine, nursing and midwifery. Most of these staff also established private practices in the areas in which they were located. The health information system contains little information on the health care facilities established for private practice by these staff. This article reports on the results of enumerating all health facilities in 15 districts in Java. Methods We enumerated all healthcare facilities, public and private, by type in each of 15 districts in Java. Results The enumeration showed a much higher number of healthcare facilities in each district than is shown in most reports and in the health information system which concentrates on public, multi-provider facilities. Across the 15 districts: 86% of facilities were solo-provider facilities for outpatient services; 13% were multi-provider facilities for outpatient services; and 1% were multi-provider facilities offering both outpatient and inpatient services. Conclusion The relatively good distribution of health facilities in Indonesia was achieved through establishing public health centers at the sub-district level and staffing them through a system of compulsory service for doctors, nurses and midwives. Subsequently, these public sector staff also established solo-provider facilities for their own private practice; these solo-provider facilities, of which those for nurses are almost half, comprise the largest category of outpatient care facilities, most are not included in official statistics. Now that Indonesia no longer has mandatory service for newly graduated doctors, nurses and midwives, it will have difficulty maintaining the distribution of facilities and providers established through the 1980s. The current challenge is to envision a new health system that responds to the changing disease patterns as well as the changes in distribution of health facilities.

Heywood, Peter; Harahap, Nida P

2009-01-01

15

Principles and Procedures of Health Facility Planning and Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Policy guidelines are offered for the provision of adequate facilities for health services for Kansas as part of the State Health Plan of Kansas. The material was developed by the Kansas State Board of Health for use by the State Office of Comprehensive H...

1971-01-01

16

77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage Insurance...programs for multifamily housing or health care facilities. This notice announces...

2012-08-15

17

77 FR 21580 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...market-rate multifamily housing, health care facility, and hospital...

2012-04-10

18

A System for Fire Safety Evaluation of Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A quantitative evaluation system for grading health care facilities in terms of fire safety is described. The system can be used to determine how combinations of widely accepted fire safety equipment and building construction features may provide a level ...

H. E. Nelson A. J. Shibe

1978-01-01

19

A System for Fire Safety Evaluation of Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A quantitative evaluation system for grading health care facilities in terms of fire safety is described. The system can be used to determine how combinations of widely accepted fire safety equipment and building construction features may provide a level ...

H. E. Nelson A. J. Shibe

1980-01-01

20

Violence in Healthcare Facilities: Lessons From the Veterans Health Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals: The authors examined assault frequency and risk factors in health care. Methods: The authors conducted a cross-sectional question­ naire survey in 142 hospitals. Analyses are presented at the level of the individual and aggregated by facility. Results: Thirteen percent of employees described at least 1 assault in the last year; the proportion assaulted per facility ranged from 1% to

Michael J. Hodgson; Richard Reed; Thomas Craig; Frances Murphy; Larry Lehmann; Linda Belton; Nick Warren

2004-01-01

21

Mental Illness and Nursing Facilities: Predictors of Health Services Use.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study considers the relationship between mental illness and nursing facility use as well as the use of mental health services within nursing facilities and in the community. Three data sets are used in this study: the 1985 National Nursing Home Surve...

D. G. Shea S. Arcona L. W. Chen A. S. Davey J. Grana S. Nag P. A. Russo M. A. Smyer J. J. Vasey F. Davis

1997-01-01

22

Reference Manual for Project Review Standards and Criteria Covering Health Care Facilities and Health Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guidelines are presented for reviewing and commenting upon projects undertaken in Tennessee to improve health care services and facilities. The document outlines the major types of reviews carried out by the Tennessee Office of Comprehensive Health Planni...

1974-01-01

23

Siting efficiency of long-term health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a multiple criteria location assessment model while providing an application using fractional programming. The model was developed for a major health care provider, and was subsequently used to support siting a decision for a long-term health care facility in Northern Virginia. The model incorporates efficiency measurement methodologies utilizing Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to estimate the relative siting

Molly K. O'Neill

1998-01-01

24

ACSM's Health/Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) sets the industry standard for certifying professionals involved in health and fitness and their clinical applications. This 5-part publication provides a revised edition of six standards representing the industry's consensus on design and operation of a safe and high-quality health/fitness facility.…

Peterson, James A., Ed; Tharrett, Stephen J., Ed.

25

ACSM's Health/Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) sets the industry standard for certifying professionals involved in health and fitness and their clinical applications. This 5-part publication provides a revised edition of six standards representing the industry's consensus on design and operation of a safe and high-quality health/fitness facility.…

Peterson, James A., Ed; Tharrett, Stephen J., Ed.

26

Facility Siting and Health Questions: The Burden of Health Risk Uncertainty  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted several evaluations of occupational health problems at or near hazardous waste disposal facilities. Several examples illustrate the variety of public health concerns, including contamination of water supplies, airborne exposure to toxic substances for nearby residential areas, fires affecting nearby residents and local firefighters, and occupational health hazards for workers at

JAMES M. MELIUS; RICHARD J. COSTELLO; JOHN R. KOMINSKY

1984-01-01

27

New dimensions for future health care facilities.  

PubMed

The questions most insistently asked nowadays are: what "space" will health treatment have, and what should we understand by "care" or "assistance", in a future scenario characterized by a renewed dimension of the concept of health? As things stand, over 40% of the social/health expenditure borne by governments is absorbed by hospital structures. The main factors cutting into this expenditure and determining the very nature of the hospital today are directly connected to phenomena such as the growing use of techno-medicines, biotechnologies and e-health, the unstoppable increase in health service consumerism, and the effects induced by longer life expectancy. The progressive and necessary disappearance of the boundaries between the various medical/surgical specializations aimed at making treatment less fragmented, the growth of new "medical practices" connected to the introduction of gene therapies, selective chemotherapies, immunotherapy, stem cells, the most recent radiotherapy techniques, and the ever-growing weight of chronic pathologies and rehabilitation activities are all factors that make it essential to rethink not only the idea of "Hospital", but also the idea of the whole infrastructural system within which said "Hospital" is situated. PMID:17621770

Del Nord, Romano

2007-01-01

28

Health Seeking Behaviour and Utilization of Health Facilities for Schistosomiasis-Related Symptoms in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Schistosomiasis causes long-term illness and significant economic burden. Morbidity control through integration within existing health care delivery systems is considered a potentially sustainable and cost-effective approach, but there is paucity of information about health-seeking behaviour. Methods A questionnaire-based study involving 2,002 subjects was conducted in three regions of Ghana to investigate health-seeking behaviour and utilization of health facilities for symptoms related to urinary (blood in urine and painful urination) and intestinal schistosomiasis (diarrhea, blood in stool, swollen abdomen and abdominal pain). Fever (for malaria) was included for comparison. Results Only 40% of patients with urinary symptoms sought care compared to >70% with intestinal symptoms and >90% with fever. Overall, about 20% of schistosomiasis-related symptoms were reported to a health facility (hospital or clinic), compared to about 30% for fever. Allopathic self-medication was commonly practiced as alternative action. Health-care seeking was relatively lower for patients with chronic symptoms, but if they took action, they were more likely to visit a health facility. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, perceived severity was the main predictor for seeking health care or visiting a health facility. Age, socio-economic status, somebody else paying for health care, and time for hospital visit occasionally showed a significant impact, but no clear trend. The effect of geographic location was less marked, although people in the central region, and to a lesser extent the north, were usually less inclined to seek health care than people in the south. Perceived quality of health facility did not demonstrate impact. Conclusion Perceived severity of the disease is the most important determinant of seeking health care or visiting a health facility in Ghana. Schistosomiasis control by passive case-finding within the regular health care delivery looks promising, but the number not visiting a health facility is large and calls for supplementary control options.

Danso-Appiah, Anthony; Stolk, Wilma A.; Bosompem, Kwabena M.; Otchere, Joseph; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Habbema, J. Dik F.; de Vlas, Sake J.

2010-01-01

29

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2009-10-01

30

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2010-10-01

31

Energy conservation in health-care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

As energy expenditures continue their dramatic rise in the health-care industry, they absorb a larger portion of hospital budgets and prompt managers to seek ways to conserve energy and reduce consumption. Hospital managers, however, may be forced by capital constraints to choose between medical and energy conservation investments. The author examines some of the issues (including fairness, legal and financial

Hunt

1983-01-01

32

Health care providers and facilities issue brief: health facilities: year end report-2004.  

PubMed

American health facilities are said to provide the best health care in the world. But hospitals are continually challenged by staff shortages, patient safety and medical errors, uninsured patients, and the growth of specialty hospitals. This issue brief provides an analysis of the issues that challenge hospitals' ability to provide quality care for patients. Moreover, the issue brief defines each issue, including staffing mandates, patient safety and medical errors, emergency hospitals, billing practices, and niche and specialty hospitals, outlines the arguments for and against each issue, and finally details and characterizes state legislative activity in regard to each issue. As of 2002, the most recent data available from the American Hospital Association (AHA), there were 5,794 registered hospitals in the United States. The AHA also states that there are 4,927 community hospitals, which includes non-governmental non-profit hospitals, investor-owned (for-profit) hospitals, and hospitals owned by state and local governments. The AHA defines community hospitals as all non-federal, short-term general, and other specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals include obstetrics and gynecology, rehabilitation, orthopedic, and other individually described specialty services. Statistics provided by the AHA indicate that the number of rural and urban community hospitals is approximately equal--2,178 rural hospitals compared to 2,749 urban hospitals. However, this statistic alone does not address the quality of care in urban and rural settings. It does not address the total expenditures in rural and urban hospitals, nor does it address staffing levels. PMID:15768467

McKinley, Andrew

2004-12-31

33

Facility characteristics associated with the use of electronic health records in residential care facilities.  

PubMed

The integration of electronic health records (EHRs) across care settings including residential care facilities (RCFs) promises to reduce medical errors and improve coordination of services. Using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (n=2302), this study examines the association between facility structural characteristics and the use of EHRs in RCFs. Findings indicate that in 2010, only 3% of RCFs nationwide were using an EHR. However, 55% of RCFs reported using a computerized system for one or more (but not all) of the functionalities defined by a basic EHR. Ownership, chain membership, staffing levels, and facility size were significantly associated with the use of one or more core EHR functionalities. These findings suggest that facility characteristics may play an important role in the adoption of EHRs in RCFs. PMID:23645538

Holup, Amanda A; Dobbs, Debra; Meng, Hongdao; Hyer, Kathryn

2013-05-03

34

Linking Up with Local Health Care Facilities to Provide Clinical Updating for Health Occupations Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When health occupations teachers are not able to leave their teaching jobs to obtain much needed clinical updating, alternatives must be found. The method of linking with local health care facilities to provide clinical updating for health occupations teachers is not perfect and has not been rated as the most effective. Clinical updating workshops…

Sandiford, Janice R.

35

Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC), a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing

Khurshid Alam; Shakil Ahmed

2010-01-01

36

Ghost Doctors: Absenteeism in Rural Bangladeshi Health Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unannounced visits were made to health clinics in Bangladesh to determine what proportion of medical professionals were at their assigned post. Averaged over all job categories and types of facility, the absentee rate was 35 percent. The absentee rate for physicians was 40 percent at the larger clinics and 74 percent at the smaller subcenters with a single physician. Whether

Nazmul Chaudhury; Jeffrey S. Hammer

2004-01-01

37

The use of computer simulation in health care facility design  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a decision-making tool for managers of hospitals and health care facilities, the management sciences technique of computer simulation modeling, is introduced. Its benefits as a planning and evaluative tool for hospital managers is illustrated by explaining a successful modeling application, a computer simulation model of physical therapy, developed at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. With the physical

O. George Kennedy

1973-01-01

38

Application of probabilistic health analysis in generating facilities maintenance scheduling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preventive maintenance scheduling of generating facilities is an important requirement in generating system planning. Not conducting maintenance may enhance the ability to provide the available reserve in the short run, but will lead to higher generating unit failure rates which could create serious reserve shortages and decreased system reliability. A new technique designated as the health levelization technique is presented

Roy Billinton; Ahmed Saleh Abdulwhab

2001-01-01

39

Powering Health: Options for Improving Energy Services at Health Facilities in Guyana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The acquisition of reliable and affordable power poses a challenge to many health facilities in developing countries, especially those in remote rural areas. This is the case in Guyana where the PEPFAR (Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) program a...

J. Haeni W. Ratterman

2007-01-01

40

Environmental health and safety in health-care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience and research of a team of environmental practitioners at the University of Minnesota are documented in this book which is concerned with developing solutions to environmental health and safety problems in the institutional setting. The book is designed for medical staff, nurses, dietitians, engineers, laboratory personnel, as well as hospital and nursing home administrators. Historic and administrative aspects

R. G. Bond; G. S. Michaelson; R. L. DeRoos

1973-01-01

41

The structural quality of Tanzanian primary health facilities.  

PubMed

Structural quality is a key element in the quality of care provided at the primary level, which aims to offer health care interventions of proven efficacy. This assessment of the structural quality of Tanzanian primary health services indicated serious weaknesses in the available physical infrastructure, as well as supervision and other support, both for government and nongovernmental services and for dispensary and first referral-level services. Addressing these weaknesses is likely to require some additional funding and review of the functions of different groups of health care facilities within the primary care system. Although district health management teams have an important role to play in tackling the weaknesses, the existing division of management responsibilities indicates that they can only do so with the support of the regional and national levels of the health management structure. Study methods might be adapted to facilitate improved supervision and management. PMID:7704920

Gilson, L; Magomi, M; Mkangaa, E

1995-01-01

42

Content of antenatal care services in secondary health care facilities in Nigeria: implication for quality of maternal health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To assess the contents of antenatal care and to relate the findings to the adequacy of maternal health care. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Public secondary health-care facilities. Participants. Pregnant women. Interventions. Three hundred and ninety consecutive pregnant women attending 12 selected secondary health facilities were recruited proportionate to the client load recorded for each facility during the year preceding

KAYODE OSUNGBADE; SAMUEL OGINNI; ADERONKE OLUMIDE

2007-01-01

43

Health Systems Plan for 1978-1983. Health Service Area 2 Georgia. Health Facilities and Services Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The health facilities and services plan developed by the Appalachian Georgia Health Systems Agency is part of the health systems plan in that it delineates policies and guidelines for use by the agency in improving the accessibility, quality, and cost-eff...

1979-01-01

44

Assessing Health Care Needs in Skilled Nursing Facilities: Health Professional Perspectives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Long-term health care needs are assessed from the perspective of key health professionals, primarily physicians and nurses, in the first of three monographs based on DHEW's Long-Term Care Facility Improvement Study. Issues concerning long-term patient car...

1976-01-01

45

75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9197-7] Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY: Environmental...document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities. The...

2010-09-08

46

Health Resources Statistics; Health Manpower and Health Facilities, 1968. Public Health Service Publication No. 1509.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report is a part of the program of the National Center for Health Statistics to provide current statistics as baseline data for the evaluation, planning, and administration of health programs. Part I presents data concerning the occupational fields: (1) administration, (2) anthropology and sociology, (3) data processing, (4) basic sciences,…

National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

47

Patterns of mental health service utilization in a general hospital and outpatient mental health facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Mental health is one of the priorities of the European Commission. Studies of the use and cost of mental health facilities\\u000a are needed in order to improve the planning and efficiey of mental health resources. We analyze the patterns of mental health\\u000a service use in multiple clinical settings to identify factors associated with high cost.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Subjects and methods  22,859 patients received

Enrique Baca-Garcia; Maria M. Perez-Rodriguez; Ignacio Basurte-Villamor; F. Javier Quintero-Gutierrez; Juncal Sevilla-Vicente; Maria Martinez-Vigo; Antonio Artes-Rodriguez; Antonio L. Fernandez del Moral; Miguel A. Jimenez-Arriero; Jose L. Gonzalez de Rivera

2008-01-01

48

Powering Health Options for Improving Energy Services at Health Facilities in Ethiopia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At the request of PEPFAR(President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief)/Ethiopia, the USAID Office of Infrastructure and Engineering's Energy Team conducted a two-week assessment of Ethiopian health facilities in April 2008. The purpose of the assessment was...

P. Baldinger W. Ratterman

2008-01-01

49

Report on a National Survey of Correctional Health Facilities: A Needs Assessment of Health Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey comprised of twenty correctional health issues and twelve statements regarding the state of knowledge, training, and resources related to legal and ethical issues was mailed to medical directors at prisons, jails, and juvenile facilities across the country. The responses were tabulated and analyzed based upon a number of independent as well as associated variables. The top issues identified

T. Howard Stone; William J. Winslade

1998-01-01

50

Filtering Web Pages for Quality Indicators: An Empirical Approach to Finding High Quality Consumer Health Information on the World Wide Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

The World Wide Web is an increasingly popular source for consumer health information, but many authors have expressed concerns about the quality of health information present on the Internet. We have developed a prototype system that responds to a consumer health query by returning a list of Web pages that are ranked according to the likely quality of the page

Susan L. Price; William R. Hersh

1999-01-01

51

Combined Assessment Program: Summary Report. Enteral Nutrition Safety in Veterans Health Administration Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of enteral nutrition (EN) safety in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. The purposes of the evaluation were to determine whether facilities complied w...

2012-01-01

52

National ignition facility environment, safety, and health management plan  

SciTech Connect

The ES&H Management Plan describes all of the environmental, safety, and health evaluations and reviews that must be carried out in support of the implementation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. It describes the policy, organizational responsibilities and interfaces, activities, and ES&H documents that will be prepared by the Laboratory Project Office for the DOE. The only activity not described is the preparation of the NIF Project Specific Assessment (PSA), which is to be incorporated into the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (PEIS). This PSA is being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with input from the Laboratory participants. As the independent NEPA document preparers ANL is directly contracted by the DOE, and its deliverables and schedule are agreed to separately with DOE/OAK.

NONE

1995-11-01

53

Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility Care  

MedlinePLUS

... transportation. Or, you may need to think about home health care. See page 39. If you need custodial carein a nursing facility after you are discharged from the SNF, you may want to start thinking about where you want to ...

54

New Architecture for Mental Health; New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation - Report to the Governor, 1969.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The accomplishments of The Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation during the past years in creating needed hospitals and health centers for the mentally disabled is documented. The new facilities show awareness of architectural trends and new objectives in design in order to better serve the needs of the patient. Pictures…

New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corp., Albany.

55

New Architecture for Mental Health; New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation - Report to the Governor, 1969.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The accomplishments of The Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation during the past years in creating needed hospitals and health centers for the mentally disabled is documented. The new facilities show awareness of architectural trends and new objectives in design in order to better serve the needs of the patient. Pictures and…

New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corp., Albany.

56

Occupational Health and Safety in Household Hazardous Waste Management Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employees in household hazardous waste management facilities encounter a variety of potentially hazardous exposures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both chemical and physical hazards at a representative group of household hazardous waste management facilities in Minnesota. Sampling results suggest that chemical exposures are generally not a problem when chemical bulking is performed outside the facility. For facilities

G. Betsinger; L. M. Brosseau; J. Golden

2000-01-01

57

Public Health Assessment for Alark Hard Chrome Riverside, Riverside County, California. EPA Facility ID: CAD098229214.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Health Investigations Branch (EHIB) of the California Department of Health Services, under cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), is conducting a PHA for the Alark Hard Chrome (AHC) facil...

2003-01-01

58

Combined Assessment Program Summary Report: Evaluation of Nurse Staffing in Veterans Health Administration Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of nurse staffing in Veterans Health Administration facilities. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the extent to which Veterans Health Administration f...

2013-01-01

59

Implementation of tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Mukono and Wakiso districts, Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis infection control (TBIC) is rarely implemented in the health facilities in resource limited settings. Understanding the reasons for low level of implementation is critical. The study aim was to assess TBIC practices and barriers to implementation in two districts in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 51 health facilities in districts of Mukono and Wakiso. The study included: a facility survey, observations of practices and eight focus group discussions with health workers. Results Quantitative: Only 16 facilities (31%) had a TBIC plan. Five facilities (10%) were screening patients for cough. Two facilities (4%) reported providing masks to patients with cough. Ventilation in the waiting areas was inadequate for TBIC in 43% (22/51) of the facilities. No facility possessed N95 particulate respirators. Qualitative: Barriers that hamper implementation of TBIC elicited included: under-staffing, lack of space for patient separation, lack of funds to purchase masks, and health workers not appreciating the importance of TBIC. Conclusion TBIC measures were not implemented in health facilities in the two Ugandan districts where the survey was done. Health system factors like lack of staff, space and funds are barriers to implement TBIC. Effective implementation of TBIC measures occurs when the fundamental health system building blocks -governance and stewardship, financing, infrastructure, procurement and supply chain management are in place and functioning appropriately.

2013-01-01

60

Provision of Mental Health Services in South African Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To date, South African research has not examined mental health service provision in substance abuse treatment facilities, even though these services improve client retention and treatment outcomes. To describe the extent to which substance abuse treatment facilities in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces provide clients with mental health

Myers, Bronwyn; Fakier, Nuraan

2009-01-01

61

Implementation of Oral Health Recommendations into Two Residential Aged Care Facilities in a Regional Australian City  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Residents of aged care facilities usually have a large number of oral health problems. Residents who suffer from dementia are at particular risk. A systematic review of the best available evidence with regard to maintaining the oral health of older people with dementia in residential aged care facilities provided a number of recommendations. Objectives The aim of the implementation

Michelle Cameron BN; Debra Mackenzie; Jacinta Pitt RN

62

42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

(a) If a health care facility or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to enter and perform the duties and functions required under its contract with CMS, the QIO mayâ (1) Determine that the health care facility or practitioner has failed to comply with the requirements of §...

2009-10-01

63

TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern  

MedlinePLUS

... in federal or state prisons, local jails, juvenile correction centers, or other facilities. Other correctional facilities include ... Got Mice? Know Hepatitis B Secondhand Smoke TB & Corrections Data & Statistics Diseases & Conditions Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental ...

64

System retrofit provides decentralized heating for mental health facility  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a low temperature/pressure unitary heating equipment which significantly improves building environmental conditions. In 1988, the State of Georgia Department of Human Resources considered closing Brook Run, then named the Georgia Retardation Center. Closing the 101-acre (41-hectare) mental health campus and relocating 377 permanent residents and 925 staff were being considered because of trauma caused by repeated failures of the campus' heating system. The 22-year-old central high temperature water (HTW) campus underground piping system that served HVAC and domestic hot water loads had been leaking 40 gallons per minute (21 million gallons per year) of water at 350F (177C) and 290 psig (1999 kPa). The campus heating system was no longer serviceable. The cost for repairing routine leaks had averaged $100,000 per year. In addition, over $5,000,000 in capital expenditures had been previously spent for system restoration. The facility had been cited for failure to meet federal and state temperature guidelines as a result of repeated wintertime catastrophic heating system failures. Discouraged residents' parents wrote personal checks payable to then-Governor Joe Frank Harris for Heat at Georgia Retardation Center. Ten buildings totaling 191,000 ft[sup 2] (17 744m[sup 2]) were included in the retrofit project. These included five permanent resident cottages, two workshop buildings, a theater, the administration building and the maintenance shop.

Gabriel, G.R. (Krewson Vickrey Gabriel Engineers, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States))

1993-03-01

65

Uses of inorganic hypochlorite (bleach) in health-care facilities.  

PubMed Central

Hypochlorite has been used as a disinfectant for more than 100 years. It has many of the properties of an ideal disinfectant, including a broad antimicrobial activity, rapid bactericidal action, reasonable persistence in treated potable water, ease of use, solubility in water, relative stability, relative nontoxicity at use concentrations, no poisonous residuals, no color, no staining, and low cost. The active species is undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Hypochlorites are lethal to most microbes, although viruses and vegetative bacteria are more susceptible than endospore-forming bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Activity is reduced by the presence of heavy metal ions, a biofilm, organic material, low temperature, low pH, or UV radiation. Clinical uses in health-care facilities include hyperchlorination of potable water to prevent Legionella colonization, chlorination of water distribution systems used in hemodialysis centers, cleaning of environmental surfaces, disinfection of laundry, local use to decontaminate blood spills, disinfection of equipment, decontamination of medical waste prior to disposal, and dental therapy. Despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants, hypochlorites continue to find wide use in hospitals.

Rutala, W A; Weber, D J

1997-01-01

66

Older Adult Participation in Health Promotion Programs: Perspectives of Facility Administrators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administrators of older adult-centered facilities must identify barriers to the planning and implementation of health promotion programs. In this qualitative research those barriers were identified through in-depth interviews with administrators of older adult-centered facilities. As identified by administrators, the predominant barriers to the participation of older adults in health promotion programs were scheduling conflicts, physical and mental health issues, a

Tim Wright; Gerald C. Hyner

2011-01-01

67

Provision of Mental Health Services in South African Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, South African research has not examined mental health service provision in substance abuse treatment facilities,\\u000a even though these services improve client retention and treatment outcomes. To describe the extent to which substance abuse\\u000a treatment facilities in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces provide clients with mental health services during the course\\u000a of treatment and to compare mental health service provision

Bronwyn Myers; Nuraan Fakier

2009-01-01

68

Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC), a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Given the current maternal and child mortality in Bangladesh and the challenges to addressing health-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets the financial sustainability of such facilities is crucial. Methods The study was designed as a case study covering a single facility. The methodology was based on the 'ingredient approach' using the allocation techniques by inpatient and outpatient services. Cost recovery of the facility was estimated from the provider's perspective. The value of capital items was annualized using 5% discount rate and its market price of 2004 (replacement value). Sensitivity analysis was done using 3% discount rate. Results The cost recovery ratio of the BRAC primary care facility was 59%, and if excluding all capital costs, it increased to 72%. Of the total costs, 32% was for personnel while drugs absorbed 18%. Capital items were17% of total costs while operational cost absorbed 12%. Three-quarters of the total cost was variable costs. Inpatient services contributed 74% of total revenue in exchange of 10% of total utilization. An average cost per patient was US$ 10 while it was US$ 67 for inpatient and US$ 4 for outpatient. Conclusion The cost recovery of this NGO primary care facility is important for increasing its financial sustainability and decreasing donor dependency, and achieving universal health coverage in a developing country setting. However, for improving the cost recovery of the health facility, it needs to increase utilization, efficient planning, resource allocation and their optimum use. It also requires controlling variable costs and preventing any wastage of resources.

2010-01-01

69

Health status and socio-economic factors associated with health facility utilization in rural and urban areas in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Abstracts Background With regards to equity, the objective for health care systems is “equal access for equal needs”. We examined associations of predisposing, enabling and need factors with health facility utilization in areas with high HIV prevalence and few people being aware of their HIV status. Methods The data is from a population-based survey among adults aged 15years or older conducted in 2003. The current study is based on a subset of this data of adults 15–49 years with a valid HIV test result. A modified Health behaviour model guided our analytical approach. We report unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals from logistic regression analyses. Results Totals of 1042 males and 1547 females in urban areas, and 822 males and 1055 females in rural areas were included in the study. Overall, 53.1% of urban and 56.8% of rural respondents utilized health facilities past 12 months. In urban areas, significantly more females than males utilized health facilities (OR=1.4 (95% CI [1.1, 1.6]). Higher educational attainment (10+ years of schooling) was associated with utilization of health facilities in both urban (OR=1.7, 95% CI [1.3, 2.1]) and rural (OR=1.4, 95% CI [1.0, 2.0]) areas compared to respondents who attained up to 7 years of schooling. Respondents who self-rated their health status as very poor/ poor/fair were twice more likely to utilize health facilities compared to those who rated their health as good/excellent. Respondents who reported illnesses were about three times more likely to utilize health facilities compared to those who did not report the illnesses. In urban areas, respondents who had mental distress were 1.7 times more likely to utilize health facilities compare to those who had no mental distress. Compared to respondents who were HIV negative, respondents who were HIV positive were 1.3 times more likely to utilize health facilities. Conclusion The health care needs were the factors most strongly associated with health care seeking. After accounting for need differentials, health care seeking differed modestly by urban and rural residence, was somewhat skewed towards women, and increased substantially with socioeconomic position.

2012-01-01

70

Monitoring child survival in 'real time' using routine health facility records: results from Malawi  

PubMed Central

Objectives Few developing countries have the accurate civil registration systems needed to track progress in child survival. However, the health information systems in most of these countries do record facility births and deaths, at least in principle. We used data from two districts of Malawi to test a method for monitoring child mortality based on adjusting health facility records for incomplete coverage. Methods Trained researchers collected reports of monthly births and deaths among children younger than 5 years from all health facilities in Balaka and Salima districts of Malawi in 2010–2011. We estimated the proportion of births and deaths occurring in health facilities, respectively, from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey and a household mortality survey conducted between October 2011 and February 2012. We used these proportions to adjust the health facility data to estimate the actual numbers of births and deaths. The survey also provided ‘gold-standard’ measures of under-five mortality. Results Annual under-five mortality rates generated by adjusting health facility data were between 35% and 65% of those estimated by the gold-standard survey in Balaka, and 46% and 50% in Salima for four overlapping 12-month periods in 2010–2011. The ratios of adjusted health facility rates to gold-standard rates increased sharply over the four periods in Balaka, but remained relatively stable in Salima. Conclusions Even in Malawi, where high proportions of births and deaths occur in health facilities compared with other countries in sub-Saharan Africa, routine Health Management Information Systems data on births and deaths cannot be used at present to estimate annual trends in under-five mortality.

Amouzou, Agbessi; Kachaka, Willie; Banda, Benjamin; Chimzimu, Martina; Hill, Kenneth; Bryce, Jennifer

2013-01-01

71

Protecting new health facilities from natural hazards: guidelines for the promotion of disaster mitigation.  

PubMed

The health sector is particularly vulnerable to naturally occurring events. The vulnerability of the health infrastructure (hospitals and clinics) is of particular concern. Not only are such facilities vulnerable structurally, but their ability to continue to provide essential functions may be severely compromised, thus leaving the stricken population without essential services. This paper summarizes a more detailed document, Guidelines for Vulnerability Reduction in the Design of New Health Facilities published by the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO)/ World Health Organization (WHO). The current document summarizes these Guidelines emphasizing how they may be used, by whom, and for what purpose. Potential users of the Guidelines include, but are not limited to: (1) initiators of health facility construction projects; (2) executors and supervisors of health facility construction projects; and (3) financing bodies in charge of funding health facility construction projects. The Guidelines include: (1) implications of natural phenomena upon the health infrastructure; (2) guidelines for vulnerability reduction for incorporation into development project cycles; (3) definitive phases and stages within the phases for development projects including: (I) Projects Assessment (needs assessment; assessment of options, the preliminary project); (II) Investment (project design, construction); and (III) Operational Activities (operations and maintenance). In addition, investment in damage reduction measures, policies and regulations, training and education, and the role of international organizations in the promotion and funding of mitigation strategies are addressed. PMID:15645629

72

Effects of the community mental health centers program on the growth of mental health facilities in nonmetropolitan areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a quasi-experimental design, changes in the numbers of mental health facilities between 1964 and 1974 were examined for a sample of 50 nonmetropolitan catchment areas that established a Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) before January 1973 and a sample that did not. Compared to non-CMHC areas, CMHC areas had a slightly greater number of general hospital psychiatric units in

Jeffrey A. Buck

1984-01-01

73

Selecting and Effectively Using a Health/Fitness Facility  

MedlinePLUS

... you into purchasing a membership? • Does the membership fee fit into your budget? • Is there a trial ... there different membership options and are all the fees for services posted? • Does the facility provide you ...

74

Healthcare Inspection: Evaluation of Quality Management in Veterans Health Administration Facilities, Fiscal Year 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG), Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities quality management (QM) programs. The purposes of the evaluation were to determine whether VHA fa...

2009-01-01

75

Combined Assessment Program Summary Report: Management of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in Veterans Health Administration Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of the management of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) in Veterans Health Administration facilities. The purposes of the evaluation were to determine whether fa...

2011-01-01

76

Combined Assessment Program Summary Report. Management of Workplace Violence in Veterans Health Administration Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of the management of workplace violence (WPV) in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the extent to whic...

2012-01-01

77

Healthcare Inspection: Review of Selected Pharmacy Operations in Veterans Health Administration Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

VA Office of Inspector General, Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of select pharmacy processes in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities. The purpose of our review was to: (1) evaluate pharmacy controls related to s...

2009-01-01

78

Medicare and Medicaid programs; fire safety requirements for certain health care facilities. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule amends the fire safety standards for hospitals, long-term care facilities, intermediate care facilities for the mentally retarded, ambulatory surgery centers, hospices that provide inpatient services, religious nonmedical health care institutions, critical access hospitals, and Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly facilities. Further, this final rule adopts the 2000 edition of the Life Safety Code and eliminates references in our regulations to all earlier editions. PMID:12523353

2003-01-10

79

The ADA in action at health care facilities.  

PubMed

The purpose of the work documented here was to assist defendants in legal actions to comply with settlement agreements, consent decrees, and memoranda of understanding. The work involved surveying medical center facilities and interviewing the staff and, based on the results, developing recommendations for compliance. Recommendations are offered for exam tables and chairs, weight scales, and ancillary aids. Guidance on interior design barriers and communication barriers is also provided. Finally, recommendations regarding facility policies and procedures and staff training are outlined. PMID:21122793

Story, Molly F; Kailes, June I; Donald, Christie Mac

2010-10-01

80

New British Columbia guidelines for supporting sexual health and intimacy in care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intimacy and sexual expression are an integral part of being human and of healthy living. However, this important aspect of well-being is often overlooked or avoided when a person enters a care facility such as a nursing home, group home, or assisted living residence. This article summarizes the new Supporting Sexual Health and Intimacy in Care Facilities Guidelines, which suggest

Bethan Everett; Jenny Young; Marie Carlson; Gerrit Clements

2010-01-01

81

Reducing health care costs through optimised facility management-related processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The German health care system is in dire straits financially. The costs of stationary patient care in hospitals are prohibitive. Currently, 30 per cent of hospital costs are a result of facility related processes, a percentage representing the equivalent of more than 14bn annually. Optimising facility-related processes in hospitals has the potential to incur major savings and improve medical processes

Kunibert Lennerts; Jochen Abel; Uwe Pfründer; Vishal Sharma

2003-01-01

82

Older Adult Participation in Health Promotion Programs: Perspectives of Facility Administrators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Administrators of older adult-centered facilities must identify barriers to the planning and implementation of health promotion programs. In this qualitative research those barriers were identified through in-depth interviews with administrators of older adult-centered facilities. As identified by administrators, the predominant barriers to the…

Wright, Tim; Hyner, Gerald C.

2011-01-01

83

Sharps injury recordkeeping activities and safety product use in California health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In 1999, licensed health care facilities in California (N = 2532) were invited to participate in a survey about occupational bloodborne pathogens exposure surveillance activities, recordkeeping methods, and use of safety-enhanced sharps devices. Results: A total of 1274 facilities responded to the survey from January 1999 through August 1999 (response rate = 50%). Sharps-related injuries were recorded for multiple

Marion Gillen; Martha Davis; Jennifer McNary; Alisa Boyd; Julieann Lewis; Chris Curran; Carol A. Young; Mary Schuller; James Cone

2002-01-01

84

Cost analysis and facility reimbursement in the long-term health care industry.  

PubMed Central

This article examines costs and develops a system of prospective reimbursement for the industry committed to long-term health care. Together with estimates of average cost functions--for purposes of determining those factors affecting the costs of long-term health care, the author examines in depth the cost effects of patient mix and facility quality. Policy implications are indicated. The article estimates cost savings and predicted improvements in facility performance resulting from adoption of a prospective reimbursement system.

Ullmann, S G

1984-01-01

85

Free-standing health care facilities: financial arrangements, quality assurance and a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Free-standing health care facilities now deliver many diagnostic and therapeutic services formerly provided only in hospitals. The financial arrangements available to these facilities differ according to whether the services are uninsured or insured. For an uninsured service, such as cosmetic surgery, the patient pays a fee directly to the service provider. For an insured service, such as cataract surgery, the provincial government uses tax revenues to fund the facility by paying it a facility fee and remunerates the physician who provided the service with a professional fee. No comprehensive, proactive quality assurance efforts have been implemented for either these facilities or the clinical practice provided within them. A pilot study involving therapeutic facilities in Ontario has suggested that a large-scale quality improvement effort could be undertaken in these facilities and rigorously evaluated.

