Sample records for pages health facilities

  1. Health Facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  2. Page 1 of 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Page 1 of 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Chemical Hygiene Programs: Operation of the Chemical: The Environmental Health and Safety Department (EHS) operates the Chemical Storage and Distribution Facility (CSDF.1200, Employee Hazard Communication, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Title 40, Code of Federal

  3. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Internal Software Review

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Internal Software Review Jefferson Lab (Edep from ADCs) #12;Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 4 TOF Reconstruction Methods-weighted average vs. earliest hit. #12;Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 5 Code Validation page 5

  4. The Health Facility Surveyor, A New Public Health Entity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, John L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the role of the Health Facility Surveyor, a relatively new member of the public health team. Included in the job qualifications is background in the health profession and/or administration, plus basic investigative skills. (MLB)

  5. Employee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    ** and sports facilities*** · Flu immunisation programme · Health promotion programmes · Occupational health · Occupational sick pay scheme · Sports and social association · Staff refectory facilities ConditionsEmployee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare · Annual leave of up to 30

  6. Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Amy L.

    , hazardous chemical storage cabinets, safety equipment, sinks, and cabinetry for glassware and chemicals, and a Nanopure® DiamondTM analytical ultra-pure water treatment system. Common facilities include two temperature-Van, which is designed for the off-site transport and use of laboratory instrumentation. Field measurement

  7. Industrial Sanitation and Personal Facilities. Module SH-13. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on industrial sanitation and personal facilities is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module deals wth many facets of industrial sanitation and the facilities industries should provide so that proper health procedures may be followed. Following the introduction, 14 objectives (each keyed to a page in…

  8. Fire Alarm Systems for Health Care Facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh O. Nash

    1983-01-01

    Fire alarm systems for health care facilities must be designed for early detection, accurate location annunciation, fire department notification, and control of the high voltage alternating current (HVAC) system, and elevators. The designer must keep in mind that the system is designed to initiate a planned response by the hospital staff and the fire brigade without disturbing patients unnecessarily. The

  9. Peter Meyer Lab Facilities page Tissue Culture Facility

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Peter

    -mediated gene transfer. Transgenic tissue is selected and propagated in the culture room, and transgenic plants are regenerated from the transformed tissue using plant growth hormones. #12;2 Plant Growth Facility Transgenic variants in transgenic plants. The image below demonstrates luciferase assay of a transgenic tobacco line

  10. Simulations of Design Modifications in Military Health Facilities 

    E-print Network

    Kiss, Christopher William

    2012-07-16

    The Military Health System (MHS) is a worldwide network of healthcare facilities and personnel. The healthcare facility inventory is aging and requires extensive facility management, renovations and replacement construction ...

  11. JAMA Patient Page: Health Literacy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you get information. FINDING RELIABLE INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET The Internet can be a good source for health information ... are some tips to help you start your Internet search: • Government Web sites, like the National Institutes ...

  12. University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    WORKERS PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for tuberculosis skin testing in health care facility workers loss). PROCEDURE: 1. Mantoux PPD skin testing will be administered by Employee Health ServicesUniversity of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual

  13. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  14. Manned Mars mission health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioanni, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) requirements which enable/enhance manned Mars missions (MMMs) are addressed. It does not attempt to resolve any issues that may affect the feasibility of any given element in the HMF. Reference is made to current work being conducted in the design of the space station HMF. The HMF requirements are discussed within the context of two distinctly different scenarios: HMF as part of the Mars surface infrastructure, and HMF as part of the nine months translation from low Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Requirements for an HMF are provided, and a concept of HMF is shown.

  15. Health Facility Reuse, Retrofit, and Reconfiguration. NCHSR Research Proceedings Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    In addition to publishing the papers given at key meetings, this series on health facilities includes discussions and responses. The series is intended to help meet the information needs of health service providers and others who require direct access to concepts and ideas evolving from the exchange of research results. Health facility reuse is an…

  16. TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Features TB in Correctional Facilities is a Public Health Concern Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Diagnosing ... the community with untreated TB present a serious public health concern. Figure 1 (larger view). TB Control in ...

  17. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  18. Who Do I Call? --Environmental Health Safety or Facilities Management

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Earthquake preparation X Electrical equipment repair or replacement X Electrical safety/Lock out tag outWho Do I Call? -- Environmental Health Safety or Facilities Management ISSUE EH&S FACILITIES/or electrical fuse blown X Confined space entry and signage X Construction projects - health impacts X

  19. Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

  20. Columbia University Health Sciences Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section -Page 43

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page _________ *************************************************************************** Please complete and forward the attached pages to Environmental Health & Safety, Mailbox 8. Keep a copy;ColumbiaUniversityHealthSciences­Health&SafetyManual2003 LaboratorySafetySection-Page44 Attachment

  1. Safety in Elevators and Grain Handling Facilities. Module SH-27. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety in elevators and grain handling facilities is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. Following the introduction, 15 objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to accomplish are listed (e.g., Explain how explosion suppression works). Then each objective is taught in detail,…

  2. 77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...programs for multifamily housing or health care facilities. This notice...

  3. 77 FR 21580 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...market-rate multifamily housing, health care facility, and hospital...

  4. Psychological Testing in Outpatient Mental Health Facilities: A National Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Piotrowski; John W. Keller

    1989-01-01

    We surveyed psychological testing trends in outpatient mental health centers, clinics, and services in the United States. The sample was obtained from the National Directory of Mental Health and the National Registry of Community Mental Health Services. Of 900 facilities with a psychologist on staff, 413 (46%) returned questionnaires. The MMPI and the Wechsler scales were the instruments most frequently

  5. OccupationalHealthCenter EnvironmentalSafetyFacility(ESF)

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    OccupationalHealthCenter EnvironmentalSafetyFacility(ESF) 480OakRoad,RoomB15 Stanford,CA94305 to ESF bus stop. Location of the Occupational Health Center: Related Contacts: Environmental Health & Safety: (650) 723-0448 http://ehs.stanford.edu Risk Management: (650) 723-4554 http://www.stanford.edu/dept/Risk-Management

  6. Health Care Facilities Resilient to Climate Change Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jaclyn; Berry, Peter; Ebi, Kristie; Varangu, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator’s guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned areas were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change. PMID:25522050

  7. Development of a Master Health Facility List in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Azeez, Aderemi; Bamidele, Samson; Oyemakinde, Akin; Oyediran, Kolawole Azeez; Adebayo, Wura; Fapohunda, Bolaji; Abioye, Abimbola; Mullen, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Routine Health Information Systems (RHIS) are increasingly transitioning to electronic platforms in several developing countries. Establishment of a Master Facility List (MFL) to standardize the allocation of unique identifiers for health facilities can overcome identification issues and support health facility management. The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) recently developed a MFL, and we present the process and outcome. Methods The MFL was developed from the ground up, and includes a state code, a local government area (LGA) code, health facility ownership (public or private), the level of care, and an exclusive LGA level health facility serial number, as part of the unique identifier system in Nigeria. To develop the MFL, the LGAs sent the list of all health facilities in their jurisdiction to the state, which in turn collated for all LGAs under them before sending to the FMOH. At the FMOH, a group of RHIS experts verified the list and identifiers for each state. Results The national MFL consists of 34,423 health facilities uniquely identified. The list has been published and is available for worldwide access; it is currently used for planning and management of health services in Nigeria. Discussion Unique identifiers are a basic component of any information system. However, poor planning and execution of implementing this key standard can diminish the success of the RHIS. Conclusion Development and adherence to standards is the hallmark for a national health information infrastructure. Explicit processes and multi-level stakeholder engagement is necessary to ensuring the success of the effort. PMID:25422720

  8. Interstitial space in health care facilities : planning for change & evolution

    E-print Network

    Garcia Alvarez, Angel

    1989-01-01

    Hospitals are most useful material for architectural research for they exhibit all the problems encountered in other building types in an acute and easily measurable form. Health Care Facilities house the greatest range ...

  9. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Secretary of Agriculture NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care facilities. (a) Communications. A...

  10. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Secretary of Agriculture NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care facilities. (a) Communications. A...

  11. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Secretary of Agriculture NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care facilities. (a) Communications. A...

  12. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Secretary of Agriculture NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care facilities. (a) Communications. A...

  13. Violence in Healthcare Facilities: Lessons From the Veterans Health Administration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Hodgson; Richard Reed; Thomas Craig; Frances Murphy; Larry Lehmann; Linda Belton; Nick Warren

    2004-01-01

    Goals: The authors examined assault frequency and risk factors in health care. Methods: The authors conducted a cross-sectional question­ naire survey in 142 hospitals. Analyses are presented at the level of the individual and aggregated by facility. Results: Thirteen percent of employees described at least 1 assault in the last year; the proportion assaulted per facility ranged from 1% to

  14. University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    SECTION: PATIENT RELATED INFECTION CONTROL NUMBER: 2.7 POST-MORTEM HANDLING OF BODIES PURPOSE: To prevent in Healthcare Facilities, Recommendations from CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices AdvisoryUniversity of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual

  15. Hill-Burton Facilities Obligated to Provide Free or Reduced-Cost Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Facilities Obligated to Provide Free or Reduced-Cost Health Care Total Obligated Facilities: 152 (03/31/2015) No ... 463-7313 Outpatient Facility 120270 PFCA FL RURAL HEALTH CARE, INC 1213 STATE ROAD 20 INTERLACHEN 32148 386- ...

  16. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  17. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  18. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  19. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  20. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  1. 34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  2. 34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  3. 34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  4. 34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  5. 34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  6. 34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  7. 34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  8. 34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  9. 34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  10. 34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

  11. Video Surveillance in Mental Health Facilities: Is it Ethical?

    PubMed

    Stolovy, Tali; Melamed, Yuval; Afek, Arnon

    2015-05-01

    Video surveillance is a tool for managing safety and security within public spaces. In mental health facilities, the major benefit of video surveillance is that it enables 24 hour monitoring of patients, which has the potential to reduce violent and aggressive behavior. The major disadvantage is that such observation is by nature intrusive. It diminishes privacy, a factor of huge importance for psychiatric inpatients. Thus, an ongoing debate has developed following the increasing use of cameras in this setting. This article presents the experience of a medium-large academic state hospital that uses video surveillance, and explores the various ethical and administrative aspects of video surveillance in mental health facilities. PMID:26137651

  12. Updated Feb 10, 2014 Shared Facilities and Cores Guidelines & Policies Page 1 of 6 Einstein Shared Facilities and Cores

    E-print Network

    Kenny, Paraic

    and guidelines for the fiscal and administrative operations of Albert Einstein College of Medicine (EinsteinUpdated Feb 10, 2014 Shared Facilities and Cores Guidelines & Policies Page 1 of 6 Einstein Shared and accounting practices within Einstein shared facilities and cores. · Ensure compliance with federal

  13. Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information

    E-print Network

    Lichtarge, Olivier

    Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information Section 81.003 of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code requires employers of persons who provide Mental Health Services to make inquiries, and former patients. Please read the following information regarding mental health services and providers

  14. GERIATRIC MEDICINE CAPITAL HEALTH RESEARCH Page 1

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    in health care planning. This is critical in Canada, where 20 per cent of the population will be elderly healthy aging and how an aging population impacts the health care system. "With increasing pressure on our, efficient and effective care." As Dr. Mallery notes, proactive health management-- before a person becomes

  15. Health facility-based maternal death audit in Tigray, Ethiopia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel Hailu; Fikre Enqueselassie; Yemane Berhane

    Background: Maternal deaths are often unrecognized and improperly documented in the health system. Objective: To identify causes of maternal death occurring in hospitals and determine avoidability of maternal death. Methods: The study assessed each death for the cause and surrounding circumstances as well as avoidable factors, by reviewing two years patient and facility records and interviewing individuals who were involved

  16. Page 1 of 4 Applied Health Behavior Research

    E-print Network

    Grant, Gregory

    Page 1 of 4 Applied Health Behavior Research Student Application for Enrollment Disability Do you have a disability? Yes No Intentionally withheld If yes, which of the following categories best describes your disability? (Select

  17. Community health facility preparedness for a cholera surge in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Mobula, Linda Meta; Jacquet, Gabrielle A; Weinhauer, Kristin; Alcidas, Gladys; Thomas, Hans-Muller; Burnham, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    With increasing population displacement and worsening water insecurity after the 2010 earthquake, Haiti experienced a large cholera outbreak. Our goal was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of seven community health facilities' ability to respond to a surge in cholera cases. Since 2010, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) with a number of public and private donors has been working with seven health facilities in an effort to reduce morbidity and mortality from cholera infection. In November 2012, CRS through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s support, asked the Johns Hopkins Center for Refugee and Disaster Response to conduct a cholera surge simulation tabletop exercise at these health facilities to improve each facility's response in the event of a cholera surge. Using simulation development guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization and others, a simulation scenario script was produced that included situations of differing severity, supply chain, as well as a surge of patients. A total of 119 hospital staff from seven sites participated in the simulation exercise including community health workers, clinicians, managers, pharmacists, cleaners, and security guards. Clinics that had challenges during the simulated clinical care of patients were those that did not appropriately treat all cholera patients according to protocol, particularly those that were vulnerable, those that would need additional staff to properly treat patients during a surge of cholera, and those that required a better inventory of supplies. Simulation-based activities have the potential to identify healthcare delivery system vulnerabilities that are amenable to intervention prior to a cholera surge. PMID:24481887

  18. Trends in antenatal care attendance and health facility delivery following community and health facility systems strengthening interventions in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity and mortality remains high in Uganda; largely due to inadequate antenatal care (ANC), low skilled deliveries and poor quality of other maternal health services. In order to address both the demand and quality of ANC and skilled deliveries, we introduced community mobilization and health facility capacity strengthening interventions. Methods Interventions were introduced between January 2010 and September 2011. These included: training health workers, provision of medical supplies, community mobilization using village health teams, music dance and drama groups and male partner access clubs. These activities were implemented at Kitgum Matidi health center III and its catchment area. Routinely collected health facility data on selected outcomes in the year preceding the interventions and after 21 months of implementation of the interventions was reviewed. Trend analysis was performed using excel and statistical significance testing was performed using EPINFO StatCal option. Results The number of pregnant women attending the first ANC visit significantly increased from 114 to 150 in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.39–2.12) and to 202 in the third quarter of 2011(OR 11.41; 95% CI 7.97–16.34). The number of pregnant women counselled, tested and given results for HIV during the first ANC attendance significantly rose from 92 (80.7%) to 146 (97.3%) in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 and then to 201 (99.5%) in the third quarter of 2011. The number of male partners counseled, tested and given results together with their wives at first ANC visit rose from 13 (16.7%) in the fourth quarter of 2009 to 130 (89%) in the fourth quarter of 2010 and to 180 (89.6%) in the third quarter of 2011. There was a significant rise in the number of pregnant women delivering in the health facility with provision of mama-kits (delivery kits), from 74 (55.2%) to 149 (99.3%) in the second and fourth quarter of 2010. Conclusions Combined community and facility systems strengthening interventions led to increased first ANC visits by women and their partners, and health facility deliveries. Interventions aimed at increasing uptake of maternal health services should address both the demand and availability of quality services. PMID:24134717

  19. Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    . A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) must be consulted to obtain any necessary information pertaining. MSDS sheets can be obtained by following a link on the Health and Safety website at http://www.safetyQueen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.: 1 Document No.: SOP-CHEM-05

  20. The impact of health facilities on healthcare workers’ well-being and performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Rechel; James Buchan; Martin McKee

    2009-01-01

    The impact of health facilities on patients has been extensively researched. Yet, while there is a growing recognition of the need for healthy working environments, little is known about how health facilities affect the staff working in them. This paper explores how the design of health facilities impacts on the well-being and performance of healthcare workers. The article is based

  1. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials

    E-print Network

    Koenig, Kristi L MD

    2008-01-01

    Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiologicalHealth care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiologicalHealth care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological

  2. Health facility committees and facility management - exploring the nature and depth of their roles in Coast Province, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community participation has been emphasized internationally as a way of enhancing accountability, as well as a means to enhance health goals in terms of coverage, access and effective utilization. In rural health facilities in Kenya, initiatives to increase community accountability have focused on Health Facility Committees (HFCs). In Coast Province the role of HFCs has been expanded with the introduction of direct funding of rural facilities. We explored the nature and depth of managerial engagement of HFCs at the facility level in two rural districts in this Coastal setting, and how this has contributed to community accountability Methods We conducted structured interviews with the health worker in-charge and with patients in 30 health centres and dispensaries. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with district managers, and with health workers and HFC members in 12 health centres and dispensaries. In-depth interviews with health workers and HFC members included a participatory exercise to stimulate discussion of the nature and depth of their roles in facility management. Results HFCs were generally functioning well and played an important role in facility operations. The breadth and depth of engagement had reportedly increased after the introduction of direct funding of health facilities which allowed HFCs to manage their own budgets. Although relations with facility staff were generally good, some mistrust was expressed between HFC members and health workers, and between HFC members and the broader community, partially reflecting a lack of clarity in HFC roles. Moreover, over half of exit interviewees were not aware of the HFC's existence. Women and less well-educated respondents were particularly unlikely to know about the HFC. Conclusions There is potential for HFCs to play an active and important role in health facility management, particularly where they have control over some facility level resources. However, to optimise their contribution, efforts are needed to improve their training, clarify their roles, and improve engagement with the wider community. PMID:21936958

  3. MSU Performance Bond Form 112 Page 1 of 1 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    cost of such alterations cause the total project cost to exceed the original contract sum by more thanMSU Performance Bond Form 112 Page 1 of 1 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION Sixth Avenue by and through its Director, Montana State University, Facilities Planning, Design, & Construction dated

  4. Page 1 of 7 S98-5 NAMING OF CAMPUS FACILITIES AND

    E-print Network

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Page 1 of 7 S98-5 NAMING OF CAMPUS FACILITIES AND PROPERTIES AT SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY President: "Approved as University Policy." Signed Robert Caret, 4-29-98 POLICY RECOMMENDATION NAMING the naming of campus facilities has been antiquated by two developments; first, the issuance of a Trustees

  5. Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Cost Reduction IBM Corporation | December 2, 2009 Page 1 of 7

    E-print Network

    Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Cost Reduction © IBM Corporation | December 2, 2009 Page 1 of 7 - Internal distribution only Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Cost Reduction Summary By moving from typical to best practice, organisations can improve value for money and reduce their real estate

  6. Patterns of mental health service utilization in a general hospital and outpatient mental health facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrique Baca-Garcia; Maria M. Perez-Rodriguez; Ignacio Basurte-Villamor; F. Javier Quintero-Gutierrez; Juncal Sevilla-Vicente; Maria Martinez-Vigo; Antonio Artes-Rodriguez; Antonio L. Fernandez del Moral; Miguel A. Jimenez-Arriero; Jose L. Gonzalez de Rivera

    2008-01-01

    Purpose  Mental health is one of the priorities of the European Commission. Studies of the use and cost of mental health facilities\\u000a are needed in order to improve the planning and efficiey of mental health resources. We analyze the patterns of mental health\\u000a service use in multiple clinical settings to identify factors associated with high cost.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Subjects and methods  22,859 patients received

  7. FACULTY LEGISLATION USE OF FACILITIES (pages II-900 ff.)

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    or his or her designee. 6. Use by Political Parties or Candidates for Public Office. Leaders of political on behalf of each recognized candidate for public office. In a general election year, each political party political parties may also use university facilities. Members of the audience should be given a reasonable

  8. Continued on page 7 Busy Future for Fuel Test Facility

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    as a PhD student with the objective of providing a facility to test a prototypic uranium-molyb- denum (U-Mo) alloy fuel for high performance research reactors. In 2004, the National Nuclear Security Administration the use of high-enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Still unconverted are 28 high

  9. Health spending and political influence: the case of earmarks and health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Tung, Greg; Castrucci, Brian; Sprague, James B

    2015-01-01

    Earmarks, otherwise known as Congressionally directed spending requests, are a historically significant means of political influence over budgets. In this brief, we report on the results of a longitudinal study of federal earmarks affecting health care facilities and public health. We analyzed 10 years of earmark for health care facilities and examined the correlates of being in the top 50% of earmark recipients for each year. Having representatives or senators serving on the respective Appropriations committees were shown to have increased odds of being a top earmark recipient, as was being in jurisdictions with greater poverty. However, health-related measures of need were not significantly associated with being a top earmark recipient. PMID:25148133

  10. 041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY WOMEN'S HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY ­ WOMEN'S HEALTH: _______________________ DOB: / / Mo. Day Year Please complete for your first Women's Health visit at University Health

  11. Does the Health Maintenance Facility Provide Speciality Capabilities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joey; Wurgler, James; Broadwell, Kim; Martin, William; Stiernberg, Charles M.; Bove, Alfred; Fromm, Rob; O'Neill, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) is capable of handling all minor illnesses, most moderate illnesses, and some major illnesses on board a space station. Its primary purpose should be to treat problems that are mission threatening, not life threatening. The HMF will have greater medical capabilities than those currently on Navy submarines. Much of the discussion in this document focuses on the possibilities of treating specific medical conditions on board a space station. The HMF will be limited to caring for critically ill patients for a few days, so a crew return vehicle will be important.

