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1

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you choose ...

2

Prepared by: Facilities and Environmental Health & Safety Divisions June 17, 2011  

E-print Network

.0 Integrated Safety Management System page 6 Section 5.0 Communication and Training Tools 5 Supervision and Management Orientation page 10 5.5 Quarterly Safety Meeting with Construction Prepared by: Facilities and Environmental Health & Safety Divisions June 17

Eisen, Michael

3

Page 1 of 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Chemical Hygiene Programs: Operation of the Chemical: The Environmental Health and Safety Department (EHS) operates the Chemical Storage and Distribution Facility (CSDF minimization by facilitating the recycling of obsolete and surplus chemicals. Minimize the quantities

4

Chemical Waste Guide for Facilities Services UW Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

CChemmical Fa Was aciliti Au te G ies S ugust uide Servic t 24, 2 for ces 2011 #12;Chemical Waste Guide for Facilities Services UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 2 Chemical Waste Guide ........................................................................................................... 3 Chemical Hazards

Wilcock, William

5

See Next Page Health & Society Scholars Program  

E-print Network

See Next Page Health & Society Scholars Program David A. Kindig, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Director John Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars Program at UW-Madison is sponsoring a campus of health (e.g., biological, medical, behavioral, social, economic and environmental) and their important

Sheridan, Jennifer

6

GERIATRIC MEDICINE CAPITAL HEALTH RESEARCH Page 1  

E-print Network

GERIATRIC MEDICINE CAPITAL HEALTH RESEARCH Page 1 CAPITAL HEALTH -- RESEARCH FOCUS ON Many people are working to better understand and care for the complex needs of geriatric patients. Geriatric medicine by 2020. China is keenly interested as well. In fact, the Capital Health geriatric medicine team has

Brownstone, Rob

7

vaccination in Queensland Health facilities.  

E-print Network

This policy has been developed in accordance with the following principles: Queensland Health adheres to best practice principles for provision of vaccination services to reduce the impact of morbidity and mortality on individuals and the community for vaccine preventable diseases. Standards of practice as described in the Drugs and Poisons Regulations, Drug Therapy

unknown authors

8

Energy conservation in health-care facilities  

SciTech Connect

As energy expenditures continue their dramatic rise in the health-care industry, they absorb a larger portion of hospital budgets and prompt managers to seek ways to conserve energy and reduce consumption. Hospital managers, however, may be forced by capital constraints to choose between medical and energy conservation investments. The author examines some of the issues (including fairness, legal and financial impediments, and medical practices) involved in reducing health care costs. He makes practical suggestions for improving facility efficiency that include a strategy for energy management and a checklist of ideas. The case histories of 25 medical facilities illustrate conservation opportunities. 18 references, 34 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

Hunt, V.D. (comp.)

1983-01-01

9

Columbia University Health Sciences Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section -Page 43  

E-print Network

Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page;ColumbiaUniversityHealthSciences­Health&SafetyManual2003 LaboratorySafetySection-Page44 Attachment&ChemicalHygieneTraining(seescheduleviaEH&Swebsite) #12;Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page

Jia, Songtao

10

EXTERNAL EFFECTS OF MENTAL HEALTH FACILITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of a 1,090-household survey in metropolitan Toronto, Ontario, shows that community mental health facilities generate externality fields that include such effects as fears of the negative impact on property values, traffic volumes, and residential satisfaction. There are also strongly neutral respondents who do not anticipate any impact on their neighborhoods. The spatial extent of the externality effect of mental

MICHAEL DEAR; S. MARTIN TAYLOR; G. B. HALL

1980-01-01

11

Employee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare  

E-print Network

** and sports facilities*** · Flu immunisation programme · Health promotion programmes · Occupational healthEmployee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare · Annual leave of up to 30 Use Policy) · Cycle-2-Work scheme · Discounts to local leisure facilities · On-site health club

Crowther, Paul

12

UAVP/policy/EHS #12 Page 1 of 3 Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

UAVP/policy/EHS #12 Page 1 of 3 Environmental Health & Safety Policy & Procedure #12 TITLE contaminants (rust, bacteria, etc.). RESPONSIBILITY ACTION FACILITIES PLANNING Ensure all new construction, contact EH&S at 297-3129. . ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Make safety shower testing equipment available

Fernandez, Eduardo

13

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY June 2012 Page 1  

E-print Network

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY June 2012 #12;June 2012 Page 1 UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY 2012 Contents Page Foreword by the Principal 2 A) Health and Safety Policy Statement 3 B) Organisation and Responsibilities for Health and Safety 4 C) Health and Safety Management in Schools

Levi, Ran

14

JAMA Patient Page: Health Literacy  

MedlinePLUS

... you get information. FINDING RELIABLE INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET The Internet can be a good source for health information ... are some tips to help you start your Internet search: Government Web sites, like the National Institutes ...

15

A health maintenance facility for space station freedom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe a health care facility to be built and used on an orbiting space station in low Earth orbit. This facility, called the health maintenance facility, is based on and modeled after isolated terrestrial medical facilities. It will provide a phased approach to health care for the crews of Space Station Freedom. This paper presents the capabilities of the health maintenance facility. As Freedom is constructed over the next decade there will be an increase in activities, both construction and scientific. The health maintenance facility will evolve with this process until it is a mature, complete, stand-alone health care facility that establishes a foundation to support interplanetary travel. As our experience in space continues to grow so will the commitment to providing health care.

Billica, R. D.; Doarn, C. R.

1991-01-01

16

Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

1991-01-01

17

Manned Mars mission health maintenance facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) requirements which enable/enhance manned Mars missions (MMMs) are addressed. It does not attempt to resolve any issues that may affect the feasibility of any given element in the HMF. Reference is made to current work being conducted in the design of the space station HMF. The HMF requirements are discussed within the context of two distinctly different scenarios: HMF as part of the Mars surface infrastructure, and HMF as part of the nine months translation from low Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Requirements for an HMF are provided, and a concept of HMF is shown.

Degioanni, Joseph C.

1986-01-01

18

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy  

E-print Network

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy #12;Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 2 of 8 Coventry University Health and Safety Policy 1. Introduction, Purpose and Scope The objective of our Health and Safety Policy is to enable the University to operate effectively

Low, Robert

19

Health Facility Reuse, Retrofit, and Reconfiguration. NCHSR Research Proceedings Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In addition to publishing the papers given at key meetings, this series on health facilities includes discussions and responses. The series is intended to help meet the information needs of health service providers and others who require direct access to concepts and ideas evolving from the exchange of research results. Health facility reuse is an

National Center for Health Services Research (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

20

Facilities-Site Services Environmental, Health & Safety Committee  

E-print Network

, self- assessment results, and any other information that may have an impact on the health and safetyFacilities- Site Services Environmental, Health & Safety Committee Charter (Draft) 1.0 The purpose of this EH&S Committee is: 1.1 To provide an environment, safety and health forum for Facilities Site

21

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

22

TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC Features TB in Correctional Facilities is a Public Health Concern Share Compartir Diagnosing and treating TB in ... the community with untreated TB present a serious public health concern. Figure 1 (larger view). TB Control in ...

23

Health facilities at the district level in Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background At Independence the Government of Indonesia inherited a weak and unevenly distributed health system to which much of the population had only limited access. In response, the government decided to increase the number of facilities and to locate them closer to the people. To staff these health facilities the government introduced obligatory government service for all new graduates in medicine, nursing and midwifery. Most of these staff also established private practices in the areas in which they were located. The health information system contains little information on the health care facilities established for private practice by these staff. This article reports on the results of enumerating all health facilities in 15 districts in Java. Methods We enumerated all healthcare facilities, public and private, by type in each of 15 districts in Java. Results The enumeration showed a much higher number of healthcare facilities in each district than is shown in most reports and in the health information system which concentrates on public, multi-provider facilities. Across the 15 districts: 86% of facilities were solo-provider facilities for outpatient services; 13% were multi-provider facilities for outpatient services; and 1% were multi-provider facilities offering both outpatient and inpatient services. Conclusion The relatively good distribution of health facilities in Indonesia was achieved through establishing public health centers at the sub-district level and staffing them through a system of compulsory service for doctors, nurses and midwives. Subsequently, these public sector staff also established solo-provider facilities for their own private practice; these solo-provider facilities, of which those for nurses are almost half, comprise the largest category of outpatient care facilities, most are not included in official statistics. Now that Indonesia no longer has mandatory service for newly graduated doctors, nurses and midwives, it will have difficulty maintaining the distribution of facilities and providers established through the 1980s. The current challenge is to envision a new health system that responds to the changing disease patterns as well as the changes in distribution of health facilities. PMID:19445728

Heywood, Peter; Harahap, Nida P

2009-01-01

24

Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

1993-01-01

25

Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information Section 81.003 of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code requires employers of persons who provide Mental Health Services to make inquiries, and former patients. Please read the following information regarding mental health services and providers

Lichtarge, Olivier

26

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.  

E-print Network

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.: 1 Document No.: SOP-CHEM-04 of Environmental Health & Safety 1.0 Introduction The Mold Prevention Assessment and Remediation Procedures were developed by the Department of Environmental Health & Safety in accordance with the University's Policy

Abolmaesumi, Purang

27

77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage Insurance...programs for multifamily housing or health care facilities. This notice announces...

2012-08-15

28

77 FR 21580 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...market-rate multifamily housing, health care facility, and hospital...

2012-04-10

29

Health care facilities resilient to climate change impacts.  

PubMed

Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator's guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned are as were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25590098

Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

2014-12-01

30

Health care facilities resilient to climate change impacts.  

PubMed

Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator's guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned areas were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25522050

Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

2014-01-01

31

Health Care Facilities Resilient to Climate Change Impacts  

PubMed Central

Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitators guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned areas were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25522050

Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

2014-01-01

32

Interstitial space in health care facilities : planning for change & evolution  

E-print Network

Hospitals are most useful material for architectural research for they exhibit all the problems encountered in other building types in an acute and easily measurable form. Health Care Facilities house the greatest range ...

Garcia Alvarez, Angel

1989-01-01

33

Selected Bibliographies and State-of-the-Art Review for Health Facilities Planning. Volume 6: Health Facility Planning References. International Health Planning Reference Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended as a companion piece to volume 5 in the Method Series, Health Facilities Planning (CE 024 233), this sixth of six volumes in the International Health Planning Reference Series is a combined literature review and annotated bibliography dealing with health facilities planning for developing countries. The review identifies literature

White (E.H.) Co., San Francisco, CA.

34

Violence in Healthcare Facilities: Lessons From the Veterans Health Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals: The authors examined assault frequency and risk factors in health care. Methods: The authors conducted a cross-sectional question naire survey in 142 hospitals. Analyses are presented at the level of the individual and aggregated by facility. Results: Thirteen percent of employees described at least 1 assault in the last year; the proportion assaulted per facility ranged from 1% to

Michael J. Hodgson; Richard Reed; Thomas Craig; Frances Murphy; Larry Lehmann; Linda Belton; Nick Warren

2004-01-01

35

Qualified Environmentalist/Sanitarian Needed in Every Health Care Facility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is concerned with the need for a qualified professional environmentalist/sanitarian to be employed full time at all health care facilities. Rising hospital costs and increasingly sophisticated procedures point out the need for professionals trained to carry out a positive environmental health program. (MA)

Journal of Environmental Health, 1975

1975-01-01

36

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.  

E-print Network

. A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) must be consulted to obtain any necessary information pertaining. MSDS sheets can be obtained by following a link on the Health and Safety website at http://www.safetyQueen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.: 1 Document No.: SOP-CHEM-05

Abolmaesumi, Purang

37

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2014-10-01

38

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2013-10-01

39

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2012-10-01

40

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2011-10-01

41

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

2010-10-01

42

MSU Instructions to Bidders Page 1 of 6 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION  

E-print Network

MSU Instructions to Bidders Page 1 of 6 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION Sixth Avenue-5665 INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS 1. Table of Contents Permit Notice Invitation to Bid Instruction to Bidders Bid: (406) 549-5002 Fax: (406) 721-2941 #12;MSU Instructions to Bidders Page 2 of 6 3. Borrowing

Dyer, Bill

43

041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY WOMEN'S HEALTH  

E-print Network

041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY ­ WOMEN'S HEALTH: _______________________ DOB: / / Mo. Day Year Please complete for your first Women's Health visit at University Health

Yener, Aylin

44

Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Cost Reduction IBM Corporation | December 2, 2009 Page 1 of 7  

E-print Network

Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Cost Reduction © IBM Corporation | December 2, 2009 Page 1 of 7 - Internal distribution only Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Cost Reduction Summary By moving the necessary management information. This paper sets out an overview of the challenges of real estate cost

45

Introducing health facility accreditation in Liberia  

PubMed Central

In recent years, dozens of countries have introduced accreditation and other quality improvement initiatives. A great deal of information is available regarding best practices in high- and middle-income countries; however, little is available to guide developing nations seeking to introduce an accreditation programme. This paper describes the outputs and lessons learned in the first year of establishing an accreditation programme in Liberia, a developing nation in West Africa that in 2003 emerged from a brutal 14-year civil war. The Liberian experience of developing and implementing a government-sponsored, widespread accreditation programme may provide insight to other low-income and post-conflict countries seeking a way to drive rapid, system-wide reform in the health system, even with limited infrastructure and extremely challenging conditions. PMID:20623390

Cleveland, Emily C.; Dahn, Bernice T.; Lincoln, Teta M.; Safer, Meredith; Podesta, Mae; Bradley, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

46

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Page 1 of 2  

E-print Network

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology Page 1 of 2 Issue Date: 5/25/2012 Document Title: Histology Laboratory Research Prices Document Code: AP-HISTO-CHT-010-V.01 Histology Laboratory Research Prices Prepared/Reviewed by: Martin Slade, Technical Service Supervisor, Histology Laboratory Tissues

Pawlowski, Wojtek

47

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health  

E-print Network

public interest and scientific investigation, reflecting an increased public awareness of mental illness plus incidence of mental illness (due in part to our aging population). The proposed programsNeuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health · B

48

Health Resources Statistics; Health Manpower and Health Facilities, 1968. Public Health Service Publication No. 1509.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is a part of the program of the National Center for Health Statistics to provide current statistics as baseline data for the evaluation, planning, and administration of health programs. Part I presents data concerning the occupational fields: (1) administration, (2) anthropology and sociology, (3) data processing, (4) basic sciences,

National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

49

Community health facility preparedness for a cholera surge in Haiti.  

PubMed

With increasing population displacement and worsening water insecurity after the 2010 earthquake, Haiti experienced a large cholera outbreak. Our goal was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of seven community health facilities' ability to respond to a surge in cholera cases. Since 2010, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with a number of public and private donors has been working with seven health facilities in an effort to reduce morbidity and mortality from cholera infection. In November 2012, CRS through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s support, asked the Johns Hopkins Center for Refugee and Disaster Response to conduct a cholera surge simulation tabletop exercise at these health facilities to improve each facility's response in the event of a cholera surge. Using simulation development guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization and others, a simulation scenario script was produced that included situations of differing severity, supply chain, as well as a surge of patients. A total of 119 hospital staff from seven sites participated in the simulation exercise including community health workers, clinicians, managers, pharmacists, cleaners, and security guards. Clinics that had challenges during the simulated clinical care of patients were those that did not appropriately treat all cholera patients according to protocol, particularly those that were vulnerable, those that would need additional staff to properly treat patients during a surge of cholera, and those that required a better inventory of supplies. Simulation-based activities have the potential to identify healthcare delivery system vulnerabilities that are amenable to intervention prior to a cholera surge. PMID:24481887

Mobula, Linda Meta; Jacquet, Gabrielle A; Weinhauer, Kristin; Alcidas, Gladys; Thomas, Hans-Muller; Burnham, Gilbert

2013-01-01

50

Trends in antenatal care attendance and health facility delivery following community and health facility systems strengthening interventions in Northern Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal morbidity and mortality remains high in Uganda; largely due to inadequate antenatal care (ANC), low skilled deliveries and poor quality of other maternal health services. In order to address both the demand and quality of ANC and skilled deliveries, we introduced community mobilization and health facility capacity strengthening interventions. Methods Interventions were introduced between January 2010 and September 2011. These included: training health workers, provision of medical supplies, community mobilization using village health teams, music dance and drama groups and male partner access clubs. These activities were implemented at Kitgum Matidi health center III and its catchment area. Routinely collected health facility data on selected outcomes in the year preceding the interventions and after 21months of implementation of the interventions was reviewed. Trend analysis was performed using excel and statistical significance testing was performed using EPINFO StatCal option. Results The number of pregnant women attending the first ANC visit significantly increased from 114 to 150 in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.392.12) and to 202 in the third quarter of 2011(OR 11.41; 95% CI 7.9716.34). The number of pregnant women counselled, tested and given results for HIV during the first ANC attendance significantly rose from 92 (80.7%) to 146 (97.3%) in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 and then to 201 (99.5%) in the third quarter of 2011. The number of male partners counseled, tested and given results together with their wives at first ANC visit rose from 13 (16.7%) in the fourth quarter of 2009 to 130 (89%) in the fourth quarter of 2010 and to 180 (89.6%) in the third quarter of 2011. There was a significant rise in the number of pregnant women delivering in the health facility with provision of mama-kits (delivery kits), from 74 (55.2%) to 149 (99.3%) in the second and fourth quarter of 2010. Conclusions Combined community and facility systems strengthening interventions led to increased first ANC visits by women and their partners, and health facility deliveries. Interventions aimed at increasing uptake of maternal health services should address both the demand and availability of quality services. PMID:24134717

2013-01-01

51

Human resource development in rural health care facilities.  

PubMed

In this paper, human resource development problems facing rural health care facilities are identified and it is recognised that, particularly in the face of escalating demands for training arising from environmental pressures such as implementation of the structural efficiency principle, a coordinated approach to meet these problems is desirable. Such coordination is often sought via a regional staff development service. Accordingly, using the organisational life cycle as a conceptual framework, staff development services in five NSW health regions are examined. Ranging from a cafeteria style to a results-orientation, a diversity of strategic approaches to staff development is reflected. PMID:10121773

Johnson, L

1991-01-01

52

Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 1 of 18 Version 4.0 KINGSTON UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 1 of 18 Version 4.0 KINGSTON UNIVERSITY HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY Release: Final Subject: Health & Safety Policy Issued by: University Safety Office Version: 4.0 Effective From : December 2010 #12;Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 2 of 18 Version 4.0 Foreword

Jones, Graeme A.

53

UK HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 1 September 1, 2009 HIPAA Education Level One  

E-print Network

UK HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 1 September 1, 2009 HIPAA Education ­ Level of an individual's health information Ensures physical and technical security of an individual's health HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 2 September 1, 2009 ~ Who is required to comply

MacAdam, Keith

54

Page 1 of 6 Environmental Health and Safety Office  

E-print Network

H 4R2 902.494.2495 · (FAX) 902.494.2996 · safety.dal.ca GUIDANCE ON CHOICE OF LAB COAT STYLE) 902.494.2996 · safety.dal.ca GUIDANCE ON CHOICE OF LAB COAT STYLE AND MATERIAL Effective DatePage 1 of 6 Environmental Health and Safety Office 1391 Seymour Street · Halifax, Nova Scotia B3

Brownstone, Rob

55

The Global Health Group Page 1 of 2 Private Sector Healthcare Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow Position Description  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group Page 1 of 2 Private Sector Healthcare Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow ­ Position Description The Global Health Group University of California, San Francisco The Global Health Group (GHG) at the University of California, San

Mullins, Dyche

56

Health system support for childbirth care in Southern Tanzania: results from a health facility census  

PubMed Central

Background Progress towards reaching Millennium Development Goals four (child health) and five (maternal health) is lagging behind, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, despite increasing efforts to scale up high impact interventions. Increasing the proportion of birth attended by a skilled attendant is a main indicator of progress, but not much is known about the quality of childbirth care delivered by these skilled attendants. With a view to reducing maternal mortality through health systems improvement we describe the care routinely offered in childbirth at dispensaries, health centres and hospitals in five districts in rural Southern Tanzania. We use data from a health facility census assessing 159 facilities in five districts in early 2009. A structural and operational assessment was undertaken based on staff reports using a modular questionnaire assessing staffing, work load, equipment and supplies as well as interventions routinely implemented during childbirth. Results Health centres and dispensaries attended a median of eight and four deliveries every month respectively. Dispensaries had a median of 2.5 (IQR 23) health workers including auxiliary staff instead of the recommended four clinical officer and certified nurses. Only 28% of first-line facilities (dispensaries and health centres) reported offering active management in the third stage of labour (AMTSL). Essential childbirth care comprising eight interventions including AMTSL, infection prevention, partograph use including foetal monitoring and newborn care including early breastfeeding, thermal care at birth and prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum was offered by 5% of dispensaries, 38% of health centres and 50% of hospitals consistently. No first-line facility had provided all signal functions for emergency obstetric complications in the previous six months. Conclusions Essential interventions for childbirth care are not routinely implemented in first-line facilities or hospitals. Dispensaries have both low staffing and low caseload which constrains the ability to provide high-quality childbirth care. Improvements in quality of care are essential so that women delivering in facility receive skilled attendance and adequate care for common obstetric complications such as post-partum haemorrhage. PMID:24171904

2013-01-01

57

The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services

Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

2006-01-01

58

Using Facebook Page Insights Data to Determine Posting Best Practices in an Academic Health Sciences Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library created a Facebook page and a corresponding managing committee in March 2010. Facebook Page Insights data collected from the library's Facebook page were statistically analyzed to investigate patterns of user engagement. The committee hoped to improve posting practices and increase user

Houk, Kathryn M.; Thornhill, Kate

2013-01-01

59

Predictors of the quality of health worker treatment practices for uncomplicated malaria at government health facilities in Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods We analysed data from a survey of government health facilities in four Kenyan districts in which HW consultations were observed, caretakers and HW were interviewed, and health facility assessments were performed. The analysis was limited to children 2-59 months old with uncomplicated malaria. Treatment was defined as recommended (antimalarial recommended by national guidelines), a minor error (effective, but non-recommended

D Zurovac; AK Rowe; SA Ochola; AM Noor; B Midia; M English; RW Snow

2004-01-01

60

Using Facility-Location Models to Optimally Locate Hierarchical Community-based Health Facilities in Davao City  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alternative hierarchical location-allocation models are used to locate two types of community-based health facilities in Davao City relative to population locations. Accounting for factors such as politics and resource availability, different optimization approaches were implemented to locate a mix of health centers and nutrition posts across the rural and urban areas of the city. The results were evaluated based on

Myra E Silva; Johnson Michael P Jr

2009-01-01

61

Journal of Public Health in Africa 2012; volume 3:e19 [page 80] [Journal of Public Health in Africa 2012; 3:e19  

E-print Network

Journal of Public Health in Africa 2012; volume 3:e19 [page 80] [Journal of Public Health in Africa to protect public health in developing nations. Introduction In 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO

62

Provision of Mental Health Services in South African Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To date, South African research has not examined mental health service provision in substance abuse treatment facilities, even though these services improve client retention and treatment outcomes. To describe the extent to which substance abuse treatment facilities in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces provide clients with mental health services

Myers, Bronwyn; Fakier, Nuraan

2009-01-01

63

Implementation of Oral Health Recommendations into Two Residential Aged Care Facilities in a Regional Australian City  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Residents of aged care facilities usually have a large number of oral health problems. Residents who suffer from dementia are at particular risk. A systematic review of the best available evidence with regard to maintaining the oral health of older people with dementia in residential aged care facilities provided a number of recommendations. Objectives The aim of the implementation

Michelle Cameron BN; Debra Mackenzie; Jacinta Pitt RN

64

Quality along the Continuum: A Health Facility Assessment of Intrapartum and Postnatal Care in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate effective coverage of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana. Methods We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC), emergency newborn care (EmNC) and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated effective coverage of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality. Findings Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as low or substandard for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was low or substandard in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with high or highest quality in all dimensions. Conclusion Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated effective coverage of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large quality gap. Effective coverage could be a meaningful indicator of progress towards reducing maternal and newborn mortality. PMID:24312265

Nesbitt, Robin C.; Lohela, Terhi J.; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Edmond, Karen; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R.; Gabrysch, Sabine

2013-01-01

65

American Health Information Management Association. Position statement. Issue: managing health information in facility mergers and acquisitions.  

PubMed

Healthcare facility mergers and acquisitions are becoming more common as the industry consolidates. Many critical issues must be considered in mergers and acquisitions, including the management of patient health information. In addition to operational issues, licensure, regulatory, and accreditation requirements must be addressed. To ensure availability of health information to all legitimate users, patient records should be consolidated or linked in the master patient index. A record retention policy should be developed and implemented to meet user needs and assure compliance with legal, regulatory, and accreditation requirements. If health information from closed facilities will be stored for a period of time, its integrity and confidentiality must be preserved, and it must be readily accessible for patient care. The compatibility and functionality of existing information systems should be assessed, and a plan should be formulated for integration of the systems to the extent possible. Such integration may be essential for the organization to successfully meet the demands of integrated delivery systems. Existing databases should be maintained in an accessible form to meet anticipated future needs. PMID:10133022

1994-04-01

66

Uses of inorganic hypochlorite (bleach) in health-care facilities.  

PubMed Central

Hypochlorite has been used as a disinfectant for more than 100 years. It has many of the properties of an ideal disinfectant, including a broad antimicrobial activity, rapid bactericidal action, reasonable persistence in treated potable water, ease of use, solubility in water, relative stability, relative nontoxicity at use concentrations, no poisonous residuals, no color, no staining, and low cost. The active species is undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Hypochlorites are lethal to most microbes, although viruses and vegetative bacteria are more susceptible than endospore-forming bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Activity is reduced by the presence of heavy metal ions, a biofilm, organic material, low temperature, low pH, or UV radiation. Clinical uses in health-care facilities include hyperchlorination of potable water to prevent Legionella colonization, chlorination of water distribution systems used in hemodialysis centers, cleaning of environmental surfaces, disinfection of laundry, local use to decontaminate blood spills, disinfection of equipment, decontamination of medical waste prior to disposal, and dental therapy. Despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants, hypochlorites continue to find wide use in hospitals. PMID:9336664

Rutala, W A; Weber, D J

1997-01-01

67

Provision of Mental Health Services in South African Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, South African research has not examined mental health service provision in substance abuse treatment facilities,\\u000a even though these services improve client retention and treatment outcomes. To describe the extent to which substance abuse\\u000a treatment facilities in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces provide clients with mental health services during the course\\u000a of treatment and to compare mental health service provision

Bronwyn Myers; Nuraan Fakier

2009-01-01

68

Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response.  

PubMed

Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministre de la Sant Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system. PMID:25276595

Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

2014-08-01

69

Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministre de la Sant Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system. PMID:25276595

Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

2014-01-01

70

Version Date: 1/5/2012 Page 1 of 3 Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing  

E-print Network

Version Date: 1/5/2012 Page 1 of 3 Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing Peer Review Guidelines & Manuscript Review Form About Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing (CPHCM) is an online journal featuring peer- reviewed case studies

Vertes, Akos

71

Lung Health Dissertation Grant (LH) Program Description Page 1 of 6 5/25/2011  

E-print Network

Lung Health Dissertation Grant (LH) Program Description Page 1 of 6 5/25/2011 IMPORTANT NOTES REFERENCE. The objective of the Lung Health Research Dissertation Grant is to support pre-doctoral dissertation research in the various disciplines of social science examining risk factors affecting lung health

Gleeson, Joseph G.

72

Informal payments in government health facilities in Albania: Results of a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

As governments seek to expand access to quality health care services, policy makers in many countries are confronting the problem of informal payments to medical personnel. The aim of this study was to help health planners in Albania understand informal payments occurring in government health facilities. Researchers used in-depth interviews and focus groups with 131 general public and provider informants

Taryn Vian; Kristina Grybosk; Zamira Sinoimeri; Rachel Hall

2006-01-01

73

Perception and prevalence of work-related health hazards among health care workers in public health facilities in southern India.  

PubMed

Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are exposed to occupational related health hazards. Measuring worker perception and the prevalence of these hazards can help facilitate better risk management for HCWs, as these workers are envisaged to be the first point of contact, especially in resource poor settings. Objective: To describe the perception of occupational health hazards and self-reported exposure prevalence among HCWs in Southern India. Methods: We used cross sectional design with stratified random sampling of HCWs from different levels of health facilities and categories in a randomly selected district in Southern India. Data on perception and exposure prevalence were collected using a structured interview schedule developed by occupational health experts and administered by trained investigators. Results: A total of 482 HCWs participated. Thirty nine percent did not recognize work-related health hazards, but reported exposure to at least one hazard upon further probing. Among the 815% who reported exposure to biological hazard, 939% had direct skin contact with infectious materials. Among HCWs reporting needle stick injury, 705% had at least one in the previous three months. Ergonomic hazards included lifting heavy objects (42%) and standing for long hours (37%). Psychological hazards included negative feelings (203%) and verbal or physical abuse during work (205%). Conclusion: More than a third of HCWs failed to recognize work-related health hazards. Despite training in handling infectious materials, HCWs reported direct skin contact with infectious materials and needle stick injuries. Results indicate the need for training oriented toward behavioral change and provision of occupational health services. PMID:25482656

Senthil, Arasi; Anandh, Balasubramanian; Jayachandran, Palsamy; Thangavel, Gurusamy; Josephin, Diana; Yamini, Ravindran; Kalpana, Balakrishnan

2014-12-01

74

Monitoring child survival in real time using routine health facility records: results from Malawi  

PubMed Central

Objectives Few developing countries have the accurate civil registration systems needed to track progress in child survival. However, the health information systems in most of these countries do record facility births and deaths, at least in principle. We used data from two districts of Malawi to test a method for monitoring child mortality based on adjusting health facility records for incomplete coverage. Methods Trained researchers collected reports of monthly births and deaths among children younger than 5 years from all health facilities in Balaka and Salima districts of Malawi in 20102011. We estimated the proportion of births and deaths occurring in health facilities, respectively, from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey and a household mortality survey conducted between October 2011 and February 2012. We used these proportions to adjust the health facility data to estimate the actual numbers of births and deaths. The survey also provided gold-standard measures of under-five mortality. Results Annual under-five mortality rates generated by adjusting health facility data were between 35% and 65% of those estimated by the gold-standard survey in Balaka, and 46% and 50% in Salima for four overlapping 12-month periods in 20102011. The ratios of adjusted health facility rates to gold-standard rates increased sharply over the four periods in Balaka, but remained relatively stable in Salima. Conclusions Even in Malawi, where high proportions of births and deaths occur in health facilities compared with other countries in sub-Saharan Africa, routine Health Management Information Systems data on births and deaths cannot be used at present to estimate annual trends in under-five mortality. PMID:23906285

Amouzou, Agbessi; Kachaka, Willie; Banda, Benjamin; Chimzimu, Martina; Hill, Kenneth; Bryce, Jennifer

2013-01-01

75

Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmental to modify an assessment checklist that best addresses specific safety and environmental compliance needs

76

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.18 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

of Protected Health Information for Marketing Purposes SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU) System to in this policy as LSUHSC-NO. PURPOSE: To provide guidance to the health care facilities and providers affiliated or disclosing an individual's Protected Health Information for marketing purposes. POLICY: All LSU System health

77

Health and Safety Management for Small-scale Methane Fermentation Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we considered health and safety management for small-scale methane fermentation facilities that treat 2-5 ton of biomass daily based on several years operation experience with an approximate capacity of 5 td-1. We also took account of existing knowledge, related laws and regulations. There are no qualifications or licenses required for management and operation of small-scale methane fermentation facilities, even though rural sewerage facilities with a relative similar function are required to obtain a legitimate license. Therefore, there are wide variations in health and safety consciousness of the operators of small-scale methane fermentation facilities. The industrial safety and health laws are not applied to the operation of small-scale methane fermentation facilities. However, in order to safely operate a small-scale methane fermentation facility, the occupational safety and health management system that the law recommends should be applied. The aims of this paper are to clarify the risk factors in small-scale methane fermentation facilities and encourage planning, design and operation of facilities based on health and safety management.

Yamaoka, Masaru; Yuyama, Yoshito; Nakamura, Masato; Oritate, Fumiko

78

Health Facilities for Primary Eye Care in Sultanate of Oman  

PubMed Central

Objective: Endeavor to improve (i) the quality of Primary Eye Care with the aid of an Eye Health Care Programme and (ii) the resourcing Primary Eye Care in Ministry of Health Institutions in 2001. Method: In this descriptive study, staff were randomly selected from 84 health institutions and representing 136 primary health institutions to carry out quality assurance procedures. Ophthalmologists trained in this evaluation were field staff who evaluated the resource status, such as health staff, space for eye care delivery, instruments, materials for health education, referring cases (for continuous medical education of the primary health staff), drugs for eye care, etc., in each health institution. In addition to availability, the standards of eye care delivery were also estimated. Results: The health institutes of Oman have adequate resources for Primary Eye Care. Additional requirement of ophthalmic loupes and medicaments would further improve Primary Eye Care in Oman. Conclusion: It is recommended that such a review of the health care programme and its resources and quality be periodically conducted as a part of a system of quality assurance in primary health care. PMID:21748123

Khandekar, Rajiv; Mohammed, Ali J

2006-01-01

79

Evidence-based facilities design in health care: a study of aged care facilities in Australia.  

PubMed

Many facilities for people with dementia have been built with little translation of the substantial body of evidence available to inform design. Knowledge translation has been described as a four-stage process: awareness, agreement, adoption and adherence. This paper identifies where knowledge translation fails in the design of aged care facilities for people with dementia. Ten aged care facilities were audited using the Environmental Audit Tool. Senior managers and architects involved in the facility design were then interviewed to ascertain their knowledge of evidence-based principles of dementia design, their agreement with the principles and the nature of the obstacles they had encountered in their implementation. All architects claimed at least partial awareness of the design principles. Five facility managers claimed full awareness. Those facilities designed with the input of managers who were fully aware of the principles were of significantly higher design quality. There was little agreement on the significance of other obstacles. Once aged care providers are aware of the principles, they appear to find ways to implement them. If the next generation of residential aged care facilities is to be suitable for people with dementia, the facility managers must be made aware of the available design principles, architects encouraged to be more active in sharing their knowledge and ways found to improve the exchange of knowledge between the parties. PMID:23135886

Fleming, Richard; Fay, Roger; Robinson, Andrew

2012-08-01

80

THE APPLICATION OF LINEAR PROGRAMMING TO LOCATING MENTAl HEALTH OUTPATIENT FACILITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model for locating public mental health outpatient facilities must incorporate: accessibility factors within budgetary constraints. The model should also include an oppositioll factor to spread risk, both real and perceived, in an equitable fashion. The size of the facilities must be small enough to effectively minimize opposition to their construction, yet large enough to allow economics of scale to

Phyllis A. Peterson

81

Older Adult Participation in Health Promotion Programs: Perspectives of Facility Administrators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Administrators of older adult-centered facilities must identify barriers to the planning and implementation of health promotion programs. In this qualitative research those barriers were identified through in-depth interviews with administrators of older adult-centered facilities. As identified by administrators, the predominant barriers to the

Wright, Tim; Hyner, Gerald C.