Lavis, J N; Lomas, J; Anderson, G M; Donner, A; Iscoe, N A; Gold, G; Craighead, J

1998-01-01

86

Assessment of obstetric and neonatal health services in developing country health facilities.  

PubMed

Objective To describe the staffing and availability of medical equipment and medications and the performance of procedures at health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care at African, Asian, and Latin American sites participating in a multicenter trial to improve emergency obstetric/neonatal care in communities with high maternal and perinatal mortality.Study Design In 2009, prior to intervention, we surveyed 136 hospitals and 228 clinics in 7 sites in Africa, Asia, and Latin America regarding staffing, availability of equipment/medications, and procedures including cesarean section.Results The coverage of physicians and nurses/midwives was poor in Africa and Latin America. In Africa, only 20% of hospitals had full-time physicians. Only 70% of hospitals in Africa and Asia had performed cesarean sections in the last 6 months. Oxygen was unavailable in 40% of African hospitals and 17% of Asian hospitals. Blood was unavailable in 80% of African and Asian hospitals.Conclusions Assuming that adequate facility services are necessary to improve pregnancy outcomes, it is not surprising that maternal and perinatal mortality rates in the areas surveyed are high. The data presented emphasize that to reduce mortality in these areas, resources that result in improved staffing and sufficient equipment, supplies, and medication, along with training, are required. PMID:23329566

Manasyan, Albert; Saleem, Sarah; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Althabe, Fernando; Pasha, Omrana; Chomba, Elwyn; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Patel, Archana; Esamai, Fabian; Garces, Ana; Kodkany, Bhala; Belizan, Jose; McClure, Elizabeth M; Derman, Richard J; Hibberd, Patricia; Liechty, Edward A; Hambidge, K Michael; Carlo, Waldemar A; Buekens, Pierre; Moore, Janet; Wright, Linda L; Goldenberg, Robert L

2013-01-17

87

Assessment of Obstetric and Neonatal Health Services in Developing Country Health Facilities  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the staffing and availability of medical equipment and medications and the performance of procedures at health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care at African, Asian, and Latin American sites participating in a multicenter trial to improve emergency obstetric/neonatal care in communities with high maternal and perinatal mortality. Study Design In 2009, prior to intervention, we surveyed 136 hospitals and 228 clinics in 7 sites in Africa, Asia, and Latin America regarding staffing, availability of equipment/ medications, and procedures including cesarean section. Results The coverage of physicians and nurses/midwives was poor in Africa and Latin America. In Africa, only 20% of hospitals had full-time physicians. Only 70% of hospitals in Africa and Asia had performed cesarean sections in the last 6 months. Oxygen was unavailable in 40% of African hospitals and 17% of Asian hospitals. Blood was unavailable in 80% of African and Asian hospitals. Conclusions Assuming that adequate facility services are necessary to improve pregnancy outcomes, it is not surprising that maternal and perinatal mortality rates in the areas surveyed are high. The data presented emphasize that to reduce mortality in these areas, resources that result in improved staffing and sufficient equipment, supplies, and medication, along with training, are required.

Manasyan, Albert; Saleem, Sarah; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Althabe, Fernando; Pasha, Omrana; Chomba, Elwyn; Goudar, Shivaprasad S.; Patel, Archana; Esamai, Fabian; Garces, Ana; Kodkany, Bhala; Belizan, Jose; McClure, Elizabeth M.; Derman, Richard J.; Hibberd, Patricia; Liechty, Edward A.; Hambidge, K. Michael; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Buekens, Pierre; Moore, Janet; Wright, Linda L.; Goldenberg, Robert L.

2013-01-01

88

Using classification tree modelling to investigate drug prescription practices at health facilities in rural Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Drug prescription practices depend on several factors related to the patient, health worker and health facilities. A better understanding of the factors influencing prescription patterns is essential to develop strategies to mitigate the negative consequences associated with poor practices in both the public and private sectors. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in rural Tanzania among patients attending health facilities, and health workers. Patients, health workers and health facilities-related factors with the potential to influence drug prescription patterns were used to build a model of key predictors. Standard data mining methodology of classification tree analysis was used to define the importance of the different factors on prescription patterns. Results This analysis included 1,470 patients and 71 health workers practicing in 30 health facilities. Patients were mostly treated in dispensaries. Twenty two variables were used to construct two classification tree models: one for polypharmacy (prescription of ?3 drugs) on a single clinic visit and one for co-prescription of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) with antibiotics. The most important predictor of polypharmacy was the diagnosis of several illnesses. Polypharmacy was also associated with little or no supervision of the health workers, administration of AL and private facilities. Co-prescription of AL with antibiotics was more frequent in children under five years of age and the other important predictors were transmission season, mode of diagnosis and the location of the health facility. Conclusion Standard data mining methodology is an easy-to-implement analytical approach that can be useful for decision-making. Polypharmacy is mainly due to the diagnosis of multiple illnesses.

2012-01-01

89

Strategic Facilities Planning: A Focus on Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbulent market conditions have forced the health care sector to re-examine its business and operational practices. Health care has become increasingly complex as decisions and planning are reframed in light of the current lagging economy, an increased demand for services, new global competition, and impending legislation reform. The stress is felt most keenly within the nation's hospitals and consortia of

Ellen D. Hoadley; Brian Jorgensen

2010-01-01

90

Health physics monitoring at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Remote radiation monitoring has been designed into the Vitrification portion of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Local alarms and remote readings are provided for area radiation levels, door alarms, airborne radioactivity, effluent air activity and liquid (process system) activity.

Hogue, M.G.; Priester, H.P.

1994-06-01

91

Primary health care facility performance assessment in Armenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to focus on the performance of select facilities in Lori and Shirak provinces in Armenia in Spring 2008. This is in response to the deterioration of the primary healthcare sector in Armenia. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The performance assessment focused on the status of several performance indicators, both current and as recalled for 2006.

Tsovinar Harutyunyan; Anahit Demirchyan; Michael Thompson; Varduhi Petrosyan

2010-01-01

92

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

2009-01-01

93

Police and public health partnerships: Evidence from the evaluation of Vancouver's supervised injection facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In various settings, drug market policing strategies have been found to have unintended negative effects on health service use among injection drug users (IDU). This has prompted calls for more effective coordination of policing and public health efforts. In Vancouver, Canada, a supervised injection facility (SIF) was established in 2003. We sought to determine if local police impacted utilization of

Kora DeBeck; Evan Wood; Ruth Zhang; Mark Tyndall; Julio Montaner; Thomas Kerr

2008-01-01

94

Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

2009-01-01

95

Training the Auxiliary Health Workers; An Analysis of Functions, Training Content, Training Costs, and Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The booklet describes what each type of worker is allowed to do and presents an overview of the substantive content of the training, length of training, training costs, and kinds of facilities and staff needed. The types of workers include community health aide, homemaker-home health aide, social worker aide, food service supervisor, physical…

Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

96

Developing a Performance Measurement Framework and Indicators for Community Health Service Facilities in Urban China  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: China has had no effective and systematic information system to provide guidance for strengthening PHC (Primary Health Care) or account to citizens on progress. We report on the development of the China results-based Logic Model for Community Health Facilities and Stations (CHS) and a set of relevant PHC indicators intended to measure CHS priorities. METHODS: We adapted the PHC

Sabrina T. Wong; Delu Yin; Onil Bhattacharyya; Bin Wang; Liqun Liu; Bowen Chen

2010-01-01

97

Healthy Firms: Constraints to Growth among Private Health Sector Facilities in Ghana and Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background Health outcomes in developing countries continue to lag the developed world, and many countries are not on target to meet the Millennium Development Goals. The private health sector provides much of the care in many developing countries (e.g., approximately 50 percent in Sub-Saharan Africa), but private providers are often poorly integrated into the health system. Efforts to improve health systems performance will need to include the private sector and increase its contributions to national health goals. However, the literature on constraints private health care providers face is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze data from a survey of private health facilities in Kenya and Ghana to evaluate growth constraints facing private providers. A significant portion of facilities (Ghana: 62 percent; Kenya: 40 percent) report limited access to finance as the most significant barrier they face; only a small minority of facilities report using formal credit institutions to finance day to day operations (Ghana: 6 percent; Kenya: 11 percent). Other important barriers include corruption, crime, limited demand for goods and services, and poor public infrastructure. Most facilities have paper-based rather than electronic systems for patient records (Ghana: 30 percent; Kenya: 22 percent), accounting (Ghana: 45 percent; Kenya: 27 percent), and inventory control (Ghana: 41 percent; Kenya: 24 percent). A majority of clinics in both countries report undertaking activities to improve provider skills and to monitor the level and quality of care they provide. However, only a minority of pharmacies report undertaking such activities. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that improved access to finance and improving business processes especially among pharmacies would support improved contributions by private health facilities. These strategies might be complementary if providers are more able to take advantage of increased access to finance when they have the business processes in place for operating a successful business and health facility.

Burger, Nicholas E.; Kopf, Daniel; Spreng, Connor P.; Yoong, Joanne; Sood, Neeraj

2012-01-01

98

Impacts of natural hazards on primary health care facilities of iran: a 10-year retrospective survey.  

PubMed

Public health facilities in Iran are exposed to a wide range of natural hazards. This article presents the first survey of the impacts of such natural hazards on primary health care (PHC) centers in Iran from 2001 to 2011. A retrospective survey was conducted in 25 out of 30 provinces of Iran. Archival reports at provincial public health departments were cross-referenced with key informant interviews. During a 10-year period, 119 natural hazard events were recorded that led to physical damage and/or functional failure in 1,401 health centers, 127 deaths and injury or illness in 644 health staff. Earthquakes accounted for the most physical damage and all health-worker deaths. However, there was an increasing trend of impacts due to hydro-meteorological hazards. Iran's health system needs to establish a registry to track the impact of natural hazards on health facilities, conduct regular hazard and vulnerability assessments and increase mitigation and preparedness measures. Keywords: Disaster, primary health care, facility, Iran, natural hazard Corresponding author: Ali Ardalan MD, PhD. Iran's National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Email: aardalan@tums.ac.ir. PMID:23863871

Ardalan, Ali; Mowafi, Hani; Khoshsabeghe, Homa Yousefi

2013-06-28

99

Impacts of Natural Hazards on Primary Health Care Facilities of Iran: A 10-Year Retrospective Survey  

PubMed Central

Public health facilities in Iran are exposed to a wide range of natural hazards. This article presents the first survey of the impacts of such natural hazards on primary health care (PHC) centers in Iran from 2001 to 2011. A retrospective survey was conducted in 25 out of 30 provinces of Iran. Archival reports at provincial public health departments were cross-referenced with key informant interviews. During a 10-year period, 119 natural hazard events were recorded that led to physical damage and/or functional failure in 1,401 health centers, 127 deaths and injury or illness in 644 health staff. Earthquakes accounted for the most physical damage and all health-worker deaths. However, there was an increasing trend of impacts due to hydro-meteorological hazards. Iran’s health system needs to establish a registry to track the impact of natural hazards on health facilities, conduct regular hazard and vulnerability assessments and increase mitigation and preparedness measures. Keywords: Disaster, primary health care, facility, Iran, natural hazard Corresponding author: Ali Ardalan MD, PhD. Iran’s National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Email: aardalan@tums.ac.ir

Ardalan, Ali; Mowafi, Hani; Yousefi, Homa

2013-01-01

100

Development and implementation of the internal audit mechanisms to be used in the health care facilities.  

PubMed

Issues concerning the quality of care service improvement have become of national importance in the health-care system for both developed and developing countries. Internal audit is effective and efficient method to improve the quality of care in various health care facilities. Data from 452 outpatient cards of the case patients with arterial hypertension were analyzed, the level of awareness and patient compliance were defined. The stages of internal audit mechanisms implementation in the health care facilities were developed. As a result of medical records audit and awareness monitoring of patients with arterial hypertension ways to improve quality of medical care were defined. PMID:23863212

Smeyanov, V; Tarasenko, S; Smeyanova, O

2013-06-01

101

Health sciences libraries in Kuwait: a study of their resources, facilities, and services  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of health sciences libraries in Kuwait in terms of their staff, collections, facilities, use of information technology, information services, and cooperation. Seventeen libraries participated in the study. Results show that the majority of health sciences libraries were established during the 1980s. Their collections are relatively small. The majority of their staff is nonprofessional. The majority of libraries provide only basic information services. Cooperation among libraries is limited. Survey results also indicate that a significant number of health sciences libraries are not automated. Some recommendations for the improvement of existing resources, facilities, and services are made.

Al-Ansari, Husain A.; Al-Enezi, Sana

2001-01-01

102

Mexican American clients' perceptions of services in an outpatient mental health facility in a border city.  

PubMed

This descriptive-exploratory pilot study analyzed the perceptions of services in an outpatient mental health facility located in a border city in southwest Texas among Mexican American clientele with chronic mental illness. Face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires were conducted with high functioning mentally ill clients. The questionnaire, with both English and Spanish versions, consisted of items on sociodemographics, support networks, illness experiences, reasons for seeking health services, reactions to being visited in the home setting for follow-up care, receiving care from a mental health professional with a similar cultural background, satisfactions, problems encountered in the mental health delivery system, and suggestions for improving health services. Data from 56 respondents yielded generally highly favorable and positive ratings of services received in the facility. Overall, these baseline data present challenges and implications for delivering culturally competent mental health care to Mexican American clients with chronic mental illness. PMID:9601309

Lantican, L S

103

Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities  

MedlinePLUS

... 2013 Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities On This Page Key findings Most residential ... National Survey of Residential Care Facilities Most residential care communities did not use electronic health records in ...

104

Preventing Airborne Disease Transmission: Review of Methods for Ventilation Design in Health Care Facilities  

PubMed Central

Health care facility ventilation design greatly affects disease transmission by aerosols. The desire to control infection in hospitals and at the same time to reduce their carbon footprint motivates the use of unconventional solutions for building design and associated control measures. This paper considers indoor sources and types of infectious aerosols, and pathogen viability and infectivity behaviors in response to environmental conditions. Aerosol dispersion, heat and mass transfer, deposition in the respiratory tract, and infection mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on experimental and modeling approaches. Key building design parameters are described that include types of ventilation systems (mixing, displacement, natural and hybrid), air exchange rate, temperature and relative humidity, air flow distribution structure, occupancy, engineered disinfection of air (filtration and UV radiation), and architectural programming (source and activity management) for health care facilities. The paper describes major findings and suggests future research needs in methods for ventilation design of health care facilities to prevent airborne infection risk.

Aliabadi, Amir A.; Rogak, Steven N.; Bartlett, Karen H.; Green, Sheldon I.

2011-01-01

105

Adoption and Utilization of Electronic Health Record Systems by Long-Term Care Facilities in Texas  

PubMed Central

Long-term care (LTC) is an important sector in the healthcare industry; however, the adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems in LTC facilities lags behind that in other sectors of healthcare. This study examines the adoption and utilization of EHRs in LTC facilities in Texas and identifies the barriers preventing implementation of EHRs. A survey instrument was mailed to all Texas LTC facilities between October 2010 and March 2011. The survey found that in Texas, 39.5 percent of LTC facilities have fully or partially implemented EHR systems and 15 percent of LTC facilities have no plans to adopt EHRs yet. There is significant variation in the use of EHR functionalities across the LTC facilities in Texas. In the LTC facilities, the administrative functions of EHRs have been more widely adopted and are more widely utilized than the clinical functions of EHRs. Among the clinical functions adopted, the resident assessment, physician orders, care management plan, and census management are the leading functions used by the LTC facilities in Texas. Lack of capital resources is still the greatest barrier to EHR adoption and implementation. Policy makers, vendors, LTC administrators, educators, and researchers should make more effort to improve EHR adoption in LTC facilities.

Wang, Tiankai; Biedermann, Sue

2012-01-01

106

Keeping health facilities safe: one way of strengthening the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health systems.  

PubMed

The debate on the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health system strengthening in the last few years has intensified as experts seek to tease out common ground and find solutions and synergies to bridge the divide. Unfortunately, the debate continues to be largely academic and devoid of specificity, resulting in the issues being irrelevant to health care workers on the ground. Taking the theme 'What would entice HIV- and tuberculosis (TB)-programme managers to sit around the table on a Monday morning with health system experts', this viewpoint focuses on infection control and health facility safety as an important and highly relevant practical topic for both disease-specific programmes and health system strengthening. Our attentions, and the examples and lessons we draw on, are largely aimed at sub-Saharan Africa where the great burden of TB and HIV ? AIDS resides, although the principles we outline would apply to other parts of the world as well. Health care infections, caused for example by poor hand hygiene, inadequate testing of donated blood, unsafe disposal of needles and syringes, poorly sterilized medical and surgical equipment and lack of adequate airborne infection control procedures, are responsible for a considerable burden of illness amongst patients and health care personnel, especially in resource-poor countries. Effective infection control in a district hospital requires that all the components of a health system function well: governance and stewardship, financing,infrastructure, procurement and supply chain management, human resources, health information systems, service delivery and finally supervision. We argue in this article that proper attention to infection control and an emphasis on safe health facilities is a concrete first step towards strengthening the interaction between disease-specific programmes and health systems where it really matters – for patients who are sick and for the health care workforce who provide the care and treatment. PMID:21137105

Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Schouten, Erik J; Chimbwandira, Frank; Van Damme, Wim; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

2010-12-01

107

Food security practice in Kansas schools and health care facilities.  

PubMed

This pilot study investigated perceived importance and frequency of specific preventive measures, and food and nutrition professionals' and foodservice directors' willingness to develop a food defense management plan. A mail questionnaire was developed based on the US Department of Agriculture document, Biosecurity Checklist for School Foodservice Programs--Developing a Biosecurity Management Plan. The survey was sent to food and nutrition professionals and foodservice operators in 151 acute care hospitals, 181 long-term-care facilities, and 450 school foodservice operations. Chemical use and storage was perceived as the most important practice to protect an operation and was the practice implemented most frequently. Results of the study indicate training programs on food security are needed to increase food and nutrition professionals' motivation to implement preventive measures. PMID:17258972

Yoon, Eunju; Shanklin, Carol W

2007-02-01

108

Implementation of health facilities in a new city.  

PubMed

A new city is under construction in a developing country. The town will be organized in modules, and the population projection is established till the 90s. The ratio of medical personnel to inhabitants is fixed according to health policy criteria. The primary care system should be composed of a set of health centres which are identical with regard to equipment and personnel. The problem is to determine the number--and thus the size--of the health centres, and their location. The solution depends on two opposing factors: the total construction cost, which is increasing with the number of centres, and the walking distance for the patient, which is decreasing with the number of centres. For a given critical distance, we find--using techniques of location theory in network--the smallest number of centres that will ensure that all inhabitants are located within the critical distance. A Fortran program in which the sensitivity of the solution is studied as a function of the given critical distance is developed. PMID:10269461

Berghmans, L; Schoovaerts, P; Teghem, J

1984-12-01

109

Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials.  

PubMed

Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility-based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including crowd control, triage, removal of contaminated garments, cleaning of body contaminants, and management of contaminated materials and equipment), and a discussion of methods to achieve preparedness. PMID:18082785

Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

2008-01-01

110

Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. Methods All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75 % in 2005, 71 % in 2007, and 94 % in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form) for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support) model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. Results One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Conclusion Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors.

2012-01-01

111

Telepsychiatry in Correctional Facilities: Using Technology to Improve Access and Decrease Costs of Mental Health Care in Underserved Populations  

PubMed Central

Objective: It is unclear if telepsychiatry, a subset of telemedicine, increases access to mental health care for inmates in correctional facilities or decreases costs for clinicians or facility administrators. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how utilization of telepsychiatry affected access to care and costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Methods: A literature review complemented by a semistructured interview with a telepsychiatry practitioner. Five electronic databases, the National Bureau of Justice, and the American Psychiatric Association Web sites were searched for this research, and 49 sources were referenced. The literature review examined implementation of telepsychiatry in correctional facilities in Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Ohio, Texas, and West Virginia to determine the effect of telepsychiatry on inmate access to mental health services and the costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Results: Telepsychiatry provided improved access to mental health services for inmates, and this increase in access is through the continuum of mental health care, which has been instrumental in increasing quality of care for inmates. Use of telepsychiatry saved correctional facilities from $12,000 to more than $1 million. The semistructured interview with the telepsychiatry practitioner supported utilization of telepsychiatry to increase access and lower costs of providing mental health care in correctional facilities. Conclusions: Increasing access to mental health care for this underserved group through telepsychiatry may improve living conditions and safety inside correctional facilities. Providers, facilities, and state and federal governments can expect increased savings with utilization of telepsychiatry.

Deslich, Stacie Anne; Thistlethwaite, Timothy; Coustasse, Alberto

2013-01-01

112

Gender equality and childbirth in a health facility: Nigeria and MDG5.  

PubMed

This paper examined how addressing gender equality can lead to reductions in maternal mortality in Nigeria through an increased use of facility delivery. Because the majority of maternal complications cannot be predicted and often arise suddenly during labor, delivery and the immediate postpartum period, childbirth in a health facility is key to reducing maternal mortality. This paper used data from the 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) to examine associations of gender measures on the utilization of facility delivery after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Four gender equality measures were studied: household decision-making, financial decision-making, attitudes towards wife beating, and attitudes regarding a wife's ability to refuse sex. Results found older, more educated, wealthier, urban, and working women were more likely to have a facility delivery than their counterparts. In addition ethnicity was a significant variable indicating the importance of cultural and regional diversity. Notably, after controlling for the socioeconomic variables, two of the gender equality variables were significant: household decision-making and attitudes regarding a wife's ability to refuse sex. In resource-poor settings such as Nigeria, women with more decision-making autonomy are likely better able to advocate for and access a health facility for childbirth. Thus programs and policies that focus on gender in addition to focusing on education and poverty have the potential to reduce maternal mortality even further. PMID:23437506

Singh, Kavita; Bloom, Shelah; Haney, Erica; Olorunsaiye, Comfort; Brodish, Paul

2012-09-01

113

Predictors for health facility delivery in Busia district of Uganda: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Among the factors contributing to the high maternal morbidity and mortality in Uganda is the high proportion of pregnant women who do not deliver under supervision in health facilities. This study aimed to identify the independent predictors of health facility delivery in Busia a rural district in Uganda with a view of suggesting measures for remedial action. Methods In a cross sectional survey, 500 women who had a delivery in the past two years (from November 16 2005 to November 15 2007) were interviewed regarding place of delivery, demographic characteristics, reproductive history, attendance for antenatal care, accessibility of health services, preferred delivery positions, preference for disposal of placenta and mother’s autonomy in decision making. In addition the household socio economic status was assessed. The independent predictors of health facility delivery were identified by comparing women who delivered in health facilities to those who did not, using bivariate and binary logistic regression analysis. Results Eight independent predictors that favoured delivery in a health facility include: being of high socio-economic status (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.8 95% Confidence interval [95% CI]1.2–6.3), previous difficult delivery (AOR 4.2, 95% CI 3.0–8.0), parity less than four (AOR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6–5.6), preference of supine position for second stage of labour (AOR 5.9, 95% CI 3.5–11.1) preferring health workers to dispose the placenta (AOR 12.1, 95% CI 4.3–34.1), not having difficulty with transport (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.5), being autonomous in decision to attend antenatal care (AOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.4) and depending on other people (e.g. spouse) in making a decision of where to deliver from (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4–4.6). A model with these 8 variables had an overall correct classification of 81.4% (chi square?=?230.3, P?health facility deliveries there is need for reaching women of low social economic status and of higher parity with suitable interventions aimed at reducing barriers that make women less likely to deliver in health units such as ensuring availability of transport and involving spouses in the birth plan.

2012-01-01

114

Lessons Learned from the On-Site Distillation of Used Solvents Generated by Health Care Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the sources of contaminants found in used solvents generated by the histopathological laboratories at health care facilities and the technical problems, corrective measures, and economic analysis associated with the on-site recycling and reusing of these solvents. An appendix contains an economic analysis for a used-solvent recycling…

Huang, Ching-San; Ciesla, John

1992-01-01

115

Aging, health and place in residential care facilities in Beijing, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, residential care has become an alternative option for elder care in Beijing, China. Little is known, however, about the well-being of elderly residents and the relationship between their health and living in residential care facilities (RCFs). Hence this research aims to understand the well-being of elderly residents in RCFs and how the environment of RCFs affects elderly

Yang Cheng; Mark W. Rosenberg; Wuyi Wang; Linsheng Yang; Hairong Li

2011-01-01

116

INVITED EDITORIAL: Health effects of radiation exposure at uranium processing facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial public and scientific interest in the health consequences of exposures to ionising radiation in nuclear installations, in particular at nuclear fuels enrichment and production facilities. In this issue of Journal of Radiological Protection, McGeoghegan and Binks report on the follow-up of a cohort of over 19 000 uranium fuel and uranium hexafluoride production workers employed at the

Elisabeth Cardis; David Richardson

2000-01-01

117

Measuring the quality of child health care at first-level facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sound policy and program decisions require timely information based on valid and relevant measures. Recent findings suggest that despite the availability of effective and affordable guidelines for the management of sick children in first-level health facilities in developing countries, the quality and coverage of these services remains low. We report on the development and evaluation of a set of summary

Eleanor Gouws; Jennifer Bryce; George Pariyo; Joanna Armstrong Schellenberg; João Amaral; Jean-Pierre Habicht

2005-01-01

118

Cost-Conscious Guide to Fire Safety in Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study focuses upon the use of the Fire Safety Evaluation System developed by the Center for Fire Research at the National Bureau of Standards for determining equivalence to the Life Safety Code for health care facilities. The Life Safety Code, a volun...

R. E. Chapman

1982-01-01

119

Assessment of Clinical Profile of the Patients Treated at Ayurvedic Health Facilities in North India  

PubMed Central

Since a very long time, a significant number of patients have been seeking treatment at Complementary and Alternative Medicine health facilities, but the disease burden at these facilities has never been assessed and documented. Present cross-sectional study was carried out at Ayurvedic tertiary care hospital to document and to assess the rationale of disease reporting at Ayurvedic institutions of the northern state of India from January 2011 to October 2011. Almost half of the patients’ morbidities were not classified at all into any of the disease categories. The common reported morbidities at study hospital were: Respiratory (10.5%), neuromuscular (9.5%), digestive (9.2%) and circulatory (9.1%) disorders. As the majority of diseases were unclassified, so mainstreaming of the effective disease surveillance would be required to understand the morbidity pattern and successful treatment practices at health facilities.

Kumar, Dinesh; Quasmi, Nafis Ahmed; Chandel, Jameer Khan; Bhardwaj, Ashok Kumar; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Y. K.

2013-01-01

120

Household Decision-making about Delivery in Health Facilities: Evidence from Tanzania  

PubMed Central

This study investigated how partners’ perceptions of the healthcare system influence decisions about delivery-location in low-resource settings. A multistage population-representative sample was used in Kasulu district, Tanzania, to identify women who had given birth in the last five years and their partners. Of 826 couples in analysis, 506 (61.3%) of the women delivered in the home. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with delivery in a health facility were agreement of partners on the importance of delivering in a health facility and agreement that skills of doctors are better than those of traditional birth attendants. When partners disagreed, the opinion of the woman was more influential in determining delivery-location. Agreement of partners regarding perceptions about the healthcare system appeared to be an important driver of decisions about delivery-location. These findings suggest that both partners should be included in the decision-making process regarding delivery to raise rates of delivery at facility.

Danforth, E.J.; Rockers, P.C.; Mbaruku, G; Galea, S

2009-01-01

121

Assessment of clinical profile of the patients treated at ayurvedic health facilities in north India.  

PubMed

Since a very long time, a significant number of patients have been seeking treatment at Complementary and Alternative Medicine health facilities, but the disease burden at these facilities has never been assessed and documented. Present cross-sectional study was carried out at Ayurvedic tertiary care hospital to document and to assess the rationale of disease reporting at Ayurvedic institutions of the northern state of India from January 2011 to October 2011. Almost half of the patients' morbidities were not classified at all into any of the disease categories. The common reported morbidities at study hospital were: Respiratory (10.5%), neuromuscular (9.5%), digestive (9.2%) and circulatory (9.1%) disorders. As the majority of diseases were unclassified, so mainstreaming of the effective disease surveillance would be required to understand the morbidity pattern and successful treatment practices at health facilities. PMID:24130953

Kumar, Dinesh; Quasmi, Nafis Ahmed; Chandel, Jameer Khan; Bhardwaj, Ashok Kumar; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Y K

2013-09-01

122

Page 1 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text VersionPage 1. Page 1 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA + + + + + DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES + + + + + ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

123

Horizontal equity and efficiency at primary health care facilities in rural Afghanistan: a seemingly unrelated regression approach.  

PubMed

Producing services efficiently and equitably are important goals for health systems. Many countries pursue horizontal equity - providing people with the same illnesses equal access to health services - by locating facilities in remote areas. Staff are often paid incentives to work at such facilities. However, there is little evidence on how many fewer people are treated at remote facilities than facilities in more densely settled areas. This research explores if there is an association between the efficiency of health centers in Afghanistan and the remoteness of their location. Survey teams collected data on facility level inputs and outputs at a stratified random sample of 579 health centers in 2005. Quality of care was measured by observing staff interact with patients and determining if staff completed a set of normative patient care tasks. We used seemingly unrelated regression to determine if facilities in remote areas have fewer outpatient visits than other rural facilities. In this analysis, one equation compares the number of outpatient visits to facility inputs, while another compares quality of care to determinants of quality. The results indicate remote facilities have about 13% fewer outpatient visits than non-remote facilities, holding inputs constant. Our analysis suggests that facilities in remote areas are realizing horizontal equity since their clients are receiving comparable quality of care to those at non-remote facilities. However, we find the average labor cost for a visit at a remote facility is $1.44, but only $0.97 at other rural facilities, indicating that a visit in a remote facility would have to be 'worth' 1.49 times a visit at a rural facility for there to be no equity - efficiency trade-off. In determining where to build or staff health centers, this loss of efficiency may be offset by progress toward a social policy objective of providing services to disadvantaged rural populations. PMID:23726212

Johns, Benjamin; Steinhardt, Laura; Walker, Damian G; Peters, David H; Bishai, David

2013-04-24

124

Drug prescribing in rural health facilities in China: implications for service quality and cost.  

PubMed

Overuse of drugs in rural areas of China has led to a growing concern regarding service quality and cost. The study found evidence of high levels of drug use in some rural health facilities in comparison with a number of other developing countries. Such a result was significantly associated with the government policy of financing health care, regulation and monitoring of health services, and users' attitudes and behaviour. It underlines the need for measures to be taken in China to improve drug use in order to allow its population access to effective care at reasonable cost. PMID:9481197

Zhan, S K; Tang, S L; Guo, Y D; Bloom, G

1998-01-01

125

Treatment of uncomplicated malaria at public health facilities and medicine retailers in south-eastern Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background At primary care facilities in Nigeria, national treatment guidelines state that malaria should be symptomatically diagnosed and treated with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Evidence from households and health care providers indicates that many patients do not receive the recommended treatment. This study sought to determine the extent of the problem by collecting data as patients and caregivers leave health facilities, and determine what influences the treatment received. Methods A cross-sectional cluster survey of 2,039 respondents exiting public health centres, pharmacies and patent medicine dealers was undertaken in urban and rural settings in Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria. Results Although 79% of febrile patients received an anti-malarial, only 23% received an ACT. Many patients (38%) received sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). A further 13% of patients received an artemisinin-derivative as a monotherapy. An estimated 66% of ACT dispensed was in the correct dose. The odds of a patient receiving an ACT was highly associated with consumer demand (OR: 55.5, p < 0.001). Conclusion Few febrile patients attending public health facilities, pharmacies and patent medicine dealers received an ACT, and the use of artemisinin-monotherapy and less effective anti-malarials is concerning. The results emphasize the importance of addressing both demand and supply-side influences on malaria treatment and the need for interventions that target consumer preferences as well as seek to improve health service provision.

2011-01-01

126

Health facilities safety in natural disasters: experiences and challenges from South East Europe.  

PubMed

The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations. PMID:22754465

Radovic, Vesela; Vitale, Ksenija; Tchounwou, Paul B

2012-05-04

127

Drug consumption facility as part of a primary health care centre for problem drug users—Which clients are attracted?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTo investigate whether users of a drug consumption facility (DCF) established as part of a health care centre for problem drug users fulfilled entry criteria, especially public drug consumption, risky drug-application and housing problems. We also investigated whether the drug consumption facility attracted hard-to-reach opiate users who usually do not use the health care system.

Norbert Scherbaum; Michael Specka; Johannes Bombeck; Baerbel Marrziniak

2009-01-01

128

Management of severely ill children at first-level health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa when referral is difficult  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To quantify the main reasons for referral of infants and children from first-level health facilities to referral hospitals in sub- Saharan Africa and to determine what further supplies, equipment, and legal empowerment might be needed to manage such children when referral is difficult. Methods In an observational study at first-level health facilities in Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania,

Eric A. F. Simoes; Stefan Peterson; Youssouf Gamatie; Felix S. Kisanga; Gelasius Mukasa; Jesca Nsungwa-Sabiiti; Martin W. Weber

129

Prevalence of Malaria during Pregnancy and Antimalarial Intervention in an Urban Secondary Health Care Facility in Southern Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of malaria during pregnancy and antimalarial interventions in an urban secondary health care facility. Subjects and Methods: Of 432 pregnant women who delivered or were attending an antenatal clinic in a secondary health care facility in Benin City, Nigeria, 199 were recruited for the study. Demographic data were obtained from the pregnant women at delivery,

Ehijie F. O. Enato; Augustine O. Okhamafe; Eugene E. Okpere; Frederick I. Oseji

2007-01-01

130

Summary of selected health statistics for counties with nuclear facilities, New York State excluding New York City, 1960--1975  

Microsoft Academic Search

A previous report of the Office of Biostatistics of the New York State Department of Health, issued in 1971, summarized selected health statistics for the period 1960 through 1969, comparing counties in Upstate New York (New York State exclusive of New York City) in which nuclear facilities are located with counties without such facilities. This report will present comparisons extending

E. Burometto; G. Therriault; V. Logrillo

1977-01-01

131

Examining Inequities in Incidence of Catastrophic Health Expenditures on Different Healthcare Services and Health Facilities in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Objective There is limited evidence about levels of socio-economic and other differences in catastrophic health spending in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. The study estimated the level of catastrophic healthcare expenditures for different healthcare services and facilities and their distribution across socioeconomic status (SES) groups. Methods The study took place in four Local Government Areas in southeast Nigeria. Data were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires administered to 4873 households. Catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) were measured using a threshold of 40% of monthly non-food expenditure. We examined both total monthly health expenditure and disaggregated expenditure by source and type of care. Results The average total household health expenditure per month was 2354 Naira ($19.6). For outpatient services, average monthly expenditure was 1809 Naira ($15.1), whilst for inpatient services it was 610 Naira ($5.1). Higher health expenditures were incurred by urban residents and the better-off SES groups. Overall, 27% of households incurred CHE, higher for poorer socioeconomic groups and for rural residents. Only 1.0% of households had a member that was enrolled in a health insurance scheme. Conclusion The worse-off households (the poorest SES and rural dwellers) experienced the highest burden of health expenditure. There was almost a complete lack of financial risk protection. Health reform mechanisms are needed to ensure universal coverage with financial risk protection mechanisms.