  12. The Epidaurus Project: holism in Department of Defense health facilities.

    PubMed

    Foote, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    The Epidaurus Project, an advanced initiative in holistic (or whole-person) medicine, has operated in the Military Health System (MHS) since 2001. Its purpose has been to engage prominent civilian authorities on evidence-based building design, family-centered approaches, interdisciplinary care integration, and wellness, to optimize outcomes in the MHS. Over the past decade, many of the Epidaurus idea sets have been incorporated into MHS facility designs and therapeutic programs. The MHS owes a debt of gratitude to the numerous civilian thought leaders who participated in this project. PMID:22338971

  13. Health system support for childbirth care in Southern Tanzania: results from a health facility census

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progress towards reaching Millennium Development Goals four (child health) and five (maternal health) is lagging behind, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, despite increasing efforts to scale up high impact interventions. Increasing the proportion of birth attended by a skilled attendant is a main indicator of progress, but not much is known about the quality of childbirth care delivered by these skilled attendants. With a view to reducing maternal mortality through health systems improvement we describe the care routinely offered in childbirth at dispensaries, health centres and hospitals in five districts in rural Southern Tanzania. We use data from a health facility census assessing 159 facilities in five districts in early 2009. A structural and operational assessment was undertaken based on staff reports using a modular questionnaire assessing staffing, work load, equipment and supplies as well as interventions routinely implemented during childbirth. Results Health centres and dispensaries attended a median of eight and four deliveries every month respectively. Dispensaries had a median of 2.5 (IQR 2–3) health workers including auxiliary staff instead of the recommended four clinical officer and certified nurses. Only 28% of first-line facilities (dispensaries and health centres) reported offering active management in the third stage of labour (AMTSL). Essential childbirth care comprising eight interventions including AMTSL, infection prevention, partograph use including foetal monitoring and newborn care including early breastfeeding, thermal care at birth and prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum was offered by 5% of dispensaries, 38% of health centres and 50% of hospitals consistently. No first-line facility had provided all signal functions for emergency obstetric complications in the previous six months. Conclusions Essential interventions for childbirth care are not routinely implemented in first-line facilities or hospitals. Dispensaries have both low staffing and low caseload which constrains the ability to provide high-quality childbirth care. Improvements in quality of care are essential so that women delivering in facility receive “skilled attendance” and adequate care for common obstetric complications such as post-partum haemorrhage. PMID:24171904

  14. Factors affecting medical waste management in low- level health facilities in Tanzania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. V. Manyele; T. J. Lyasenga

    2010-01-01

    A study on evaluation of medical waste management systems was conducted in the low-level health facilities (LLHFs) in Dar es Salaam by comparing Ilala and Kinondoni municipalities. Questionnaires, interviews, visits and observation were used in data collection. The study has revealed that; most of the facilities have no specific disposal sites. In Ilala, 70% of the health facilities burn wastes

  15. Page 1 of 8 POULTRY HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO

    E-print Network

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Page 1 of 8 POULTRY HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO MARYLAND FAIRS AND SHOWS - 2005 N. G@mda.state.md.us 1. What are the regulations on Avian Influenza testing? · Poultry must come from flocks that participate in the U.S. National Poultry Improvement Plan Certified Avian Influenza-Free Program (Sample

  16. Page 1 of 6 Environmental Health and Safety Office

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    H 4R2 902.494.2495 · (FAX) 902.494.2996 · safety.dal.ca GUIDANCE ON CHOICE OF LAB COAT STYLE) 902.494.2996 · safety.dal.ca GUIDANCE ON CHOICE OF LAB COAT STYLE AND MATERIAL Effective DatePage 1 of 6 Environmental Health and Safety Office 1391 Seymour Street · Halifax, Nova Scotia B3

  17. Building capacity in health facility management: guiding principles for skills transfer in Liberia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura A Rowe; Sister Barbara Brillant; Emily Cleveland; Bernice T Dahn; Shoba Ramanadhan; Mae Podesta; Elizabeth H Bradley

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management training is fundamental to developing human resources for health. Particularly as Liberia revives its health delivery system, facility and county health team managers are central to progress. Nevertheless, such management skills are rarely prioritized in health training, and sustained capacity building in this area is limited. We describe a health management delivery program in which a north and

  18. New Architecture for Mental Health; New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation - Report to the Governor, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corp., Albany.

    The accomplishments of The Health and Mental Hygiene Facilities Improvement Corporation during the past years in creating needed hospitals and health centers for the mentally disabled is documented. The new facilities show awareness of architectural trends and new objectives in design in order to better serve the needs of the patient. Pictures and…

  19. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Hall B: Software Utilization

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Hall B: Software Utilization Gerard Gilfoyle University of Richmond 12 GeV Upgrade Software Review Jefferson Lab November 25-26, 2013 #12;Thomas Jefferson, projects. Tools. Simulation. Reconstruction. Visualization Physics Analysis. Summary. #12;Thomas Jefferson

  20. MSU Construction Change Directive Form 109 Page 1 of 1 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU Construction Change Directive Form 109 Page 1 of 1 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION: (406) 994-5665 CONSTRUCTION CHANGE DIRECTIVE Project Name: PPA No.: Location: Montana State University, Design & Construction 6th & Grant, Po Box 172760 Bozeman, Mt 59717-2760 Architect

  1. Facilities -Security President's Council Section Page 25 Motion: 199510.11

    E-print Network

    Bolch, Tobias

    Facilities - Security President's Council Section Page 25 Motion: 199510.11 To be reviewed again & Finance) for the administration of this policy and procedures. 4. Procedures If a provincial or federal instructor is responsible for the transportation of weapons on and off campus. The instructor is required

  2. Parking Guidelines Facilities Management Department (Fill in Policy or Procedure Name) Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Grant, Gregory

    Parking Guidelines Facilities Management Department (Fill in Policy or Procedure Name) Page 1 of 1 guidelines for acquiring parking on the Washington University School of Medicine Campus DEFINITIONS: Permits parking at BJC or on the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis. PROCESS: Faculty, staff

  3. Quality management standards for facility services in the Italian health care sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vittorio Cesarotti; Bruna Di Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – Health care, one of the most dynamic sectors in Italy, is studied with a particular focus on outsourcing non-core activities such as facility management (FM) services. The project's goals are to define national standards to balance and control facility service evolution, and to drive FM services towards organisational excellence. The authors, in cooperation with a pool of facility

  4. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristi L. Koenig; Connie J. Boatright; John A. Hancock; Frank J. Denny; David S. Teeter; Christopher A. Kahn; Carl H. Schultz

    2008-01-01

    Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility–based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including

  5. Utilization of Occupational Therapy in Mental Health Facilities in Western Pennsylvania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaime Phillip Muñoz; John Sciulli Jr; Dara L. Thomas; Ryan S. Wissner

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores factors that are influencing the utilization of occupational therapists in mental health facilities in Western Pennsylvania from the perspective of administrators of mental health agencies. Administrators completed a 32 item survey. Descriptive statistics were compiled and inferential statistical analysis compared group means by type of facility, employment of occupational therapy personnel, awareness of occupational therapy education, and

  6. [Nosocomial infections in long-term health care facilities].

    PubMed

    Serrano, Marcos; Barcenilla, Fernando; Limón, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The long-term care facilities (LTCF) are the health care level that integrates medical assistance and social services according to the requirements of its beneficiaries. There is a great variability depending on the users profile, the professional staff and accessibility to technical resources for diagnosis, treatment or rehabilitation. In LTCF different factors are shaping a challenge in the infection control. These factors are high prevalence of infection and colonization by multiresistant microorganisms (MROs), a high rate of, often inadequate, antibiotic prescriptions, the high transfer of hospital patients, and the lack of diagnostic resources. In infection studies in LTCF, one of the main problems is the lack of standard, and well defined, infection criteria. The special features of infections in the elderly population, together with the limited resources, make it necessary to establish standard and worldwide validated criteria in order achieve appropriate monitoring and control of infection. The most common infection is the respiratory, followed by the urinary, skin and soft tissue, gastro-intestinal tract, and eyes. The problematic microorganisms most frequently identified in LTCF are enterobacteriaceae extended spectrum beta lactamase, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A successful infection control mainly depends on two actions. First, a high compliance of standard precautions and second, patient organization according to the risk of transmission of a particular MROs infection, especially MRSA. This risk classification may be a way to rationalize application measures, and the incorporation of ethical and legal issues. The level of stratification is established mainly according to the condition of being colonized or infected, the MROs anatomical location, and the degree of behavioral disorders suffered by the patient. Implementation of extensive screening programs or complex monitoring programs, as in acute care hospitals are not indicated. The epidemiological surveillance must adapt to clinical guidelines, with the registering of colonized and infected patients being mandatory, along with the coordination between health and social systems by applying global control programs. PMID:24447921

  7. Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 1 of 18 Version 4.0 KINGSTON UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Jones, Graeme A.

    Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 1 of 18 Version 4.0 KINGSTON UNIVERSITY HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY Release: Final Subject: Health & Safety Policy Issued by: University Safety Office Version: 4.0 Effective From : December 2010 #12;Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 2 of 18 Version 4.0 Foreword

  8. UK HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 1 September 1, 2009 HIPAA Education Level One

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    UK HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 1 September 1, 2009 HIPAA Education ­ Level of an individual's health information Ensures physical and technical security of an individual's health HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 2 September 1, 2009 ~ Who is required to comply

  9. Human Resources hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Human Resources ­ hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing Protocol & Safety Manager Contact: Health & Safety Team Table of Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................. 4 Contractor/Sub-contractor Health and Safety Considerations

  10. Uses of inorganic hypochlorite (bleach) in health-care facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Rutala, W A; Weber, D J

    1997-01-01

    Hypochlorite has been used as a disinfectant for more than 100 years. It has many of the properties of an ideal disinfectant, including a broad antimicrobial activity, rapid bactericidal action, reasonable persistence in treated potable water, ease of use, solubility in water, relative stability, relative nontoxicity at use concentrations, no poisonous residuals, no color, no staining, and low cost. The active species is undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Hypochlorites are lethal to most microbes, although viruses and vegetative bacteria are more susceptible than endospore-forming bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Activity is reduced by the presence of heavy metal ions, a biofilm, organic material, low temperature, low pH, or UV radiation. Clinical uses in health-care facilities include hyperchlorination of potable water to prevent Legionella colonization, chlorination of water distribution systems used in hemodialysis centers, cleaning of environmental surfaces, disinfection of laundry, local use to decontaminate blood spills, disinfection of equipment, decontamination of medical waste prior to disposal, and dental therapy. Despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants, hypochlorites continue to find wide use in hospitals. PMID:9336664

  11. System retrofit provides decentralized heating for mental health facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, G.R. (Krewson Vickrey Gabriel Engineers, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    This article describes a low temperature/pressure unitary heating equipment which significantly improves building environmental conditions. In 1988, the State of Georgia Department of Human Resources considered closing Brook Run, then named the Georgia Retardation Center. Closing the 101-acre (41-hectare) mental health campus and relocating 377 permanent residents and 925 staff were being considered because of trauma caused by repeated failures of the campus' heating system. The 22-year-old central high temperature water (HTW) campus underground piping system that served HVAC and domestic hot water loads had been leaking 40 gallons per minute (21 million gallons per year) of water at 350F (177C) and 290 psig (1999 kPa). The campus heating system was no longer serviceable. The cost for repairing routine leaks had averaged $100,000 per year. In addition, over $5,000,000 in capital expenditures had been previously spent for system restoration. The facility had been cited for failure to meet federal and state temperature guidelines as a result of repeated wintertime catastrophic heating system failures. Discouraged residents' parents wrote personal checks payable to then-Governor Joe Frank Harris for Heat at Georgia Retardation Center. Ten buildings totaling 191,000 ft[sup 2] (17 744m[sup 2]) were included in the retrofit project. These included five permanent resident cottages, two workshop buildings, a theater, the administration building and the maintenance shop.

  12. Physical access to health facilities and contraceptive use in Kenya: evidence from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Ettarh, Remare R; Kyobutungi, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the spatial variation in modern contraceptive use and unmet need for family planning across the counties of Kenya and to examine whether the spatial patterns were associated with inequalities in physical access to health facilities. Data were obtained from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey and linked to the location of health facilities in the country. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the influence of distance to the nearest health facility and health facility density, in addition to other covariates, on modern contraceptive use and unmet need. Overall, the prevalence of modern contraceptive use and unmet need among women aged 15-49 in Kenya was 42.1% and 19.7% respectively. Among the respondents who lived more than 5 km from the nearest health facility modern contraceptive use was significantly less likely compared to women resident 5 km or less from the nearest health facility. Women from counties with higher health facility density were 53% more likely to use modern contraceptives compared to women in counties with low health facility density. Distance and health facility density in the county were not significantly associated with unmet need. Physical access to health facilities is an important determinant of modern contraceptive use and unmet need in Kenya. Strategies should be developed in underserved counties to mitigate the challenge of distance to health facilities, such as delivering services by outreach and mobile facilities. PMID:23437499

  13. Construction Grants for Educational Facilities, Fiscal Years 1965-77. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Bella U.; Rosenthal, Samuel

    This publication provides information on construction assistance awarded to schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatric medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, and nursing. In addition it provides data on grants awarded to schools of allied health, medical libraries, and health research facilities

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Socio-Demographic Factors Predicting Birth in Health Facility

    PubMed Central

    Berhan, Yifru; Berhan, Asres

    2014-01-01

    Background The low proportion of health facility delivery in developing countries is one of the main challenges in achieving the Millennium Development Goal of a global reduction of maternal deaths by 75% by 2015. There are several primary studies which identified socio-demographic and other predictors of birth in health facility. However, there are no efforts to synthesis the findings of these studies. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the strength of the association of birth in the health facility with selected sociodemographic factors. Methods A meta-analysis of Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios was conducted by including 24 articles which were reported between 2000 and 2013 from developing countries. A computer-based search was done from MEDLINE, African Journals Online, Google Scholar and HINARI databases. Included studies did compare the women's' health facility delivery in relation to their selected socio-demographic characteristics. Results The pooled analysis demonstrated association of health facility delivery with living in urban areas (OR = 9.8), secondary and above educational level of the parents (OR = 5.0), middle to high wealth status (OR = 2.3) and first time pregnancy (OR = 2.8). The risk of delivering outside the health facility was not significantly associated with maternal age (teenage vs 20 years and above) and marital status. The distance of pregnant women's residence from the health facility was found to have an inverse relation to the proportion of health facility delivery. Conclusion Although the present meta-analysis identified several variables which were associated with an increase in health facility delivery, the most important predictor of birth in the health facility amenable to intervention is educational status of the parents to be. Therefore, formal and informal education to women and family members on the importance of health facility delivery needs to be strengthened. Improving the wealth status of the population across the world may not be achieved soon, but should be in the long-term strategy to increase the birth rate in the health facility. PMID:25489185

  15. Protecting new health facilities from natural hazards: guidelines for the promotion of disaster mitigation.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The health sector is particularly vulnerable to naturally occurring events. The vulnerability of the health infrastructure (hospitals and clinics) is of particular concern. Not only are such facilities vulnerable structurally, but their ability to continue to provide essential functions may be severely compromised, thus leaving the stricken population without essential services. This paper summarizes a more detailed document, Guidelines for Vulnerability Reduction in the Design of New Health Facilities published by the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO)/ World Health Organization (WHO). The current document summarizes these Guidelines emphasizing how they may be used, by whom, and for what purpose. Potential users of the Guidelines include, but are not limited to: (1) initiators of health facility construction projects; (2) executors and supervisors of health facility construction projects; and (3) financing bodies in charge of funding health facility construction projects. The Guidelines include: (1) implications of natural phenomena upon the health infrastructure; (2) guidelines for vulnerability reduction for incorporation into development project cycles; (3) definitive phases and stages within the phases for development projects including: (I) Projects Assessment (needs assessment; assessment of options, the preliminary project); (II) Investment (project design, construction); and (III) Operational Activities (operations and maintenance). In addition, investment in damage reduction measures, policies and regulations, training and education, and the role of international organizations in the promotion and funding of mitigation strategies are addressed. PMID:15645629

  16. Requirements for Temporary Facilities/Tents/Stages Page 1 of 4 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5406 Rev.: 3

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Requirements for Temporary Facilities/Tents/Stages Page 1 of 4 Virginia Polytechnic Institute __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Requirements for Temporary Facilities/Tents/Stages ............................................................................................................................................................2 3.1 Permit/Temporary Certificate of Use for a Temporary Facility/Tent/Stage

  17. Differences in essential newborn care at birth between private and public health facilities in eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Waiswa, Peter; Akuze, Joseph; Peterson, Stefan; Kerber, Kate; Tetui, Moses; Forsberg, Birger C.; Hanson, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background In Uganda and elsewhere, the private sector provides an increasing and significant proportion of maternal and child health services. However, little is known whether private care results in better quality services and improved outcomes compared to the public sector, especially regarding care at the time of birth. Objective To describe the characteristics of care-seekers and assess newborn care practices and services received at public and private facilities in rural eastern Uganda. Design Within a community-based maternal and newborn care intervention with health systems strengthening, we collected data from mothers with infants at baseline and endline using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate data analysis comparing nine newborn care practices and three composite newborn care indicators among private and public health facilities was conducted. Results The proportion of women giving birth at private facilities decreased from 25% at baseline to 17% at endline, whereas overall facility births increased. Private health facilities did not perform significantly better than public health facilities in terms of coverage of any essential newborn care interventions, and babies were more likely to receive thermal care practices in public facilities compared to private (68% compared to 60%, p=0.007). Babies born at public health facilities received an average of 7.0 essential newborn care interventions compared to 6.2 at private facilities (p<0.001). Women delivering in private facilities were more likely to have higher parity, lower socio-economic status, less education, to seek antenatal care later in pregnancy, and to have a normal delivery compared to women delivering in public facilities. Conclusions In this setting, private health facilities serve a vulnerable population and provide access to service for those who might not otherwise have it. However, provision of essential newborn care practices was slightly lower in private compared to public facilities, calling for quality improvement in both private and public sector facilities, and a greater emphasis on tracking access to and quality of care in private sector facilities. PMID:25843495

  18. Facilities Fact Book, 1995. Texas Public Universities, Health-Related Institutions, and Technical Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    The 14 tables presented in this fact book provide information about the physical facilities at Texas public universities and colleges based on data gathered during 1995. Overall, the data show a deficit of space at public universities and health-related institutions; a ratio of deferred maintenance to facilities replacement value of 2 percent for…

  19. Health Facilities for Primary Eye Care in Sultanate of Oman

    PubMed Central

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Mohammed, Ali J

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Endeavor to improve (i) the quality of Primary Eye Care with the aid of an Eye Health Care Programme and (ii) the resourcing Primary Eye Care in Ministry of Health Institutions in 2001. Method: In this descriptive study, staff were randomly selected from 84 health institutions and representing 136 primary health institutions to carry out quality assurance procedures. Ophthalmologists trained in this evaluation were field staff who evaluated the resource status, such as health staff, space for eye care delivery, instruments, materials for health education, referring cases (for continuous medical education of the primary health staff), drugs for eye care, etc., in each health institution. In addition to availability, the standards of eye care delivery were also estimated. Results: The health institutes of Oman have adequate resources for Primary Eye Care. Additional requirement of ophthalmic loupes and medicaments would further improve Primary Eye Care in Oman. Conclusion: It is recommended that such a review of the health care programme and its resources and quality be periodically conducted as a part of a system of quality assurance in primary health care. PMID:21748123

  20. Management of Childhood Illness at Health Facilities in Benin: Problems and Their Causes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander K. Rowe; Faustin Onikpo; Marcel Lama; Francois Cokou; Michael S. Deming

    Objectives. To prepare for the implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in Benin, we studied the management of ill children younger than 5 years at outpatient health facilities. Methods. We observed a representative sample of consultations; after each consultation, we interviewed caregivers and reexamined children. Health workers' performance was evaluated against IMCI guidelines. To identify determinants of performance,

  1. Healthy Firms: Constraints to Growth among Private Health Sector Facilities in Ghana and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Nicholas E.; Kopf, Daniel; Spreng, Connor P.; Yoong, Joanne; Sood, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Background Health outcomes in developing countries continue to lag the developed world, and many countries are not on target to meet the Millennium Development Goals. The private health sector provides much of the care in many developing countries (e.g., approximately 50 percent in Sub-Saharan Africa), but private providers are often poorly integrated into the health system. Efforts to improve health systems performance will need to include the private sector and increase its contributions to national health goals. However, the literature on constraints private health care providers face is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyze data from a survey of private health facilities in Kenya and Ghana to evaluate growth constraints facing private providers. A significant portion of facilities (Ghana: 62 percent; Kenya: 40 percent) report limited access to finance as the most significant barrier they face; only a small minority of facilities report using formal credit institutions to finance day to day operations (Ghana: 6 percent; Kenya: 11 percent). Other important barriers include corruption, crime, limited demand for goods and services, and poor public infrastructure. Most facilities have paper-based rather than electronic systems for patient records (Ghana: 30 percent; Kenya: 22 percent), accounting (Ghana: 45 percent; Kenya: 27 percent), and inventory control (Ghana: 41 percent; Kenya: 24 percent). A majority of clinics in both countries report undertaking activities to improve provider skills and to monitor the level and quality of care they provide. However, only a minority of pharmacies report undertaking such activities. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that improved access to finance and improving business processes especially among pharmacies would support improved contributions by private health facilities. These strategies might be complementary if providers are more able to take advantage of increased access to finance when they have the business processes in place for operating a successful business and health facility. PMID:22383944

  2. The occupational health service. Staffing, facilities, and equipment.

    PubMed

    Rieth, L K

    2000-08-01

    An occupational health service can be an integral part of any company. It is incumbent on the industry to conduct a thorough assessment of the need for such a service and then support the service from a financial and resource perspective. Consequently, staffing and equipping an occupational health service adequately are dependent on the services to be delivered and the type of professional staff hired. All occupational health programs can be conducted in a cost effective manner when the goals and mission are in alignment with company goals, management supports appropriate funding, and space supports the delivery of quality health care. PMID:11760302

  3. 8/25/2009 Page 1 of 3 Occupational Health & Safety

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    8/25/2009 Page 1 of 3 Occupational Health & Safety Disciplinary Action Overview Under the Occupational Health & Safety Act, the employer is required to ensure the health & safety of workers engaged or no supervision. The employer is also obligated to ensure the health & safety program is implemented

  4. Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Billing.) Appeal A request for your health insurer or plan to review a decision or a grievance again. Balance Billing When a provider bills you for the difference between the provider's charge and the allowed

  5. The Legal Implications of HIPAA Privacy and Public Health Reporting for Correctional Facilities.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Leila; Collmer, Veda; Meza, Nick; Penunuri, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    Inmates in cramped living quarters, a situation common to correctional facilities, are especially vulnerable to disease. Cramped living conditions, coupled with above-average rates of HIV, tuberculosis, and other communicable diseases, increase inmates' risk of problematic health outcomes. Thus, high-quality health care and sustained efforts to prevent disease are especially important to improve inmate health within correctional facilities. Compliance with federal privacy restrictions pursuant to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule and state disease reporting requirements will foster inmate health and assist efforts to prevent the spread of disease. This article examines the interplay between HIPAA rules and state reporting laws to preserve health information privacy and to control the spread of disease. PMID:25953838

  6. Primary health care facility performance assessment in Armenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsovinar Harutyunyan; Anahit Demirchyan; Michael Thompson; Varduhi Petrosyan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to focus on the performance of select facilities in Lori and Shirak provinces in Armenia in Spring 2008. This is in response to the deterioration of the primary healthcare sector in Armenia. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The performance assessment focused on the status of several performance indicators, both current and as recalled for 2006.