2011-01-01

82

Health workers knowledge of and attitudes towards computer applications in rural African health facilities  

PubMed Central

Background The QUALMAT (Quality of Maternal and Prenatal Care: Bridging the Know-do Gap) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pre-natal and maternal care services in rural primary health facilities in Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Tanzania. Objective To report an assessment of health providers computer knowledge, experience, and attitudes prior to the implementation of the QUALMAT electronic CDSS. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted with providers in 24 QUALMAT project sites. Information was collected using structured questionnaires. Chi-squared tests and one-way ANOVA describe the association between computer knowledge, attitudes, and other factors. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted to gain further insights. Results A total of 108 providers responded, 63% were from Tanzania and 37% from Ghana. The mean age was 37.6 years, and 79% were female. Only 40% had ever used computers, and 29% had prior computer training. About 80% were computer illiterate or beginners. Educational level, age, and years of work experience were significantly associated with computer knowledge (p<0.01). Most (95.3%) had positive attitudes towards computers average score (SD) of 37.2 (4.9). Females had significantly lower scores than males. Interviews and group discussions showed that although most were lacking computer knowledge and experience, they were optimistic about overcoming challenges associated with the introduction of computers in their workplace. Conclusions Given the low levels of computer knowledge among rural health workers in Africa, it is important to provide adequate training and support to ensure the successful uptake of electronic CDSSs in these settings. The positive attitudes to computers found in this study underscore that also rural care providers are ready to use such technology. PMID:25361721

Sukums, Felix; Mensah, Nathan; Mpembeni, Rose; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E.; Blank, Antje

2014-01-01

83

Health on the Net Foundation: assessing the quality of health web pages all over the world.  

PubMed

The Internet provides a great amount of information and has become one of the communication media which is most widely used [1]. However, the problem is no longer finding information but assessing the credibility of the publishers as well as the relevance and accuracy of the documents retrieved from the web. This problem is particularly relevant in the medical area which has a direct impact on the well-being of citizens. In this paper, we assume that the quality of web pages can be controlled, even when a huge amount of documents has to be reviewed. But this must be supported by both specific automatic tools and human expertise. In this context, we present various initiatives of the Health on the Net Foundation informing the citizens about the reliability of the medical content on the web. PMID:17911869

Boyer, Clia; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Baujard, Vincent; Geissbhler, Antoine

2007-01-01

84

Work conditions and personality characteristics affecting job satisfaction of student interns in extended health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

58 undergraduates employed as summer interns in extended health care facilities completed the Allport-Vernon-Lindzey (AVL) Study of Values, the TAT, and at least 25 daily logs in which they recorded activities and rated them according to a satisfaction index. Significantly high AVL social and low political and economic scores were found among the intern Ss attracted to health care summer

George H. Labovitz; Charles D. Orth

1972-01-01

85

An Integrated Approach to Multi-Criteria-based Health Care Facility Location Planning  

E-print Network

in order to solve the model. Experiments on synthetic datasets and on the Alberta breast cancer screening approach to health care facility planning whereby the methods from three research topics are combined. In this approach, a new health accessibility estimation method is developed in order to capture the current

86

Understanding NUI-supported Nomadic Social Places in a Brazilian Health Care Facility  

E-print Network

and Communication Technologies (ICT) play an important role in redefining public spaces by multiply- ingUnderstanding NUI-supported Nomadic Social Places in a Brazilian Health Care Facility Roberto an ethnographic study with a community of Brazilian health care professionals at a chronic care hospital. We

British Columbia, University of

87

DuPont/HFM Forum on carpet in health care facilities. Roundtable discussion.  

PubMed

DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--on May 13 to take part in DuPont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, end-users, interior designers and mill representatives talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10183973

Murph, J; Hemmes, M; Blyth, P L; Plappert, K K; Noell, E; VanStavern, V; Cama, R; Lynn, V; Pollitt, B S; Rainey, P M

1993-11-01

88

Page 1 | B.S. in Public Health | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Public Health  

E-print Network

Page 1 | B.S. in Public Health | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Public Health Academic Plan of Study College of Health & Human Services Department of Public Health Sciences publichealth required prior to declaration. Focus on completing Public Health prerequisite curriculum prior to applying

Raja, Anita

89

SmartConnect: Data connectivity for peripheral health facilities  

E-print Network

data connectivity · Integrated with other electrically powered equipment, e.g., a vaccine refrigerator: ­ Informants from vaccination project in Vietnam ­ WHO guidelines 6/15/2010 NSDR 2010 8 #12;Expectations, pre-visit · Target facilities with vaccine storage ­ Grid power or solar power ­ Associate the device

Anderson, Richard

90

Health physics monitoring at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Remote radiation monitoring has been designed into the Vitrification portion of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Local alarms and remote readings are provided for area radiation levels, door alarms, airborne radioactivity, effluent air activity and liquid (process system) activity.

Hogue, M.G.; Priester, H.P.

1994-06-01

91

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 4 -Laboratory Equipment and Facilities  

E-print Network

. Biological Safety Cabinets.............................................................4-10 6. Laminar FlowSeptember 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 4 - Laboratory Equipment and Facilities UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 4-1 Section 4 - Laboratory Equipment and Facilities Contents A. EMERGENCY

Wilcock, William

92

Needs and opportunities for improving the health, safety, and productivity of medical research facilities.  

PubMed Central

Medical research facilities, indeed all the nation's constructed facilities, must be designed, operated, and maintained in a manner that supports the health, safety, and productivity of the occupants. The National Construction Goals, established by the National Science and Technology Council, envision substantial improvements in occupant health and worker productivity. The existing research and best practices case studies support this conclusion, but too frequently building industry professionals lack the knowledge to design, construct, operate, and maintain facilities at these optimum levels. There is a need for more research and more collaborative efforts between medical and facilities engineering researchers and practitioners in order to attain the National Construction Goals. Such collaborative efforts will simultaneously support attainment of the National Health Goals. This article is the summary report of the Healthy Buildings Committee for the Leadership Conference: Biomedical Facilities and the Environment sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the National Association of Physicians for the Environment, and the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers on 1--2 November 1999 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. PMID:11124125

Hodgson, M; Brodt, W; Henderson, D; Loftness, V; Rosenfeld, A; Woods, J; Wright, R

2000-01-01

93

Preventing Airborne Disease Transmission: Review of Methods for Ventilation Design in Health Care Facilities  

PubMed Central

Health care facility ventilation design greatly affects disease transmission by aerosols. The desire to control infection in hospitals and at the same time to reduce their carbon footprint motivates the use of unconventional solutions for building design and associated control measures. This paper considers indoor sources and types of infectious aerosols, and pathogen viability and infectivity behaviors in response to environmental conditions. Aerosol dispersion, heat and mass transfer, deposition in the respiratory tract, and infection mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on experimental and modeling approaches. Key building design parameters are described that include types of ventilation systems (mixing, displacement, natural and hybrid), air exchange rate, temperature and relative humidity, air flow distribution structure, occupancy, engineered disinfection of air (filtration and UV radiation), and architectural programming (source and activity management) for health care facilities. The paper describes major findings and suggests future research needs in methods for ventilation design of health care facilities to prevent airborne infection risk. PMID:22162813

Aliabadi, Amir A.; Rogak, Steven N.; Bartlett, Karen H.; Green, Sheldon I.

2011-01-01

94

Public health response to a measles outbreak in a large correctional facility, Queensland, 2013.  

PubMed

This report documents the prompt, co-ordinated and effective public health response to a measles outbreak in Queensland in 2013. There were 17 cases in a large, high-security, regional correctional facility, a setting with unique challenges. Recommendations are provided to reduce the likelihood and magnitude of measles outbreaks in correctional facilities. Commun Dis Intell 2014;38(4):E294-E297. PMID:25631590

Chatterji, Madhumati; Baldwin, Anne M; Prakash, Rajendra; Vlack, Susan A; Lambert, Stephen B

2014-01-01

95

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or

1990-01-01

96

[Association between participation in health check and visiting medical facilities in residents in a rural town].  

PubMed

Participants in a community secondary prevention action sponsored by the local government were compared with non-participants with respect to utilization of medical facilities for medical examinations. The study sample consisted of 1,013 males and 1,042 females aged 40 years or over, in a rural town in Kyoto prefecture, who were members of the National Health Insurance. Data from National Health Insurance records, such as date of consultation and type of medical examinations, were analyzed. The secondary prevention action sponsored by the town consisted of a multiphasic health check for circulatory or other chronic diseases, and screenings for tuberculosis and cancers of the stomach, lung, breast and cervix. Medical examinations included urine test, blood cell count, electrocardiography, laboratory tests for serum transaminases, serum glucose, and fecal occult blood, X-ray or endoscopy of the stomach, chest X-ray, mammography, and cervical cytology. Results of the study showed that those who attended the town sponsored secondary prevention action were more likely to utilize local medical facilities, and those who did not participate were likely to visit facilities outside the town. Medical facilities, both local and outside the town, had a larger proportion of examinations corresponding to health examinations or stomach cancer screening than the town office, however, the town office had a larger proportion of lung or cervical cancer screening. The health examination and stomach cancer screening in the town office, and in the medical facilities appeared to be redundant while lung and cervical cancer screening were complemented tests at medical facilities. When these examinations are targeted as modifying factors in the natural history of diseases, consideration should be given to both the records of secondary prevention actions as well as medical records of other medical facilities that may be utilized. PMID:8111083

Ozasa, K; Higashi, A; Watanabe, Y; Shimouchi, A; Liang, H; Hayashi, K; Aoike, A; Kawai, K

1993-12-01

97

Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. Methods All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75 % in 2005, 71 % in 2007, and 94 % in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form) for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support) model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. Results One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Conclusion Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors. PMID:22551645

2012-01-01

98

A spatial national health facility database for public health sector planning in Kenya in 2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Efforts to tackle the enormous burden of ill-health in low-income countries are hampered by weak health information infrastructures that do not support appropriate planning and resource allocation. For health information systems to function well, a reliable inventory of health service providers is critical. The spatial referencing of service providers to allow their representation in a geographic information system is

Abdisalan M Noor; Victor A Alegana; Peter W Gething; Robert W Snow

2009-01-01

99

Antenatal Care as a Means of Increasing Birth in the Health Facility and Reducing Maternal Mortality: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Although there is a general agreement on the importance of antenatal care to improve the maternal and perinatal health, little is known about its importance to improve health facility delivery in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the association of antenatal care with birth in health facility. Methods A systematic review with meta-analysis of Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios was conducted by including seventeen small scale studies that compared antenatal care and health facility delivery between 2003 and 2013. Additionally, national survey data of African countries which included antenatal care, health facility delivery and maternal mortality in their report were included. Data were accessed via a computer based search from MEDLINE, African Journals Online, HINARI and Google Scholar databases. Results The regression analysis of antenatal care with health facility delivery revealed a positive correlation. The pooled analysis also demonstrated that woman attending antenatal care had more than 7 times increased chance of delivering in a health facility. The comparative descriptive analysis, however, demonstrated a big gap between the proportion of antenatal care and health facility delivery by the same individuals (27%95% vs 4%45%). Antenatal care and health facility delivery had negative correlation with maternal mortality. Conclusion The present regression and meta-analysis has identified the relative advantage of having antenatal care to give birth in health facilities. However, the majority of women who had antenatal care did not show up to a health facility for delivery. Therefore, future research needs to give emphasis to identifying barriers to health facility delivery despite having antenatal care follow up. PMID:25489186

Berhan, Yifru; Berhan, Asres

2014-01-01

100

Evaluation of literacy level of patient education pages in health-related journals.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reading level of patient education material from selected current health care journals. Ten patient education pages from a variety of health care journals were entered into a Microsoft Word program. Applying the Flesch-Kincaid readability formula available from Microsoft Word, a reading level for each page was established and compared to recommended standards. Only 2 of 10 patient education pages fell within the recommended reading levels for health-related materials, and 5 of 10 were above the estimated mean U.S. reading level of 8th grade. A 5th to 6th grade level is recommended for patient education materials. This study suggests that although it is known that low health literacy is a widespread problem, it is not always considered when patient-targeted materials are developed. Health care professionals need to become more active in addressing the literacy needs of the intended receiver of written health-related information. PMID:15847246

Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E; Carpenter-Haefele, Kara M

2005-06-01

101

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 5 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 5 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual SECTION: PATIENT RELATED INFECTION CONTROL NUMBER: 2.17 PREVENTION OF CATHETER ASSOCIATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS (CAUTI BUNDLE) PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to implement the recommended Centers

Oliver, Douglas L.

102

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

to Infection Prevention by the unit designee. Mail Code: 3806. 6. Avoid the femoral site when possible. 7. AllUniversity of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual SECTION: PATIENT RELATED INFECTION CONTROL NUMBER: 2.16 CENTRAL LINE BUNDLE COMPLIANCE PURPOSE

Oliver, Douglas L.

103

INVITED EDITORIAL: Health effects of radiation exposure at uranium processing facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial public and scientific interest in the health consequences of exposures to ionising radiation in nuclear installations, in particular at nuclear fuels enrichment and production facilities. In this issue of Journal of Radiological Protection, McGeoghegan and Binks report on the follow-up of a cohort of over 19 000 uranium fuel and uranium hexafluoride production workers employed at the

Elisabeth Cardis; David Richardson

2000-01-01

104

Hospital/Health Facilities and the Hill-Burton Obligations: A Secret from the Black Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uncompensated/free care and community service obligations under the Hill-Burton Act can assist substantially in providing needed health care services to the Black community. Blacks, however, must become knowledgeable about these obligations, develop monitoring projects, and be prepared to take legal steps to bring Hill-Burton facilities into

Rice, Mitchell F.

1986-01-01

105

Lessons Learned from the On-Site Distillation of Used Solvents Generated by Health Care Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the sources of contaminants found in used solvents generated by the histopathological laboratories at health care facilities and the technical problems, corrective measures, and economic analysis associated with the on-site recycling and reusing of these solvents. An appendix contains an economic analysis for a used-solvent recycling

Huang, Ching-San; Ciesla, John

1992-01-01

106

The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics), which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In

Ayano Kunimitsu

2009-01-01

107

Seismic Resilience of a Health care facility Gian Paolo CIMELLARO1  

E-print Network

Seismic Resilience of a Health care facility Gian Paolo CIMELLARO1 , Andrei REINHORN2 and Michel BRUNEAU3 ABSTRACT This paper explains the fundamental concepts of resilience proposing a unified resilience. The evaluation is based on a non-dimensional analytical function based on loss recovery within

Bruneau, Michel

108

Quality of post-abortion care in public health facilities in Ethiopia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Comprehensive quality Post Abortion Care (PAC) is one of the important strategies to save lives where access to safe abortion is restricted by Law and services are inaccessible. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the status of quality of PAC in health facilities of Amhara and Oromiya regional states. Methods: The study was cross-sectional by design

Solomon Kumbi; Yilma Melkamu; Hailu Yeneneh

109

Adoption factors associated with electronic health record among long-term care facilities: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act created incentives for adopting electronic health records (EHRs) for some healthcare organisations, but long-term care (LTC) facilities are excluded from those incentives. There are realisable benefits of EHR adoption in LTC facilities; however, there is limited research about this topic. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to identify EHR adoption factors for LTC facilities that are ineligible for the HITECH Act incentives. Setting We conducted systematic searches of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete via Ebson B. Stephens Company (EBSCO Host), Google Scholar and the university library search engine to collect data about EHR adoption factors in LTC facilities since 2009. Participants Search results were filtered by date range, full text, English language and academic journals (n=22). Interventions Multiple members of the research team read each article to confirm applicability and study conclusions. Primary and secondary outcome measures Researchers identified common themes across the literature: specifically facilitators and barriers to adoption of the EHR in LTC. Results Results identify facilitators and barriers associated with EHR adoption in LTC facilities. The most common facilitators include access to information and error reduction. The most prevalent barriers include initial costs, user perceptions and implementation problems. Conclusions Similarities span the system selection phases and implementation process; of those, cost was the most common mentioned. These commonalities should help leaders in LTC facilities align strategic decisions to EHR adoption. This review may be useful for decision-makers attempting successful EHR adoption, policymakers trying to increase adoption rates without expanding incentives and vendors that produce EHRs. PMID:25631311

Kruse, Clemens Scott; Mileski, Michael; Alaytsev, Vyachelslav; Carol, Elizabeth; Williams, Ariana

2015-01-01

110

Effects of health and safety problem recognition on small business facility investment  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study involved a survey of the facility investment experiences, which was designed to recognize the importance of health and safety problems, and industrial accident prevention. Ultimately, we hope that small scale industries will create effective industrial accident prevention programs and facility investments. Methods An individual survey of businesses present physical conditions, recognition of the importance of the health and safety problems, and facility investment experiences for preventing industrial accidents was conducted. The survey involved 1,145 business operators or management workers in small business places with fewer than 50 workers in six industrial complexes. Results Regarding the importance of occupational health and safety problems (OHS), 54.1% said it was very important. Received technical and financial support, and industrial accidents that occurred during the past three years were recognized as highly important for OHS. In an investigation regarding facility investment experiences for industrial accident prevention, the largest factors were business size, greater numbers of industrial accidents, greater technical and financial support received, and greater recognition of the importance of the OHS. The related variables that decided facility investment for industry accident prevention in a logistic regression analysis were the experiences of business facilities where industrial accidents occurred during the past three years, received technical and financial support, and recognition of the OHS. Those considered very important were shown to be highly significant. Conclusions Recognition of health and safety issues was higher when small businesses had experienced industrial accidents or received financial support. The investment in industrial accidents was greater when health and safety issues were recognized as important. Therefore, the goal of small business health and safety projects is to prioritize health and safety issues in terms of business management and recognition of importance. Therefore, currently various support projects are being conducted. However, there are issues regarding the limitations of the target businesses and inadequacies in maintenance and follow-up. Overall, it is necessary to provide various incentives for onsite participation that can lead to increased recognition of health and safety issues and practical investments, while perfecting maintenance and follow up measures by thoroughly revising existing operating systems. PMID:24472180

2013-01-01

111

Health Facilities Safety in Natural Disasters: Experiences and Challenges from South East Europe  

PubMed Central

The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations. PMID:22754465

Radovic, Vesela; Vitale, Ksenija; Tchounwou, Paul B.

2012-01-01

112

Treatment of uncomplicated malaria at public health facilities and medicine retailers in south-eastern Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background At primary care facilities in Nigeria, national treatment guidelines state that malaria should be symptomatically diagnosed and treated with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Evidence from households and health care providers indicates that many patients do not receive the recommended treatment. This study sought to determine the extent of the problem by collecting data as patients and caregivers leave health facilities, and determine what influences the treatment received. Methods A cross-sectional cluster survey of 2,039 respondents exiting public health centres, pharmacies and patent medicine dealers was undertaken in urban and rural settings in Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria. Results Although 79% of febrile patients received an anti-malarial, only 23% received an ACT. Many patients (38%) received sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). A further 13% of patients received an artemisinin-derivative as a monotherapy. An estimated 66% of ACT dispensed was in the correct dose. The odds of a patient receiving an ACT was highly associated with consumer demand (OR: 55.5, p < 0.001). Conclusion Few febrile patients attending public health facilities, pharmacies and patent medicine dealers received an ACT, and the use of artemisinin-monotherapy and less effective anti-malarials is concerning. The results emphasize the importance of addressing both demand and supply-side influences on malaria treatment and the need for interventions that target consumer preferences as well as seek to improve health service provision. PMID:21651787

2011-01-01

113

Health facilities safety in natural disasters: experiences and challenges from South East Europe.  

PubMed

The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations. PMID:22754465

Radovic, Vesela; Vitale, Ksenija; Tchounwou, Paul B

2012-05-01

114

Behind bars: the compelling case for academic health centers partnering with correctional facilities.  

PubMed

Academic health centers (AHCs), particularly those that are publicly funded institutions, have as their mission the treatment of disadvantaged populations, the training of the next generation of clinicians, and the development and dissemination of new knowledge to reduce the burden of disease and improve the health of individuals and populations. Incarcerated populations have the most prevalent and acute disease burden and health disparities in the United States, even in comparison with inner-city populations. Yet, only a small proportion of AHCs have reached out to incarcerated populations to fulfill their mission. Those AHCs that have partnered with correctional facilities have overcome concerns about the value and popularity of "training behind bars"; the cost, liability, and pragmatics of caring for a medically complicated population; and the viability of correctional health research and extramural research funding. They have done so to great benefit to patients, students, and faculty. Partnering with correctional facilities to provide health care offers opportunities for AHCs to fulfill their core missions of clinical service, education, and research, while also enhancing their financial stability, to the benefit of all. In this Commentary, the authors discuss, based on their experiences, these concerns, how existing partnerships have overcome them, and the benefits of such relationships to both AHCs and correctional facilities. PMID:25054416

Trestman, Robert L; Ferguson, Warren; Dickert, Jeff

2015-01-01

115

Evaluation of a successful vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus prevention intervention in a community of health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In April 1997, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) emerged in several health care facilities in the Siouxland region and a VRE Task Force was formed. From 1997 through 1999, an evaluation of VRE prevalence at 30 facilities was performed. Methods: In 1999, we conducted a survey and focus groups of health care workers to address initial reactions to VRE, feasibility of

Annette H. Sohn; Belinda E. Ostrowsky; Ronda L. Sinkowitz-Cochran; Stephen B. Quirk; William R. Jarvis

2001-01-01

116

A One-Page Guide to the Health Insurance Marketplace  

MedlinePLUS

... you qualify, coverage can begin immediately. Qualifying coverage, fees and exemptions Youre considered covered if you ... people must have health coverage or pay a fee. If you dont have coverage in 2015, ...

117

Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

Not Available

1993-08-01

118

Measuring health workers motivation in rural health facilities: baseline results from three study districts in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Health worker motivation can potentially affect the provision of health services. Low morale among the workforce can undermine the quality of service provision and drive workers away from the profession. While the presence of high-quality, motivated staff is a key aspect of health system performance, it is also one of the most difficult factors to measure. Methods We assessed health worker motivation as part of the baseline assessment for a health system strengthening intervention in three rural districts in Zambia. The intervention (Better Health Outcomes Through Mentoring and Assessment (BHOMA)) aims to increase health worker motivation through training, mentoring and support. We assessed motivation by examining underlying issues grouped around relevant outcome constructs such as job satisfaction, general motivation, burnout, organization commitment, conscientiousness and timeliness that collectively measure overall levels of motivation. The tools and the concepts have been used in high-income countries and they were recently applied in African settings to measure health worker motivation. Results Female participants had the highest motivation scores (female: mean 78.5 (SD 7.8) vs male: mean (SD 7.0)). By type of worker, nurses had the highest scores while environmental health technicians had the lowest score (77.4 (SD 7.8 vs 73.2 (SD 9.3)). Health workers who had been in post longer also had higher scores (>7months). Health workers who had received some form of training in the preceding 12months were more likely to have a higher score; this was also true for those older than 40years when compared to those less than 40years of age. The highest score values were noted in conscientiousness and timeliness, with all districts scoring above 80. Conclusions This study evaluated motivation among rural health workers using a simple adapted tool to measure the concept of motivation. Results showed variation in motivation score by sex, type of health worker, training and time in post. Further research is needed to establish why these health worker attributes were associated with motivation and whether health system interventions targeting health workers, such as the current intervention, could influence health worker motivation. PMID:23433226

2013-01-01

119

Historical analysis of the development of health care facilities in Kerala State, India.  

PubMed

Kerala's development experience has been distinguished by the primacy of the social sectors. Traditionally, education and health accounted for the greatest shares of the state government's expenditure. Health sector spending continued to grow even after 1980 when generally the fiscal deficit in the state budget was growing and government was looking for ways to control expenditure. But growth in the number of beds and institutions in the public sector had slowed down by the mid-1980s. From 1986-1996, growth in the private sector surpassed that in the public sector by a wide margin. Public sector spending reveals that in recent years, expansion has been limited to revenue expenditure rather than capital, and salaries at the cost of supplies. Many developments outside health, such as growing literacy, increasing household incomes and population ageing (leading to increased numbers of people with chronic afflictions), probably fueled the demand for health care already created by the increased access to health facilities. Since the government institutions could not grow in number and quality at a rate that would have satisfied this demand, health sector development in Kerala after the mid-1980s has been dominated by the private sector. Expansion in private facilities in health has been closely linked to developments in the government health sector. Public institutions play by far the dominant role in training personnel. They have also sensitized people to the need for timely health interventions and thus helped to create demand. At this point in time, the government must take the lead in quality maintenance and setting of standards. Current legislation, which has brought government health institutions under local government control, can perhaps facilitate this change by helping to improve standards in public institutions. PMID:10731241

Kutty, V R

2000-03-01

120

Reasons rural Laotians choose home deliveries over delivery at health facilities: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal mortality among poor rural women in the Lao Peoples Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is among the highest in Southeast Asia, in part because only 15% give birth at health facilities. This study explored why women and their families prefer home deliveries to deliveries at health facilities. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from December 2008 to February 2009 in two provinces of Lao PDR. Data was collected through eight focus group discussions (FGD) as well as through in-depth interviews with 12 mothers who delivered at home during the last year, eight husbands and eight grandmothers, involving a total of 71 respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze the FGD and interview transcripts. Results Obstacles to giving birth at health facilities included: (1) Distance to the health facilities and difficulties and costs of getting there; (2) Attitudes, quality of care, and care practices at the health facilities, including a horizontal birth position, episiotomies, lack of privacy, and the presence of male staff; (3) The wish to have family members nearby and the need for women to be close to their other children and the housework; and (4) The wish to follow traditional birth practices such as giving birth in a squatting position and lying on a hot bed after delivery. The decision about where to give birth was commonly made by the womans husband, mother, mother-in-law or other relatives in consultation with the woman herself. Conclusion This study suggests that the preference in rural Laos for giving birth at home is due to convenience, cost, comfort and tradition. In order to assure safer births and reduce rural Lao PDRs high maternal mortality rate, health centers could consider accommodating the wishes and traditional practices of many rural Laotians: allowing family in the birthing rooms; allowing traditional practices; and improving attitudes among staff. Traditional birth attendants, women, and their families could be taught and encouraged to recognize the signs of at-risk pregnancies so as to be able to reach health facilities on time. PMID:22925107

2012-01-01

121

The WHO Green Page Assessment of the Environmental Health Risks in Children  

PubMed Central

Background: The objective of this study was to assess the possibility of implementation of the WHO Green Page as a tool to supplement basic medical interviews with environmental health risk factors for children. Methods: The WHO Green Page questionnaire was tested on parents of children who visited family practice doctors. Results: A total of 159 parents took part in the study. It was noted that 24.3% of caregivers expressed concern about their childrens environment without naming the risk factors. It was also found that 23.7% of the parents demonstrated knowledge and awareness of existing real environmental risks, and 7.0% of them stated that their children had sustained injuries in connection with road traffic prior to the questionnaire study. Conclusions: The WHO Green Page will provide additional information to the basic medical interview and, if regularly updated, will allow for monitoring of changing environmental conditions of children.

Kurpas, Donata; Church, Joseph; Mroczek, Bo?ena; Hans-Wytrychowska, Anna; Rudkowski, Zbigniew

2013-01-01

122

Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient facilities that provide health services to the  

E-print Network

Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient). A Nurse Managed Health Center can be independently operated, be based in a public school, or University-owned. The NMHCs also serve as research oriented clinical practice sites for undergraduate and graduate nursing

Firestone, Jeremy

123

Collaboration with behavioral health care facilities to implement systemwide tobacco control policies - california, 2012.  

PubMed

The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) administered 4 regional trainings in 2012 to staffers at CTCP-funded projects, tobacco control coalitions, several county departments of mental health and alcohol and drug, and administrators and providers from behavioral health care facilities. These trainings focused on the special tobacco use cessation needs and opportunities for cessation among persons with mental illness or substance abuse disorders, and they provided information about cessation and smoke-free policies. CTCP surveyed county and private behavioral health care programs to assess their readiness for adopting tobacco control strategies at treatment facilities. Between baseline and follow-up we found a decrease in the proportion of organizations at the precontemplation or contemplation stages of change and twice as many organizations at the action and maintenance stages of change. Significant obstacles remain to implementing policy: many agencies have concerns about going tobacco-free. But significant progress has been made, as evidenced by new policies and a growing number of tobacco-free coalitions consisting of public health agencies, behavioral health care agencies, and local hospitals. PMID:25654218

Gordon, Lauren; Modayil, Mary V; Pavlik, Jim; Morris, Chad D

2015-01-01

124

Collaboration With Behavioral Health Care Facilities to Implement Systemwide Tobacco Control Policies California, 2012  

PubMed Central

The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) administered 4 regional trainings in 2012 to staffers at CTCP-funded projects, tobacco control coalitions, several county departments of mental health and alcohol and drug, and administrators and providers from behavioral health care facilities. These trainings focused on the special tobacco use cessation needs and opportunities for cessation among persons with mental illness or substance abuse disorders, and they provided information about cessation and smoke-free policies. CTCP surveyed county and private behavioral health care programs to assess their readiness for adopting tobacco control strategies at treatment facilities. Between baseline and follow-up we found a decrease in the proportion of organizations at the precontemplation or contemplation stages of change and twice as many organizations at the action and maintenance stages of change. Significant obstacles remain to implementing policy: many agencies have concerns about going tobacco-free. But significant progress has been made, as evidenced by new policies and a growing number of tobacco-free coalitions consisting of public health agencies, behavioral health care agencies, and local hospitals. PMID:25654218

Gordon, Lauren; Modayil, Mary V.; Pavlik, Jim

2015-01-01

125

Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

Santy, Patricia A.

1987-01-01

126

Appraisal of Supervisor's Attitude and Managerial Performance in Health Care Facilities-Mashhad-2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is an applied, cross-sectional descriptive research which includes all supervisors and Staffs in Mashhad health care facilities. It was used of 2 different questionnaires. Data was gathered and then had been coded and analyzed with SPSS software and t-test. In practice, the maximum notice of administrations was to organization and the minimum one referred to assessment. Between administration attitudes and their performance about planning and assessment was a significant direction positive but there was a significant difference about organization between these groups. The length of services of employee's was the only factor that was effective about the administration performance. The finding depicted that supervisor's performance evaluation as one of the most effective recognition and control methods and has an important role and is effective in promoting productivity of services in health care facilities.

Vafaee, A.; Majdi, M.; Kabazkhoob, M.