Onwujekwe, Obinna; Hanson, Kara; Uzochukwu, Benjamin

2012-01-01

132

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PAGE 16  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

Text VersionPage 1. Page 2. Page 3. Page 4. Page 5. Page 6. Page 7. Page 8. Page 9. Page 10. Page 11. Page 12. Page 13. Page 14. Page 15. Page 16. ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling

133

Barriers and solutions for timely initiation of antenatal care in Kigali, Rwanda: Health facility professionals' perspective.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE: timely initiation of antenatal care (i.e. within the first trimester) is associated with attendance of the full recommended regimen of antenatal visits. This study assessed social and behavioural factors that affect timely initiation of antenatal care in Kigali, Rwanda from the perspective of health facility professionals. DESIGN: health facility professionals involved in antenatal care provision were interviewed on their perceptions about untimely initiation of antenatal care based on open-ended questions. These one-on-one interviews were tape recorded and transcribed for analysis. SETTING: interviews were performed in June and July 2011 at Muhima Health Center in Kigali, Rwanda. PARTICIPANTS: 17 health facility professionals with a wide range of skills and experience levels were selected from the 36 total staff members of Muhima Health Center based on their participation in and knowledge of antenatal care. MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: inductive content analysis was used to group responses from these qualitative interviews with the goal of creating a conceptual map around barriers and solutions for untimely antenatal care. Qualitative responses were coded to identify the most common themes and sub-themes following a consensus methodology. The health-care professional interviews identified five themes as barriers to timely initiation of antenatal care: (1) lack of knowledge; (2) experience with previous births; (3) issues with male partners not willing/able to attend the clinic; (4) poverty or problems with health insurance; and (5) antenatal care culture. As potential solutions to these hurdles, the following themes were identified: (1) maternal/community education and sensitisation; (2) incentives to attend antenatal care visits; and (3) tracking the content and recommended number of antenatal visits. KEY CONCLUSIONS: qualitative results indicate that behavioural contextual interventions may help overcome antenatal care barriers. The Rwandan Government and health facilities should work together with target communities to improve antenatal care compliance, taking into account the solutions suggested by the health facility professional interviews. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: study findings suggest that there are specific solutions to increase adherence with timely initiation of antenatal care in Rwanda, including education and sensitisation, modifying couples' HIV testing policies, addressing costs of antenatal care, and tracking the number of recommended antenatal visits. PMID:23538104

Hagey, Jill; Rulisa, Stephen; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

2013-03-26

134

Experiences of Fast Queue health care users in primary health care facilities in eThekwini district, South Africa.  

PubMed

Background: Comprehensive Primary Health Care (PHC), based on the principles of accessibility, availability, affordability, equity and acceptability, was introduced in South Africa to address inequalities in health service provision. Whilst the Fast Queue was instrumental in the promotion of access to health care, a major goal of the PHC approach, facilities were not prepared for the sudden influx of clients. Increased access resulted in long waiting times and queues contributing to dissatisfaction with the service which could lead to missed appointments and non-compliance with established treatment plans. Objectives: Firstly to describe the experiences of clients using the Fast Queue strategy to access routine healthcare services and secondly, to determine how the clients' experiences led to satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the Fast Queue service.Method: A descriptive qualitative survey using content analysis explored the experiences of the Fast Queue users in a PHC setting. Setting was first identified based on greatest number using the Fast Queue and geographic diversity and then a convenience sample of health care users of the Fast Queue were sampled individually along with one focus group of users who accessed the Queue monthly for medication refills. The same interview guide questions were used for both individual interviews and the one focus group discussion. Five clinics with the highest number of attendees during a three month period and a total of 83 health care users of the Fast Queue were interviewed. The average participant was female, 31 years old, single and unemployed.Results: Two themes with sub-themes emerged: health care user flow and communication, which highlights both satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the fast queue and queue marshals, could assist in directing users to the respective queues, reduce waiting time and keep users satisfied with the use of sign posts where there is a lack of human resources.Conclusion: Effective health communication strategies contribute to positive experiences by health care users and these can be effected by: (1) involvement of health care providers in planning the construction of health facilities to give input about patient flow, infection prevention and control and provision of privacy, (2) effective complaints mechanisms for users to ensure that complaints are followed up and (3)encouraging users to arrive at the facility throughout the day, rather than the present practice where all users arrive at the clinic early in the morning.  PMID:23902165

Sokhela, Dudu G; Makhanya, Nonhlanhla J; Sibiya, Nokuthula M; Nokes, Kathleen M

2013-07-05

135

Exploring the perspectives and experiences of health workers at primary health facilities in Kenya following training  

PubMed Central

Background A cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a national Kenyan mental health primary care training programme demonstrated a significant impact for health workers on the health, disability and quality of life of their clients, despite a severe shortage of medicines in the clinics. In order to better understand the potential reasons for the improved outcomes in the intervention group, the experiences of the participating health workers were explored through qualitative focus group discussions, as focus group methodology has been found to be a useful method of obtaining a detailed understanding of client and health worker perspectives within health systems. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 10 health workers from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training during the earlier randomised controlled trial. Results These focus group discussions suggest that the health workers in the intervention group perceived an increase in their communication, diagnostic and counselling skills, and that the clients in the intervention group noticed and appreciated these enhanced skills, while health workers and clients in the control group were both aware of the lack of these skills. Conclusion Enhanced health worker skills conferred by the mental health training programme may be responsible for the significant improvement in outcome of patients in the intervention clinics found in the randomised controlled trial, despite the general shortage of medicines and other health system weaknesses. These findings suggest that strengthening mental health training for primary care staff is worthwhile even where health systems are not strong and where the medicine supply cannot be guaranteed. Trial registration ISRCTN 53515024

2013-01-01

136

[Medicolegal opinions assessing the ability to undergo imprisonment vs. capacity of the Prison Health Service facilities].  

PubMed

Estimating the subject's ability to undergo imprisonment has become a medicolegal opinionating problem. Polish penal law indicates the presence of negative prerequisites, such as a "serious disease" and "important health-associated reasons". In these cases, the conditions of imprisonment pose a direct danger of death or detriment to health. Interruption of imprisonment or remission of the penalty of imprisonment must constitute the only possibility of avoiding such dangers. In his opinion, the expert should define the health-associated needs of the condemned and the possibilities of meeting such needs in the situation of imprisonment, also taking into consideration the capacity of the prison health service facility and its cooperation with regular health care institutions. PMID:18767503

Jurek, Tomasz; Bujak, Marek; Szostak, Maciej; Swiatek, Barbara

137

Modeling heterogeneity for count data: A study of maternal mortality in health facilities in Mozambique.  

PubMed

Count data are very common in health services research, and very commonly the basic Poisson regression model has to be extended in several ways to accommodate several sources of heterogeneity: (i) an excess number of zeros relative to a Poisson distribution, (ii) hierarchical structures, and correlated data, (iii) remaining "unexplained" sources of overdispersion. In this paper, we propose hierarchical zero-inflated and overdispersed models with independent, correlated, and shared random effects for both components of the mixture model. We show that all different extensions of the Poisson model can be based on the concept of mixture models, and that they can be combined to account for all different sources of heterogeneity. Expressions for the first two moments are derived and discussed. The models are applied to data on maternal deaths and related risk factors within health facilities in Mozambique. The final model shows that the maternal mortality rate mainly depends on the geographical location of the health facility, the percentage of women admitted with HIV and the percentage of referrals from the health facility. PMID:23828715

Loquiha, Osvaldo; Hens, Niel; Chavane, Leonardo; Temmerman, Marleen; Aerts, Marc

2013-07-05

138

Nursing attrition and the work environment in South African health facilities.  

PubMed

A number of media reports appeared on the shortages of professional health workers in the public health sector. Unsatisfactory working conditions in health facilities were mentioned as one of the key aspects responsible for the shortages. Literature indicates that stress caused by unsatisfactory work environments may play a major role in employees' decision to resign their jobs, in spite of enjoying the nature of their work. The aim of this article is to explore the current human resource situation in nursing i.e. to determine if a shortage of nursing skills exists, to establish the challenges that nurses have to face in performing their duties and to establish the potential effect of the work environment on attrition. Currently 155 484 nurses are practicing in South Africa at a rate of 343 nurses per 100 000 of the population, which compares favourably with the World Health Organisation minimum of 200:100 000. The lack of reliable data on the supply of and demand for nurses makes it difficult to determine whether real shortages exist. However the supply of nursing services is influenced by the uneven distribution of skills across regions and the outflow of professional skills. It seems that the existing situation will deteriorate because fewer people are interested in taking up or pursuing nursing as a career in South Africa. At the same time a need for more nurses was identified because of the growth in the population as well as a change in health care needs. Workplace conditions for health workers employed at hospitals and clinics in South Africa were explored as part of a recent national study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on the health sector. Health workers' opinions on aspects such as workload, staff morale and working hours were obtained during personal interviews, which were conducted at 222 health facilities. Nine hundred and twenty four professional nurses, enrolled nurses and nursing assistants, who were mostly employed in the public health sector, participated. A stressful work environment was identified in public hospitals and clinics. An increase in the number of patients visiting these facilities, accompanied by a lack of equipment, unsatisfactory work environment and a shortage of nurses were pointed out. Many patients cannot be accommodated elsewhere because of a lack of finance and alternative health care options. Nurses also indicated that they do not get much support from their employers. The effect of all these factors culminates in a stressed workforce who may be forced to consider alternative career options. This will be to the detriment of health care in the country. PMID:15712823

Hall, E J

2004-11-01

139

Fairness of utilizing health care facilities and out-of-pocket payment burden: evidence from Cambodia.  

PubMed

Catastrophic spending on health care through out-of-pocket payment is a huge problem in most low- and middle-income countries all over the world. The collapse of health systems and poverty have resulted in the proliferation of the private health sector in Cambodia, but very few studies have examined the fairness in ease of utilization of these services based on mode of payment. This study examined the utilization of health services for sickness or injury and identified its relationship with people's ability to pay for treatment seeking at various instances. Based on cross-sectional data from the Cambodian 2007 Demographic and Health Survey, the economic index estimated through principal component analysis and Lorenz curve was used to quantify the degree of fairness and equality in utilization and payment burden among the respondents. A distinct level of fairness was found in health care utilization and out-of-pocket payments. Specifically, use of private health care facilities and over-the-counter remedies dominate, and out-of-pocket payments cut across all socioeconomic strata. As many countries in low- and middle-income regions, and most importantly those in transition such as Cambodia, are repositioning their health systems, efforts should be made towards maintaining equitable access through adoption of finance mechanisms that make utilization of health care services fair and equitable. PMID:22958391

Dalal, Koustuv; Aremu, Olatunde

2012-09-10

140

Prevention and control of health care–associated waterborne infections in health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current article is a review of the public health risks attributable to waterborne pathogens in health care. The consequences of health care-associated infections (HAIs) are discussed. Not only are Legionella spp involved in HAIs, but also Pseudomonas aeruginosa, other gram-negative microorganisms, fungi, and amoeba-associated bacteria. This is particularly noteworthy among immunocompromised patients. New prevention strategies and control measures brought

M. Exner; A. Kramer; L. Lajoie; J. Gebel; S. Engelhart; P. Hartemann

2005-01-01

141

Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in rural health facilities in southern Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: One year after the adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS\\/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, this study was designed to assess the treatment practices regarding anti-malarial drugs at health facilities in four rural areas in southern Cameroon. METHODS: Between April and August 2005, information was collected by interviewing fifty-two health professionals from twelve rural health facilities, using

Collins Sayang; Mathieu Gausseres; Nicole Vernazza-Licht; Denis Malvy; Daniel Bley; Pascal Millet

2009-01-01

142

Appraisal of Supervisor's Attitude and Managerial Performance in Health Care Facilities-Mashhad-2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is an applied, cross-sectional descriptive research which includes all supervisors and Staffs in Mashhad health care facilities. It was used of 2 different questionnaires. Data was gathered and then had been coded and analyzed with SPSS software and t-test. In practice, the maximum notice of administrations was to organization and the minimum one referred to assessment. Between administration attitudes and their performance about planning and assessment was a significant direction positive but there was a significant difference about organization between these groups. The length of services of employee's was the only factor that was effective about the administration performance. The finding depicted that supervisor's performance evaluation as one of the most effective recognition and control methods and has an important role and is effective in promoting productivity of services in health care facilities.

Vafaee, A.; Majdi, M.; Kabazkhoob, M.

143

Site inspection health and safety plan. Bennett Army National Guard Facility Bennett, Colorado. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) is based on the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) HSP originally developed by R.L. Stollar Associates, Inc. in 1991 for use at the Bennett Army National Guard Facility (BANGF). Subsequent to the initial preparation of the plan, funding to perform the RI/FS at BANGF was not provided. The original RI/FS HSP has been modified to address the potential health and safety hazards associated with conducting a Site Inspection (SI) of this facility. The HSP meets the requirements of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1910.120 (29 CFR 1910.120) and 29 CFR 1910.134. Compliance with this HSP for BANGF is required of all field personnel, including subcontractors conducting investigations and waste management identified in the BANGF SI Sampling and Analysis Plan.

NONE

1995-01-26

144

Health care worker opinions on use of isolation precautions in long-term care facilities  

PubMed Central

To address controversies surrounding contact isolation precautions in skilled nursing facilities (SNF), we surveyed 356 nurses and nurses’ aides from 7 SNFs on their opinions regarding benefits and harms of contact isolation precautions. Whereas a majority of health care workers believed that contact isolation reduces transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms, they were also concerned about potentially harmful consequences to the SNF residents including depression and isolation.

Furuno, Jon P.; Krein, Sarah; Lansing, Bonnie; Mody, Lona

2012-01-01

145

Regional health care planning: a methodology to cluster facilities using community utilization patterns  

PubMed Central

Background Community-based health care planning and regulation necessitates grouping facilities and areal units into regions of similar health care use. Limited research has explored the methodologies used in creating these regions. We offer a new methodology that clusters facilities based on similarities in patient utilization patterns and geographic location. Our case study focused on Hospital Groups in Michigan, the allocation units used for predicting future inpatient hospital bed demand in the state’s Bed Need Methodology. The scientific, practical, and political concerns that were considered throughout the formulation and development of the methodology are detailed. Methods The clustering methodology employs a 2-step K-means + Ward’s clustering algorithm to group hospitals. The final number of clusters is selected using a heuristic that integrates both a statistical-based measure of cluster fit and characteristics of the resulting Hospital Groups. Results Using recent hospital utilization data, the clustering methodology identified 33 Hospital Groups in Michigan. Conclusions Despite being developed within the politically charged climate of Certificate of Need regulation, we have provided an objective, replicable, and sustainable methodology to create Hospital Groups. Because the methodology is built upon theoretically sound principles of clustering analysis and health care service utilization, it is highly transferable across applications and suitable for grouping facilities or areal units.

2013-01-01

146

JAMA Patient Page: Retinopathy  

MedlinePLUS

... jama.com. A Patient Page on causes of visual impairment was published in the October 15, 2003, issue. ... health problems that put them at risk for visual impairment should see an ophthalmologist (a doctor with specialized ...

147

JAMA Patient Page: Grief  

MedlinePLUS

... of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE Grief G rief (bereavement) is the emotional and physical ... specifically to treat people with complicated grief. ABNORMAL GRIEF FOR MORE INFORMATION • National Mental Health Association 800/ ...

148

Physical Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

Rodriguez, S. M.; Novelo Casanova, D.

2010-12-01

149

Social and cultural dimensions of hygiene in Cambodian health care facilities  

PubMed Central

Background The frequency of bloodborne pathogen healthcare-associated infections is thought to be high in developing Southeast Asian Countries. The underlying social-cultural logics contributing to the risks of transmission are rarely studied. This report provides some insights on the social and cultural factors that shape hygiene practices in Cambodian health care settings. Methods We conducted qualitative surveys in various public and private health facilities in Phnom Penh, the capital city and in provinces. We observed and interviewed 319 participants, health care workers and patients, regarding hygiene practices and social relationships amongst the health care staff and with patients. We also examined the local perceptions of hygiene, their impact on the relationships between the health care staff and patients, and perceptions of transmission risks. Data collection stem from face to face semi-structured and open-ended interviews and focus group discussions with various health care staffs (i.e. cleaners, nurses, midwives and medical doctors) and with patients who attended the study health facilities. Results Overall responses and observations indicated that hygiene practices were burdened by the lack of adequate materials and equipements. In addition, many other factors were identified to influence and distort hygiene practices which include (1) informal and formal social rapports in hospitals, (2) major infection control roles played by the cleaners in absence of professional acknowledgment. Moreover, hygiene practices are commonly seen as an unessential matter to be devoted to low-ranking staff. Conclusion Our anthropological findings illustrate the importance of comprehensive understanding of hygiene practices; they need to be considered when designing interventions to improve infection control practices in a Cambodian medical setting.

2011-01-01

150

Health care facilities' "war on terrorism": a deliberate process for recommending personal protective equipment.  

PubMed

The protection of health care facility (HCF) staff from the effects of weapons of mass destruction has gained heightened attention since the 9-11 terrorist attacks. One critical component of protection is personal protective equipment (PPE). No universal standard exists for an "essential" level of PPE for HCF staff. The absence of such a standard raises the need for development of national policy for PPE levels, particularly in HCFs. We describe a process used by the Veterans Health Administration for recommending policy for "essential" PPE levels. Although the recommendations are specific for Veterans Health Administration, the process, findings, and applications may be useful to other institutions as they attempt to resolve this critical issue. This descriptive account will serve to generate practical scientific debate in the academic community and lead to definitive public policy recommendations for the Nation's HCFs in executing their roles in the event of a terrorist attack. PMID:17276809

Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

2007-02-01

151

Combined Assessment Program Summary Report: Evaluation of Quality Management in Veterans Health Administration Facilities, Fiscal Year 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities quality management (QM) programs. The purposes of the evaluation were to det...

2012-01-01

152

Guide to Assessing Patient Needs and Planning Nursing Care. A Reference for Nurses in Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guidelines are presented for use by nurses in health care facilities in the assessment of patient needs and the development of nursing care plans. Nursing care is viewed as a continuing process of observing, evaluating, reporting, and recording physiologi...

M. Ayers M. E. Adams M. O'Boyle

1972-01-01

153

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...quality system for laboratory seed health testing...selection procedure and a training system to ensure technical...plant pathologist or by laboratory technicians under the supervision...the facility, the training program must be...

2009-01-01

154

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...quality system for laboratory seed health testing...selection procedure and a training system to ensure technical...plant pathologist or by laboratory technicians under the supervision...the facility, the training program must be...

2010-01-01

155

The impact of reducing financial barriers on utilisation of a primary health care facility in Rwanda  

PubMed Central

This study investigates the impact of subsidising community-based health insurance (mutuelle) enrolment, removing point-of-service co-payments, and improving service delivery on health facility utilisation rates in Mayange, a sector of rural Rwanda of approximately 25,000 people divided among five ‘imidugudu’ or small villages. While comprehensive service upgrades were introduced in the Mayange Health Centre between April 2006 and February 2007, utilisation rates remained similar to comparison sites. Between February 2007 and April 2007, subsidies for mutuelle enrolment established virtually 100% coverage. Immediately after co-payments were eliminated in February 2007, patient visits levelled at a rate triple the previous value. Regression analyses using data from Mayange and two comparison sites indicate that removing financial barriers resulted in about 0.6 additional annual visits for curative care per capita. Although based on a single local pilot, these findings suggest that in order to achieve improved health outcomes, key short-term objectives include improved service delivery and reduced financial barriers. Based on this pilot, higher utilisation rates may be affected if broader swaths of the population are enrolled in mutuelle and co-payments are eliminated. Health leaders in Rwanda should consider further studies to determine if the impact of eliminating co-payments and increasing subsidies for mutuelle enrolment as seen in Mayange holds at greater levels of scale. Broader studies to better elucidate the impact of enrolment subsidies and co-payment subsidies on utilisation, health outcomes, and costs would also provide policy insights.

Dhillon, Ranu S.; Bonds, Matthew H.; Fraden, Max; Ndahiro, Donald; Ruxin, Josh

2011-01-01

156

Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure Facilities for Bio-Effects Research at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a ...

J. S. Ali C. Weil

1983-01-01

157

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

158

Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Waste Coolant Processing Facility (T-038)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy's Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for theWaste Coolant Processing Facility (T-038). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at Oak

D. E. Bohrman; M. S. Uziel; D. C. Landguth; S. W. Hawthorne

1990-01-01

159

Ready, aim fire! Mental health nurses under siege in acute inpatient facilities.  

PubMed

It has been clearly acknowledged and well-documented that physical, emotional, and psychological violence is a central theme and an expected workplace hazard for registered nurses working in acute inpatient mental health care facilities. Limited research, however, has focused on how registered nurses have been able to cope within this environment and adequately protect themselves from harm. A critical feminist research project recently explored the lived experience of 13 Australian, female, registered nurses working in a busy metropolitan acute inpatient mental health care facility. "Fear" was exposed as the precursor to violence and aggression, both "fear as experienced by the nurse" and "fear as experienced by the patient." The participants reported experiencing a sense of fear when they could not accurately or confidently anticipate a patient response or reaction. They identified this relationship with fear as being "part of the job" and part of the unpredictable nature of caring for people experiencing complex distortions in thinking and behavior. The participants believed, however, that additional workplace pressures complicated the therapeutic environment, resulting in a distraction from patient care and observation. This distraction could lead to nurse-patient miscommunication and the potential for violence. This article discusses a major theme to emerge from this study, "Better the devil you know!" The theme highlights how mental health nurses cope with violence and why they choose to continue working in this complex care environment. PMID:23566191

Ward, Louise

2013-04-01

160

Accessibility to health care facilities in Montreal Island: an application of relative accessibility indicators from the perspective of senior and non-senior residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Geographical access to health care facilities is known to influence health services usage. As societies age, accessibility to health care becomes an increasingly acute public health concern. It is known that seniors tend to have lower mobility levels, and it is possible that this may negatively affect their ability to reach facilities and services. Therefore, it becomes important to

Antonio Paez; Ruben G Mercado; Steven Farber; Catherine Morency; Matthew Roorda

2010-01-01

161

Revolving drug funds at front-line health facilities in Vientiane, Lao PDR.  

PubMed

Pharmaceutical cost recovery programmes, which have been mainly implemented in Africa, are gradually spreading to Southeast Asian countries that formerly belonged to the socialist bloc. This report describes the economic and operational realities of revolving drug funds (RDFs) at district hospitals and health centres in the capital of the Lao PDR by reviewing research conducted by the implementing department. People in the municipality spent an average of US$11 on drugs in 1996. The RDFs comprised only 3% of the total yearly drug sales in the municipality, whereas private pharmacies accounted for 75%. The RDFs were forced to operate in conjunction with the remaining government drug endowment and the thriving private pharmacies. This scheme has provided a stable supply of essential drugs. The assurance of drug availability at the front-line health facilities has resulted in increased utilization of the facilities despite the introduction of a drug fee. The cost recovery rate was 107% at health centres and 108% at district hospitals in two monitored districts during the 10 months from November 1997. Decentralized financial management was essential for cost recovery, allowing timely adjustment of selling prices as purchase prices rapidly inflated after the Asian economic crisis. The health staff observed that the people perceived drugs as everyday commodities that they should buy and take based on self-diagnosis and personal preference. Adaptation of the public health authorities to market-oriented thinking along with the establishment of pharmaceutical cost recovery occurred with few problems. However, both financial and operational management capacity at the municipal level pose a major challenge to policy clarification and scheme setting, especially in procurement, control of prescribing practices and the integration of drug dispensing with other components of quality clinical care. PMID:11238436

Murakami, H; Phommasack, B; Oula, R; Sinxomphou, S

2001-03-01

162

Hepatitis B among pregnant women attending health care facilities in rural Bangladesh.  

PubMed

This study assessed hepatitis B prevalence among pregnant women attending health care facilities in rural Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected from 480 participants. HBsAg was positive in 0.4% of subjects, anti-HBc was positive in 21.5% and anti-HBs was positive in 8.5% of subjects. HBsAg was more prevalent among the older age group. Hepatitis B has a low prevalence among pregnant women in rural Bangladesh. Existing hepatitis B vaccination schedule in the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) to vaccinate the children in rural Bangladesh is appropriate. PMID:22299410

Shamsuzzaman, Md; Singhasivanon, P; Kaewkungwal, J; Lawpoolsri, S; Tangkijvanich, P; Gibbons, Robert V; Rahman, M; Alamgir, A S M; Mahtab, M A

2011-11-01

163

Imported care: recruiting foreign nurses to U.S. health care facilities.  

PubMed

As U.S. health care facilities struggle to fill current registered nurse staffing vacancies, a more critical nurse undersupply is predicted over the next twenty years. In response, many institutions are doubling their efforts to attract and retain nurses. To that end, foreign nurses are increasingly being sought, creating a lucrative business for new recruiting agencies both at home and abroad. This paper examines past and current foreign nurse use as a response to nurse shortages and its implications for domestic and global nurse workforce policies. PMID:15160805

Brush, Barbara L; Sochalski, Julie; Berger, Anne M

164

Unfulfilled expectations to services offered at primary health care facilities: Experiences of caretakers of underfive children in rural Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background There is growing evidence that patients frequently bypass primary health care (PHC) facilities in favour of higher level hospitals regardless of substantial additional time and costs. Among the reasons given for bypassing are poor services (including lack of drugs and diagnostic facilities) and lack of trust in health workers. The World Health Report 2008 “PHC now more than ever” pointed to the importance of organizing health services around people’s needs and expectations as one of the four main issues of PHC reforms. There is limited documentation of user’s expectations to services offered at PHC facilities. The current study is a community extension of a hospital-based survey that showed a high bypassing frequency of PHC facilities among caretakers seeking care for their underfive children at two district hospitals. We aimed to explore caretakers’ perceptions and expectations to services offered at PHC facilities in their area with reference to their experiences seeking care at such facilities. Methods We conducted four community-based focus group discussions (FGD’s) with 47 caretakers of underfive children in Muheza district of Tanga region, Tanzania in October 2009. Results Lack of clinical examinations and laboratory tests, combined with shortage of drugs and health workers, were common experiences. Across all the focus group discussions, unpleasant health workers’ behaviors, lack of urgency and unnecessary delays were major complaints. In some places, unauthorized fees reduced access to services. Conclusion The study revealed significant disappointments among caretakers with regard to the quality of services offered at PHC facilities in their areas, with implications for their utilization and proper functioning of the referral system. Practices regarding partial drugs administrations, skipping of injections, unofficial payments and consultations by unskilled health care providers need urgent action. There is also a need for proper accountability mechanisms to govern appropriate allocation and monitoring of health care resources and services in Tanzania.

2012-01-01

165

Why give birth in health facility? Users' and providers' accounts of poor quality of birth care in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background In Tanzania, half of all pregnant women access a health facility for delivery. The proportion receiving skilled care at birth is even lower. In order to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, the government has set out to increase health facility deliveries by skilled care. The aim of this study was to describe the weaknesses in the provision of acceptable and adequate quality care through the accounts of women who have suffered obstetric fistula, nurse-midwives at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities and local community members. Methods Semi-structured interviews involving 16 women affected by obstetric fistula and five nurse-midwives at maternity wards at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities, and Focus Group Discussions with husbands and community members were conducted between October 2008 and February 2010 at Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania and Temeke hospitals in Dar es Salaam, and Mpwapwa district in Dodoma region. Results Health care users and health providers experienced poor quality caring and working environments in the health facilities. Women in labour lacked support, experienced neglect, as well as physical and verbal abuse. Nurse-midwives lacked supportive supervision, supplies and also seemed to lack motivation. Conclusions There was a consensus among women who have suffered serious birth injuries and nurse midwives staffing both BEmOC and CEmOC maternity wards that the quality of care offered to women in birth was inadequate. While the birth accounts of women pointed to failure of care, the nurses described a situation of disempowerment. The bad birth care experiences of women undermine the reputation of the health care system, lower community expectations of facility birth, and sustain high rates of home deliveries. The only way to increase the rate of skilled attendance at birth in the current Tanzanian context is to make facility birth a safer alternative than home birth. The findings from this study indicate that there is a long way to go.

2013-01-01

166

The effect of distance to formal health facility on childhood mortality in rural Tanzania, 2005-2007  

PubMed Central

Background Major improvements are required in the coverage and quality of essential childhood interventions to achieve Millennium Development Goal Four (MDG 4). Long distance to health facilities is one of the known barriers to access. We investigated the effect of networked and Euclidean distances from home to formal health facilities on childhood mortality in rural Tanzania between 2005 and 2007. Methods A secondary analysis of data from a cohort of 28,823 children younger than age 5 between 2005 and 2007 from Ifakara Health and Demographic Surveillance System was carried out. Both Euclidean and networked distances from the household to the nearest health facility were calculated using geographical information system methods. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to investigate the effect of distance from home to the nearest health facility on child mortality. Results Children who lived in homes with networked distance >5 km experienced approximately 17% increased mortality risk (HR=1.17; 95% CI 1.02–1.38) compared to those who lived <5 km networked distance to the nearest health facility. Death of a mother (HR=5.87; 95% CI 4.11–8.40), death of preceding sibling (HR=1.9; 95% CI 1.37–2.65), and twin birth (HR=2.9; 95% CI 2.27–3.74) were the strongest independent predictors of child mortality. Conclusions Physical access to health facilities is a determinant of child mortality in rural Tanzania. Innovations to improve access to health facilities coupled with birth spacing and care at birth are needed to reduce child deaths in rural Tanzania.

Kadobera, Daniel; Sartorius, Benn; Masanja, Honorati; Mathew, Alexander; Waiswa, Peter

2012-01-01

167

Hispanic Americans and Mental Health Services: A Comparison of Hispanic, Black, and White Admissions to Selected Mental Health Facilities, 1975. Mental Health Service System Reports. Series CN No. 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report compares Hispanic American admissions with white and black admissions to selected mental health facilities in 1975. It focuses on differences and similarities in the use of mental health facilities by the three racial/ethnic groups as related to age, sex, marital status, educational attainment, source of referral, previous psychiatric…

Rosenstein, Marilyn J.

168

Entertainment Pages.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Notes that the planning of an effective entertainment page in a school newspaper must begin by establishing its purpose. Examines all the elements that contribute to the makeup of a good entertainment page. (RL)|

Druce, Mike

1981-01-01

169

The influences of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on women's choice of prenatal care facility: Investigation of differences between rural and non-rural areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI), implemented in 1995, substantially increased the number of health care facilities that can deliver free prenatal care. Because of the increase in such facilities, it is usually assumed that women would have more choices regarding prenatal care facilities and thus experience reduction in travel cost. Nevertheless, there has been no research exploring these issues

Likwang Chen; Chi-Liang Chen; Wei-Chih Yang

2008-01-01

170

Sterilization efficiency of the photocatalyst against environmental microorganisms in a health care facility.  

PubMed

The photocatalyst equipment consists of a titanium dioxide membrane and an ultraviolet lamp. The authors studied if the photocatalyst equipment is practically useful in sterilizing environmental microorganisms in the health care facility. The number of microorganisms was compared in the cases of no sterilization (control) and the photocatalyst sterilization. As a result, a statistical difference was observed between control and the photocatalyst sterilization against airborne microorganisms (p < 0.01), but not against surface microorganisms (p > 0.2). The photocatalyst uses an air sucking system, so it may be ineffective against microorganisms tightly attached to surfaces. However, the effectiveness of the photocatalyst to sterilize airborne microorganisms in the health care facility was successfully confirmed. Concerning the humidity effect on the photocatalyst sterilization, the authors compared the number of airborne microorganisms in cases of the control, UV alone and photocatalyst sterilization when humidity was changed. A statistical difference was observed between UV and the photocatalyst sterilization (p < 0.01) when humidity was increased to 60-70%, but not observed between UV and the photocatalyst sterilization (p > 0.2) when humidity was not controlled and was around 10-20%. This indicates that maintaining high humidity levels will present satisfactory sterilization results due to a greater production of OH radicals. From data obtained, no effect of the adsorption on the TiO2 membrane could be observed. PMID:16637435

Shintani, Hideharu; Kurosu, Sinobu; Miki, Akiko; Hayashi, Fumie; Kato, Shigekazu

2006-03-01

171

Health Consultation: North Indian Bend Wash Central Ground Treatment Facility, Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Arizona. EPA Facility ID: AZD980695969.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The North Indian Bend Wash (NIBW) Superfund site was added to the National Priorities List in 1983. As part of the remediation, the Central Groundwater Treatment Facility (CGTF) was built by several key entities. These entities include, the United States ...

2006-01-01

172

Health Hazard Evaluation Report, HETA-2008-0230-3096, General Mills, Los Angeles, CA, November 2009. Report on an Investigation of Buttermilk Flavoring Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Bakery Mix Production Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On July 8, 2008, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a confidential Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) request to perform an investigation of possible health hazards at the General Mills, Inc. bakery mix facility in Los ...

G. A. Day G. J. Kullman K. J. Cummings

2009-01-01

173

Paging Performance with Page Coloring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constraining the mapping of virtual to physical addresses (page coloring) can speed and\\/or simplify caches in the presence of virtual memory. For the mapping to hold, physical memory must be partitioned into distinct colors, and virtual pages allocated to a specific color of physical page determined by the mapping. This paper uses and analytical model and simulation to compare the

William L. Lynch; M. J. Flynn

174

Building capacity in health facility management: guiding principles for skills transfer in Liberia  

PubMed Central

Background Management training is fundamental to developing human resources for health. Particularly as Liberia revives its health delivery system, facility and county health team managers are central to progress. Nevertheless, such management skills are rarely prioritized in health training, and sustained capacity building in this area is limited. We describe a health management delivery program in which a north and south institution collaborated to integrate classroom and field-based training in health management and to transfer the capacity for sustained management development in Liberia. Methods We developed and implemented a 6-month training program in health management skills (i.e. strategic problem solving, financial management, human resource management and leadership) delivered by Yale University and Mother Patern College from Liberia, with support from the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative. Over three 6-month cycles, responsibility for course instruction was transferred from the north institution to the south institution. A self-administered survey was conducted of all participants completing the course to measure changes in self-rated management skills, the degree to which the course was helpful and met its stated objectives, and faculty members' responsiveness to participant needs as the transfer process occurred. Results Respondents (n = 93, response rate 95.9%) reported substantial improvement in self-reported management skills, and rated the helpfulness of the course and the degree to which the course met its objectives highly. Levels of improvement and course ratings were similar over the three cohorts as the course was transferred to the south institution. We suggest a framework of five elements for implementing successful management training programs that can be transferred and sustained in resource-limited settings, including: 1) use a short-course format focusing on four key skill areas with practical tools; 2) include didactic training, on-site projects, and on-site mentoring; 3) collaborate with an in-country academic institution, willing and able to scale-up and maintain the training; 4) provide training for the in-country academic faculty; and 5) secure Ministry-level support to ensure participation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate key elements for scaling up and replicating educational initiatives that address management skills essential for long-term health systems strengthening in resource-poor settings.

2010-01-01

175

PEPFAR programs linked to more deliveries in health facilities by African women who are not infected with HIV.  

PubMed

HIV programs in lower-income countries have provided lifesaving care and treatment to millions of people, but their expansion has raised concerns that these programs may have diverted health workers, management attention, and infrastructure investments from other health priorities, such as high maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the effect of HIV programs supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) on maternal health services for women not infected with HIV in 257 health facilities in eight African countries in 2007-11. Controlling for other variables, we found that having more patients on antiretroviral treatment and HIV-related infrastructure investments, such as on-site laboratories at health clinics, were associated with more deliveries at health facilities by women not infected with HIV. This association is consistent with the hypothesis that PEPFAR-funded infrastructure may also support other health services and that the program may have laid the foundation for improving health system performance in maternal health overall. We recommend that lessons learned from the rapid expansion of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa should be drawn on to increase the provision of maternal and newborn health care and other high-priority health services, such as the treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic, noncommunicable diseases. PMID:22778337

Kruk, Margaret E; Jakubowski, Aleksandra; Rabkin, Miriam; Elul, Batya; Friedman, Michael; El-Sadr, Wafaa

2012-07-01

176

Aging, health and place in residential care facilities in Beijing, China.  