  7. Health care facility and community strategies for patient care surge capacity.

    PubMed

    Hick, John L; Hanfling, Dan; Burstein, Jonathan L; DeAtley, Craig; Barbisch, Donna; Bogdan, Gregory M; Cantrill, Stephen

    2004-09-01

    Recent terrorist and epidemic events have underscored the potential for disasters to generate large numbers of casualties. Few surplus resources to accommodate these casualties exist in our current health care system. Plans for "surge capacity" must thus be made to accommodate a large number of patients. Surge planning should allow activation of multiple levels of capacity from the health care facility level to the federal level. Plans should be scalable and flexible to cope with the many types and varied timelines of disasters. Incident management systems and cooperative planning processes will facilitate maximal use of available resources. However, resource limitations may require implementation of triage strategies. Facility-based or "surge in place" solutions maximize health care facility capacity for patients during a disaster. When these resources are exceeded, community-based solutions, including the establishment of off-site hospital facilities, may be implemented. Selection criteria, logistics, and staffing of off-site care facilities is complex, and sample solutions from the United States, including use of local convention centers, prepackaged trailers, and state mental health and detention facilities, are reviewed. Proper pre-event planning and mechanisms for resource coordination are critical to the success of a response. PMID:15332068

  8. Needs and opportunities for improving the health, safety, and productivity of medical research facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, M; Brodt, W; Henderson, D; Loftness, V; Rosenfeld, A; Woods, J; Wright, R

    2000-01-01

    Medical research facilities, indeed all the nation's constructed facilities, must be designed, operated, and maintained in a manner that supports the health, safety, and productivity of the occupants. The National Construction Goals, established by the National Science and Technology Council, envision substantial improvements in occupant health and worker productivity. The existing research and best practices case studies support this conclusion, but too frequently building industry professionals lack the knowledge to design, construct, operate, and maintain facilities at these optimum levels. There is a need for more research and more collaborative efforts between medical and facilities engineering researchers and practitioners in order to attain the National Construction Goals. Such collaborative efforts will simultaneously support attainment of the National Health Goals. This article is the summary report of the Healthy Buildings Committee for the Leadership Conference: Biomedical Facilities and the Environment sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the National Association of Physicians for the Environment, and the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers on 1--2 November 1999 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. PMID:11124125

  9. Have Computers, Will Travel: Providing On-site Library Instruction in Rural Health Facilities Using a Portable Computer Lab

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine J. Neilson

    2010-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Health Information Resources Partnership (SHIRP) provides library instruction to Saskatchewan's health care practitioners and students on placement in health care facilities as part of its mission to provide province-wide access to evidence-based health library resources. A portable computer lab was assembled in 2007 to provide hands-on training in rural health facilities that do not have computer labs of

  10. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL...Responsibilities of Utilization and Quality...hospital seeking payment for services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries... Health care providers that submit Medicare...patient care data and other...

  11. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL...Responsibilities of Utilization and Quality...hospital seeking payment for services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries... Health care providers that submit Medicare...patient care data and other...

  12. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T. [and others

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

  13. Measuring physical accessibility to health facilities--a case study on Khulna City.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed Shariful; Aktar, Shamima

    2011-01-01

    Improving health services is a crucial issue and an immense challenge for the government of any Third World country. Bangladesh lacks healthcare services, one of the basic necessities of life. This paper demonstrates a method for estimating the geographical accessibility of health facilities by population coverage, average travel time and distance to the closest hospital. This analysis was applied to community units in the research area, allowing geographical access to be linked to people. The study area was divided into hexagons of equal size, and accessibility was measured from the centre of each hexagon. Despite the abundance of evidence on the inadequacy of health services in Khulna City, this study has given us a diverse dimension of possibilities. The study found that even with existing health facilities, discontent about the unavailability of health services can be mitigated in most areas. Exceptions are some peripheral areas, where average travel time to reach the city centre and distance from hospital services is greater. PMID:21677527

  14. Study on Patient Satisfaction in the Government Allopathic Health Facilities of Lucknow District, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Ranjeeta; Idris, MZ; Bhushan, Vidya; Khanna, Anish; Agarwal, Monika; Singh, SK

    2009-01-01

    Background: The outcome of any disease is influenced by the decisions to seek care, timely arrival at appropriate diagnostic and treatment services and the receipt of adequate care from service providers. Satisfaction in service provision is increasingly being used as a measure of health system performance. Satisfaction manifests itself in the distribution, access and utilization of health services. Objectives: To determine the areas and causes of low satisfaction among the patients and suggest methods for improvement. Materials and Methods: Multistage stratified random sampling was used to select the government allopathic health facilities of Lucknow district and systematic random sampling for the selection of the patients for the interview. Results: The accessibility was difficult in 42% patients and waiting time more than 30 min for 62.5% of those attending the tertiary level health facility. The satisfaction with the duration of the outpatient department (OPD) (64.6%) and the presence of signboards (46.6%) was also found to be low. The overall satisfaction regarding the doctor-patient communication was more than 60% at all the levels of health care facilities but that with the examination and consultation was less than 60% at the primary level as compared to more than 80% elsewhere. The most important motivating factor for the visit to the tertiary (48.2%) and secondary level (71.9%, 67.1%) of health facilities was the faith on doctors or health facility. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction is severely deficient in several areas and needs improvement for the achievement of optimal health of the people. PMID:19876453

  15. Management of Childhood Illness at Health Facilities in Benin: Problems and Their Causes

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Alexander K.; Onikpo, Faustin; Lama, Marcel; Cokou, Francois; Deming, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. To prepare for the implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in Benin, we studied the management of ill children younger than 5 years at outpatient health facilities. Methods. We observed a representative sample of consultations; after each consultation, we interviewed caregivers and reexamined children. Health workers' performance was evaluated against IMCI guidelines. To identify determinants of performance, statistical modeling was performed and 6 focus groups with health workers were conducted to solicit their opinions. Results. Altogether, 584 children were enrolled and 101 health workers were observed; 130 health workers participated in focus group discussions. Many serious deficiencies were found: incomplete assessment of children's signs and symptoms, incorrect diagnosis and treatment of potentially life-threatening illnesses, inappropriate prescription of dangerous sedatives, missed opportunities to vaccinate, and failure to refer severely ill children for hospitalization. Quantitative and qualitative analyses showed various health facility–, health worker–, caregiver-, and child-related factors as possible determinants of health worker performance. Conclusions. Action is urgently needed. Our results suggest that to improve health care delivery, interventions should target both the health system and the community level. PMID:11574325

  16. SmartConnect: Data connectivity for peripheral health facilities

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    not see any candidate solar + cell phone sites 6/15/2010 20NSDR 2010 #12;Health Post Connectivity · Visit more reliable than a cell phone · Potentially better connectivity (with antenna or improved cell phone: ­ Informants from vaccination project in Vietnam ­ WHO guidelines 6/15/2010 NSDR 2010 8 #12;Expectations, pre

  17. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

    2008-01-01

    Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility-based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including crowd control, triage, removal of contaminated garments, cleaning of body contaminants, and management of contaminated materials and equipment), and a discussion of methods to achieve preparedness. PMID:18082785

  18. Version Date: 1/5/2012 Page 1 of 3 Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Version Date: 1/5/2012 Page 1 of 3 Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing Peer Review Guidelines & Manuscript Review Form About Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing (CPHCM) is an online journal featuring peer- reviewed case studies

  19. PCRM Health & Safety President's Council November 16th , 2005 Page 1

    E-print Network

    Bolch, Tobias

    PCRM ­ Health & Safety President's Council ­ November 16th , 2005 Page 1 REVISED Enterprise Risk for Approval Submitted by Joint Health & Safety Committee UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA Policies by Joint Health & Safety Committee 2) the suspension, when necessary, of the use of any radioisotope

  20. PCRM Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15

    E-print Network

    Bolch, Tobias

    PCRM ­ Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH there is reasonable cause to believe that the work would create an undue hazard to the health or safety of any person meetings as a forum for discussing health or safety concerns whether it be the focus or element

  1. University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    testing (TST) skin testing by Employee Health Services. Annual TST is recommended for employees in allUniversity of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual: The University of Connecticut Health Center has developed and implemented a Tuberculosis Containment Program

  2. Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety Date Issued: Page No.

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    and Commercial Buildings, EPA 402-K-01-001 New York City Department of Health, Guidelines on Assessment developed by the Department of Environmental Health & Safety in accordance with the University's Policy Prevention Assessment and Remediation Procedures Prepared by: The Department of Environmental Health & Safety

  3. A ‘Mystery Client’ Evaluation of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health services in Health Facilities from Two Regions in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mchome, Zaina; Richards, Esther; Nnko, Soori; Dusabe, John; Mapella, Elizabeth; Obasi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcoming behaviours and judgemental attitudes have long been recognised as a barrier to young people’s access to reproductive health services. Over the last decade youth friendly reproductive health services have been promoted and implemented world-wide. However, long term evidence of the impact of these programmes is lacking. We report the results of a large mystery client evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in Tanzania, a country that has had a long established youth friendly policy. Forty-eight visits made to thirty-three health facilities were conducted by twelve young people (six in each region) trained to perform three different scripted scenarios (i.e., condom request, information on sexually transmitted infections and family planning). The study revealed barriers in relation to poor signage and reception for services. In addition health workers demonstrated paternalistic attitudes as well as lack of knowledge about adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. In some cases, health workers discouraged young people from using services such as condoms and family planning methods. Lack of confidentiality and privacy were also noted to be common challenges for the young people involved. Intervention strategies that focus on changing health workers’ mind-set in relation to adolescent sexual and reproductive health are crucial for ensuring quality provision of sexual and reproductive health services to young people. The study identified the importance of reception or signs at the health units, as this can facilitate young people’s efforts in seeking sexual and reproductive health services. Likewise, improvement of health workers knowledge of existing policy and practice on sexual and reproductive health services and youth friendly services is much needed. PMID:25803689

  4. A 'mystery client' evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in health facilities from two regions in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mchome, Zaina; Richards, Esther; Nnko, Soori; Dusabe, John; Mapella, Elizabeth; Obasi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcoming behaviours and judgemental attitudes have long been recognised as a barrier to young people's access to reproductive health services. Over the last decade youth friendly reproductive health services have been promoted and implemented world-wide. However, long term evidence of the impact of these programmes is lacking. We report the results of a large mystery client evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in Tanzania, a country that has had a long established youth friendly policy. Forty-eight visits made to thirty-three health facilities were conducted by twelve young people (six in each region) trained to perform three different scripted scenarios (i.e., condom request, information on sexually transmitted infections and family planning). The study revealed barriers in relation to poor signage and reception for services. In addition health workers demonstrated paternalistic attitudes as well as lack of knowledge about adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. In some cases, health workers discouraged young people from using services such as condoms and family planning methods. Lack of confidentiality and privacy were also noted to be common challenges for the young people involved. Intervention strategies that focus on changing health workers' mind-set in relation to adolescent sexual and reproductive health are crucial for ensuring quality provision of sexual and reproductive health services to young people. The study identified the importance of reception or signs at the health units, as this can facilitate young people's efforts in seeking sexual and reproductive health services. Likewise, improvement of health workers knowledge of existing policy and practice on sexual and reproductive health services and youth friendly services is much needed. PMID:25803689

  5. PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.1 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1

    E-print Network

    of the Notice, and if not obtained, document the good faith efforts by LSUHSC-NO to obtain an acknowledgement Practices SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU) System health care facilities and providers including, but not limited to hospitals, physician practices, clinics, schools, etc. on the LSU Health Sciences Center New

  6. Determining health-care facility catchment areas in Uganda using data on malaria-related visits

    PubMed Central

    Charland, Katia; Kigozi, Ruth; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R; Buckeridge, David L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To illustrate the use of a new method for defining the catchment areas of health-care facilities based on their utilization. Methods The catchment areas of six health-care facilities in Uganda were determined using the cumulative case ratio: the ratio of the observed to expected utilization of a facility for a particular condition by patients from small administrative areas. The cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to these facilities was determined using data from the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project. Catchment areas were also derived using various straight line and road network distances from the facility. Subsequently, the 1-year cumulative malaria case rate was calculated for each catchment area, as determined using the three methods. Findings The 1-year cumulative malaria case rate varied considerably with the method used to define the catchment areas. With the cumulative case ratio approach, the catchment area could include noncontiguous areas. With the distance approaches, the denominator increased substantially with distance, whereas the numerator increased only slightly. The largest cumulative case rate per 1000 population was for the Kamwezi facility: 234.9 (95% confidence interval, CI: 226.2–243.8) for a straight-line distance of 5 km, 193.1 (95% CI: 186.8–199.6) for the cumulative case ratio approach and 156.1 (95% CI: 150.9–161.4) for a road network distance of 5 km. Conclusion Use of the cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to determine health-care facility catchment areas was feasible. Moreover, this approach took into account patients’ actual addresses, whereas using distance from the facility did not. PMID:24700977

  7. The effect of health facility delivery on neonatal mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though promising progress has been made towards achieving the Millennium Development Goal four through substantial reduction in under-five mortality, the decline in neonatal mortality remains stagnant, mainly in the middle and low-income countries. As an option, health facility delivery is assumed to reduce this problem significantly. However, the existing evidences show contradicting conclusions about this fact, particularly in areas where enabling environments are constraint. Thus, this review was conducted with the aim of determining the pooled effect of health facility delivery on neonatal mortality. Methods The reviewed studies were accessed through electronic web-based search strategy from PUBMED, Cochrane Library and Advanced Google Scholar by using combination key terms. The analysis was done by using STATA-11. I2 test statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Begg’s test and Egger’s test were used to check for publication bias. Pooled effect size was determined in the form of relative risk in the random-effects model using DerSimonian and Laird's estimator. Results A total of 2,216 studies conducted on the review topic were identified. During screening, 37 studies found to be relevant for data abstraction. From these, only 19 studies fulfilled the preset criteria and included in the analysis. In 10 of the 19 studies included in the analysis, facility delivery had significant association with neonatal mortality; while in 9 studies the association was not significant. Based on the random effects model, the final pooled effect size in the form of relative risk was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.87) for health facility delivery as compared to home delivery. Conclusion Health facility delivery is found to reduce the risk of neonatal mortality by 29% in low and middle income countries. Expansion of health facilities, fulfilling the enabling environments and promoting their utilization during childbirth are essential in areas where home delivery is a common practice. PMID:23339515

  8. Compliance with universal precautions in correctional health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Gershon, R R; Karkashian, C D; Vlahov, D; Kummer, L; Kasting, C; Green-McKenzie, J; Escamilla-Cejudo, J A; Kendig, N; Swetz, A; Martin, L

    1999-03-01

    There were three main objectives of this cross-sectional study of Maryland State correctional health care workers. The first was to evaluate compliance with work practices designed to minimize exposure to blood and body fluids; the second, to identify correlates of compliance with universal precautions (UPs); and the third was to determine the relationship, if any, between compliance and exposures. Of 216 responding health care workers, 34% reported overall compliance across all 15 items on a compliance scale. Rates for specific items were particularly low for use of certain types of personal protective equipment, such as protective eyewear (53.5%), face mask (47.2%) and protective clothing (33.9%). Compliance rates were highest for glove use (93.2%) waste disposal (89.8%), and sharps disposal (80.8%). Compliance rates were generally not associated with demographic factors, except for age; younger workers were more likely to be compliant with safe work practices than were older workers (P < 0.05). Compliance was positively associated with several work-related variables, including perceived safety climate (i.e., management's commitment to infection control and the overall safety program) and job satisfaction, and was found to be inversely associated with security-related work constraints, job/task factors, adverse working conditions, workplace discrimination, and perceived work stress. Bloodborne exposures were not uncommon; 13.8% of all respondents had at least one bloodborne exposure within the previous 6 months, and compliance was inversely related to blood and body fluid exposures. This study identified several potentially modifiable correlates of compliance, including factors unique to the correctional setting. Infection-control interventional strategies specifically tailored to these health care workers may therefore be most effective in reducing the risk of bloodborne exposures. PMID:10091141

  9. Guiding Ebola patients to suitable health facilities: an SMS-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Mohamad-Ali; Jurdak, Raja; Rana, Rajib

    2015-01-01

    Access to appropriate health services is a fundamental problem in developing countries, where patients do not have access to information and to the nearest health service facility. We propose building a recommendation system based on simple SMS text messaging to help Ebola patients readily find the closest health service with available and appropriate resources. The system will map people’s reported symptoms to likely Ebola case definitions and suitable health service locations. In addition to providing a valuable individual service to people with curable diseases, the proposed system will also predict population-level disease spread risk for infectious diseases using crowd-sourced symptoms from the population. Health workers will be able to better plan and anticipate responses to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Patients will have improved access to appropriate health care. This system could also be applied in other resource poor or rich settings. PMID:25789162

  10. Morbidity and mortality in booked women who deliver outside orthodox health facilities in Calabar, Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J Etuk; I. H Itam; E. E. J Asuquo

    2000-01-01

    Women who booked for antenatal care at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH), Calabar, but delivered outside orthodox health facilities were studied. The aims were to determine the pattern of maternal morbidity and mortality in them and to compare this with the pattern in women who booked and delivered at UCTH. One hundred and eighteen of the defaulters traced

  11. Lessons Learned from the On-Site Distillation of Used Solvents Generated by Health Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ching-San; Ciesla, John

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the sources of contaminants found in used solvents generated by the histopathological laboratories at health care facilities and the technical problems, corrective measures, and economic analysis associated with the on-site recycling and reusing of these solvents. An appendix contains an economic analysis for a used-solvent recycling…

  12. Quality of post-abortion care in public health facilities in Ethiopia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Solomon Kumbi; Yilma Melkamu; Hailu Yeneneh

    Background: Comprehensive quality Post Abortion Care (PAC) is one of the important strategies to save lives where access to safe abortion is restricted by Law and services are inaccessible. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the status of quality of PAC in health facilities of Amhara and Oromiya regional states. Methods: The study was cross-sectional by design

  13. Measuring governance at health facility level: developing and validation of simple governance tool in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Governance has been cited as a key determinant of economic growth, social advancement and overall development. Achievement of millennium development goals is partly dependant on governance practices. In 2007, Health Systems 20/20 conducted an Internet-based survey on the practice of good governance. The survey posed a set of good practices related to health governance and asked respondents to indicate whether their experience confirmed or disconfirmed those practices. We applied the 17 governance statements in rural health facilities of Zambia. The aim was to establish whether the statements were reliable and valid for assessing governance practices at primary care level. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. We first applied the governance statements developed by the health system 20/20 and then conducted focus group discussion and In-depth interviews to explore some elements of governance including accountability and community participation. The target respondents were the health facility management team and community members. The sample size include 42 health facilities. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 and Nvivo version 9. Results The 95% one-sided confidence interval for Cronbach’s alpha was between 0.69 and 0.74 for the 16 items. The mean score for most of the items was above 3. Factor analysis yielded five principle components: Transparency, community participation, Intelligence & vision, Accountability and Regulation & oversight. Most of the items (6) clustered around the transparency latent factor. Chongwe district performed poorly in overall mean governance score and across the five domains of governance. The overall scores in Chongwe ranged between 51 and 94% with the mean of 80%. Kafue and Luangwa districts had similar overall mean governance scores (88%). Community participation was generally low. Generally, it was noted that community members lacked capacity to hold health workers accountable for drugs and medical supplies. Conclusions The study successfully validated and applied the new tool for evaluating health system governance at health facility level. The results have shown that it is feasible to measure governance practices at health facility level and that the adapted tool is fairly reliable with the 95% one-sided confidence interval for Cronbach’s alpha laying between 0.69 and 0.74 for the 16 items. Caution should be taken when interpreting overall scores as they tended to mask domain specific variations. PMID:23927531