127

Oral Health Status Among Women Inmates at Rikers Island Correctional Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the oral health status [Decayed (D), Missing (M), and Filled (F) teeth (DMFI)J and dental experience of women detained by the New York City (N.Y.C.) Department of Corrections at Riker's Island Correctional Facility. The population (183) was 27.6 5.8 years old and primarily black. The mean DMFT was 9.9, the percent D\\/DFT was 34.3, and percent

Victor Badner; Robert Margolin

1994-01-01

128

Oral Health Status Among Women Inmates at Rikers Island Correctional Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the oral health status [Decayed (D), Missing (M), and Filled (F) teeth (DMFT)] and dental experience of women detained by the New York City (N.Y.C.) Department of Correc tions at Riker's Island Correctional Facility. The population (183) was 27.6 5.8 years old and primarily black. The mean DMFT was 9.9, the percent D\\/DFT was 34.3, and

Victor Badner; Robert Margolin

1994-01-01

129

Mental Health of North Korean Refugees in Protective Facilities in China  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aims to provide alternative care plans for mental health of North Korean refugees who are in protective facilities in China. Methods Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was utilized to measure the presence/absence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 65 North Korean refugees. Results The gender differences in PAI t-scores showed that women exhibited meaningfully higher scores largely in anxiety (m=61.85), depression (m=65.23), and schizophrenia (m=60.98). In different age groups, schizophrenia in the 30 age bracket (m=65.23) was meaningfully higher than the teens (m=48.11). Aggression among the treatment features was the highest in the 20 age group (m=59.19) showing higher t-scores than the teens (m=39.67). Duration in the facility affected mental health in that the 3-5 years group (m=63.91) reported the highest in paranoia. Groups of under 1 year and less than 1-3 years showed meaningfully higher scores in nonsupport. The PTSD (including partial PTSD) rate of the group recorded 9.2%. Correlation between the PTSD and PAI scores showed that the full-PTSD group demonstrated higher average scores in negative impression, somatic complaints, anxiety, anxiety-related disorder, depression, paranoia, schizophrenia, antisocial features, suicide ideation, and treatment rejection than the non-PTSD group. Conclusion Mental health of North Korean refugees in China was worse in women, the thirties, and less than 3-5 years in the facility, and it deteriorated as the duration prolonged. To promote better psychological health of North Korean refugees in China, the attention and aid from the protection facilities and domestic and international interests are required. PMID:20046348

Yu, Shi-Eun

2008-01-01

130

Post abortion care quality status in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Unsafe abortion in the developing world accounts for 13% of all maternal deaths. Ethiopia is one of the developing countries with the highest maternal mortality ratio (673 per 100,000 live births) in the world. Unsafe abortion was estimated to account for 32% of all maternal deaths in Ethiopia. Objective To assess post abortion care quality status in health facilities of Guraghe zone. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study design with both quantitative and qualitative methods was conducted. Patient interview, direct service observation, provider self administered questionnaire and inventory of equipment and supplies were used for the assessment. Six health centers, two hospitals and 422 post-abortion patients were included in the study. Results Patient-provider interaction was generally satisfactory from the patients perspective. The majority of the respondents (93.5%) said that they were treated with politeness and respect. More than half 226(56.5%) of the clients have received post abortion family planning. Overall, 83.5% of the patients were satisfied with the services. Those who said waiting time was long were less satisfied and unemployed women were more satisfied than others. Conclusion The study has revealed several improvements as well as problems in the provision of post-abortion care service in the studied health facilities. PMID:23875945

2013-01-01

131

Regional health care planning: a methodology to cluster facilities using community utilization patterns  

PubMed Central

Background Community-based health care planning and regulation necessitates grouping facilities and areal units into regions of similar health care use. Limited research has explored the methodologies used in creating these regions. We offer a new methodology that clusters facilities based on similarities in patient utilization patterns and geographic location. Our case study focused on Hospital Groups in Michigan, the allocation units used for predicting future inpatient hospital bed demand in the states Bed Need Methodology. The scientific, practical, and political concerns that were considered throughout the formulation and development of the methodology are detailed. Methods The clustering methodology employs a 2-step K-means + Wards clustering algorithm to group hospitals. The final number of clusters is selected using a heuristic that integrates both a statistical-based measure of cluster fit and characteristics of the resulting Hospital Groups. Results Using recent hospital utilization data, the clustering methodology identified 33 Hospital Groups in Michigan. Conclusions Despite being developed within the politically charged climate of Certificate of Need regulation, we have provided an objective, replicable, and sustainable methodology to create Hospital Groups. Because the methodology is built upon theoretically sound principles of clustering analysis and health care service utilization, it is highly transferable across applications and suitable for grouping facilities or areal units. PMID:23964905

2013-01-01

132

Compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Many publications are available on the topic of compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities all over the world. The approaches of developing and developed countries show wide variation, but the principles of infection prevention and control are the same globally. This study is a systematic review and global perspective of the available literature on infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities. Nine focus areas on compliance with infection-control measures were investigated: knowledge of infectious occupational hazards; personal hygiene and care of hands; correct application of personal protective equipment; use of environmental barriers and disposable items; sterilisation (recirculation) of instruments and handpieces; disinfection (surfaces) and housekeeping; management of waste disposal; quality control of dental unit waterlines, biofilms and water; and some special considerations. Various international studies from developed countries have reported highly scientific evidence-based information. In developed countries, the resources for infection prevention and control are freely available, which is not the case in developing countries. The studies in developing countries also indicate serious shortcomings with regard to infection prevention and control knowledge and education in oral health-care facilities. This review highlights the fact that availability of resources will always be a challenge, but more so in developing countries. This presents unique challenges and the opportunity for innovative thinking to promote infection prevention and control. PMID:25244364

Oosthuysen, Jeann; Potgieter, Elsa; Fossey, Annabel

2014-12-01

133

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE CHOICE OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDING FACILITY AMONG WORKERS IN A LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECRETARIAT IN SOUTH WESTERN NIGERIA  

PubMed Central

Background: There is increasing interest in the choice of health care providing facility in Nigeria. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the factors influencing choice and satisfaction with health service providers among local government staff. Methods: A cross sectional survey of all 312 workers in a Local Government Secretariat in South West Nigeria was done. Chi Square and logistic regression analysis was done. Results: The mean age was 38.6 7.5 years, 55% were females and 71.7% had tertiary education. The median monthly family income of the respondents was N 28, 000 (N3,000 N500,000), with 24.4% earning a monthly income of N21, 000 to N30, 000. Many (72.3%) utilized public health facilities attributing the choice to the low cost of services. Respondents who are satisfied with their usual care providing facilities are 12.2 times more likely to have used public facilities than private facilities (95%, CI 3.431 43.114). Respondents who described the quality with ease of getting care/short waiting times as being good are 3.9 times more likely to have private facilities as their chosen health care providing facility (95%, CI 1.755 8.742). Cost/payment for service is 2.9 times more likely to predict the use of public health facility as the usual health care provider. Conclusion: Private facilities though costlier do not appear to be providing better services than public facilities. To increase access to health care the cost of services and the waiting time are important factors to address. PMID:25161426

Uchendu, O.C.; Ilesanmi, O.S.; Olumide, A.E.

2013-01-01

134

H1N1 pandemic planning in a mental health residential facility.  

PubMed

It is only in the past few years that the mental health impact of disasters has gained attention in research and planning. This article provides a perspective of the experience of the H1N1 outbreak in New Zealand and the response by nurses in a community mental health residential facility. The key lessons learned were: planning and managing for infectious diseases should be part of disaster planning, know your clients and your community, share your knowledge, support the mental health of individuals throughout, and expect reactions as part of recovery. More research and publications are needed in this area for nurses to fully support consumers through pandemics in a more integrated manner. PMID:20210266

Hughes, Frances A

2010-03-01

135

Assessment of community mobilization and home-based HIV counselling and testing offered by health facilities in rural Uganda.  

PubMed

Home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) and community mobilization have been proven to be effective in increasing the number of people linked to HIV care and treatment. An assessment was conducted in 18 health facilities in Uganda to evaluate the availability and extent of home based testing services and community mobilization activities in underserved communities. The performance of the health facilities was assessed using a checklist with indicators of HBHCT and community mobilization. While most of the health facilities (72.2%) had active community mobilization, only 12.2% had HBHCT services and this might have affected universal access to HIV prevention, care and treatment. The health facilities did not accompany their intensive community mobilization activities with HBHCT yet this provided the ideal entry point and opportunity to improve linkage to HIV treatment and care. PMID:24689329

Shumba, Constance S; Atuhaire, Lydia; Memiah, Peter; Atukunda, Ruth

2013-12-01

136

Health Plan Changes / Go for the Gold Wellness Credit, July 2010 page 1 Go for the Gold Wellness Credit and the Vanderbilt Health Plan Account  

E-print Network

Health Plan Changes / Go for the Gold Wellness Credit, July 2010 page 1 Go for the Gold Wellness is paid 1. Why did Vanderbilt change how the Go for the Gold Wellness Credit is paid? Vanderbilt pays offset your health care costs. The original intent for Go for the Gold was to raise awareness

Bordenstein, Seth

137

Vaccination policies for health-care workers in acute health-care facilities in Europe.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate existing policies regarding recommended and mandatory occupational vaccinations for health-care workers (HCWs) in Europe. A standardized questionnaire was sent to experts in Infection Control or Occupational Health in all 27 European Union Member States, as well as Norway, Russia, and Switzerland. All 30 countries have established policies about HCW vaccination against vaccine-preventable diseases. However significant gaps and considerable country-to-country variation were found, in terms of number of recommended vaccines and target subgroups of HCWs and health-care settings. Vaccination against hepatitis B and annual vaccination against seasonal influenza are almost universally recommended for HCWs in Europe (29 countries each, including eight countries where vaccination against hepatitis B is mandatory or required for employment). Policies regarding HCW vaccination also exist against mumps (12 countries), measles or rubella (15 countries), varicella (17 countries), diphtheria-tetanus (14 countries), pertussis (9 countries), poliomyelitis (11 countries), hepatitis A (11 countries), tuberculosis (BCG vaccine) (9 countries), and against meningococcus group C or meningococci groups A, C, W135, Y (tetravalent vaccine) (in 4 countries each). Re-evaluation of occupational vaccine policies for HCWs in Europe on a consensus basis is imperative in order to promote HCW and patient safety. PMID:21964058

Maltezou, Helena C; Wicker, Sabine; Borg, Michael; Heininger, Ulrich; Puro, Vincenzo; Theodoridou, Maria; Poland, Gregory A

2011-11-28

138

Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.  

PubMed

Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances. PMID:25599637

Murad, Abdulkader A

2014-01-01

139

Health Risks Assessment in Children for Phthalate Exposure Associated with Childcare Facilities and Indoor Playgrounds  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study assessed the health risks for children exposed to phthalate through several pathways including house dust, surface wipes and hand wipes in child facilities and indoor playgrounds. Methods The indoor samples were collected from various children's facilities (40 playrooms, 42 daycare centers, 44 kindergartens, and 42 indoor-playgrounds) in both summer (Jul-Sep, 2007) and winter (Jan-Feb, 2008). Hazard index (HI) was estimated for the non-carcinogens and the examined phthalates were diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), and butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP). The present study examined these four kinds of samples, i.e., indoor dust, surface wipes of product and hand wipes. Results Among the phthalates, the detection rates of DEHP were 98% in dust samples, 100% in surface wipe samples, and 95% in hand wipe samples. In this study, phthalate levels obtained from floor dust, product surface and children's hand wipe samples were similar to or slightly less compared to previous studies. The 50th and 95th percentile value of child-sensitive materials did not exceed 1 (HI) for all subjects in all facilities. Conclusions For DEHP, DnBP and BBzP their detection rates through multi-routes were high and their risk based on health risk assessment was also observed to be acceptable. This study suggested that ingestion and dermal exposure could be the most important pathway of phthalates besides digestion through food. PMID:22125769

Kim, Ho-Hyun; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Sun-Duk; Yang, Su-Hee; Lee, Chung-Soo; Shin, Dong-Chun

2011-01-01

140

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

141

Newborn care practices at home and in health facilities in 4 regions of Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Ethiopia is one of the ten countries with the highest number of neonatal deaths globally, and only 1 in 10 women deliver with a skilled attendant. Promotion of essential newborn care practices is one strategy for improving newborn health outcomes that can be delivered in communities as well as facilities. This article describes newborn care practices reported by recently-delivered women (RDWs) in four regions of Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a household survey with two-stage cluster sampling to assess newborn care practices among women who delivered a live baby in the period 1 to 7months prior to data collection. Results The majority of women made one antenatal care (ANC) visit to a health facility, although less than half made four or more visits and women were most likely to deliver their babies at home. About one-fifth of RDWs in this survey had contact with Health Extension Workers (HEWS) during ANC, but nurse/midwives were the most common providers, and few women had postnatal contact with any health provider. Common beneficial newborn care practices included exclusive breastfeeding (87.6%), wrapping the baby before delivery of the placenta (82.3%), and dry cord care (65.2%). Practices contrary to WHO recommendations that were reported in this population of recent mothers include bathing during the first 24hours of life (74.7%), application of butter and other substances to the cord (19.9%), and discarding of colostrum milk (44.5%). The results suggest that there are not large differences for most essential newborn care indicators between facility and home deliveries, with the exception of delayed bathing and skin-to-skin care. Conclusions Improving newborn care and newborn health outcomes in Ethiopia will likely require a multifaceted approach. Given low facility delivery rates, community-based promotion of preventive newborn care practices, which has been effective in other settings, is an important strategy. For this strategy to be successful, the coverage of counseling delivered by HEWs and other community volunteers should be increased. PMID:24289501

2013-01-01

142

Factors determining intention to quit tobacco: exploring patient responses visiting public health facilities in India  

PubMed Central

Introduction Intention to quit and setting a quit date are key steps in the process towards improving quit rates and are thus an integral part of tobacco cessation efforts. The present study examined various motivating factors of intention to quit and setting a quit date in patients visiting public health facilities in two states of India. Methods A total of 1569 tobacco-users visiting public health facilities in 12 districts of the states of Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat were assessed through an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was performed to assess the effect of socio-demographic characteristics, nicotine dependence, previous quit attempts and motivational factors on intention to quit within 30 days and setting a quit date. Results Only 12% of patients intended to quit tobacco within 30 days and about 11% of them were ready to set a quit date. Respondents aged above 25 years were 53% less likely to quit tobacco within 30 days when compared to those below 25 years (95% Confidence Intervals [CI]: 0.22 to 0.99). Smokeless tobacco users were associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.05 (95% CI: 1.15 to 3.65) for setting a quit date when compared to smokers. Those with 1 to 5 previous quit attempts (in the past twelve months) were associated with an OR of 2.2 (95% CI: 1.38 to 3.51) for intention to quit and 2.46 (95% CI: 1.52 to 3.96) for setting a quit date. Concern for personal health and setting an example for children were associated with ORs of 3.42 (95% CI: 1.35 to 8.65) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.03 to 6.03) respectively for setting a quit date. Conclusions This study is amongst the first in India to explore factors associated with the intention to quit and setting a quit date among patients visiting public health facilities. Our findings suggest that socio-economic and individual-level factors are important factors depicting intention to quit and setting a quit date. We recommend the need for well-defined studies to understand the long term effects of factors influencing tobacco cessation for patients visiting public health facilities in India. PMID:24444137

2014-01-01

143

Page 1 D. Dilling, T. Brown FIRE FACILITIES AND SITE REQUIREMENTS  

E-print Network

of remote handling systems to remove and transport tokamak parts to hot cell facilities. Major tokamak test cell, hot cells, structures to house key services, and routing of service connections and pellet injection. Facilities must be provided to store and manage the delivery of hydrogen, deuterium

144

Preparedness of Tanzanian health facilities for outpatient primary care of hypertension and diabetes: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Historically, health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa have mainly managed acute, infectious diseases. Few data exist for the preparedness of African health facilities to handle the growing epidemic of chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We assessed the burden of NCDs in health facilities in northwestern Tanzania and investigated the strengths of the health system and areas for improvement with regard to primary care management of selected NCDs. Methods Between November, 2012, and May, 2013, we undertook a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of 24 public and not-for-profit health facilities in urban and rural Tanzania (four hospitals, eight health centres, and 12 dispensaries). We did structured interviews of facility managers, inspected resources, and administered self-completed questionnaires to 335 health-care workers. We focused on hypertension, diabetes, and HIV (for comparison). Our key study outcomes related to service provision, availability of guidelines and supplies, management and training systems, and preparedness of human resources. Findings Of adult outpatient visits to hospitals, 58% were for chronic diseases compared with 20% at health centres, and 13% at dispensaries. In many facilities, guidelines, diagnostic equipment, and first-line drug therapy for the primary care of NCDs were inadequate, and management, training, and reporting systems were weak. Services for HIV accounted for most chronic disease visits and seemed stronger than did services for NCDs. Ten (42%) facilities had guidelines for HIV whereas three (13%) facilities did for NCDs. 261 (78%) health workers showed fair knowledge of HIV, whereas 198 (59%) did for hypertension and 187 (56%) did for diabetes. Generally, health systems were weaker in lower-level facilities. Front-line health-care workers (such as non-medical-doctor clinicians and nurses) did not have knowledge and experience of NCDs. For example, only 74 (49%) of 150 nurses had at least fair knowledge of diabetes care compared with 85 (57%) of 150 for hyptertension and 119 (79%) of 150 for HIV, and only 31 (21%) of 150 had seen more than five patients with diabetes in the past 3 months compared with 50 (33%) of 150 for hypertension and 111 (74%) of 150 for HIV. Interpretation Most outpatient services for NCDs in Tanzania are provided at hospitals, despite present policies stating that health centres and dispensaries should provide such services. We identified crucial weaknesses (and strengths) in health systems that should be considered to improve primary care for NCDs in Africa and identified ways that HIV programmes could serve as a model and structural platform for these improvements. Funding UK Medical Research Council. PMID:24818084

Peck, Robert; Mghamba, Janneth; Vanobberghen, Fiona; Kavishe, Bazil; Rugarabamu, Vivian; Smeeth, Liam; Hayes, Richard; Grosskurth, Heiner; Kapiga, Saidi

2014-01-01

145

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

NONE

1998-05-01

146

Electronic health records use and barriers and benefits to use in skilled nursing facilities.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of automation for 21 clinical functions and the benefits and barriers to electronic health records use in skilled nursing facilities in one of the Midwestern states in the US. A cross-sectional design was implemented. Data were collected from nursing home administrators using a mail and online survey approach. A total of 156 usable questionnaires of 397 distributed were returned, for a 39.30% response rate. While many facilities reported fully automated Minimum Data Set assessments, licensed nurse clinical notes, and care plans, there remained a predominant reliance on paper for functions, such as diagnostic tests and consults. Although many facilities had advanced toward using automation to produce quality reports, they were lagging behind in the use of automated clinical decision support and summary reports. The top two barriers included the amount of capital needed and the cost for hardware and infrastructure. Facilities with paper records were more likely to identify those barriers for functions, such as clinical notes and assessments. The top three benefits were quality patient care monitoring, management control of performance, and anywhere/anytime easier access to clinical data. The study concludes with recommendations to nursing home leaders and other stakeholders. PMID:23774447

Filipova, Anna A

2013-07-01

147

Induced Abortion and Associated Factors in Health Facilities of Guraghe Zone, Southern Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR?=?4.28, CI: (1.2414.71)), age of 3034 years (AOR?=?0.15, CI: (0.040.55)), primary education (AOR?=?0.26, CI: (0.130.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR?=?0.44, CI: (0.140.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

2014-01-01

148

Induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, southern Ethiopia.  

PubMed

Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR = 4.28, CI: (1.24-14.71)), age of 30-34 years (AOR = 0.15, CI: (0.04-0.55)), primary education (AOR = 0.26, CI: (0.13-0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR = 0.44, CI: (0.14-0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

2014-01-01

149

24.01.01.M4 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 4 UNIVERSITY RULE  

E-print Network

24.01.01.M4 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 4 UNIVERSITY RULE 24.01.01.M4 Next scheduled review: April 10, 2017 Rule Statement Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) provides working on or visiting any TAMU or Riverside campus. Official Rule/ Responsibilities/ Process 1

150

24.01.01.Q0.03 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE  

E-print Network

) · Chemical and Lab Safety ­ Laboratory Safety Sub-Committee (LSSC) · Fieldwork/Field Trip ­ Fieldwork Safety24.01.01.Q0.03 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 24.01.01.Q0.03 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Approved July 18, 2012 Next scheduled

151

Why give birth in health facility? Users and providers accounts of poor quality of birth care in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background In Tanzania, half of all pregnant women access a health facility for delivery. The proportion receiving skilled care at birth is even lower. In order to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, the government has set out to increase health facility deliveries by skilled care. The aim of this study was to describe the weaknesses in the provision of acceptable and adequate quality care through the accounts of women who have suffered obstetric fistula, nurse-midwives at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities and local community members. Methods Semi-structured interviews involving 16 women affected by obstetric fistula and five nurse-midwives at maternity wards at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities, and Focus Group Discussions with husbands and community members were conducted between October 2008 and February 2010 at Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania and Temeke hospitals in Dar es Salaam, and Mpwapwa district in Dodoma region. Results Health care users and health providers experienced poor quality caring and working environments in the health facilities. Women in labour lacked support, experienced neglect, as well as physical and verbal abuse. Nurse-midwives lacked supportive supervision, supplies and also seemed to lack motivation. Conclusions There was a consensus among women who have suffered serious birth injuries and nurse midwives staffing both BEmOC and CEmOC maternity wards that the quality of care offered to women in birth was inadequate. While the birth accounts of women pointed to failure of care, the nurses described a situation of disempowerment. The bad birth care experiences of women undermine the reputation of the health care system, lower community expectations of facility birth, and sustain high rates of home deliveries. The only way to increase the rate of skilled attendance at birth in the current Tanzanian context is to make facility birth a safer alternative than home birth. The findings from this study indicate that there is a long way to go. PMID:23663299

2013-01-01

152

Utilisation of Health Services and Geography: Deconstructing Regional Differences in Barriers to Facility-Based Delivery in Nepal.  

PubMed

While established that geographical inaccessibility is a key barrier to the utilisation of health services, it remains unknown whether disparities are driven only by limited access to these services, or are also attributable to health behaviour. Significant disparities exist in health outcomes and the coverage of many critical health services between the mountains region of Nepal and the rest of the country, yet the principal factors driving these regional disparities are not well understood. Using national representative data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey, we examine the extent to which observable factors explain the overall differences in the utilisation of maternal health services. We apply nonlinear Blinder-Oaxaca-type decomposition methods to quantify the effect that differences in measurable characteristics have on the regional coverage gap in facility-based delivery. The mean coverage of facility-based deliveries was 18.6 and 36.3% in the mountains region and the rest of Nepal, respectively. Between 54.8 and 74.1% of the regional coverage gap was explained by differences in observed characteristics. Factors influencing health behaviours (proxied by mothers' education, TV viewership and tobacco use, and household wealth) and subjective distance to the health facility were the major factors, contributing between 52.9 and 62.5% of the disparity. Mothers' birth history was also noteworthy. Policies simultaneously addressing access and health behaviours appear necessary to achieve greater coverage and better health outcomes for women and children in isolated areas. PMID:24927787

Hodge, Andrew; Byrne, Abbey; Morgan, Alison; Jimenez-Soto, Eliana

2014-06-14

153

A guide to treating military personnel in a civilian mental health facility.  

PubMed

As the number of troops returning home from the Middle East continues to rise, so does the need for psychiatric treatment. More and more often, civilian mental health facilities will be faced with treating active duty service members. Because the patients are active duty status, civilian providers need to become familiar with the unique intricacies and challenges of interacting with military command and mental health clinics. Concepts such as confidentiality and consent have a slightly different meaning in the military that affects care in the civilian realm. Diagnoses, medication choices, and treatment planning can also have an impact on a service member's career in the military that civilian providers may not recognize. This guide serves as a "beginner's" manual for working with active duty service members. PMID:25406055

Levitt, Gwen A

2014-11-01

154

Challenges, alternatives, and paths to sustainability: better public health promotion using social networking pages as key tools.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the possibility of promoting public health and implementing educational health services using Facebook. We discuss the challenges and strengths of using such a platform as a tool for public health care systems from two different perspectives, namely, the view of IT developers and that of physicians. We present a new way of evaluating user interactivity in health care systems from tools provided by Facebook that measure statistical traffic in the Internet. Findings show that Facebook is a very promising tool in promoting e-health services in Web 2.0. Results from statistical traffic show that a Facebook page is more efficient than other pages in promoting public health. PMID:25631841

Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kadhem, Z; Larbani, M; Lakulu, M B; Hashim, M

2015-02-01

155

Reproductive rights denied: the Hyde Amendment and access to abortion for Native American women using Indian health service facilities.  

PubMed

Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern. PMID:25122025

Arnold, Shaye Beverly

2014-10-01

156

The Impact of Health Information Technology Adoption by Outpatient Facilities on Pregnancy Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objective Examine whether health information technology (HIT) at nonhospital facilities (NHFs) improves health outcomes and decreases resource use at hospitals within the same heath care network, and whether the impact of HIT varies as providers gain experience using the technologies. Data Sources Administrative claims data on 491,832 births in Pennsylvania during 19982004 from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council and HIT applications data from the Dorenfest Institute. Study Design Fixed-effects regression analysis of the impact of HIT at NHFs on adverse birth outcomes and resource use. Principal Findings Greater use of clinical HIT applications by NHFs is associated with reduced incidence of obstetric trauma and preventable complications, as well as longer lengths of stay. In addition, the beneficial effects of HIT increase the longer that technologies have been in use. However, we find no consistent evidence on whether or how nonclinical HIT in NHFs affects either resource use or health outcomes. Conclusions Clinical HIT applications at NHFs may reduce the likelihood of adverse birth outcomes, particularly after physicians and staff gain experience using the technologies. PMID:22742682

Deily, Mary E; Hu, Tianyan; Terrizzi, Sabrina; Chou, Shin-Yi; Meyerhoefer, Chad D

2013-01-01

157

Quality of newborn care: a health facility assessment in rural Ghana using survey, vignette and surveillance data  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the structural capacity for, and quality of, immediate and essential newborn care (ENC) in health facilities in rural Ghana, and to link this with demand for facility deliveries and admissions. Design Health facility assessment survey and population-based surveillance data. Setting Seven districts in Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana. Participants Heads of maternal/neonatal wards in all 64 facilities performing deliveries. Main outcome measures Indicators include: the availability of essential infrastructure, newborn equipment and drugs, and personnel; vignette scores and adequacy of reasons given for delayed discharge of newborn babies; and prevalence of key immediate ENC practices that facilities should promote. These are matched to the percentage of babies delivered in and admitted to each type of facility. Results 70% of babies were delivered in health facilities; 56% of these and 87% of neonatal admissions were in four referral level hospitals. These had adequate infrastructure, but all lacked staff trained in ENC and some essential equipment (including incubators and bag and masks) and/or drugs. Vignette scores for care of very low-birth-weight babies were generally moderate-to-high, but only three hospitals achieved high overall scores for quality of ENC. We estimate that only 33% of babies were born in facilities capable of providing high quality, basic resuscitation as assessed by a vignette plus the presence of a bag and mask. Promotion of immediate ENC practices in facilities was also inadequate, with coverage of early initiation of breastfeeding and delayed bathing both below 50% for babies born in facilities; this represents a lost opportunity. Conclusions Unless major gaps in ENC equipment, drugs, staff, practices and skills are addressed, strategies to increase facility utilisation will not achieve their potential to save newborn lives. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov NCT00623337. PMID:23667161

Vesel, Linda; Manu, Alexander; Lohela, Terhi J; Gabrysch, Sabine; Okyere, Eunice; ten Asbroek, Augustinus H A; Hill, Zelee; Agyemang, Charlotte Tawiah; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R

2013-01-01

158

How much malaria occurs in urban Luanda, Angola? A health facility-based assessment.  

PubMed

We conducted a health facility-based survey of patients with fever during malaria transmission season to determine the proportion with laboratory-confirmed malaria in Luanda, Angola. We enrolled 864 patients at 30 facilities; each underwent a blood film for malaria and a questionnaire. Only 3.6% had a positive blood film. When stratified by distance of the facility to city center (< 15 km and > or = 15 km), the proportions were 1.5% (9/615) and 8.8% (22/249), respectively (P < 0.0001). Of patients traveling outside Luanda in the preceding 3 months, 6.8% (6/88) had malaria, compared with 3.2% (26/776) not traveling (P = 0.13). Children < 5 years of age were less likely to have malaria (2.4%; 12/510) than children ages 5-14 (8.7%; 9/104) and adults (4.0%; 10/250) (P = 0.03). The prevalence of laboratory-confirmed malaria in febrile patients in Luanda is very low, but increases with distance from the urban center. Prevention and treatment should be focused in surrounding rural areas. PMID:19270303

Thwing, Julie I; Mihigo, Jules; Fernandes, Alexandra Pataca; Saute, Francisco; Ferreira, Carolina; Fortes, Filomeno; de Oliveira, Alexandre Macedo; Newman, Robert D

2009-03-01

159

Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's Sustainable Energy for All initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care facilities. Such evidence about electricity needs and gaps would optimize use of limited resources, which can help to strengthen health systems. PMID:25276537

Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

2013-01-01

160

Coverage and Quality of Antenatal Care Provided at Primary Health Care Facilities in the Punjab Province of Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Background Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In Pakistan antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to Divisions and Districts. By population Punjab is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in Punjab province of Pakistan. Methods Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. Results The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. Conclusion The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in Punjab are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and out of those 1/3 drop out in follow-up visits. PMID:25409502

Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif; Memon, Zahid Ali

2014-01-01

161

Are Health Facility Management Committees in Kenya ready to implement financial management tasks: findings from a nationally representative survey  

PubMed Central

Background Community participation in peripheral public health facilities has in many countries focused on including community representatives in Health Facility Management Committees (HFMCs). In Kenya, HFMC roles are being expanded with the phased implementation of the Health Sector Services Fund (HSSF). Under HSSF, HFMCs manage facility funds which are dispersed directly from central level into facility bank accounts. We assessed how prepared HFMCs were to undertake this new role in advance of HSSF roll out, and considered the implications for Kenya and other similar settings. Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative sample of 248 public health centres and dispensaries in 24 districts in 2010. Data collection included surveys with in-charges (n?=?248), HFMC members (n?=?464) and facility users (n?=?698), and record reviews. These data were supplemented by semi-structured interviews with district health managers in each district. Results Some findings supported preparedness of HFMCs to take on their new roles. Most facilities had bank accounts and HFMCs which met regularly. HFMC members and in-charges generally reported positive relationships, and HFMC members expressed high levels of motivation and job satisfaction. Challenges included users low awareness of HFMCs, lack of training and clarity in roles among HFMCs, and some indications of strained relations with in-charges. Such challenges are likely to be common to many similar settings, and are therefore important considerations for any health facility based initiatives involving HFMCs. Conclusion Most HFMCs have the basic requirements to operate. However to manage their own budgets effectively and meet their allocated roles in HSSF implementation, greater emphasis is needed on financial management training, targeted supportive supervision, and greater community awareness and participation. Once new budget management roles are fully established, qualitative and quantitative research on how HFMCs are adapting to their expanded roles, especially in financial management, would be valuable in informing similar financing mechanisms in Kenya and beyond. PMID:24107094

2013-01-01

162

Delivering at home or in a health facility? health-seeking behaviour of women and the role of traditional birth attendants in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Traditional birth attendants retain an important role in reproductive and maternal health in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Government promotes TBAs in order to provide maternal and neonatal health counselling and initiating timely referral, however, their role officially does not include delivery attendance. Yet, experience illustrates that most TBAs still often handle complicated deliveries. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to describe (1) womens health-seeking behaviour and experiences regarding their use of antenatal (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC); (2) their rationale behind the choice of place and delivery; and to learn (3) about the use of traditional practices and resources applied by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) and how they can be linked to the bio-medical health system. Methods Qualitative and quantitative interviews were conducted with over 270 individuals in Masasi District, Mtwara Region and Ilala Municipality, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Results The results from the urban site show that significant achievements have been made in terms of promoting pregnancy- and delivery-related services through skilled health workers. Pregnant women have a high level of awareness and clearly prefer to deliver at a health facility. The scenario is different in the rural site (Masasi District), where an adequately trained health workforce and well-equipped health facilities are not yet a reality, resulting in home deliveries with the assistance of either a TBA or a relative. Conclusions Instead of focusing on the traditional sector, it is argued that more attention should be paid towards (1) improving access to as well as strengthening the health system to guarantee delivery by skilled health personnel; and (2) bridging the gaps between communities and the formal health sector through community-based counselling and health education, which is provided by well-trained and supervised village health workers who inform villagers about promotive and preventive health services, including maternal and neonatal health. PMID:23448583

2013-01-01

163

Primary Headache Disorders at a Tertiary Health Facility in Lagos, Nigeria: Prevalence and Consultation Patterns  

PubMed Central

Background. Primary headaches are underdiagnosed and undertreated, with a significant impact on social activities and work. Aim. To determine the last-year prevalence and health care utilization pattern of primary headaches at a tertiary centre. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out amongst staff of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. 402 staff members were selected by simple random sampling and administered a detailed structured headache assessment questionnaire. Migraine and tension-type headache were diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Headache Society (2004). Results. The participants comprised 168 males and 234 females. The mean age was 36.9 7.9 years. The overall headache prevalence was 39.3% with female predominance (P < 0.0001). Tension-type headache was the most prevalent at 72.8% and migraine at 18.9%. Unclassifiable headache constituted 8.2%. Migraine headache showed female preponderance (P = 0.000). 80.4% of participants did not seek medical consultation compared with 19.6% who did (P = 0.000). Of the latter, 83.9% consulted the general practitioner (GP), whilst 16.1% consulted the neurologist. Conclusions. Primary headache prevalence is high in our population. It is not recognised as that requiring care by most of the staff of this tertiary health facility; thus education is required to increase health care utilization. PMID:24587991

Okubadejo, Njideka; Ojelabi, Olaitan; Dada, Akinola

2014-01-01

164

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-04-21

165

Assessing the population-level impact of vouchers on access to health facility delivery for women in Kenya.  

PubMed

Although available evidence indicates that vouchers improve service utilization among the target populations, we do not know whether increased utilization results from improved access (new clients who would not have used services without the voucher) or from shifting clients from non-accredited to contracted service providers. This paper examines whether the safe motherhood voucher program in Kenya is associated with improved access to health facility delivery using information on births within two years preceding the survey in voucher and comparison sites. Data were collected in 2010-2011 and in 2012 among 2933 and 3094 women aged 15-49 years reporting 962 and 1494 births within two years before the respective surveys. Analysis entails cross-tabulations and estimation of multilevel random-intercept logit models. The results show that the proportion of births occurring at home declined by more than 10 percentage points while the proportion of births delivered in health facilities increased by a similar margin over time in voucher sites. The increase in facility-based births occurred in both public and private health facilities. There was also a significant increase in the likelihood of facility-based delivery (odds ratios [OR]: 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40-2.98 in the 2006 voucher arm; OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.22-2.43 in the 2010-2011 voucher arm) in voucher sites over time. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the likelihood of facility-based delivery in the comparison arm over time. These findings suggest that the voucher program contributed to improved access to institutional delivery by shifting births from home to health facilities. However, available evidence from qualitative data shows that some women who purchased the vouchers did not use them because of high transportation costs to accredited facilities. The implication is that substantial improvements in service uptake could be achieved if the program subsidized transportation costs as well. PMID:24565156

Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Abuya, Timothy; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

2014-02-01

166

Status of the implementation of the World Health Organization multimodal hand hygiene strategy in United States of America health care facilities  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization (WHO) launched a multimodal strategy and campaign in 2009 to improve hand hygiene practices worldwide. Our objective was to evaluate the implementation of the strategy in United States health care facilities. Methods From July through December 2011, US facilities participating in the WHO global campaign were invited to complete the Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework online, a validated tool based on the WHO multimodal strategy. Results Of 2,238 invited facilities, 168 participated in the survey (7.5%). A detailed analysis of 129, mainly nonteaching public facilities (80.6%), showed that most had an advanced or intermediate level of hand hygiene implementation progress (48.9% and 45.0%, respectively). The total Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework score was 36 points higher for facilities with staffing levels of infection preventionists > 0.75/100 beds than for those with lower ratios (P = .01) and 41 points higher for facilities participating in hand hygiene campaigns (P = .002). Conclusion Despite the low response rate, the survey results are unique and allow interesting reflections. Whereas the level of progress of most participating facilities was encouraging, this may reflect reporting bias, ie, better hospitals more likely to report. However, even in respondents, further improvement can be achieved, in particular by embedding hand hygiene in a stronger institutional safety climate and optimizing staffing levels dedicated to infection prevention. These results should encourage the launch of a coordinated national campaign and higher participation in the WHO global campaign. PMID:24581011

Allegranzi, Benedetta; Conway, Laurie; Larson, Elaine; Pittet, Didier

2014-01-01

167

Observation of the extent of smoking in a mental health inpatient facility with a smoke-free policy  

PubMed Central

Background People with a mental illness experience a higher burden of smoking-related disease. Smoke-free policies in mental health facilities provide an opportunity to reduce smoking-related harms for patients and staff alike. Limited evidence regarding the effect of such policies on preventing smoking in mental health facilities has been reported. The aims of this study are to describe the extent of smoking and the provision of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to patients in a mental health facility with a smoke-free policy. Methods Cross-sectional studies of smoking (cigarette butt count and observed smoking) and nicotine dependence treatment (patient record audit) were undertaken over 9 consecutive weekdays in one mental health facility in Australia. A smoke-free policy incorporating a total smoking ban and guidelines for treating nicotine dependence among patients was implemented in the facility 4years prior to the study. Results Two thousand one hundred and thirty seven cigarette butts were collected and 152 occasions of people smoking were observed. Staff members were observed to enforce the policy on 66% of occasions. Use of NRT was recorded for 53% of patients who were smokers. Conclusion Implementation of the smoke-free policy was less than optimal and as a consequence ineffective in eliminating smoking and in optimising the provision of NRT. Additional strategies to improve the provision of nicotine dependence treatment to patients and the monitoring of adherence are needed to ensure the intended benefits of smoke-free policies are realised. PMID:24679109

2014-01-01

168

Expansion of health facilities in Iraq a decade after the US-led invasion, 20032012  

PubMed Central

Background In the last few decades, Iraqs health care capacity has been severely undermined by the effects of different wars, international sanctions, sectarian violence and political instability. In the aftermath of the 2003 US-led invasion, the Ministry of Health has set plans to expand health service delivery, by reorienting the public sector towards primary health care and attributing a larger role to the private sector for hospital care. Quantitative assessments of the post-2003 health policy outcomes have remained scant. This paper addresses this gap focusing on a key outcome indicator that is the expansion of health facilities. Methods The analysis is based on data on health facilities provided by the World Health Organisation and Iraqs Ministry of Health. For each governorate, we calculated the change in the absolute number of facilities by type from early 2003 to the end of 2012. To account for population growth, we computed the change in the number of facilities per 100,000 population. We compared trends in the autonomous northern Kurdistan region, which has been relatively stable from 2003 onwards, and in the rest of Iraq (centre/south), where fragile institutions and persistent sectarian strife have posed major challenges to health system recovery. Results The countrywide number of primary health care centres per 100,000 population rose from 5.5 in 2003 to 7.4 in 2012. The extent of improvement varied significantly within the country, with an average increase of 4.3 primary health care centres per 100,000 population in the Kurdistan region versus an average increase of only 1.4 in central/southern Iraq. The average number of public hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 1.3 to 1.5 in Kurdistan, whereas it remained at 0.6 in centre/south. The average number of private hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 0.2 to 0.6 in Kurdistan, whereas it declined from 0.3 to 0.2 in centre/south. Conclusions The expansion of both public and private health facilities in the Kurdistan region appears encouraging, but still much should be done to reach the standards of neighbouring countries. The slow pace of improvement in the rest of Iraq is largely attributable to the dire security situation and should be a cause for major concern. PMID:25221620

2014-01-01

169

Hepatitis B outbreak associated with a home health care agency serving multiple assisted living facilities in Texas, 2008-2010.  