PubMed

In recent years, residential care has become an alternative option for elder care in Beijing, China. Little is known, however, about the well-being of elderly residents and the relationship between their health and living in residential care facilities (RCFs). Hence this research aims to understand the well-being of elderly residents in RCFs and how the environment of RCFs affects elderly people's everyday activities and health. The concepts of therapeutic landscapes, active aging, and well-being contribute to understanding the relationships among aging, health, and environment within RCF settings. Qualitative data from 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews with RCF managers, elderly residents, and family members in Beijing were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. The results show that most of the elderly residents are satisfied with their lives in RCFs, but a few of them feel isolated and depressed after their relocation. Each RCF, as a place with its unique physical and social environment, has a significant influence on the elderly residents' physical and psychological well-being. Individual factors such as characteristics of elderly residents, their attitudes on aging and residential care, and family support also play important roles in their adaptation and well-being after relocation from home to RCFs. Although this study focuses on residential care at the local level, it sheds light on future research on geographical and socio-cultural meanings of elder care at local, regional, and national levels in China. PMID:21109338

Cheng, Yang; Rosenberg, Mark W; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Hairong

2010-10-26

177

Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Waste Coolant Processing Facility (T-038)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy`s Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for theWaste Coolant Processing Facility (T-038). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at Oak

D. E. Bohrman; M. S. Uziel; D. C. Landguth; S. W. Hawthorne

1990-01-01

178

Direct facility funding as a response to user fee reduction: implementation and perceived impact among Kenyan health centres and dispensaries  

PubMed Central

There is increasing pressure for reduction of user fees, but this can have adverse effects by decreasing facility-level funds. To address this, direct facility funding (DFF) was piloted in Coast Province, Kenya, with health facility committees (HFCs) responsible for managing the funds. We evaluated the implementation and perceived impact 2.5 years after DFF introduction. Quantitative data collection at 30 public health centres and dispensaries included a structured interview with the in-charge, record reviews and exit interviews. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with the in-charge and HFC members at 12 facilities, and with district staff and other stakeholders. DFF procedures were well established: HFCs met regularly and accounting procedures were broadly followed. DFF made an important contribution to facility cash income, accounting for 47% in health centres and 62% in dispensaries. The main items of expenditure were wages for support staff (32%), travel (21%), and construction and maintenance (18%). DFF was perceived to have a highly positive impact through funding support staff such as cleaners and patient attendants, outreach activities, renovations, patient referrals and increasing HFC activity. This was perceived to have improved health worker motivation, utilization and quality of care. A number of problems were identified. HFC training was reportedly inadequate, and no DFF documentation was available at facility level, leading to confusion. Charging user fees above those specified in the national policy remained common, and understanding of DFF among the broader community was very limited. Finally, relationships between HFCs and health workers were sometimes characterized by mistrust and resentment. Relatively small increases in funding may significantly affect facility performance when the funds are managed at the periphery. Kenya plans to scale up DFF nationwide. Our findings indicate this is warranted, but should include improved training and documentation, greater emphasis on community engagement, and insistence on user fee adherence.

Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

2010-01-01

179

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-04-21

180

Management of scales and other insect debris: occupational health hazard in a lepidopterous rearing facility.  

PubMed

Scales and other body parts of Lepidoptera are known allergens and pose a serious health hazard for workers in rearing programs. Researchers of the Crop Science Research Laboratory (USDA-ARS), located at Mississippi State, MS, have reared lepidopterous insects since the late 1960s. Efforts have been made by them to continuously improve management of the moth scale problem and reduce allergic reactions suffered by workers. We developed strategy that requires a separate facility for housing the moth colonies, oviposition cages that facilitate exit of scales and other debris, an improved air filtration system, and sanitation procedures. The strategy used currently (coined ALERT for Advanced Lepidoptera Environmental Rearing Technology) for scale management efficiently minimizes this serious occupational hazard. PMID:7722080

Davis, F M; Jenkins, J N

1995-04-01

181

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard  

SciTech Connect

This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

NONE

1998-05-01

182

Evaluation of Spatial Relationships between Health and the Environment: The Rapid Inquiry Facility  

PubMed Central

Background The initiation of environmental public health tracking systems in the United States and the United Kingdom provided an opportunity to advance techniques and tools available for spatial epidemiological analysis integrating both health and environmental data. Objective The Rapid Inquiry Facility (RIF) allows users to calculate adjusted and unadjusted standardized rates and risks. The RIF is embedded in ArcGIS so that further geographical information system (GIS) spatial functionality can be exploited or results can be exported to statistical packages for further tailored analyses where required. The RIF also links directly to several statistical packages and displays the results in the GIS. Methods The value of the RIF is illustrated here with two case studies: risk of leukemia in areas surrounding oil refineries in the State of Utah (USA) and an analysis of the geographical variation of risk of esophageal cancer in relation to zinc cadmium sulfide exposure in Norwich (United Kingdom). Results The risk analysis study in Utah did not suggest any evidence of increased relative risk of leukemia, multiple myeloma, or Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the populations around the five oil-refining facilities but did reveal an excess risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that might warrant further investigation. The disease-mapping study in Norwich did not reveal any areas with higher relative risks of esophageal cancer common to both males and females, suggesting that a common geographically determined exposure was unlikely to be influencing cancer risk in the area. Conclusion The RIF offers a tool that allows epidemiologists to quickly carry out ecological environmental epidemiological analysis such as risk assessment or disease mapping.

Beale, Linda; Hodgson, Susan; Abellan, Juan Jose; LeFevre, Sam; Jarup, Lars

2010-01-01

183

Quality of malaria case management at outpatient health facilities in Angola  

PubMed Central

Background Angola's malaria case-management policy recommends treatment with artemether-lumefantrine (AL). In 2006, AL implementation began in Huambo Province, which involved training health workers (HWs), supervision, delivering AL to health facilities, and improving malaria testing with microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Implementation was complicated by a policy that was sometimes ambiguous. Methods Fourteen months after implementation began, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 33 outpatient facilities in Huambo Province to assess their readiness to manage malaria and the quality of malaria case-management for patients of all ages. Consultations were observed, patients were interviewed and re-examined, and HWs were interviewed. Results Ninety-three HWs and 177 consultations were evaluated, although many sampled consultations were missed. All facilities had AL in-stock and at least one HW trained to use AL and RDTs. However, anti-malarial stock-outs in the previous three months were common, clinical supervision was infrequent, and HWs had important knowledge gaps. Except for fever history, clinical assessments were often incomplete. Although testing was recommended for all patients with suspected malaria, only 30.7% of such patients were tested. Correct testing was significantly associated with caseloads < 25 patients/day (odds ratio: 18.4; p < 0.0001) and elevated patient temperature (odds ratio: 2.5 per 1°C increase; p = 0.007). Testing was more common among AL-trained HWs, but the association was borderline significant (p = 0.072). When the malaria test was negative, HWs often diagnosed patients with malaria (57.8%) and prescribed anti-malarials (60.0%). Sixty-six percent of malaria-related diagnoses were correct, 20.1% were minor errors, and 13.9% were major (potentially life-threatening) errors. Only 49.0% of malaria treatments were correct, 5.4% were minor errors, and 45.6% were major errors. HWs almost always dosed AL correctly and gave accurate dosing instructions to patients; however, other aspects of counseling needed improvement. Conclusion By late-2007, substantial progress had been made to implement the malaria case-management policy in a setting with weak infrastructure. However, policy ambiguities, under-use of malaria testing, and distrust of negative test results led to many incorrect malaria diagnoses and treatments. In 2009, Angola published a policy that clarified many issues. As problems identified in this survey are not unique to Angola, better strategies for improving HW performance are urgently needed.

2009-01-01

184

Pilot program provides oral health services to long term care facility residents through service learning and community partnership.  

PubMed

Old Dominion University School of Dental Hygiene in Norfolk, Virginia, created an innovative preventive oral health program at Lake Taylor Transitional Care Hospital, a long term care facility located in coastal Virginia. The program had two main short-term goals: to increase the number of residents who receive preventive and therapeutic oral health services and to enhance future dental hygienists' learning experience with this diverse vulnerable population through service learning. The anticipated long-term goals are to improve quality of oral health care and overall health of long term care residents, to prevent potential disease, and to reproduce this model at other long term care facilities to improve access to care. PMID:23375477

Lemaster, Margaret

2013-01-30

185

Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in urban health facilities in Yaoundé, central province, Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: After adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS\\/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria by the malaria control programme, this study was designed to assess the availability of anti-malarial drugs, treatment practices and acceptability of the new protocol by health professionals, in the urban health facilities and drugstores of Yaoundé city, Cameroon. METHODS: Between April and August 2005, retrospective

Collins Sayang; Mathieu Gausseres; Nicole Vernazza-Licht; Denis Malvy; Daniel Bley; Pascal Millet

2009-01-01

186

Public Health Assessment for Coronet Industries, Incorporated (a/k/a Borden Feed Phosphate Complex), Plant City, Hillsborough County, Florida, January 18, 2007. EPA Facility ID: FLD001704741.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report assesses the public health threat of exposure to wastewater discharged to English Creek and addresses community health concerns for the Coronet Industries contaminated former phosphate mining and processing facility near Plant City, Florida. I...

2007-01-01

187

David Baldwin's Trauma Information Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Trauma Information Pages, provided by psychologist David Baldwin, provide information about traumatic stress for clinicians and researchers in the field. The pages include information on trauma symptoms, connections to trauma resources including full text articles and an EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing) bibliography, general support information including grief, stress, and mental health pointers, disaster handouts and links, and links to other trauma and trauma related sites. The Trauma Pages are searchable.

Baldwin, David V.

1997-01-01

188

Use of facility assessment data to improve reproductive health service delivery in the Democratic Republic of the Congo  

PubMed Central

Background Prolonged exposure to war has severely impacted the provision of health services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Health infrastructure has been destroyed, health workers have fled and government support to health care services has been made difficult by ongoing conflict. Poor reproductive health (RH) indicators illustrate the effect that the prolonged crisis in DRC has had on the on the reproductive health (RH) of Congolese women. In 2007, with support from the RAISE Initiative, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and CARE conducted baseline assessments of public hospitals to evaluate their capacities to meet the RH needs of the local populations and to determine availability, utilization and quality of RH services including emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and family planning (FP). Methods Data were collected from facility assessments at nine general referral hospitals in five provinces in the DRC during March, April and November 2007. Interviews, observation and clinical record review were used to assess the general infrastructure, EmOC and FP services provided, and the infection prevention environment in each of the facilities. Results None of the nine hospitals met the criteria for classification as an EmOC facility (either basic or comprehensive). Most facilities lacked any FP services. Shortage of trained staff, essential supplies and medicines and poor infection prevention practices were consistently documented. All facilities had poor systems for routine monitoring of RH services, especially with regard to EmOC. Conclusions Women's lives can be saved and their well-being improved with functioning RH services. As the DRC stabilizes, IRC and CARE in partnership with the local Ministry of Health and other service provision partners are improving RH services by: 1) providing necessary equipment and renovations to health facilities; 2) improving supply management systems; 3) providing comprehensive competency-based training for health providers in RH and infection prevention; 4) improving referral systems to the hospitals; 5) advocating for changes in national RH policies and protocols; and 6) providing technical assistance for monitoring and evaluation of key RH indicators. Together, these initiatives will improve the quality and accessibility of RH services in the DRC - services which are urgently needed and to which Congolese women are entitled by international human rights law.

2009-01-01

189

Organizational-Focused Outcomes of Patients Age 65 and Over Admitted to Department of Defense Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to describe outcome measures of patients who are 65 years of age and older admitted to military treatment facilities (MTFs). The Military Health System (MHS) faces a continuing growth of aging beneficiaries who will consume a ...

K. R. Kovats

2002-01-01

190

Assisted Living Facility Administrator and Direct Care Staff Views of Resident Mental Health Concerns and Staff Training Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This community needs assessment surveyed 21 administrators and 75 direct care staff at 9 larger and 12 smaller assisted living facilities (ALFs) regarding perceptions of resident mental health concerns, direct care staff capacity to work with residents with mental illness, and direct care staff training needs. Group differences in these perceptions were also examined. Both administrators and directcare staff indicated

Emily Dakin; Louise M. Quijano; Courtney McAlister

2010-01-01

191

Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in rural health facilities in southern Cameroon  

PubMed Central

Background One year after the adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, this study was designed to assess the treatment practices regarding anti-malarial drugs at health facilities in four rural areas in southern Cameroon. Methods Between April and August 2005, information was collected by interviewing fifty-two health professionals from twelve rural health facilities, using a structured questionnaire. Results In 2005, only three anti-malarial drugs were used in rural health facilities, including: amodiaquine, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. Only 2.0% of the health professionals prescribed the recommended AS/AQ combination. After reading the treatment guidelines, 75.0% were in favour of the treatment protocol with the following limitations: lack of paediatric formulations, high cost and large number of tablets per day. Up to 21.0% of professionals did not prescribe AS/AQ because of the level of adverse events attributed to the use of amodiaquine as monotherapy. Conclusion The present study indicates that AS/AQ was not available in the public health facilities at the time of the study, and health practitioners were not informed about the new treatment guidelines. Results of qualitative analysis suggest that prescribers should be involved as soon as possible in projects related to the optimization of treatment guidelines and comply with new drugs. Adapted formulations should be made available at the international level and implemented locally before new drugs and treatments are proposed through a national control programme. This baseline information will be useful to monitor progresses in the implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Cameroon.

Sayang, Collins; Gausseres, Mathieu; Vernazza-Licht, Nicole; Malvy, Denis; Bley, Daniel; Millet, Pascal

2009-01-01

192

South Yorkshire Cohort: a 'cohort trials facility' study of health and weight - Protocol for the recruitment phase  

PubMed Central

Background Growing levels of both obesity and chronic disease in the general population pose a major public health problem. In the UK, an innovative 'health and weight' cohort trials facility, the 'South Yorkshire Cohort', is being built in order to provide robust evidence to inform policy, commissioning and clinical decisions in this field. This protocol reports the design of the facility and outlines the recruitment phase methods. Method/Design The South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight study uses the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design. This design recruits a large observational cohort of patients with the condition(s) of interest which then provides a facility for multiple randomised controlled trials (with large representative samples of participants, long term outcomes as standard, increased comparability between each trial conducted within the cohort and increased efficiency particularly for trials of expensive interventions) as well as ongoing information as to the natural history of the condition and treatment as usual. This study aims to recruit 20,000 participants to the population based South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight research trials facility. Participants are recruited by invitation letters from their General Practitioners. Data is collected using postal and/or online patient self completed Health Questionnaires. NHS numbers will be used to facilitate record linkage and access to routine data. Participants are eligible if they are: aged 16 - 85 years, registered with one of 40 practices in South Yorkshire, provide consent for further contact from the researchers and to have their information used to look at the benefit of health treatments. The first wave of data is being collected during 2010/12 and further waves are planned at 2 - 5 year intervals for the planned 20 year duration of the facility. Discussion The South Yorkshire Cohort combines the strengths of the standard observational, longitudinal cohort study design with a population based cohort facility for multiple randomised controlled trials in a range of long term health and weight related conditions (including obesity). This infrastructure will allow the rapid and cheap identification and recruitment of patients, and facilitate the provision of robust evidence to inform the management and self-management of health and weight.

2011-01-01

193

ACSM Fit Society Page  

MedlinePLUS

... Page include (click title to view): 2013 -- Overhauling Fitness: Breaking Plateaus 2013 -- Youth Sports Health and Safety 2012 -- Injury Management and Recovery 2012 -- On the Move 2012 -- Managing Chronic Disease 2012 -- DIY ... Fitness Assessment & Injury Prevention 2009 -- Strength Training 2009 -- Menopause ...

194

Recovery of funds in transaction affecting ownership of federally assisted health professions and nurse teaching facilities--HRSA. Statement of general policy.  

PubMed

HRSA announces its recovery policy regarding purported leases and sales of (1) health professions teaching facilities or affiliated hospitals constructed with grant funds under Part B of Title VII of the Public Health Service Act, and (2) nurse teaching facilities constructed with grant funds under Title VIII of the Act. PMID:10272122

1985-08-23

195

Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in urban health facilities in Yaound?, central province, Cameroon  

PubMed Central

Background After adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria by the malaria control programme, this study was designed to assess the availability of anti-malarial drugs, treatment practices and acceptability of the new protocol by health professionals, in the urban health facilities and drugstores of Yaoundé city, Cameroon. Methods Between April and August 2005, retrospective and current information was collected by consulting registers and interviewing health practitioners in urban health facilities using a structured questionnaire. Results In 2005, twenty-seven trade-named drugs have been identified in drugstores; quinine tablets (300 mg) were the most affordable anti-malarial drugs. Chloroquine was restricted to food market places and no generic artemisinin derivative was available in public health centres. In public health facilities, 13.6% of health professionals were informed about the new guidelines; 73.5% supported the use of AS-AQ as first-line therapy. However, 38.6% apprehended its use due to adverse events attributed to amodiaquine. Malaria treatment was mainly based on the diagnosis of fever. Quinine (300 mg tablets) was the most commonly prescribed first-line anti-malarial drug in adults (44.5%) and pregnant women (52.5%). Artequin® was the most cited artemsinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (9.9%). Medical sales representatives were the main sources of information on anti-malarials. Conclusion The use of AS/AQ was not implemented in 2005 in Yaoundé, despite the wide range of anti-malarials and trade-named artemisinin derivatives available. Nevertheless, medical practitioners will support the use of this combination, when it is available in a paediatric formulation, at an affordable price. Training, information and participation of health professionals in decision-making is one of the key elements to improve adherence to new protocol guidelines. This baseline information will be useful to monitor progress in ACT implementation in Cameroon.

Sayang, Collins; Gausseres, Mathieu; Vernazza-Licht, Nicole; Malvy, Denis; Bley, Daniel; Millet, Pascal

2009-01-01

196

Safety and health criteria for the design of a research and development facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Safety engineering support is provided to a chemical research and development center research and development facility. The criteria was developed during the early stages of the project and represents the minimum requirements tailored specifically for this facility.

Collins, G. E.; Kartachak, T. S.

1984-08-01

197

Women's Studies Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Maryland Baltimore County maintains two very useful pages of women's studies pointers. One offers an alphabetical list of over 100 selected women's and gender related sites of all types. To make the list easier to navigate, it has also been divided by topic, including activism, arts and humanities, health, international, net info, science/technology, and sexuality, as well as a separate list pointing to over 40 national and international university women's studies programs and research centers. The second page provides an annotated collection of over 200 women's issues and gender studies email lists. Again, the collection is presented both alphabetically and by topic, including the topics above plus religion/spirituality lists, social science lists, women of color lists, and womens studies lists. Both pages are excellent sources of women's studies information on the Internet, and the email list page is one of the more comprehensive pages available. Women's Studies WWW Pages and gophers: http://www-unix.umbc.edu/~korenman/wmst/links.html Gender Related Electronic Forums: http://www-unix.umbc.edu/~korenman/wmst/forums.html

198

The interdependence of mental health service systems: the effects of VA mental health funding on veterans' use of state mental health inpatient facilities.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: There are relatively few published data on how the financial structures of different health systems affect each other. With increasing financial restrictions in both public and private healthcare systems, it is important to understand how changes in one system (e.g. VA mental healthcare) affect utilization of other systems (e.g. state hospitals). AIMS OF THE STUDY: This study utilizes data from state hospitals in eight states to examine the relationship of VA per capita mental health funding and state per capita mental health expenditures to veterans' use of state hospitals, adjusting for other determinants of utilization. METHODS: This study utilized a large database that included records from all male inpatient admissions to state hospitals between 1984 and 1989 in eight states (n = 152541). Funding levels for state hospitals and VA mental health systems were examined as alternative enabling factors for veterans' use of state hospital care. Logistic regression models were adjusted for other determinants of utilization such as socio-economic status, diagnosis, travel distances to VA and non-VA facilities and the proportion of veterans in the population. RESULTS: The single strongest predictor of whether a state hospital patient would be a veteran was the level of VA mental healthcare funding (OR = 0.81 per $10 of funding per veteran in the population, p = 0.0001), with higher VA funding associated with less use of state hospitals by veterans. Higher per capita state funding, reciprocally, increased veterans' use of state hospitals. We also calculated elasticities for state hospital use with respect to VA mental healthcare funding and with respect to state hospital per capita funding. A 50% increase in VA per capita mental health spending was associated with a 30% decrease in veterans' use of state hospitals (elasticity of -0.6). Conversely, a 50% increase in state hospital per capita funding was associated with only an 11% increase in veterans' use of state hospitals (elasticity of 0.06). IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE PROVISION AND USE: These data indicate that per capita funding for state hospitals and VA mental health systems exerts a significant influence on service use, apparently mediated by the effect on supply of mental health services. Veterans are likely to substitute state hospital care for VA care when funding restrictions limit the availability of VA mental health services. However, due to the relative sizes of the two systems, VA funding has a larger effect than state hospital funding upon state hospital use by veterans. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH POLICIES: These data indicate that changes in the organizational and/or financial structure of any given healthcare system have the potential to affect surrounding systems, possibly quite substantially. Policy makers should take this into account when making decisions, instead of approaching systems as independent, as has been traditional. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: Further research is needed in two areas. First, these results should be replicated in other systems of care using more recent data. Second, these results are difficult to generalize to individual behavior. Future research should examine the extent and individual determinants of cross-system use. PMID:11967439

Desai, Rani A.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

2000-06-01

199

Pregnancy outcomes associated with Cesarean deliveries in Peruvian public health facilities  

PubMed Central

A continuous rise in the rate of cesarean deliveries has been reported in many countries over recent decades. This trend has prompted the emergence of a debate on the risks and benefits associated with cesarean section. The present study was designed to estimate cesarean section rates over time during the period between 2000 and 2010 in Peru and to present outcomes for each mode of delivery. This is a secondary analysis of a large database obtained from the Perinatal Information System, which includes 570,997 pregnant women and their babies from 43 Peruvian public health facilities in three geographical regions: coast, highlands, and jungle. Over 10 years, 558,901 women delivered 563,668 infants weighing at least 500 g. The cesarean section rate increased from 25.5% in 2000 to 29.9% in 2010 (26.9% average; P < 0.01). The rate of stillbirths was lower with cesarean than vaginal deliveries (P < 0.01). On the other hand, and as expected, the rates for preterm births, twin pregnancies, and preeclampsia were higher in women who delivered by cesarean section (P < 0.01). More importantly, the rate of maternal mortality was 5.5 times higher in the cesarean section group than in the vaginal delivery group. Data suggest that cesarean sections are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Gonzales, Gustavo F; Tapia, Vilma L; Fort, Alfredo L; Betran, Ana Pilar

2013-01-01

200

Health awareness and life-style practices of employees in extended-care facilities.  

PubMed

From six extended-care facilities, 306 employees responded to a questionnaire on perceived life-style. Most respondents were female, married, and under age 35. The majority had had recent blood pressure checks, seldom missed work because of infections, made time for leisure activities, and felt secure in their jobs. Overall, the percentage of smokers was slightly below the national average, but 45% of the technical employees smoked. Perception of overweight and skipped meals increased with level of education. Consumption of fried foods and sweets decreased with the level of education while fiber intake increased. More skilled and technical employees than professional employees consumed milk products. Less than half of any employee group consumed excessive amounts of coffee or colas. Few study participants consumed alcohol. Very few members of any group consumed meals away from home five or more times per week. Less than half of all employees believed that they received enough exercise; one-third or less exercised regularly. A greater percentage of technical employees than of the other two employee groups expressed interest in improving health through physical fitness and class sessions. PMID:3782685

Shoaf, L R

1986-12-01

201

Pregnancy outcomes associated with Cesarean deliveries in Peruvian public health facilities.  

PubMed

A continuous rise in the rate of cesarean deliveries has been reported in many countries over recent decades. This trend has prompted the emergence of a debate on the risks and benefits associated with cesarean section. The present study was designed to estimate cesarean section rates over time during the period between 2000 and 2010 in Peru and to present outcomes for each mode of delivery. This is a secondary analysis of a large database obtained from the Perinatal Information System, which includes 570,997 pregnant women and their babies from 43 Peruvian public health facilities in three geographical regions: coast, highlands, and jungle. Over 10 years, 558,901 women delivered 563,668 infants weighing at least 500 g. The cesarean section rate increased from 25.5% in 2000 to 29.9% in 2010 (26.9% average; P < 0.01). The rate of stillbirths was lower with cesarean than vaginal deliveries (P < 0.01). On the other hand, and as expected, the rates for preterm births, twin pregnancies, and preeclampsia were higher in women who delivered by cesarean section (P < 0.01). More importantly, the rate of maternal mortality was 5.5 times higher in the cesarean section group than in the vaginal delivery group. Data suggest that cesarean sections are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24124393

Gonzales, Gustavo F; Tapia, Vilma L; Fort, Alfredo L; Betran, Ana Pilar

2013-10-04

202

Use of a Balanced Scorecard in strengthening health systems in developing countries: an analysis based on nationally representative Bangladesh Health Facility Survey.  

PubMed

This paper illustrates the importance of collecting facility-based data through regular surveys to supplement the administrative data, especially for developing countries of the world. In Bangladesh, measures based on facility survey indicate that only 70% of very basic medical instruments and 35% of essential drugs were available in health facilities. Less than 2% of officially designated obstetric care facilities actually had required drugs, injections and personnel on-site. Majority of (80%) referral hospitals at the district level were not ready to provide comprehensive emergency obstetric care. Even though the Management Information System reports availability of diagnostic machines in all district-level and sub-district-level facilities, it fails to indicate that 50% of these machines are not functional. In terms of human resources, both physicians and nurses are in short supply at all levels of the healthcare system. The physician-nurse ratio also remains lower than the desirable level of 3.0. Overall job satisfaction index was less than 50 for physicians and 66 for nurses. Patient satisfaction score, however, was high (86) despite the fact that process indicators of service quality were poor. Facility surveys can help strengthen not only the management decision-making process but also the quality of administrative data. PMID:22887590

Khan, M Mahmud; Hotchkiss, David R; Dmytraczenko, Tania; Zunaid Ahsan, Karar

2012-08-09

203

The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system  

PubMed Central

Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre — Community Health Agents (CHA) — who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connect’s district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzania’s need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844

2013-01-01

204

Parent and Health Care Professional Perspectives on Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We on the Same Page?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A family-centered approach to health care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) is widely acknowledged as the ideal model of service delivery, but less is known about the actual practice of family-centered care (FCC), especially from the viewpoints of parents and health care professionals. This cross-sectional research compared…

Bellin, Melissa H.; Osteen, Philip; Heffernan, Caitlin; Levy, Judy M.; Snyder-Vogel, Mary E.

2011-01-01

205

Public Health Assessment: Formosa Mine, Riddle, Oregon. EPA Facility ID: ORN001002616.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Health Assessment Program (EHAP) in the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) developed this public health assessment to address the risk of negative health effects associated with exposure to contaminants in the water and soil from ...

2010-01-01

206

Public Health Assessment for Litchfield Airport Area, Goodyear, Maricopa County, Arizona, EPA Facility ID: AZD980695902.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) prepared this Public Health Assessment (PHA) to evaluate whether a public health hazard exists as a result of potential environmental exposures from the contamination at the Phoenix Goodyear Airport (PGA) N...

2000-01-01

207

Norovirus-like virus outbreak at a correctional facility in haliburton kawartha pine ridge district health unit, march to april 2008.  

PubMed

In March 2008, an enteric outbreak was reported from a correctional facility in Central East Ontario to the Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit. The clinical and epidemiological data were compatible with the presence of norovirus in this enteric outbreak. This report summarizes the outbreak investigation conducted and the various public health measures undertaken through a coordinated response by the facility health care and correctional staff and local and provincial health authorities to contain the infection within the facility. Correctional facilities present unique challenges to the implementation of infection control measures, and the investigators eventually recommended that the facility be closed to transfers and new admissions until the outbreak was brought under control. PMID:24078622

Sunil, Vidya; Holt, Anne Marie; Dixon, Ruth; Dingman, Diane; Noseworthy, Avis Lynn

2013-10-01

208

Relationship between system-level characteristics of assisted living facilities and the health and safety of unlicensed staff.  

PubMed

This study examined system-level characteristics of assisted living facilities and the association between these characteristics and the health and safety outcomes of unlicensed staff. Forty-two unlicensed direct care workers completed a survey related to system-level stressors and the individual stress responses of staff. Measurement tools included the Work Stressor Inventory (WSI), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). High levels of emotional exhaustion, psychiatric distress, and work-related injuries were reported by unlicensed staff. Providing care to residents with dementia-related behaviors and supporting families were the most frequently reported work stressors. System-level factors were significantly associated with staff role competence, job commitment, and emotional exhaustion. These results support the need for continued exploration, development, and evaluation of strategies to reduce occupational stressors at multiple levels in assisted living facilities. PMID:21462900

McKenzie, Glenise L; Teri, Linda; Salazar, Mary K; Farran, Carol J; Beck, Cornelia; Paun, Olimpia

2011-04-01

209

Client-centered design of residential addiction and mental health care facilities: staff perceptions of their work environment.  

PubMed

In this article we discuss the findings from a series of focus groups conducted as part of a 3-year, mixed-method evaluation of clinical programs in a large mental health and substance use treatment facility in Canada. We examined the perceptions of clinical personnel on the physical design of new treatment units and the impact on service delivery and the work environment. The new physical design appeared to support client recovery and reduce stigma; however, it brought certain challenges. Participants reported a compromised ability to monitor clients, a lack of designated therapeutic spaces, and insufficient workspace for staff. They also thought that physical design positively facilitated communication and therapeutic relationships among clinicians and clients, and increased team cohesion. We suggest that, from these findings, new avenues for research on achieving the important balance between client and staff needs in health facility design can be explored. PMID:21725027

Novotná, Gabriela; Urbanoski, Karen A; Rush, Brian R

2011-07-01

210

Surge capacity concepts for health care facilities: the CO-S-TR model for initial incident assessment.  

PubMed

Facility-based health care personnel often lack emergency management training and experience, making it a challenge to efficiently assess evolving incidents and rapidly mobilize appropriate resources. We propose the CO-S-TR model, a simple conceptual tool for hospital incident command personnel to prioritize initial incident actions to adequately address key components of surge capacity. There are 3 major categories in the tool, each with 4 subelements. "CO" stands for command, control, communications, and coordination and ensures that an incident management structure is implemented. "S" considers the logistical requirements for staff, stuff, space, and special (event-specific) considerations. "TR" comprises tracking, triage, treatment, and transportation: basic patient care and patient movement functions. This comprehensive yet simple approach is designed to be implemented in the immediate aftermath of an incident, and complements the incident command system by aiding effective incident assessment and surge capacity responses at the health care facility level. PMID:18769268

Hick, John L; Koenig, Kristi L; Barbisch, Donna; Bey, Tareg A

2008-09-01

211

Short and long term retention in antiretroviral care in health facilities in rural Malawi and Zimbabwe  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the successful scale-up of ART services over the past years, long term retention in ART care remains a major challenge, especially in high HIV prevalence and resource-limited settings. This study analysed the short (<12 months) and long (>12 months) term retention on ART in two ART programmes in Malawi (Thyolo district) and Zimbabwe (Buhera district). Methods Retention rates at six-month intervals are reported separately among (1) patients since ART initiation and (2) patients who had been on ART for at least 12 months, according to the site of ART initiation and follow-up, using the Kaplan Meier method. ‘Retention’ was defined as being alive on ART or transferred out, while ‘attrition’ was defined as dead, lost to follow-up or stopped ART. Results In Thyolo and Buhera, a total of 12,004 and 9,721 patients respectively were included in the analysis. The overall retention among the patients since ART initiation was 84%, 80% and 77% in Thyolo and 88%, 84% and 82% in Buhera at 6, 12 and 18 months, respectively. In both programmes the largest drop in ART retention was found during the initial 12 months on ART, mainly related to a high mortality rate in the health centres in Thyolo and a high loss to follow-up rate in the hospital in Buhera. Among the patients who had been on ART for at least 12 months, the retention rates leveled out, with 97%, 95% and 94% in both Thyolo and Buhera, at 18, 24 and 30 months respectively. Loss to follow-up was identified as the main contributor to attrition after 12 months on treatment in both programmes. Conclusions To better understand the reasons of attrition and adapt the ART delivery care models accordingly, it is advisable to analyse short and long term retention separately, in order to adapt intervention strategies accordingly. During the initial months on ART more medical follow-up, especially for symptomatic patients, is required to reduce mortality. Once stable on ART, however, the ART care delivery should focus on regular drug refill and adherence support to reduce loss to follow up. Hence, innovative life-long retention strategies, including use of new communication technologies, community based interventions and drug refill outside the health facilities are required.

2012-01-01

212

How accurate are medical record data in Afghanistan's maternal health facilities? An observational validity study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Improvement activities, surveillance and research in maternal and neonatal health in Afghanistan rely heavily on medical record data. This study investigates accuracy in delivery care records from three hospitals across workshifts. Design Observational cross-sectional study. Setting The study was conducted in one maternity hospital, one general hospital maternity department and one provincial hospital maternity department. Researchers observed vaginal deliveries and recorded observations to later check against data recorded in patient medical records and facility registers. Outcome measures We determined the sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operator characteristics curves (AUROCs), proportions correctly classified and the tendency to make performance seem better than it actually was. Results 600 observations across the three shifts and three hospitals showed high compliance with active management of the third stage of labour, measuring blood loss and uterine contraction at 30?min, cord care, drying and wrapping newborns and Apgar scores and low compliance with monitoring vital signs. Compliance with quality indicators was high and specificity was lower than sensitivity. For adverse outcomes in birth registries, specificity was higher than sensitivity. Overall AUROCs were between 0.5 and 0.6. Of 17 variables that showed biased errors, 12 made performance or outcomes seem better than they were, and five made them look worse (71% vs 29%, p=0.143). Compliance, sensitivity and specificity varied less among the three shifts than among hospitals. Conclusions Medical record accuracy was generally poor. Errors by clinicians did not appear to follow a pattern of self-enhancement of performance. Because successful improvement activities, surveillance and research in these settings are heavily reliant on collecting accurate data on processes and outcomes of care, substantial improvement is needed in medical record accuracy.

Broughton, Edward I; Ikram, Abdul Naser; Sahak, Ihsanullah

2013-01-01

213

Hospital-acquired infections in a Nigerian tertiary health facility: An audit of surveillance reports  

PubMed Central

Background: Hitherto efforts to implement data driven prevention guidelines for hospital-acquired infections (HAI) in Nigeria have been limited by the inadequate knowledge of the risks of these infections. This study evaluated the occurrence of HAI in a foremost tertiary health facility over a 5-year period for the purpose of reinforcing control efforts. Materials and Methods: A retrospective survey of records from the infection control unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, was done for the years 2005-09. For the 5 years studied 22,941 in-patients were reviewed and the data of those who developed infections during admission were retrieved and analyzed. The prevalence, types, and causative organisms of HAI were determined. The chi-square test was used to evaluate associations. Results: The prevalence of HAI over the 5-year period was 2.6% (95% CI: 2.4–2.8). Surgical and medical wards had the most infections (48.3%) and (20.5%) respectively. Urinary tract infection (UTI) and surgical site infection (30.7%) were the most prevalent (43.9%) HAI. UTIs were significantly higher in surgical and medical wards, surgical site infections in obstetrics and gynecology wards, and soft tissue infections and bacteremia in pediatric wards (P<0.05). Gram-negative infections occurred about four times as often as gram-positive infections with Klebsiella sp. and staphylococcus aureus being the predominant isolates (34.3%) and (20.1%) respectively. Conclusion: Efforts to limit HAI should be guided by local surveillance data if progress is to be made in improving the quality of patient care in Nigeria.

Ige, O. K.; Adesanmi, A. A.; Asuzu, M. C.

2011-01-01

214

Effectiveness of Qigong in promoting the health of wheelchair-bound older adults in long-term care facilities.  