  14. Drug prescribing in rural health facilities in China: implications for service quality and cost.

    PubMed

    Zhan, S K; Tang, S L; Guo, Y D; Bloom, G

    1998-01-01

    Overuse of drugs in rural areas of China has led to a growing concern regarding service quality and cost. The study found evidence of high levels of drug use in some rural health facilities in comparison with a number of other developing countries. Such a result was significantly associated with the government policy of financing health care, regulation and monitoring of health services, and users' attitudes and behaviour. It underlines the need for measures to be taken in China to improve drug use in order to allow its population access to effective care at reasonable cost. PMID:9481197

  15. Treatment of uncomplicated malaria at public health facilities and medicine retailers in south-eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background At primary care facilities in Nigeria, national treatment guidelines state that malaria should be symptomatically diagnosed and treated with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Evidence from households and health care providers indicates that many patients do not receive the recommended treatment. This study sought to determine the extent of the problem by collecting data as patients and caregivers leave health facilities, and determine what influences the treatment received. Methods A cross-sectional cluster survey of 2,039 respondents exiting public health centres, pharmacies and patent medicine dealers was undertaken in urban and rural settings in Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria. Results Although 79% of febrile patients received an anti-malarial, only 23% received an ACT. Many patients (38%) received sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). A further 13% of patients received an artemisinin-derivative as a monotherapy. An estimated 66% of ACT dispensed was in the correct dose. The odds of a patient receiving an ACT was highly associated with consumer demand (OR: 55.5, p < 0.001). Conclusion Few febrile patients attending public health facilities, pharmacies and patent medicine dealers received an ACT, and the use of artemisinin-monotherapy and less effective anti-malarials is concerning. The results emphasize the importance of addressing both demand and supply-side influences on malaria treatment and the need for interventions that target consumer preferences as well as seek to improve health service provision. PMID:21651787

  16. Behind bars: the compelling case for academic health centers partnering with correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Trestman, Robert L; Ferguson, Warren; Dickert, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs), particularly those that are publicly funded institutions, have as their mission the treatment of disadvantaged populations, the training of the next generation of clinicians, and the development and dissemination of new knowledge to reduce the burden of disease and improve the health of individuals and populations. Incarcerated populations have the most prevalent and acute disease burden and health disparities in the United States, even in comparison with inner-city populations. Yet, only a small proportion of AHCs have reached out to incarcerated populations to fulfill their mission. Those AHCs that have partnered with correctional facilities have overcome concerns about the value and popularity of "training behind bars"; the cost, liability, and pragmatics of caring for a medically complicated population; and the viability of correctional health research and extramural research funding. They have done so to great benefit to patients, students, and faculty. Partnering with correctional facilities to provide health care offers opportunities for AHCs to fulfill their core missions of clinical service, education, and research, while also enhancing their financial stability, to the benefit of all. In this Commentary, the authors discuss, based on their experiences, these concerns, how existing partnerships have overcome them, and the benefits of such relationships to both AHCs and correctional facilities. PMID:25054416

  17. Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

  18. A Medical Decision Support System for the Space Station Health Maintenance Facility

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, David V.; Gardner, Reed M.; Logan, James S.

    1988-01-01

    NASA is developing a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) to provide the equipment and supplies necessary to deliver medical care in the Space Station. An essential part of the Health Maintenance Facility is a computerized Medical Decision Support System (MDSS) that will enhance the ability of the medical officer (“paramedic” or “physician”) to maintain the crew's health, and to provide emergency medical care. The computer system has four major functions: 1) collect and integrate medical information into an electronic medical record from Space Station medical officers, HMF instrumentation, and exercise equipment; 2) provide an integrated medical record and medical reference information management system; 3) manage inventory for logistical support of supplies and secure pharmaceuticals; 4) supply audio and electronic mail communications between the medical officer and ground based flight surgeons. ImagesFigure 1

  19. Birth in a Health Facility –Inequalities among the Ethiopian Women: Results from Repeated National Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Yesuf, Elias Ali; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Background Uptake of health facilities for delivery care in Ethiopia has not been examined in the light of equality. We investigated differences in institutional deliveries by urbanity, administrative region, economic status and maternal education. Methods This study was based on nation-wide repeated surveys undertaken in the years 2000, 2005, and 2011. The surveys used a cluster sampling design. Women of reproductive age were interviewed on the place of their last delivery. Data was analyzed using logistic regressions to estimate the weighted association between birth in a health facility and study's predictors. Results Utilization of health institutions for deliveries has improved throughout the study period, however, rates remain low (5.4%,2000 and 11.8%,2011). Compared with women from rural places, women from urban areas had independent OR of a health facility delivery of 4.9 (95% CI: 3.4, 7.0), 5.0 (95% CI: 3.6, 6.9), and 4.6 (95% CI: 3.5, 6.0) in 2000, 2005, and 2011, respectively. Women with secondary/higher education had more deliveries in a healthcare facility than women with no education, and these gaps widened over the years (OR: 35.1, 45.0 and 53.6 in 2000, 2005, and 2011, respectively). Women of the upper economic quintile had 3.0–7.2 times the odds of healthcare facility deliveries, compared with the lowest quintile, with no clear trend over the years. While Addis-Ababa and Dire Dawa remained with the highest OR for deliveries in a health facility compared with Amhara, other regions displayed shifts in their relative ranking with Oromiya, SNNPR, Afar, Harari, and Somali getting relatively worse over time. Conclusions The disparity related to urbanity or education in the use of health facility for birth in Ethiopia is staggering. There is a small inequality between most regions except Addis Ababa/Dire Dawa and sign of abating inequity between economic strata except for the richest households. PMID:24751600

  20. The Mistreatment of Women during Childbirth in Health Facilities Globally: A Mixed-Methods Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bohren, Meghan A.; Vogel, Joshua P.; Hunter, Erin C.; Lutsiv, Olha; Makh, Suprita K.; Souza, João Paulo; Aguiar, Carolina; Saraiva Coneglian, Fernando; Diniz, Alex Luíz Araújo; Tunçalp, Özge; Javadi, Dena; Oladapo, Olufemi T.; Khosla, Rajat; Hindin, Michelle J.; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite growing recognition of neglectful, abusive, and disrespectful treatment of women during childbirth in health facilities, there is no consensus at a global level on how these occurrences are defined and measured. This mixed-methods systematic review aims to synthesize qualitative and quantitative evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth in health facilities to inform the development of an evidence-based typology of the phenomenon. Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, CINAHL, and Embase databases and grey literature using a predetermined search strategy to identify qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies on the mistreatment of women during childbirth across all geographical and income-level settings. We used a thematic synthesis approach to synthesize the qualitative evidence and assessed the confidence in the qualitative review findings using the CERQual approach. In total, 65 studies were included from 34 countries. Qualitative findings were organized under seven domains: (1) physical abuse, (2) sexual abuse, (3) verbal abuse, (4) stigma and discrimination, (5) failure to meet professional standards of care, (6) poor rapport between women and providers, and (7) health system conditions and constraints. Due to high heterogeneity of the quantitative data, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis; instead, we present descriptions of study characteristics, outcome measures, and results. Additional themes identified in the quantitative studies are integrated into the typology. Conclusions This systematic review presents a comprehensive, evidence-based typology of the mistreatment of women during childbirth in health facilities, and demonstrates that mistreatment can occur at the level of interaction between the woman and provider, as well as through systemic failures at the health facility and health system levels. We propose this typology be adopted to describe the phenomenon and be used to develop measurement tools and inform future research, programs, and interventions. PMID:26126110

  1. Reasons rural Laotians choose home deliveries over delivery at health facilities: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality among poor rural women in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is among the highest in Southeast Asia, in part because only 15% give birth at health facilities. This study explored why women and their families prefer home deliveries to deliveries at health facilities. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from December 2008 to February 2009 in two provinces of Lao PDR. Data was collected through eight focus group discussions (FGD) as well as through in-depth interviews with 12 mothers who delivered at home during the last year, eight husbands and eight grandmothers, involving a total of 71 respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze the FGD and interview transcripts. Results Obstacles to giving birth at health facilities included: (1) Distance to the health facilities and difficulties and costs of getting there; (2) Attitudes, quality of care, and care practices at the health facilities, including a horizontal birth position, episiotomies, lack of privacy, and the presence of male staff; (3) The wish to have family members nearby and the need for women to be close to their other children and the housework; and (4) The wish to follow traditional birth practices such as giving birth in a squatting position and lying on a “hot bed” after delivery. The decision about where to give birth was commonly made by the woman’s husband, mother, mother-in-law or other relatives in consultation with the woman herself. Conclusion This study suggests that the preference in rural Laos for giving birth at home is due to convenience, cost, comfort and tradition. In order to assure safer births and reduce rural Lao PDR’s high maternal mortality rate, health centers could consider accommodating the wishes and traditional practices of many rural Laotians: allowing family in the birthing rooms; allowing traditional practices; and improving attitudes among staff. Traditional birth attendants, women, and their families could be taught and encouraged to recognize the signs of at-risk pregnancies so as to be able to reach health facilities on time. PMID:22925107

  2. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-003

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-003: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-003 Printed Copies where there are any changes that affect workplace health and safety, represented on health and safety

  3. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-009

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-009, 2011 Page 2 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-009 Printed Copies of this Document and responsibilities under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, job-specific health and safety policies

  4. Health and Safety Policy Page 1 of 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No.1005 Rev.: 4

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Health and Safety Policy Page 1 of 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No.1005 __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Health and Safety Policy safety awareness; meet requirements of environmental, occupational health, and safety laws

  5. Page 1 of 2 Health & Society Scholars Program

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Grants: Application Instructions The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars Program Mullahy, Ph.D., Co-Director Stephanie A. Robert, M.S.W., Ph.D., Co-Director Jane F. Lambert, M.A., Program

  6. Official Building and Facility Names, Designations and Numbers Page 1 of 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5410 Rev.: 5

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Official Building and Facility Names, Designations and Numbers Page 1 of 3 Virginia Polytechnic __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Official Building and Facility Names, Designations and Numbers and facility names, numbers and data for all university buildings (i.e., existing and proposed). This policy

  7. Have computers, will travel: providing on-site library instruction in rural health facilities using a portable computer lab.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Christine J

    2010-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Health Information Resources Partnership (SHIRP) provides library instruction to Saskatchewan's health care practitioners and students on placement in health care facilities as part of its mission to provide province-wide access to evidence-based health library resources. A portable computer lab was assembled in 2007 to provide hands-on training in rural health facilities that do not have computer labs of their own. Aside from some minor inconveniences, the introduction and operation of the portable lab has gone smoothly. The lab has been well received by SHIRP patrons and continues to be an essential part of SHIRP outreach. PMID:20391160

  8. 2013 StudentHealthInsurance Page1 NorthwesternUniversity CAESAR/SES Updated:7/11/2013

    E-print Network

    Shahriar, Selim

    ©2013 StudentHealthInsurance Page1 NorthwesternUniversity CAESAR/SES Updated:7/11/2013 SES/CAESAR vID and password. The Home Page appears. #12;©2013 StudentHealthInsurance Page2 NorthwesternUniversity CAESAR/SES as an example, follows.) #12;©2013 StudentHealthInsurance Page3 NorthwesternUniversity CAESAR/SES Updated:7

  9. Page 1 of 2 Affordable Care Act / Health Care Reform

    E-print Network

    Eligibility III. ACA Health Fee Information IV. Contract and Grant Accounting I. Overview · Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the definition of Full-time Employee includes variable hour employees who are paid an average of 130 hours/month (30 or more hours per week). · All employees meeting the ACA criteria ACA FAQs

  10. January 17, 2013 Page 1 Student Health Services

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    · Cloud Computing #12;#12;#12;HHS Office of Civil Rights breach notification data (9/11/12) #12 policies including passwords & sign off computer requirements 5. Remove patient information from unsecure and with business associates · Unprotected Protected Health Information (PHI) on cloud has become a bre

  11. JAMA Patient Page: Health Care Concerns After a Disaster

    MedlinePLUS

    ... waived, including stringency of medical record requirements. Electronic health record systems do not work in the event of a lengthy power outage, and emergency generators may not be able to function. Preparation • Make a disaster plan for you and your family. Many resources are ...

  12. Page 1 of 2 Health & Society Scholars Program

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    :00 pm on May 1, 2014 to Jane Lambert at jflamber@wisc.edu. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Mullahy, Ph.D., Co-Director Stephanie A. Robert, M.S.W., Ph.D., Co-Director Jane F. Lambert, M.A., Program

  13. Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

  14. Public Health Investigation After the Discovery of Ricin in a South Carolina Postal Facility

    PubMed Central

    Schier, Joshua G.; Patel, Manish M.; Belson, Martin G.; Patel, Amee; Schwartz, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Nicole; Drociuk, Dan; Deitchman, Scott; Meyer, Richard; Litovitz, Toby; Watson, William A.; Rubin, Carol H.; Kiefer, Max

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. In October 2003, a package containing ricin and a note threatening to poison water supplies was discovered in a South Carolina postal facility, becoming the first potential chemical terrorism event involving ricin in the United States. We examined the comprehensive public health investigation that followed and discuss the lessons learned from it. Methods. An investigation consisting primarily of environmental sampling for ricin contamination, performance of health assessments on affected personnel, and local, regional, and national surveillance for ricin-associated illness. Results. Laboratory analysis of 75 environmental sampling specimens revealed no ricin contamination. Health assessments of 36 affected employees were completed. Local surveillance initially identified 3 suspected cases, and national surveillance identified 399 outliers during the 2-week period after the incident. No confirmed cases of ricin-associated illness were identified. Conclusions. A multifaceted and multidisciplinary approach is required for an effective public health response to a chemical threat such as ricin. The results of all of the described activities were used to determine that the facility was safe to reopen and that no public health threat existed. PMID:17413057

  15. Can motivational signs prompt increases in incidental physical activity in an Australian health-care facility?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Marshall; A. E. Bauman; C. Patch; J. Wilson; J. Chen

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether a stair- promoting signed intervention could increase the use of the stairs over the elevator in a health-care facility. A time-series design was conducted over 12 weeks. Data were collected before, during and after displaying a signed intervention during weeks 4-5 and 8-9. Evalu- ation included anonymous counts recorded by an objective unobtrusive motion-sensing

  16. Occupational traumatic injuries among workers in health care facilities - United States, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ahmed E; Tapp, Loren C; Luckhaupt, Sara E; Vanoli, Kelly; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Raudabaugh, William M; Nowlin, Susan; Sprigg, Susan M

    2015-04-24

    In 2013, one in five reported nonfatal occupational injuries occurred among workers in the health care and social assistance industry, the highest number of such injuries reported for all private industries. In 2011, U.S. health care personnel experienced seven times the national rate of musculoskeletal disorders compared with all other private sector workers. To reduce the number of preventable injuries among health care personnel, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), with collaborating partners, created the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN) to collect detailed injury data to help target prevention efforts. OHSN, a free, voluntary surveillance system for health care facilities, enables prompt and secure tracking of occupational injuries by type, occupation, location, and risk factors. This report describes OHSN and reports on current findings for three types of injuries. A total of 112 U.S. facilities reported 10,680 OSHA-recordable* patient handling and movement (4,674 injuries); slips, trips, and falls (3,972 injuries); and workplace violence (2,034 injuries) injuries occurring from January 1, 2012-September 30, 2014. Incidence rates for patient handling; slips, trips, and falls; and workplace violence were 11.3, 9.6, and 4.9 incidents per 10,000 worker-months,† respectively. Nurse assistants and nurses had the highest injury rates of all occupations examined. Focused interventions could mitigate some injuries. Data analyzed through OHSN identify where resources, such as lifting equipment and training, can be directed to potentially reduce patient handling injuries. Using OHSN can guide institutional and national interventions to protect health care personnel from common, disabling, preventable injuries. PMID:25905893

  17. Physical Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S. M.; Novelo Casanova, D.

    2010-12-01

    Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

  18. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 2 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-004

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 2 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-004: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 2 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-004 Printed Copies of the Occupational Health and Safety inspection Division of the Department of Labor. The Director of the Department

  19. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-021

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S date: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-021 Printed Copies & legislative requirements as set out in Section 4 of the Newfoundland & Labrador Occupational Health & Safety

  20. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 5 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety E-003

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    is the most common health hazard along with ingestion and skin absorption. It should be noted that leadLatest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 5 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety E-003 revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 5 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety E-003 Printed Copies

  1. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

  2. Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient facilities that provide health services to the

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    that are mandated by the state board of nursing to obtain licensure. As a result of this education and training of nurse managed centers were established by nursing schools using federal grants in the 1970s and 1980sOverview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient

  3. Newborn care practices at home and in health facilities in 4 regions of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is one of the ten countries with the highest number of neonatal deaths globally, and only 1 in 10 women deliver with a skilled attendant. Promotion of essential newborn care practices is one strategy for improving newborn health outcomes that can be delivered in communities as well as facilities. This article describes newborn care practices reported by recently-delivered women (RDWs) in four regions of Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a household survey with two-stage cluster sampling to assess newborn care practices among women who delivered a live baby in the period 1 to 7 months prior to data collection. Results The majority of women made one antenatal care (ANC) visit to a health facility, although less than half made four or more visits and women were most likely to deliver their babies at home. About one-fifth of RDWs in this survey had contact with Health Extension Workers (HEWS) during ANC, but nurse/midwives were the most common providers, and few women had postnatal contact with any health provider. Common beneficial newborn care practices included exclusive breastfeeding (87.6%), wrapping the baby before delivery of the placenta (82.3%), and dry cord care (65.2%). Practices contrary to WHO recommendations that were reported in this population of recent mothers include bathing during the first 24 hours of life (74.7%), application of butter and other substances to the cord (19.9%), and discarding of colostrum milk (44.5%). The results suggest that there are not large differences for most essential newborn care indicators between facility and home deliveries, with the exception of delayed bathing and skin-to-skin care. Conclusions Improving newborn care and newborn health outcomes in Ethiopia will likely require a multifaceted approach. Given low facility delivery rates, community-based promotion of preventive newborn care practices, which has been effective in other settings, is an important strategy. For this strategy to be successful, the coverage of counseling delivered by HEWs and other community volunteers should be increased. PMID:24289501

  4. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

  5. Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 University of California

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 University of California as determined by Anthem Blue Cross. When using Non-PPO and Other Health Care Providers, insured persons

  6. Induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR = 4.28, CI: (1.24-14.71)), age of 30-34 years (AOR = 0.15, CI: (0.04-0.55)), primary education (AOR = 0.26, CI: (0.13-0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR = 0.44, CI: (0.14-0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

  7. Induced Abortion and Associated Factors in Health Facilities of Guraghe Zone, Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR?=?4.28, CI: (1.24–14.71)), age of 30–34 years (AOR?=?0.15, CI: (0.04–0.55)), primary education (AOR?=?0.26, CI: (0.13–0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR?=?0.44, CI: (0.14–0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

  8. Medicare and Medicaid programs; fire safety requirements for certain health care facilities; amendment. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2006-09-22

    This final rule adopts the substance of the April 15, 2004 tentative interim amendment (TIA) 00-1 (101), Alcohol Based Hand Rub Solutions, an amendment to the 2000 edition of the Life Safety Code, published by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). This amendment allows certain health care facilities to place alcohol-based hand rub dispensers in egress corridors under specified conditions. This final rule also requires that nursing facilities at least install battery-operated single station smoke alarms in resident rooms and common areas if they are not fully sprinklered or they do not have system-based smoke detectors in those areas. Finally, this final rule confirms as final the provisions of the March 25, 2005 interim final rule with changes and responds to public comments on that rule. PMID:17017467

  9. Beaumont health system biobank: a multidisciplinary biorepository and translational research facility.

    PubMed

    Akervall, Jan; Pruetz, Barbara L; Geddes, Timothy J; Larson, Dianna; Felten, David J; Wilson, George D

    2013-08-01

    The Beaumont BioBank model is a multidisciplinary facility that is designed to provide access and opportunity for research-minded clinicians to become involved in research without the need for their own research infrastructure, thus increasing the research effort across the Health System. We describe a biobank model that works primarily in operating rooms for tissue collection and utilizes a generic consent process to facilitate rapid and accurate collection of biospecimens. The model combines both a biorepository that collects specimens based on clinical questions and also a translational research facility that undertakes biomarker-based research on those specimens in a seamless and efficient process. We believe that the Beaumont BioBank model would be readily applicable and reproducible in other academic healthcare systems. PMID:24845589

  10. Mapping the capacities of fixed health facilities to cover people at risk of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The emphasis placed on the activities of mobile teams in the detection of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can at times obscure the major role played by fixed health facilities in HAT control and surveillance. The lack of consistent and detailed data on the coverage of passive case-finding and treatment further constrains our ability to appreciate the full contribution of the health system to the control of HAT. Methods A survey was made of all fixed health facilities that are active in the control and surveillance of gambiense HAT. Information on their diagnostic and treatment capabilities was collected, reviewed and harmonized. Health facilities were geo-referenced. Time-cost distance analysis was conducted to estimate physical accessibility and the potential coverage of the population at-risk of gambiense HAT. Results Information provided by the National Sleeping Sickness Control Programmes revealed the existence of 632 fixed health facilities that are active in the control and surveillance of gambiense HAT in endemic countries having reported cases or having conducted active screening activities during the period 2000-2012. Different types of diagnosis (clinical, serological, parasitological and disease staging) are available from 622 facilities. Treatment with pentamidine for first-stage disease is provided by 495 health facilities, while for second-stage disease various types of treatment are available in 206 health facilities only. Over 80% of the population at-risk for gambiense HAT lives within 5-hour travel of a fixed health facility offering diagnosis and treatment for the disease. Conclusions Fixed health facilities have played a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment and coverage of at-risk-population for gambiense HAT. As the number of reported cases continues to dwindle, their role will become increasingly important for the prospects of disease elimination. Future updates of the database here presented will regularly provide evidence to inform and monitor a rational deployment of control and surveillance efforts. Support to the development and, if successful, the implementation of new control tools (e.g. new diagnostics and new drugs) is crucial, both for strengthening and expanding the existing network of fixed health facilities by improving access to diagnosis and treatment and for securing a sustainable control and surveillance of gambiense HAT. PMID:24517513

  11. Cornell University On-Campus Housing Facility Fire Log 2012 Page 1 The following table provides information about fires that have occurred at Cornell University on-campus housing facilities during

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Kitchen Accidental Cooking ­ Oven mitt in broiler compartment caught fire when broiler accidentally turnedCornell University On-Campus Housing Facility Fire Log 2012 Page 1 The following table provides information about fires that have occurred at Cornell University on-campus housing facilities during the 2012

  12. Health care-associated infection outbreaks in pediatric long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Murray, Meghan T; Pavia, Marianne; Jackson, Olivia; Keenan, Mary; Neu, Natalie M; Cohen, B; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L

    2015-07-01

    Children in pediatric long-term care facilities (pLTCFs) have complex medical conditions and increased risk for health care-associated infections (HAIs). We performed a retrospective study from January 2010-December 2013 at 3 pLTCFs to describe HAI outbreaks and associated infection control interventions. There were 62 outbreaks involving 700 cases in residents and 250 cases in staff. The most common interventions were isolation precautions and education and in-services. Further research should examine interventions to limit transmission of infections in pLTCFs. PMID:25934066

  13. An assessment of clinical chemical sensing technology for potential use in space station health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Health Maintenance Facility is currently under development for space station application which will provide capabilities equivalent to those found on Earth. This final report addresses the study of alternate means of diagnosis and evaluation of impaired tissue perfusion in a microgravity environment. Chemical data variables related to the dysfunction and the sensors required to measure these variables are reviewed. A technology survey outlines the ability of existing systems to meet these requirements. How the candidate sensing system was subjected to rigorous testing is explored to determine its suitability. Recommendations for follow-on activities are included that would make the commercial system more appropriate for space station applications.