PubMed

We investigated a multifacility outbreak of acute hepatitis B virus infection involving 21 residents across 10 assisted living facilities in Texas during the period January 2008 through July 2010. Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggested that these infections belonged to a single outbreak. The only common exposure was receipt of assisted monitoring of blood glucose from the same home health care agency. Improved infection control oversight and training of assisted living facility and home health care agency personnel providing assisted monitoring of blood glucose is needed. PMID:24176604

Zheteyeva, Yenlik A; Tosh, Pritish; Patel, Priti R; Martinez, Diana; Kilborn, Cindy; Awosika-Olumo, Debo; Khuwaja, Salma; Ibrahim, Syed; Ryder, Anthony; Tohme, Rania A; Khudyakov, Yury; Thai, Hong; Drobeniuc, Jan; Heseltine, Gary; Guh, Alice Y

2014-01-01

170

Piloting Laboratory Quality System Management in Six Health Facilities in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Achieving accreditation in laboratories is a challenge in Nigeria like in most African countries. Nigeria adopted the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory (Quality) Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (WHO/AFRO SLIPTA) in 2010. We report on FHI360 effort and progress in piloting WHO-AFRO recognition and accreditation preparedness in six health facility laboratories in five different states of Nigeria. Method Laboratory assessments were conducted at baseline, follow up and exit using the WHO/AFRO SLIPTA checklist. From the total percentage score obtained, the quality status of laboratories were classified using a zero to five star rating, based on the WHO/AFRO quality improvement stepwise approach. Major interventions include advocacy, capacity building, mentorship and quality improvement projects. Results At baseline audit, two of the laboratories attained 1- star while the remaining four were at 0- star. At follow up audit one lab was at 1- star, two at 3-star and three at 4-star. At exit audit, four labs were at 4- star, one at 3-star and one at 2-star rating. One laboratory dropped a star at exit audit, while others consistently improved. The two weakest elements at baseline; internal audit (4%) and occurrence/incidence management (15%) improved significantly, with an exit score of 76% and 81% respectively. The elements facility and safety was the major strength across board throughout the audit exercise. Conclusion This effort resulted in measurable and positive impact on the laboratories. We recommend further improvement towards a formal international accreditation status and scale up of WHO/AFRO SLIPTA implementation in Nigeria. PMID:25542022

Mbah, Henry; Ojo, Emmanuel; Ameh, James; Musuluma, Humphrey; Negedu-Momoh, Olubunmi Ruth; Jegede, Feyisayo; Ojo, Olufunmilayo; Uwakwe, Nkem; Ochei, Kingsley; Dada, Michael; Udah, Donald; Chiegil, Robert; Torpey, Kwasi

2014-01-01

171

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard  

SciTech Connect

This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

NONE

1998-05-01

172

Amino Acids In Health and Disease: New Perspectives, pages 369-382 @ 1987 Alan R. Liss, Inc. )  

E-print Network

Amino Acids In Health and Disease: New Perspectives, pages 369-382 @ 1987 Alan R. Liss, Inc. ) PLASMA AMINO ACID LEVELS IN OBESITY: EFFECTS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE Benjamin Caballero, Nicholas Finer1, lsoleucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine. The plasma amino acid response t(f. food Intake is also different

Wurtman, Richard

173

LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1  

E-print Network

is posted in each lab listed on the permit. i. A copy of the CNSC (Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission) lab years. c) Persons working in the lab who are not radiation safety certified have read and signedLABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1

Machel, Hans

174

European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS): background, aims and methods  

PubMed Central

Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii) identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii) at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a) stakeholder analysis, (b) international literature reviews, (c) Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d) focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental disorders must take into account behavioural, environmental and iatrogenic health risks. A European health promotion toolkit needs to consider heterogeneity of mental disorders, the multitude of physical health problems, health-relevant behaviour, health-related attitudes, health-relevant living conditions, and resource levels in mental health and social care facilities. PMID:19715560

Weiser, Prisca; Becker, Thomas; Losert, Carolin; Alptekin, Kksal; Berti, Loretta; Burti, Lorenzo; Burton, Alexandra; Dernovsek, Mojca; Dragomirecka, Eva; Freidl, Marion; Friedrich, Fabian; Genova, Aneta; Germanavicius, Arunas; Halis, Ula?; Henderson, John; Hjorth, Peter; Lai, Taavi; Larsen, Jens Ivar; Lech, Katarzyna; Lucas, Ramona; Marginean, Roxana; McDaid, David; Mladenova, Maya; Munk-Jrgensen, Povl; Paziuc, Alexandru; Paziuc, Petronela; Priebe, Stefan; Prot-Klinger, Katarzyna; Wancata, Johannes; Kilian, Reinhold

2009-01-01

175

Developing a Performance Measurement Framework and Indicators for Community Health Service Facilities in Urban China  

PubMed Central

Background China has had no effective and systematic information system to provide guidance for strengthening PHC (Primary Health Care) or account to citizens on progress. We report on the development of the China results-based Logic Model for Community Health Facilities and Stations (CHS) and a set of relevant PHC indicators intended to measure CHS priorities. Methods We adapted the PHC Results Based Logic Model developed in Canada and current work conducted in the community health system in China to create the China CHS Logic Model framework. We used a staged approach by first constructing the framework and indicators and then validating their content through an interactive process involving policy analysis, critical review of relevant literature and multiple stakeholder consultation. Results The China CHS Logic Model includes inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes with a total of 287 detailed performance indicators. In these indicators, 31 indicators measure inputs, 64 measure activities, 105 measure outputs, and 87 measure immediate (n = 65), intermediate (n = 15), or final (n = 7) outcomes. Conclusion A Logic Model framework can be useful in planning, implementation, analysis and evaluation of PHC at a system and service level. The development and content validation of the China CHS Logic Model and subsequent indicators provides a means for stronger accountability and a clearer sense of overall direction and purpose needed to renew and strengthen the PHC system in China. Moreover, this work will be useful in moving towards developing a PHC information system and performance measurement across districts in urban China, and guiding the pursuit of quality in PHC. PMID:21087516

2010-01-01

176

Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya  

PubMed Central

Objective Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals and within a stratified random sampling of 30 dispensaries and health centres in western Kenya. The key informants were the most senior facility healthcare provider and manager available. Emergency physician researchers utilised a semistructured assessment tool, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic coding. Results No lower level facilities and 30% of higher level facilities reported having a defined, organised approach to trauma. 43% of higher level facilities had access to an anaesthetist. The majority of lower level facilities had suture and wound care supplies and gloves but typically lacked other basic trauma supplies. For cardiac care, 50% of higher level facilities had morphine, but a minority had functioning ECG, sublingual nitroglycerine or a defibrillator. Only 20% of lower level facilities had glucometers, and only 33% of higher level facilities could care for diabetic emergencies. No facilities had sepsis clinical guidelines. Conclusions Large gaps in essential emergency care capabilities were identified at all facility levels in western Kenya. There are great opportunities for a universally deployed basic emergency care package, an advanced emergency care package and facility designation scheme, and a reliable prehospital care transportation and communications system in resource-limited settings. PMID:25260371

Burke, Thomas F; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

2014-01-01

177

A retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at twelve health facilities in four districts in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Objective To establish the appropriateness of malaria case management at health facility level in four districts in Zambia. Methods This study was a retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at health facilities in four districts conveniently sampled to represent both urban and rural settings in different epidemiological zones and health facility coverage. The review period was from January to December 2008. The sample included twelve lower level health facilities from four districts. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to identify characteristics which affected the quality of case management. Results Out of 4?891 suspected malaria cases recorded at the 12 health facilities, more than 80% of the patients had a temperature taken to establish their fever status. About 67% (CI95 66.1-68.7) were tested for parasitemia by either rapid diagnostic test or microscopy, whereas the remaining 22.5% (CI95 21.3.1-23.7) were not subjected to any malaria test. Of the 2?247 malaria cases reported (complicated and uncomplicated), 71% were parasitologically confirmed while 29% were clinically diagnosed (unconfirmed). About 56% (CI95 53.9-58.1) of the malaria cases reported were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (AL), 35% (CI95 33.1-37.0) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, 8% (CI95 6.9-9.2) with quinine and 1% did not receive any anti-malarial. Approximately 30% of patients WHO were found negative for malaria parasites were still prescribed an anti-malarial, contrary to the guidelines. There were marked inter-district variations in the proportion of patients in WHOm a diagnostic tool was used, and in the choice of anti-malarials for the treatment of malaria confirmed cases. Association between health worker characteristics and quality of case malaria management showed that nurses performed better than environmental health technicians and clinical officers on the decision whether to use the rapid diagnostic test or not. Gender, in service training on malaria, years of residence in the district and length of service of the health worker at the facility were not associated with diagnostic and treatment choices. Conclusions Malaria case management was characterised by poor adherence to treatment guidelines. The non-adherence was mainly in terms of: inconsistent use of confirmatory tests (rapid diagnostic test or microscopy) for malaria; prescribing anti-malarials which are not recommended (e.g. sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine) and prescribing anti-malarials to cases testing negative. Innovative approaches are required to improve health worker adherence to diagnosis and treatment guidelines. PMID:25182953

Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Chanda, Emmanuel; Masaninga, Freddie; Habluetzel, Annette; Masiye, Felix; Fall, Ibrahima Soce

2014-01-01

178

The food and beverage vending environment in health care facilities participating in the healthy eating, active communities program. Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

179

An Examination of Health Profile, Service Use and Care Needs of Older Adults in Residential Care Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile,

Aminzadeh, F.; Salziel, William B.; Molnar, F. J.; Alie, J.

2004-01-01

180

Modern contraceptive utilization among female ART attendees in health facilities of Gimbie town, West Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background In many areas of the world where HIV prevalence is high, rates of unintended pregnancy have also been shown to be high. Of all pregnancies worldwide in 2008, 41% were reported as unintended and approximately 50% of these ended in abortion. To address these problems family planning is the best solution. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to assess modern contraceptive use among females on ART in health facilities of Gimbie town, Western Ethiopia. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in Gimbie town, western Ethiopia from December 2012 to January 2013. HIV infected women of reproductive age group (15-49 years) who came for ART care follow up during the data collection period were included in the study. Data was collected using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Binary logistic regression and multivariate analysis were employed using SPSS version 17. Results Three hundred ninety five women on ART have participated in the study. More than half, 224 (56.7%), of the respondents were using modern contraceptive, of whom 67 (30%) use dual contraceptive method. Having information on modern contraception is positively associated with modern contraceptive use with (AOR=6.3, 95% CI (1.67, 24.1)) and respondents who have family size ?4 were 50% less contraceptive users than those who have family size >4 (AOR=0.51, 95% CI (0.27, 0.96)). Conclusion In this study contraceptive use among HIV positive women is better than the general population. However, use of dual methods, long acting and permanent method of contraceptives were found to be low. Continuous and targeted information provision on modern contraceptive should be done. PMID:24731751

2014-01-01

181

Hazardous medical waste generation rates of different categories of health-care facilities  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculated hazardous medical waste generation rates (HMWGR) from 132 hospitals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Based on a 22-month study period, HMWGR were highly skewed to the right. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HMWGR varied from 0.00124 to 0.718 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A positive correlation existed between the HMWGR and the number of hospital beds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used non-parametric statistics to compare rates among hospital categories. - Abstract: Goal of this work was to calculate the hazardous medical waste unit generation rates (HMWUGR), in kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, using data from 132 health-care facilities in Greece. The calculations were based on the weights of the hazardous medical wastes that were regularly transferred to the sole medical waste incinerator in Athens over a 22-month period during years 2009 and 2010. The 132 health-care facilities were grouped into public and private ones, and, also, into seven sub-categories, namely: birth, cancer treatment, general, military, pediatric, psychiatric and university hospitals. Results showed that there is a large variability in the HMWUGR, even among hospitals of the same category. Average total HMWUGR varied from 0.012 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the public psychiatric hospitals, to up to 0.72 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the public university hospitals. Within the private hospitals, average HMWUGR ranged from 0.0012 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the psychiatric clinics, to up to 0.49 kg bed{sup -1} d{sup -1}, for the birth clinics. Based on non-parametric statistics, HMWUGR were statistically similar for the birth and general hospitals, in both the public and private sector. The private birth and general hospitals generated statistically more wastes compared to the corresponding public hospitals. The infectious/toxic and toxic medical wastes appear to be 10% and 50% of the total hazardous medical wastes generated by the public cancer treatment and university hospitals, respectively.

Komilis, Dimitrios, E-mail: dkomilis@env.duth.gr [Laboratory of Solid and Hazardous Waste Management, Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 671 00 (Greece); Fouki, Anastassia [Hellenic Open University, Patras (Greece); Papadopoulos, Dimitrios [APOTEFROTIRAS S.A., Ano Liossia, 192 00 Elefsina (Greece)

2012-07-15

182

Safe motherhood voucher programme coverage of health facility deliveries among poor women in South-western Uganda.  

PubMed

There has been increased interest in and experimentation with demand-side mechanisms such as the use of vouchers that place purchasing power in the hands of targeted consumers to improve the uptake of healthcare services in low-income settings. A key measure of the success of such interventions is the extent to which the programmes have succeeded in reaching the target populations. This article estimates the coverage of facility deliveries by a maternal health voucher programme in South-western Uganda and examines whether such coverage is correlated with district-level characteristics such as poverty density and the number of contracted facilities. Analysis entails estimating the voucher coverage of health facility deliveries among the general population and poor population (PP) using programme data for 2010, which was the most complete calendar year of implementation of the Uganda safe motherhood (SM) voucher programme. The results show that: (1) the programme paid for 38% of estimated deliveries among the PP in the targeted districts, (2) there was a significant negative correlation between the poverty density in a district and proportions of births to poor women that were covered by the programme and (3) improving coverage of health facility deliveries for poor women is dependent upon increasing the sales and redemption rates. The findings suggest that to the extent that the programme stimulated demand for SM services by new users, it has the potential of increasing facility-based births among poor women in the region. In addition, the significant negative correlation between the poverty density and the proportions of facility-based births to poor women that are covered by the voucher programme suggests that there is need to increase both voucher sales and the rate of redemption to improve coverage in districts with high levels of poverty. PMID:24173430

Kanya, Lucy; Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Abuya, Timothy; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

2014-07-01

183

MOVE: weight management program across the veterans health administration: patient- and facility-level predictors of utilization  

PubMed Central

Background Health care systems initiating major behavioral health programs often face challenges with variable implementation and uneven patient engagement. One large health care system, Veterans Health Administration (VHA), recently initiated the MOVE! Weight Management Program, but it is unclear if veterans most in need of MOVE! services are accessing them. The purpose of this study was to examine patient and facility factors associated with MOVE! utilization (defined as 1 or more visits) across all VHA facilities. Methods Using national administrative data in a retrospective cohort study of eligible overweight (25??=30) VHA outpatients, we examined variation in and predictors of MOVE! utilization in fiscal year (FY) 2010 using generalized linear mixed models. Results 4.39% (n?=?90,230) of all eligible overweight and obese patients using VHA services utilized MOVE! services at least once in FY 2010. Facility-level MOVE! Utilization rates ranged from 0.05% to 16%. Veterans were more likely to have at least one MOVE! visit if they had a higher BMI, were female, unmarried, younger, a minority, or had a psychiatric or obesity-related comorbidity. Conclusions Although substantial variation exists across VHA facilities in MOVE! utilization rates, Veterans most in need of obesity management services were more likely to access MOVE!, although at a low level. However, there may still be many Veterans who might benefit but are not accessing these services. More research is needed to examine the barriers and facilitators of MOVE! utilization, particularly in facilities with unusually high and low reach. PMID:24325730

2013-01-01

184

The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system  

PubMed Central

Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre Community Health Agents (CHA) who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connects district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzanias need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844 PMID:23819587

2013-01-01

185

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed.

NONE

1995-07-01

186

Evidence from facility level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings  

PubMed Central

Most of the maternal and newborn deaths occur at birth or within 24 hours of birth. Therefore, essential lifesaving interventions need to be delivered at basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care facilities. Facilities provide complex interventions including advice on referrals, post discharge care, long-term management of chronic conditions along with staff training, managerial and administrative support to other facilities. This paper reviews the effectiveness of facility level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined facility level interventions and included 32 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that additional social support during pregnancy and labour significantly decreased the risk of antenatal hospital admission, intrapartum analgesia, dissatisfaction, labour duration, cesarean delivery and instrumental vaginal birth. However, it did not have any impact on pregnancy outcomes. Continued midwifery care from early pregnancy to postpartum period was associated with reduced medical procedures during labour and shorter length of stay. Facility based stress training and management interventions to maintain well performing and motivated workforce, significantly reduced job stress and improved job satisfaction while the interventions tailored to address identified barriers to change improved the desired practice. We found limited and inconclusive evidence for the impacts of physical environment, exit interviews and organizational culture modifications. At the facility level, specialized midwifery teams and social support during pregnancy and labour have demonstrated conclusive benefits in improving maternal newborn health outcomes. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited to high income countries. Future programs in resource limited settings should utilize these findings to implement relevant interventions tailored to their needs. PMID:25208539

2014-01-01

187

Validation of three geolocation strategies for health-facility attendees for research and public health surveillance in a rural setting in western Kenya.  

PubMed

Understanding the spatial distribution of disease is critical for effective disease control. Where formal address networks do not exist, tracking spatial patterns of clinical disease is difficult. Geolocation strategies were tested at rural health facilities in western Kenya. Methods included geocoding residence by head of compound, participatory mapping and recording the self-reported nearest landmark. Geocoding was able to locate 729% [95% confidence interval (CI) 677-776] of individuals to within 250 m of the true compound location. The participatory mapping exercise was able to correctly locate 820% of compounds (95% CI 789-848) to a 2 25 km area with a 500 m buffer. The self-reported nearest landmark was able to locate 781% (95% CI 738-821) of compounds to the correct catchment area. These strategies tested provide options for quickly obtaining spatial information on individuals presenting at health facilities. PMID:24787145

Stresman, G H; Stevenson, J C; Owaga, C; Marube, E; Anyango, C; Drakeley, C; Bousema, T; Cox, J

2014-09-01

188

Rotordynamic Analysis and Feasibility Study of a Disk Spin Test Facility for Rotor Health Monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recently, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) initiated a program to achieve the significant improvement in aviation safety. One of the technical challenges is the design and development of accelerated experiments that mimic critical damage cases encountered in engine components. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently addressing the goal concerning propulsion health management and the development of propulsion system specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe. For this goal the unique disk spin simulation system was assembled at NASA GRC, which allows testing of rotors with the spinning speeds up to 10K RPM, and at the elevated temperature environment reaching 540 C (1000 F). It is anticipated that the facility can be employed for detection of Low Cycle Fatigue disk cracking and further High Cycle Fatigue blade vibration. The controlled crack growth studies at room and elevated temperatures can be conducted on the turbine wheels, and various NDE techniques can be integrated and assessed as in-situ damage monitoring tools. Critical rotating parts in advanced gas turbine engines such as turbine disks frequently operate at high temperature and stress for long periods of time. The integrity of these parts must be proven by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during various machining steps ranging from forging blank to finished shape, and also during the systematic overhaul inspections. Conventional NDE methods, however, have unacceptable limits. Some of these techniques are time-consuming and inconvenient for service aircraft testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage is known in advance. These experimental techniques can provide only local information and no indication of the structural strength at a component and/or system level. The shortcomings of currently available NDE methods lead to the requirement of new damage detection techniques that can provide global information on the rotating components/system, and, in addition, they do not require direct human access to the operating system. During this period of research considerable effort was directed towards the further development of experimental facility and development of the vibration-based crack detection methodology for rotating disks and shafts. A collection of papers and reports were written to describe the results of this work. The attached captures that effort and represents the research output during the grant period.

Sawicki, Jerzy T.

2005-01-01

189

[Evaluating the activity of the Italian Mental Health Services inpatient and residential facilities: the PRISM (Process Indicator System for Mental health) indicators].  

PubMed

This article describes the activities of a project aimed at developing a system of process and process/outcome indicators suitable to monitor over time the quality of psychiatric care of Italian inpatient and residential psychiatric facilities. This system, named PRISM (Process Indicator System for Mental health), was developed by means of a standardized evaluation made by a panel of experts and a consecutive pilot study in 17 inpatient and 13 residential psychiatric facilities. Materials and methods. A total of 28 indicators were selected from a set of 251 candidate indicators developed by the most relevant and qualified Italian and international authorities. These indicators are derived by data from medical records and information about characteristics of facilities, and they cover processes of care, operational equipment of facilities, staff training and working, relationships with external agencies, and sentinel events. Results. The procedure followed for the development of the indicator system was reliable and innovative. The data collected from the pilot study suggested a favourable benefit-cost ratio between the workload associated with regular use of the indicators into the context of daily clinical activities and the advantages related to the information gathered through regular use of the indicators. Conclusions. The PRISM system provides additional information about the healthcare processes with respect to the information gathered via routine information systems, and it might prove useful for both continuous quality improvement programs and health services research. PMID:25668628

Picardi, Angelo; Tarolla, Emanuele; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gigantesco, Antonella; Neri, Giovanni; Rossi, Elisabetta; Biondi, Massimo

2014-01-01

190

Gender-based distributional skewness of the United Republic of Tanzanias health workforce cadres: a cross-sectional health facility survey  

PubMed Central

Background While severe shortages, inadequate skills and a geographical imbalance of health personnel have been consistently documented over the years as long term critical challenges in the health sector of the United Republic of Tanzania, there is limited evidence on the gender-based distribution of the health workforce and its likely implications. Extant evidence shows that some people may not seek healthcare unless they have access to a provider of their gender. This paper, therefore, assesses the gender-based distribution of the United Republic of Tanzanias health workforce cadres. Methods This is a secondary analysis of data collected in a cross-sectional health facility survey on health system strengthening in the United Republic of Tanzania in 2008. During the survey, 88 health facilities, selected randomly from 8 regions, yielded 815 health workers (HWs) eligible for the current analysis. While Chi-square was used for testing associations in the bivariate analysis, multivariate analysis was conducted using logistic regression to assess the relationship between gender and each of the cadres involved in the analysis. Results The mean age of the HWs was 39.7, ranging from 15 to 63 years. Overall, 75% of the HWs were women. The proportion of women among maternal and child health aides or medical attendants (MCHA/MA), nurses and midwives was 86%, 86% and 91%, respectively, while their proportion among clinical officers (COs) and medical doctors (MDs) was 28% and 21%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) that a HW was a female (baseline category is male) for each cadre was: MCHA/MA, OR?=?3.70, 95% CI 2.16-6.33; nurse, OR?=?5.61, 95% CI 3.22-9.78; midwife, OR?=?2.74, 95% CI 1.44-5.20; CO, OR?=?0.08, 95% CI 0.04-0.17 and MD, OR?=?0.04, 95% CI 0.02-0.09. Conclusion The distribution of the United Republic of Tanzanias health cadres is dramatically gender-skewed, a reflection of gender inequality in health career choices. MCHA/MA, nursing and midwifery cadres are large and female-dominant, whereas COs and MDs are fewer in absolute numbers and male-dominant. While a need for more staff is necessary for an effective delivery of quality health services, adequate representation of women in highly trained cadres is imperative to enhance responses to some gender-specific roles and needs. PMID:23800028

2013-01-01

191

Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed -Print -MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM  

E-print Network

Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM] Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed In 3 of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

192

The NIH Almanac -National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory of Hygiene in 1887, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today is one of the world's foremost medical research centers. An  

E-print Network

The NIH Almanac - National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory specialists. The NIH Almanac is compiled and edited by the Office of Communications and Public Liaison, Online...Turning Discovery into Health" is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The NIH Almanac

Levin, Judith G.

193

How accurate are medical record data in Afghanistan's maternal health facilities? An observational validity study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Improvement activities, surveillance and research in maternal and neonatal health in Afghanistan rely heavily on medical record data. This study investigates accuracy in delivery care records from three hospitals across workshifts. Design Observational cross-sectional study. Setting The study was conducted in one maternity hospital, one general hospital maternity department and one provincial hospital maternity department. Researchers observed vaginal deliveries and recorded observations to later check against data recorded in patient medical records and facility registers. Outcome measures We determined the sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operator characteristics curves (AUROCs), proportions correctly classified and the tendency to make performance seem better than it actually was. Results 600 observations across the three shifts and three hospitals showed high compliance with active management of the third stage of labour, measuring blood loss and uterine contraction at 30?min, cord care, drying and wrapping newborns and Apgar scores and low compliance with monitoring vital signs. Compliance with quality indicators was high and specificity was lower than sensitivity. For adverse outcomes in birth registries, specificity was higher than sensitivity. Overall AUROCs were between 0.5 and 0.6. Of 17 variables that showed biased errors, 12 made performance or outcomes seem better than they were, and five made them look worse (71% vs 29%, p=0.143). Compliance, sensitivity and specificity varied less among the three shifts than among hospitals. Conclusions Medical record accuracy was generally poor. Errors by clinicians did not appear to follow a pattern of self-enhancement of performance. Because successful improvement activities, surveillance and research in these settings are heavily reliant on collecting accurate data on processes and outcomes of care, substantial improvement is needed in medical record accuracy. PMID:23619087

Broughton, Edward I; Ikram, Abdul Naser; Sahak, Ihsanullah

2013-01-01

194

Management of severely ill children at first-level health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa when referral is difficult.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To quantify the main reasons for referral of infants and children from first-level health facilities to referral hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa and to determine what further supplies, equipment, and legal empowerment might be needed to manage such children when referral is difficult. METHODS: In an observational study at first-level health facilities in Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Niger, over 3-5 months, we prospectively documented the diagnoses and severity of diseases in children using the standardized Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines. We reviewed the facilities for supplies and equipment and examined the legal constraints of health personnel working at these facilities. FINDINGS: We studied 7195 children aged 2-59 months, of whom 691 (9.6%) were classified under a severe IMCI classification that required urgent referral to a hospital. Overall, 226 children had general danger signs, 292 had severe pneumonia or very severe disease, 104 were severely dehydrated, 31 had severe persistent diarrhoea, 207 were severely malnourished, and 98 had severe anaemia. Considerably more ill were 415 young infants aged one week to two months: nearly three-quarters of these required referral. Legal constraints and a lack of simple equipment (suction pumps, nebulizers, and oxygen concentrators) and supplies (nasogastric tubes and 50% glucose) could prevent health workers from dealing more appropriately with sick children when referral was not possible. CONCLUSION: When referral is difficult or impossible, some additional supplies and equipment, as well as provision of simple guidelines, may improve management of seriously ill infants and children. PMID:12973645

Simoes, Eric A. F.; Peterson, Stefan; Gamatie, Youssouf; Kisanga, Felix S.; Mukasa, Gelasius; Nsungwa-Sabiiti, Jesca; Were, M. Wilson; Weber, Martin W.

2003-01-01

195

Factors Influencing Early Health Facility Contact and Low Default Rate among New Sputum Smear Positive Tuberculosis Patients, India  

PubMed Central

Early case identification and prompt treatment of new sputum smear positive case are important to reduce the spread of tuberculosis (TB). Present study was planned to study the associated factors for duration to contact the health facility since appearance of symptoms and treatment default. Methodology. It was prospective cohort study of TB patients already registered for treatment in randomly selected TB units (TUs) in Himachal Pradesh, India. Relative risk (RR) was calculated as risk estimate to find out the explanatory variables for early contact and default. Results. Total 1607 patients were recruited and 25 (1.5%) defaulted treatment. Patients from nuclear family (aRR: 1.37; 1.091.73), ashamed of TB (aRR: 1.32; 1.031.70), wishing to disclose disease status (aRR: 1.79; 1.432.24), but aware of curable nature (aRR: 1.67; 1.172.39) and preventable (aRR: 1.35; 1.071.70) nature of disease, contacted health facility early since appearance of symptoms. Conclusion. Better awareness and less misconceptions about disease influences the early contact of health facility and low default rate in North India. PMID:24734176

Bhardwaj, Ashok Kumar; Bansal, Pradeep; Chander, Vishav; Sharma, Sushant

2014-01-01

196

CHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Health Economics Health Economics Competencies October 2012 --Page 1 of 4  

E-print Network

Description This program focuses on economic evaluation of interventions and treatments that impact health Economics and Health Technology Assessment seminars. Others as recommended by the student's Supervisor/committee. Monthly Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment seminars. Others as recommended by the student

Habib, Ayman

197

Output based Facilities Management Specifications in Output based Facilities Management Specifications in Output based Facilities Management Specifications in Output based Facilities Management Specifications in the National Health Service: Literature review and the National Health Service: Literature review and the National Health Service: Literature review and the National Health Service: Literature review and directional outcomes directional outcomes directional outcomes directional outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review supported an investigation into the level of use and methods of performance management of Output-based facilities service specifications within the NHS. One hundred and ten works were assessed, related to five key themes: Outsourcing, Service Specifications, Performance Measures, Quality Aspects of Performance and Applicable Measures for Facilities Contracts Performance. Study of this literature revealed a bias towards opinion

Robert Heavisides

198

General Regulations, Appendix 4 Version 2008, Page 1 of 12 Appendix 4 Code of Conduct for Use of ICT Facilities  

E-print Network

of ICT Facilities 1 Purpose The purpose of this Code of Conduct is to set the regulatory framework are defined in section 17. 2 Scope This Code applies to all Users of ICT facilities which are owned, leased, hired or otherwise provided by CULC and /or Coventry University, ICT facilities connected directly

Low, Robert

199

Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years. PMID:24865584

Sreenivasan, N; Gotestrand, S A; Ombeki, S; Oluoch, G; Fischer, T K; Quick, R

2014-05-27

200

Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

1988-05-01

201

Concentration, distribution, and human health risk assessment of endosulfan from a manufacturing facility in Huai'an, China.  

PubMed

Endosulfan concentrations and its distribution in air, soil, sediment and foodstuffs in the area surrounding a production facility in Huai'an, China were investigated because of its threats to the environment and human health. Air concentrations for endosulfan ?, endosulfan II and endosulfan sulfate measured in this study were several orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for this region. Surface soil concentration ranges of endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and endosulfan sulfate were greater than in sediment. Endosulfan II was the greatest contributor to total endosulfan concentrations in both surface sediment and soil followed by endosulfan sulfate and endosulfan ?. However, a different concentration profile was observed in fish and crop samples, with endosulfan sulfate having the highest concentration followed by endosulfan I and endosulfan II. The concentration of ?endosulfans (endosulfans ? and II) in soil decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the plant by a factor of 10 within 45 km. Trace amounts of ?endosulfans were observed in deep soil layers which implied that these compounds are transported through the leaching of pore water in soil. This demonstrated that emissions from the manufacturing facility can lead to ground water contamination in the area near the plant. A screening level human health risk assessment of ?endosulfans based on the worst-case scenario was performed for people living in the vicinity of the manufacturing facility. The hazard indices were at least 2 orders of magnitude of <1, indicating no adverse health effects are likely to occur at current exposure levels, and the risk to human health is generally acceptable. PMID:24491393

Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Guo, Ming-Xing; Pei, Wei; Wu, Qian

2014-09-01

202

Tuberculosis case finding and isoniazid preventive therapy among people living with HIV at public health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional facility based study  

PubMed Central

Background Activities to decrease the burden of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) include intensified TB case-finding (ICF), Isoniaizid (INH) preventive therapy (IPT) and infection control in health-care and congregate settings (IC). Information about the status of collaborative TB/HIV care services which decreases the burden of TB among PLHIV in Ethiopia is limited. The purpose of the study was to assess TB case finding and provision of IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross sectional, facility-based survey was conducted between June 2011 and August 2011. Data was collected by interviewing 849 PLHIV from ten health facilities in Addis Ababa. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze findings and the results are described in this report. Results The proportion of PLHIV who have been screened for TB during any one of their follow-up cares was 92.8%. Eighty eight (10.4%) of the study participants have been diagnosed for TB during their HIV follow-up cares. PLHIV who had never been diagnosed for TB before they knew their positive HIV status were nearly four times more likely to be diagnosed for TB during follow-up cares than those diagnosed before (AOR [95% CI]: 3.78 [1.69-8.43]). Nearly a third (28.7%) of all interviewed PLHIV self reported that they had been treated with IPT. Conclusions It can be concluded that ICF for TB and IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa need boosting. Hence, it is recommended to put into practice the national and global guidelines to improve ICF and IPT among PLHIV in the city. PMID:24438508

2014-01-01

203

Antimalarial drug prescribing practice in private and public health facilities in South-east Nigeria: a descriptive study  

PubMed Central

Background Nigeria's national standard has recently moved to artemisinin combination treatments for malaria. As clinicians in the private sector are responsible for attending a large proportion of the population ill with malaria, this study compared prescribing in the private and public sector in one State in Nigeria prior to promoting ACTs. Objective To assess prescribing for uncomplicated malaria in government and private health facilities in Cross River State. Method Audit of 665 patient records at six private and seven government health facilities in 2003. Results Clinicians in the private sector were less likely to record history or physical examination than those in public facilities, but otherwise practice and prescribing were similar. Overall, 45% of patients had a diagnostic blood slides; 77% were prescribed monotherapy, either chloroquine (30.2%), sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (22.7%) or artemisinin derivatives alone (15.8%). Some 20.8% were prescribed combination therapy; the commonest was chloroquine with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. A few patients (3.5%) were prescribed sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-mefloquine in the private sector, and only 3.0% patients were prescribed artemisinin combination treatments. Conclusion Malaria treatments were varied, but there were not large differences between the public and private sector. Very few are following current WHO guidelines. Monotherapy with artemisinin derivatives is relatively common. PMID:17480216

Meremikwu, Martin; Okomo, Uduak; Nwachukwu, Chukwuemeka; Oyo-Ita, Angela; Eke-Njoku, John; Okebe, Joseph; Oyo-Ita, Esu; Garner, Paul

2007-01-01

204

75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY [FRL-9197-7] Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals...comments on a draft guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals...facilities. EPA expects that this document will help reduce the...