PubMed

Institutional wheelchair-bound older adults often do not get regular exercise and are prone to health problems. The aim of this study was to test the effects of a 12-week qigong exercise program on the physiological and psychological health of wheelchair-bound older adults in long-term care facilities. Study design was quasi-experimental, pre-post test, nonequivalent control group. Participants comprised a convenience sample of 72 wheelchair-bound older adults (qigong = 34; control = 38). The qigong group exercised 35 min/day, 5 days/week for 12 weeks. Measures for physical health (blood pressure, heart rate variability, and distal skin temperature) and psychological health (Brief Symptom Rating Scale-5) were collected before and during study Weeks 4, 8, and 12. The qigong group participants' blood pressure, distal skin temperature, and psychological health were significantly improved (all p < .001). These findings suggest that qigong exercise is a suitable daily activity for elderly residents in long-term care facilities and may help in the control of blood pressure among older adults. PMID:21385797

Kuan, Shu-Chien; Chen, Kuei-Min; Wang, Chi

2011-03-08

215

Routine checks for HIV in children attending primary health care facilities in South Africa: Attitudes of nurses and child caregivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of HIV-infected and exposed children is challenging for health workers in primary care settings. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) is a WHO\\/UNICEF strategy for improving morbidity and mortality in under 5 children attending first level facilities in developing countries. In high HIV-prevalence settings, IMCI includes an HIV component for identification and management of HIV-infected and exposed children, which requires

Christiane Horwood; Anna Voce; Kerry Vermaak; Nigel Rollins; Shamim Qazi

2010-01-01

216

Racism Takes a Toll on Kids' Mental Health, Research Shows  

MedlinePLUS

... 22, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Child Mental Health Health Disparities Teen Mental Health SUNDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- ... reserved. More Health News on: Child Mental Health Health Disparities Teen Mental Health Recent Health News Page last ...

217

[The guideline Oral Health Care for dependent residents in long term care facilities, 2007: dire necessity!  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oral health status of residents in Dutch nursing homes is rather poor, especially of those depending on caregivers for their oral health care. Moreover, when care dependency is rising, the provision of good oral health care becomes more difficult. With more elderly people still having (parts of) their natural teeth, the need for good oral health care is increasing

GJ van der Putten; L De Visschere; J. van Obbergen; J. G. J. H. Schols; C. de Baat

2008-01-01

218

The Interaction of Race\\/Ethnicity and Mental Health Problems on Visitation in State Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the relationship between mental health problems and visitation for prison inmates. Logistic regression analyses indicated that inmates with mental health problems have lower odds of visitation. Interaction effects indicated that visitation for Hispanic inmates differed depending upon whether inmates reported mental health problems. Hispanic males reporting a history of mental health problems had increased probabilities of visitation

Melissa J. Stacer

2012-01-01

219

Gender-based distributional skewness of the United Republic of Tanzania's health workforce cadres: a cross-sectional health facility survey  

PubMed Central

Background While severe shortages, inadequate skills and a geographical imbalance of health personnel have been consistently documented over the years as long term critical challenges in the health sector of the United Republic of Tanzania, there is limited evidence on the gender-based distribution of the health workforce and its likely implications. Extant evidence shows that some people may not seek healthcare unless they have access to a provider of their gender. This paper, therefore, assesses the gender-based distribution of the United Republic of Tanzania’s health workforce cadres. Methods This is a secondary analysis of data collected in a cross-sectional health facility survey on health system strengthening in the United Republic of Tanzania in 2008. During the survey, 88 health facilities, selected randomly from 8 regions, yielded 815 health workers (HWs) eligible for the current analysis. While Chi-square was used for testing associations in the bivariate analysis, multivariate analysis was conducted using logistic regression to assess the relationship between gender and each of the cadres involved in the analysis. Results The mean age of the HWs was 39.7, ranging from 15 to 63 years. Overall, 75% of the HWs were women. The proportion of women among maternal and child health aides or medical attendants (MCHA/MA), nurses and midwives was 86%, 86% and 91%, respectively, while their proportion among clinical officers (COs) and medical doctors (MDs) was 28% and 21%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) that a HW was a female (baseline category is “male”) for each cadre was: MCHA/MA, OR?=?3.70, 95% CI 2.16-6.33; nurse, OR?=?5.61, 95% CI 3.22-9.78; midwife, OR?=?2.74, 95% CI 1.44-5.20; CO, OR?=?0.08, 95% CI 0.04-0.17 and MD, OR?=?0.04, 95% CI 0.02-0.09. Conclusion The distribution of the United Republic of Tanzania’s health cadres is dramatically gender-skewed, a reflection of gender inequality in health career choices. MCHA/MA, nursing and midwifery cadres are large and female-dominant, whereas COs and MDs are fewer in absolute numbers and male-dominant. While a need for more staff is necessary for an effective delivery of quality health services, adequate representation of women in highly trained cadres is imperative to enhance responses to some gender-specific roles and needs.

2013-01-01

220

Spatial Analysis of the Level of Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

Moran, S.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

2011-12-01

221

Effect on treatment coverage of adding community-directed treatment to the health facility-based approach of delivering anthelminthic drugs to under-five children during child health week in Mazabuka District, Zambia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current approach of delivering anthelminthic drugs to children aged 12–59 months through health facilities during child health week (CHW) results in low treatment coverage in certain areas of Zambia. This study was designed to determine the impact on treatment coverage of adding community-directed treatment (ComDT) to the health facility (HF) approach. Treatment coverage was compared in two areas, one

Hikabasa Halwindi; Pascal Magnussen; Dan Meyrowitsch; Ray Handema; Seter Siziya; Annette Olsen

222

Cephalopod Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Detailed information on octopus, squid and cuttlefish with links to other cephalopod and mollusc pages. Site features a classification section complete with pictures, articles from in-house scientists, conference information, a mailing list, and even a section on where you can purchase different cephalopods. Links to CephBase, an interactive database with photos, videos, publications, and much more, all concerning cephalopods.

223

Effect of Geographical Access to Health Facilities on Child Mortality in Rural Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Background There have been few studies that have examined associations between access to health care and child health outcomes in remote populations most in need of health services. This study assessed the effect of travel time and distance to health facilities on mortality in children under five years in a remote area of rural north-western Ethiopia. Methods and Findings This study involved a randomly selected cross sectional survey of 2,058 households. Data were collected during home visits to all resident women of reproductive age (15–49 years). A geographic information system (GIS) was used to map all households and the only health centre in the district. The analysis was restricted to 2,206 rural children who were under the age of five years during the five years before the survey. Data were analysed using random effects Poisson regression. 90.4% (1,996/2,206) of children lived more than 1.5 hours walk from the health centre. Children who lived ?1.5 hrs from the health centre had a two to three fold greater risk of death than children who lived <1.5 hours from the health centre (children with travel time 1.5–<2.5 hrs adjusted relative risk [adjRR] 2.3[0.95–5.6], travel time 2.5–<3.5 hrs adjRR 3.1[1.3–7.4] and travel time 3.5–<6.5 hrs adjRR 2.5[1.1–6.2]). Conclusion Distance to a health centre had a marked influence on under five mortality in a poor, rural, remote area of Ethiopia. This study provides important information for policy makers on the likely impact of new health centres and their most effective location in remote areas.

Okwaraji, Yemisrach B.; Cousens, Simon; Berhane, Yemane; Mulholland, Kim; Edmond, Karen

2012-01-01

224

Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

1988-05-01

225

Health Facilities: Problems at Harlem Hospital in Complying with Medicare Standards.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report reviews Harlem Hospital Center's compliance with the Medicare program's standards. It includes information on the hospital's compliance with Medicare standards and determines what actions the New York State Department of Health and the Health C...

1987-01-01

226

VA Health Care: Many Medical Facilities Have Challenges in Recruiting and Retaining Nurse Anesthetists.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA), registered nurses who have completed a master's degree program in nurse anesthesia, provide the majority of anesthesia care veterans receive in VA medical facilities. While the demand for CRNAs is anticipate...

2007-01-01

227

Increase in facility-based deliveries associated with a maternal health voucher programme in informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya  

PubMed Central

Objective To measure whether there was an association between the introduction of an output-based voucher programme and the odds of a facility-based delivery in two Nairobi informal settlements. Data sources Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System (NUHDSS) and two cross-sectional household surveys in Korogocho and Viwandani informal settlements in 2004–05 and 2006–08. Methods Odds of facility-based delivery were estimated before and after introduction of an output-based voucher. Supporting NUHDSS data were used to determine whether any trend in maternal health care was coincident with immunizations, a non-voucher outpatient service. As part of NUHDSS, households in Korogocho and Viwandani reported place of delivery and the presence of a skilled birth attendant (2003–10) and vaccination coverage (2003–09). A detailed maternal and child health (MCH) tool was added to NUHDSS (September 2006–10). Prospective enrolment in NUHDSS-MCH was conditional on having a newborn after September 2006. In addition to recording mother’s place of delivery, NUHDSS-MCH recorded the use of the voucher. Findings There were significantly greater odds of a facility-based delivery among respondents during the voucher programme compared with similar respondents prior to voucher launch. Testing whether unrelated outpatient care also increased, a falsification exercise found no significant increase in immunizations for children 12–23 months of age in the same period. Although the proportion completing any antenatal care (ANC) visit remained above 95% of all reported pregnancies and there was a significant increase in facility-based deliveries, the proportion of women completing 4+ ANC visits was significantly lower during the voucher programme. Conclusions A positive association was observed between vouchers and facility-based deliveries in Nairobi. Although there is a need for higher quality evidence and validation in future studies, this statistically significant and policy relevant finding suggests that increases in facility-based deliveries can be achieved through output-based finance models that target subsidies to underserved populations.

Bellows, Ben; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Mutua, Martin Kavao; Warren, Charlotte; Ezeh, Alex

2013-01-01

228

The duty to disclose in Kenyan health facilities: a qualitative investigation of HIV disclosure in everyday practice.  

PubMed

Disclosure of HIV status is routinely promoted as a public health measure to prevent transmission and enhance treatment adherence support. While studies show a range of positive and negative outcomes associated with disclosure, it has also been documented that disclosing is a challenging and ongoing process. This article aims to describe the role of health-care workers in Central and Nairobi provinces in Kenya in facilitating disclosure in the contexts of voluntary counselling and testing and provider-initiated testing and counselling and includes a discussion on how participants perceive and experience disclosure as a result. We draw on in-depth qualitative research carried out in 2008-2009 among people living with HIV (PLHIV) and the health workers who provide care to them. Our findings suggest that in everyday practice, there are three models of disclosure at work: (1) voluntary-consented disclosure, in alignment with international guidelines; (2) involuntary, non-consensual disclosure, which may be either intentional or accidental; and (3) obligatory disclosure, which occurs when PLHIV are forced to disclose to access services at health facilities. Health-care workers were often caught between the three models and struggled with the competing demands of promoting prevention, adherence, and confidentiality. Findings indicate that as national and global policies shift to normalize HIV testing as routine in a range of clinical settings, greater effort must be made to define suitable best practices that balance the human rights and the public health perspectives in relation to disclosure. PMID:23826931

Moyer, Eileen; Igonya, Emmy Kageha; Both, Rosalijn; Cherutich, Peter; Hardon, Anita

2013-07-04

229

Health impact of a proposed waste-to-energy facility in Illinois  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) has given the Robbins Resource Recovery Company (RRRC) a permit to construct a Regional Pollution Control Facility in Robbins, Illinois. Site approval for this waste-to-energy (WTE) combustor has been granted by the Village of Robbins which is located about three miles south of Chicago. The facility is designed to operate continuously for 40-45 years,

W. H. Hallenbeck

1995-01-01

230

Progress towards implementation of ACT malaria case-management in public health facilities in the Republic of Sudan: a cluster-sample survey  

PubMed Central

Background Effective malaria case-management based on artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and parasitological diagnosis is a major pillar within the 2007-2012 National Malaria Strategic Plan in the Sudan. Three years after the launch of the strategy a health facility survey was undertaken to evaluate case-management practices and readiness of the health facilities and health workers to implement a new malaria case-management strategy. Methods A cross-sectional, cluster sample survey was undertaken at public health facilities in 15 states of Sudan. Data were collected using quality-of-care assessment methods. The main outcomes were the proportions of facilities with ACTs and malaria diagnostics; proportions of health workers exposed to malaria related health systems support activities; and composite and individual indicators of case-management practices for febrile outpatients stratified by age, availability of ACTs and diagnostics, use of malaria diagnostics, and test result. Results We evaluated 244 facilities, 294 health workers and 1,643 consultations for febrile outpatients (425 < 5 years and 1,218 ? 5 years). Health facility and health worker readiness was variable: chloroquine was available at only 5% of facilities, 73% stocked recommended artesunate and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (AS+SP), 51% had the capacity to perform parasitological diagnosis, 53% of health workers had received in-service training on ACTs, 24% were trained in the use of malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests, and 19% had received a supervisory visit including malaria case-management. At all health facilities 46% of febrile patients were parasitologically tested and 35% of patients were both, tested and treated according to test result. At facilities where AS+SP and malaria diagnostics were available 66% of febrile patients were tested and 51% were both, tested and treated according to test result. Among test positive patients 64% were treated with AS+SP but 24% were treated with artemether monotherapy. Among test negative patients only 17% of patients were treated for malaria. The majority of ACT dispensing and counseling practices were suboptimal. Conclusions Five years following change of the policy from chloroquine to ACTs and 3 years before the end of the new malaria strategic plan chloroquine was successfully phased out from public facilities in Sudan, however, an important gap remained in the availability of ACTs, diagnostic capacities and coverage with malaria case-management activities. The national scale-up of diagnostics, using the findings of this survey as well as future qualitative research, should present an opportunity not only to expand existing testing capacities but also to implement effective support interventions to bridge the health systems gaps and support corrective case-management measures, including the discontinuation of artemether monotherapy treatment.

2012-01-01

231

Health Consultation: Tittabawassee River Fish Consumption Health Consultation, Tittabawassee River, Midland, Midland County, Michigan. EPA Facility ID: MID980994354.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry and Michigan Department of Community Health received a petition about the dioxin contamination along the Tittabawassee River downstream of the city of Midland. Elevated concentrations of dioxin and diox...

2005-01-01

232

Public Health Assessment for Petitioned Public Health Assessment, Keil Chemical, Hammond, Lake County, Indiana, EPA Facility ID: IND005421755.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Residents of Hammond, Indiana petitioned the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to conduct a health assessment in response to concerns of child brain cancer and emissions from the Keil Chemical plant. Specific concerns were the relea...

2001-01-01

233

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) legislation and its implication on speech privacy design in health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 (104th Congress, H.R. 3103, January 3, 1986), among many things, individual patient records and information be protected from unnecessary issue. This responsibility is assigned to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) which has issued a Privacy Rule most recently dated August 2002 with a revision being proposed

Gregory C. Tocci; Christopher A. Storch

2005-01-01

234

[Medicine on mission: The international health reform of Seventh-Day Adventists and their health care facilities in Sweden].  

PubMed

The international non-conformist denomination, Seventh-day Adventists, have since their foundation in 1863, had a distinctive health care model for their members. The life-style has included vegetarian diet, abstinence from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and the observance of a day of rest once a week. The health policy has striven to care for God's creation in the hope of resurrection at the Day of Judgment and to reform the conventional medical practice. The Adventists have pursued an extensive international health care system--from the start based on dietary and physical treatment methods, such as hydrotherapy, massage and physiotherapy--in line with the Christian mission. Health care establishments have been inaugurated around the world as a vehicle for enabling the Christian health care message to reach the upper classes. With Adventist and Doctor, John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanatorium in Michigan as both inspirational source and educational institution, the health care mission--including a vegetarian health food industry, following in the footsteps of cornflakes--spread to the Nordic countries by the turn of the century, 1900. Skodsborgs Badesanatorium near Copenhagen became the model institution for several health care establishments in Sweden during the 1900's, such as Hultafors Sanatorium. The American-Nordic link has manifested itself through co-publication of papers, exchange of health care personnel and reporting to the central Adventist church. The American non-conformist domain as well as a private sphere of activity, aiming mainly from the outset at society's upper classes, has encountered certain difficulties in maintaining this distinction in Sweden's officially increasing secularised society, and in relation to a state health insurance and a publicly financed health care system. With the passing of time, the socioeconomic composition of patients at Hultafors became more heterogeneous, and conventional medical procedures were increasingly incorporated into the array of treatment resources. The successful enterprises--as they had been for a considerable time--could not, at the end of the 20th century, continue to be self financing or fulfil the missionary objectives among the upper classes. The institutionalised health care apparatus came to an end around the turn of the century, which also included the sale of health associated food product companies. The Seventh-day Adventist's combination of medicine and religion with Christian missionary aims have indeed, not only steered health care models and institutions worldwide, but also which target groups to mainly turn to, the specific treatment philosophy, desirable working environment and which medical technologies to use. Furthermore, the Adventist's health reform and care of the sick provide an example for how different medical cultures influence each other and develop in relation to one another in a pluralistic medical market. The developments are not merely a reflection of the medical, scientific and technical advancements, but also of the medical market's structure, financing and (inter)national connections, of religion, culture and not least of all, patients' options and their choices. PMID:19848037

Eklöf, Motzi

2008-01-01

235

Community accountability at peripheral health facilities: a review of the empirical literature and development of a conceptual framework.  

PubMed

Public accountability has re-emerged as a top priority for health systems all over the world, and particularly in developing countries where governments have often failed to provide adequate public sector services for their citizens. One approach to strengthening public accountability is through direct involvement of clients, users or the general public in health delivery, here termed 'community accountability'. The potential benefits of community accountability, both as an end in itself and as a means of improving health services, have led to significant resources being invested by governments and non-governmental organizations. Data are now needed on the implementation and impact of these initiatives on the ground. A search of PubMed using a systematic approach, supplemented by a hand search of key websites, identified 21 papers from low- or middle-income countries describing at least one measure to enhance community accountability that was linked with peripheral facilities. Mechanisms covered included committees and groups (n = 19), public report cards (n = 1) and patients' rights charters (n = 1). In this paper we summarize the data presented in these papers, including impact, and factors influencing impact, and conclude by commenting on the methods used, and the issues they raise. We highlight that the international interest in community accountability mechanisms linked to peripheral facilities has not been matched by empirical data, and present a conceptual framework and a set of ideas that might contribute to future studies. PMID:22279082

Molyneux, Sassy; Atela, Martin; Angwenyi, Vibian; Goodman, Catherine

2012-01-25

236

Community accountability at peripheral health facilities: a review of the empirical literature and development of a conceptual framework  

PubMed Central

Public accountability has re-emerged as a top priority for health systems all over the world, and particularly in developing countries where governments have often failed to provide adequate public sector services for their citizens. One approach to strengthening public accountability is through direct involvement of clients, users or the general public in health delivery, here termed ‘community accountability’. The potential benefits of community accountability, both as an end in itself and as a means of improving health services, have led to significant resources being invested by governments and non-governmental organizations. Data are now needed on the implementation and impact of these initiatives on the ground. A search of PubMed using a systematic approach, supplemented by a hand search of key websites, identified 21 papers from low- or middle-income countries describing at least one measure to enhance community accountability that was linked with peripheral facilities. Mechanisms covered included committees and groups (n?=?19), public report cards (n?=?1) and patients’ rights charters (n?=?1). In this paper we summarize the data presented in these papers, including impact, and factors influencing impact, and conclude by commenting on the methods used, and the issues they raise. We highlight that the international interest in community accountability mechanisms linked to peripheral facilities has not been matched by empirical data, and present a conceptual framework and a set of ideas that might contribute to future studies.

Molyneux, Sassy; Atela, Martin; Angwenyi, Vibian; Goodman, Catherine

2012-01-01

237

Direct costs of hospitalization for rotavirus gastroenteritis in different health facilities in India  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Diarrhoeal disease is the fifth leading cause of all mortality globally. To this burden, rotavirus contributes over half a million deaths annually. This pilot study was conducted to determine the economic burden of diarrhoeal episodes on families from different geographical regions accessing medical facilities in India. Methods: Participants were enrolled from four study sites with eight reporting hospitals, categorized as non-profit and low cost, private and government facilities between November 2008 and February 2009. Questionnaires detailing healthcare utilization, medical and non-medical expenditure and lost income were completed by families of children < 5 yr of age hospitalized for gastroenteritis. All available faecal samples were tested for rotavirus. Results: A total of 211 patients were enrolled. The mean total cost of a hospitalized diarrhoeal episode was 3633 (US$ 66.05) for all facilities, with a marked difference in direct costs between governmental and non-governmental facilities. Costs for rotavirus positive hospitalizations were slightly lower, at 2956 (US$ 53.75). The median cost of a diarrhoeal episode based on annual household expenditure was 6.4 per cent for all-cause diarrhoea and 7.6 per cent for rotavirus diarrhoea. Of the 124 samples collected, 66 (53%) were positive for rotavirus. Interpretation & conclusions: Data on direct costs alone from multiple facilities show that diarrhoeal disease constitutes a large economic burden on Indian families. Affordable, effective vaccines would greatly reduce the economic burden of severe gastroenteritis on patients, families and the government.

Sowmyanarayanan, T. V.; Patel, Tushar; Sarkar, Rajiv; Broor, Shobha; Chitambar, Shobha D.; Krishnan, Triveni; Arora, Rashmi; Kang, Gagandeep

2012-01-01

238

Client satisfaction and unmet needs assessment: evaluation of an HIV ambulatory health care facility in Sydney, Australia.  

PubMed

A mixed-methods approach study was conducted at an ambulatory HIV health care facility in Sydney during 2007/2008. A quantitative self-administered structured questionnaire survey (phase 1) was conducted to assess client satisfaction levels, followed by qualitative semistructured interviews (phase 2) to investigate reasons for satisfaction/dissatisfaction and unmet needs. The mean overall satisfaction score of the 166 respondents in phase 1 was high (86 out of 100). Participants were most satisfied with the "knowledge" and "attitudes" of health care providers (HCP) and "maintenance of confidentiality." They were least satisfied with "waiting time before consultation." "Knowledge of HCP" and "rapport, care, and trust towards HCP" emerged as most important aspects of satisfaction. The broad range of HCP and services provided at one location was particularly appreciated. Health care service evaluation by assessing client satisfaction using mixed methods provided valuable insight into health care service quality. It can be applied to a broader range of health care services. PMID:21118857

Chow, Maria Yui Kwan; Li, Mu; Quine, Susan

2010-11-30

239

New York State School Facilities and Student Health, Achievement, and Attendance: A Data Analysis Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students who attend schools with environmental hazards that impact indoor air quality are more likely to miss class, and therefore lose learning opportunities. Yet school environmental health and safety remains largely unregulated and there is no state or federal agency in charge of protecting children's environmental health in schools. This…

Boese, Stephen; Shaw, John

2005-01-01

240

A Legislative Snapshot of 1979 State Enactments Relating to Mental Health Facilities and Community Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The need for community-based mental health services has been a national priority since the publication of the Report of the Joint Commission on Mental Illness and Health in 1961. Implementation of the policy has been hindered primarily by lack of resident...

J. Regner

1980-01-01

241

Critical Factors in Mental Health Programming for Juveniles in Corrections Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles with mental health and other specialized needs are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, and while juvenile corrections have not historically provided standardized and evidence-based mental health services for its incarcerated youth, the demand is evident. The reality is that juveniles with serious mental illness are committed…

Underwood, Lee A.; Phillips, Annie; von Dresner, Kara; Knight, Pamela D.

2006-01-01

242

National Medical Cyclotron Facility: Report to the Minister of Health by the Medical Cyclotron Committee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Research and training in nuclear medicine in Australia are both limited by the lack of a medical cyclotron facility. The Committee recommends the establishment of a national medical cyclotron to provide a supply of short-lived radioisotopes for research i...

1985-01-01

243

Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on Evidence-Based Medicine courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for

Nathalie IR Hugenholtz; Karen Nieuwenhuijsen; Judith K Sluiter; Frank JH van Dijk

2009-01-01

244

Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on EBM courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT\\\\BACKGROUND:Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM

N. I. R. Hugenholtz; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; J. K. Sluiter; Dijk van F. J. H

2009-01-01

245

Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health; Final Report of the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee?s public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The following report, "Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health," was written by the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel (ORHASP) for the following purposes: (1) to explain the components and process of the lengthy, complex study; (2) to summarize important study results in less technical language; and (3) to provide the State with the Panel's recommendations for future actions concerning the Oak Ridge communities. The dose reconstruction process involved the examination of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility. It resulted in hundreds of documents being declassified and provided an avenue for a complete public accounting of past practices and releases. Researchers used this information to identify released contaminants of concern, to estimate the quantity and timing of these releases, to evaluate the routes taken by contaminants through the environment to nearby populations, and to estimate the doses and health risks to exposed groups. The results suggest it is likely that some people's risks of developing various types of cancers or other health effects were increased because of the releases. Two groups were most likely to have been harmed: local children drinking milk, in the early 1950's, from a ?backyard? cow or goat that had grazed on pastures contaminated with iodine-131, and fetuses carried in the 1950's and early 1960's by women who routinely ate fish taken from nearby creeks and rivers contaminated with mercury and PCBs. More detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, are presented in seven technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the "author field" for the name "Widner," since Mr. T.E. Widner was the principal investigator on this project.

Alexander,J; Brooks,B; Erwin,P; Hamilton,J; Holloway,J; Lipford,P; Morin,N; Peelle,R; Smith,J; Voilleque,P; Zawia,N. Edited by Williams,L.

1999-12-01

246

Workers' Page  

MedlinePLUS

... Heat Stress Card How To Prepare For Workplace Emergencies Job Safety & Health Protection Poster OSHA Fact Sheets OSHA Inspections Personal Protective Equipment Recommendations for Workplace Violence Prevention Programs ...

247

Patient satisfaction on tuberculosis treatment service and adherence to treatment in public health facilities of Sidama zone, South Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Patient compliance is a key factor in treatment success. Satisfied patients are more likely to utilize health services, comply with medical treatment, and continue with the health care providers. Yet, the national tuberculosis control program failed to address some of these aspects in order to achieve the national targets. Hence, this study attempted to investigate patient satisfaction and adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Sidama zone of south Ethiopia. Methods A facility based cross sectional study was conducted using quantitative method of data collection from March to April 2011. A sample of 531 respondents on anti TB treatment from 11 health centers and 1 hospital were included in the study. The sample size to each facility was allocated using probability proportional to size allocation, and study participants for the interview were selected by systematic random sampling. A Pre tested, interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Collected data was edited, coded and entered to Epi data version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 16. Confirmatory factor analysis was done to identify factors that explain most of the variance observed in most of the manifested variables. Bivariate and Multivariate analysis were computed to analyze the data. Result The study revealed 90% of the study participants were satisfied with TB treatment service. However, 26% of respondents had poor adherence to their TB treatment. Patient perceived on professional care, time spent with health care provider, accessibility, technical competency, convenience (cleanliness) and consultation and relational empathy were independent predictors of overall patient satisfaction (P?health care provider, perceived accessibility, perceived waiting time, perceived professional care and over all patient satisfaction were significantly associated with adherence to TB treatment (P?health care provider interaction had a significant influence on patient satisfaction and adherence to TB treatment. Moreover, absence of drugs and long waiting time had a negative outcome on patient adherence. Therefore, the problem needs an urgent attention from programme managers and health care providers to intervene the challenges.

2013-01-01

248

Physical Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Volunteer Search Email this page Print this page Physical health Tweet The physical recovery after transplant is a slow process. Your ... strength. A combination of eating well and some physical activity can help you feel better. Each person ...

249

Educational facilities and financial assistance for graduate students in psychology: 1964-65  

Microsoft Academic Search

A table 5 pages in length summarizes requirements for admission to graduate programs in psychology. Information is also descriptively summarized on facilities, tuition, financial assistance for graduate students (fellowships, scholarships, assistantships, stipends), sex preferred, the existence of VA programs, US Public Health Service stipends, and other data concerning institutions providing graduate work in psychology.

Sherman Ross; Jacqueline J. Harmon

1963-01-01

250

Opinion-Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created and operated by Montgomery Kersell, this excellent resource allows users to access very recent opinion and editorial pieces from approximately 600 different English-language international sources. Indexed daily, the database can be searched by keyword with numerous modifiers. Returns include a link to the piece and a brief abstract. A sample search for "presidential campaign" produced 40 hits, while one for "Kashmir" returned 11 hits. In both cases, the pieces linked to were very current, many from that day. Users can also keyword search topical collections of columnists's pages, including Political & General, Business & Finance, Technology, Arts & Leisure, Health, and Sports. Those looking for the opinion page or letter to the editor columns for specific newspapers can browse a geographic listing. Additional resources include a pair of opinion columns (Think Ahead and Think Sideways) penned by Kersell himself.

251

Effect of an oral health assessment education program on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in skilled nursing facilities.  

PubMed

This pilot intervention study measured the impact of an oral health education intervention on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in regard to oral assessments of institutionalized elders. Two 1-hour education sessions were completed over a 3-week period; a pretest and a posttest were administered immediately preceding the first session and immediately following the second session. Medical records were reviewed prior to and after the intervention to assess practices including completeness of oral health assessment and congruency with the Minimum Data Set 2.0 (MDS). Nine nurses attended the education intervention. Retrospectively, 176 records were reviewed preintervention and 80 postintervention. There was no significant change in knowledge from the pre- to posttest (p= .262). Completeness of all oral health assessment variables increased significantly (p= .001) as did the congruency of data between the nursing assessment (NA) and MDS assessments (p= .002). Providing nurses with education on oral health assessments in skilled nursing facilities has a positive impact on completeness of data and congruency between the NA and the MDS. PMID:19573046

Munoz, Nancy; Touger-Decker, Riva; Byham-Gray, Laura; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan

252

Strengthening Health Systems at Facility-Level: Feasibility of Integrating Antiretroviral Therapy into Primary Health Care Services in Lusaka, Zambia  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionHIV care and treatment services are primarily delivered in vertical antiretroviral (ART) clinics in sub-Saharan Africa but there have been concerns over the impact on existing primary health care services. This paper presents results from a feasibility study of a fully integrated model of HIV and non-HIV outpatient services in two urban Lusaka clinics.MethodsIntegration involved three key modifications: i) amalgamation

Stephanie M. Topp; Julien M. Chipukuma; Mark Giganti; Linah K. Mwango; Like M. Chiko; Bushimbwa Tambatamba-Chapula; Chibesa S. Wamulume; Stewart Reid; Landon Myer

2010-01-01

253

Administrator's Guide for Animal Facilitated Therapy Programs in Federal Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Animal facilitated therapy has positively impacted upon a wide variety of both in-patient and outpatient medical treatment programs. This study outlines a variety of issues and answers surrounding the inclusion of animals into health care organizations an...

T. E. Catanzaro

1983-01-01

254

Letter Health Consultation: Palermo Superfund Site, Tumwater, Washington. EPA Facility ID: WA0000026534.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently provided the Washington Department of Health (DOH) with its August 18, 2008, Final Second Five-Year Review Report, Palermo Wellfield Superfund Site, Tumwater, Washington. The purpose of the second fi...

2008-01-01

255

Transitioning to adult health care facilities for young adults with a chronic condition.  

PubMed

Youth with chronic conditions and special health care needs are surviving into adulthood. In certain circumstances, these youth may choose to remain with their pediatricians for their health care needs. However, most youth will require complex coordinated care in order for them to live full and productive lives to the best that they are able. Issues such as independence and dependence, educational and vocational choices, and insurance are important in transitioning to an adult-focused system of health care. This article addresses strategies that will assist young adults with the process of transitioning from pediatric care centers to adult health care centers. Despite the importance of providing a transition program, few transition programs exist for young people with chronic conditions (Sawyer, Blair, & Bowes, 1997). This article will also discuss barriers to the transition process. PMID:12025316

Lewis-Gary, M D

256

Soil metal concentrations and toxicity: associations with distances to industrial facilities and implications for human health.  

PubMed

Urban and rural areas may have different levels of environmental contamination and different potential sources of exposure. Many metals, i.e., arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), have well-documented negative neurological effects, and the developing fetus and young children are particularly at risk. Using a database of mother and child pairs, three areas were identified: a rural area with no increased prevalence of mental retardation and developmental delay (MR/DD) (Area A), and a rural area (Area B) and an urban area (Area C) with significantly higher prevalence of MR/DD in children as compared to the state-wide average. Areas were mapped and surface soil samples were collected from nodes of a uniform grid. Samples were analyzed for As, barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), Pb, manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and Hg concentrations and for soil toxicity, and correlated to identify potential common sources. ArcGIS was used to determine distances between sample locations and industrial facilities, which were correlated with both metal concentrations and soil toxicity. Results indicated that all metal concentrations (except Be and Hg) in Area C were significantly greater than those in Areas A and B (p< or =0.0001) and that Area C had fewer correlations between metals suggesting more varied sources of metals than in rural areas. Area C also had a large number of facilities whose distances were significantly correlated with metals, particularly Cr (maximum r=0.33; p=0.0002), and with soil toxicity (maximum r=0.25; p=0.007) over a large spatial scale. Arsenic was not associated with distance to any facility and may have a different anthropogenic, or natural source. In contrast to Area C, both rural areas had lower concentrations of metals, lower soil toxicity, and a small number of facilities with significant associations between distance and soil metals. PMID:19155049

Aelion, C Marjorie; Davis, Harley T; McDermott, Suzanne; Lawson, Andrew B

2009-01-19

257

Soil metal concentrations and toxicity: Associations with distances to industrial facilities and implications for human health  

PubMed Central

Urban and rural areas may have different levels of environmental contamination and different potential sources of exposure. Many metals, i.e., arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), have well-documented negative neurological effects, and the developing fetus and young children are particularly at risk. Using a database of mother and child pairs, three areas were identified: a rural area with no increased prevalence of mental retardation and developmental delay (MR/DD) (Area A), and a rural area (Area B) and an urban area (Area C) with significantly higher prevalence of MR/DD in children as compared to the state-wide average. Areas were mapped and surface soil samples were collected from nodes of the uniform grid. Samples were analyzed for As, barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), Pb, manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and Hg concentrations, and for soil toxicity and correlated to identify potential common sources. ArcGIS® was used to determine distances between sample locations and industrial facilities, which were correlated with both metal concentrations and soil toxicity. Results indicated that all metal concentrations (except Be and Hg) in Area C were significantly greater than those in Areas A and B (p ? 0.0001) and that Area C had fewer correlations between metals suggesting more varied sources of metals than in rural areas. Area C also had a large number of facilities whose distances were significantly correlated with metals, particularly Cr (maximum r = 0.33; p = 0.0002), and with soil toxicity (maximum r = 0.25; p = 0.007) over a large spatial scale. Arsenic was not associated with distance to any facility and may have different anthropogenic, or a natural source. In contrast to Area C, both rural areas had lower concentrations of metals, lower soil toxicity, and a small number of facilities with significant associations between distance and soil metals.

Aelion, C. Marjorie; Davis, Harley T.; McDermott, Suzanne; Lawson, Andrew B.

2009-01-01

258

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive

N. C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-01-01

259

Community and facility-level engagement in planning and budgeting for the government health sector--a district perspective from Kenya.  

PubMed

Health systems reform processes have increasingly recognized the essential contribution of communities to the success of health programs and development activities in general. Here we examine the experience from Kilifi district in Kenya of implementing annual health sector planning guidelines that included community participation in problem identification, priority setting, and planning. We describe challenges in the implementation of national planning guidelines, how these were met, and how they influenced final plans and budgets. The broad-based community engagement envisaged in the guidelines did not take place due to the delay in roll out of the Ministry of Health-trained community health workers. Instead, community engagement was conducted through facility management committees, though in a minority of facilities, even such committees were not involved. Some overlap was found in the priorities highlighted by facility staff, committee members and national indicators, but there were also many additional issues raised by committee members and not by other groups. The engagement of the community through committees influenced target and priority setting, but the emphasis on national health indicators left many local priorities unaddressed by the final work plans. Moreover, it appears that the final impact on budgets allocated at district and facility level was limited. The experience in Kilifi highlights the feasibility of engaging the community in the health planning process, and the challenges of ensuring that this engagement feeds into consolidated plans and future implementation. PMID:20888061

O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme; Tsofa, Benjamin; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine; McKenzie, F Ellis

2010-11-19

260

Evaluation of the built environment at a children's convalescent hospital: development of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory parent and staff satisfaction measures for pediatric health care facilities.  