  14. University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Control Practices Advisory Committee. 2007 Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing TransmissionUniversity of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual SECTION: PATIENT RELATED INFECTION CONTROL NUMBER: 2.12 LINEN PURPOSE: To provide clean linen for patient

  15. PCRM Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15

    E-print Network

    Bolch, Tobias

    PCRM ­ Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA Policies and Procedures SUBJECT: SAFETY TRAINING FOR NEW UNBC EMPLOYEES , VOLUNTEERS, AND STUDENTS, and students working for or at the University. 3. Authority The Risk & Safety Manager, reporting

  16. A guide to treating military personnel in a civilian mental health facility.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Gwen A

    2014-11-01

    As the number of troops returning home from the Middle East continues to rise, so does the need for psychiatric treatment. More and more often, civilian mental health facilities will be faced with treating active duty service members. Because the patients are active duty status, civilian providers need to become familiar with the unique intricacies and challenges of interacting with military command and mental health clinics. Concepts such as confidentiality and consent have a slightly different meaning in the military that affects care in the civilian realm. Diagnoses, medication choices, and treatment planning can also have an impact on a service member's career in the military that civilian providers may not recognize. This guide serves as a "beginner's" manual for working with active duty service members. PMID:25406055

  17. Regulations governing the use of University library and computer room/area facilities and services 2013/2014 Page 1 of 7

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    POLICY Regulations governing the use of University library and computer room/area facilities and services 2013/2014 Page 1 of 7 Regulations governing the use of University library and computer room/area facilities and services Contents 1. Scope of regulations 1 2. Conformance with legislation 2 3. Borrower

  18. Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care facilities. Such evidence about electricity needs and gaps would optimize use of limited resources, which can help to strengthen health systems. PMID:25276537

  19. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 12 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-015

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    will cover Product Labeling, Material Safety Data Sheets, and Worker Training. 3.0 WHMIS - HazardLatest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 12 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-015;Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 12 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-015

  20. MSU Certificate of Substantial Completion Form 107 Page 1 of 2 FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    : Project Location: TO: Montana State University Facilities Planning, Design & Construction 6th & Grant, PO Material (e.g. masonry, metal panel, wood, etc.) Total Construction Cost Fire Sprinklers Installed (yes & CONSTRUCTION Sixth Avenue and Grant Street · PO Box 172760 · Bozeman, Montana 59717-2760 Phone: (406) 994

  1. Page 1 D. Dilling, T. Brown FIRE FACILITIES AND SITE REQUIREMENTS

    E-print Network

    the buildings and balance of plant systems required to support the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE to the tokamak. Site requirements, a generic site plan, and conceptual building arrangements are provided. IPage 1 D. Dilling, T. Brown FIRE FACILITIES AND SITE REQUIREMENTS David A. Dilling Oak Ridge

  2. Effects of China's national essential medicines policy on the use of injection in primary health facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoxi; Yang, Chunyan; Wang, Difei; Ye, Jing; Zhang, Xinping

    2012-08-01

    The overuse of injection exists more than 20 years since economic reform in China. It is a persistent problem and seems becoming a new challenge in the new health reform period. This study was designed to assess the effect of national essential medicines policy (NEMP) on injection use at primary health facilities in China by investigating their prescription information. Questionnaires were designed and disseminated to collect empirical data on injection use at 120 primary health facilities in 6 provinces from January to September in 2010 and 2011. The injection use was measured as the indicator as the percentage of prescriptions with one or more injections. The results showed that the percentage of prescriptions with one or more injections was decreased from 38.91% to 36.82% (? (2)=11.158, P=0.001) in the all survey areas during the NEMP reform. The difference in level of the injection use in 2011 was significant among the eastern, central and western regions (? (2)=223.584, P=0.000); level of the injection use in western region was the lowest (27.73%), while that in the central region was the highest (43.10%). The level of the injection use in 2011 among different provinces was also of great difference (26.00%-58.25%, range: 32.25%). The level of the injection use in 2011 was still much higher than the standard suggested by WHO for developing countries (13.4%-24.1%). It was concluded that NEMP has improved injection use in China, but the injection abuse situation remains serious, indicating that one of the priorities to the next stage of NEMP is to promote the rational use of drugs, especially the injection use. PMID:22886982

  3. Delivering at home or in a health facility? health-seeking behaviour of women and the role of traditional birth attendants in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional birth attendants retain an important role in reproductive and maternal health in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Government promotes TBAs in order to provide maternal and neonatal health counselling and initiating timely referral, however, their role officially does not include delivery attendance. Yet, experience illustrates that most TBAs still often handle complicated deliveries. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to describe (1) women’s health-seeking behaviour and experiences regarding their use of antenatal (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC); (2) their rationale behind the choice of place and delivery; and to learn (3) about the use of traditional practices and resources applied by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) and how they can be linked to the bio-medical health system. Methods Qualitative and quantitative interviews were conducted with over 270 individuals in Masasi District, Mtwara Region and Ilala Municipality, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Results The results from the urban site show that significant achievements have been made in terms of promoting pregnancy- and delivery-related services through skilled health workers. Pregnant women have a high level of awareness and clearly prefer to deliver at a health facility. The scenario is different in the rural site (Masasi District), where an adequately trained health workforce and well-equipped health facilities are not yet a reality, resulting in home deliveries with the assistance of either a TBA or a relative. Conclusions Instead of focusing on the traditional sector, it is argued that more attention should be paid towards (1) improving access to as well as strengthening the health system to guarantee delivery by skilled health personnel; and (2) bridging the gaps between communities and the formal health sector through community-based counselling and health education, which is provided by well-trained and supervised village health workers who inform villagers about promotive and preventive health services, including maternal and neonatal health. PMID:23448583

  4. Building capacity in health facility management: guiding principles for skills transfer in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Management training is fundamental to developing human resources for health. Particularly as Liberia revives its health delivery system, facility and county health team managers are central to progress. Nevertheless, such management skills are rarely prioritized in health training, and sustained capacity building in this area is limited. We describe a health management delivery program in which a north and south institution collaborated to integrate classroom and field-based training in health management and to transfer the capacity for sustained management development in Liberia. Methods We developed and implemented a 6-month training program in health management skills (i.e. strategic problem solving, financial management, human resource management and leadership) delivered by Yale University and Mother Patern College from Liberia, with support from the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative. Over three 6-month cycles, responsibility for course instruction was transferred from the north institution to the south institution. A self-administered survey was conducted of all participants completing the course to measure changes in self-rated management skills, the degree to which the course was helpful and met its stated objectives, and faculty members' responsiveness to participant needs as the transfer process occurred. Results Respondents (n = 93, response rate 95.9%) reported substantial improvement in self-reported management skills, and rated the helpfulness of the course and the degree to which the course met its objectives highly. Levels of improvement and course ratings were similar over the three cohorts as the course was transferred to the south institution. We suggest a framework of five elements for implementing successful management training programs that can be transferred and sustained in resource-limited settings, including: 1) use a short-course format focusing on four key skill areas with practical tools; 2) include didactic training, on-site projects, and on-site mentoring; 3) collaborate with an in-country academic institution, willing and able to scale-up and maintain the training; 4) provide training for the in-country academic faculty; and 5) secure Ministry-level support to ensure participation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate key elements for scaling up and replicating educational initiatives that address management skills essential for long-term health systems strengthening in resource-poor settings. PMID:20298565

  5. Perceived barriers to utilizing maternal and neonatal health services in contracted-out versus government-managed health facilities in the rural districts of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Atif; Zaidi, Shehla; Khowaja, Asif Raza

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of developing countries have contracted out public health facilities to the Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) in order to improve service utilization. However, there is a paucity of in-depth qualitative information on barriers to access services as a result of contracting from service users’ perspective. The objective of this study was to explore perceived barriers to utilizing Maternal and Neonatal Health (MNH) services, in health facilities contracted out by government to NGO for service provision versus in those which are managed by government (non-contracted). Methods: A community-based qualitative exploratory study was conducted between April to September 2012 at two contracted-out and four matched non-contracted primary healthcare facilities in Thatta and Chitral, rural districts of Pakistan. Using semi-structured guide, the data were collected through thirty-six Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) conducted with mothers and their spouses in the catchment areas of selected facilities. Thematic analysis was performed using NVivo version 10.0 in which themes and sub-themes emerged. Results: Key barriers reported in contracted sites included physical distance, user charges and familial influences. Whereas, poor functionality of health centres was the main barrier for non-contracted sites with other issues being comparatively less salient. Decision-making patterns for participants of both catchments were largely similar. Spouses and mother-in-laws particularly influenced the decision to utilize health facilities. Conclusion: Contracting out of health facility reduces supply side barriers to MNH services for the community served but distance, user charges and low awareness remain significant barriers. Contracting needs to be accompanied by measures for transportation in remote settings, oversight on user fee charges by contractor, and strong community-based behavior change strategies. PMID:25905478

  6. Direct facility funding as a response to user fee reduction: implementation and perceived impact among Kenyan health centres and dispensaries

    PubMed Central

    Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure for reduction of user fees, but this can have adverse effects by decreasing facility-level funds. To address this, direct facility funding (DFF) was piloted in Coast Province, Kenya, with health facility committees (HFCs) responsible for managing the funds. We evaluated the implementation and perceived impact 2.5 years after DFF introduction. Quantitative data collection at 30 public health centres and dispensaries included a structured interview with the in-charge, record reviews and exit interviews. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with the in-charge and HFC members at 12 facilities, and with district staff and other stakeholders. DFF procedures were well established: HFCs met regularly and accounting procedures were broadly followed. DFF made an important contribution to facility cash income, accounting for 47% in health centres and 62% in dispensaries. The main items of expenditure were wages for support staff (32%), travel (21%), and construction and maintenance (18%). DFF was perceived to have a highly positive impact through funding support staff such as cleaners and patient attendants, outreach activities, renovations, patient referrals and increasing HFC activity. This was perceived to have improved health worker motivation, utilization and quality of care. A number of problems were identified. HFC training was reportedly inadequate, and no DFF documentation was available at facility level, leading to confusion. Charging user fees above those specified in the national policy remained common, and understanding of DFF among the broader community was very limited. Finally, relationships between HFCs and health workers were sometimes characterized by mistrust and resentment. Relatively small increases in funding may significantly affect facility performance when the funds are managed at the periphery. Kenya plans to scale up DFF nationwide. Our findings indicate this is warranted, but should include improved training and documentation, greater emphasis on community engagement, and insistence on user fee adherence. PMID:20211967

  7. Direct facility funding as a response to user fee reduction: implementation and perceived impact among Kenyan health centres and dispensaries.

    PubMed

    Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

    2010-09-01

    There is increasing pressure for reduction of user fees, but this can have adverse effects by decreasing facility-level funds. To address this, direct facility funding (DFF) was piloted in Coast Province, Kenya, with health facility committees (HFCs) responsible for managing the funds. We evaluated the implementation and perceived impact 2.5 years after DFF introduction. Quantitative data collection at 30 public health centres and dispensaries included a structured interview with the in-charge, record reviews and exit interviews. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with the in-charge and HFC members at 12 facilities, and with district staff and other stakeholders. DFF procedures were well established: HFCs met regularly and accounting procedures were broadly followed. DFF made an important contribution to facility cash income, accounting for 47% in health centres and 62% in dispensaries. The main items of expenditure were wages for support staff (32%), travel (21%), and construction and maintenance (18%). DFF was perceived to have a highly positive impact through funding support staff such as cleaners and patient attendants, outreach activities, renovations, patient referrals and increasing HFC activity. This was perceived to have improved health worker motivation, utilization and quality of care. A number of problems were identified. HFC training was reportedly inadequate, and no DFF documentation was available at facility level, leading to confusion. Charging user fees above those specified in the national policy remained common, and understanding of DFF among the broader community was very limited. Finally, relationships between HFCs and health workers were sometimes characterized by mistrust and resentment. Relatively small increases in funding may significantly affect facility performance when the funds are managed at the periphery. Kenya plans to scale up DFF nationwide. Our findings indicate this is warranted, but should include improved training and documentation, greater emphasis on community engagement, and insistence on user fee adherence. PMID:20211967

  8. First experiences in the implementation of biometric technology to link data from Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems with health facility data

    PubMed Central

    Serwaa-Bonsu, Adwoa; Herbst, Abraham J.; Reniers, Georges; Ijaa, Wilfred; Clark, Benjamin; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa; Sankoh, Osman

    2010-01-01

    Background In developing countries, Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs) provide a framework for tracking demographic and health dynamics over time in a defined geographical area. Many HDSSs co-exist with facility-based data sources in the form of Health Management Information Systems (HMIS). Integrating both data sources through reliable record linkage could provide both numerator and denominator populations to estimate disease prevalence and incidence rates in the population and enable determination of accurate health service coverage. Objective To measure the acceptability and performance of fingerprint biometrics to identify individuals in demographic surveillance populations and those attending health care facilities serving the surveillance populations. Methodology Two HDSS sites used fingerprint biometrics for patient and/or surveillance population participant identification. The proportion of individuals for whom a fingerprint could be successfully enrolled were characterised in terms of age and sex. Results Adult (18–65 years) fingerprint enrolment rates varied between 94.1% (95% CI 93.6–94.5) for facility-based fingerprint data collection at the Africa Centre site to 96.7% (95% CI 95.9–97.6) for population-based fingerprint data collection at the Agincourt site. Fingerprint enrolment rates in children under 1 year old (Africa Centre site) were only 55.1% (95% CI 52.7–57.4). By age 5, child fingerprint enrolment rates were comparable to those of adults. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of fingerprint-based individual identification for population-based research in developing countries. Record linkage between demographic surveillance population databases and health care facility data based on biometric identification systems would allow for a more comprehensive evaluation of population health, including the ability to study health service utilisation from a population perspective, rather than the more restrictive health service perspective. PMID:20200659

  9. Status of the implementation of the World Health Organization multimodal hand hygiene strategy in United States of America health care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Allegranzi, Benedetta; Conway, Laurie; Larson, Elaine; Pittet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) launched a multimodal strategy and campaign in 2009 to improve hand hygiene practices worldwide. Our objective was to evaluate the implementation of the strategy in United States health care facilities. Methods From July through December 2011, US facilities participating in the WHO global campaign were invited to complete the Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework online, a validated tool based on the WHO multimodal strategy. Results Of 2,238 invited facilities, 168 participated in the survey (7.5%). A detailed analysis of 129, mainly nonteaching public facilities (80.6%), showed that most had an advanced or intermediate level of hand hygiene implementation progress (48.9% and 45.0%, respectively). The total Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework score was 36 points higher for facilities with staffing levels of infection preventionists > 0.75/100 beds than for those with lower ratios (P = .01) and 41 points higher for facilities participating in hand hygiene campaigns (P = .002). Conclusion Despite the low response rate, the survey results are unique and allow interesting reflections. Whereas the level of progress of most participating facilities was encouraging, this may reflect reporting bias, ie, better hospitals more likely to report. However, even in respondents, further improvement can be achieved, in particular by embedding hand hygiene in a stronger institutional safety climate and optimizing staffing levels dedicated to infection prevention. These results should encourage the launch of a coordinated national campaign and higher participation in the WHO global campaign. PMID:24581011

  10. [Road map for health and safety management systems in healthcare facilities, according to the OHSAS 18001:2007 standard].

    PubMed

    Pugliese, F; Albini, E; Serio, O; Apostoli, P

    2011-01-01

    The 81/2008 Act has defined a model of a health and safety management system that can contribute to prevent the occupational health and safety risks. We have developed the structure of a health and safety management system model and the necessary tools for its implementation in health care facilities. The realization of a model is structured in various phases: initial review, safety policy, planning, implementation, monitoring, management review and continuous improvement. Such a model, in continuous evolution, is based on the responsibilities of the different corporate characters and on an accurate analysis of risks and involved norms. PMID:23393831

  11. 77 FR 1495 - Criteria for Determining Priorities Among Correctional Facility Health Professional Shortage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Criteria for Determining...Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS....

  12. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

  13. Expansion of health facilities in Iraq a decade after the US-led invasion, 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the last few decades, Iraq’s health care capacity has been severely undermined by the effects of different wars, international sanctions, sectarian violence and political instability. In the aftermath of the 2003 US-led invasion, the Ministry of Health has set plans to expand health service delivery, by reorienting the public sector towards primary health care and attributing a larger role to the private sector for hospital care. Quantitative assessments of the post-2003 health policy outcomes have remained scant. This paper addresses this gap focusing on a key outcome indicator that is the expansion of health facilities. Methods The analysis is based on data on health facilities provided by the World Health Organisation and Iraq’s Ministry of Health. For each governorate, we calculated the change in the absolute number of facilities by type from early 2003 to the end of 2012. To account for population growth, we computed the change in the number of facilities per 100,000 population. We compared trends in the autonomous northern Kurdistan region, which has been relatively stable from 2003 onwards, and in the rest of Iraq (centre/south), where fragile institutions and persistent sectarian strife have posed major challenges to health system recovery. Results The countrywide number of primary health care centres per 100,000 population rose from 5.5 in 2003 to 7.4 in 2012. The extent of improvement varied significantly within the country, with an average increase of 4.3 primary health care centres per 100,000 population in the Kurdistan region versus an average increase of only 1.4 in central/southern Iraq. The average number of public hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 1.3 to 1.5 in Kurdistan, whereas it remained at 0.6 in centre/south. The average number of private hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 0.2 to 0.6 in Kurdistan, whereas it declined from 0.3 to 0.2 in centre/south. Conclusions The expansion of both public and private health facilities in the Kurdistan region appears encouraging, but still much should be done to reach the standards of neighbouring countries. The slow pace of improvement in the rest of Iraq is largely attributable to the dire security situation and should be a cause for major concern. PMID:25221620

  14. Evaluation of prototype air/fluid separator for Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Smith, Maureen; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype air/fluid separator suction apparatus proposed as a possible design for use with the Health Maintenance Facility aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF) was evaluated. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed for this purpose. The flights followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. A protocol was prepared to evaluate the prototype device in several regulator modes (or suction force), using three fluids of varying viscosity, and using either continuous or intermittent suction. It was felt that a matrixed approach would best approximate the range of utilization anticipated for medical suction on SSF. The protocols were performed in one-gravity in a lab setting to familiarize the team with procedures and techniques. Identical steps were performed aboard the KC-135 during parabolic flight.