2010-09-08

205

Indiatimes l My Mail l Make TOI your home page l Home | Cities | India | World | Indians Abroad | Business | Cricket | Other Sports | Health/Sci | Infotech | Education | Earth  

E-print Network

school girl murdered Nose wheel of Air India plane collapses More Videos My Times , My Voice Has LucknowLess height? Blame your older brother-Health/Sci-The Times of India 16/05/2008http://timesofindiaIndiatimes l My Mail l Make TOI your home page l Health/Sci Home | Cities | India | World | Indians

Lummaa, Virpi

206

New York State School Facilities and Student Health, Achievement, and Attendance: A Data Analysis Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students who attend schools with environmental hazards that impact indoor air quality are more likely to miss class, and therefore lose learning opportunities. Yet school environmental health and safety remains largely unregulated and there is no state or federal agency in charge of protecting children's environmental health in schools. This

Boese, Stephen; Shaw, John

2005-01-01

207

Critical Factors in Mental Health Programming for Juveniles in Corrections Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juveniles with mental health and other specialized needs are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, and while juvenile corrections have not historically provided standardized and evidence-based mental health services for its incarcerated youth, the demand is evident. The reality is that juveniles with serious mental illness are committed

Underwood, Lee A.; Phillips, Annie; von Dresner, Kara; Knight, Pamela D.

2006-01-01

208

High sensitivity and specificity of clinical microscopy in rural health facilities in western Kenya under an external quality assurance program.  

PubMed

Microscopic diagnosis of malaria is a well-established and inexpensive technique that has the potential to provide accurate diagnosis of malaria infection. However, it requires both training and experience. Although it is considered the gold standard in research settings, the sensitivity and specificity of routine microscopy for clinical care in the primary care setting has been reported to be unacceptably low. We established a monthly external quality assurance program to monitor the performance of clinical microscopy in 17 rural health centers in western Kenya. The average sensitivity over the 12-month period was 96% and the average specificity was 88%. We identified specific contextual factors that contributed to inadequate performance. Maintaining high-quality malaria diagnosis in high-volume, resource-constrained health facilities is possible. PMID:24935953

Wafula, Rebeccah; Sang, Edna; Cheruiyot, Olympia; Aboto, Angeline; Menya, Diana; O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme

2014-09-01

209

Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.  

PubMed

The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite. PMID:20140506

Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

2011-01-01

210

Accessibility to health care facilities in Montreal Island: an application of relative accessibility indicators from the perspective of senior and non-senior residents  

PubMed Central

Background Geographical access to health care facilities is known to influence health services usage. As societies age, accessibility to health care becomes an increasingly acute public health concern. It is known that seniors tend to have lower mobility levels, and it is possible that this may negatively affect their ability to reach facilities and services. Therefore, it becomes important to examine the mobility situation of seniors vis-a-vis the spatial distribution of health care facilities, to identify areas where accessibility is low and interventions may be required. Methods Accessibility is implemented using a cumulative opportunities measure. Instead of assuming a fixed bandwidth (i.e. a distance threshold) for measuring accessibility, in this paper the bandwidth is defined using model-based estimates of average trip length. Average trip length is an all-purpose indicator of individual mobility and geographical reach. Adoption of a spatial modelling approach allows us to tailor these estimates of travel behaviour to specific locations and person profiles. Replacing a fixed bandwidth with these estimates permits us to calculate customized location- and person-based accessibility measures that allow inter-personal as well as geographical comparisons. Data The case study is Montreal Island. Geo-coded travel behaviour data, specifically average trip length, and relevant traveller's attributes are obtained from the Montreal Household Travel Survey. These data are complemented with information from the Census. Health care facilities, also geo-coded, are extracted from a comprehensive business point database. Health care facilities are selected based on Standard Industrial Classification codes 8011-21 (Medical Doctors and Dentists). Results Model-based estimates of average trip length show that travel behaviour varies widely across space. With the exception of seniors in the downtown area, older residents of Montreal Island tend to be significantly less mobile than people of other age cohorts. The combination of average trip length estimates with the spatial distribution of health care facilities indicates that despite being more mobile, suburban residents tend to have lower levels of accessibility compared to central city residents. The effect is more marked for seniors. Furthermore, the results indicate that accessibility calculated using a fixed bandwidth would produce patterns of exposure to health care facilities that would be difficult to achieve for suburban seniors given actual mobility patterns. Conclusions The analysis shows large disparities in accessibility between seniors and non-seniors, between urban and suburban seniors, and between vehicle owning and non-owning seniors. This research was concerned with potential accessibility levels. Follow up research could consider the results reported here to select case studies of actual access and usage of health care facilities, and related health outcomes. PMID:20973969

2010-01-01

211

Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain  

PubMed Central

Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory mechanisms. Measures to stop the availability of poor-quality medicines should include limiting procurement to WHO prequalified products and implementing routine quality testing. PMID:24828338

Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

2014-01-01

212

Timeliness of childhood vaccine uptake among children attending a tertiary health service facility-based immunisation clinic in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Childhood immunisation is a cost-effective activity in health. Immunisation of children has contributed to reducing child morbidity and mortality. In the last two decades, global deaths from vaccine-preventable illnesses have decreased significantly as a result of immunisation. Similar trends have been observed in Ghana following the introduction of the Expanded Programme on Immunisation. The administration of vaccines is based on the period of highest susceptibility among others. Ghana has long used the proportion of children receiving vaccines and the trends in vaccine preventable illness incidence as performance indicators for immunisation. The addition of timeliness of vaccine uptake as an additional performance indicator has been recommended. This study evaluated the timeliness of vaccine uptake among children immunised at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. Methods The study was conducted at the Maternal and Child Health clinic of the hospital between February and March 2012. A representative sample of 259 respondents was selected by simple random sampling. Data collection was by a structured questionnaire and included the examination of Child Health records booklet. Data was entered into a Microsoft Office Access database and analysed using Epi Info Version 3.5.1 2008. Results The majority of mothers attended antenatal clinics during pregnancy. An overwhelming majority of babies (98.8%) were delivered in a hospital. About 85% of babies were less than 12 months of age. Mean time taken to reach the clinic was 30 minutes. Vaccine uptake was generally timely for initial vaccines. The proportion of children receiving the vaccines later increased with latter vaccines. Overall, 87.3% of babies received vaccines on time with only 5.3% receiving vaccines beyond 28 days of the scheduled date. Children receiving immunisations services in the same facility as they were born were more likely to receive the BCG vaccine on time. Conclusions Vaccine uptake is mostly timely among respondents in the study. The BCG vaccine in particular was received on time among children born in the same facility as the immunisation clinic. There is the need to further examine the timeliness of vaccine uptake among children delivered outside health facilities in Ghana. PMID:24476339

2014-01-01

213

Soil metal concentrations and toxicity: Associations with distances to industrial facilities and implications for human health  

PubMed Central

Urban and rural areas may have different levels of environmental contamination and different potential sources of exposure. Many metals, i.e., arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), have well-documented negative neurological effects, and the developing fetus and young children are particularly at risk. Using a database of mother and child pairs, three areas were identified: a rural area with no increased prevalence of mental retardation and developmental delay (MR/DD) (Area A), and a rural area (Area B) and an urban area (Area C) with significantly higher prevalence of MR/DD in children as compared to the state-wide average. Areas were mapped and surface soil samples were collected from nodes of the uniform grid. Samples were analyzed for As, barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), Pb, manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and Hg concentrations, and for soil toxicity and correlated to identify potential common sources. ArcGIS was used to determine distances between sample locations and industrial facilities, which were correlated with both metal concentrations and soil toxicity. Results indicated that all metal concentrations (except Be and Hg) in Area C were significantly greater than those in Areas A and B (p ? 0.0001) and that Area C had fewer correlations between metals suggesting more varied sources of metals than in rural areas. Area C also had a large number of facilities whose distances were significantly correlated with metals, particularly Cr (maximum r = 0.33; p = 0.0002), and with soil toxicity (maximum r = 0.25; p = 0.007) over a large spatial scale. Arsenic was not associated with distance to any facility and may have different anthropogenic, or a natural source. In contrast to Area C, both rural areas had lower concentrations of metals, lower soil toxicity, and a small number of facilities with significant associations between distance and soil metals. PMID:19155049

Aelion, C. Marjorie; Davis, Harley T.; McDermott, Suzanne; Lawson, Andrew B.

2009-01-01

214

"It broke our hearts": understanding parents' lived experiences of their child's admission to an acute mental health care facility.  

PubMed

This article reports the evaluative findings of an Early Psychosis Education Program (EPEP) designed to support parents caring for their child who was recently admitted to the psychiatric intensive care unit of an inpatient mental health care facility in Australia. The EPEP offered education on mental illness, treatment options, and medication, as well as information on the recovery model of care. The EPEP was facilitated by two RNs and was evaluated for educational effectiveness using a simple pre- and postevaluation questionnaire. The evaluation revealed two themes expressed by parents: "We didn't see it coming," and "Hopelessness and helplessness." The themes highlighted the parents' lack of mental health care knowledge prior to the EPEP, which had a significant impact on the parents' experiences and well-being. The evaluative findings highlighted a need for a nurse-led EPEP within the community. A community EPEP has the potential to strengthen the partnership between parents, families, and mental health service providers and to help with the provision of a recovery framework of care. PMID:24694246

Ward, Louise; Gwinner, Karleen

2014-07-01

215

Tracking rural health facility financial data in resource-limited settings: a case study from Rwanda.  

PubMed

Chunling Lu and colleagues describe a project for tracking health center financial data in two rural districts of Rwanda, which could be adapted for other low- or middle-income countries. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. PMID:25460586

Lu, Chunling; Tsai, Sandy; Ruhumuriza, John; Umugiraneza, Grace; Kandamutsa, Solange; Salvatore, Phillip P; Zhang, Zibiao; Binagwaho, Agnes; Ngabo, Fidele

2014-12-01

216

77 FR 1495 - Criteria for Determining Priorities Among Correctional Facility Health Professional Shortage Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...amended by the Health Care Safety Net Amendments of 2002, 42 U.S.C. 254f-1(b)(1), the Secretary...332 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C. 254e, provides that the Secretary...designating HPSAs are codified at 42 C.F.R. Part 5. Section...

2012-01-10

217

Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been promoted as a means to reduce malaria transmission due to their ability to kill both asexual blood stages of malaria parasites, which sustain infections over long periods and the immature derived sexual stages responsible for infecting mosquitoes and onward transmission. Early studies reported a temporal association between ACT introduction and reduced malaria transmission in a number of ecological settings. However, these reports have come from areas with low to moderate malaria transmission, been confounded by the presence of other interventions or environmental changes that may have reduced malaria transmission, and have not included a comparison group without ACT. This report presents results from the first large-scale observational study to assess the impact of case management with ACT on population-level measures of malaria endemicity in an area with intense transmission where the benefits of effective infection clearance might be compromised by frequent and repeated re-infection. Methods A pre-post observational study with a non-randomized comparison group was conducted at two sites in Tanzania. Both sites used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) monotherapy as a first-line anti-malarial from mid-2001 through 2002. In 2003, the ACT, artesunate (AS) co-administered with SP (AS?+?SP), was introduced in all fixed health facilities in the intervention site, including both public and registered non-governmental facilities. Population-level prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia were assessed using light microscopy from samples collected during representative household surveys in 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 and 2006. Findings Among 37,309 observations included in the analysis, annual asexual parasitaemia prevalence in persons of all ages ranged from 11% to 28% and gametocytaemia prevalence ranged from <1% to 2% between the two sites and across the five survey years. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to adjust for age, socioeconomic status, bed net use and rainfall. In the presence of consistently high coverage and efficacy of SP monotherapy and AS?+?SP in the comparison and intervention areas, the introduction of ACT in the intervention site was associated with a modest reduction in the adjusted asexual parasitaemia prevalence of 5 percentage-points or 23% (p?health facilities only modestly reduced asexual parasitaemia prevalence. ACT is effective for treatment of uncomplicated malaria and should have substantial public health impact on morbidity and mortality, but is unlikely to reduce malaria transmission substantially in much of sub-Saharan Africa where individuals are rapidly re-infected. PMID:22545573

2012-01-01

218

Information technology systems in public sector health facilities in developing countries: the case of South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The public healthcare sector in developing countries faces many challenges including weak healthcare systems and under-resourced facilities that deliver poor outcomes relative to total healthcare expenditure. Global references demonstrate that information technology has the ability to assist in this regard through the automation of processes, thus reducing the inefficiencies of manually driven processes and lowering transaction costs. This study examines the impact of hospital information systems implementation on service delivery, user adoption and organisational culture within two hospital settings in South Africa. Methods Ninety-four interviews with doctors, nurses and hospital administrators were conducted in two public sector tertiary healthcare facilities (in two provinces) to record end-user perceptions. Structured questionnaires were used to conduct the interviews with both qualitative and quantitative information. Results Noteworthy differences were observed among the three sample groups of doctors, nurses and administrators as well as between our two hospital groups. The impact of automation in terms of cost and strategic value in public sector hospitals is shown to have yielded positive outcomes with regard to patient experience, hospital staff workflow enhancements, and overall morale in the workplace. Conclusion The research provides insight into the reasons for investing in system automation, the associated outcomes, and organisational factors that impact the successful adoption of IT systems. In addition, it finds that sustainable success in these initiatives is as much a function of the technology as it is of the change management function that must accompany the system implementation. PMID:23347433

2013-01-01

219

A hospital-based estimate of major causes of death among under-five children from a health facility in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria: possible indicators of health inequality  

PubMed Central

Introduction Current evidence on the root-causes of deaths among children younger than 5years is critical to direct international efforts to improve child survival, focus on health promotion and achieve Millennium Development Goal 4. We report a hospital-based estimate for 2005-2007 of the major causes of death in children in this age-group in south-west Nigeria. Methods We used retrospective data from the intensive care unit of a second-tier health facility to extract the presenting complaints, clinical diagnosis, treatment courses, prognosis and outcome among children aged 659months. SPSS-19 was used for data analysis. Results Of the 301 children (58% males, 42% females) admitted into the ICU within the period of study, 173 (26%) presented with complaints related to the gastrointestinal system, 138 (21%) with respiratory symptoms and 196 (29%) with complaints of fever. Overall, 708 investigations were requested for among which were full blood count (215, 30%) and blood slides for malaria parasite (166, 23%). Infection ranked highest (181, 31%) in clinicians diagnosis, followed by haematological health problems (109, 19%) and respiratory illnesses (101, 17%). There were negative correlations between outcome of the illness and patients weight (r=-0.195, p=0.001) and a strong positive correlation between prognosis and outcome of admission (r=0.196, p=0.001). Of the 59 (20%) children that died, presentation of respiratory tract illnesses were significantly higher in females (75%) than in males (39%) (?=7.06; p=0.008) and diagnoses related to gastrointestinal pathology were significantly higher in males (18%) than in females (0%) (?=4.07; p=0.05). Majority of the deaths (21%) occurred among children aged 1.0 to 1.9years old and among weight group of 5.1-15.0kg. Conclusion The major causes of deaths among under-five years old originate from respiratory, gastrointestinal and infectious diseases diseases that were recognized as major causes of childhood mortality about half a century earlier. Realization of MDG4 - to reduce child mortality by two-thirds is only possible if the government and donor agencies look beyond the health sector to find hidden causative factors such as education and housing and within the health sector such as vibrant maternal, new-born, and child health interventions. PMID:22873746

2012-01-01

220

National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services newsinhealth.nih.gov continued on page 2  

E-print Network

at Ohio State University. She and other researchers have found that stress affects the body's immune how stress affects your health and what you can do about it. Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Immune System The system that protects your body from microscopic threats. Feeling Stressed? Stress

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

221

Formal and informal payments in health care facilities in two Russian cities, Tyumen and Lipetsk.  

PubMed

Informal payments for health care services are common in many transition countries, including Russia. While the Russian government proclaims its policy goal of improving access to and quality of free-of-charge health services, it has approved regulations that give local authorities the right to provide services against payment. This paper reports the results of a population-based survey (n = 2001) examining the prevalence of the use of medical services for which people pay formally or informally in two regional capitals of different economic status. The purpose of the study was to reveal any differences in the forms of and reasons for payments between the two cities and between socio-economic groups. The results indicate that formal payments were more common in the capital of the wealthier region, Tyumen, while the prevalence of informal payments was higher in the capital of the poorer region, Lipetsk. Around 15% of respondents had made informal payments in the past 3 years. Being a female (OR = 1.57), having a chronic disease (OR = 1.62), being a pensioner (OR = 2.8) and being willing to pay for additional medical information (OR = 2.48) increased the probability of informal payments. The survey demonstrates that in Russia access to and quality of publicly funded health care services may be under serious threat due to the current unclear, non-transparent financial rules. The practice of informal payments exists along with the introduction of formal chargeable government services, which may hamper the government's efforts to enhance equality among health service users. PMID:19625468

Aarva, Pauliina; Ilchenko, Irina; Gorobets, Pavel; Rogacheva, Anastasiya

2009-09-01

222

Availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care: experience of health facility managers in a rural District of Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Provision of quality emergency obstetric care relies upon the presence of skilled health attendants working in an environment where drugs and medical supplies are available when needed and in adequate quantity and of assured quality. This study aimed to describe the experience of rural health facility managers in ensuring the timely availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a total of 17 health facility managers: 14 from dispensaries and three from health centers. Two members of the Council Health Management Team and one member of the Council Health Service Board were also interviewed. A survey of health facilities was conducted to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Participants reported on the unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies for EmOC; this was supported by the absence of essential items observed during the facility survey. The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies was reported to result in the provision of untimely and suboptimal EmOC services. An insufficient budget for drugs from central government, lack of accountability within the supply system and a bureaucratic process of accessing the locally mobilized drug fund were reported to contribute to the current situation. Conclusion The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies compromises the timely provision of quality EmOC. Multiple approaches should be used to address challenges within the health system that prevent access to essential drugs and supplies for maternal health. There should be a special focus on improving the governance of the drug delivery system so that it promotes the accountability of key players, transparency in the handling of information and drug funds, and the participation of key stakeholders in decision making over the allocation of locally collected drug funds. PMID:24646098

2014-01-01

223

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

1994-12-01

224

An overview of the space medicine program and development of the Health Maintenance Facility for Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because the prolonged stay on board the Space Station will increase the risk of possible inflight medical problems from that on Skylab missions, the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) planned for the Space Station is much more sophisticated than the small clinics of the Skylab missions. The development of the HMF is directed by the consideration of three primary factors: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries and illnesses that may occur in flight. The major components of the HMF include the clinical laboratory, pharmacy, imaging system, critical-care system, patient-restraint system, data-management system, exercise system, surgical system, electrophysiologic-monitoring system, introvenous-fluid system, dental system, and hyperbaric-treatment-support system.

Pool, Sam Lee

1988-01-01

225

Health impact assessment of waste management facilities in three European countries  

PubMed Central

Background Policies on waste disposal in Europe are heterogeneous and rapidly changing, with potential health implications that are largely unknown. We conducted a health impact assessment of landfilling and incineration in three European countries: Italy, Slovakia and England. Methods A total of 49 (Italy), 2 (Slovakia), and 11 (England) incinerators were operating in 2001 while for landfills the figures were 619, 121 and 232, respectively. The study population consisted of residents living within 3 km of an incinerator and 2 km of a landfill. Excess risk estimates from epidemiological studies were used, combined with air pollution dispersion modelling for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). For incinerators, we estimated attributable cancer incidence and years of life lost (YoLL), while for landfills we estimated attributable cases of congenital anomalies and low birth weight infants. Results About 1,000,000, 16,000, and 1,200,000 subjects lived close to incinerators in Italy, Slovakia and England, respectively. The additional contribution to NO2 levels within a 3 km radius was 0.23, 0.15, and 0.14 ?g/m3, respectively. Lower values were found for PM10. Assuming that the incinerators continue to operate until 2020, we are moderately confident that the annual number of cancer cases due to exposure in 2001-2020 will reach 11, 0, and 7 in 2020 and then decline to 0 in the three countries in 2050. We are moderately confident that by 2050, the attributable impact on the 2001 cohort of residents will be 3,621 (Italy), 37 (Slovakia) and 3,966 (England) YoLL. The total exposed population to landfills was 1,350,000, 329,000, and 1,425,000 subjects, respectively. We are moderately confident that the annual additional cases of congenital anomalies up to 2030 will be approximately 2, 2, and 3 whereas there will be 42, 13, and 59 additional low-birth weight newborns, respectively. Conclusions The current health impacts of landfilling and incineration can be characterized as moderate when compared to other sources of environmental pollution, e.g. traffic or industrial emissions, that have an impact on public health. There are several uncertainties and critical assumptions in the assessment model, but it provides insight into the relative health impact attributable to waste management. PMID:21635784

2011-01-01

226

In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

Lloyd, Charles W.

1993-01-01

227

Indian Health Service: Find Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Find Health Care Share This Page: Find Health Care IMPORTANT If you are having a health emergency ... services, continuous nursing services and that provides comprehensive health care including diagnosis and treatment. Health Locations An ambulatory ...

228

ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

NONE

1998-07-01

229

Situation analysis of existing facilities for screening, treatment and prevention of cervical cancer in hospitals/primary health centers of Delhi-NCR region, India.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer, the second most common malignancy all over the world, is associated with HPV infection. In a developing country like India, lack of early detection and treatment facilities is the main cause for its high burden. Therefore, through our study we e tried to present the current scenario of existing facilities for the detection and treatment of cervical cancer in hospitals and primary health centers (PHCs) of Delhi-NCR region. Data were collected from 312 healthcare facilities including public and private hospitals and PHCs of all nine districts from Delhi-NCR region. Healthcare providers including gynecologists, medical officers, women health care providers and paramedical staff were interviewed, using a questionnaire; the facilities for screening, diagnosing, and treating cervical cancer in each institution were recorded, using a previously designed checklist. Our study has shown that the basic facilities for the detection and treatment of cervical cancer are abhorrently lacking in Public hospitals and PHCs as compared to the Private hospitals in Delhi-NCR region. This study demonstrates that there is an urgent need for more investment in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer facilities in public and rural healthcare facilities of Delhi-NCR region. PMID:25041021

Chawla, P Cheena; Chawla, Anil Kumar; Shrivastava, Richa; Shrivastava, Anju; Chaudhary, Seema

2014-01-01

230

Giving cell phones to pregnant women and improving services may increase primary health facility utilization: a casecontrol study of a Nigerian project  

PubMed Central

Background Worldwide, about 287 000 women die each year from mostly preventable complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. A disproportionately high number of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The Abiye (Safe Motherhood) project in the Ifedore Local Government Area (LGA) of Ondo-State of Nigeria aimed at improving facility utilization and maternal health through the use of cell phones and generally improved health care services for pregnant women, including Health Rangers, renovated Health Centres, and improved means of transportation. Methods A one-year sample of retrospective data was collected from hospital records and patients case files from Ifedore (the project area) and Idanre (control area) and was analyzed to determine healthcare facility utilization rates in each location. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to generate supplemental data. Results The total facility utilization rate of pregnant women was significantly higher in Ifedore than in Idanre. The facility utilization rate of the primary health care centres was significantly higher in Ifedore than in Idanre. The number of recorded cases of the five major causes of maternal death in the two LGAs was not significantly different, possibly because the project was new. Conclusions Giving cell phones to pregnant women and generally improving services could increase their utilization of the primary healthcare system. PMID:24438150

2014-01-01

231

PAGE 1 of 4 The Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) Program and the Dependent Care Assistance Program (DeCAP)  

E-print Network

PAGE 1 of 4 The Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) Program and the Dependent Care Assistance Program (DeCAP) are divisions of the Office of Labor Relations' Tax-Favored Benefits Program PLAN YEAR 2013 ENROLLMENT/CHANGE FORM FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS (FSA) PROGRAM 40 Rector Street, 3rd Floor

Qiu, Weigang

232

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.12 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

the patient's designation of the means and location of alternative delivery of the PHI. For example Communications by Alternative Means or at Alternative Locations SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU or at alternative locations of their Protected Health Information, as required by the Health Insurance Portability

233

Health, United States, 2000 With Adolescent Health Chartbook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released this major report on health in the United States. It is an electronic edition of the annual report which details a variety of health statistics, such as "birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, morbidity and health status, risk factors, use of ambulatory care and inpatient care, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and other health topics." Users can download the full text of the 450-page report by topical section or in its entirety. Additionally, the report also includes a chartbook and trend tables that may be downloaded in Excel or Lotus formats. Updated tables, the official news releases, and previous editions of the report are also available at the site.

Duran, C. R.

2000-01-01

234

The influences of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on women's choice of prenatal care facility: Investigation of differences between rural and non-rural areas  

PubMed Central

Background Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI), implemented in 1995, substantially increased the number of health care facilities that can deliver free prenatal care. Because of the increase in such facilities, it is usually assumed that women would have more choices regarding prenatal care facilities and thus experience reduction in travel cost. Nevertheless, there has been no research exploring these issues in the literature. This study compares how Taiwan's NHI program may have influenced choice of prenatal care facility and perception regarding convenience in transportation for obtaining such care for women in rural and non-rural areas in Taiwan. Methods Based on data collected by a national survey conducted by Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in 2000, we tried to compare how women chose prenatal care facility before and after Taiwan's National Health Insurance program was implemented. Basing our analysis on how women answered questionnaire items regarding "the type of major health care facility used and convenience of transportation to and from prenatal care facility," we investigated whether there were disparities in how women in rural and non-rural areas chose prenatal care facilities and felt about the transportation, and whether the NHI had different influences for the two groups of women. Results After NHI, women in rural areas were more likely than before to choose large hospitals for prenatal care services. For women in rural areas, the relative probability of choosing large hospitals to choosing non-hospital settings in 19981999 was about 6.54 times of that in 19901992. In contrast, no such change was found in women in non-rural areas. For a woman in a non-rural area, she was significantly more likely to perceive the transportation to and from prenatal care facilities to be very convenient between 1998 and 1999 than in the period between 1990 and 1992. No such improvement was found for women in rural areas. Conclusion We concluded that women in rural areas were more likely to seek prenatal care in large hospitals, but were not more likely to perceive very convenient transportation to and from prenatal care facilities in the late 1990s than in the early 1990s. In contrast, women in non-rural areas did not have a stronger tendency to seek prenatal care in large hospitals in the late 1990s than in earlier periods. In addition, they did perceive an improvement in transportation for acquiring prenatal care in the late 1990s. More efforts should be made to reduce these disparities. PMID:18373869

Chen, Likwang; Chen, Chi-Liang; Yang, Wei-Chih

2008-01-01

235

Health risks associated with ingesting venison from a uranium enrichment facility with multiple operable units  

SciTech Connect

Ingestion of game, including venison, may be a significant exposure pathway in human health risk assessments at hazardous waste sites. The difficulty associated with modeling contaminant tissue concentrations in a wide-ranging herbivorous mammal is compounded when the home range of the mammal extends over multiple operable units (OUs) of varying size and media contaminant concentration. Using biotransfer factors extracted from the literature and species-specific parameter information (e.g., home range size, diet, forage and water ingestion rates) the authors estimate contaminant concentrations in venison based on soil and surface water contaminant concentrations and determine the contribution of individual OUs to modeled venison tissue concentrations. Estimated tissue concentrations are calculated through the use of site foraging factors (SFFS) that adjust exposure contributions from individual OUs to account for the size of the OU in relation to the animals home range. The authors then use the venison tissue concentrations to estimate human health risk associated with ingesting venison under both a current and future exposure scenario.

Duncan, J.; Welsh, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management

1995-12-31

236

Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures were recommended. PMID:24106574

Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

2013-01-01

237

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-04-01

238

Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion  

MedlinePLUS

... of blindness among adults. 6 Top of page Health Risk Behaviors that Cause Chronic Diseases Health risk behaviors ... of page The Cost of Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Behaviors The majority of US health care and ...

239

Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Methods Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 19572007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. Results During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (?13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (?1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (?69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Conclusion Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion. PMID:22574194

Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastin; Romero, Camila X.; Aguilera, Hernn; Ahlers, Ivonne

2012-01-01

240

UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-14 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY  

E-print Network

for chemical, high hazard, radioactive, and biological wastes. Personnel safety, requirements of the law://blink.ucsd.edu/facilities/services/shipping/hazardous/ C. DISPOSAL a. Disposal to the Sanitary Sewer Prohibition Radioactive materials or wastes containing, radioactive materials and any other hazardous wastes shall never be disposed of in the general waste

Aluwihare, Lihini

241

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.13 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

/or local laws and regulations. POLICY: LSUHSC-NO healthcare facilities and providers will take reasonable information ­LSU workplace practices: Paper: · Each LSUHSC-NO workplace will store files and documents-NO workplace will ensure that files and documents awaiting disposal or destruction in desk-site containers

242

Savings analysis of a 1 MW cogeneration system at a Texas mental health facility  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration is defined as the generation of electric power and coincident recovery of useful thermal energy from a single prime mover using a single fuel. The 1 MW gas turbine cogeneration system at Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), Austin, came on line in March, 1992 and is a unique application of federal and state funds. This system has been analyzed for its present performance and loads using hourly measured data. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A and M University has been collecting hourly data for natural gas use and the electrical energy produced by the engine since August, 1992. Waste heat recovered by the Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) is also monitored. This paper describes the present system, analyzes the system using hourly monitored data, calculates energy and dollar savings, compares the measured results with the estimated savings, and discusses some of the problems encountered during the first year of operation.

Athar, A.; Turner, W.D.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); McClean, G. [Texas Department for Mental Health and Mental Retardation, Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

243

Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Hong Kong's Residential Care Facilities: A Descriptive Analysis of Health and Disease Patterns by Sex, Age, and Presence of Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to describe the health status profile and identify the healthcare needs of adults with intellectual disability (ID) residing in 18 of Hong Kong's residential care facilities. The author employed a cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire survey to collect data on 811 persons with ID (432 males, 53.3%, and

Wong, Chi Wai

2011-01-01

244

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01

245

Counting the cost of not costing HIV health facilities accurately: pay now, or pay more later.  

PubMed

The HIV pandemic continues to be one of our greatest contemporary public health threats. Policy makers in many middle- and low-income countries are in the process of scaling up HIV prevention, treatment and care services in the context of a reduction in international HIV funding due to the global economic downturn. In order to scale up services that are sustainable in the long term, policy makers and implementers need to have access to robust and contemporary strategic information, including financial information on expenditure and cost, in order to be able to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate HIV services. A major problem in middle- and low-income countries continues to be a lack of basic information on the use of services, their cost, outcome and impact, while those few costing studies that have been performed were often not done in a standardized fashion. Some researchers handle this by transposing information from one country to another, developing mathematical or statistical models that rest on assumptions or information that may not be applicable, or using top-down costing methods that only provide global financial costs rather than using bottom-up ingredients-based costing. While these methods provide answers in the short term, countries should develop systematic data collection systems to store, transfer and produce robust and contemporary strategic financial information for stakeholders at local, sub-national and national levels. National aggregated information should act as the main source of financial data for international donors, agencies or other organizations involved with the global HIV response. This paper describes the financial information required by policy makers and other stakeholders to enable them to make evidence-informed decisions and reviews the quantity and quality of the financial information available, as indicated by cost studies published between 1981 and 2008. Among the lessons learned from reviewing these studies, a need was identified for providing countries with practical guidance to produce reliable and standardized costing data to monitor performance, as countries want to improve programmes and services, and have to demonstrate an efficient use of resources. Finally, the issues raised in this paper relate to the provision of all areas of healthcare in countries and it is going to be increasingly important to leverage the lessons learned from the HIV experience and use resources more effectively and efficiently to improve health systems in general. PMID:22830633

Beck, Eduard J; Avila, Carlos; Gerbase, Sofia; Harling, Guy; De Lay, Paul

2012-10-01

246

Quality of prescribing for hypertension and bronchial asthma at a tertiary health care facility, India using Prescription Quality Index tool  

PubMed Central

Objective: Several tools have been introduced to evaluate the quality of prescribing. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of prescribing in hypertension and bronchial asthma in tertiary health care (THC) setting using the new Prescription Quality Index (PQI) tool and to assess the reliability of this tool. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out for 2 months in order to assess the quality of prescribing of antihypertensive and antiasthmatic drugs using recently described PQI at THC facility. Patients with hypertension and bronchial asthma, attending out-patient departments of internal medicine and pulmonary medicine respectively for at least 3 months were included. Complete medical history and prescriptions received were noted. Total and criteria wise PQI scores were derived for each prescription. Prescriptions were categorized as poor, medium and high quality based on total PQI scores. Results: A total of 222 patients were included. Mean age was 56 15.1 years (range 4-87 years) with 67 (30.2%) patients above 65 years of age. Mean total PQI score was 32.1 5.1. Of 222 prescriptions, 103 (46.4%) prescriptions were of high quality with PQI score ?34. Quality of prescribing did not differ between hypertension and bronchial asthma (P > 0.05). The value of Cronbach's ? for the entire 22 criteria of PQI was 0.71. Conclusion: As evaluated by PQI tool, the quality of prescribing for hypertension and bronchial asthma is good in about 47% of prescriptions at THC facility. PQI is valid for measuring prescribing quality in these chronic diseases in Indian setting.