PubMed

In preparation for the design, construction, and postoccupancy evaluation of a new Children's Convalescent Hospital, focus groups were conducted and measurement instruments were developed to quantify and characterize parent and staff satisfaction with the built environment of the existing pediatric health care facility, a 30-year-old, 59-bed, long-term, skilled nursing facility dedicated to the care of medically fragile children with complex chronic conditions. The measurement instruments were designed in close collaboration with parents, staff, and senior management involved with the existing and planned facility. The objectives of the study were to develop pediatric measurement instruments that measured the following: (1) parent and staff satisfaction with the built environment of the existing pediatric health care facility, (2) parent satisfaction with the health care services provided to their child, and (3) staff satisfaction with their coworker relationships. The newly developed Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scales demonstrated internal consistency reliability (average alpha = 0.92 parent report, 0.93 staff report) and initial construct validity. As anticipated, parents and staff were not satisfied with the existing facility, providing detailed qualitative and quantitative data input to the design of the planned facility and a baseline for postoccupancy evaluation of the new facility. Consistent with the a priori hypotheses, higher parent satisfaction with the built environment structure and aesthetics was associated with higher parent satisfaction with health care services (r =.54, p <.01; r =.59, p <.01, respectively). Higher staff satisfaction with the built environment structure and aesthetics was associated with higher coworker relationship satisfaction (r =.53; p <.001; r =.51; p <.01, respectively). The implications of the findings for the architectural design and evaluation of pediatric health care facilities are discussed. PMID:14767351

Varni, James W; Burwinkle, Tasha M; Dickinson, Paige; Sherman, Sandra A; Dixon, Pamela; Ervice, Judy A; Leyden, Pat A; Sadler, Blair L

2004-02-01

261

Health impact assessment of waste management facilities in three European countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Policies on waste disposal in Europe are heterogeneous and rapidly changing, with potential health implications that are largely\\u000a unknown. We conducted a health impact assessment of landfilling and incineration in three European countries: Italy, Slovakia\\u000a and England.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 49 (Italy), 2 (Slovakia), and 11 (England) incinerators were operating in 2001 while for landfills the figures\\u000a were 619, 121

Francesco Forastiere; Chiara Badaloni; Kees de Hoogh; Martin K von Kraus; Marco Martuzzi; Francesco Mitis; Lubica Palkovicova; Daniela Porta; Philipp Preiss; Andrea Ranzi; Carlo A Perucci; David Briggs

2011-01-01

262

Indian Health Service: Find Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Patients Find Health Care Share This Page: Find Health Care IMPORTANT If you are having a health emergency ... services, continuous nursing services and that provides comprehensive health care including diagnosis and treatment. Health Locations An ambulatory ...

263

Implementation of Home based management of malaria in children reduces the work load for peripheral health facilities in a rural district of Burkina Faso  

PubMed Central

Background Home Management of Malaria (HMM) is one of the key strategies to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable population in endemic countries. It is based on the evidence that well-trained communities health workers can provide prompt and adequate care to patients close to their homes. The strategy has been shown to reduce malaria mortality and severe morbidity and has been adopted by the World Health Organization as a cornerstone of malaria control in Africa. However, the potential fall-out of this community-based strategy on the work burden at the peripheral health facilities level has never been investigated. Methods A two-arm interventional study was conducted in a rural health district of Burkina Faso. The HMM strategy has been implemented in seven community clinics catchment's area (intervention arm). For the other seven community clinics in the control arm, no HMM intervention was implemented. In each of the study arms, presumptive treatment was provided for episodes of fevers/malaria (defined operationally as malaria). The study drug was artemether-lumefantrine, which was sold at a subsidized price by community health workers/Key opinion leaders at the community level and by the pharmacists at the health facility level. The outcome measured was the proportion of malaria cases among all health facility attendance (all causes diseases) in both arms throughout the high transmission season. Results A total of 7,621 children were enrolled in the intervention arm and 7,605 in the control arm. During the study period, the proportions of malaria cases among all health facility attendance (all causes diseases) were 21.0%, (445/2,111, 95% CI [19.3%–22.7%]) and 70.7% (2,595/3,671, 95% CI 68.5%–71.5%), respectively in the intervention and control arms (p << 0.0001). The relative risk ratio for a fever/malaria episode to be treated at the HF level was 30% (0.30 < RR < 0.32). The number of malaria episodes treated in the intervention arm was much higher than in the control arm (6,661 vs. 2,595), with malaria accounting for 87.4% of all disease episodes recorded in the intervention area and for 34.1% in the control area (P < 0.0001). Of all the malaria cases treated in the intervention arm, only 6.7% were treated at the health facility level. Conclusion These findings suggest that implementation of HMM, by reducing the workload in health facilities, might contributes to an overall increase of the performance of the peripheral health facilities.

Tiono, Alfred B; Kabore, Youssouf; Traore, Abdoulaye; Convelbo, Nathalie; Pagnoni, Franco; Sirima, Sodiomon B

2008-01-01

264

Perceived health status and environmental quality in the assessment of external costs of waste disposal facilities. An empirical investigation.  

PubMed

Taxation for urban waste management has been reformed in Italy by the introduction of an environmental law in 2006. In the planning phase of waste management, externalities generated by new facilities remain widely unaccounted, with a consequent distortion for prices, often raising local conflicts. The paper presents a survey based on the choice modelling methodology, aimed to evaluate on a monetary scale the disamenity effect perceived by incinerator and landfills in an Italian urban context: the city of Turin. In a random utility framework the behaviour of respondents, whose choices are found to be driven by the endowment of information about technological options, socio-economic characteristics as income, education, family composition, and also by their health status was modelled. Furthermore, empirical evidence that the behaviour in residential location choices is affected by different aspects of the respondent life and in particular by the health status was found. Distinct estimates of willingness to accept compensation for disamenity effects of incinerator (Euro 2670) and landfill (Euro 3816) are elicited. The effect of health status of the respondents, their level of information about the waste disposal infrastructure, the presence of a subjective strong aversion (NIMBY) and the actual endowment and concentration of infrastructures are demonstrated to be significant factors determining the choice behaviour, but differentiated and specific for incinerators and landfills. PMID:22588111

Giaccaria, Sergio; Frontuto, Vito

2012-05-15

265

MODEL FOR CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE IN A HEALTH CARE FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model of clinical social work practice for direct patient service in a health care setting, providing clarity of role and function, was a wide benefit of a social service department's addressing the accountability issue. This document has provided the structure for a recording and reporting scheme to demonstrate what social service performs, what it accomplishes, and in what quantity.

Dorothy B. Black; Julia Morrison; Linda J. Snyder; Patricia Tally

1978-01-01

266

Barriers and solutions in implementing occupational health and safety services at a large nuclear weapons facility.  

PubMed

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's largest nuclear weapons sites. The enormous changes experienced by Hanford over the last several years, as its mission has shifted from weapons production to cleanup, has profoundly affected its occupational health and safety services. Innovative programs and new initiatives hold promise for a safer workplace for the thousands of workers at Hanford and other DOE sites. However, occupational health and safety professionals continue to face multiple organizational, economic, and cultural challenges. A major problem identified during this review was the lack of coordination of onsite services. Because each health and safety program operates independently (albeit with the guidance of the Richland field operations office), many services are duplicative and the health and safety system is fragmented. The fragmentation is compounded by the lack of centralized data repositories for demographic and exposure data. Innovative measures such as a questionnaire-driven Employee Job Task Analysis linked to medical examinations has allowed the site to move from the inefficient and potentially dangerous administrative medical monitoring assignment to defensible risk-based assignments and could serve as a framework for improving centralized data management and service delivery. PMID:11186038

Takaro, T K; Ertell, K; Salazar, M K; Beaudet, N; Stover, B; Hagopian, A; Omenn, G; Barnhart, S

267

Survey of the Need for Nursing Home and Health Related Facility Beds: Steuben County.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey was conducted in Steuben County, New York during 1974 to verify the results of a 1969 - 1970 survey on the estimation of inpatient bed needs in the county. Arrangements were made with the Steuben County Public Health Nursing Service to engage som...

1974-01-01

268

NHANES 1 Epidemiologic Followup Study (NHEFS), 1987. Health Care Facility Stay.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The NHANES 1 Epidemiologic Followup study (NHEFS) is a longitudinal study which uses as its baseline those adult persons ages 25-74 years who were examined in 1971-1975 in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1). NHANES 1 col...

1987-01-01

269

Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been promoted as a means to reduce malaria transmission due to their ability to kill both asexual blood stages of malaria parasites, which sustain infections over long periods and the immature derived sexual stages responsible for infecting mosquitoes and onward transmission. Early studies reported a temporal association between ACT introduction and reduced malaria transmission in a number of ecological settings. However, these reports have come from areas with low to moderate malaria transmission, been confounded by the presence of other interventions or environmental changes that may have reduced malaria transmission, and have not included a comparison group without ACT. This report presents results from the first large-scale observational study to assess the impact of case management with ACT on population-level measures of malaria endemicity in an area with intense transmission where the benefits of effective infection clearance might be compromised by frequent and repeated re-infection. Methods A pre-post observational study with a non-randomized comparison group was conducted at two sites in Tanzania. Both sites used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) monotherapy as a first-line anti-malarial from mid-2001 through 2002. In 2003, the ACT, artesunate (AS) co-administered with SP (AS?+?SP), was introduced in all fixed health facilities in the intervention site, including both public and registered non-governmental facilities. Population-level prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia were assessed using light microscopy from samples collected during representative household surveys in 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 and 2006. Findings Among 37,309 observations included in the analysis, annual asexual parasitaemia prevalence in persons of all ages ranged from 11% to 28% and gametocytaemia prevalence ranged from <1% to 2% between the two sites and across the five survey years. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to adjust for age, socioeconomic status, bed net use and rainfall. In the presence of consistently high coverage and efficacy of SP monotherapy and AS?+?SP in the comparison and intervention areas, the introduction of ACT in the intervention site was associated with a modest reduction in the adjusted asexual parasitaemia prevalence of 5 percentage-points or 23% (p?health facilities only modestly reduced asexual parasitaemia prevalence. ACT is effective for treatment of uncomplicated malaria and should have substantial public health impact on morbidity and mortality, but is unlikely to reduce malaria transmission substantially in much of sub-Saharan Africa where individuals are rapidly re-infected.

2012-01-01

270

Identifying characteristics associated with performing recommended practices in maternal and newborn care among health facilities in Rwanda: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Although rates of maternal and neonatal mortality have decreased in many countries over the last two decades, they remain unacceptably high, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Nevertheless, we know little about the quality of facility-based maternal and newborn care in low-income countries and little about the association between quality of care and health worker training, supervision, and incentives in these settings. We therefore sought to examine the quality of facility-based maternal and newborn health care by describing the implementation of recommended practices for maternal and newborn care among health care facilities. We also aimed to determine whether increased training, supervision, and incentives for health workers were associated with implementing these recommended practices. We chose to study these aims in the Republic of Rwanda, where rates of maternal and newborn mortality are high and where substantial attention is currently focused on strengthening health workforce capacity and quality. Methods We used data from the 2007 Rwanda Service Provision Assessment. Using observations from 455 facilities and interviews from 1357 providers, we generated descriptive statistics to describe the use of recommended practices and frequencies of provider training, supervision, and incentives in the areas of antenatal, delivery, and newborn care. We then constructed multivariable regression models to examine the associations between using recommended practices and health provider training, supervision, and incentives. Results Use of recommended practices varied widely, and very few facilities performed all recommended practices. Furthermore, in most areas of care, less than 25% of providers reported having had any pre-service or in-service training in the last 3?years. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no evidence that training, supervision, or incentives were consistently associated with using recommended practices. Conclusion Our findings highlight the need to improve facility-based maternal and newborn care in Rwanda and suggest that current approaches to workforce training, supervision, and incentives may not be adequate for improving these critical practices.

2012-01-01

271

Formal and informal payments in health care facilities in two Russian cities, Tyumen and Lipetsk.  

PubMed

Informal payments for health care services are common in many transition countries, including Russia. While the Russian government proclaims its policy goal of improving access to and quality of free-of-charge health services, it has approved regulations that give local authorities the right to provide services against payment. This paper reports the results of a population-based survey (n = 2001) examining the prevalence of the use of medical services for which people pay formally or informally in two regional capitals of different economic status. The purpose of the study was to reveal any differences in the forms of and reasons for payments between the two cities and between socio-economic groups. The results indicate that formal payments were more common in the capital of the wealthier region, Tyumen, while the prevalence of informal payments was higher in the capital of the poorer region, Lipetsk. Around 15% of respondents had made informal payments in the past 3 years. Being a female (OR = 1.57), having a chronic disease (OR = 1.62), being a pensioner (OR = 2.8) and being willing to pay for additional medical information (OR = 2.48) increased the probability of informal payments. The survey demonstrates that in Russia access to and quality of publicly funded health care services may be under serious threat due to the current unclear, non-transparent financial rules. The practice of informal payments exists along with the introduction of formal chargeable government services, which may hamper the government's efforts to enhance equality among health service users. PMID:19625468

Aarva, Pauliina; Ilchenko, Irina; Gorobets, Pavel; Rogacheva, Anastasiya

2009-07-22

272

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

1994-12-01

273

Environmental Health Topics from A to Z  

MedlinePLUS

... Education Home Page Brochures & Fact Sheets Environmental Health Topics Science Education Kids' Pages Research Home Page At ... for Scientists Clinical Research National Toxicology Program Research Topics Funding Opportunities Home Page Grants Challenge Awards Contracts & ...

274

ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

NONE

1998-07-01

275

Health, United States, 2000 With Adolescent Health Chartbook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released this major report on health in the United States. It is an electronic edition of the annual report which details a variety of health statistics, such as "birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, morbidity and health status, risk factors, use of ambulatory care and inpatient care, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and other health topics." Users can download the full text of the 450-page report by topical section or in its entirety. Additionally, the report also includes a chartbook and trend tables that may be downloaded in Excel or Lotus formats. Updated tables, the official news releases, and previous editions of the report are also available at the site.

Duran, C. R.; Fingerhut, L. A.; Mackay, A. P.

2000-01-01

276

Teacher Page - Deutsch Klasse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On this site you will find the resource needed to teach a German Level I Course. There are links below for lesson plans and a link to the student page. This page is an introductory page for the teacher. Below are four links that will provide teachers with additional resources to use in their classrooms. Teacher Page - Lesson Plans Teacher Page - Resources Student Page - Deutsch Klasse Student WebQuests ...

Barlow, Frau

2009-11-02

277

A hospital-based estimate of major causes of death among under-five children from a health facility in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria: possible indicators of health inequality  

PubMed Central

Introduction Current evidence on the root-causes of deaths among children younger than 5years is critical to direct international efforts to improve child survival, focus on health promotion and achieve Millennium Development Goal 4. We report a hospital-based estimate for 2005-2007 of the major causes of death in children in this age-group in south-west Nigeria. Methods We used retrospective data from the intensive care unit of a second-tier health facility to extract the presenting complaints, clinical diagnosis, treatment courses, prognosis and outcome among children aged 6—59months. SPSS-19 was used for data analysis. Results Of the 301 children (58% males, 42% females) admitted into the ICU within the period of study, 173 (26%) presented with complaints related to the gastrointestinal system, 138 (21%) with respiratory symptoms and 196 (29%) with complaints of fever. Overall, 708 investigations were requested for among which were full blood count (215, 30%) and blood slides for malaria parasite (166, 23%). Infection ranked highest (181, 31%) in clinicians’ diagnosis, followed by haematological health problems (109, 19%) and respiratory illnesses (101, 17%). There were negative correlations between outcome of the illness and patient’s weight (r=-0.195, p=0.001) and a strong positive correlation between prognosis and outcome of admission (r=0.196, p=0.001). Of the 59 (20%) children that died, presentation of respiratory tract illnesses were significantly higher in females (75%) than in males (39%) (?²=7.06; p=0.008) and diagnoses related to gastrointestinal pathology were significantly higher in males (18%) than in females (0%) (?²=4.07; p=0.05). Majority of the deaths (21%) occurred among children aged 1.0 to 1.9years old and among weight group of 5.1-15.0kg. Conclusion The major causes of deaths among under-five years old originate from respiratory, gastrointestinal and infectious diseases – diseases that were recognized as major causes of childhood mortality about half a century earlier. Realization of MDG4 - to reduce child mortality by two-thirds – is only possible if the government and donor agencies look beyond the health sector to find hidden causative factors such as education and housing and within the health sector such as vibrant maternal, new-born, and child health interventions.

2012-01-01

278

The influences of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on women's choice of prenatal care facility: Investigation of differences between rural and non-rural areas  

PubMed Central

Background Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI), implemented in 1995, substantially increased the number of health care facilities that can deliver free prenatal care. Because of the increase in such facilities, it is usually assumed that women would have more choices regarding prenatal care facilities and thus experience reduction in travel cost. Nevertheless, there has been no research exploring these issues in the literature. This study compares how Taiwan's NHI program may have influenced choice of prenatal care facility and perception regarding convenience in transportation for obtaining such care for women in rural and non-rural areas in Taiwan. Methods Based on data collected by a national survey conducted by Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in 2000, we tried to compare how women chose prenatal care facility before and after Taiwan's National Health Insurance program was implemented. Basing our analysis on how women answered questionnaire items regarding "the type of major health care facility used and convenience of transportation to and from prenatal care facility," we investigated whether there were disparities in how women in rural and non-rural areas chose prenatal care facilities and felt about the transportation, and whether the NHI had different influences for the two groups of women. Results After NHI, women in rural areas were more likely than before to choose large hospitals for prenatal care services. For women in rural areas, the relative probability of choosing large hospitals to choosing non-hospital settings in 1998–1999 was about 6.54 times of that in 1990–1992. In contrast, no such change was found in women in non-rural areas. For a woman in a non-rural area, she was significantly more likely to perceive the transportation to and from prenatal care facilities to be very convenient between 1998 and 1999 than in the period between 1990 and 1992. No such improvement was found for women in rural areas. Conclusion We concluded that women in rural areas were more likely to seek prenatal care in large hospitals, but were not more likely to perceive very convenient transportation to and from prenatal care facilities in the late 1990s than in the early 1990s. In contrast, women in non-rural areas did not have a stronger tendency to seek prenatal care in large hospitals in the late 1990s than in earlier periods. In addition, they did perceive an improvement in transportation for acquiring prenatal care in the late 1990s. More efforts should be made to reduce these disparities.

Chen, Likwang; Chen, Chi-Liang; Yang, Wei-Chih

2008-01-01

279

Use of geographic information systems technology to track critical health code violations in retail facilities available to populations of different socioeconomic status and demographics.  

PubMed

Research shows that community socioeconomic status (SES) predicts, based on food service types available, whether a population has access to healthy food. It is not known, however, if a relationship exists between SES and risk for foodborne illness (FBI) at the community level. Geographic information systems (GIS) give researchers the ability to pinpoint health indicators to specific geographic locations and detect resulting environmental gradients. It has been used extensively to characterize the food environment, with respect to access to healthy foods. This research investigated the utility of GIS in determining whether community SES and/or demographics relate to access to safe food, as measured by food service critical health code violations (CHV) as a proxy for risk for FBI. Health inspection records documenting CHV for 10,859 food service facilities collected between 2005 and 2008 in Philadelphia, PA, were accessed. Using an overlay analysis through GIS, CHV were plotted over census tracts of the corresponding area. Census tracts (n = 368) were categorized into quintiles, based on poverty level. Overall, food service facilities in higher poverty areas had a greater number of facilities (with at least one CHV) and had more frequent inspections than facilities in lower poverty areas. The facilities in lower poverty areas, however, had a higher average number of CHV per inspection. Analysis of CHV rates in census tracts with high concentrations of minority populations found Hispanic facilities had more CHV than other demographics, and Hispanic and African American facilities had fewer days between inspections. This research demonstrates the potential for utilization of GIS mapping for tracking risks for FBI. Conversely, it sheds light on the subjective nature of health inspections, and indicates that underlying factors might be affecting inspection frequency and identification of CHV, such that CHV might not be a true proxy for risk for FBI. PMID:21902922

Darcey, Valerie L; Quinlan, Jennifer J

2011-09-01

280

Quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients in a secondary health care facility, Ilorin, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the quality of life (QoL) and associated factors for 160 HIV/AIDS patients in Sobi Specialist Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria. The patients were assessed with the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Short Version. Frequency distribution, percentages, and means were employed for the statistical analysis of the results. The mean age of the HIV/AIDS patients was 38.0 years; 70% were females, 55% were literates, more than three quarters were married, and one third were businessmen/women. The overall mean scores for health-related QoL were 72 for the physical domain, 67 for the psychological domain, 65 for the environment domain, and 47 for the social domain. Significant differences were observed in all domains among patients who had received 12 months of antiretroviral therapy compared with those who had just begun therapy. Marital status, fewer pills, and longer duration of therapy appeared to predict better QoL in this study. The improved QoL in the physical, psychological, and environmental domains is suggestive of the interventions offered to the patients by the pharmacists in this setting.

Bello, Ibrahim K.

2013-01-01

281

Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures were recommended.

Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

2013-01-01

282

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-04-01

283

Using SERVQUAL for assessing and improving patient satisfaction at a rural health facility in Pakistan.  

PubMed

A cross-sectional study of patient satisfaction with care was conducted over a period of 1 year from March 2004 to March 2005 in a secondary-level hospital in a peri-urban area of Karachi, Pakistan. Using the SERVQUAL tool and exit interviews, data were collected quarterly from a total of 1533 patients. Results sharing and capacity-building workshops were arranged during the 4 phases of the survey to sensitize the staff of the hospital to work towards improving patient satisfaction. The level of satisfaction of the patients with the outpatient health services provided showed a gradual increase from 34.4% to 82.0% over the 1-year period. PMID:18561738

Shaikh, B T; Mobeen, N; Azam, S I; Rabbani, F

284

An international role model for training staff in health care facilities.  

PubMed

This paper describes a unique experience in training the staff in the Borders Health District in Scotland in techniques to improve the quality of life of elderly people inside and out of the institution. The reader is given a concise description of the curriculum; the philosophic approach; and the methodology. The latter is of particular interest since it appeals to emotional as well as cognitive learning. These techniques are spelled out as are some of the simple exercises used to demonstrate how elderly people may feel re: specific physical and emotional handicaps. The need for and a plan for administrative support and follow up are described as well as the close relationship of education and improved services. PMID:7216524

Saul, S; Saul, S R

285

Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Methods Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957–2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. Results During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (?13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (?1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (?69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Conclusion Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion.

Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastian; Romero, Camila X.; Aguilera, Hernan; Ahlers, Ivonne

2012-01-01

286

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01

287

The interdependence of mental health service systems: the effects of VA mental health funding on veterans' use of state mental health inpatient facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There are relatively few published data on how the financial structures of different health systems affect each other. With increasing financial restrictions in both public and private healthcare systems, it is important to understand how changes in one system (e.g. VA mental healthcare) affect utilization of other systems (e.g. state hospitals). Aims of Study: This study utilizes data from

Rani A. Desai; Robert A. Rosenheck

2000-01-01

288

Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Hong Kong's Residential Care Facilities: A Descriptive Analysis of Health and Disease Patterns by Sex, Age, and Presence of Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this study was to describe the health status profile and identify the healthcare needs of adults with intellectual disability (ID) residing in 18 of Hong Kong's residential care facilities. The author employed a cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire survey to collect data on 811 persons with ID (432 males, 53.3%, and…

Wong, Chi Wai

2011-01-01

289

Interactional group discussion: Results of a controlled trial using a behavioral intervention to reduce the use of injections in public health facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Injections are commonly overused in Indonesia. More than 60% of patients attending public health facilities receive at least one injection, which increases clinical risk and has adverse economic impact. This study assesses the efficacy of an innovative behavioral intervention, the Interactional Group Discussion (IGD), for reducing the overuse of injections. This study was a controlled trial in a single district

Johana E. Prawitasari Hadiyono; Sri Suryawati; Sulanto S. Danu; Sunartono; Budiono Santoso

1996-01-01

290

Inside PageRank  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the interest of a Web page is strictly related to its content and to the subjective readers' cultural background, a measure of the page authority can be provided that only depends on the topological structure of the Web. PageRank is a noticeable way to attach a score to Web pages on the basis of the Web connectivity. In this

Monica Bianchini; Marco Gori; Franco Scarselli

2005-01-01

291

Counting the cost of not costing HIV health facilities accurately: pay now, or pay more later.  

PubMed

The HIV pandemic continues to be one of our greatest contemporary public health threats. Policy makers in many middle- and low-income countries are in the process of scaling up HIV prevention, treatment and care services in the context of a reduction in international HIV funding due to the global economic downturn. In order to scale up services that are sustainable in the long term, policy makers and implementers need to have access to robust and contemporary strategic information, including financial information on expenditure and cost, in order to be able to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate HIV services. A major problem in middle- and low-income countries continues to be a lack of basic information on the use of services, their cost, outcome and impact, while those few costing studies that have been performed were often not done in a standardized fashion. Some researchers handle this by transposing information from one country to another, developing mathematical or statistical models that rest on assumptions or information that may not be applicable, or using top-down costing methods that only provide global financial costs rather than using bottom-up ingredients-based costing. While these methods provide answers in the short term, countries should develop systematic data collection systems to store, transfer and produce robust and contemporary strategic financial information for stakeholders at local, sub-national and national levels. National aggregated information should act as the main source of financial data for international donors, agencies or other organizations involved with the global HIV response. This paper describes the financial information required by policy makers and other stakeholders to enable them to make evidence-informed decisions and reviews the quantity and quality of the financial information available, as indicated by cost studies published between 1981 and 2008. Among the lessons learned from reviewing these studies, a need was identified for providing countries with practical guidance to produce reliable and standardized costing data to monitor performance, as countries want to improve programmes and services, and have to demonstrate an efficient use of resources. Finally, the issues raised in this paper relate to the provision of all areas of healthcare in countries and it is going to be increasingly important to leverage the lessons learned from the HIV experience and use resources more effectively and efficiently to improve health systems in general. PMID:22830633

Beck, Eduard J; Avila, Carlos; Gerbase, Sofia; Harling, Guy; De Lay, Paul

2012-10-01

292

An action plan to assess the current situation of maternal & newborn care at government health facilities in Jharkhand, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maternal and child health care especially safe motherhood services are an important factor in the primary health care and are the responsibility of the government and ministry of health. Consolidating and strengthening health network and quality of primary health care is one of the priority issues of the state and the health department for providing good health care and protection

Sudesh Kumar; Janet Singh

2007-01-01

293

Survey of potential health and safety hazards of commercial-scale ethanol production facilities  

SciTech Connect

Generic safety and health aspects of commercial-scale (60 to 600 million L/y) anhydrous ethanol production were identified. Several common feedstocks (grains, roots and fibers, and sugarcane) and fuels (coal, natural gas, wood, and bagasse) were evaluated throughout each step of generic plant operation, from initial milling and sizing through saccharification, fermentation, distillation, and stillage disposal. The fermentation, digestion, or combustion phases are not particularly hazardous, although the strong acids and bases used for hydrolysis and pH adjustment should be handled with the same precautions that every industrial solvent deserves. The most serious safety hazard is that of explosion from grain dust or ethanol fume ignition and boiler/steam line overpressurization. Inhalation of ethanol and carbon dioxide vapors may cause intoxication or asphyxiation in unventilated areas, which could be particularly hazardous near equipment controls and agitating vats. Contact with low-pressure process steam would produce scalding burns. Benzene, used in stripping water from ethanol in the final distillation column, is a suspected leukemogen. Substitution of this fluid by alternative liquids is addressed.

Watson, A.P.; Smith, J.G.; Elmore, J.L.

1982-04-01

294

Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Health and safety plan. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1910.120(f), shall be met for all employees performing or supervising hazardous waste operations. Medical exams shall be conducted as soon as possible upon notification by an employee that he/she has developed signs or symptoms indicating possible health hazards or overexposure to hazardous substances. Subcontractor personnel shall provide documentation of current status of participation in a medical surveillance program as required by 29 CFR 1910.120(f). Subcontractors unable to provide such documentation shall have successfully completed a medical examination as described in the above referenced OSHA standard prior to beginning work in a contaminated zone. Specific protocols for medical examinations are designed by an occupational physician. Common components include: (a) medical history and physical examination; (b) dipstick urinalysis, vision screen and vital signs; (c) spirometry ;(d) audiometry; (e) blood chemistry (complete blood count, liver function, kidney function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism); (f) resting EkG (with approval); (g) chest radiograph (P/A). No project-specific medical examinations, or biological monitoring is required for this project.

Thompson, P.; McKown, G.; Waugh, J.; Houser, W.; Joy, G.

1995-09-01

295

Sporadic "Transitional" Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Health Care Facilities in the United States?  

PubMed Central

We describe phenotypic and genotypic traits of a group of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones that are either remnants of unsuccessful community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) clones or represent a transitional state with some yet-to-be-acquired characteristics of CA-MRSA. These rare strains (n = 20) were identified during a 10-year period (1990-1999) from 13 unrelated health care facilities in Wisconsin. The isolates were recovered from patients in nosocomial or long-term chronic care facilities (60%) and outpatient settings (40%). Sixty percent (n = 12) of the isolates were recovered from skin and soft tissue infections, whereas the remaining isolates (n = 8) were from invasive infections. Ninety percent of isolates were susceptible to all antibiotic classes tested or resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, and spa typing clustered these isolates into 8, 8, and 14 clonal groups, respectively. Eight plasmid profiles were represented in these strains. All four agr types were represented, with type IV being predominant (40%). All strains harbored subtypes of type IV staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec but lacked genes for the virulence factor Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). The strains harbored one or more of the following toxin genes: sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seh, sej, sek, sel, seg, sei, sem, sen, and seo. Individual clonal groups maintained the same set of enterotoxin genes even though they were isolated over extended time periods, suggesting significant genomic stability. The potential role of PVL-carrying phages and plasmids in the success of CA-MRSA clones has been discussed.

Brady, Jennifer M.; Stemper, Mary E.; Weigel, Ashley; Chyou, Po-Huang; Reed, Kurt D.; Shukla, Sanjay K.

2007-01-01

296

Infant feeding practices in Bhaktapur, Nepal: a cross-sectional, health facility based survey  

PubMed Central

Background Promotion of proper breastfeeding practices for the first six months of life is the most cost-effective intervention for reducing childhood morbidity and mortality. However, the adherence to breastfeeding recommendations in many developing countries is not satisfactory. The aims of the study were to determine breastfeeding and infant feeding patterns at nine months of age and to assess factors influencing exclusive breastfeeding practices. Methods In Bhaktapur, Nepal, we carried out a cross-sectional survey of 325 infants who came for measles vaccination at the age of nine months. Mothers were interviewed on details regarding feeding of their child and health since birth. Results Three quarters of all mothers reported that they did not receive any information on breastfeeding during the antenatal visit. Two hundred and ninety five (91%) mothers gave colostrum and 185 (57%) initiated breastfeeding within one hour of delivery. The prevalence of exclusively breastfeeding at 1, 3 and 6 months were 240 (74%), 78 (24%) and 29 (9%), and partial feeding was initiated in 49 (15%), 124 (38%) and 257 (79%) babies, respectively. The main reason, according to the mother, for introducing other foods before six months of age was insufficient breast milk. In logistic regression analyses, mother's knowledge on how long child should be given only breast milk and not living in joint families were associated positively with exclusive or predominant breastfeeding for four months or beyond. Conclusions Despite the high proportion of mothers who initiated breastfeeding immediately after birth, continuation of exclusive breastfeeding for up to six months was not common. Very few mothers received any information on breastfeeding during the antenatal visit, indicating a need for counseling on exclusive breastfeeding. Possible options for this counseling could be during antenatal visits and at regular clinic visits for vaccination.

2012-01-01

297

Environment, safety, health at DOE Facilities. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's occupational safety and property protection performance in fiscal year 1980 was excellent in all reported categories with loss rates generally less than one-third of comparable industry figures. The Department of Energy's fiscal year 1980 incidence rate per 200,000 work hours was 1.1 lost workday cases and 18.2 lost workdays compared to 1.1 lost workday cases and 17.2 lost workdays during fiscal year 1979. The recorded occupational illness rate, based on only 70 cases, was 0.05 cases per 200,000 work hours compared to 0.06 cases per 200,000 work hours for fiscal year 1979. Ten fatalities involving Federal or contractor employees occurred in fiscal year 1980 compared to nine for fiscal year 1979. Four of those in fiscal year 1980 resulted from two aircraft accidents. Total reported property loss during fiscal year 1980 was $7.1 million with $3.5 million attributable to earthquake damage sustained by the Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories on January 24, 1980. A total of 131 million vehicle miles of official vehicular travel during fiscal year 1980 resulted in 768 accidents and $535,145 in property damages. The 104,986 monitored Department of Energy and Department of Energy contractor employees received a total dose of 9040 REM in calendar year 1979. Both the total dose and the 1748 employees receiving radiation exposures greater than 1 REM in 1979 represent a continuing downward trend from the calendar year 1978 total dose of 9380 REM and the 1826 employees who received radiation exposures greater than 1 REM. The fifty-nine appraisals conducted indicate that generally adequate plans have been developed and effective organizational structures have been established to carry out the Department of Energy's Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection (ES and H) Program.

Not Available

1981-07-01

298

Health facility-based malaria surveillance: The effects of age, area of residence and diagnostics on test positivity rates  

PubMed Central

Background The malaria test positivity rate (TPR) is increasingly used as an indicator of malaria morbidity because TPR is based on laboratory-confirmed cases and is simple to incorporate into existing surveillance systems. However, temporal trends in TPR may reflect changes in factors associated with malaria rather than true changes in malaria morbidity. This study examines the effects of age, area of residence and diagnostic test on TPR at two health facilities in regions of Uganda with differing malaria endemicity. Methods The analysis included data from diagnostic blood smears performed at health facilities in Walukuba and Aduku between January 2009 and December 2010. The associations between age and time and between age and TPR were evaluated independently to determine the potential for age to confound temporal trends in TPR. Subsequently, differences between observed TPR and TPR adjusted for age were compared to determine if confounding was present. A similar analysis was performed for area of residence. Temporal trends in observed TPR were compared to trends in TPR expected using rapid diagnostic tests, which were modelled based upon sensitivity and specificity in prior studies. Results Age was independently associated with both TPR and time at both sites. At Aduku, age-adjusted TPR increased relative to observed TPR due to the association between younger age and TPR and the gradual increase in age distribution. At Walukuba, there were no clear differences between observed and age-adjusted TPR. Area of residence was independently associated with both TPR and time at both sites, though there were no clear differences in temporal trends in area of residence-adjusted TPR and observed TPR at either site. Expected TPR with pLDH- and HRP-2-based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was higher than observed TPR at all time points at both sites. Conclusions Adjusting for potential confounders such as age and area of residence can ensure that temporal trends in TPR due to confounding are not mistakenly ascribed to true changes in malaria morbidity. The potentially large effect of diagnostic test on TPR can be accounted for by calculating and adjusting for the sensitivity and specificity of the test used.

2012-01-01

299

Health Consultation: Philip Services Corporation (Georgetown Site), City of Seattle, King County, Washington. EPA Facility ID: WAD000812909.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of a health consultation is to identify and prevent harmful human health effects resulting from exposure to hazardous substances in the environment. Health consultations focus on specific health issues so that DOH can respond to requests from ...