  15. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  16. Evaluation of Spatial Relationships between Health and the Environment: The Rapid Inquiry Facility

    PubMed Central

    Beale, Linda; Hodgson, Susan; Abellan, Juan Jose; LeFevre, Sam; Jarup, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background The initiation of environmental public health tracking systems in the United States and the United Kingdom provided an opportunity to advance techniques and tools available for spatial epidemiological analysis integrating both health and environmental data. Objective The Rapid Inquiry Facility (RIF) allows users to calculate adjusted and unadjusted standardized rates and risks. The RIF is embedded in ArcGIS so that further geographical information system (GIS) spatial functionality can be exploited or results can be exported to statistical packages for further tailored analyses where required. The RIF also links directly to several statistical packages and displays the results in the GIS. Methods The value of the RIF is illustrated here with two case studies: risk of leukemia in areas surrounding oil refineries in the State of Utah (USA) and an analysis of the geographical variation of risk of esophageal cancer in relation to zinc cadmium sulfide exposure in Norwich (United Kingdom). Results The risk analysis study in Utah did not suggest any evidence of increased relative risk of leukemia, multiple myeloma, or Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the populations around the five oil-refining facilities but did reveal an excess risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that might warrant further investigation. The disease-mapping study in Norwich did not reveal any areas with higher relative risks of esophageal cancer common to both males and females, suggesting that a common geographically determined exposure was unlikely to be influencing cancer risk in the area. Conclusion The RIF offers a tool that allows epidemiologists to quickly carry out ecological environmental epidemiological analysis such as risk assessment or disease mapping. PMID:20457552

  17. Piloting Laboratory Quality System Management in Six Health Facilities in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Henry; Ojo, Emmanuel; Ameh, James; Musuluma, Humphrey; Negedu-Momoh, Olubunmi Ruth; Jegede, Feyisayo; Ojo, Olufunmilayo; Uwakwe, Nkem; Ochei, Kingsley; Dada, Michael; Udah, Donald; Chiegil, Robert; Torpey, Kwasi

    2014-01-01

    Background Achieving accreditation in laboratories is a challenge in Nigeria like in most African countries. Nigeria adopted the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory (Quality) Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA) in 2010. We report on FHI360 effort and progress in piloting WHO-AFRO recognition and accreditation preparedness in six health facility laboratories in five different states of Nigeria. Method Laboratory assessments were conducted at baseline, follow up and exit using the WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA checklist. From the total percentage score obtained, the quality status of laboratories were classified using a zero to five star rating, based on the WHO/AFRO quality improvement stepwise approach. Major interventions include advocacy, capacity building, mentorship and quality improvement projects. Results At baseline audit, two of the laboratories attained 1- star while the remaining four were at 0- star. At follow up audit one lab was at 1- star, two at 3-star and three at 4-star. At exit audit, four labs were at 4- star, one at 3-star and one at 2-star rating. One laboratory dropped a ‘star’ at exit audit, while others consistently improved. The two weakest elements at baseline; internal audit (4%) and occurrence/incidence management (15%) improved significantly, with an exit score of 76% and 81% respectively. The elements facility and safety was the major strength across board throughout the audit exercise. Conclusion This effort resulted in measurable and positive impact on the laboratories. We recommend further improvement towards a formal international accreditation status and scale up of WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA implementation in Nigeria. PMID:25542022

  18. Health Facility Graduation from Donor-Supported Intensive Technical Assistance and Associated Factors in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Koni, Phillip; Chishinga, Nathaniel; Nyirenda, Lameck; Kasonde, Prisca; Nsakanya, Richard; Welsh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The FHI360-led Zambia Prevention Care and Treatment partnership II (ZPCT II) with funding from United States Agency for International Development, supports the Zambian Ministry of Health in scaling up HIV/AIDS services. To improve the quality of HIV/AIDS services, ZPCT II provides technical assistance until desired standards are met and districts are weaned-off intensive technical support, a process referred to as district graduation. This study describes the graduation process and determines performance domains associated with district graduation. Methods Data were collected from 275 health facilities in 39 districts in 5 provinces of Zambia between 2008 and 2012. Performance in technical capacity, commodity management, data management and human resources domains were assessed in the following services areas: HIV counselling and testing and prevention of mother to child transmission, antiretroviral therapy/clinical care, pharmacy and laboratory. The overall mean percentage score was calculated by obtaining the mean of mean percentage scores for the four domains. Logistic regression models were used to obtain odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the domain mean percentage scores in graduated versus non-graduated districts; according to rural-urban, and province strata. Results 24 districts out of 39 graduated from intensive donor supported technical assistance while 15 districts did not graduate. The overall mean percentage score for all four domains was statistically significantly higher in graduated than non-graduated districts (93.2% versus 91.2%, OR = 1.34, 95%CI:1.20–1.49); including rural settings (92.4% versus 89.4%, OR = 1.43,95%CI:1.24–1.65). The mean percentage score in human resource domain was statistically significantly higher in graduated than non-graduated districts (93.6% versus 71.6%, OR = 5.81, 95%CI: 4.29–7.86) and in both rural and urban settings. Conclusions QA/QI tools can be used to assess performance at health facilities and determine readiness for district graduation. Human resources management domain was found to be an important factor associated with district graduation. PMID:26098555

  19. An Examination of Health Profile, Service Use and Care Needs of Older Adults in Residential Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminzadeh, F.; Salziel, William B.; Molnar, F. J.; Alie, J.

    2004-01-01

    Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile,…

  20. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. McKone; K. P. Brand; C. Shan

    1997-01-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the

  1. South Yorkshire Cohort: a 'cohort trials facility' study of health and weight - Protocol for the recruitment phase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growing levels of both obesity and chronic disease in the general population pose a major public health problem. In the UK, an innovative 'health and weight' cohort trials facility, the 'South Yorkshire Cohort', is being built in order to provide robust evidence to inform policy, commissioning and clinical decisions in this field. This protocol reports the design of the facility and outlines the recruitment phase methods. Method/Design The South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight study uses the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design. This design recruits a large observational cohort of patients with the condition(s) of interest which then provides a facility for multiple randomised controlled trials (with large representative samples of participants, long term outcomes as standard, increased comparability between each trial conducted within the cohort and increased efficiency particularly for trials of expensive interventions) as well as ongoing information as to the natural history of the condition and treatment as usual. This study aims to recruit 20,000 participants to the population based South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight research trials facility. Participants are recruited by invitation letters from their General Practitioners. Data is collected using postal and/or online patient self completed Health Questionnaires. NHS numbers will be used to facilitate record linkage and access to routine data. Participants are eligible if they are: aged 16 - 85 years, registered with one of 40 practices in South Yorkshire, provide consent for further contact from the researchers and to have their information used to look at the benefit of health treatments. The first wave of data is being collected during 2010/12 and further waves are planned at 2 - 5 year intervals for the planned 20 year duration of the facility. Discussion The South Yorkshire Cohort combines the strengths of the standard observational, longitudinal cohort study design with a population based cohort facility for multiple randomised controlled trials in a range of long term health and weight related conditions (including obesity). This infrastructure will allow the rapid and cheap identification and recruitment of patients, and facilitate the provision of robust evidence to inform the management and self-management of health and weight. PMID:21834964

  2. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2013 Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities On This Page Key findings Most residential ... National Survey of Residential Care Facilities Most residential care communities did not use electronic health records in ...

  3. Modern contraceptive utilization among female ART attendees in health facilities of Gimbie town, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many areas of the world where HIV prevalence is high, rates of unintended pregnancy have also been shown to be high. Of all pregnancies worldwide in 2008, 41% were reported as unintended and approximately 50% of these ended in abortion. To address these problems family planning is the best solution. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to assess modern contraceptive use among females on ART in health facilities of Gimbie town, Western Ethiopia. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in Gimbie town, western Ethiopia from December 2012 to January 2013. HIV infected women of reproductive age group (15-49 years) who came for ART care follow up during the data collection period were included in the study. Data was collected using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Binary logistic regression and multivariate analysis were employed using SPSS version 17. Results Three hundred ninety five women on ART have participated in the study. More than half, 224 (56.7%), of the respondents were using modern contraceptive, of whom 67 (30%) use dual contraceptive method. Having information on modern contraception is positively associated with modern contraceptive use with (AOR=6.3, 95% CI (1.67, 24.1)) and respondents who have family size ?4 were 50% less contraceptive users than those who have family size >4 (AOR=0.51, 95% CI (0.27, 0.96)). Conclusion In this study contraceptive use among HIV positive women is better than the general population. However, use of dual methods, long acting and permanent method of contraceptives were found to be low. Continuous and targeted information provision on modern contraceptive should be done. PMID:24731751

  4. Impact of Free Delivery Care on Health Facility Delivery and Insurance Coverage in Ghana’s Brong Ahafo Region

    PubMed Central

    Dzakpasu, Susie; Soremekun, Seyi; Manu, Alexander; ten Asbroek, Guus; Tawiah, Charlotte; Hurt, Lisa; Fenty, Justin; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Hill, Zelee

    2012-01-01

    Background Many sub-Saharan countries, including Ghana, have introduced policies to provide free medical care to pregnant women. The impact of these policies, particularly on access to health services among the poor, has not been evaluated using rigorous methods, and so the empirical basis for defending these policies is weak. In Ghana, a recent report also cast doubt on the current mechanism of delivering free care – the National Health Insurance Scheme. Longitudinal surveillance data from two randomized controlled trials conducted in the Brong Ahafo Region provided a unique opportunity to assess the impact of Ghana’s policies. Methods We used time-series methods to assess the impact of Ghana’s 2005 policy on free delivery care and its 2008 policy on free national health insurance for pregnant women. We estimated their impacts on facility delivery and insurance coverage, and on socioeconomic differentials in these outcomes after controlling for temporal trends and seasonality. Results Facility delivery has been increasing significantly over time. The 2005 and 2008 policies were associated with significant jumps in coverage of 2.3% (p?=?0.015) and 7.5% (p<0.001), respectively after the policies were introduced. Health insurance coverage also jumped significantly (17.5%, p<0.001) after the 2008 policy. The increases in facility delivery and insurance were greatest among the poorest, leading to a decline in socioeconomic inequality in both outcomes. Conclusion Providing free care, particularly through free health insurance, has been effective in increasing facility delivery overall in the Brong Ahafo Region, and especially among the poor. This finding should be considered when evaluating the impact of the National Health Insurance Scheme and in supporting the continuation and expansion of free delivery care. PMID:23173061

  5. Monitoring the ability to deliver care in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of health facility assessment tools

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Jason W; Adams, Orvill; Attaran, Amir; Hatcher-Roberts, Janet; Tugwell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Health facilities assessments are an essential instrument for health system strengthening in low- and middle-income countries. These assessments are used to conduct health facility censuses to assess the capacity of the health system to deliver health care and to identify gaps in the coverage of health services. Despite the valuable role of these assessments, there are currently no minimum standards or frameworks for these tools. Methods We used a structured keyword search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE and HealthStar databases and searched the websites of the World Health Organization, the World Bank and the International Health Facilities Assessment Network to locate all available health facilities assessment tools intended for use in low- and middle-income countries. We parsed the various assessment tools to identify similarities between them, which we catalogued into a framework comprising 41 assessment domains. Results We identified 10 health facility assessment tools meeting our inclusion criteria, all of which were included in our analysis. We found substantial variation in the comprehensiveness of the included tools, with the assessments containing indicators in 13 to 33 (median: 25.5) of the 41 assessment domains included in our framework. None of the tools collected data on all 41 of the assessment domains we identified. Conclusions Not only do a large number of health facility assessment tools exist, but the data they collect and methods they employ are very different. This certainly limits the comparability of the data between different countries’ health systems and probably creates blind spots that impede efforts to strengthen those systems. Agreement is needed on the essential elements of health facility assessments to guide the development of specific indicators and for refining existing instruments. PMID:24895350

  6. 24.01.01.Q0.03 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE

    E-print Network

    ) · Chemical and Lab Safety ­ Laboratory Safety Sub-Committee (LSSC) · Fieldwork/Field Trip ­ Fieldwork Safety24.01.01.Q0.03 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 24.01.01.Q0.03 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Approved July 18, 2012 Next scheduled

  7. 24.01.01.M4 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 4 UNIVERSITY RULE

    E-print Network

    (SSOC) 1.2.2 Chemical and Lab Safety ­ Laboratory Safety Committee (LSC) 1.2.3 Diving ­ Diving Control24.01.01.M4 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Page 1 of 4 UNIVERSITY RULE 24.01.01.M4 Environmental Health and Safety Programs Approved October 21, 1998 Revised June 18, 2010 Revised April 10, 2014

  8. Page 1 of 5 Alison Van Eenennaam, UC Davis Applications of Animal Biotechnology in Animal Health, January 2009

    E-print Network

    Delany, Mary E.

    Page 1 of 5 Alison Van Eenennaam, UC Davis Applications of Animal Biotechnology in Animal Health, January 2009 POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY ON ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Written by Bill Pohlmeier treatments Animal biotechnology offers a number of approaches to fight disease in animals. Firstly, through

  9. Challenges, alternatives, and paths to sustainability: better public health promotion using social networking pages as key tools.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kadhem, Z; Larbani, M; Lakulu, M B; Hashim, M

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of promoting public health and implementing educational health services using Facebook. We discuss the challenges and strengths of using such a platform as a tool for public health care systems from two different perspectives, namely, the view of IT developers and that of physicians. We present a new way of evaluating user interactivity in health care systems from tools provided by Facebook that measure statistical traffic in the Internet. Findings show that Facebook is a very promising tool in promoting e-health services in Web 2.0. Results from statistical traffic show that a Facebook page is more efficient than other pages in promoting public health. PMID:25631841

  10. Seroprevalence of yellow Fever virus in selected health facilities in Western kenya from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Kwallah, Allan Ole; Inoue, Shingo; Thairu-Muigai, Anne Wangari; Kuttoh, Nancy; Morita, Kouichi; Mwau, Matilu

    2015-05-20

    Yellow fever (YF), which is caused by a mosquito-borne virus, is an important viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in equatorial Africa and South America. Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototype of the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of YFV in selected health facilities in Western Kenya during the period 2010-2012. A total of 469 serum samples from febrile patients were tested for YFV antibodies using in-house IgM-capture ELISA, in-house indirect IgG ELISA, and 50% focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT50). The present study did not identify any IgM ELISA-positive cases, indicating absence of recent YFV infection in the area. Twenty-eight samples (6%) tested positive for YFV IgG, because of either YFV vaccination or past exposure to various flaviviruses including YFV. Five cases were confirmed by FRNT50; of these, 4 were either vaccination or natural infection during the YF outbreak in 1992-1993 or another period and 1 case was confirmed as a West Nile virus infection. Domestication and routine performance of arboviral differential diagnosis will help to address the phenomenon of pyrexia of unknown origin, contribute to arboviral research in developing countries, and enhance regular surveillance. PMID:25672346

  11. The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre — Community Health Agents (CHA) — who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connect’s district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzania’s need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844 PMID:23819587

  12. Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the most prevalent. In the context of slower progress in achieving Millennium Development Goals in developing countries and the ever-increasing man-made and natural disasters in these areas, it is important to understand the association between reproductive health and mental health among women with post-disaster experiences. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 387 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) randomly selected from the October 2005 earthquake affected areas of Pakistan. Data on reproductive health was collected using the Centers for Disease Control reproductive health assessment toolkit. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, while earthquake experiences were captured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The association of either depression or anxiety with socio-demographic variables, earthquake experiences, reproductive health and access to health facilities was estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results Post-earthquake reproductive health events together with economic deprivation, lower family support and poorer access to health care facilities explained a significant proportion of differences in the experiencing of clinical levels of depression and anxiety. For instance, women losing resources for subsistence, separation from family and experiencing reproductive health events such as having a stillbirth, having had an abortion, having had abnormal vaginal discharge or having had genital ulcers, were at significant risk of depression and anxiety. Conclusion The relationship between women's post-earthquake mental health and reproductive health, socio-economic status, and health care access is complex and explained largely by the socio-cultural role of women. It is suggested that interventions that consider gender differences and that are culturally appropriate are likely to reduce the incidence. PMID:21718519

  13. Rotordynamic Analysis and Feasibility Study of a Disk Spin Test Facility for Rotor Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) initiated a program to achieve the significant improvement in aviation safety. One of the technical challenges is the design and development of accelerated experiments that mimic critical damage cases encountered in engine components. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently addressing the goal concerning propulsion health management and the development of propulsion system specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe. For this goal the unique disk spin simulation system was assembled at NASA GRC, which allows testing of rotors with the spinning speeds up to 10K RPM, and at the elevated temperature environment reaching 540 C (1000 F). It is anticipated that the facility can be employed for detection of Low Cycle Fatigue disk cracking and further High Cycle Fatigue blade vibration. The controlled crack growth studies at room and elevated temperatures can be conducted on the turbine wheels, and various NDE techniques can be integrated and assessed as in-situ damage monitoring tools. Critical rotating parts in advanced gas turbine engines such as turbine disks frequently operate at high temperature and stress for long periods of time. The integrity of these parts must be proven by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during various machining steps ranging from forging blank to finished shape, and also during the systematic overhaul inspections. Conventional NDE methods, however, have unacceptable limits. Some of these techniques are time-consuming and inconvenient for service aircraft testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage is known in advance. These experimental techniques can provide only local information and no indication of the structural strength at a component and/or system level. The shortcomings of currently available NDE methods lead to the requirement of new damage detection techniques that can provide global information on the rotating components/system, and, in addition, they do not require direct human access to the operating system. During this period of research considerable effort was directed towards the further development of experimental facility and development of the vibration-based crack detection methodology for rotating disks and shafts. A collection of papers and reports were written to describe the results of this work. The attached captures that effort and represents the research output during the grant period.

  14. Medicare and Medicaid programs; fire safety requirements for certain health care facilities; amendment. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2005-03-25

    This interim final rule with comment period adopts the substance of the April 15, 2004 temporary interim amendment (TIA) 00-1 (101), Alcohol Based Hand Rub Solutions, an amendment to the 2000 edition of the Life Safety Code, published by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). This amendment will allow certain health care facilities to place alcohol-based hand rub dispensers in egress corridors under specified conditions. This interim final rule with comment period also requires that nursing facilities install smoke detectors in resident rooms and public areas if they do not have a sprinkler system installed throughout the facility or a hard-wired smoke detection system in those areas. PMID:15791727

  15. A Multidisciplinary Paradigm and Approach to Protecting Human Health and the Environment, Society, and Stakeholders at Nuclear Facilities - 12244

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Rutgers University, Piscataway NY, USA and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Clarke, James; Powers, Charles W.; Kosson, David [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Rutgers University, Piscataway NY, USA and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As the Department of Energy (DOE) continues to remediate its lands, and to consider moving toward long-term stewardship and the development of energy parks on its industrial, remediated land, it is essential to adequately characterize the environment around such facilities to protect society, human health, and the environment. While DOE sites re considering several different land-use scenarios, all of them require adequate protection of the environment. Even if DOE lands are developed for energy parks that are mainly for industrializes sections of DOE lands that will not be remediated to residential standards, there is still the need to consider the protection of human health and the environment. We present an approach to characterization and establishment of teams that will gather the information, and integrate that information for a full range of stakeholders from technical personnel, to public policy makers, and that public. Such information is needed to establish baselines, site new energy facilities in energy parks, protect existing nuclear facilities and nuclear wastes, improve the basis for emergency planning, devise suitable monitoring schemes to ensure continued protection, provide data to track local and regional response changes, and for mitigation, remediation and decommissioning planning. We suggest that there are five categories of information or data needs, including 1) geophysical, sources, fate and transport, 2) biological systems, 3) human health, 4) stakeholder and environmental justice, and 5) societal, economic, and political. These informational needs are more expansive than the traditional site characterization, but encompass a suite of physical, biological, and societal needs to protect all aspects of human health and the environment, not just physical health. We suggest a Site Committee be established that oversees technical teams for each of the major informational categories, with appropriate representation among teams and with a broad involvement of a range of governmental personnel, natural and social scientists, Native Americans, environmental justice communities, and other stakeholders. Such informational teams (and Oversight Committee) would report to a DOE-designated authority or Citizen's Advisory Board. Although designed for nuclear facilities and energy parks on DOE lands, the templates and information teams can be adapted for other hazardous facilities, such as a mercury storage facility at Oak Ridge. (authors)

  16. Exposures and Health Outcomes in Relation to Bioaerosol Emissions From Composting Facilities: A Systematic Review of Occupational and Community Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Clare; Littlewood, Emma; Douglas, Philippa; Robertson, Sarah; Gant, Timothy W.; Hansell, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    The number of composting sites in Europe is rapidly increasing, due to efforts to reduce the fraction of waste destined for landfill, but evidence on possible health impacts is limited. This article systematically reviews studies related to bioaerosol exposures within and near composting facilities and associated health effects in both community and occupational health settings. Six electronic databases and bibliographies from January 1960 to July 2014 were searched for studies reporting on health outcomes and/or bioaerosol emissions related to composting sites. Risk of bias was assessed using a customized score. Five hundred and thirty-six papers were identified and reviewed, and 66 articles met the inclusion criteria (48 exposure studies, 9 health studies, 9 health and exposure studies). Exposure information was limited, with most measurements taken in occupational settings and for limited time periods. Bioaerosol concentrations were highest on-site during agitation activities (turning, shredding, and screening). Six studies detected concentrations of either Aspergillus fumigatus or total bacteria above the English Environment Agency’s recommended threshold levels beyond 250 m from the site. Occupational studies of compost workers suggested elevated risks of respiratory illnesses with higher bioaerosol exposures. Elevated airway irritation was reported in residents near composting sites, but this may have been affected by reporting bias. The evidence base on health effects of bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities is still limited, although there is sufficient evidence to support a precautionary approach for regulatory purposes. While data to date are suggestive of possible respiratory effects, further study is needed to confirm this and to explore other health outcomes. PMID:25825807