Suthar, Jalpa V.; Patel, Varsha J.; Vaishnav, B.

2014-01-01

247

Risk Factors for Birth Asphyxia in an Urban Health Facility in Cameroon  

PubMed Central

Objective The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 4 million children are born with asphyxia every year, of which 1 million die and an equal number survive with severe neurologic sequelae. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors of birth asphyxia and the hospital outcome of affected neonates. Materials & Methods This study was a prospective case-control study on term neonates in a tertiary hospital in Yaounde, with an Apgar score of < 7 at the 5th minute as the case group, that were matched with neonates with an Apgar score of ? 7 at the 5th minute as control group. Statistical analysis of relevant variables of the mother and neonates was carried out to determine the significant risk factors. Results The prevalence of neonatal asphyxia was 80.5 per 1000 live births. Statistically significant risk factors were the single matrimonial status, place of antenatal visits, malaria, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, prolonged labor, arrest of labour, prolonged rupture of membranes, and non-cephalic presentation. Hospital mortality was 6.7%, that 12.2% of them had neurologic deficits and/or abnormal transfontanellar ultrasound/electroencephalogram on discharge, and 81.1% had a satisfactory outcome. Conclusion The incidence of birth asphyxia in this study was 80.5% per1000 live birth with a mortality of 6.7%. Antepartum risk factors were: place of antenatal visit, malaria during pregnancy, and preeclampsia/eclampsia. Whereas prolonged labor, stationary labor, and term prolonged rupture of membranes were intrapartum risk faktors. Preventive measures during prenatal visits through informing and communicating with pregnant women should be reinforced. PMID:24665306

CHIABI, Andreas; NGUEFACK, Seraphin; MAH, Evelyne; NODEM, Sostenne; MBUAGBAW, Lawrence; MBONDA, Elie; TCHOKOTEU, Pierre-Fernand; DOH FRCOG, Anderson

2013-01-01

248

Home Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care What is Home Health Care? How Do I ... More About Home Health Care? What is Home Health Care? Home health care helps seniors live independently for ...

249

Health Service Areas used in SEER*Stat  

Cancer.gov

Health Service AreaPage ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17 excl AK)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 13)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 9)Page ofHSA # (NCI Modified) Health Service Area (NCI Modified) Description State-county FIPS Butler,

250

Page 1 of 4 Revised 7/11 Certification of Health Care Provider  

E-print Network

by another provider of health services (e.g., physical therapist), please state the nature of the treatments or an individual's family member or an embryo lawfully held by an individual or family member receiving assistive a general description of such regimen (e.g., prescription drugs, physical therapy requiring special

Meyers, Steven D.

251

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.10 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

as otherwise statutorily excluded. Such exclusions consists of psychotherapy notes, information incident. Examples of Protected Health Information include medical and billing records of a patient. Psychotherapy counseling session and that are separated from the rest of the individual's record. Psychotherapy notes do

252

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

, there is no need to label the bags as infectious. REFERENCE: Centers for Disease Control, Recommendations for non-linen items (i.e. sharps, blades and instruments) prior to placing in cloth bags. Soiled areas of Infectious Agents in Health Care Settings. Am J Infect Control. 35:S65-164, 2007. APPROVAL: Infection Control

Oliver, Douglas L.

253

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital  

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with the patient's health and safety in mind and that of the patient care provider and the John Dempsey Hospital physician will immediately be consulted. c. A mask will be placed on the patient and the patient will be escorted to a negative pressure isolation room. d. The staff providing care for the patient

Oliver, Douglas L.

254

Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover among Nurses in Sidama Zone Public Health Facilities, South Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background. Workplace turnover is destructive to nursing and patient outcomes as it leads to losing competent and qualified nurses. However, developments of coping strategies demand a clear understanding of workplace variables that either motivate nurses to remain employed or lead them to leave their current jobs. Objective. This study was designed toassess factors influencing job satisfaction and intention to turnover among nurses in Sidama zone public health facilities, in Southern Ethiopia. Method. Cross-sectional study design was carried out on 278 nurses using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods from May 12 to June 05, 2010. Result. A total of 242 nurses were interviewed giving a response rate of 87%. Nearly two-third (68.6%) of the participants were female, and the mean age was 28 (6.27) years for both sexes. All job satisfaction subscale except benefit and salary subscale were significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Satisfactions with work environment and group cohesion (AOR: 0.25 [95% CI: 0.12, 0.51]), single cohesion (AOR: 2.56 [95% CI: 1.27, 5.13]), and working in hospital (AOR: 2.19 [95% CI: 1.12, 4.30]) were the final significant predictors of anticipated turnover of Sidama zone nurses. Conclusions. More than any factors managers should consider the modification of working environment and group cohesions rather than trying to modify nurses to retain and maintain more experienced nurses for the organizations. PMID:24707397

Belachew, Tefera; Yimam, Ebrahim

2014-01-01

255

Systematic review of facility-based sexual and reproductive health services for female sex workers in Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Several biological, behavioural, and structural risk factors place female sex workers (FSWs) at heightened risk of HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and other adverse sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes. FSW projects in many settings have demonstrated effective ways of altering this risk, improving the health and wellbeing of these women. Yet the optimum delivery model of FSW projects in Africa is unclear. This systematic review describes intervention packages, service-delivery models, and extent of government involvement in these services in Africa. Methods On 22 November 2012, we searched Web of Science and MEDLINE, without date restrictions, for studies describing clinical and non-clinical facility-based SRH prevention and care services for FSWs in low- and middle-income countries in Africa. We also identified articles in key non-indexed journals and on websites of international organizations. A single reviewer screened titles and abstracts, and extracted data from articles using standardised tools. Results We located 149 articles, which described 54 projects. Most were localised and small-scale; focused on research activities (rather than on large-scale service delivery); operated with little coordination, either nationally or regionally; and had scanty government support (instead a range of international donors generally funded services). Almost all sites only addressed HIV prevention and STIs. Most services distributed male condoms, but only 10% provided female condoms. HIV services mainly encompassed HIV counselling and testing; few offered HIV care and treatment such as CD4 testing or antiretroviral therapy (ART). While STI services were more comprehensive, periodic presumptive treatment was only provided in 11 instances. Services often ignored broader SRH needs such as family planning, cervical cancer screening, and gender-based violence services. Conclusions Sex work programmes in Africa have limited coverage and a narrow scope of services and are poorly coordinated with broader HIV and SRH services. To improve FSWs health and reduce onward HIV transmission, access to ART needs to be addressed urgently. Nevertheless, HIV prevention should remain the mainstay of services. Service delivery models that integrate broader SRH services and address structural risk factors are much needed. Government-led FSW services of high quality and scale would markedly reduce SRH vulnerabilities of FSWs in Africa. PMID:24916010

2014-01-01

256

Why some women fail to give birth at health facilities: a qualitative study of womens perceptions of perinatal care from rural Southern Malawi  

PubMed Central

Background Despite Malawi governments policy to support women to deliver in health facilities with the assistance of skilled attendants, some women do not access this care. Objective The study explores the reasons why women delivered at home without skilled attendance despite receiving antenatal care at a health centre and their perceptions of perinatal care. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using a semi- structured interview guide that collected information on womens perception on perinatal care. A total of 12 in- depth interviews were conducted with women that had delivered at home in the period December 2010 to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers before, during, and after delivery. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Onset of labor at night, rainy season, rapid labor, socio-cultural factors and health workers attitudes were related to the women delivering at home. The participants were assisted in the delivery by traditional birth attendants, relatives or neighbors. Two women delivered alone. Most women went to the health facility the same day after delivery. Conclusions This study reveals beliefs about labor and delivery that need to be addressed through provision of appropriate perinatal information to raise community awareness. Even though, it is not easy to change cultural beliefs to convince women to use health facilities for deliveries. There is a need for further exploration of barriers that prevent women from accessing health care for better understanding and subsequently identification of optimal solutions with involvement of the communities themselves. PMID:23394229

2013-01-01

257

Facility safety study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

1979-01-01

258

Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Services Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the drug and ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

259

Respectful maternity care in three health facilities in Burkina Faso: the experience of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Burkina Faso.  

PubMed

The Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Burkina Faso (SOGOB) conducted a project to reinforce skills in respectful maternity care among its members and health workers at three facilities. The participatory process allowed health workers to self-diagnose quality of care, recognize their own responsibility, propose solutions, and pledge respectful care commitments that were specific for each unit. Key commitments included good reception; humanistic clinical examination; attentive listening and responsiveness to patient needs; privacy, discretion, and confidentiality; availability; and comfort. These commitments can potentially be modified after each evaluation by SOGOB. Poor working conditions were found to negatively impact on quality of care. High staff turnover, frequent technical malfunctions, and inadequate infrastructure were identified as issues that require future focus to ensure improvements in quality of care are sustainable. Programs that aim to improve the maternity experience by linking good practice with humanistic care merit rollout to all healthcare facilities in Burkina Faso. PMID:25087176

Oudraogo, Ali; Kiemtor, Sibraogo; Zaman, Hyacinthe; Bonan, Blandine T; Akotionga, Michel; Lankoande, Jean

2014-10-01

260

Getting antimalarials on target: impact of national roll-out of malaria rapid diagnostic tests on health facility treatment in three regions of Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Objectives Parasitological confirmation of malaria prior to treatment is recommended for patients of all ages, with malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) an important tool to target artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) to patients with malaria. To evaluate the impact on case management practices of routine government implementation of mRDTs, we conducted large-scale health facility surveys in three regions of Tanzania before and after mRDT roll-out. Methods Febrile patients at randomly selected health facilities were interviewed about care received at the facility, and blood samples were collected for reference blood smears. Health facility staff were interviewed about their qualifications and availability of malaria diagnostics and drugs. Results The percentage of febrile patients tested for malaria at the facility increased from 15.8% in 2010 to 54.9% in 2012. ACTs were obtained by 65.8% of patients positive by reference blood smear in 2010 and by 50.2% in 2012 (P=0.0675); no antimalarial was obtained by 57.8% of malaria-negative patients in 2010 and by 82.3% in 2012 (P<0.0001). Overall, ACT use decreased (39.921.3%, P<0.0001) and antibiotic use increased (31.248.5%, P<0.0001). Conclusion Roll-out of mRDTs in Tanzania dramatically improved diagnostic testing for malaria and reduced overuse of ACTs for patients without parasitemia. However, postroll-out almost 50% of febrile patients did not receive a diagnostic test, and almost 50% of patients testing positive did not receive ACTs. Stock-outs of ACTs and mRDTs were important problems. Further investigation is needed to determine reasons for not providing ACTs to patients with malaria and potential for inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:23937722

Bruxvoort, Katia; Kalolella, Admirabilis; Nchimbi, Happy; Festo, Charles; Taylor, Mark; Thomson, Rebecca; Cairns, Matthew; Thwing, Julie; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S Patrick

2013-01-01

261

THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER JOHN DEMPSEY HOSPITAL  

E-print Network

: ADMINISTRATION NUMBER: 02-020 SUBJECT: JOHN DEMPSEY HOSPITAL SPACE POLICY PAGE: 1 of 2 PURPOSE: This policy Dempsey Hospital (JDH) space in the UConn Health Center facilities. POLICY: The allocation of space the best possible decisions regarding the allocation of space, and that the process is participatory

Kim, Duck O.

262

Road map to scaling-up: translating operations research studys results into actions for expanding medical abortion services in rural health facilities in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background Identifying unsafe abortion among the major causes of maternal deaths and respecting the rights to health of women, in 2002, the Nepali parliament liberalized abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy on request. However, enhancing womens awareness on and access to safe and legal abortion services, particularly in rural areas, remains a challenge in Nepal despite a decade of the initiation of safe abortion services. Methods Between January 2011 and December 2012, an operations research study was carried out using quasi-experimental design to determine the effectiveness of engaging female community health volunteers, auxiliary nurse midwives, and nurses to provide medical abortion services from outreach health facilities to increase the accessibility and acceptability of women to medical abortion. This paper describes key components of the operations research study, key research findings, and follow-up actions that contributed to create a conducive environment and evidence in scaling up medical abortion services in rural areas of Nepal. Results It was found that careful planning and implementation, continuous advocacy, and engagement of key stakeholders, including key government officials, from the planning stage of study is not only crucial for successful completion of the project but also instrumental for translating research results into action and policy change. While challenges remained at different levels, medical abortion services delivered by nurses and auxiliary nurse midwives working at rural outreach health facilities without oversight of physicians was perceived to be accessible, effective, and of good quality by the service providers and the women who received medical abortion services from these rural health facilities. Conclusions This research provided further evidence and a road-map for expanding medical abortion services to rural areas by mid-level service providers in minimum clinical settings without the oversight of physicians, thus reducing complications and deaths due to unsafe abortion. PMID:24886393

2014-01-01

263

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

2007-10-01

264

Health and safety plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This HASP describes the process for identifying the requirements, written safety documentation, and procedures for protecting personnel involved in the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. Objective of this project is to place 19 former isotope production facilities at ORNL in a safe condition in anticipation of an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance.

NONE

1996-08-01

265

Radon Health Risks  

MedlinePLUS

... EPA Home Air Indoor Air Radon Health Risks Health Risks (September 2009) The United Nation's World Health Organization ( ... page, 26 K) . For More Information on Radon Health Risks Radon Frequently Asked Questions EPA's 2003 Updated Radon ...

266

Situation analysis and issues in management of biomedical waste in select small health care facilities in a ward under Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike, Bangalore, India.  

PubMed

Smaller health care facilities especially clinics though believed to generate lesser quantum/categories of medical waste, the number of clinics/small health care settings are considerable. The movement to manage biomedical waste in a safe and scientific manner has gathered momentum among the medium and large hospitals in Bangalore, but there has been a little understanding and focus on the smaller health care facilities/clinics in this aspect. It is important to gather evidence regarding the current situation of bio-medical waste (BMW) management and issues in smaller health care settings, so as to expand the safe management to all points of generation in Bangalore and will also help to plan relevant interventional strategies for the same. Hence an exploratory study was conducted to assess the current situation and issues in management of BMW among small health care facilities (sHCF). This cross sectional study was conducted in T. Dasarahalli (ward number 15) under Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagar Palike (BBMP) of Bangalore. Data was collected from a convenient sample of 35 nursing homes (<50 beds) and clinics in December 2011. The results of this study indicate that 3 (20 %) of nursing homes had a Policy for Health Care Waste Management, though committees for Infection control and Hospital waste management were absent. Recording system like injury and waste management registers were non-existent. In our study the Common Bio-medical Waste Treatment Facility operator collected waste from 28 (80 %) of the sHCF. Segregation at the point of generation was present in 22 (62.9 %) of the sHCF. Segregation process was compliant as per BMW rules 1998 among 5 (16.1 %) of the sHCF. 18 sHCF workers were vaccinated with hepatitis B and tetanus. Deficiencies were observed in areas of containment, sharps management and disinfection. It was observed that though the quantum and category of waste generated was limited there exist deficiencies which warrant initiation of system development measures including capacity building. PMID:23982773

Chethana, Thirthahalli; Thapsey, Hemanth; Gautham, Melur Sukumar; Sreekantaiah, Pruthvish; Suryanarayana, Suradhenupura Puttajois

2014-04-01

267

Prevalence and determinants of caesarean section in private and public health facilities in underserved South Asian communities: cross-sectional analysis of data from Bangladesh, India and Nepal  

PubMed Central

Objectives To describe the prevalence and determinants of births by caesarean section in private and public health facilities in underserved communities in South Asia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 81 community-based geographical clusters in four locations in Bangladesh, India and Nepal (three rural, one urban). Participants 45?327 births occurring in the study areas between 2005 and 2012. Outcome measures Proportion of caesarean section deliveries by location and type of facility; determinants of caesarean section delivery by location. Results Institutional delivery rates varied widely between settings, from 21% in rural India to 90% in urban India. The proportion of private and charitable facility births delivered by caesarean section was 73% in Bangladesh, 30% in rural Nepal, 18% in urban India and 5% in rural India. The odds of caesarean section were greater in private and charitable health facilities than in public facilities in three of four study locations, even when adjusted for pregnancy and delivery characteristics, maternal characteristics and year of delivery (Bangladesh: adjusted OR (AOR) 5.91, 95% CI 5.15 to 6.78; Nepal: AOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.62 to 3.44; urban India: AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.38). We found that highly educated women were particularly likely to deliver by caesarean in private facilities in urban India (AOR 2.10; 95% CI 1.61 to 2.75) and also in rural Bangladesh (AOR 11.09, 95% CI 6.28 to 19.57). Conclusions Our results lend support to the hypothesis that increased caesarean section rates in these South Asian countries may be driven in part by the private sector. They also suggest that preferences for caesarean delivery may be higher among highly educated women, and that individual-level and provider-level factors interact in driving caesarean rates higher. Rates of caesarean section in the private sector, and their maternal and neonatal health outcomes, require close monitoring. PMID:25550293

Neuman, Melissa; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Osrin, David; More, Neena Shah; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Sikorski, Catherine; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Colbourn, Tim; Houweling, Tanja A J; Seward, Nadine; Manandhar, Dharma S; Shrestha, Bhim P; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

2014-01-01

268

Environmental Public Health Performance Standards  

E-print Network

Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self Agency: Total Environmental Health Program Budget: #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (v. 2.0); Environmental Health Program Assessment Instrument, 1/7/2010 Page 2 Proportion

269

The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST): an effectiveness study on improving newborn health and survival in rural Uganda through a community-based intervention linked to health facilities - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Reducing neonatal-related deaths is one of the major bottlenecks to achieving Millennium Development Goal 4. Studies in Asia and South America have shown that neonatal mortality can be reduced through community-based interventions, but these have not been adapted to scalable intervention packages for sub-Saharan Africa where the culture, health system and policy environment is different. In Uganda, health outcomes are poor for both mothers and newborn babies. Policy opportunities for neonatal health include the new national Health Sector Strategic Plan, which now prioritizes newborn health including use of a community model through Village Health Teams (VHT). The aim of the present study is to adapt, develop and cost an integrated maternal-newborn care package that links community and facility care, and to evaluate its effect on maternal and neonatal practices in order to inform policy and scale-up in Uganda. Methods/Design Through formative research around evidence-based practices, and dialogue with policy and technical advisers, we constructed a home-based neonatal care package implemented by the responsible VHT member, effectively a Community Health Worker (CHW). This CHW was trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits - two before and three just after birth - so that linkages will be made to facility care and targeted messages for home-care and care-seeking delivered. The project is improving care in health units to provide standardized care for the mother and the newborn in both intervention and comparison areas. The study is taking place in a new Demographic Surveillance Site in two rural districts, Iganga and Mayuge, in Uganda. It is a two-arm cluster randomized controlled design with 31 intervention and 32 control areas (villages). The comparison parishes receive the standard care already being provided by the district, but to the intervention villages are added a system for CHWs to visit the mother five times in her home during pregnancy and the neonatal period. Both areas benefit from a standardized strengthening of facility care for mothers and neonates. Discussion UNEST is designed to directly feed into the operationalization of maternal and newborn care in the national VHT strategy, thereby helping to inform scale-up in rural Uganda. The study is registered as a randomized controlled trial, number ISRCTN50321130. PMID:23153395

2012-01-01

270

American College of Radiology Accredited Facility Search  

MedlinePLUS

... Safety RADPEER Additional Resources eNews Contact Q&S Accredited Facility Search Use the search form at the bottom of this page to determine whether your imaging facility is currently accredited by the American College of ...

271

Survey of Facilities for Testing Photovoltaics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

42-page report describes facilities capable of testing complete photovoltaic systems, subsystems, or components. Compilation includes facilities and capabilities of five field centers of national photovoltaics program, two state-operated agencies, and five private testing laboratories.

Weaver, R. W.

1982-01-01

272

A Comparative Analysis of the Functional Disability Levels of Adult Day Care, Adult Day Health and ICF-Level Nursing Home Elderly in Hawaii.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the functional disability levels of participants in adult day centers with patients in intermediate care facilities (ICFs). A three-page questionnaire measuring demographics, social resources, physical health, mental health, and activities of daily living as assessed by the Activities of Daily Living scale and the Instrumental

Hayashida, Cullen T.

273

Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Council on Education for Public Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Between 1945-1973, the American Public Health Association (APHA), a membership organization for public professionals, accredited graduate programs in public health. In 1974, the APHA and the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), a national association representing deans, faculty, and students of accredited schools of public health,

US Department of Education, 2010

2010-01-01

274

HIV/AIDS among Inmates of and Releasees from US Correctional Facilities, 2006: Declining Share of Epidemic but Persistent Public Health Opportunity  

PubMed Central

Because certain groups at high risk for HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) come together in correctional facilities, seroprevalence was high early in the epidemic. The share of the HIV/AIDS epidemic borne by inmates of and persons released from jails and prisons in the United States (US) in 1997 was estimated in a previous paper. While the number of inmates and releasees has risen, their HIV seroprevalence rates have fallen. We sought to determine if the share of HIV/AIDS borne by inmates and releasees in the US decreased between 1997 and 2006. We created a new model of population flow in and out of correctional facilities to estimate the number of persons released in 1997 and 2006. In 1997, approximately one in five of all HIV-infected Americans was among the 7.3 million who left a correctional facility that year. Nine years later, only one in seven (14%) of infected Americans was among the 9.1 million leaving, a 29.3% decline in the share. For black and Hispanic males, two demographic groups with heightened incarceration rates, recently released inmates comprise roughly one in five of those groups' total HIV-infected persons, a figure similar to the proportion borne by the correctional population as a whole in 1997. Decreasing HIV seroprevalence among those admitted to jails and prisons, prolonged survival and aging of the US population with HIV/AIDS beyond the crime-prone years, and success with discharge planning programs targeting HIV-infected prisoners could explain the declining concentration of the epidemic among correctional populations. Meanwhile, the number of persons with HIV/AIDS leaving correctional facilities remains virtually identical. Jails and prisons continue to be potent targets for public health interventions. The fluid nature of incarcerated populations ensures that effective interventions will be felt not only in correctional facilities but also in communities to which releasees return. PMID:19907649

Spaulding, Anne C.; Seals, Ryan M.; Page, Matthew J.; Brzozowski, Amanda K.; Rhodes, William; Hammett, Theodore M.

2009-01-01

275

75 FR 55574 - Joint Public Roundtable on Swap Execution Facilities and Security-Based Swap Execution Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Commission (``CFTC'') and Securities and Exchange Commission...swap execution facilities and security-based swap execution facilities...Interpretation & Guidance Web page at http://www.cftc...swap execution facilities and security-based swap execution...

2010-09-13

276

OSU Student Health History Form Updated 3/6/13 Page 1 Student Health Services, SHS @ Dixon, 211 Dixon Recreation Center  

E-print Network

541-737-7721 | Medical Fax 541-737-9665 | studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/ Acupuncture Health History ______________________________________ Have you had acupuncture before? 6 No 6 Yes, Name of Acupuncturist ____________________ Major Complaint:________________________________________________________ S:\\Forms & Handouts\\Health history forms\\ Acupuncture health history 2013-03-08 #12;OSU Student

Tullos, Desiree

277

Parent and Health Care Professional Perspectives on Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We on the Same Page?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A family-centered approach to health care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) is widely acknowledged as the ideal model of service delivery, but less is known about the actual practice of family-centered care (FCC), especially from the viewpoints of parents and health care professionals. This cross-sectional research compared

Bellin, Melissa H.; Osteen, Philip; Heffernan, Caitlin; Levy, Judy M.; Snyder-Vogel, Mary E.

2011-01-01

278

NIEHS Kids Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Kids Pages teach children about the connections between their health and the environment. The site encourages children to pursue careers in health, science, and the environment; explains the mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; and assists children in learning to read and master challenging mathematics and science. It offers games and activities, a story time section, information on environmental health and science topics and careers, sing-along songs and a 'Guess this Tune' game, coloring pages, brainteasers and riddles, and jokes. This is available in Spanish as well.

279

Perception of quality of maternal healthcare services among women utilising antenatal services in selected primary health facilities in Anambra State, Southeast Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study aimed at assessing antenatal care service attendees perception of quality of maternal healthcare (MHC) services in Anambra State, southeast Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 310 pregnant women utilising antenatal care (ANC) services in three purposively selected primary health centres (PHCs) in rural communities in Anambra State were studied. Reponses were elicited from the participants selected consecutively over a 4-month period, using a pre-tested, semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, utilisation and perception of MHC services. Data collected were analysed using SPSS version 17. Results: Findings showed that utilisation of facility for both antenatal (97.0%; 95% CI, 94.498.4%) and natal services (92.7%; 95% CI 89.295.2%) were quite high. Generally, most of the women were satisfied with MHC services (89.7%). Most of them were satisfied with the staff attitude (85.1%), waiting time (84.1%) and cost of services (79.5%). Being ?30 years (X2 = 4.61, P = 0.032), married (X2 = 9.70, P = 0.008) and multiparous (X2 = 9.14, P = 0.028), as well as utilisation of formal health facility for antenatal (X2 = 26.94, P = 0.000) and natal (X2 = 33.42, P = 0.000) services were associated with satisfaction with maternal health services. Conclusions: The study showed high level of satisfaction with quality of maternal health services among antenatal attendees and highlights the need to strengthen interventions that increase uptake of formal MHC services. PMID:24791050

Emelumadu, Obiageli F.; Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu Uchenna; Ukegbu, Andrew Ugwunna; Ezeama, Nkiru N.; Ifeadike, Chigozie Ozoemena; Okezie, Obasi Kanu

2014-01-01

280

Safety-net facilities and hospitalization rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2007 Texas Health Care Information Council inpatient data  

PubMed Central

Purpose Geographic disparities in hospitalization rates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been observed in Texas. However, little is known about the sources of these variations. The purpose of this manuscript is to further explore the geographic disparity of COPD hospitalization rates in Texas by examining county-level factors affecting access to care. Patients and methods The study is a cross-sectional analysis of the 2007 Texas Health Care Information Council, Texas, demographer population projections and the 2009 Area Resource File (ARF). The unit of analysis was county-specific hospitalization rate, calculated as the number of discharges of county residents divided by county-level population estimates. Indicators of access to care included: type of safety-net facility and number of pulmonary specialists in a county. Safety-net facilities of interest were federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and rural health clinics (RHCs). Results There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in hospitalization rates according to health center presence. Counties with only FQHCs had the lowest COPD hospitalization rate (132 per 100,000 observations), and counties with only RHCs had the highest hospitalization rate (229 per 100,000 observations). The presence of a pulmonary specialist was associated with a significant decrease (25%) in hospitalization rates among counties with only FQHCs. Conclusion In Texas, counties with only FQHCs were associated with lower COPD hospitalization rates. The presence of a RHC alone may be insufficient to decrease hospitalizations from COPD. There are a number of factors that may contribute to these variations in hospitalization rates, such as racial/ethnic distribution, types and quality of services provided, and the level of rurality, which creates greater distances to care and lower concentration of hospitals and pulmonary specialists. PMID:22135489

Jackson, Bradford E; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Coultas, David; Su, Fenghsiu; Lingineni, Ravi; Singh, Karan P; Bartolucci, Alfred; Bae, Sejong

2011-01-01

281

Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium\\u000a Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading\\u000a causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the\\u000a most prevalent. In

Jasim Anwar; Elias Mpofu; Lynda R Matthews; Ahmed Farah Shadoul; Kaye E Brock

2011-01-01

282

Workplace Violence towards Congolese health care workers: a survey of 436 healthcare facilities in Katanga province, Democratic Republic of Congo.  

PubMed

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate workplace violence by patients or their relatives towards health-care workers in Congolese hospitals. Methods: Through the autumn of 2012, a cross-sectional survey on workplace violence was conducted in a sample of 2,210 registered health-care workers (989 males and 1,221 females, aged 338 years) from 436 hospitals located in the province of Katanga, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Verbal aggression, harassment and physical violence perpetrated by patients or their relatives within the previous year along with factors contributing to violence, were recorded, and the response rate was 99%. Results: About 80.1% of the health-care workers had experienced one or more types of workplace violence. Overall, the severity of workplace violence varied from verbal aggression (57.4%) and harassment (15.2%) to physical violence (7.5%). Patients were the major perpetrators of verbal aggression and harassment, whereas patients' relatives were mainly involved in physical violence. The frequency of workplace violence was similar across hospitals. Male health-care workers were more likely to be victims of physical violence, whereas female health-care workers were the prime target for harassment. Only 34.3% of the violent episodes were reported to a supervisor. Furthermore, disrespect for medical deontology was the main cause of workplace violence perceived by 68.8% of the health-care workers. Conclusion: Although it has not been officially recognized, there has been workplace violence towards health-care workers perpetrated by patients or their relatives despite the fact that health-care workers have traditionally been highly respected in Congolese society. Further studies on this issue may suggest opportunities for combating violence in Congolese hospitals. PMID:25476862

Muzembo, Basilua Andre; Mbutshu, Lukuke Hendrick; Ngatu, Nlandu Roger; Malonga, Kaj Francoise; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Hirota, Ryoji; Suganuma, Narufumi

2014-12-01

283

Human health risk assessment of occupational and residential exposures to dechlorane plus in the manufacturing facility area in China and comparison with e-waste recycling site.  

PubMed

A screening level human health risk assessment based on the worst-case scenario was conducted on the occupational and residential exposures to dechlorane plus (DP) in the manufacturing facility region and an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site in China, which are two of the most polluted areas of DP in the world. Total estimated exposure doses (EEDs) via dietary intake, dermal contact, and inhalation was approximately 0.01 mg kg(-1) d(-1) for people living in the manufacturing facility region. In comparison, total EEDs (approximate 0.03 ?g kg(-1), d(-1)) were 300-fold lower in people living near an e-waste recycling site in China. Chronic oral, dermal, and inhalation reference doses (RfDs) were estimated to be 5.0, 2.0, and 0.01 mg kg(-1)d (-1), respectively. The oral RfD was markedly greater than Mirex (210(-4) mg kg(-1) d(-1)) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209; 710(-3) mg kg(-1) d(-1)), which have been or might be replaced by DP as a flame retardant with less toxicity. Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate the probability densities and functions for the hazard index which was calculated from the EEDs and RfDs to assess the human health risk. The hazard index was three orders of magnitude lower than 1, suggesting that occupational and residential exposures were relatively safe in the manufacturing facility region and e-waste recycling site. PMID:23354373

Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Byer, Jonathan D; Brimble, Samantha; Pacepavicius, Grazina

2013-02-15

284

Is a change in functional capacity or dependency in activities of daily living associated with a change in mental health among older people living in residential care facilities?  

PubMed Central

Aim Functional capacity and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) could be important mediators for an association between physical exercise and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL is associated with a change in depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities, and whether dementia can be a moderating factor for this association. Methods A prospective cohort study was undertaken. Participants were 206 older people, dependent in ADL, living in residential care facilities, 115 (56%) of whom had diagnosed dementia. Multivariate linear regression, with comprehensive adjustment for potential confounders, was used to investigate associations between differences over 3 months in Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) scores, and in BBS and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) scores. Associations were also investigated between differences in Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 scores, and in Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS scores. Results There were no significant associations between changes in scores over 3 months; the unstandardized ? for associations between BBS and GDS-15 was 0.026 (P=0.31), BBS and PGCMS 0.045 (P=0.14), Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 0.123 (P=0.06), and Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS ?0.013 (P=0.86). There were no interaction effects for dementia. Conclusion A change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL does not appear to be associated with a change in depressive symptoms or psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities. These results may offer one possible explanation as to why studies of physical exercise to influence these aspects of mental health have not shown effects in this group of older people. PMID:24379657

Conradsson, Mia; Littbrand, Hkan; Bostrm, Gustaf; Lindelf, Nina; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

2013-01-01

285

Quality of Longer Term Mental Health Facilities in Europe: Validation of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care against Service Users Views  

PubMed Central

Background The Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) is a staff rated, international toolkit that assesses care in longer term hospital and community based mental health facilities. The QuIRC was developed from review of the international literature, an international Delphi exercise with over 400 service users, practitioners, carers and advocates from ten European countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation, and review of the care standards in these countries. It can be completed in under an hour by the facility manager and has robust content validity, acceptability and inter-rater reliability. In this study, we investigated the internal validity of the QuIRC. Our aim was to identify the QuIRC domains of care that independently predicted better service user experiences of care. Method At least 20 units providing longer term care for adults with severe mental illness were recruited in each of ten European countries. Service users completed standardised measures of their experiences of care, quality of life, autonomy and the units therapeutic milieu. Unit managers completed the QuIRC. Multilevel modelling allowed analysis of associations between service user ratings as dependent variables with unit QuIRC domain ratings as independent variables. Results 1750/2495 (70%) users and the managers of 213 units from across ten European countries participated. QuIRC ratings were positively associated with service users autonomy and experiences of care. Associations between QuIRC ratings and service users ratings of their quality of life and the units therapeutic milieu were explained by service user characteristics (age, diagnosis and functioning). A hypothetical 10% increase in QuIRC rating resulted in a clinically meaningful improvement in autonomy. Conclusions Ratings of the quality of longer term mental health facilities made by service managers were positively associated with service users autonomy and experiences of care. Interventions that improve quality of care in these settings may promote service users autonomy. PMID:22675508

Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Wright, Christine; Taylor, Tatiana L.; Turton, Penny; Kallert, Thomas; Schuster, Mirjam; Cervilla, Jorge A.; Brangier, Paulette; Raboch, Jiri; Kalisova, Lucie; Onchev, Georgi; Alexiev, Spiridon; Mezzina, Roberto; Ridente, Pina; Wiersma, Durk; Visser, Ellen; Kiejna, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Ploumpidis, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jos Miguel; Cardoso, Graa; King, Michael

2012-01-01

286

Learn about Health Literacy  

MedlinePLUS

... health literate [433 KB, 27 pages] How Can Organizations, Communities, and People Improve Health Literacy? The resources ... learn about health literacy and what you, your organization or community can do to improve it. The ...