2005-01-01

300

Methodology for optimising location of new primary health care facilities in rural communities: a case study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa  

PubMed Central

Study objective To develop a quantitative methodology to optimally site new primary health care facilities so as to achieve the maximum population level increase in accessibility to care. The study aims to test the methodology in a rural community characterised by considerable heterogeneity in population distribution and health care access. Design A geographical information system was used to estimate travel time to the nearest primary health care facility for each of the 26?000 homesteads in the subdistrict. The homestead‘s travel time estimate was then converted into an impedance to care estimate using distance decay (in clinic use) data obtained from the subdistrict. A map of total person impedance/km2 was then produced using a 3?km standard Gaussian filter. The resulting map was used to site a test clinic in the largest contiguous area of high person impedance. Setting Hlabisa health subdistrict, KwaZulu?Natal, South Africa. Main results The population level increase in accessibility that would be achieved by the construction of the test clinic would be 3.6 times the increase in accessibility achieved by the construction of the newest clinic in the subdistrict. The corresponding ratio for increasing clinic coverage (% of the population within 60?minutes of care) would be 4.7. Conclusions The methodology successfully identifies a locality for a new facility that would maximise the population level increase in accessibility to care. The same principles used in this research could also be applied in other settings. The methodology is of practical value in health research and practice and provides a framework for optimising location of new primary health care facilities.

Tanser, Frank

2006-01-01

301

Evaluation of the US Department of Energy's occupational safety and health program for its government-owned contractor-operated facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present to Secretary of Energy James Watkins the findings and recommendations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) evaluation of the Department of Energy's (DOE) programs for worker safety and health at DOE's government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) nuclear facilities. The OSHA evaluation is based on an intensive and comprehensive review and analysis of DOE's worker safety and health programs including: written programs; safety and health inspection programs; and the adequacy of resource, training, and management controls. The evaluation began on April 10, 1990 and involved over three staff years before its conclusion. The evaluation was initiated by former Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole in response to Secretary of Energy James Watkins' request that OSHA assist him in determining the actions needed to assure that DOE has an exemplary safety and health program in place at its GOCOs. 6 figs.

Not Available

1990-12-01

302

Your Annual Health Care Visit  

MedlinePLUS

Your Annual Health Care Visit Home About ACOG ACOG Departments & Activities Annual Women's Health Care Your Annual Health Care Visit Page Navigation ? ... about your annual health care exam Your Annual Health Care Visit Having an annual health care visit is ...

303

Relationship between structural characteristics and outcome quality indicators at health care facilities for the elderly requiring long-term care in Japan from a nationwide survey.  

PubMed

AIM: To clarify the performance situation of selected quality indicators: falls, pressure ulcers and dehydration, at health care facilities for the elderly in Japan, and what structural characteristics are related to them. METHODS: The operational population consisted of 1057 institutionalized users (approximately 10 randomly selected per facility) from a survey answered by the care staff. The facilities were divided into two groups according to their prevalence of negative outcomes (falls, pressure ulcers, dehydration): the best 25% (the very good performers) and the remaining 75% (not so good performers). Logistic regression analysis was carried out to examine the relationship between the structure characteristics of the facilities and their performance regarding each quality indicator. RESULTS: After controlling for sex, years of operation and average age of the users, our results showed a beneficial significant relationship between falls and the total number of nurses per 100 users with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 0.77 (95% CI 0.59-0.98); In contrast, for pressure ulcers, harmful associations between a higher number of registered nurses (AOR 1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.05) and the availability of 24-h nurse staffing (AOR 4.95, 95% CI 1.19-24.91) were found; regarding dehydration, we did not find any related staffing characteristics. CONCLUSION: Nursing staff might be considered as a potentially related variable in the quality of care in health care facilities for the elderly. The present study is the first to show a relationship between structural characteristics and quality outcomes in health care facilities for the elderly. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2013; ??: ??-??. PMID:23773284

Sandoval Garrido, Felipe Alfonso; Tamiya, Nanako; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Miyata, Sumiko; Okochi, Jiro; Moriyama, Yoko; Yamaoka, Yui; Takamuku, Kiyoshi

2013-06-18

304

Delivery Practices and Associated Factors among Mothers Seeking Child Welfare Services in Selected Health Facilities in Nyandarua South District, Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background A measure of the proportion of deliveries assisted by skilled attendants is one of the indicators of progress towards achieving Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5, which aims at improving maternal health. This study aimed at establishing delivery practices and associated factors among mothers seeking child welfare services at selected health facilities in Nyandarua South district, Kenya to determine whether mothers were receiving appropriate delivery care. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional survey among women who had recently delivered while in the study area was carried out between August and October 2009. Binary Logistic regression was used to identify factors that predicted mothers' delivery practice. Results Among the 409 mothers who participated in the study, 1170 deliveries were reported. Of all the deliveries reported, 51.8% were attended by unskilled birth attendants. Among the deliveries attended by unskilled birth attendants, 38.6% (452/1170) were by neighbors and/or relatives. Traditional Birth Attendants attended 1.5% (17/1170) of the deliveries while in 11.7% (137/1170) of the deliveries were self administered. Mothers who had unskilled birth attendance were more likely to have <3 years of education (Adjusted Odds ratio [AOR] 19.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 - 212.8) and with more than three deliveries in a life time (AOR 3.8, 95% CI 2.3 - 6.4). Mothers with perceived similarity in delivery attendance among skilled and unskilled delivery attendants were associated with unsafe delivery practice (AOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1 - 3.4). Mother's with lower knowledge score on safe delivery (%) were more likely to have unskilled delivery attendance (AOR 36.5, 95% CI 4.3 - 309.3). Conclusion Among the mothers interviewed, utilization of skilled delivery attendance services was still low with a high number of deliveries being attended by unqualified lay persons. There is need to implement cost effective and sustainable measures to improve the quality of maternal health services with an aim of promoting safe delivery and hence reducing maternal mortality.

2011-01-01

305

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 9. Methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report sets forth methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities for electric power generation. The review is divided into a Notice of Intention process and an Application for Certification process, in accordance with the structure to be used by the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, the

A. V. Nero; M. S. Quinby-Hunt

1977-01-01

306

Why some women fail to give birth at health facilities: a qualitative study of women's perceptions of perinatal care from rural Southern Malawi  

PubMed Central

Background Despite Malawi government’s policy to support women to deliver in health facilities with the assistance of skilled attendants, some women do not access this care. Objective The study explores the reasons why women delivered at home without skilled attendance despite receiving antenatal care at a health centre and their perceptions of perinatal care. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using a semi- structured interview guide that collected information on women’s perception on perinatal care. A total of 12 in- depth interviews were conducted with women that had delivered at home in the period December 2010 to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers before, during, and after delivery. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Onset of labor at night, rainy season, rapid labor, socio-cultural factors and health workers’ attitudes were related to the women delivering at home. The participants were assisted in the delivery by traditional birth attendants, relatives or neighbors. Two women delivered alone. Most women went to the health facility the same day after delivery. Conclusions This study reveals beliefs about labor and delivery that need to be addressed through provision of appropriate perinatal information to raise community awareness. Even though, it is not easy to change cultural beliefs to convince women to use health facilities for deliveries. There is a need for further exploration of barriers that prevent women from accessing health care for better understanding and subsequently identification of optimal solutions with involvement of the communities themselves.

2013-01-01

307

Communication: Health Communication: Health Professionals ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text VersionPage 1. Communication: Health Communication: Health Professionals and Consumers Professionals and Consumers Presented by Presented by ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

308

Public Health Assessment for R & H Oil Company, EPA Facility ID: TXD057577579 and Tropicana Energy Company, EPA Facility ID: TX0002369072, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports fo...

2003-01-01

309

Health, United States, 2001 With Urban and Rural Health Chartbook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released Monday, this large statistical report presents data on the nation's health in 460 pages, including birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and much more. This is the 25th annual report of its kind (see the July 28, 2000 Scout Report for a review of 2000's report), and this year is the first to give statistics on health status relative to level of urbanization, finding that suburban Americans "fare significantly better in many key health measures than those who live in the most rural and most urban areas." The report is available in its entirety or by section in .pdf format, and trendtables are available in Lotus or Excel formats.

Makuc, D. M.; Ingram, D. D.; Eberhardt, M. S.

2001-01-01

310

A Comparative Analysis of the Functional Disability Levels of Adult Day Care, Adult Day Health and ICF-Level Nursing Home Elderly in Hawaii.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compared the functional disability levels of participants in adult day centers with patients in intermediate care facilities (ICFs). A three-page questionnaire measuring demographics, social resources, physical health, mental health, and activities of daily living as assessed by the Activities of Daily Living scale and the Instrumental…

Hayashida, Cullen T.

311

Public Health Assessment for Red Rock Road, Sutherlin, Douglas County, Oregon, May 30, 2007. EPA Facility ID: OR0002367191.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Superfund Health Investigation and Education (SHINE) Program prepared this Public Health Assessment (PHA) to evaluate the human health risk from potential exposure to contaminants in mine tailings used to construct Red Rock Road (RRR). SHINE is part o...

2007-01-01

312

Wavelet Based Page Segmentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: The process of page segmentation produces adescription of the spatial extent and position ofvarious components on the document page. In thispaper, we present an approach for segmentation of ageneral document page image using wavelets. Thismethod uses orthonormal wavelet decomposition toextract the attributes of the document spread overdifferent scales. We have devised a scheme for theparameterisation of the font-size of

P. Gupta; N. Vohra; S. Chaudhury; S. Joshi

2000-01-01

313

Individual and health facility factors and the risk for obstructed labour and its adverse outcomes in south-western Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Obstructed labour is still a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality and of adverse outcome for newborns in low-income countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of individual and health facility factors and the risk for obstructed labour and its adverse outcomes in south-western Uganda. Methods A review was performed on 12,463 obstetric records for the year 2006 from six hospitals located in south-western Uganda and 11,180 women records were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to control for probable confounders. Results Prevalence of obstructed labour for the six hospitals was 10.5% and the main causes were cephalopelvic disproportion (63.3%), malpresentation or malposition (36.4%) and hydrocephalus (0.3%). The risk of obstructed labour was statistically significantly associated with being resident of a particular district [Isingiro] (AOR 1.39, 95% CI: 1.04-1.86), with nulliparous status (AOR 1.47, 95% CI: 1.22-1.78), having delivered once before (AOR 1.57, 95% CI: 1.30-1.91) and age group 15-19 years (AOR 1.21, 95% CI: 1.02-1.45). The risk for perinatal death as an adverse outcome was statistically significantly associated with districts other than five comprising the study area (AOR 2.85, 95% CI: 1.60-5.08) and grand multiparous status (AOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.11-3.22). Women who lacked paid employment were at increased risk of obstructed labour. Perinatal mortality rate was 142/1000 total births in women with obstructed labour compared to 65/1000 total births in women without the condition. The odds of having maternal complications in women with obstructed labour were 8 times those without the condition. The case fatality rate for obstructed labour was 1.2%. Conclusions Individual socio-demographic and health system factors are strongly associated with obstructed labour and its adverse outcome in south-western Uganda. Our study provides baseline information which may be used by policy makers and implementers to improve implementation of safe motherhood programmes.

2011-01-01

314

NIMBY syndrome and public consultation policy: the implications of a discourse analysis of local responses to the establishment of a community mental health facility.  

PubMed

The relocation of mental health services from an institutional to community base in different parts of the UK has witnessed incidents of public opposition in relation to the establishment of community mental health projects. It has been argued that this not-in-my-backyard (NIMBY) syndrome is partly a result of the attitudes held by the public towards people with mental health problems. The present paper reports some findings from a study of community attitudes towards individuals with mental health problems in a Scottish community, and discusses their implications for the development of public consultation guidelines with respect to the establishment of community mental health facilities. Discourse analysis was used to explore people's views about individuals with mental health problems. The study examined the ways in which their views were expressed in letters to the local press, and in subsequent discussions and interviews, when arguing for or against a supported accommodation project in their neighbourhood. Participants formulated their arguments around a number of issues which they claimed were of public concern. One of these related to the way in which the project was set up. In particular, participants argued that it had been established without any prior consultation with local people and in circumstances of secrecy. The findings demonstrate that, while consultation is relatively unproblematically defined in terms of its function, the specific nature of consultation is more problematic. The implications of these findings for mental health policy and practice are considered in the light of current official guidelines on public consultation relating to the establishment of community mental health facilities. It is argued that existing guidelines fail to take account of the concerns of local people, and therefore, that any intervention based on such guidelines is likely to be ineffective. It is suggested that the findings of this study will be of interest to policy makers and practitioners seeking to devise future public consultation strategies. PMID:14498834

Cowan, Sue

2003-09-01

315

Comparison of medicine availability measurements at health facilities: evidence from Service Provision Assessment surveys in five sub-Saharan African countries  

PubMed Central

Background With growing emphasis on health systems strengthening in global health, various health facility assessment methods have been used increasingly to measure medicine and commodity availability. However, few studies have systematically compared estimates of availability based on different definitions. The objective of this study was to compare estimates of medicine availability based on different definitions. Methods A secondary data analysis was conducted using data from the Service Provision Assessment (SPA) – a nationally representative sample survey of health facilities – conducted in five countries: Kenya SPA 2010, Namibia SPA 2009, Rwanda SPA 2007, Tanzania SPA 2006, and Uganda SPA 2007. For 32 medicines, percent of facilities having the medicine were estimated using five definitions: four for current availability and one for six-month period availability. ‘Observed availability of at least one valid unit’ was used as a reference definition, and ratios between the reference and each of the other four estimates were calculated. Summary statistics of the ratios among the 32 medicines were calculated by country. The ratios were compared further between public and non-public facilities within each country. Results Across five countries, compared to current observed availability of at least one valid unit, ‘reported availability without observation’ was on average 6% higher (ranging from 3% in Rwanda to 8% in Namibia), ‘observed availability where all units were valid’ was 11% lower (ranging from 2% in Tanzania to 19% in Uganda), and ‘six-month period availability’ was 14% lower (ranging from 5% in Namibia to 25% in Uganda). Conclusions Medicine availability estimates vary substantially across definitions, and need to be interpreted with careful consideration of the methods used.

2013-01-01

316

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for

R. M. Neupauer; S. M. Thurmond

1992-01-01

317

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for

R. M. Neupauer; S. M. Thurmond

1992-01-01

318

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

2007-10-01

319

Health and safety plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This HASP describes the process for identifying the requirements, written safety documentation, and procedures for protecting personnel involved in the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. Objective of this project is to place 19 former isotope production facilities at ORNL in a safe condition in anticipation of an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance.

NONE

1996-08-01

320

Pipeline paging for wireless systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In sequential paging (SP) schemes, the paging process is considered on a per user basis. When an incoming call reaches a mobile terminal (MT), the associated location area is divided into several paging areas (PAs) and PAs are paged one by one until the MT is found. Even though SP algorithms can reduce the paging cost compared to blanket paging

Yang Xiao; Hui Chen; M. Guizani

2005-01-01

321

The CMA's Health Information Privacy Code: Does it go too far?  

Microsoft Academic Search

he CMA has adopted an expanded and comprehensive policy statement (page 997) that will, if implemented, severely limit the use of any health information arising from the physician-patient relationship. This policy was developed in response to the increasing facility with which patients' medical records can be stored and manipulated electronically. The development of nu- merous potential applications for the use

John Hoey

322

Project People 2: An extended interview study of behavior response patterns in health care facility fire incidents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The data collected in a taped interview study involving a population of 150 facility staff personnel, 53 fire department personnel and 9 patients are presented and discussed. A physical examination and analysis of the fire incident area of the facility was conducted by experienced fire protection engineers to determine the physical area of fire origin with the flame and smoke propagation patterns. Fire department personnel were interviewed to obtain observations of flame and smoke propagation. Facility personnel and patients were interviewed to determine the human behavior responses of the participants during the fire incident and to determine their perception of the fire incident threat.

Bryan, J. L.

323

Public Health Assessment for Annapolis Lead Mine, Annapolis, Iron County, Missouri, September 7, 2006. EPA Facility ID: MO0000958611.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), in cooperation with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), is evaluating the public health impact of the Annapolis Lead Mine (ALM) Site. ATSDR is a federal agency authori...

2006-01-01

324

Public Health Assessment for Laytonville Landfill, Laytonville, Mendocino County, California, March 22, 2005. EPA Facility ID: CAD000065532.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) prepared this public health assessment (PHA) under a cooperative agreement with the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). PHAs provide communities with information on the spec...

2005-01-01

325

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 92-0073-2337, United States Postal Service General Mail Facility, Denver, Colorado.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a confidential request from employees working at the Denver General Mail Facility (SIC-4311) in Colorado, an evaluation was undertaken of ergonomic hazards associated with the use of two types of automated mail processing machines, the Bar ...

D. J. Habes T. R. Hales K. A. Grant

1993-01-01

326

APIC State-of-the-Art Report: The role of infection control during construction in health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc (APIC), is a multidisciplinary organization of more than 12,000 health care professionals who practice infection control and epidemiology within a variety of health care settings.This report reviews issues the infection control professional should consider related to construction and renovation projects in health care facilitie Preventing transmission of infectious agents to

Judene Mueller Bartley

2000-01-01

327

Entitlements to health care: Why is there a preference for private facilities among poorer residents of Chennai, India?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines access to health care by poorer residents in Chennai, India. It reveals constraining and enabling conditions for impoverished users seeking treatment. We explore patterns of health-seeking behaviour through the reasoning of residents themselves as well as stakeholders involved in providing care for these users. Particular attention is paid to the needy residents’ preference for private health care

Christina R. Ergler; Patrick Sakdapolrak; Hans-Georg Bohle; Robin A. Kearns

2011-01-01

328

Letter Health Consultation: Soil Data Evaluation: Ross Park Tar Site, St. Bernard, Hamilton County, Ohio. EPA Facility ID: OHN000510412.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This letter is in response to your request to evaluate the public health threat posed by potential exposures to seeps of petroleum hydrocarbons at the Ross Park Tar Site in St. Bernard, Ohio. The Ohio Department of Health's Health Assessment Section (HAS)...

2010-01-01

329

Mercury: Health Effects  

MedlinePLUS

... toxicological profile for mercury . Top of page Elemental mercury effects Elemental (metallic) mercury primarily causes health effects ... 0370.htm . Top of page Effects of other mercury compounds (inorganic and organic) High exposures to inorganic ...

330

Examining appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria: availability and use of rapid diagnostic tests and artemisinin-based combination therapy in public and private health facilities in south east Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) have been widely advocated by government and the international community as cost-effective tools for diagnosis and treatment of malaria. ACTs are now the first line treatment drug for malaria in Nigeria and RDTs have been introduced by the government to bridge the existing gaps in proper diagnosis. However, it is not known how readily available these RDTs and ACTs are in public and private health facilities and whether health workers are actually using them. Hence, this study investigated the levels of availability and use of RDTs and ACTs in these facilities. Methods The study was undertaken in Enugu state, southeast Nigeria in March 2009. Data was collected from heads of 74 public and private health facilities on the availability and use of RDTs and ACTs. Also, the availability of RDTs and the types of ACTs that were available in the facilities were documented. Results Only 31.1% of the health facilities used RDTs to diagnose malaria. The majority used the syndromic approach. However, 61.1% of healthcare providers were aware of RDTs. RDTs were available in 53.3% of the facilities. Public health facilities and health facilities in the urban areas were using RDTs more and these were mainly bought from pharmacy shops and supplied by NGOs. The main reasons given for non use are unreliability of RDTs, supply issues, costs, preference for other methods of diagnosis and providers' ignorance. ACTs were the drug of choice for most public health facilities and the drugs were readily available in these facilities. Conclusion Although many providers were knowledgeable about RDTs, not many facilities used it. ACTS were readily available and used in public but not private health facilities. However, the reported use of ACTs with limited proper diagnosis implies that there could be high incidence of inappropriate case management of malaria which can also increase the economic burden of illnesses. Government and donors should ensure constant availability of RDTs in both public and private facilities, so that every treatment with ACTs is accompanied with proper diagnosis.

2010-01-01

331

Perspectives and concerns of clients at primary health care facilities involved in evaluation of a national mental health training programme for primary care in Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background A cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a national Kenyan mental health primary care training programme demonstrated a significant impact on the health, disability and quality of life of clients, despite a severe shortage of medicines in the clinics (Jenkins et al. Submitted 2012). As focus group methodology has been found to be a useful method of obtaining a detailed understanding of client and health worker perspectives within health systems (Sharfritz and Roberts. Health Transit Rev 4:81–85, 1994), the experiences of the participating clients were explored through qualitative focus group discussions in order to better understand the potential reasons for the improved outcomes in the intervention group. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 10 clients from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 clients from the control group where staff had not received the training during the earlier randomised controlled trial. Results These focus group discussions suggest that the clients in the intervention group noticed and appreciated enhanced communication, diagnostic and counselling skills in their respective health workers, whereas clients in the control group were aware of the lack of these skills. Confidentiality emerged from the discussions as a significant client concern in relation to the volunteer cadre of community health workers, whose only training comes from their respective primary care health workers. Conclusion Enhanced health worker skills conferred by the mental health training programme may be responsible for the significant improvement in outcomes for clients in the intervention clinics found in the randomised controlled trial, despite the general shortage of medicines and other health system weaknesses. These findings suggest that strengthening mental health training for primary care staff is worthwhile even where health systems are not strong and where the medicine supply cannot be guaranteed. Trial registration ISRCTN 53515024.

2013-01-01

332

The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST): an effectiveness study on improving newborn health and survival in rural Uganda through a community-based intervention linked to health facilities - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Reducing neonatal-related deaths is one of the major bottlenecks to achieving Millennium Development Goal 4. Studies in Asia and South America have shown that neonatal mortality can be reduced through community-based interventions, but these have not been adapted to scalable intervention packages for sub-Saharan Africa where the culture, health system and policy environment is different. In Uganda, health outcomes are poor for both mothers and newborn babies. Policy opportunities for neonatal health include the new national Health Sector Strategic Plan, which now prioritizes newborn health including use of a community model through Village Health Teams (VHT). The aim of the present study is to adapt, develop and cost an integrated maternal-newborn care package that links community and facility care, and to evaluate its effect on maternal and neonatal practices in order to inform policy and scale-up in Uganda. Methods/Design Through formative research around evidence-based practices, and dialogue with policy and technical advisers, we constructed a home-based neonatal care package implemented by the responsible VHT member, effectively a Community Health Worker (CHW). This CHW was trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits - two before and three just after birth - so that linkages will be made to facility care and targeted messages for home-care and care-seeking delivered. The project is improving care in health units to provide standardized care for the mother and the newborn in both intervention and comparison areas. The study is taking place in a new Demographic Surveillance Site in two rural districts, Iganga and Mayuge, in Uganda. It is a two-arm cluster randomized controlled design with 31 intervention and 32 control areas (villages). The comparison parishes receive the standard care already being provided by the district, but to the intervention villages are added a system for CHWs to visit the mother five times in her home during pregnancy and the neonatal period. Both areas benefit from a standardized strengthening of facility care for mothers and neonates. Discussion UNEST is designed to directly feed into the operationalization of maternal and newborn care in the national VHT strategy, thereby helping to inform scale-up in rural Uganda. The study is registered as a randomized controlled trial, number ISRCTN50321130.

2012-01-01

333

Wetlands and Web Pages.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Argues that the preservation of areas like the Shoreline Park (California) wetlands depends on educating students about the value of natural resources. Describes the creation of a Web page on the wetlands for third-grade students by seventh-grade art and ecology students. Outlines the technical process of developing a Web page. (DSK)|

Tisone-Bartels, Dede

1998-01-01

334

The Small Area Health Statistics Unit: a national facility for investigating health around point sources of environmental pollution in the United Kingdom  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVE--The Small Area Health Statistics Unit (SAHSU) was established at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in response to a recommendation of the enquiry into the increased incidence of childhood leukaemia near Sellafield, the nuclear reprocessing plant in West Cumbria. The aim of this paper was to describe the Unit's methods for the investigation of health around

P Elliott; A J Westlake; M Hills; I Kleinschmidt; L Rodrigues; P McGale; K Marshall; G Rose

1992-01-01

335

Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

336

Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

337

Health Consultation: Cancer Incidence Rates in East Omaha 1990-2001, Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. EPA Facility ID: NESFN0703481.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In May 2005, ATSDR released its final Public Health Assessment for the Omaha Lead Superfund Site (OLS), concluding that ongoing exposure to lead puts children 6 and younger living in or near the Omaha Lead site area at risk of lead-related health effects....

2005-01-01

338

Linkage between VCT and reproductive health services (FP, ANC and delivery) in two public facilities of rural Ethiopia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Linking of related health services or delivering services in an integrated setup is an indispensable undertaking to optimize utilization of scarce resources in developing countries like Ethiopia. However, very related services such as HIV\\/AIDS and reproductive health are mostly delivered not in an integrated setup and a lot of missed opportunities are observed. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted

Awoke Misganaw; Yilma Melkamu

339

20/20 vision. To celebrate our 20th anniversary, Health Facilities Management explores emerging industry trends.  

PubMed

In the past 20 years, hospital design has evolved from institutional to evidence-based and patient-centered, medical and information technologies have advanced at unprecedented rates, infection control and security concerns have become more pronounced and environmental issues have broadened hospitals' healing mission to include the facility's impact on the community and the world at large. PMID:19024847

Eagle, Amy

2008-10-01

340

Perceived health status and environmental quality in the assessment of external cost of waste disposal facilities. An empirical investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The taxation for urban waste management has been reformed in Italy by the introduction of the environmental law in 2006. In the planning phase of waste management the externalities (social and environmental costs) generated by new facilities remain widely naccounted, with a consequent distortion for prices, and the raise of local conflicts. In order to support the diffusion of cost-benefit

Giaccaria Sergio; Frontuto Vito

2010-01-01

341

Exemplary healthcare facilities.  

PubMed

Symposium attendees had the opportunity to choose from 13 different tours designed to meet their diverse needs. Each tour consisted of one or more facilities grouped together to show innovative solutions to the problems in healthcare design today. Tours were of exemplary healthcare facilities throughout the Boston area, some of which were presented as case studies in the program. Facility types included medical centers with special services, ambulatory care centers, long term care facilities, pediatric hospitals, a school and center for the blind, a hospice, research and educational facilities, a community health center, an AIDS respite project, and a Ronald McDonald house. PMID:10183786

1992-01-01

342

MedlinePlus - Health Information from the National Library of Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Women's Health Checkup Allergy Asthma in Children Bullying Child Safety Childhood Immunization Children's Health Children's Page ... Women's Health Checkup Children Allergy Asthma in Children Bullying Child Safety Childhood Immunization Children's Health Children's Page ...

343

Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health; Final Report of the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessees public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and

J Alexander; B Brooks; P Erwin; J Holloway; P Lipford; N Morin; R Peelle; J Smith; P Voilleque; N. Zawia

1999-01-01

344

Meaningful involvement of people living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda through linkages between network groups and health facilities: an evaluation study.  

PubMed

While community-based groups are able to provide vital support to people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV), their organizational and technical capacities are limited, and they frequently operate in isolation from PLHIV groups. We evaluated a three-year project implemented by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance in Uganda to increase the involvement of PLHIV in the HIV/AIDS response and to improve access to and utilization of prevention, treatment, care, and support services for households affected by HIV/AIDS. Information sources included project monitoring data, interviews with 113 key informants, and 17 focus group discussions in 11 districts. The evaluation found that PLHIV groups reached large numbers of people with education and awareness activities and made a growing number of referrals to health facilities and community-based services. The project trained individuals living openly with HIV as service providers in the community and at designated health facilities. Their presence helped to reduce the stigma that previously deterred PLHIV from seeking care and encouraged individuals to disclose their HIV status to spouses and family members. The project has put into practice the widely endorsed principles of greater and meaningful involvement of PLHIV in a systematic manner and on a large scale. A wide audience--ranging from grassroots PLHIV networks and AIDS service organizations to national-level non-governmental organizations, government agencies, and international organizations--can benefit from the lessons learned. PMID:21777091

Kim, Young Mi; Kalibala, Samuel; Neema, Stella; Lukwago, John; Weiss, Deborah C

2011-07-21

345

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, WA, and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care or nurse practitioners, with telemedicine supervision, perform cardi...

D. J. Sahn J. Kinney R. Puntel

2009-01-01

346

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military of Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Washington, and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision,...

D. J. Sahn

2006-01-01

347

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Washington, and Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision, ...

D. J. Sahn J. Kinney

2005-01-01

348

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis Washington and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perf...

D. J. Sahn J. Kinney R. Puntel

2008-01-01

349

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis Washington and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perf...

D. J. Sahn J. Kinney R. Puntel

2007-01-01

350

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Washington, and Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision, ...

D. J. Sahn

2004-01-01

351

Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our partnership of investigators from Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Washington, and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, is testing the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision...

D. J. Sahn J. Kinney R. Puntel

2009-01-01

352

Safety, Security, and Privacy for Female Veterans at a Chicago, IL Homeless Grant Provider Facility. Veterans Health Administration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We are providing this memorandum to advise of serious female veteran housing safety, security, and privacy issues discovered during on-going audit work that require immediate Veterans Health Administration management attention. These issues emerged while ...

2011-01-01

353

Occupational Health Assessment of Resource Recovery Energy Industries: Municipal Solid Waste-to-Solid Fuel Processing Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Occupational health and safety in the geothermal hydrothermal convection industry is reviewed. Exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development and energy production phases of geothermal hydrothermal convection operations are described, a...

M. A. Zerwas C. R. Witwer M. D. Gidley R. E. Freeman C. L. Witham

1979-01-01

354

Public Health Assessment for North Railroad Avenue Plume Espanola, Rio, Arriba County, New Mexico EPA Facility ID: NMD986670156.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has evaluated the public health significance of groundwater contamination that underlies parts of the City of Espanola, New Mexico and the adjacent Santa Clara Pueblo, defined as the North Railr...

2003-01-01

355

Work Environment, Job Attitude, and Job Performance Relationships in Outpatient Health Care Clinics. I. Facility and Position Differences.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Perceptions of the work environment were related to job attitudes and performance measures for personnel assigned to five outpatient health care clinics as part of a multistage, systematic investigation of organizational factors and practices that influen...

M. C. Butler A. P. Jones

1980-01-01

356

Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium\\u000a Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading\\u000a causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the\\u000a most prevalent. In

Jasim Anwar; Elias Mpofu; Lynda R Matthews; Ahmed Farah Shadoul; Kaye E Brock

2011-01-01

357

Gelatin Volcanoes: Teacher Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the Teacher Page of an activity that teaches students how and why magma moves inside volcanoes by injecting colored water into a clear gelatin cast. Activity preparation instructions are on the Student Page, while the Teacher Page has background, preparation, and in-class information. An extension activity has the students repeat the experiment using a square bread pan to simulate the original research that was done using elongate models with triangular cross-sections. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

358

Psychology of Religion Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Designed and maintained by Professor Michael E. Nielsen of the Psychology Department at Georgia Southern University, this site offers numerous resources for people interested in psychological aspects of religious belief and behavior. The site is designed as an introduction to the psychology of religion, rather than a comprehensive treatment. Resources are grouped into three main categories: general resource pages, science and religion pages, and pages devoted to new religious movements. Contents include notable people in the psychology of religion; a bibliography; course syllabi; journal TOCs; essays on the field, on science and religion, and on several aspects of new religious movements; and related links.

Nielsen, Michael E.

1998-01-01

359

The Page Lifecycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Getting a page to your browser using Drupal is quite a roundabout process.The final content is a mashup of data retrieved\\u000a from a database,modified by modules,and finally formed for presentation by a theming layer.Understanding the steps a page\\u000a goes through is critical to being able to develop custom modules for Drupal.This chapter covers the page lifecycle,and shows\\u000a where you can

Brian Travis

360

An exploratory study of the factors associated with medication nonadherence among youth in adult mental health facilities in Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

Although the issue of medication nonadherence among children and youth appears to be high, there is a paucity of research examining associated factors related to medication nonadherence among youth with mental health difficulties. Using logistic regression, this exploratory study sought to examine specific factors associated with medication nonadherence among youth with mental health needs in Ontario, Canada. Data on 3681 youth between the ages of 12-18 years old were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for Mental Health (RAI-MH). Medication nonadherence was observed among 24.6% of the study population. Multivariate results showed that youth who experienced side effects of psychotropic medication were more than 3 times more likely to have failed to adhere to their medication. Other significant factors contributing to medication nonadherence include age, having multiple psychiatric admissions, limited insight into mental health, and having a disturbed/dysfunctional relationship with immediate family members. Tobacco use, cannabis use, depressive symptoms, and positive symptoms were also associated with medication nonadherence. Our data highlights some of the factors associated with medication nonadherence among youth with mental health needs. Physicians, clinicians and mental health care providers need to consider these factors, particularly when planning for discharge. PMID:23465295

Stewart, Shannon L; Baiden, Philip

2013-03-05

361

Human health risk assessment of occupational and residential exposures to dechlorane plus in the manufacturing facility area in China and comparison with e-waste recycling site.  

PubMed

A screening level human health risk assessment based on the worst-case scenario was conducted on the occupational and residential exposures to dechlorane plus (DP) in the manufacturing facility region and an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site in China, which are two of the most polluted areas of DP in the world. Total estimated exposure doses (EEDs) via dietary intake, dermal contact, and inhalation was approximately 0.01 mg kg(-1) d(-1) for people living in the manufacturing facility region. In comparison, total EEDs (approximate 0.03 ?g kg(-1), d(-1)) were 300-fold lower in people living near an e-waste recycling site in China. Chronic oral, dermal, and inhalation reference doses (RfDs) were estimated to be 5.0, 2.0, and 0.01 mg kg(-1)d (-1), respectively. The oral RfD was markedly greater than Mirex (2×10(-4) mg kg(-1) d(-1)) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209; 7×10(-3) mg kg(-1) d(-1)), which have been or might be replaced by DP as a flame retardant with less toxicity. Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate the probability densities and functions for the hazard index which was calculated from the EEDs and RfDs to assess the human health risk. The hazard index was three orders of magnitude lower than 1, suggesting that occupational and residential exposures were relatively safe in the manufacturing facility region and e-waste recycling site. PMID:23354373

Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Byer, Jonathan D; Brimble, Samantha; Pacepavicius, Grazina

2013-01-22

362

Quality of Longer Term Mental Health Facilities in Europe: Validation of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care against Service Users' Views  

PubMed Central

Background The Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) is a staff rated, international toolkit that assesses care in longer term hospital and community based mental health facilities. The QuIRC was developed from review of the international literature, an international Delphi exercise with over 400 service users, practitioners, carers and advocates from ten European countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation, and review of the care standards in these countries. It can be completed in under an hour by the facility manager and has robust content validity, acceptability and inter-rater reliability. In this study, we investigated the internal validity of the QuIRC. Our aim was to identify the QuIRC domains of care that independently predicted better service user experiences of care. Method At least 20 units providing longer term care for adults with severe mental illness were recruited in each of ten European countries. Service users completed standardised measures of their experiences of care, quality of life, autonomy and the unit’s therapeutic milieu. Unit managers completed the QuIRC. Multilevel modelling allowed analysis of associations between service user ratings as dependent variables with unit QuIRC domain ratings as independent variables. Results 1750/2495 (70%) users and the managers of 213 units from across ten European countries participated. QuIRC ratings were positively associated with service users’ autonomy and experiences of care. Associations between QuIRC ratings and service users’ ratings of their quality of life and the unit’s therapeutic milieu were explained by service user characteristics (age, diagnosis and functioning). A hypothetical 10% increase in QuIRC rating resulted in a clinically meaningful improvement in autonomy. Conclusions Ratings of the quality of longer term mental health facilities made by service managers were positively associated with service users’ autonomy and experiences of care. Interventions that improve quality of care in these settings may promote service users’ autonomy.

Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Wright, Christine; Taylor, Tatiana L.; Turton, Penny; Kallert, Thomas; Schuster, Mirjam; Cervilla, Jorge A.; Brangier, Paulette; Raboch, Jiri; Kalisova, Lucie; Onchev, Georgi; Alexiev, Spiridon; Mezzina, Roberto; Ridente, Pina; Wiersma, Durk; Visser, Ellen; Kiejna, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Ploumpidis, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Cardoso, Graca; King, Michael

2012-01-01

363

42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136...HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation of Facilities...Services § 136.110 Facilities construction. In addition to other...

2012-10-01

364

42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136...HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation of Facilities...Services § 136.110 Facilities construction. In addition to other...