  17. Exposures and health outcomes in relation to bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities: a systematic review of occupational and community studies.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Clare; Littlewood, Emma; Douglas, Philippa; Robertson, Sarah; Gant, Timothy W; Hansell, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    The number of composting sites in Europe is rapidly increasing, due to efforts to reduce the fraction of waste destined for landfill, but evidence on possible health impacts is limited. This article systematically reviews studies related to bioaerosol exposures within and near composting facilities and associated health effects in both community and occupational health settings. Six electronic databases and bibliographies from January 1960 to July 2014 were searched for studies reporting on health outcomes and/or bioaerosol emissions related to composting sites. Risk of bias was assessed using a customized score. Five hundred and thirty-six papers were identified and reviewed, and 66 articles met the inclusion criteria (48 exposure studies, 9 health studies, 9 health and exposure studies). Exposure information was limited, with most measurements taken in occupational settings and for limited time periods. Bioaerosol concentrations were highest on-site during agitation activities (turning, shredding, and screening). Six studies detected concentrations of either Aspergillus fumigatus or total bacteria above the English Environment Agency's recommended threshold levels beyond 250 m from the site. Occupational studies of compost workers suggested elevated risks of respiratory illnesses with higher bioaerosol exposures. Elevated airway irritation was reported in residents near composting sites, but this may have been affected by reporting bias. The evidence base on health effects of bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities is still limited, although there is sufficient evidence to support a precautionary approach for regulatory purposes. While data to date are suggestive of possible respiratory effects, further study is needed to confirm this and to explore other health outcomes. PMID:25825807

  18. An attempt to quantify the role of existing health facilities in controlling vesical schistosomiasis in rural northern Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, R; Polderman, A M; Um, J P; Robert, C F

    1995-01-01

    Around the artificial reservoir in the Benue River near Lagdo in Northern Cameroon, Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni are prevalent. The primary health care structure has been reinforced in recent years, but no special attention has been paid to schistosomiasis. This setting was considered ideal to estimate the contribution of the existing health facilities in the control of morbidity due to schistosomiasis. The patients locally diagnosed as having vesical schistosomiasis, were subsequently examined with a standardized quantitative filtration method. Furthermore, surveys were carried out in the surrounding villages to estimate the age-specific prevalences of vesical schistosomiasis in the health centre's catchment area. The number of heavily infected people is low in the region (12%), but heavy infections represented 64% of the visitors with vesical schistosomiasis at the health centre. The data suggest that the health centre is efficacious in 'passively' detecting the most heavy infections. It was also possible to identify villages with large numbers of heavily infected people from the health centre's records. Finally, a calculation model is presented to estimate the expected number of visitors to the health centre, based on data from the field survey. PMID:7747334

  19. Spatial Analysis of the Level of Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

  20. Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, N; Gotestrand, S A; Ombeki, S; Oluoch, G; Fischer, T K; Quick, R

    2015-03-01

    Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years. PMID:24865584

  1. Illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic substances from a generic geological disposal facility for radioactive waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C Wilson; Michael C Thorne; George Towler; Simon Norris

    2011-01-01

    Many countries have a programme for developing an underground geological disposal facility for radioactive waste. A case study is provided herein on the illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic and radioactive substances from a generic geological disposal facility (GDF) for radioactive waste. The illustrative assessment uses a source–pathway–receptor methodology and considers a number

  2. Diversion of Drugs Within Health Care Facilities, a Multiple-Victim Crime: Patterns of Diversion, Scope, Consequences, Detection, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Keith H.; Dillon, Kevin R.; Sikkink, Karen M.; Taylor, Timothy K.; Lanier, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Mayo Clinic has been involved in an ongoing effort to prevent the diversion of controlled substances from the workplace and to rapidly identify and respond when such diversion is detected. These efforts have found that diversion of controlled substances is not uncommon and can result in substantial risk not only to the individual who is diverting the drugs but also to patients, co-workers, and employers. We believe that all health care facilities should have systems in place to deter controlled substance diversion and to promptly identify diversion and intervene when it is occurring. Such systems are multifaceted and require close cooperation between multiple stakeholders including, but not limited to, departments of pharmacy, safety and security, anesthesiology, nursing, legal counsel, and human resources. Ideally, there should be a broad-based appreciation of the dangers that diversion creates not only for patients but also for all employees of health care facilities, because diversion can occur at any point along a long supply chain. All health care workers must be vigilant for signs of possible diversion and must be aware of how to engage a preexisting group with expertise in investigating possible diversions. In addition, clear policies and procedures should be in place for dealing with such investigations and for managing the many possible outcomes of a confirmed diversion. This article provides an overview of the multiple types of risk that result from drug diversion from health care facilities. Further, we describe a system developed at Mayo Clinic for evaluating episodes of potential drug diversion and for taking action once diversion is confirmed. PMID:22766087

  3. Concentration, distribution, and human health risk assessment of endosulfan from a manufacturing facility in Huai'an, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Guo, Ming-Xing; Pei, Wei; Wu, Qian

    2014-09-01

    Endosulfan concentrations and its distribution in air, soil, sediment and foodstuffs in the area surrounding a production facility in Huai'an, China were investigated because of its threats to the environment and human health. Air concentrations for endosulfan ?, endosulfan II and endosulfan sulfate measured in this study were several orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for this region. Surface soil concentration ranges of endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and endosulfan sulfate were greater than in sediment. Endosulfan II was the greatest contributor to total endosulfan concentrations in both surface sediment and soil followed by endosulfan sulfate and endosulfan ?. However, a different concentration profile was observed in fish and crop samples, with endosulfan sulfate having the highest concentration followed by endosulfan I and endosulfan II. The concentration of ?endosulfans (endosulfans ? and II) in soil decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the plant by a factor of 10 within 45 km. Trace amounts of ?endosulfans were observed in deep soil layers which implied that these compounds are transported through the leaching of pore water in soil. This demonstrated that emissions from the manufacturing facility can lead to ground water contamination in the area near the plant. A screening level human health risk assessment of ?endosulfans based on the worst-case scenario was performed for people living in the vicinity of the manufacturing facility. The hazard indices were at least 2 orders of magnitude of <1, indicating no adverse health effects are likely to occur at current exposure levels, and the risk to human health is generally acceptable. PMID:24491393

  4. Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kunimitsu, Ayano

    2009-01-01

    Background The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics), which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In order to improve the malaria reporting system to the level required to eventually eliminate this disease, this study estimates the gaps between the records of clinics and government statistics regarding the incidence of clinical malaria, and then also examines some factors that might explain the data discrepancy, including such variables as clinic staffing and record keeping. Methods All medical records for outpatients in 2007, handwritten by nurses, were collected from local clinics in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The all-monthly clinical malaria cases were then recalculated. The corresponding monthly data in official statistics were provided by the government. Next, in order to estimate any data discrepancy, the ratio of the cases recorded at clinics to the cases reported to the government was determined on the monthly basis. Finally, the associations between the monthly discrepancy and other variables were evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. Results The mean data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics was 21.2% (n = 96). Significant associations were observed between the discrepancy and the average number of patients (coefficient: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.07), illegible handwriting (coefficient: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.15), the use of tally sheets (coefficient:-0.38, 95%CI: -0.54, -0.22), and the clinic level (coefficient:-0.48, 95%CI:-0.89,-0.06). Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the huge data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics in regard to clinical malaria case reporting. Moreover, the high numbers of patients, illegible writing, the disuse of tally sheets, and insufficient resources at some clinics are likely to be related to the increase in the discrepancy. The clinical malaria case reporting at the local clinic level therefore urgently needs improvement, in order to achieve both better malaria surveillance and to also eventually eliminate this disease in the Solomon Islands. PMID:19389239

  6. An Assessment of Abortion Services in Public Health Facilities in Mozambique: Women's and Providers' Perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria F Gallo; Hailemichael Gebreselassie; Maria Teresa A Victorino; Martinho Dgedge; Lilia Jamisse; Cassimo Bique

    2004-01-01

    Complications of unsafe abortion contribute to high maternal mortality and morbidity in Mozambique. In 2002, the Ministry of Health conducted an assessment of abortion services in the public health sector to inform efforts to make abortion safer. This paper reports on interviews with 461 women receiving treatment for abortion-related complications in 37 public hospitals and four health centres in the

  7. The importance of public sector health facility-level data for monitoring changes in maternal mortality risks among communities: the case of pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anrudh K; Sathar, Zeba; Salim, Momina; Shah, Zakir Hussain

    2013-09-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of monitoring health facility-level information to monitor changes in maternal mortality risks. The annual facility-level maternal mortality ratios (MMRs), complications to live births ratios and case fatality ratios (CFRs) were computed from data recorded during 2007 and 2009 in 31 upgraded public sector health facilities across Pakistan. The facility-level MMR declined by about 18%; both the number of Caesarean sections and the episodes of complications as a percentage of live births increased; and CFR based on Caesarean sections and episodes of complications declined by 29% and 37%, respectively. The observed increases in the proportion of women with complications among those who come to these facilities point to a reduction in the delay in reaching facilities (first and second delays; Thaddeus & Maine, 1994); the decrease in CFRs points to improvements in treating obstetric complications and a reduction in the delay in receiving treatment once at facilities (the third delay). These findings point to a decline in maternal mortality risks among communities served by these facilities. A system of woman-level data collection instituted at health facilities with comprehensive emergency obstetric care is essential to monitor changes in the effects of any reduction in the three delays and any improvement in quality of care or the effectiveness of treating pregnancy-related complications among women reaching these facilities. Such a system of information gathering at these health facilities would also help policymakers and programme mangers to measure and improve the effectiveness of safe-motherhood initiatives and to monitor progress being made toward achieving the fifth Millennium Development Goal. PMID:23528186

  8. [Medicine on mission: The international health reform of Seventh-Day Adventists and their health care facilities in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Eklöf, Motzi

    2008-01-01

    The international non-conformist denomination, Seventh-day Adventists, have since their foundation in 1863, had a distinctive health care model for their members. The life-style has included vegetarian diet, abstinence from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and the observance of a day of rest once a week. The health policy has striven to care for God's creation in the hope of resurrection at the Day of Judgment and to reform the conventional medical practice. The Adventists have pursued an extensive international health care system--from the start based on dietary and physical treatment methods, such as hydrotherapy, massage and physiotherapy--in line with the Christian mission. Health care establishments have been inaugurated around the world as a vehicle for enabling the Christian health care message to reach the upper classes. With Adventist and Doctor, John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanatorium in Michigan as both inspirational source and educational institution, the health care mission--including a vegetarian health food industry, following in the footsteps of cornflakes--spread to the Nordic countries by the turn of the century, 1900. Skodsborgs Badesanatorium near Copenhagen became the model institution for several health care establishments in Sweden during the 1900's, such as Hultafors Sanatorium. The American-Nordic link has manifested itself through co-publication of papers, exchange of health care personnel and reporting to the central Adventist church. The American non-conformist domain as well as a private sphere of activity, aiming mainly from the outset at society's upper classes, has encountered certain difficulties in maintaining this distinction in Sweden's officially increasing secularised society, and in relation to a state health insurance and a publicly financed health care system. With the passing of time, the socioeconomic composition of patients at Hultafors became more heterogeneous, and conventional medical procedures were increasingly incorporated into the array of treatment resources. The successful enterprises--as they had been for a considerable time--could not, at the end of the 20th century, continue to be self financing or fulfil the missionary objectives among the upper classes. The institutionalised health care apparatus came to an end around the turn of the century, which also included the sale of health associated food product companies. The Seventh-day Adventist's combination of medicine and religion with Christian missionary aims have indeed, not only steered health care models and institutions worldwide, but also which target groups to mainly turn to, the specific treatment philosophy, desirable working environment and which medical technologies to use. Furthermore, the Adventist's health reform and care of the sick provide an example for how different medical cultures influence each other and develop in relation to one another in a pluralistic medical market. The developments are not merely a reflection of the medical, scientific and technical advancements, but also of the medical market's structure, financing and (inter)national connections, of religion, culture and not least of all, patients' options and their choices. PMID:19848037

  9. Chapter to appear in book "Future of Health Technology", 2001, OIS Press. Page 1 Affective Medicine: Technology with

    E-print Network

    Chapter to appear in book "Future of Health Technology", 2001, OIS Press. Page 1 Affective Medicine: Technology with Emotional Intelligence Rosalind W. Picard MIT Media Laboratory; 20 Ames Street; Cambridge, MA of recent studies indicates that emotions, particularly stress, anger, and depression, are important factors

  10. LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1

    E-print Network

    Machel, Hans

    LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1) WHMIS Designate SPILL Designate TDG Designate CHEMATIX Designate A. Laboratory Signage laboratory doors have a Laboratory Hazard Sign indicating current emergency contact information and hazards

  11. WINTER 1997 PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI-NIH APLYSIA RESOURCE FACILITY MIAMI, FLORIDA ....Continued on page 2

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    WINTER 1997 · PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI-NIH APLYSIA RESOURCE FACILITY · MIAMI, FLORIDA demonstrate the seasonal trends in seaweed production. #12;NIH/University of Miami Aplysia Resource Facility 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, Florida 33149 Ordering & Information (305) 361-4941 Fax (305) 361

  12. Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on EBM courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. I. R. Hugenholtz; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; J. K. Sluiter; Dijk van F. J. H

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT\\\\BACKGROUND:Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM

  13. http://www.colorado.edu/ehs/ Donnelly 07/17/03, Lapham rev. 02/12 Property Services/Facilities Management/Environmental Health & Safety

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    /Facilities Management/Environmental Health & Safety Equipment Disposal/Resale Form Form Instructions: This form or contact Health Physics, (303) 492-6523 Were Hazardous Materials or Waste ever used or stored in equipment for disposal/resale contain oils, chlorofluorocarbons, or heavy metals? N ___ Y ___ (Pump oil, Freon, anti

  14. Health and safety plan for characterization sampling of ETR and MTR facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, D.E.

    1994-10-01

    This health and safety plan establishes the procedures and requirements that will be used to minimize health and safety risks to persons performing Engineering Test Reactor and Materials Test Reactor characterization sampling activities, as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard, 29 CFR 1910.120. It contains information about the hazards involved in performing the tasks, and the specific actions and equipment that will be used to protect persons working at the site.

  15. Prepared by: Facilities and Environmental Health & Safety Divisions June 17, 2011

    E-print Network

    Eisen, Michael

    .0 Integrated Safety Management System page 6 Section 5.0 Communication and Training Tools 5 Supervision and Management Orientation page 10 5.5 Quarterly Safety Meeting with Construction Safety Plan Appendix F: Emergency Contact Information Appendix G: HSS Overview of 10 CFR 851 Appendix

  16. Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health; Final Report of the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander,J; Brooks,B; Erwin,P; Hamilton,J; Holloway,J; Lipford,P; Morin,N; Peelle,R; Smith,J; Voilleque,P; Zawia,N.

    1999-12-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee?s public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The following report, "Releases of Contaminants from Oak Ridge Facilities and Risks to Public Health," was written by the Oak Ridge Health Agreement Steering Panel (ORHASP) for the following purposes: (1) to explain the components and process of the lengthy, complex study; (2) to summarize important study results in less technical language; and (3) to provide the State with the Panel's recommendations for future actions concerning the Oak Ridge communities. The dose reconstruction process involved the examination of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility. It resulted in hundreds of documents being declassified and provided an avenue for a complete public accounting of past practices and releases. Researchers used this information to identify released contaminants of concern, to estimate the quantity and timing of these releases, to evaluate the routes taken by contaminants through the environment to nearby populations, and to estimate the doses and health risks to exposed groups. The results suggest it is likely that some people's risks of developing various types of cancers or other health effects were increased because of the releases. Two groups were most likely to have been harmed: local children drinking milk, in the early 1950's, from a ?backyard? cow or goat that had grazed on pastures contaminated with iodine-131, and fetuses carried in the 1950's and early 1960's by women who routinely ate fish taken from nearby creeks and rivers contaminated with mercury and PCBs. More detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, are presented in seven technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the "author field" for the name "Widner," since Mr. T.E. Widner was the principal investigator on this project.

  17. 041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Page 1

    E-print Network

    Whitton, Mary C.

    041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Information Technology Services Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Policy Statement Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personal Identifying Information

  18. New York State School Facilities and Student Health, Achievement, and Attendance: A Data Analysis Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boese, Stephen; Shaw, John

    2005-01-01

    Students who attend schools with environmental hazards that impact indoor air quality are more likely to miss class, and therefore lose learning opportunities. Yet school environmental health and safety remains largely unregulated and there is no state or federal agency in charge of protecting children's environmental health in schools. This…

  19. Psychological test usage in southeastern outpatient mental health facilities in 1975

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Piotrowski; John W. Keller

    1978-01-01

    93 outpatient mental health centers and clinics in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi were surveyed for the frequency of use of 25 psychological tests. 111 questionnaires from 61 centers provided usable data. Findings indicate that testing is an important function of outpatient mental health centers. Results are discussed in light of recent claims that psychological testing, especially projective techniques,

  20. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Ogwang, Brenda. A.; Namegabe, Edmond Ntabe; Mbasa, Ndemo; Kabunga, Deka Kambale; Karafuli, Kambale

    2013-01-01

    Background: HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB) are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities). Twenty-three facilities (29%) offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24%) reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases’ control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. Conclusion: HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region. PMID:24596866

  1. An Evaluation of the Clinical Assessments of Under-Five Febrile Children Presenting to Primary Health Facilities in Rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Baiden, Frank; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Bawah, Justina; Bruce, Jane; Tivura, Mathilda; Delmini, Rupert; Gyaase, Stephaney; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Chandramohan, Daniel; Webster, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Background The shift to test-based management of malaria represents an important departure from established practice under the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI). The possibility of false results of tests for malaria and co-morbidity, however, make it important that guidelines in IMCI case assessment are still followed. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional observational study to evaluate current practices in IMCI-based assessment of febrile children in 10 health centres and 5 district hospitals, with follow up of a subset of children to determine day 7–10 post-treatment clinical outcome. Clinical consultation, examination and prescribing practices were recorded using a checklist by trained non-medical observers. The facility case management of 1,983 under-five years old febrile children was observed and 593 followed up at home on days 5–10. The mean number of tasks performed from the 11 tasks expected to be done by the IMCI guidelines was 6 (SD 1.6). More than 6 tasks were performed in only 35% of children and this varied substantially between health facilities (range 3–85%). All 11 tasks were performed in only 1% of children. The most commonly performed tasks were temperature measurement (91%) and weighing (88%). Respiratory rate was checked in only 4% of children presenting with cough or difficulty in breathing. The likelihood of performing “better than average number of tasks” (>6) was higher when the consultation was done by medical assistants than doctors (O.R.?=?3.16, 1.02–9.20). The number of tasks performed during assessment did not, however, influence clinical outcome (O.R.?=?1.02, 0.83–1.24). Conclusion Facility-tailored interventions are needed to improve adherence to IMCI guidelines incorporating test-based management of malaria. Studies are needed to re-evaluate the continued validity of tasks defined in IMCI case assessment guidelines. PMID:22174932

  2. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ...for reducing or avoiding pharmaceutical waste; Practices for...managing types of unused pharmaceuticals; and Applicable disposal...help reduce the amount of pharmaceuticals that are discharged to water...organizations in the health care industry, as well as federal,...