287

Physical Activity Frequency & Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... hand corner of the player. Physical Activity Frequency & Health HealthDay February 20, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Exercise ... in a study on physical activity frequency and health. They reported their level of activity at the ...

288

Alcohol and Your Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... hand corner of the player. Alcohol and Your Health HealthDay February 11, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Page Alcohol Transcript Does alcohol consumption offer any health benefits? Researchers out of the United Kingdom and ...

289

Marriage and Heart Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... hand corner of the player. Marriage and Heart Health HealthDay November 25, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Family ... marital quality, underwent lab tests to assess cardiovascular health and provided medical information about heart attacks, strokes ...

290

General Regulations, Appendix 4 Version 2012b, Page 1 of 12 Appendix 4 Code of Conduct for Use of ICT Facilities  

E-print Network

of ICT Facilities 1 Purpose The purpose of this Code of Conduct is to set the regulatory framework of the University's ICT Services, Systems and Facilities. It comes into force immediately a user account. The terms used in this Code are defined in section 17. 2 Scope This Code applies to all Users of ICT

Low, Robert

291

Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security,\\u000a waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems\\u000a but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides\\u000a environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental

Joanna Burger; Michael Gochfeld

2011-01-01

292

Energy management system optimization for on-site facility staff - a case history of the New York State Office of Mental Health  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Novus Engineering and EME Group began a project for the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) to maximize the use and benefit of energy management systems (EMS) installed at various large psychiatric hospitals throughout New York State. The project, which was funded and managed by the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY), had three major objectives: (1) Maximize Energy Savings - Novus staff quickly learned that EMS systems as set up by contractors are far from optimal for generating energy savings. This part of the program revealed numerous opportunities for increased energy savings, such as: fine tuning proportional/integral/derivative (PID) loops to eliminate valve and damper hunting; adjusting temperature reset schedules to reduce energy consumption and provide more uniform temperature conditions throughout the facilities; and modifying equipment schedules. (2) Develop Monitoring Protocols - Large EMS systems are so complex that they require a systematic approach to daily, monthly and seasonal monitoring of building system conditions in order to locate system problems before they turn into trouble calls or equipment failures. In order to assist local facility staff in their monitoring efforts, Novus prepared user-friendly handbooks on each EMS. These included monitoring protocols tailored to each facility. (3) Provide Staff Training - When a new EMS is installed at a facility, it is frequently the maintenance staffs first exposure to a complex computerized system. Without proper training in what to look for, staff use of the EMS is generally very limited. With proper training, staff can be taught to take a pro-active approach to identify and solve problems before they get out of hand. The staff then realize that the EMS is a powerful preventative maintenance tool that can be used to make their work more effective and efficient. Case histories are presented.

Bagdon, M.J.; Martin, P.J.

1997-06-01

293

Occurrence of extended spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae among pet dogs and cats: an emerging public health threat outside health care facilities.  

PubMed

We aimed to investigate the potential role of pet dogs and cats in the epidemiology of extended spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Twenty bacterial isolates were recovered from rectal swabs obtained from 110 dogs and cats. The occurrence of extended spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in pets spotlights the emergence of a significant public health threat. PMID:24792717

Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Samir, Ahmed

2014-07-01

294

JAMA Patient Page: Retinopathy  

MedlinePLUS

... jama.com. A Patient Page on causes of visual impairment was published in the October 15, 2003, issue. ... health problems that put them at risk for visual impairment should see an ophthalmologist (a doctor with specialized ...

295

Cryptosporidium and Child Care Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

... as "Crypto") Parasites Home Share Compartir Child Care Facilities More Information Prevention Measures Control Measures for Outbreaks ... Risk Factors Treatment Biology Prevention & Control Child Care Facilities Prevention Oubreak Control Camps Disease Resources for Health ...

296

CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--U.S. 2013  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Disability & Health Tribal Support CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report (CHDIR) On this Page CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report 2013 Introduction The 2013 Report Disparities Analytics ...

297

Please cite this article in press as: Y. Zhang, et al., The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.013  

E-print Network

health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012.ijmijournal.com The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case Electronic health records (EHR) Electronic nursing documentation Interview Nursing home Residential aged care

Yu, Ping

298

OHS 11-119 *Reference Health & Safety Requirements for Minors in Laboratories at Stanford University for additional guidance: Page 1  

E-print Network

facilities, and research projects. 2.Cutting Edge of Human Anatomy and Surgical. Program Participants Activities 1.Clinical Anatomy Research Scholars (CARS) Host: School of Medicine Contact: anatomy@stanford.edu Website: http://anatomy

299

Analysis of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems for Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary analysis and comparison of various environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems required of, or suggested for use by, the Departrnent of Energy Defense Programs` sites. The summary analysis is provided by means of a comparison matrix, a set of Vean diagrams that highlights the focus of the systems, and

Neglia

1998-01-01

300

Supply-Side Effect of Health Care Facilities on Productivity Amongst the Female Workers in the Readymade Garment Sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted in 4 selected garment factories within Dhaka city. The objectives of this study were to find out health care access (Supply-side effect) in the garments factory for the women workers and their relation to the productivity. A total of 300 women garment workers were included in this study. Most (60.0%) of the respondents were adolescents, unmarried

Housne Ara Begum; Homayra Fahmida

2009-01-01

301

Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential

Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

2010-01-01

302

Patterns of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria underscore importance of data collection from private health care facilities in India  

PubMed Central

Background This study describes patterns of falciparum and vivax malaria in a private comprehensive-care, multi-specialty hospital in New Delhi from July 2006 to July 2008. Methods Malarial morbidity by Plasmodium species (Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, or Plasmodium sp.) was confirmed using microscopy and antigen tests. The influence of seasonal factors and selected patient demographics on morbidity was evaluated. The proportions of malaria cases caused by P. falciparum at the private facility were compared to data from India's National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) during the same period for the Delhi region. Results In New Delhi, P. faciparum was the dominant cause of cases requiring treatment in the private hospital during the period examined. The national data reported a smaller proportion of malaria cases caused by P. falciparum in the national capital region than was observed in a private facility within the region. Plasmodium vivax also caused a large proportion of the cases presenting clinically at the private hospital during the summer and monsoon seasons. Conclusion The proportion of P. falciparum malaria cases tends to be greatest during the post-monsoon season while the proportion of P. vivax malaria cases tends to be greatest in the monsoon season. Private hospital data demonstrate an under-reporting of malaria case incidences in the data from India's national surveillance programme during the same period for the national capital region. PMID:19822005

Gupta, Sangeeta; Gunter, James T; Novak, Robert J; Regens, James L

2009-01-01

303

Applying operations management logic and tools to save lives: A case study of the world health organization's global drug facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the field of operations management, theory concerning lead-time reduction is well developed. The application of lead-time reduction theory to the not-for-profit operations context, however, has been limited. We present an illustrative case study of a not-for-profit operation in which long lead times cause a substantial increase in unnecessary deaths from tuberculosis and hinder the efforts of the World Health

Suzanne de Treville; Ian Smith; Adrian Rlli; Virginia Arnold

2006-01-01

304

[Hi-tech health care: modern status and prospects of development in medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence].  

PubMed

The article is devoted to the current issues of providing hi-tech medical care in hospitals of the Ministry of Defence. Since the beginning of 2013 the executive body of the Russian Ministry of Defense pays special attention to improvement of the quality and accessibility of health care contingent of the Ministry of Defence. Thus, according to decision of the Minister of Defense of the Russian Federation, General of the Army Sergei Shoigu in 2013 more than 1.1 billion rubles (in 2012, targeted funding of high-tech medical care in the Ministry of Defence did not materialize) was allocated for military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation to provide high-tech medical care. As a result, in 7 months in 2013 the volume of medical care has increased by 32% in comparison with the same period in 2012. Currently the main military medical department of the Ministry of Defense is working to resolve the order of delivery and financing hi-tech medical care in the Armed Forces in the following areas: inclusion of military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defence in the list of health organizations, providing high-tech medical care, approved by Order of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, legal regulation of the provision of high-tech medical care in military medical establishments of the Ministry of defense of the Russian Federation within the budget appropriation allocated to the Ministry of Defence. PMID:25046918

Fisun, A Ia; Kuvshinov, K ; Makiev, R G; Pastukhov, A G

2014-02-01

305

Perceptions of the risk for ebola and health facility use among health workers and pregnant and lactating women - kenema district, sierra leone, september 2014.  

PubMed

With an estimated maternal mortality ratio of 1,100 per 100,000 live births and a neonatal mortality rate of 49 per 1,000 live births, Sierra Leone has the highest maternal mortality ratio and the fourth highest neonatal mortality rate in the world, accounting for 2,400 maternal and 11,200 newborn deaths annually. By straining the fragile health care infrastructure, the Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic might put pregnant women and their newborns at even greater risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:25551595

Dynes, Michelle M; Miller, Laura; Sam, Tamba; Vandi, Mohamed Alex; Tomczyk, Barbara

2015-01-01

306

Impact of an electronic clinical decision support system on workflow in antenatal care: the QUALMAT eCDSS in rural health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The implementation of new technology can interrupt established workflows in health care settings. The Quality of Maternal Care (QUALMAT) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (eCDSS) for antenatal care (ANC) and delivery in rural primary health care facilities in Africa. Objective This study was carried out to investigate the influence of the QUALMAT eCDSS on the workflow of health care workers in rural primary health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania. Design A direct observation, time-and-motion study on ANC processes was conducted using a structured data sheet with predefined major task categories. The duration and sequence of tasks performed during ANC visits were observed, and changes after the implementation of the eCDSS were analyzed. Results In 24 QUALMAT study sites, 214 observations of ANC visits (144 in Ghana, 70 in Tanzania) were carried out at baseline and 148 observations (104 in Ghana, 44 in Tanzania) after the software was implemented in 12 of those sites. The median time spent combined for all centers in both countries to provide ANC at baseline was 6.5 min [interquartile range (IQR) =4.010.6]. Although the time spent on ANC increased in Tanzania and Ghana after the eCDSS implementation as compared to baseline, overall there was no significant increase in time used for ANC activities (0.51 min, p=0.06 in Ghana; and 0.54 min, p=0.26 in Tanzania) as compared to the control sites without the eCDSS. The percentage of medical history taking in women who had subsequent examinations increased after eCDSS implementation from 58.2% (39/67) to 95.3% (61/64) p<0.001 in Ghana but not in Tanzania [from 65.4% (17/26) to 71.4% (15/21) p=0.70]. Conclusions The QUALMAT eCDSS does not increase the time needed for ANC but partly streamlined workflow at sites in Ghana, showing the potential of such a system to influence quality of care positively. PMID:25630707

Mensah, Nathan; Sukums, Felix; Awine, Timothy; Meid, Andreas; Williams, John; Akweongo, Patricia; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E.; Blank, Antje

2015-01-01

307

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Introducing RDTs for Malaria Diagnosis as Compared to Microscopy and Presumptive Diagnosis in Central and Peripheral Public Health Facilities in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Cost-effectiveness information on where malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) should be introduced is limited. We developed incremental cost-effectiveness analyses with data from rural health facilities in Ghana with and without microscopy. In the latter, where diagnosis had been presumptive, the introduction of RDTs increased the proportion of patients who were correctly treated in relation to treatment with antimalarials, from 42% to 65% at an incremental societal cost of Ghana cedis (GHS)12.2 (US$8.3) per additional correctly treated patients. In the microscopy setting there was no advantage to replacing microscopy by RDT as the cost and proportion of correctly treated patients were similar. Results were sensitive to a decrease in the cost of RDTs, which cost GHS1.72 (US$1.17) per test at the time of the study and to improvements in adherence to negative tests that was just above 50% for both RDTs and microscopy. PMID:23980131

Ansah, Evelyn K.; Epokor, Michael; Whitty, Christopher J. M.; Yeung, Shunmay; Hansen, Kristian Schultz

2013-01-01

308

9/2/2014 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa | Travelers' Health | CDC http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa 1/5  

E-print Network

9/2/2014 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa | Travelers' Health | CDC http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa 1/5 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa For Colleges

Qian, Ning

309

Comparison of activities of daily living after osteoporotic hip fracture surgery in patients admitted from home and from geriatric health service facilities  

PubMed Central

With the population and proportion of the elderly increasing each year, difficulties with postoperative treatment outcomes after osteoporotic hip fracture are increasing. This study focused on activities of daily living (ADL) in patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture through an investigation of living arrangements, the presence of dementia, and other complications of aging. Information from 99 patients who lived either at home or in geriatric health service facilities was collected for this trial. Most patients were over 65 years of age and female, and about half of them had dementia. The postoperative ADL score (focusing on patients walking ability) was significant for those living at home than for those living in facilities. In addition, patients with dementia were divided into the following two categories: an early-rising group, comprising patients who were able to use a wheelchair within 48 hours of their operation; and a late-rising group, who did not start using a wheelchair until more than 48 hours after surgery. The ADL scores for the two groups were compared. Although the preoperative ADL scores were not significantly different between the two groups, postoperative ADL scores were significantly higher in the early-rising group than in the late-rising group, especially in patients who had undergone hemiarthroplasty. These data suggest that ADL in dementia patients following hip fracture depends on the surgical procedure performed and whether they are late or early risers after surgery. PMID:25378917

Horikawa, Akira; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi; Kodama, Hiroyuki

2014-01-01

310

MedlinePlus - Health Information from the National Library of Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Women's Health Checkup Allergy Asthma in Children Bullying Child Safety Childhood Immunization Children's Health Children's Page ... Women's Health Checkup Children Allergy Asthma in Children Bullying Child Safety Childhood Immunization Children's Health Children's Page ...

311

[A place of digital X-ray fluorography in the detection of lung diseases in the public health facilities of the Russian Federation].  

PubMed

The paper shows the authors' opinion as to the use of digital X-ray fluorography (DXF) to detect pathology of the lung, primarily its tuberculosis and cancer from organizational-and-methodological and purely diagnostic standpoints. Based on a great body of data pooling 21,295 studies of patients, which comprised two (screening and routine clinical) groups, they authors state their views on the place and role of lung DXF in the work of public health facilities in the Russian Federation (RF). The objectivity of the authors' opinion is confirmed by the different nature of a lung abnormality detected by DXF at both the municipal and regional levels of the RF public health system and by a comparative analysis of the findings with those of film fluorography, routine X-ray study, linear tomography, X-ray computed tomography (XCT), and surgical evidence. The study has allowed the authors to express their opinion by recommending DXF as a method for primary diagnosis of lung diseases instead of film fluorography and routine X-ray study and to appreciate it in screenings. The authors' data indicate that XCT in its simplest variant rather than linear tomography should become the optimum method that specifies the diagnosis of lung diseases detected by DXT. PMID:14515634

Portno?, L M; Viatkina, E I; Fadiev, A V; Zabotin, V M

2003-01-01

312

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

SciTech Connect

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17

313

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Not Available

1992-09-01

314

Attributes and perspectives of public providers related to provision of medical abortion at public health facilities in Vietnam: a cross-sectional study in three provinces  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to investigate attributes of public service providers associated with the provision of medical abortion in Vietnam. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study via interviewer-administered questionnaire among abortion providers from public health facilities in Hanoi, Khanh Hoa, and Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam between August 2011 and January 2012. We recruited abortion providers at all levels of Vietnams public health service delivery system. Participants were questioned about their medical abortion provision practices and perspectives regarding abortion methods. Results A total of 905 providers from 62 health facilities were included, comprising 525 (58.0%) from Hanoi, 122 (13.5%) from Khanh Hoa, and 258 (28.5%) from Ho Chi Minh City. The majority of providers were female (96.7%), aged ?25 years (94%), married (84.4%), and had at least one child (89%); 68.9% of providers offered only manual vacuum aspiration and 31.1% performed both medical abortion and manual vacuum aspiration. Those performing both methods included physicians (74.5%), midwives (21.7%), and nurses (3.9%). Unadjusted analyses showed that female providers (odds ratio 0.1; 95% confidence interval 0.010.30) and providers in rural settings (odds ratio 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.080.79) were less likely to provide medical abortion than their counterparts. Obstetricians and gynecologists were more likely to provide medical abortion than providers with nursing/midwifery training (odds ratio 22.2; 95% confidence interval 3.81129.41). The most frequently cited advantages of medical abortion for providers were that no surgical skills are required (61.7%) and client satisfaction is better (61.0%). Conclusion Provision of medical abortion in Vietnam is lower than provision of manual vacuum aspiration. While the majority of abortion providers are female midwives in Vietnam, medical abortion provision is concentrated in urban settings among physicians. Individuals providing medical abortion found that the method yields high client satisfaction. PMID:25152635

Ngo, Thoai D; Free, Caroline; Le, Hoan T; Edwards, Phil; Pham, Kiet HT; Nguyen, Yen BT; Nguyen, Thang H

2014-01-01

315

The impact of Chinas national essential medicine system on improving rational drug use in primary health care facilities: an empirical study in four provinces.  

PubMed

BackgroundThe National Essential Medicine System (NEMS) is a new policy in China launched in 2009 to improve the appropriate use of medications. This study aims to examine the outcomes of the NEMS objectives in terms of the rational use of medicines in primary health care facilities in China.MethodsA total of 28,651 prescriptions were collected from 146 township health centers in four provinces of China by means of a field survey conducted in 20102011. Indicators of rational drug use were extracted and compared using a pre/post design and then evaluated with regard to the World Health Organization (WHO) Standard Guidelines and data from previous research.ResultsThe average number of drugs per prescription decreased from 3.64 to 3.46 (p <0.01) between 2009 and 2010. Little effect was found for the NEMS on the average number of antibiotics per prescription, but the percentage of prescriptions including antibiotics decreased from 60.26 to 58.48% (p <0.01). Prescriptions for injections or adrenal corticosteroids also decreased, to 40.31 and 11.16% of all prescriptions, respectively. All these positive issues were also recorded in 2011. However, each of the above values remained higher than WHO standards. The percentage of drugs prescribed from the Essential Drug List increased after the implementation of the NEMS (p <0.01). Where the available data allowed changes in costs to be assessed, the average expense per prescription increased significantly, from 25.77 to 27.09 yuan (p <0.01).ConclusionsThe NEMS effectively improved rational medicine use in China. However, polypharmacy and the over-prescription of antibiotics and injections remain common. There is still a large unfinished agenda requiring policy improvements. Treatment guidelines, intensive support supervision, and continuing training for both professionals and consumers are the essential actions that need to be taken. PMID:25344413

Song, Yan; Bian, Ying; Petzold, Max; Li, Lingui; Yin, Aitian

2014-10-25

316

Overview of Dose Assessment Developments and the Health of Riverside Residents Close to the Mayak PA Facilities, Russia  

PubMed Central

The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) has been involved in studies related to the Mayak PA and the consequences of activities undertaken at the site for a number of years. This paper strives to present an overview of past and present activities at the Mayak PA and subsequent developments in the quantification of health effects on local populations caused by discharges of radioactive waste into the Techa River. Assessments of doses to affected populations have relied on the development of dose reconstruction techniques for both external and internal doses. Contamination levels are typically inhomogeneous and decrease with increasing distance from the discharge point. Citations made in this paper give a comprehensive, though not exhaustive, basis for further reading about this topic. PMID:19440276

Standring, William J.F.; Dowdall, Mark; Strand, Per

2009-01-01

317

Scaling up prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV infection to primary health facilities in Nigeria: findings from two primary health centres in Northwest Nigeria.  

PubMed

Nigeria is scaling up prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV interventions to primary health care centres (PHCs). This retrospective study of PMTCT was at two PHCs in Northwest Nigeria with the main outcome measure being HIV infection rate of exposed infants at 6 weeks of life. Of 10,289 women who had antenatal HIV test, 74 had positive results. This gave a prevalence of 0.7%. The uptake of antenatal (99.8%) and intrapartum (97.3%) tests was high at both centres. 30% of HIV infected mothers and 25% of exposed infants were lost to follow-up (LFU). Most women (85.7%) had highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and vaginal delivery (98%). Perinatal mortality rate was 66/1000 births and 95.3% of exposed infants had negative HIV-DNA polymerase reaction test at 6 weeks of life. Despite a high LFU, a new vista has been opened to attaining a zero infection rate. PMID:24689324

Okusanya, Babasola O; Ashimi, Adewale O; Aigere, Egbaname O; Salawu, Siyaka E; Hassan, Rakiya

2013-12-01

318

Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment

R M Hare

1986-01-01

319

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01

320

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01

321

National Institutes of Health: Health Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Health Information portion of the National Institutes of Health website covers a wide range of topics. This consumer-oriented site includes Quick Links, on the left side of the page, to such topics as "Child & Teen Health", "Men's Health", "Minority Health", and "Seniors' Health". To browse health categories, the visitor can browse several different ways. They can browse under "Body Location/Systems", "Conditions/Diseases", "Procedures", and "Health and Wellness". On the left side of the page the visitor can also choose to search for Health Topics alphabetically and for those more inclined toward audio learning, visitors can listen to NIH Radio by clicking on "MP3 audio reports" on the right side of the page. The Research in Action feature in the top middle of the page offers insight into how humans hear. Just click on the picture above Research in Action to be taken to the article. For visitors who just can't find what they need on the Health Information site, there are a slew of Related Links near the bottom of the page, including Health Information on the Web, Health Newsletters, Health Databases, and Federal Health Agencies.

322

Efficacy of Hospital Germicides against Adenovirus 8, a Common Cause of Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Health Care Facilities  

PubMed Central

The inactivation of virus-contaminated nonporous inanimate surfaces was investigated using adenovirus type 8, a common cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. A 10-?l inoculum of adenovirus was placed onto each stainless steel disk (1-cm diameter), and the inoculum was allowed to air dry for 40 min. Twenty-one different germicides (including disinfectants and antiseptics) were selected for this study based on their current uses in health care. After a 1- or 5-minute exposure to 50 ?l of the germicide, the virus-germicide test mixture was neutralized and assayed for infectivity. Using an efficacy criterion of a 3-log10 reduction in the titer of virus infectivity and regardless of the virus suspending medium (i.e., hard water, sterile water, and hard water with 5% fetal calf serum), only five disinfectants proved to be effective against the test virus at 1 min: 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde, 2.4% glutaraldehyde, 2.65% glutaraldehyde, ?6,000 ppm chlorine, and ?1,900 ppm chlorine. Four other disinfectants showed effectiveness under four of the five testing conditions: 70% ethanol, 65% ethanol with 0.63% quaternary ammonium compound, 79.6% ethanol with 0.1% quaternary ammonium compound, and 0.2% peracetic acid. Of the germicides suitable for use as an antiseptic, 70% ethanol achieved a 3-log10 reduction under four of the five test conditions. These results emphasize the need for proper selection of germicides for use in disinfecting noncritical surfaces and semicritical medical devices, such as applanation tonometers, in order to prevent outbreaks of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:16569860

Rutala, William A.; Peacock, Jeffrey E.; Gergen, Maria F.; Sobsey, Mark D.; Weber, David J.

2006-01-01

323

Risk factors for premature births: a cross-sectional analysis of hospital records in a Cameroonian health facility.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for preterm births in the Yaounde Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital in Cameroon, and to describe their outcomes. We conducted a cross-sectional analytical study of hospital records over eight years. The incidence of prematurity was 26.5 % of admissions over a period of 7 years 7 months. After controlling for confounding factors, we identified attending antenatal care visits in a health centre (Odds ratio [OR] 6.19; 95% Confidence interval [CI] 1.15 - 33.22; p = 0.033), having a urinary tract infection (OR 39.04; 95% CI 17.19 - 88.62; p < 0.001), multiple gestation (OR 3.82; 95% CI 2.68 - 5.43; p <0.001) and congenital malformations (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.24 - 6.22; p = 0.013) increased the odds of preterm birth. On the other hand being a student mother (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.20 - 0.98; p = 0.047), being married (OR 0.40 95% CI 0.19 - 0.84; p = 0.016) and more antenatal visits (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.15 - 0.35; p <0.001) reduced the odds of preterm birth Neonatal mortality in these preterm neonates was 36.6%, in which 69% occurred in the early neonatal period. The main causes of death were neonatal infections (27.6%), neonatal asphyxia (11.9%) and congenital malformations (10.3%). We recommend enhanced prenatal care and management of pathologies which arise during pregnancy. PMID:24558784

Chiabi, Andreas; Mah, Evelyn M; Mvondo, Nicole; Nguefack, Seraphin; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Kamga, Karen K; Zhang, Shiyuan; Mboudou, Emile; Tchokoteu, Pierre F; Mbond, Elie

2013-12-01

324

Health Data Interactive  

MedlinePLUS

... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Data Access Data Access Interactive Tables and Databases NCHS ... Statistics Online Research Data Center NCHS Home Health Data Interactive Welcome! Health Data Interactive presents tables with ...

325

Health Care Visits to Check More Than Just Health?  

MedlinePLUS

... News Spotlights Media Resources Selected Profiles & Interviews Multimedia Health Care Visits to Check More Than Just Health? Skip ... media links Share this: Page Content Study Shows Health Care Providers Can Help with School Readiness During Primary ...

326

62 FR 29396 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...City [[Page 29420...MEDICAL CARE: Iowa Service Area...Gowrie County--Boone...Parts: [[Page 29481...Smelser Town County--Iowa Parts: Mifflin...HEALTH: Iowa Service Area...Catchment Area 13 County--Adair...County--Page...

1997-05-30

327

Health.  

PubMed Central

Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment is then suggested, and used to shed light on some problems about mental illness and to compare and contrast it with physical illness and with political and other deviancies which are not illnesses. PMID:3806628

Hare, R M

1986-01-01

328

Health Topics: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Topics Read about symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention for ... illnesses, health conditions and wellness issues. MedlinePlus health topics are regularly reviewed, and links are updated daily. ...

329

Whole Grains and Heart Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... corner of the player. Whole Grains and Heart Health HealthDay January 6, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Carbohydrates ... TV, your source for ideas to protect your health. Mobile version Get email updates Subscribe to RSS ...

330

The Buddy System for Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... corner of the player. The Buddy System for Health HealthDay January 23, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Exercise ... according to a new study. Researchers looked at health behaviors of more than 3,700 couples either ...

331

National Health Care Survey  

Cancer.gov

The National Health Care Survey (NHCS) encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

332

11/26/12 4:27 PMCoal mine fossils: Paleontology shows us past climate change. -Slate Magazine Page 1 of 4http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/coal/2012/11/coal_mine_fossils_paleontology_shows_us_past_climate_change.single.html  

E-print Network

11/26/12 4:27 PMCoal mine fossils: Paleontology shows us past climate change. - Slate Magazine Page 1 of 4http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/coal/2012/11/coal_mine_fossils_paleontology mine fossils: Paleontology shows us past climate change. - Slate Magazine Page 2 of 4http

Montañez, Isabel Patricia

333

Anti-malarial prescriptions in three health care facilities after the emergence of chloroquine resistance in Niakhar, Senegal (19922004)  

PubMed Central

Background In the rural zone of Niakhar in Senegal, the first therapeutic failures for chloroquine (CQ) were observed in 1992. In 2003, the national policy regarding first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria was modified, replacing CQ by a transitory bi-therapy amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP), before the implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2006. The aims of the study were to assess the evolution of anti-malarial prescriptions in three health care facilities between 1992 and 2004, in parallel with increasing CQ resistance in the region. Methods The study was conducted in the area of Niakhar, a demographic surveillance site located in a sahelo-sudanese region of Senegal, with mesoendemic and seasonal malaria transmission. Health records of two public health centres and a private catholic dispensary were collected retrospectively to cover the period 19922004. Results Records included 110,093 consultations and 292,965 prescribed treatments. Twenty-five percent of treatments were anti-malarials, prescribed to 49% of patients. They were delivered all year long, but especially during the rainy season, and 20% of patients with no clinical malaria diagnosis received anti-malarials. Chloroquine and quinine represented respectively 55.7% and 34.6% of prescribed anti-malarials. Overall, chloroquine prescriptions rose from 1992 to 2000, in parallel with clinical malaria; then the CQ prescription rate decreased from 2000 and was concomitant with the rise of SP and the persistence of quinine use. AQ and SP were mainly used as bi-therapy after 2003, at the time of national treatment policy change. Conclusion The results show the overall level of anti-malarial prescription in the study area for a considerable number of patients over a large period of time. Even though resistance to CQ rapidly increased from 1992 to 2001, no change in CQ prescription was observed until the early 2000s, possibly due to the absence of an obvious decrease in CQ effectiveness, a lack of therapeutic options or a blind follow-up of national guidelines. PMID:19397797

Munier, Aline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Cot, Michel; Ndiaye, Ousmane; Arduin, Pascal; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-01

334

JAMA Patient Page: Premature Infants  

MedlinePLUS

... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development www.nichd.nih.gov Nemours Foundations Center for ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Nemours Foundation (KidsHealth) The JAMA Patient Page is ...

335

Facilities 2010/11 Annual Statement  

E-print Network

. Our student halls have a great friendly image on Facebook. The recycling facilities introduced over Support Delivery of Sustainable Capital Programme ­ Page 4 Safe & Secure Environment ­ Page 4 #12 for Money, Waste Recycling, Food Hygiene and Working at Heights. Created new in house reactive maintenance

336

BioMed Central Page 1 of 4  

E-print Network

BioMed Central Page 1 of 4 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Women's Health Open Access, the Published: 26 October 2004 BMC Women's Health 2004, 4:8 doi:10.1186/1472-6874-4-8 Received: 08 July 2004. #12;BMC Women's Health 2004, 4:8 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/4/8 Page 2 of 4 (page number

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

Battelle Primate Facility.  

PubMed

The Battelle Primate Facility houses one of the largest collections of neotropical primates in the United States. The facility is a research resource for undergraduate and graduate students. Battelle staff, as well as staff and faculty from U.S. and international institutions. Researchers have access to the animals for a variety of studies encompassing several disciplines, a large collection of preserved tissues, and an extensive biomedical database. The facility is a World Health Organization Collaborative Center for Clinical Pathology of Neotropical Primates and is involved with the Peruvian Primatological Project in Iquitos, Peru, which provides opportunities for research in primatology and conservation. PMID:1895333

Weller, R E; Wierman, E L; Mlaga, C A; Baer, J F; LeMieux, T P

1991-05-01

338

Optimism and Your Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Health HealthDay January 16, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Heart Diseases--Prevention Mental Health Transcript Always look on the bright side of life. Its not only the title of a song; its a habit that ... between optimism and cardiovascular health in more than 5,100 people who ...

339

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories  

E-print Network

includes chemical fume hoods and biosafety cabinets, standard bench space for at least 20 students of microgram quantities, an electron microscope suite with dark room, glassware washer, autoclaves, centrifuge

Stuart, Amy L.

340

VA Health Care Facilities Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... well as by viewing through an interactive map of the United States. Links to various VA services and policies are also available. return to ... FEAR Act Whistleblower Rights & Protections Site Index USA.gov White House Inspector ...

341

Security Policy Facilities Management Policy  

E-print Network

Security Policy Facilities Management Policy © Victoria University of Wellington Page 1 Effective are provided within the University precincts. The aim of the policy is: (a) To ensure the management of this policy, unless otherwise stated, the following definitions shall apply: Incident: Any unexpected event

Frean, Marcus

342

Western Canada study of animal health effects associated with exposure to emissions from oil and natural gas field facilities. Study design and data collection II. Location of study herds relative to the oil and gas industry in Western Canada.  

PubMed

During the late part of 2000 and early months of 2001, project veterinarians recruited 205 beef herds to participate in a study of the effects of emissions from the upstream oil and gas industry on cattle reproduction and health. Researchers developed herd-selection criteria to optimize the range of exposure to facilities, including oil and gas wells, battery sites, and gas-gathering and gas-processing facilities across the major cattle-producing areas of Western Canada. Herds were initially selected on the basis of a ranking system of exposure potential on the basis of herd-owner reports of the locations of their operations in relation to oil and gas industry facilities. At the end of the study, researchers summarized data obtained from provincial regulatory agencies on facility location and reported flaring and venting volumes for each herd and compared these data to the original rankings of herd-exposure potential. Through this selection process, the researchers were successful in obtaining statistically significant differences in exposure to various types of oil and gas facility types and reported emissions among herds recruited for the study. PMID:19106063

Waldner, Cheryl L

2008-01-01

343

Science and Technology Facilities Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) is a multidisciplinary research organization that supports scientists and engineers world-wide, operates large-scale research facilities, manages international research projects, and provides advice to the British government on development of research facilities. Site materials include news articles, information on STFC and its partner organizations, information on grants and funding, and information on STFC research projects. The education and public outreach page features access to publications, advice and resources for schools and colleges on astronomy, space, and particle physics; funding information; and an overview of STFC's efforts to engage public and school audiences in science and technology.

344

7/20/10 9:21 PMUMBC's Erickson School teaches students to look at aging in new way -baltimoresun.com Page 1 of 4http://www.baltimoresun.com/health/bs-md-umbc-aging-20100719,0,117316,print.story  

E-print Network

7/20/10 9:21 PMUMBC's Erickson School teaches students to look at aging in new way - baltimoresun.com Page 1 of 4http://www.baltimoresun.com/health/bs-md-umbc-aging-20100719,0,117316,print.story advertisement www.baltimoresun.com/health/bs-md-umbc-aging-20100719,0,1873889.story baltimoresun.com UMBC

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

345

COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM MONTANA OFFICE OF RURAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM May 2007 MONTANA OFFICE OF RURAL HEALTH DIVISION OF HEALTH SCIENCES MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY BOZEMAN, MT 59717 #12;Page 2 of 31 COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM I. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The overall goal of the Montana Office of Rural Health (MORH

Maxwell, Bruce D.