2011-10-01

365

Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security,\\u000a waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems\\u000a but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides\\u000a environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental

Joanna Burger; Michael Gochfeld

2011-01-01

366

JAMA Patient Page: Concussion  

MedlinePLUS

JAMA PATIENT PAGE Concussion C oncussion (or mild traumatic brain injury) is a brain injury caused by blunt head trauma. In the United States, concussion affects more than 1 million individuals each year. ...

367

Making Pages That Move.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the mechanism of producing dynamic computer pages which is based on three technologies: (1) the document object model; (2) cascading stylesheets; and (3) javascript. Discusses the applications of these techniques in genetics and developmental biology. (YDS)

Gepner, Ivan

2001-01-01

368

The Molecular Structure Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides three ways to see molecules. They are the empirical formula, the structural formula, and the molecular model. The learner must click on one of the options. Additional free downloads may be required to see the images.

2010-01-01

369

Sign language Web pages.  

PubMed

The WORLD WIDE WEB has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The present article describes a system that allows sign language-only Web pages to be created and linked through a video-based technique called sign-linking. In two studies, 14 Deaf participants examined two iterations of signlinked Web pages to gauge the usability and learnability of a signing Web page interface. The first study indicated that signing Web pages were usable by sign language users but that some interface features required improvement. The second study showed increased usability for those features; users consequently couldnavigate sign language information with ease and pleasure. PMID:17225637

Fels, Deborah I; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G

2006-01-01

370

Screenwriters and Playwrights Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Screenwriters and Playwrights Page offers a variety of resources and services of special interest to professional and student scriptwriters alike, from film and script databases, format templates, marketing strategies, and discussion of the nuts-and-bolts of scriptwriting.

371

Mazda Miata Home Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mazda Miata Home Page, produced by Gary J. Fischman of Menlo Park, California offers tons of information about the Mazda MX-5 Miata -- the '90s re-creation of a classic roadster from the '60s. Its popularity has attained cult-like status worldwide. The Miata page provides information on the car, archives of the listserver devoted to it, information on local and regional events and clubs, and a marketplace for aftermarket products and services.

372

Web Page Evaluations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use the two chemical element web sites below to evaluate which site is more reliable. Which is more authoritative? Which is more accurate? Which is more current? How does their coverage or detail compare? Is there advertising on the page? Is there bias or objectivity? ChemicalElements.com Web Elements Evaluation Criteria by Susan E. Beck - links to a page that will help you evaluate each website. ...

Schultz, Ms.

2010-05-06

373

Gelatin Volcanoes: Student Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the Student Page of an activity that teaches students how and why magma moves inside volcanoes by injecting colored water into a clear gelatin cast. The Student Page contains the activity preparation instructions and materials list, key words, and a photograph of the experimental setup. There is also an extension activity question that has students predict what will happen when the experiment is run using an elongated model. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

374

Blue native PAGE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blue native PAGE (BN-PAGE) can be used for one-step isolation of protein complexes from biological membranes and total cell and tissue homogenates. It can also be used to determine native protein masses and oligomeric states and to identify physiological protein–protein interactions. Native complexes are recovered from gels by electroelution or diffusion and are used for 2D crystallization and electron microscopy

Ilka Wittig; Hans-Peter Braun; Hermann Schägger

2006-01-01

375

Tricine–SDS-PAGE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tricine–SDS-PAGE is commonly used to separate proteins in the mass range 1–100 kDa. It is the preferred electrophoretic system for the resolution of proteins smaller than 30 kDa. The concentrations of acrylamide used in the gels are lower than in other electrophoretic systems. These lower concentrations facilitate electroblotting, which is particularly crucial for hydrophobic proteins. Tricine–SDS-PAGE is also used preferentially

Hermann Schägger

2006-01-01

376

The Molecule Pages database  

PubMed Central

The UCSD-Nature Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages (http://www.signaling-gateway.org/molecule) provides essential information on more than 3800 mammalian proteins involved in cellular signaling. The Molecule Pages contain expert-authored and peer-reviewed information based on the published literature, complemented by regularly updated information derived from public data source references and sequence analysis. The expert-authored data includes both a full-text review about the molecule, with citations, and highly structured data for bioinformatics interrogation, including information on protein interactions and states, transitions between states and protein function. The expert-authored pages are anonymously peer reviewed by the Nature Publishing Group. The Molecule Pages data is present in an object-relational database format and is freely accessible to the authors, the reviewers and the public from a web browser that serves as a presentation layer. The Molecule Pages are supported by several applications that along with the database and the interfaces form a multi-tier architecture. The Molecule Pages and the Signaling Gateway are routinely accessed by a very large research community.

Saunders, Brian; Lyon, Stephen; Day, Matthew; Riley, Brenda; Chenette, Emily; Subramaniam, Shankar

2008-01-01

377

Health Tip: Help Toddlers Prepare for School  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Tip: Help Toddlers Prepare for School Teach them to play well ... Kohnle Monday, August 12, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Page Toddler Development (HealthDay News) -- As your child nears school ...

378

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES NDA 20 ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text VersionPage 1. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service ... Sincerely, {See appended electronic signature page} ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/developmentapprovalprocess

379

Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

2010-01-01

380

An Integrated Risk Assessment Tool to Evaluate the Existing Risk Managment System Within a Health Care Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk assessment is a method used to identify risks within an organisation. It is required by the Safety Health and Welfare at Work Act, 189 for the purpose of safety management. No one method can effectively identify all types of hazard and risks within organisations. The insufficiency of individual risk assessment techniques to generate objective data as to the level

Laura F. Breen

2001-01-01

381

Public Health Assessment: CTS/Mills Gap Road Site Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina. EPA Facility ID: NCSFN0406988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The N.C. Division of Public Health (DPH) understands the communitys concerns about contact with chemicals from the CTS/Mills Gap Road (CTS) site. The N.C. DPHs top priority is to make sure the community near the site has the best science information avail...

2011-01-01

382

Characterization of infectious aerosols in health care facilities: An aid to effective engineering controls and preventive strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment of strategies for engineering controls for the prevention of airborne infectious disease transmission to patients and to health care and related workers requires consideration of the factors relevant to aerosol characterization. These factors include aerosol generation, particle sizes and concentrations, organism viability, infectivity and virulence, airflow and climate, and environmental sampling and analysis. The major focus on attention to

Eugene C. Cole; Carl E. Cook

1998-01-01

383

Health Habits Tied to Heart Disease, Arthritis Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health habits tied to heart disease, arthritis risk (*this ... 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Disabilities Healthy Aging Women's Health By Allison Bond NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older ...

384

Intensive rehabilitation for dementia improved cognitive function and reduced behavioral disturbance in geriatric health service facilities in Japan.  

PubMed

AIM: To examine the efficacy of rehabilitation for elderly individuals with dementia at intermediate facilities between hospitals and home, based on the policies for elderly individuals to promote community-based care at home and dehospitalization. METHODS: Participants were older adults with dementia newly admitted to intermediate facilities. A total of 158 in the intervention group who claimed Long-Term Care Insurance for three consecutive months, and 54 in the control group were included in the analysis. The interventions were carried out in a tailor-made manner to meet individual needs. The personal sessions were carried out three times a week for 3 months after admission by physical, occupational or speech therapists. Outcome measures were cognitive tests (Hasegawa Dementia Scale revised [HDS-R] and Mini-Mental State Examination), and observational assessments of dementia severity, activities of daily living (ADL), social activities, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) using a short version of the Dementia Disturbance Scale (DBD13), depressive mood, and vitality. RESULTS: Significant improvement in the intervention group was shown in cognitive function measured by HDS-R (interaction F[1, 196]?=?5.190, P?=?0.024), observational evaluation of dementia severity (F[1,198]?=?9.550, P?=?0.002) and BPSD (DBD13; F[1,197]?=?4.506, P?=?0.035). Vitality, social activities, depressive mood and ADL were significantly improved only in the intervention group, although interaction was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Significant improvement by intervention was shown in multiple domains including cognitive function and BPSD. Cognitive decline and worsening of BPSD are predictors of care burden and hospitalization, thus intensive rehabilitation for dementia was beneficial for both individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2013; ??: ??-??. PMID:23647510

Toba, Kenji; Nakamura, Yu; Endo, Hidetoshi; Okochi, Jiro; Tanaka, Yukiko; Inaniwa, Chiyako; Takahashi, Akira; Tsunoda, Naoko; Higashi, Kentaro; Hirai, Motoharu; Hirakawa, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Shizuru; Maki, Yohko; Yamaguchi, Tomoharu; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

2013-05-01

385

The development of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC): a measure of best practice for facilities for people with longer term mental health problems  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the progress over recent decades in developing community mental health services internationally, many people still receive treatment and care in institutional settings. Those most likely to reside longest in these facilities have the most complex mental health problems and are at most risk of potential abuses of care and exploitation. This study aimed to develop an international, standardised toolkit to assess the quality of care in longer term hospital and community based mental health units, including the degree to which human rights, social inclusion and autonomy are promoted. Method The domains of care included in the toolkit were identified from a systematic literature review, international expert Delphi exercise, and review of care standards in ten European countries. The draft toolkit comprised 154 questions for unit managers. Inter-rater reliability was tested in 202 units across ten countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation and development of community mental health services. Exploratory factor analysis was used to corroborate the allocation of items to domains. Feedback from those using the toolkit was collected about its usefulness and ease of completion. Results The toolkit had excellent inter-rater reliability and few items with narrow spread of response. Unit managers found the content highly relevant and were able to complete it in around 90 minutes. Minimal refinement was required and the final version comprised 145 questions assessing seven domains of care. Conclusions Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative evidence directed the development of a robust and comprehensive international quality assessment toolkit for units in highly variable socioeconomic and political contexts.

2011-01-01

386

Entrepreneur's Help Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Entrepreneur's Help Page, from tannedfeet.com, offers sound advice for those looking to start up a new business. Given in an easy-to-read narrative style, the articles on this page are divided into three main sections: Business, Financial, and Legal. The Business section includes a checklist for starting a business, along with articles on buying a franchise, business insurance, and extending credit to other businesses. Financial advice provides a helpful overview as to where to find money to finance a new business, tips for finding venture capital, and advice on obtaining bank loans. Finally, the Legal section provides explanations and advice on taxation, intellectual property issues, and bankruptcy. All in all, the Entrepreneur's Help Page is a welcoming introduction to some of the issues involved with starting a new business.

1998-01-01

387

JAMA Patient Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has been committed to providing the general public with a number of high-quality print and online resources in recent years, and their collection of Patient Pages is quite thorough and most welcome. With over 390 entries, each Patient Page contains a basic overview of such topics as Lyme disease, dementia, lymphoma, and dozens of other conditions, medical procedures, and practices. Along with succinct and accessible summaries for each entry, visitors will also find illustrations, graphs, and diagrams that help explain each topic. All in all, this site is a tremendous resource, and it is worth noting that many of these Patient Pages are also available in Spanish.

388

The Online Books Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by the University of Pennsylvania Library, the Online Books Page Web site "facilitates access to books that are freely readable over the Internet...and aims to encourage the development of such online books, for the benefit and edification of all." The over 18,000 listings can be searched or browsed by author, title, and subject, of which every major physical science subject is represented. Each listing is linked to an outside Web site, making its availability unpredictable, but the shear number of books that are accessible make the Online Books Page a great resource.

1993-01-01

389

Medieval Technology Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Medieval Technology Pages, created and maintained by New York University chemistry professor Paul M Gans, "attempt[s] to provide accurate, referenced information on technological innovation and related subjects in western Europe during the Middle Ages." This fascinating Website offers insight into the history of technology with short lessons about inventions from stirrups to arabic numbers. Each brief entry includes basic information about the invention as well as links to reference sources. The site also contains a timeline of technological innovations from 500 to 1600 AD. An interesting and well produced Website, the Medieval Technology Pages is a truly engaging stop on the Information Superhighway.

Gans, Paul M.

390

National Institutes of Health: Health Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Health Information portion of the National Institutes of Health website covers a wide range of topics. This consumer-oriented site includes Quick Links, on the left side of the page, to such topics as "Child & Teen Health", "Men's Health", "Minority Health", and "Seniors' Health". To browse health categories, the visitor can browse several different ways. They can browse under "Body Location/Systems", "Conditions/Diseases", "Procedures", and "Health and Wellness". On the left side of the page the visitor can also choose to search for Health Topics alphabetically and for those more inclined toward audio learning, visitors can listen to NIH Radio by clicking on "MP3 audio reports" on the right side of the page. The Research in Action feature in the top middle of the page offers insight into how humans hear. Just click on the picture above Research in Action to be taken to the article. For visitors who just can't find what they need on the Health Information site, there are a slew of Related Links near the bottom of the page, including Health Information on the Web, Health Newsletters, Health Databases, and Federal Health Agencies.

391

FDA: NRT Safety Meeting Safety data in the Lung Health ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text Version... Page 5. Design of Lung Health Study ... Page 9. Predictors of abstinence between years 1 ... Page 11. Reduction as a Predictor of Abstinence ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/newsevents

392

Management of uncomplicated malaria in underfives in private and public health facilities in South-eastern Nigeria: a clinical audit of current practices.  

PubMed

Malaria remains a leading cause of underfive morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Effective case management is a strategy recommended by the World Health Organization for its control. A clinical audit of case management of uncomplicated malaria in underfives in health facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria, was conducted from January to March 2012. Data was extracted from patients' case records by trained medical personnel using pretested data extraction forms. Of the 463 case records reviewed, age, gender, and weight were reported in 98.1%, 97.3%, and 49.7% of the children, respectively. A history of fever was obtained in 89.6% and a record of temperature in 74.1% of the children. General examination was performed in 203 (43.8%) children. Malaria parasite test was requested in 132 (28.5%) while Packed cell volume or haemoglobin was requested in 107 (23.1%) children. Appropriate dose of Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) was instituted in 300 (64.8%), wrong dose in 109 (23.5%), and inappropriate treatment in 41 (8.9%). The utilization of ACTs for treating uncomplicated malaria in the State has improved but clinical assessment of patients and laboratory confirmation of diagnosis are suboptimum. PMID:23401847

Udoh, Ekong; Oyo-Ita, Angela; Odey, Friday; Effa, Emmanuel; Esu, Ekpereonne; Oduwole, Olabisi; Chibuzor, Moriam; Meremikwu, Martin

2013-01-21

393

Management of Uncomplicated Malaria in Underfives in Private and Public Health Facilities in South-Eastern Nigeria: A Clinical Audit of Current Practices  

PubMed Central

Malaria remains a leading cause of underfive morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Effective case management is a strategy recommended by the World Health Organization for its control. A clinical audit of case management of uncomplicated malaria in underfives in health facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria, was conducted from January to March 2012. Data was extracted from patients' case records by trained medical personnel using pretested data extraction forms. Of the 463 case records reviewed, age, gender, and weight were reported in 98.1%, 97.3%, and 49.7% of the children, respectively. A history of fever was obtained in 89.6% and a record of temperature in 74.1% of the children. General examination was performed in 203 (43.8%) children. Malaria parasite test was requested in 132 (28.5%) while Packed cell volume or haemoglobin was requested in 107 (23.1%) children. Appropriate dose of Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) was instituted in 300 (64.8%), wrong dose in 109 (23.5%), and inappropriate treatment in 41 (8.9%). The utilization of ACTs for treating uncomplicated malaria in the State has improved but clinical assessment of patients and laboratory confirmation of diagnosis are suboptimum.

Udoh, Ekong; Oyo-ita, Angela; Odey, Friday; Effa, Emmanuel; Esu, Ekpereonne; Oduwole, Olabisi; Chibuzor, Moriam; Meremikwu, Martin

2013-01-01

394

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

SciTech Connect

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17

395

National Health Interview Survey  

MedlinePLUS

... this page: About CDC.gov . National Health Interview Survey National Health Interview Survey About NHIS NHIS Questionnaire Redesign What's New Coming Events Questionnaires, Datasets, and Related Documentation Survey Instruments 1997 to the Present 1996 and Prior ...

396

Asian American Health  

MedlinePLUS

... racial or ethnic group has specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links ...

397

African American Health  

MedlinePLUS

... racial or ethnic group has specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links ...

398

Hispanic American Health  

MedlinePLUS

... racial or ethnic group has specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links ...

399

Health Care Visits to Check More Than Just Health?  

MedlinePLUS

... Releases Spotlights Media Resources Selected Profiles & Interviews Multimedia Health Care Visits to Check More Than Just Health? Page Content Study Shows Health Care Providers Can Help with School Readiness During Primary ...

400

Edible Rocks: Teacher Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students use edible samples (such as peanut brittle and fudge) as their models of rocks and meteorites. They are to observe and describe the samples' physical characteristics using geologic terminology. The Teacher Page includes recipes to make some of the samples as well as examples of field notes.

401

An Interpretation of Page's  

Microsoft Academic Search

Page's proposed extension of the theory of relativity is examined from the standpoint of the general kinematical theory developed by the present author, of which it is found to be a special case. The contention that this extension renders Einstein's theory untenable would seem to be without real foundation; for although such an attempt to treat of observers in motions

H. P. Robertson

1936-01-01

402

The Nerd Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Nerd Page (their name, not mine :-) at the University of South Carolina's College of Engineering. Nice mixture of "lite" Nerd type resources on the net. Topics include Nerd Culture and Happenings, Flotsam and Jetsam, Nerd Fun, and Software, Computing & Technology.

403

EEK! Teacher Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These environmental education pages are designed to help teachers help their students use the EEK! website. The teacher resources include nature and environmental education activities such as building a bird house, conducting a fish survey, planting trees, and observing wetland habitats. There are also instructional materials and links to environmental action projects.

404

Media Online Yellow Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Media Online Yellow Pages is another good place (along with the Big List and Newslink mentioned last week) to find media sources on the Internet. Does not appear to be searchable but the index is well-organized for browsing.

405

FDA Kids' Home Page  

MedlinePLUS

... Links on this page: "; } else if(cid_id) { var cid_img_text=" "; var cid_id_innertext = cid_id.innerHTML; if((cid_id_innertext.toLowerCase()).indexOf(" ") >= 0) { var indexer = (cid_id_innertext.toLowerCase()).indexOf(" "); var beg = ...

406

Distribution and health risk assessment of some organic and inorganic substances in a petroleum facility in central Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An oil distribution and storage station was subjected to an Environmental Auditory and results showed soil contamination in part of the surface. An assessment of the site was required in order to fulfill a complete characterization of the contaminants present in soil and groundwater, as well as to establish the probable sources of contamination. Besides, a health risk assessment was performed to set remediation goals. The aim of this work is to show how the entire characterization and risk assessment process performed in this storage station from central Mexico, regarding to subsoil and groundwater. Thirty sample points were examined. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations in soil were in a very low range (20-268 mg/kg). Ethylbenzene, methyl tert-butyl ether, tert-amyl methyl ether, and lead were identified in one sampling point. Iron and zinc were found in all soil samples. There was no correlation between total petroleum hydrocarbons and any of the metals or between both metals. Only two out of four monitoring wells showed total petroleum hydrocarbons levels (1.4 and 66 mg/L, respectively). Regarding lead, all four monitored wells showed lead concentrations (0.043-0.15 mg/L). Results suggested that metal concentrations were not associated to petroleum contamination, but to iron scrap deposits placed over the soil; nevertheless more data is needed to make a clear conclusion. Health risk assessment showed that none of the evaluated contaminants represented a risk either for the on-site or the off-site receptors, since the hazardous quotients estimated did not exceed the acceptable values.

Flores-Serrano, R. M.; Torres, L. G.; Flores, C.; Castro, A.; Iturbe, R.

407

The association between travel time to health facilities and childhood vaccine coverage in rural Ethiopia. A community based cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Few studies have examined associations between access to health care and childhood vaccine coverage in remote communities that lack motorised transport. This study assessed whether travel time to health facilities was associated with childhood vaccine coverage in a remote area of Ethiopia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using data from 775 children aged 12–59?months who participated in a household survey between January –July 2010 in Dabat district, north-western Ethiopia. 208 households were randomly selected from each kebele. All children in a household were eligible for inclusion if they were aged between 12–59?months at the time of data collection. Travel time to vaccine providers was collected using a geographical information system (GIS). The primary outcome was the percentage of children in the study population who were vaccinated with the third infant Pentavalent vaccine ([Diphtheria, Tetanus,-Pertussis Hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenza type b] Penta3) in the five years before the survey. We also assessed effects on BCG, Penta1, Penta2 and Measles vaccines. Analysis was conducted using Poisson regression models with robust standard error estimation and the Wald test. Results Missing vaccination data ranged from 4.6% (36/775) for BCG to 16.4% (127/775) for Penta3 vaccine. In children with complete vaccination records, BCG vaccine had the highest coverage (97.3% [719/739]), Penta3 coverage was (92.9% [602/648]) and Measles vaccine had the lowest coverage (81.7% [564/690]). Children living ?60mins from a health post were significantly less likely (adjRR?=?0.85 [0.79-0.92] p value?health post. This effect was not modified by household wealth (p value?=?0.240). Travel time also had a highly significant association with BCG (adjRR?=?0.95 [0.93-0.98] p value =0.002) and Measles (adjRR?=?0.88 [0.79-0.97] p value =0.027) vaccine coverage. Conclusions Travel time to vaccine providers in health posts appeared to be a barrier to the delivery of infant vaccines in this remote Ethiopian community. New vaccine delivery strategies are needed for the hardest to reach children in the African region.

2012-01-01

408

Health Topics: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Topics Read about symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention for ... illnesses, health conditions and wellness issues. MedlinePlus health topics are regularly reviewed, and links are updated daily. ...

409

California Department of Public Health  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text VersionPage 1. State of California—Health and Human Services Agency California Department of Public Health ... Director & State Health Officer Governor ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/biologicsbloodvaccines/safetyavailability

410

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

R. M. Neupauer; S. M. Thurmond

1992-01-01

411

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

R. M. Neupauer; S. M. Thurmond

1992-01-01

412

The effects of a Simplified Tai-Chi Exercise Program (STEP) on the physical health of older adults living in long-term care facilities: A single group design with multiple time points  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundStudies support the positive effects that Tai Chi has on the physical health of older adults. However, many older adults residing in long-term care facilities feel too weak to practice traditional Tai Chi, and a more simplified style is preferred.

Kuei-Min Chen; Jong-Ni Lin; Huey-Shyan Lin; Hui-Chuan Wu; Wen-Ting Chen; Chun-Huw Li; Sing Kai Lo

2008-01-01

413

Get Affordable Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Get Affordable Health Care The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is ... care. Find a Health Center > Hospitals and Other Health Care Hospitals, nursing homes and other facilities are required ...

414

[Parvovirus B-19 infections in pregnant women in day care facilities: health economic analysis of prohibition to employ seronegative women].  

PubMed

German protective legislation during pregnancy and maternity prohibit employing pregnant women if occupational activities endanger the health of either the mother-to-be or the fetus. This applies for parvovirus B19 seronegative women caring for children <6 years. Here we present a cost-effectiveness analysis from the view of the society for the prohibition to employ B19-seronegative women in day care. Prohibition of employment starting at the first day of pregnancy may prevent 1.4 cases of fetal death (mortality) and 1.7 cases of hydrops fetalis (morbidity) per year resulting in costs of 30 million (22 million /live birth). The incidence of B19 infection, the elevated occupational risk and the fetal death rate were varied in sensitivity analyses. This resulted in 0.2-3.1 fetal deaths prevented per year and costs between 10 million and 150 million per live birth. Indeed, the protective effect is assumed to be even lower since 30% of fetal deaths occur after infection during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. During that time prohibition of employment is often unrealistic since the majority of women are not aware of pregnancy. In conclusion a small number of fetal lives can be saved by prohibiting employment in contrast to the extremely high costs. The regulations for maternal protection should be revised. PMID:17999130

Gärtner, B; Enders, M; Luft-Duchow, C; Bocharov, G; Modorow, S

2007-11-01

415

Efficacy of Hospital Germicides against Adenovirus 8, a Common Cause of Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Health Care Facilities  

PubMed Central

The inactivation of virus-contaminated nonporous inanimate surfaces was investigated using adenovirus type 8, a common cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. A 10-?l inoculum of adenovirus was placed onto each stainless steel disk (1-cm diameter), and the inoculum was allowed to air dry for 40 min. Twenty-one different germicides (including disinfectants and antiseptics) were selected for this study based on their current uses in health care. After a 1- or 5-minute exposure to 50 ?l of the germicide, the virus-germicide test mixture was neutralized and assayed for infectivity. Using an efficacy criterion of a 3-log10 reduction in the titer of virus infectivity and regardless of the virus suspending medium (i.e., hard water, sterile water, and hard water with 5% fetal calf serum), only five disinfectants proved to be effective against the test virus at 1 min: 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde, 2.4% glutaraldehyde, 2.65% glutaraldehyde, ?6,000 ppm chlorine, and ?1,900 ppm chlorine. Four other disinfectants showed effectiveness under four of the five testing conditions: 70% ethanol, 65% ethanol with 0.63% quaternary ammonium compound, 79.6% ethanol with 0.1% quaternary ammonium compound, and 0.2% peracetic acid. Of the germicides suitable for use as an antiseptic, 70% ethanol achieved a 3-log10 reduction under four of the five test conditions. These results emphasize the need for proper selection of germicides for use in disinfecting noncritical surfaces and semicritical medical devices, such as applanation tonometers, in order to prevent outbreaks of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

Rutala, William A.; Peacock, Jeffrey E.; Gergen, Maria F.; Sobsey, Mark D.; Weber, David J.

2006-01-01

416

Cichlid Research Home Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cichlid Research Home Page was developed by Professor Ron Coleman of the Biological Sciences Department at California State University, Sacramento. The website offers information and resources for hobbyists, scientists, and budding researchers interested in cichlid fishes. The site provides information about Coleman's research including descriptions of two ongoing investigations, the Cichlid Egg Project and the Cichlid Mouthbrooder Project. For visitors just learning about cichlids, the site offers several helpful sections including Introduction to Cichlids, Cichlid Anatomy, Cichlid Names, a Cichlid Glossary, and a section about Becoming a Cichlid Researcher. The site also offers a FAQ page, and Dr. Coleman invites targeted queries from college, high school, and elementary school students. The website lists a number of upcoming conferences, and contains an email directory of hobbyists and scientists interested in cichlids. The site contains an extensive collection of related links as well.

417

The Skyscraper Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Put together by a group of tall building enthusiasts, the Skyscraper Page features the World's Tallest Diagram, a beta-version database that generates graphical results. While some requests only yielded error messages, a building search on Chicago produced a nifty color diagram of Chicago's 24 tallest buildings, arranged by height from the Sears Tower to the Stone Container Building, with basic information provided for each building: Address, Architect, Height, number of floors, etc. Other parts of the site include the Skyscraper Forum, an email discussion list, Skyline Photos, links to sources of views of cities and tall buildings, and the Amateur High-Rise Photography Page, where visitors can view and submit skyscraper photos. In the News & Updates section, see Lego skyscrapers, Istanbul skyscrapers, and an interactive aerial view of Manhattan (called Clickable NYC Skyscraper Map).

418

College of DuPage Institutional Portrait, 1999-2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report profiles the College of DuPage (Illinois) and provides a quick reference regarding the institution. It contains information on facilities and land, finance, staff, college/student services, the Library, athletics, academic calendars, maps, and instructional programs. This report reflects the college structure as of September 1999 and…

College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL. Office of Research and Planning.

419

Health Consultation: Evaluation of Organic Contaminants in the Private Wells Located Off the Fort Hall Indian Reservation Site, Bannock County, Idaho. EPA Facility ID: ID0000127753.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Bureau of Community and Environmental Health (BCEH), Division of Health, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, prepared this health consult...

2005-01-01

420

Dance Links University Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One of the highlights of the Dance Links Web site , compiled mainly from information provided by dance videographer Amy Reusch, is the University Dance Departments pointers page, a collection of pointers to over 150 U.S. University Dance departments, as well as departments in Australia, Canada, Finland, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Dance Links also points to resources related to dance companies, performance listings, publications, organizations, funding, dance schools, dancers, and other dance indexes.

421

Ms. Echegoyen's Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find your links below. JapanesePod101 Ecehgoyen - Wikispaces link Clear Conversations Echegoyen Sencei Wikispace Echegoyen s School Web Page Edu 20 (online learning) Celsius and Fahrenheit Conversion ClassZone Japanese Teachers Association of Michigan JLPT-Japanese Proficiency Test JLPT - Kanji Project JLPT Level 4 Kanji List POPjisyo Dictionary The Kanji Site XE - The World s Favorite Currency and Forieng Exchange Site Denshi Jisho -Online Dictionary Try this link for exploring Japanese Culture: Japan Times (Online News) ...

Schultz, Ms.

2009-01-15

422

Health Assessment for Fletcher's Paint Works and Storage Facility Hazardous Waste Material, Milford, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Region 1. CERCLIS No. NHD981067614.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fletcher's Paint Works and Storage Facility Hazardous Waste Site (Fletcher's Paint Site) in Milford, New Hampshire, consists of three distinct entities: Fletcher's Paint Works at 21 Elm Street, Fletcher's Paint Storage Facility on Mill Street, and a drain...

1990-01-01

423

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities...

1998-01-01

424

Analysis of Data Emmanating from Surveys of Residential Facilities Conducted by the Accreditation Council for Facilities for the Mentally Retarded. A Report to the U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine critical deficiencies in institutional reform related to accreditation, data from surveys conducted by the Accreditation Council for Facilities for the Mentally Retarded were analyzed. Identified were critical standards with which significant proportions of the facilities surveyed did not comply, formulated was an…

Braddock, David L.

425

Rendezvous facilities  

SciTech Connect

The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

1988-11-01

426

Analytically modeling pipeline paging for wireless systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present analytical models for the pipeline paging (PP) scheme, the blanket paging (BP) scheme, and the sequential paging (SP) scheme. In the PP scheme, multiple paging requests can be served in a pipeline manner in different paging areas. Discovery rate, total delay, paging delay, and cost are derived analytically as functions of traffic load. Extensive simulations

Yang Xiao; Hui Chen; Mohsen Guizani

2005-01-01

427

Health Consultation: Evaluation of Current and Future Soil Exposures at a Former Explosives Manufacturing Facility, On-Site Restricted Use Area Part 2, Dupont-Louviers Site, Village of Louviers, Douglas County, Colorado. EPA Facility ID: COD007060981.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall purpose of this health consultation is to evaluate the potential health hazards from exposure to soil contamination by current and future trespassers, construction workers, and industrial workers in the remaining portions of the former manufac...

2010-01-01

428

Health Consultation: Dupont-Louviers Site. Evaluation of Current and Future Soil Exposures at a Former Explosives Manufacturing Facility (Unrestricted Use Area), Village of Louviers, Douglas County, Colorado. EPA Facility ID: COD007060981.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environments (CDPHE) Environmental Epidemiology Section has prepared this health consultation in cooperation with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). ATSDR is part of the US Department...

2009-01-01

429

Health Consultation: Evaluation of Current and Future Soil Exposures at a Former Explosives Manufacturing Facility, On-Site Restricted Use Area Part 1, Dupont-Louviers Site, Village of Louviers, Douglas County, Colorado. EPA Facility ID: COD007060981.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall purpose of this health consultation is to evaluate the potential health hazards from exposure to soil contamination by current and future trespassers, construction workers, and industrial workers in the most contaminated portions of the former...

2010-01-01

430

The Real Beer Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This amazing site, coming in at over 75,000 pages, is the ultimate online resource for beer lovers and homebrewers. Among its many offerings are breaking beer news, spotlight features, an events calendar, a searchable brewery and pub with over 3,500 entries, a searchable library with original publications and a host of links to related online offerings (a trial search for "porter" returned 1,100 hits!), a BREWMall with retail items, and a collection of classified beer and brewing links. Other features include contests, games, and polls. Whatever their depth of interest or knowledge, Beer enthusiasts of all stripes will quickly lose themselves in this site.

431

ESRI Instructional Resources Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can help learners of all ages and academic disciplines understand the world around them. GIS helps students and teachers engage in studies that promote critical thinking, integrated learning, and multiple intelligences. In classrooms and campuses across the country and around the world, educators are using GIS in the study of topics as varied as Marketing and Molecular Biology to Social Studies and Language Arts. The resources on this page demonstrate how GIS can be used in variety of formal and information educational settings. Educational multimedia are included in the form of GIS video tutorials.

2012-11-02

432

The Pi Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics (CECM) at Simon Fraser University's Department of Mathematics and Statistics provides the Pi Pages Website. Since 2000 BC, people have been trying to compute Pi, and Pi is "still of serious interest to modern mathematical research." Tracing the history of Pi takes the user through geometry, analysis and special functions, numerical analysis, algebra, and number theory. Sections included at the site are Pi Story, Pi Records, Pi People, Pi Literature, Pi News, Pi Aesthetics, Pi on the net, Pi Files, Pi and other numbers, and More Links to other Pi-Enriched sites. This is an excellent resource for anyone interested in learning more about Pi.

Mathematics., Simon F.

1999-01-01

433

The Web Robots Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Martin Koster, a software engineer working in the United Kingdom, maintains this website about Web robots. Web robots, also known as Web Wanderers, Crawlers, or Spiders, are "programs that traverse the Web automatically." The website provides information on how Web robots operate, how they feed search engines, and ways to steer them away from (or to) your pages. Also available from this website is a database of currently known robots, with descriptions and contact details. For more information on technical aspects of designing, building, and operating Web robots, visitors can read discussions from an archived mailing list, browse some older articles and papers posted, or follow links to related websites.

Koster, Martin.

434

Atmospheric Variables Plotting Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Atmospheric Variables Plotting Page is part of the larger Climate Diagnostics Center Web site (last mentioned in the December 6, 2000 Scout Report for Science & Engineering ), which allows users to freely plot available data online. Inputs include date (going back to 1980); variable, such as geopotential height, eddy height, relative humidity, vector winds, and air temperature among others; analysis level, plot type, map domain, as well as several formatting options. Once obtained, the plots can be downloaded for further use, which along with the additional relevant links makes the site a useful tool for climatic data enthusiasts.

1969-12-31

435

Tricine-SDS-PAGE.  

PubMed

Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (tricine-SDS-PAGE) is an efficient way of separating low-molecular-mass proteins. However, the standard system is quite complicated and specifically may not be useful when the separated proteins require to be recovered from the gel for quantitative analysis. Here, we describe a simplified system whereby these smaller proteins can be resolved in comparatively low-percentage gels which have high compatibility with modern detectors such as UV and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). PMID:22585479

Haider, Syed R; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L

2012-01-01

436

AQMD Kid's Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) is the air pollution control agency for Orange County and major portions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside counties in Southern California. The AQMD Kid's Page contains a bunch of fun and educational links and activities for students including experiments, online games, a recipe for making smog, facts on how smog has changed over the years, a glossary of related terms, and much more. Kids can even check the current smog levels in the Los Angeles area. The fun design of the colorful site includes cartoons graphics and easy-to-read text, making it attractive and educational especially for kids of younger ages.

437

Medical facility life cycle investment strategy.  

PubMed

This document discusses a health care investment strategy developed by the military. It is based from a survey conducted of both private and military facilities. The document provides techniques to help determine a medical facility's life cycle cost. PMID:10173779

Sartori, M P

1997-10-01

438

9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

2013-01-01

439

8. Photocopy of printed page (original Page 30 of the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. Photocopy of printed page (original Page 30 of the Souvenir Program 1867-1967 Ridgely Centennial) Photographer unknown. Circa 1967. VIEW NORTHEAST, SOUTHWEST FRONT Ridgely's centennial was celebrated in 1967 and included in the souvenir brochure was page 30. This view shows the subject building with the 1950 modifications to provide for automotive traffic. It was a print of a current photograph. - 510 Central Avenue (Commercial Building), Ridgely, Caroline County, MD

440

Being Web-Savvy Tied to Better Health in Seniors  

MedlinePLUS

... Dallas Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Health Disparities Healthy Aging TUESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Older ... HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Health Disparities Healthy Aging Recent Health News Page last updated ...