346

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health  

E-print Network

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health Graduate Certificate of Public Health and Public Health Sciences Wayne State University School of Medicine September 2011 Accredited by: #12;_____________________________Graduate Programs in Public Health 2011-2012___________________________ Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Berdichevsky, Victor

347

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health  

E-print Network

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health Graduate Certificate of Public Health and Public Health Sciences Wayne State University School of Medicine September 2013 Accredited by #12;_____________________________Graduate Programs in Public Health 2013-2014___________________________ Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Berdichevsky, Victor

348

Roadmap: Public Health Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-EOHS] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Mathematics and Critical Reasoning PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent

Sheridan, Scott

349

75 FR 1615 - Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement...Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement...Waste and Facilities [[Page 1616

2010-01-12

350

Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Health Services Administration ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HSVA] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

351

Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-GLHL] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-2013/LNHD This roadmap One: [14 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

352

Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Health Services Administration ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HSVA] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 29-May-13/LNHD This roadmap One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

353

Roadmap: Public Health -Health Promotion and Education Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health - Health Promotion and Education ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HPED] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

354

Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-GLHL] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap One: [13 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

355

Roadmap: Public Health Environmental Health Science Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Environmental Health Science ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-EHS] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 22-Jul-13/LNHD This roadmap 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1

Sheridan, Scott

356

Roadmap: Public Health -Health Promotion and Education Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health - Health Promotion and Education ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HPED] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

357

Roadmap: Public Health Environmental and Occupational Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Environmental and Occupational Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-EVOH] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10 Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US

Sheridan, Scott

358

Assessing Health Risks from Pesticides  

MedlinePLUS

Assessing Health Risks from Pesticides Este Web page est disponible en espaol Questions on Pesticides? Contact the National Pesticide Information ... Types of Toxicity Tests EPA Requires for Human Health Risk Assessments EPA evaluates studies conducted over different periods ...

359

Paying for Complementary Health Approaches  

MedlinePLUS

... disclaimer about external links Menu Paying for Complementary Health Approaches On this page: Introduction Spending on Complementary ... sources for additional information. Top Spending on Complementary Health Approaches in the United States According to the ...

360

Children and Complementary Health Approaches  

MedlinePLUS

... disclaimer about external links Menu Children and Complementary Health Approaches On this page: Introduction Key Points Patterns ... care. Top Patterns on the Use of Complementary Health Approaches in Children According to the 2007 National ...

361

Asian American Health - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Asian American Health - Multiple Languages Burmese (myanmasa) Chinese - Traditional (????) Hmong (Hmoob) Korean ( ... Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

362

Baby Health Checkup - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Baby Health Checkup - Multiple Languages Chinese - Simplified (????) Chinese - Traditional (????) French (franais) ... Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

363

Childhood Obesity Brings Host of Health Problems, Researchers Report  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Childhood Obesity Brings Host of Health Problems, Researchers Report High ... November 24, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Liver Diseases Obesity in Children MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ...

364

Career Minors Page 81Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog either of two significant dimensions of health care: technical and mana-  

E-print Network

in minor electives 8 total units in the minor 20 Career Minor in Women's Health Women's health is a large minor in women's health is designed to provide students with interdisciplinary course work, training, and work experience in the politics, practice, and experience of women's health. Career needs of both

Ravikumar, B.

365

Hanford facility contingency plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

Sutton, L.N.

1996-07-01

366

Native American Health  

MedlinePLUS

... racial or ethnic group has specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native-Americans.

367

Eczema Health Risks  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... lower right-hand corner of the player. Eczema Health Risks HealthDay January 22, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Eczema ... with eczema. But a new study finds the health risks from this disease may go way beyond the ...

368

Overweight Teens Who Lose Weight for Health More Likely to Succeed  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Overweight Teens Who Lose Weight for Health More Likely to ... Monday, January 5, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Obesity Teen Health Weight Control MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay ...

369

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

. Additionally, mice should be tested for Helicobacter as outlined in SOP 2.D.6, "Animal Health Monitoring health concerns: i. Additional testing of the sentinels or quarantine animals may be required2.D.9 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for ANIMAL

Krovi, Venkat

370

Increases in correct administration of chloroquine in the home and referral of sick children to health facilities through a community-based intervention in Bougouni District, Mali  

Microsoft Academic Search

Save the Children\\/USA in collaboration with the Ministry of Health of Mali has established over 300 village drug kits in southern Mali since 1996. A cluster-randomized trial was conducted between November 2001 and February 2002 in 10 health zones of Bougouni District to evaluate an intervention to (i) improve the skills of the village drug kit managers to counsel parents

P. J. Winch; A. Bagayoko; A. Diawara; M. Kan; F. Thiro; K. Gilroy; Z. Daou; Z. Berth; E. Swedberg

2003-01-01

371

Diabetes Health Concerns  

MedlinePLUS

... necessary screening tests. Top of Page How can diabetes affect cardiovascular health? Cardiovascular disease is the leading ... triglyceride, weight, and blood pressure problems related to diabetes? People with type 2 diabetes have high rates ...

372

RCRA FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

373

Nuclear Facilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In order to produce nuclear weapons, each country must have facilities to produce and refine the nuclear materials, conduct research on weapon design, and store the completed weapons. The interactives in this collection allow you to explore the nuclear facilities of the nuclear powers (both declared and undeclared).

Christopher Griffith

374

NLM Directors Comments Transcript - Family Health Portrait  

MedlinePLUS

... MedlinePlus.gov also has a family history health topic page that provides more background information on why a ... tools sections of MedlinePlus.govs family history health topic page. MedlinePlus.govs family history health topic page also ...

375

Table Of Contents Section: Page  

E-print Network

EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 2 SANITATION Table Of Contents Section: Page 02.A General-1 SECTION 2 SANITATION 02.A GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. Employers shall establish and maintain hygienic sanitation in the workplace. a. Periodic sanitation inspections of food preparation areas (kitchens and dining facilities

US Army Corps of Engineers

376

Page 2 of 3 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Page 2 of 3 3.E.5 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE.2 All work with this organism will be conducted in the BSL Level 2 Facility. 3.3 Standard entry, gowning.6 Cages & bedding will be autoclaved prior to removal from BSL2. 3.7 After autoclaving, bedding

Krovi, Venkat

377

Energy, environmental, health and cost benefits of cogeneration from fossil fuels and nuclear energy using the electrical utility facilities of a province  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is investigated for increasing the utilization efficiency of energy resources and reducing environmental emissions, focusing on utility-scale cogeneration and the contributions of nuclear energy. A case study is presented for Ontario using the nuclear and fossil facilities of the main provincial electrical utility. Implementation of utility-based cogeneration in Ontario or a region with a similar energy system and

Marc A. Rosen

2009-01-01

378

Graduate Student Handbook For The Master of Public Health Program  

E-print Network

Graduate Student Handbook For The Master of Public Health Program Loyola University Chicago Health/25/2014 Page ii Graduate Student Handbook Welcome to Loyola University Chicago's Master of Public Health.................................................................. 3 Public Health Policy And Management Track Description ......................................... 6

379

Mental Health Woes Common Among Homeless Kids, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. Mental Health Woes Common Among Homeless Kids, Study Finds Exposure to poverty, violence and ... 19, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Child Mental Health Homeless Health Concerns THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- ...

380

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-print Network

, occupational health specialists and nurses, risk managers, compliance managers, plant or facilities managers compliance officers and staff in industry, government, nonprofit and for-profit organizations: facilities and government and become proactive in managing health and safety programs. You will learn about the most current

California at Davis, University of

381

1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 28  

E-print Network

1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 28 2. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DUNS # 032987476 s DE-AC05-76RL01830 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13} CODE FACILITY ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF COF^TTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

382

\\1. CONTRACT ID CODE OF PAGES-I PAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

E-print Network

\\1. CONTRACT ID CODE OF PAGES-I PAGE AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 3 3. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DE-AC05-76RLO1830 DUNS # 032987476 ~ 108. DATED (SEE /TEM 13) CODE FACILITY ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

383

Health Ethics Education for Health Administration Chaplains  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is imperative for divinity and health administration programs to improve their level of ethics education for their graduates who work as health administration chaplains. With an initial presentation of the variation of ethical dilemmas presented in health care facilities covering social, organizational, and patient levels, we indicate the need

Porter, Russell; Broussard, Amelia; Duckett, Todd

2008-01-01

384

FACILITY DATABASE  

Cancer.gov

January 2008 LASP FACILTY Database Form 5.000 Issue Reporting Form This form is used to report data and/or program related issues regarding the FACILITY database, Supplemental, or the LASP Online Access System. Before submitting this form,

385

Facility Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

Graves, Ben E.

1984-01-01

386

Satisfaction with focused antenatal care service and associated factors among pregnant women attending focused antenatal care at health centers in Jimma town, Jimma zone, South West Ethiopia; a facility based cross-sectional study triangulated with qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Client satisfaction is essential for further improvement of quality of focused antenatal care and to provide uniform health care services for pregnant women. However, studies on level of client satisfaction with focused antenatal care and associated factors are lacking. So, the purpose of this study is to assess satisfaction with focused antenatal care service and associated factors among pregnant women attending focused antenatal care at health centers in Jimma town. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study involving both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection was used from Feb 1-30/2013. Three hundred eighty nine pregnant women those come to the health centers were included in the study. A semi-structured questionnaire and focus group discussion guide was employed to obtain the necessary information for this study. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS for windows version 16.0. Logistic regression model was used to compare level of satisfaction by predictors variables. Qualitative data was analyzed based on thematic frameworks to support the quantitative results. Result More than half of the respondents (60.4%) were satisfied with the service that they received. As to specific components, most of the respondents (80.7%) were satisfied with interpersonal aspects, and 62.2% were satisfied with organization of health care aspect. Meanwhile, 49.9% of the respondents were not satisfied with technical quality aspect and 67.1% were not satisfied with physical environment aspect. Multivariate logistic regression analysis result showed that type of health center, educational status of mother, monthly income of the family, type of pregnancy and history of stillbirth were the predictors of the level of satisfaction. The study found out that dissatisfaction was high in mothers utilizing service at Jimma health center, in mothers with tertiary educational level, in mothers with average monthly family income >1000birr, in mothers with unplanned pregnancy and in mothers with history of stillbirth. Conclusions Even though greater percentages of women (60.4%) were satisfied with the focused antenatal care service, the level of satisfaction was lower compared to other studies. The investigator recommends that patient feedback should be recognized as a legitimate method of evaluating health services in the health center as a whole. PMID:24646407

2014-01-01

387

77 FR 28788 - Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Under the Patient Protection and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...expended on medical claims and health care quality improvement. Section 2718...included as activities to improve health care quality are exclusions. On page...practice and procedure, Claims, Health care, Health insurance, Health...

2012-05-16

388

77 FR 19522 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for Most Community Rated Plans  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Government procurement, Health insurance, [[Page 19524...Management Federal Employees Health Benefits Acquisition Regulation...including the issuer's expenditures for activities that improve health care quality, to total...

2012-04-02

389

Mountain Promise page 1 Mountain Promise  

E-print Network

health care for WV communities page 15 #12;Mountain Promise page 2 duction and use of ozone of leisure time, as most people would, as a negative. GDP counts expenditures for defensive activities defensive expenditures made to prevent the erosion of quality of life as a negative. The GDP accounts

Baltisberger, Jay H.

390

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

Crummel, G.M.

1998-05-18

391

Improving facilities, transforming attitudes.  

PubMed

Providing an effective healing environment for patients facing a wide range of mental health issues, while balancing their needs with security, safety, and affordability considerations, will be key area of focus at this year's Design in Mental Health (DIMH) conference and exhibition, taking place from 13-14 May at the National Motorcycle Museum in Bickenhill near Solihull. As HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports, conference speakers will include the director of estates and new business at the Priory Group; the chief executive of mental health charity, Mind; architects and designers with substantial mental healthcare experience; top academics, and service-users--all with their own perspective on the 2014 conference theme, 'Improving facilities, transforming attitudes'. PMID:24783329

Baillie, Jonathan

2014-04-01

392

NCI Division of Extramural Activities - Home Page  

Cancer.gov

National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Extramural Activities - Home Page Skip to Main Content Home Funding Advisory Consumer Guides FAQs & Glossary Awarded Research Division of Extramural Activities About DEA Main Staff

393

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology Immunohistochemistry Laboratory  

E-print Network

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology ­ Immunohistochemistry Laboratory Page 1 of 1 Document Antibodies Prepared/Reviewed by: Martin Slade, Technical Service Supervisor, Histology Laboratory Joy Cramer

Pawlowski, Wojtek

394

DEPARTMENT: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY ROOM REQUEST LIST SECT 200 Corbett Grainger Page 1 of 2 #12;DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP STARTSEM001881108A1 M W 30 Page 2 of 2 #12;DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP START

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

395

Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 25/01/2012 Page 1 of 5  

E-print Network

Overseas Travel Risk Assessment General/Fieldwork This model template risk assessment form is intended://www.docs.csg.ed.ac.uk/Safety/ra/MA1.doc. If you intend travelling in high risk health areas you are required to first contact with your area of travel/work which place your health at greater risk than normal e.g. malaria. Please

Barton, Nick

396

Assessment of the uptake of neonatal and young infant referrals by community health workers to public health facilities in an urban informal settlement, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Globally, 40% of the 7.6 million deaths of children under five every year occur in the neonatal period (first 28 days after birth). Increased and earlier recognition of illness facilitated by community health workers (CHWs), coupled with effective referral systems can result in better child health outcomes. This model has not been tested in a peri-urban poor setting in Africa, or in a high HIV context. Methods The Good Start Saving Newborn Lives (SNL) study (ISRCTN41046462) conducted in Umlazi, KwaZulu-Natal, was a community randomized trial to assess the effect of an integrated home visit package delivered to mothers by CHWs during pregnancy and post-delivery on uptake of PMTCT interventions and appropriate newborn care practices. CHWs were trained to refer babies with illnesses or identified danger signs. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effectiveness of this referral system by describing CHW referral completion rates as well as mothers health-care seeking practices. Interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire with all mothers whose babies had been referred by a CHW since the start of the SNL trial. Descriptive analysis was conducted to describe referral completion and health seeking behaviour of mothers. Results Of the 2423 women enrolled in the SNL study, 148 sick infants were referred between June 2008 and June 2010. 62% of referrals occurred during the first 4 weeks of life and 22% between birth and 2 weeks of age. Almost all mothers (95%) completed the referral as advised by CHWs. Difficulty breathing, rash and redness/discharge around the cord accounted for the highest number of referrals (26%, 19% and 17% respectively). Only16% of health workers gave written feedback on the outcome of the referral to the referring CHW. Conclusions We found high compliance with CHW referral of sick babies in an urban South African township. This suggests that CHWs can play a significant role, within community outreach teams, to improve newborn health and reduce child mortality. This supports the current primary health care re-engineering process being undertaken by the South African National Department of Health which involves the establishment of family health worker teams including CHWs. Trial registration number ISRCTN41046462 PMID:23388385

2013-01-01

397

Closing the Health Gap  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and ABC Radio Networks are working together to help African-Americans gain access to the best possible information regarding health issues. HHS reports that life expectancies for African-Americans lag five years behind expectancies for White Americans. The new Website Closing the Health Gap has links to information on health conditions such as diabetes and cancer as well as consumer health resources that relate to African-Americans' particular needs. Each page offers links, publications, and any news related to the subject, all in an effort to close "the health gap."

2001-01-01

398

Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia -MSN Health & Fitness -Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM  

E-print Network

Medications Health & Fitness Make msn.com your home page News Entertainment Sports Money Lifestyle More BingWorking-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia - MSN Health & Fitness - Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM

399

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap at the time of admission into the program to an academic advisor in the College of Public Health Semester One

Sheridan, Scott

400

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap at the time of admission into the program to academic advisor in the College of Public Health Semester One

Sheridan, Scott

401

Facility-Level Characteristics Associated with Serious Suicide Attempts and Deaths from Suicide in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about how facility-level characteristics affect the risk of suicide and suicide attempts in juvenile justice residential facilities. This leaves facility administrators and mental health providers without evidence-based guidance on how the facility itself affects risks. The current study uses data from two recently developed

Gallagher, Catherine A.; Dobrin, Adam

2006-01-01

402

Environmental Health Risk Assessment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is designed to help instructors and students locate and use online databases and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools to research environmental risks in their own neighborhoods. Materials include a tutorial that provides a step-by-step example of how to perform an environmental health risk inventory, using an example in Bozeman, Montana. The activity page contains an assignment and instructions for completing environmental health risk inventories, and there is also a page of links to mapping tools available on the internet, links to the tutorials for each mapping tool, and a list of online databases with searchable health-related information and data.

Laurie Cantwell

2004-01-01

403

What Are the Factors That Interplay From Normal Pregnancy to Near Miss Maternal Morbidity in a Nigerian Tertiary Health Care Facility?  

PubMed Central

Researchers in Nigeria examined the epidemiological characteristics and factors associated with maternal outcomes using a mixed method approach: a prospective case control study design involving 375 pregnant women who received maternal care from a tertiary facility and in-depth interviews reporting the experience of near-miss survivors. A generalized ordered logit model was used to generate the estimates of partial proportional odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) across categories of the outcome variable. Factors strongly associated with maternal morbidity were late referral of women, presence of complications at booking antenatal visits, low birth weight, and severe birth asphyxia. The nearmiss women were further characterized, and a low proportion (25%) had organ dysfunction or failure. The challenge of such diagnoses in resource-constrained settings raises questions about the appropriateness of using organ dysfunction criteria in developing countries. PMID:25119488

Adeoye, Ikeola A.; Ijarotimi, Omotade O.; Fatusi, Adesegun O.

2015-01-01

404

Facilities Manager.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a series of articles that cover a range of issues with regard to the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers. Papers explore ways to balance natural and human settings, provide an overview of a professional leadership academy, describe the preparations for an effectiveness skills program, and outline some of the concerns

Facilities Manager, 1998

1998-01-01

405

Music Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The layouts and specifications in this booklet are intended to assist those involved in planning music facilities for elementary and secondary schools. Drawings, room plans, and text illustrate specifications for location; space relationship; combined and separate instrumental and vocal rooms; practice rooms; and auxiliary areas. Particular

Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

406

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN  

E-print Network

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY June 2012 #12;UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY 2012 Contents Page Foreword by the Principal 2 A) Health and Safety Policy Statement 3 B) Organisation and Responsibilities for Health and Safety 4 C) Health and Safety Management in Schools/Support Services 6 D) Training

Levi, Ran

407

swinburne.edu.au Health Sciences and  

E-print Network

Community services work Disability work Education Health assistance Health science Mental health Nursing promotion, nutrition and sport science. To find out more see the Bachelor of Health Science entry on page 12 and food science psychology public health issues social justice sport science working with children

Liley, David

408

42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume of Uncompensated Services...until the deficit is made up in accordance with the preceding sentence. (ii) Title VI-assisted facilities with...

2014-10-01

409

42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume of Uncompensated Services...until the deficit is made up in accordance with the preceding sentence. (ii) Title VI-assisted facilities with...

2011-10-01

410

42 CFR 31.10 - Dependent members of families; use of Service facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dependent members...families; use of Service facilities. 31.10 Section 31.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL...

2014-10-01

411

42 CFR 31.10 - Dependent members of families; use of Service facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dependent members...families; use of Service facilities. 31.10 Section 31.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL...

2011-10-01

412

42 CFR 31.10 - Dependent members of families; use of Service facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dependent members...families; use of Service facilities. 31.10 Section 31.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL...

2013-10-01

413

42 CFR 31.10 - Dependent members of families; use of Service facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dependent members...families; use of Service facilities. 31.10 Section 31.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL...

2010-10-01

414

Pre-Health Professions Program Page 317Sonoma State University 2006-2008 Catalog Sonoma State University provides preparation for continuing study  

E-print Network

assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Students interested in entering the health professions will select, and chiropractic medicine may require fewer units and courses for admission. The following outline of courses

Ravikumar, B.

415

Security Management Guidelines Facilities Management Policy  

E-print Network

Security Management Guidelines Facilities Management Policy © Victoria University of Wellington Page 1 1 Purpose The purpose of these guidelines is to outline the management of security service for a building. Incident: Any unexpected event which may result in harm or damage to persons and property

Frean, Marcus

416

Table of Contents for Entomology IIPP, Page i of iii DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY  

E-print Network

Table of Contents for Entomology IIPP, Page i of iii DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY INJURY & ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAM TABLE OF CONTENTS [ Revised 10/02 ] Page I. UC DAVIS/ENTOMOLOGY'S COMMITMENT TO HEALTH;Table of Contents for Entomology IIPP, Page ii of iii 2. Newly Discovered Health and Safety Concerns 4 3

Ferrara, Katherine W.

417

UK HealthCare University of Kentucky  

E-print Network

UK HealthCare University of Kentucky 800 Rose St. Lexington KY 40536 RENEWALYour resource for the latest UK HealthCare construction and facilities news WINTER 2011 RENEWALYour resource for the latest UK HealthCare construction and facilities news In thIs Issue: UK HealthCare and Norton Healthcare officials

MacAdam, Keith

418

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Health  

MedlinePLUS

Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals have special health concerns besides the usual ones that affect most men and women. On this page you'll find information about these specific health issues.

419

How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?  

MedlinePLUS

... Trials Resources and Publications En Espaol How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

420

How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?  

MedlinePLUS

... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

421

Safety and Health Topics Related to Maritime  

MedlinePLUS

... RSS Feeds OSHA Newsletter RSS Feeds Occupational Safety & Health Administration We Can Help What's New | Offices Home ... OSHA Maritime Guidance Documents page. OSHA Safety and Health Injury Prevention Sheets (SHIPS) NEW Control of Hazardous ...

422

Mental Health Treatment Program Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

423

30 CFR 71.403 - Waiver of surface facilities requirements; posting of waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at...

2011-07-01

424

30 CFR 71.404 - Application for waiver of surface facilities requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at...

2011-07-01

425

30 CFR 71.403 - Waiver of surface facilities requirements; posting of waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at...

2010-07-01

426

30 CFR 71.404 - Application for waiver of surface facilities requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at...

2010-07-01

427

DEPARTMENT: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY ROOM REQUEST LIST SECT:4509:55 25DIS302343108A1 F 25 Page 1 of 3 #12;DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP START CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY ROOM REQUEST LIST SECT ENRL CAP REQ RM CAP INSTRUCTORDAYS

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

428

DEPARTMENT: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY ROOM REQUEST LIST SECT:0009:00 62LEC001306108ACC M T W R 50 Page 1 of 1 #12;DEPARTMENT: TERM: RUN DATE: RUN TIME: SESS CAT COMP TIME: SESS CAT COMP START/END TIMES FACILITY ROOM REQUEST LIST SECT ENRL CAP REQ RM CAP INSTRUCTORDAYS

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

429

Seroprevalence and transmission of Hepatitis B virus among delivering women and their new born in selected health facilities, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Hepatitis B Virus is a major public health problem worldwide. In 2012 alone, over 350 million chronic carriers and 1. 2 million annual deaths were occurred. Hepatitis B Virus causes 60 to 80% of the worlds primary liver cancer and nearly 90% infants infected due to vertical transmission are at higher risk of developing chronic liver disease and cancer. Hence determining the burden of maternal and neonatal Hepatitis B Virus infection is a priority. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from July September 2012 at St. Pauls Hospital Millennium Medical College and Selam Health Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Blood samples from delivering mothers (n = 265) and their corresponding cords (n = 265) were collected. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data. Hepatitis B Virus surface antigen was detected using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Frequency analysis and logistic regression test was used to identify the potential risk factors associated with Hepatitis B Virus positivity using SPSS Version -15. Results A total of 265 delivering women with the mean age of 25.8 years were enrolled in the study. Of these delivering women, 8 (3.0%) of mothers were positive for Hepatitis B Virus surface antigen, whereas 6 (2.3%) of cord bloods were positives with 75% concordance rate of exposed infants with sero-positive mothers. However, only one maternal positive case was observed for Hepatitis B e Ag test. Only 11% of the mothers know their Hepatitis B Virus status. Of the total mothers assessed for possible risk factors, 69 (26%) had only one type, while 161 (60.8%) had multiple exposure factors such as ear pricing, history of tribal marks, abortion, multiple-sexual partner and history of surgical procedures experienced from high to low frequency. The remaining 35 (13.2%) of the participants had not experienced possible risk factors. Conclusion Though the maternal positivity rate was low, the rate of positivity in cord bloods was almost equal to those infected mothers. Therefore, screening of pregnant mothers and vaccination of infants could help to reduce the transmission. To minimize the higher overall risk exposure status of mothers, increasing awareness and intensive public health education is also recommended. PMID:24731794

2014-01-01

430

Finding and Evaluating Online Resources on Complementary Health Approaches  

MedlinePLUS

... Menu Finding and Evaluating Online Resources on Complementary Health Approaches On this page: Key Facts Keep in ... with your health care provider. Checking Out a Health Web Site: Five Quick Questions If youre ...

431

Rx for Better Health Care: Kindness and Compassion  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Rx for Better Health Care: Kindness and Compassion Data suggests that gentler, thoughtful ... Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Want to give health care a boost? Try a little kindness, experts say. ...

432

Second Health Care Worker in Dallas Tests Positive for Ebola  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Second Health Care Worker in Dallas Tests Positive for Ebola Nurse ... WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A second health care worker who helped treat a patient who died ...

433

Federal Health Marketplace Enrolls Another 2.5 Million Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Federal Health Marketplace Enrolls Another 2.5 Million Americans Re-enrollment ... 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Enrollment through the federal health marketplace surged last week as the deadline for signing ...

434

Health Fraud Scams - Be Smart, Be Aware, Be Careful  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Announcements - Health Fraud El Fraude en la Salud Health Fraud Scams - Be Smart, Be Aware, Be Careful ... Education Inspections/Compliance State & Local Officials Consumers Industry Health Professionals FDA Archive Links on this page:

435

21 CFR 606.40 - Facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Plant and Facilities...determine their suitability as blood donors. (2) The...

2014-04-01

436

21 CFR 606.40 - Facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Plant and Facilities...determine their suitability as blood donors. (2) The...

2011-04-01

437

21 CFR 606.40 - Facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Plant and Facilities...determine their suitability as blood donors. (2) The...

2013-04-01

438

21 CFR 606.40 - Facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Plant and Facilities...determine their suitability as blood donors. (2) The...

2012-04-01

439

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

1993-12-01

440

Health Care Costs Workshop Agenda  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

441

Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans

Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

2006-01-01

442

WHO: Global Health Observatory: Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While more than 800,000 people die from suicide globally each year, the median amount of the health budget allocated to mental health in 2011 was 2.8%. In Afghanistan, six out of every 100,000 men committed suicide. In the United States, that number was 19. These and other data can be gleaned from the age-standardized suicide rates interactive graph on the World Health Organizationâs Global Health Observatory website dedicated to issues of Mental Health. Additionally, the page provides links to reports on Policy and financing of mental health, Human resources (in terms of the number of psychiatrists available per 100,000 people in a given country), and Mental health care delivery.

443

Health Tip: Breast-Feeding with Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Tip: Breast-feeding With Diabetes Potential benefits for both mom and ... Kohnle Wednesday, October 22, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breastfeeding Diabetes and Pregnancy (HealthDay News) -- Diabetic moms, after ...

444

Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Instrument (Version 2)  

E-print Network

Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Assessment Instrument, 1/7/2010 Page 3 Essential Service #1: Monitor environmental and health status health assessment been completed? 1.1B Is the community environmental health assessment updated at least

445

Health Tip: Easing Hand Eczema  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Tip: Easing Hand Eczema Gloves can help protect the skin (*this ... chemicals or doing heavy-duty work with your hands can worsen hand eczema, leaving hands dry and ...

446

Infant Care and Infant Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications En Espaol Infant Care and Infant Health: Overview Skip sharing on social media links ... Page Content Since the NICHD's founding in 1962, infant death rates in the United States have dropped ...

447

How People Recognize Previously Seen Web Pages from Titles, URLs and Thumbnails  

Microsoft Academic Search

The selectable lists of pages offered by web browsers' history and bookmark facilities ostensibly make it easier for people to return to previously visited pages. These lists show the pages as abstractions, typically as truncated titles and URLs, and more rarely as small thumbnail images. Yet we have little knowledge of how recognizable these representations really are. Consequently, we carried

Shaun Kaasten; Saul Greenberg

448

How People Recognize Previously Seen Web Pages from Titles, URLs and Thumbnails  

Microsoft Academic Search

The selectable lists of pages offered by web browsers' history and bookmark facilities ostensibly make it easier for people to return to previously visited pages. These lists show the pages as abstractions, typically as truncated titles and URLs, and more rarely as small thumbnail images. Yet we have little knowledge of how recognizable these representations really are. Consequently, we carried

Shaun Kaasten; Saul Greenberg; Christopher Edwards

2001-01-01

449

Udaipur Health Study  

E-print Network

This data set contains data on the health histories of, and access to healthcare facilities for, individuals located in the Udaipur districts of Rajasthan, India. Data was collected at the household level, as well as at ...

Abhijit Banerjee

2007-10-05

450

For Health Care Professional - Office of Cancer Survivorship  

Cancer.gov

This page provides numerous cancer-related resources for health care professionals. For information regarding cancer types, treatment, clinical trials and links to other National Cancer Institute resources, please go to the NCI home page.

451

Wellness Monthly Continued on Page 2  

E-print Network

's disease, Parkinson's disease, and HIV/AIDS. Alcohol and other substance abuse may also co. Depression can have serious health consequences ­ both mental and physical ­ if untreated. What Is DepressionWellness Monthly Continued on Page 2 » Depression and Illness When physical health challenges

Leistikow, Bruce N.

452

Quotations Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sporting a new look and user interface, as well as five hundred new quotations (and a new URL, so check your bookmark file!), this site allows the user to search ten Internet quotation archives for keywords. A new advanced search page offers the choice to search by the text of quotations, author or subject, or all fields; users may search in more than one collection at a time on the advanced search page. The site also provides links to other quotation resources on the Internet, organized by topic. This site is not a replacement for a standard quotation reference source, but rather a constantly expanding selection of quotations available on the Internet. http://www.starlingtech.com/quotes/ Random quotation page: http://www.starlingtech.com/quotes/randquote.cgi

453

65 FR 56028 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...MEDICAL CARE: Iowa Service Area...Dayton/Gowrie County--Boone...Parts: [[Page 56053...Armstrong Town [[Page 56114...Oconto Falls County--Oconto...County--Iowa Parts: Mifflin...MENTAL HEALTH: Iowa Service Area...Catchment Area 13 County--Adair...Township [[Page...

2000-09-15

454

Improving Dental Health in Underserved Communities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Oral Health Improving Dental Health in Underserved Communities Past Issues / ... public health. She is passionate about improving children's oral health. "Tooth decay is the number one chronic infectious ...

455

77 FR 1496 - National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration...Committee on Rural Health and Human Services; Notice of Meeting...Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, [[Page 1497

2012-01-10

456

eMedicine Consumer Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site is the consumer health version of eMedicine.com, "the largest and most current Clinical Knowledge Base available to physicians and health professionals." Launched in May 2003, eMedicine Consumer Health offers over 5,500 pages of health-related information geared toward the general reader. This extremely comprehensive site is organized into three main sections: Heath Resources, First Aid and Emergency, and Life and Wellness. For users not looking for specific information, Featured Resources on the main page offers a good place to start.

2007-03-25

457

Counseling Manual on Health Careers in State of Missouri.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual contains listings of health and hospital occupations, state and national health organizations, Missouri colleges and universities, Missouri licensing boards of health professions, and training programs for health occupations in Missouri. This last section, comprising 288 pages, covers health administration, public health, anesthesia,

Wong, John C., Ed.

458

UCSD Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Satellite Animal Facility Level 2 SOP  

E-print Network

UCSD Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Satellite Animal Facility Level 2 SOP 12.04.06 Page 1 of 4 Standard Operating Procedures Satellite Animal Facility Level 2 This is the Animal Care Satellite Facility SOP must address each topic in a detailed manner, must be approved by the Animal Care

Krstic, Miroslav

459

UCSD Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Satellite Animal Facility Level 1 SOP  

E-print Network

UCSD Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Satellite Animal Facility Level 1 SOP 12.13.06 Page 1 of 3 Standard Operating Procedures Satellite Animal Facility Level 1 This is the Animal Care Satellite Facility SOP must address each topic in a detailed manner, must be approved by the Animal Care

Krstic, Miroslav

460

Analysis of environment, safety, and health (ES{ampersand}H) management systems for Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary analysis and comparison of various environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems required of, or suggested for use by, the Departrnent of Energy Defense Programs` sites. The summary analysis is provided by means of a comparison matrix, a set of Vean diagrams that highlights the focus of the systems, and an `End Gate` filter diagram that integrates the three Vean diagrams. It is intended that this paper will act as a starting point for implementing a particular system or in establishing a comprehensive site-wide integrated ES&H management system. Obviously, the source documents for each system would need to be reviewed to assure proper implementation of a particular system. The matrix compares nine ES&H management systems against a list of elements generated by identifying the unique elements of all the systems. To simplify the matrix, the elements are listed by means of a brief title. An explanation of the matrix elements is provided in Attachment 2 entitled, `Description of System Elements.` The elements are categorized under the Total Quality Management (TQM) `Plan, Do, Check, Act` framework with the added category of `Policy`. (The TQM concept is explained in the `DOE Quality Management implementation Guidelines,` July 1997 (DOE/QM- 0008)). The matrix provides a series of columns and rows to compare the unique elements found in each of the management systems. A `V` is marked if the element is explicitly identified as part of the particular ES&H management system. An `X` is marked if the element is not found in the particular ES&H management system, or if it is considered to be inadequately addressed. A `?` is marked if incorporation of the element is not clear. Attachment I provides additional background information which explains the justification for the marks in the matrix cells. Through the Vean diagrams and the `End Gate` filter in Section 3, the paper attempts to pictorially display the focus of each system with respect to ES&H, the hazard of concern, and any limitations with respect to the TQM categories. A summary evaluation and explanation of each of the systems is provided in Section 4 of the paper. Several other ES&H systems were reviewed in preparation of the paper, but were not specifically included as a system in this matrix. Only those ES&H management systems that are potentially applicable to DOE Defense Program sites were included as part of the matrix comparison. A description of other ES&H management systems that were evaluated, but not specifically incorporated in this matrix comparison, are provided in Attachment 3 entitled, `Other ES&H Management Systems Reviewed.` In the past, it has been difficult integrating ES&H into work planning for several reasons. One barrier to this integration has been the complexity caused by the existence of several `stove pipe` ES&H systems. By analyzing the unique elements of the various ES&H systems, as well as their strengths and limitations, and their similarities and differences, it is envisioned that this paper will aid in facilitating the integration of ES&H into work planning. This paper was developed by the Office of Defense Programs (DP-45) and all questions or comments should be directed to Anthony Neglia of that office at (301) 903-3531 or Anthony.Neglia@dp.doe.gov.

Neglia, A. V., LLNL

1998-03-01