  3. Theoretically-driven infrastructure for supporting health care teams training at a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Turner, T Robert; Parodi, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Designated a Department of Defense Team Resource Center (TRC) in 2008, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts three tri-service health care teams training courses annually. Each consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation-based training exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for health care professionals. Simulated cases are developed to reinforce specific teamwork skills and behaviors, and to incorporate a variety of technologies including standardized patients, manikins, and virtual reality. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore applications of modeling and simulation for enhanced team training in health care. The TRC has adopted two theoretical frameworks for evaluating training efficacy and outcomes, and has used these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting health care teams training at NMCP. PMID:22360057

  4. Health risk assessment of exposure to chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos in children at childcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Hyun; Lim, Young-Wook; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Shin, Dong-Chun; Ham, Hyun-Sook; Choi, Byung-Soon; Lee, Jae-Young

    2013-02-01

    The present study evaluated 168 childcare facilities from 6 cities in South Korea to assess exposure to organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) in children through 4 major pathways (indoor air, indoor dust, surface wipe of indoor objects, and hand wash water of children). The Excess Cancer Risk (ECR) was calculated based on the Cancer Potency Factor (CPF) and Age Dependent Adjustment Factor (ADAF) in adults. Dichlorvos residues were detected in the indoor air, indoor dust, surface wipes of indoor objects, and the hand wash water of children at frequencies of 47.4, 90, 100, and 100%, respectively. After revision based on the ADAF, total cancer risk in the 50th percentile was 3.99×10(-3) for inhalation, oral intake, and dermal contact in children ages 3 to 4 and 4.63×10(-4) in kindergarteners ages 5 to 6. Inhalation was the primary pathway of pesticide exposure in children in childcare facilities. Children ages 3 to 4 in daycare centers had a Hazard Quotient (HQ) of 0.5 for dichlorvos, which was 50% lower than the risk criterion level of 1 but was higher than the 95% percentile with a HQ of 1.9. This study postulates that children in childcare facilities may be exposed to specific OPs. PMID:23291477

  5. How can malaria rapid diagnostic tests achieve their potential? A qualitative study of a trial at health facilities in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are at the early stages of introduction across malaria endemic countries. This is central to efforts to decrease malaria overdiagnosis and the consequent overuse of valuable anti-malarials and underdiagnosis of alternative causes of fever. Evidence of the effect of introducing RDTs on the overprescription of anti-malarials is mixed. A recent trial in rural health facilities in Ghana reduced overprescription of anti-malarials, but found that 45.5% patients who tested negative with RDTs were still prescribed an anti-malarial. Methods A qualitative study of this trial was conducted, using in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of health workers involved in the trial, ranging from those who continued to prescribe anti-malarials to most patients with negative RDT results to those who largely restricted anti-malarials to patients with positive RDT results. Interviews explored the experiences of using RDTs and their results amongst trial participants. Results Meanings of RDTs were constructed by health workers through participation with the tests themselves as well as through interactions with colleagues, patients and the research team. These different modes of participation with the tests and their results led to a change in practice for some health workers, and reinforced existing practice for others. Many of the characteristics of RDTs were found to be inherently conducive to change, but the limited support from purveyors, lack of system antecedents for change and limited system readiness for change were apparent in the analysis. Conclusions When introduced with a limited supporting package, RDTs were variously interpreted and used, reflecting how health workers had learnt how to use RDT results through participation. To build confidence of health workers in the face of negative RDT results, a supporting package should include local preparation for the innovation; unambiguous guidelines; training in alternative causes of disease; regular support for health workers to meet as communities of practice; interventions that address negotiation of health worker-patient relationships and encourage self-reflection of practice; feedback systems for results of quality control of RDTs; feedback systems of the results of their practice with RDTs; and RDT augmentation such as a technical and/or clinical troubleshooting resource. PMID:20398262

  6. Trends and Disparities in Specific Cancer Mortality in Eastern North Carolina Report #2.203, September 2009 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU

    E-print Network

    Trends and Disparities in Specific Cancer Mortality in Eastern North Carolina Report #2.203, September 2009 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.203 September 2009 Center for Health Services Research

  7. PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.15 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1

    E-print Network

    Health Information Psychotherapy Notes ­ means notes recorded by a health care provider who is a mental of the individual's record. Psychotherapy notes does not include: medication prescription and monitoring, counseling

  8. Measuring client satisfaction and the quality of family planning services: A comparative analysis of public and private health facilities in Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Public and private family planning providers face different incentive structures, which may affect overall quality and ultimately the acceptability of family planning for their intended clients. This analysis seeks to quantify differences in the quality of family planning (FP) services at public and private providers in three representative sub-Saharan African countries (Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana), to assess how these quality differentials impact upon FP clients' satisfaction, and to suggest how quality improvements can improve contraceptive continuation rates. Methods Indices of technical, structural and process measures of quality are constructed from Service Provision Assessments (SPAs) conducted in Tanzania (2006), Kenya (2004) and Ghana (2002) using direct observation of facility attributes and client-provider interactions. Marginal effects from multivariate regressions controlling for client characteristics and the multi-stage cluster sample design assess the relative importance of different measures of structural and process quality at public and private facilities on client satisfaction. Results Private health facilities appear to be of higher (interpersonal) process quality than public facilities but not necessarily higher technical quality in the three countries, though these differentials are considerably larger at lower level facilities (clinics, health centers, dispensaries) than at hospitals. Family planning client satisfaction, however, appears considerably higher at private facilities - both hospitals and clinics - most likely attributable to both process and structural factors such as shorter waiting times and fewer stockouts of methods and supplies. Conclusions Because the public sector represents the major source of family planning services in developing countries, governments and Ministries of Health should continue to implement and to encourage incentives, perhaps performance-based, to improve quality at public sector health facilities, as well as to strengthen regulatory and monitoring structures to ensure quality at both public and private facilities. In the meantime, private providers appear to be fulfilling an important gap in the provision of FP services in these countries. PMID:21864335

  9. Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been promoted as a means to reduce malaria transmission due to their ability to kill both asexual blood stages of malaria parasites, which sustain infections over long periods and the immature derived sexual stages responsible for infecting mosquitoes and onward transmission. Early studies reported a temporal association between ACT introduction and reduced malaria transmission in a number of ecological settings. However, these reports have come from areas with low to moderate malaria transmission, been confounded by the presence of other interventions or environmental changes that may have reduced malaria transmission, and have not included a comparison group without ACT. This report presents results from the first large-scale observational study to assess the impact of case management with ACT on population-level measures of malaria endemicity in an area with intense transmission where the benefits of effective infection clearance might be compromised by frequent and repeated re-infection. Methods A pre-post observational study with a non-randomized comparison group was conducted at two sites in Tanzania. Both sites used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) monotherapy as a first-line anti-malarial from mid-2001 through 2002. In 2003, the ACT, artesunate (AS) co-administered with SP (AS?+?SP), was introduced in all fixed health facilities in the intervention site, including both public and registered non-governmental facilities. Population-level prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia were assessed using light microscopy from samples collected during representative household surveys in 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 and 2006. Findings Among 37,309 observations included in the analysis, annual asexual parasitaemia prevalence in persons of all ages ranged from 11% to 28% and gametocytaemia prevalence ranged from <1% to 2% between the two sites and across the five survey years. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to adjust for age, socioeconomic status, bed net use and rainfall. In the presence of consistently high coverage and efficacy of SP monotherapy and AS?+?SP in the comparison and intervention areas, the introduction of ACT in the intervention site was associated with a modest reduction in the adjusted asexual parasitaemia prevalence of 5 percentage-points or 23% (p?health facilities only modestly reduced asexual parasitaemia prevalence. ACT is effective for treatment of uncomplicated malaria and should have substantial public health impact on morbidity and mortality, but is unlikely to reduce malaria transmission substantially in much of sub-Saharan Africa where individuals are rapidly re-infected. PMID:22545573

  10. The food and beverage vending environment in health care facilities participating in the healthy eating, active communities program. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  11. Health care workers’ perspectives about disclosure to HIV-infected children; cross-sectional survey of health facilities in Gauteng and Mpumalanga provinces, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mokgatle, Mathildah

    2015-01-01

    The perspectives and practices of health care workers (HCWs) regarding disclosure to HIV-infected children have not been adequately investigated ten years after the roll-out of pediatrics antiretroviral therapy (ART). The aim of the study was to examine the opinions of HCWs about disclosure to HIV-infected children and determine their role in disclosure to children accessing ART in health centers in South Africa. This was a cross-sectional survey using a semi-structured questionnaire among HCWs in ART centers at three hospitals and 48 primary health facilities in two provinces in South Africa. Of the 206 HCWs, 140 (68.2%) were nurses, 44 (21.5%) were lay counsellors, and 4 (2%) were doctors. The majority (n = 183, 89.3%) felt that disclosure benefits children and they should be told about their HIV status. Over half (n = 93, 51.4%) recommended 11–18 years as the appropriate age to disclose. Half (n = 99, 48.5%) said that caregivers should take the lead to disclose, 87 (42.7%) said that disclosure is a shared responsibility of caregivers and HCWs, and 18 (8.8%) said HCWs should lead disclosure. HCWs perceived their role as that of preparing the caregiver for disclosure and the child to understand the disease. However, the lack of guidelines and training on disclosure counselling for children affects their ability to fully participate in disclosure to children. There is a need to adopt the World Health Organizations’ disclosure guidelines for children and adapt them to the local cultural and community contexts and train HCWs to guide, support, and assist caregivers in their disclosure to HIV-infected children. PMID:25893147

  12. Energy management: the only game in town. [Survey of activities at health-care facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1976-01-01

    The United States hopes for independence from foreign oil imports by 1985, but there are many uncertainties. Oil and natural gas currently supply hospitals with 75% of their energy needs. Robert E. Griffiths, energy management specialist of Health Resources Administration at the meeting of the Curtailment Strategies Technical Advisory Committee stated that although there is enough natural gas for hospital

  13. Barriers and solutions in implementing occupational health and safety services at a large nuclear weapons facility.

    PubMed

    Takaro, T K; Ertell, K; Salazar, M K; Beaudet, N; Stover, B; Hagopian, A; Omenn, G; Barnhart, S

    2000-01-01

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's largest nuclear weapons sites. The enormous changes experienced by Hanford over the last several years, as its mission has shifted from weapons production to cleanup, has profoundly affected its occupational health and safety services. Innovative programs and new initiatives hold promise for a safer workplace for the thousands of workers at Hanford and other DOE sites. However, occupational health and safety professionals continue to face multiple organizational, economic, and cultural challenges. A major problem identified during this review was the lack of coordination of onsite services. Because each health and safety program operates independently (albeit with the guidance of the Richland field operations office), many services are duplicative and the health and safety system is fragmented. The fragmentation is compounded by the lack of centralized data repositories for demographic and exposure data. Innovative measures such as a questionnaire-driven Employee Job Task Analysis linked to medical examinations has allowed the site to move from the inefficient and potentially dangerous administrative medical monitoring assignment to defensible risk-based assignments and could serve as a framework for improving centralized data management and service delivery. PMID:11186038

  14. Availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care: experience of health facility managers in a rural District of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of quality emergency obstetric care relies upon the presence of skilled health attendants working in an environment where drugs and medical supplies are available when needed and in adequate quantity and of assured quality. This study aimed to describe the experience of rural health facility managers in ensuring the timely availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a total of 17 health facility managers: 14 from dispensaries and three from health centers. Two members of the Council Health Management Team and one member of the Council Health Service Board were also interviewed. A survey of health facilities was conducted to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Participants reported on the unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies for EmOC; this was supported by the absence of essential items observed during the facility survey. The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies was reported to result in the provision of untimely and suboptimal EmOC services. An insufficient budget for drugs from central government, lack of accountability within the supply system and a bureaucratic process of accessing the locally mobilized drug fund were reported to contribute to the current situation. Conclusion The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies compromises the timely provision of quality EmOC. Multiple approaches should be used to address challenges within the health system that prevent access to essential drugs and supplies for maternal health. There should be a special focus on improving the governance of the drug delivery system so that it promotes the accountability of key players, transparency in the handling of information and drug funds, and the participation of key stakeholders in decision making over the allocation of locally collected drug funds. PMID:24646098

  15. An overview of the space medicine program and development of the Health Maintenance Facility for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam Lee

    1988-01-01

    Because the prolonged stay on board the Space Station will increase the risk of possible inflight medical problems from that on Skylab missions, the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) planned for the Space Station is much more sophisticated than the small clinics of the Skylab missions. The development of the HMF is directed by the consideration of three primary factors: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries and illnesses that may occur in flight. The major components of the HMF include the clinical laboratory, pharmacy, imaging system, critical-care system, patient-restraint system, data-management system, exercise system, surgical system, electrophysiologic-monitoring system, introvenous-fluid system, dental system, and hyperbaric-treatment-support system.

  16. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  17. South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control federal facility agreement. Annual progress report, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hucks, R.L.

    1996-01-30

    South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) reviewed 105 primary documents during fiscal year 1995 (October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995). The primary documents reviewed consisted of 27 RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) workplans, 13 RFI/RI Reports, 12 Baseline Risk Assessments (BRA`s), 27 Site Evaluation (SE) Reports, 8 Proposed Plans, 5 Record of Decisions (ROD`s), 6 Remedial Design Workplans, 6 Remedial Action Workplans and 10 miscellaneous primary documents. Numerous other administrative duties were conducted during the reporting period that are not accounted for above. These included, but were not limited to, extension requests, monitoring well approvals, and Treatability Studies. The list of outgoing correspondence from SCDHEC to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is attached.

  18. Giving cell phones to pregnant women and improving services may increase primary health facility utilization: a case–control study of a Nigerian project

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, about 287 000 women die each year from mostly preventable complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. A disproportionately high number of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The Abiye (‘Safe Motherhood’) project in the Ifedore Local Government Area (LGA) of Ondo-State of Nigeria aimed at improving facility utilization and maternal health through the use of cell phones and generally improved health care services for pregnant women, including Health Rangers, renovated Health Centres, and improved means of transportation. Methods A one-year sample of retrospective data was collected from hospital records and patients’ case files from Ifedore (the project area) and Idanre (control area) and was analyzed to determine healthcare facility utilization rates in each location. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to generate supplemental data. Results The total facility utilization rate of pregnant women was significantly higher in Ifedore than in Idanre. The facility utilization rate of the primary health care centres was significantly higher in Ifedore than in Idanre. The number of recorded cases of the five major causes of maternal death in the two LGAs was not significantly different, possibly because the project was new. Conclusions Giving cell phones to pregnant women and generally improving services could increase their utilization of the primary healthcare system. PMID:24438150

  19. Demonstration of anticoagulation patient self-testing feasibility at an Indian Health Service facility: A case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schupbach, Ryan R.; Bousum, John M.; Miller, Michael J.

    Background Anticoagulation patient self-testing (PST) represents an alternative approach to warfarin monitoring by enabling patients to use coagulometers to test their international normalized ratio (INR) values. PST offers several advantages that potentially improve warfarin management. Objective To describe implementation and associated performance of a PST demonstration program at an Indian Health Service (IHS) facility. Methods A non-consecutive case series analysis of patients from a pharmacy-managed PST demonstration program was performed at an IHS facility in Oklahoma between July 2008 and February 2009. Results Mean time in therapeutic range (TTR) for the seven patients showed a small, absolute increase during the twelve weeks of PST compared to the twelve weeks prior to PST. Four of the seven patients had an increase in TTR during the twelve week course of PST compared to their baseline TTR. Three of four patients with increased TTR in the final eight week period of PST achieved a TTR of 100%. Of the three patients who experienced a decrease in TTR after initiating self-testing, two initially presented with a TTR of 100% prior to PST and one patient had a TTR of 100% for the final eight weeks of PST. The two patients not achieving a TTR of 100% during the twelve week PST period demonstrated an increase in TTR following the first four weeks of PST. Conclusions Although anticoagulation guidelines now emphasize patient self-management (PSM) only, optimal PST remains an integral process in PSM delivery. In the patients studied, the results of this analysis suggest that PST at the IHS facility provided a convenient, alternative method for management of chronic warfarin therapy for qualified patients. More than half of the patients demonstrated improvement in TTR. Although there is a learning curve immediately following PST initiation, the mean TTR for the entire PST period increased modestly when compared to the time period prior to PST. PMID:24155847

  20. Health Professions Advisory Program Page 165Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog health professions advisory program

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    BIOL 123* Molecular and Cell Biology 4 BIOL 328 Vertebrate Evolutionary Morphology 4 BIOL 342 Molecular Genetics 4 BIOL 344 Cell Biology 4 BIOL 472 Developmental Biology 4 CHEM 115AB* and 116AB* General for careers in various health professions, including medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary

  1. Page 156 Health Professions Advisory Program Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physi- cal therapy, physician assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for physical therapy and nursing are done for admission to health-related programs are in the sciences, most students earn degrees in biology or chemistry

  2. Evaluating the level of satisfaction of patients utilizing first-level health facilities as a function of health system performance rating in the province of Elazig, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Aliye; Oguzoncul, A Ferdane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine the level of satisfaction of patients utilizing first-level health care facilities as a function of health system performance rating in Elazig province of Turkey. Methods The study was conducted between December 2013 and March 2014 at the family health centers in the Elazig province center. For collecting the data in the cross-sectional study conducted with 1,290 patients, personal data form for patients and the Turkish version of European Patients Evaluate General/Family Practice scale was used. Results Of the patients who participated in the study, 54.3% were female. According to the general average scores received by the patients from European Patients Evaluate General/Family Practice-TR Patient Satisfaction Survey questions, average scores of male patients were found to be higher than those of female patients. Scores of the divorced and widow patients were higher compared to other groups, but this was not statistically significant. Average scores of the patients whose educational status is secondary school were higher compared to other groups. Scores of the patients with children were higher compared to those without children. Scores of the patients whose occupation was farming were higher compared to the other groups of occupation. Scores of the patients whose income was TL 1,001–2,500 were found to be higher compared to other patients. Scores of the patients who stated that they never had difficulty in access were higher compared to others, but this was not statistically significant. Average scores of the patients who had chronic diseases and patients who stated to have physical handicap were higher compared to those who did not have chronic disease and physical handicap, but these differences were not found to be statistically significant, either. Conclusion There is a statistically significant difference between the patients’ demographic characteristics (sex, educational status, occupation, and income status) and their levels of satisfaction with the family medicine practice. PMID:25414572

  3. Improving antimicrobial use among health workers in first-level facilities: results from the multi-country evaluation of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Gouws, Eleanor; Bryce, Jennifer; Habicht, Jean-Pierre; Amaral, João; Pariyo, George; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong; Fontaine, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) case management training on the use of antimicrobial drugs among health-care workers treating young children at first-level facilities. Antimicrobial drugs are an essential child-survival intervention. Ensuring that children younger than five who need these drugs receive them promptly and correctly can save their lives. Prescribing these drugs only when necessary and ensuring that those who receive them complete the full course can slow the development of antimicrobial resistance. METHODS: Data collected through observation-based surveys in randomly selected first-level health facilities in Brazil, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania were statistically analysed. The surveys were carried out as part of the multi-country evaluation of IMCI effectiveness, cost and impact (MCE). FINDINGS: Results from three MCE sites show that children receiving care from health workers trained in IMCI are significantly more likely to receive correct prescriptions for antimicrobial drugs than those receiving care from workers not trained in IMCI.They are also more likely to receive the first dose of the drug before leaving the health facility, to have their caregiver advised how to administer the drug, and to have caregivers who are able to describe correctly how to give the drug at home as they leave the health facility. CONCLUSIONS: IMCI case management training is an effective intervention to improve the rational use of antimicrobial drugs for sick children visiting first-level health facilities in low-income and middle-income countries. PMID:15508195

  4. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  5. 1/15/2014, 11:10 AMThe nocebo response -Harvard Health Publications Page 1 of 2http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/The_nocebo_response.htm

    E-print Network

    Reid, Nancy

    .harvard.edu/newsweek/The_nocebo_response.htm Shop Our Bookstore Health Newsletters Harvard Health Letter Harvard Women's Health Watch Harvard Men's Health Watch Harvard Heart Letter Premium Access Special Health Reports A Guide to Women's Health Better's Health Wellness & Prevention Women's Health Health Resources Current and Archived News Family Health

  6. Page 1 of 46 ANNUAL SECURITY

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    ...................................................................................................................9 Facilities Operations and Management (FO&M) Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) The Office Information Website Emergency Response and Notification Systems Testing Missing Person Notification Policy Information #12;Page 4 of 46 Dartmouth College's Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report (2011

  7. Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

  8. Study--The Feasibility, Practicability and Cost of the Soundproofing of Schools, Hospitals, and Public Health Facilities Located Near Airports. Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This report fulfills the requirement of Public Law 94-353 that requires the Secretary of Transportation to report to the Congress with respect to the feasibility, practicability, and cost of soundproofing noise-impacted schools, hospitals, and public health facilities, in order to reduce the possible adverse effects of aircraft noise. A survey of…

  9. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Gallegos; J Daniels; A Wegrecki

    2007-01-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

  10. Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Romero, Camila X.; Aguilera, Hernán; Ahlers, Ivonne

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Methods Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957–2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. Results During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (?13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (?1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (?69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Conclusion Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion. PMID:22574194

  11. Health risks for the population living in the vicinity of an Integrated Waste Management Facility: screening environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Rovira, Joaquim; Vilavert, Lolita; Nadal, Martí; Figueras, María J; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2015-06-15

    We performed a screening investigation to assess the human health risks of the Integrated Waste Management Facility (IWMF: mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant plus municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI); Ecoparc-3) of Barcelona (Spain). Air concentrations of pollutants potentially released by the MBT plant (VOCs and bioaerosols) and the MSWI (trace elements, PCDD/Fs and PCBs) were determined. Trace elements, PCDD/Fs and PCBs were also analyzed in soil samples. The concentrations of trace elements and bioaerosols were similar to those previously reported in other areas of similar characteristics, while formaldehyde was the predominant VOC. Interestingly, PCDD/F concentrations in soil and air were the highest ever reported near a MSWI in Catalonia, being maximum concentrations 10.8 ng WHO-TEQ/kg and 41.3 fg WHO-TEQ/m(3), respectively. In addition, there has not been any reduction in soils, even after the closure of a power plant located adjacently. Human health risks of PCDD/F exposure in the closest urban nucleus located downwind the MSWI are up to 10-times higher than those nearby other MSWIs in Catalonia. Although results must be considered as very preliminary, they are a serious warning for local authorities. We strongly recommend to conduct additional studies to confirm these findings and, if necessary, to implement measures to urgently mitigate the impact of the MSWI on the surrounding environment. We must also state the tremendous importance of an individual evaluation of MSWIs, rather than generalizing their environmental and health risks. PMID:25770949

  12. Savings analysis of a 1 MW cogeneration system at a Texas mental health facility

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, A.; Turner, W.D.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); McClean, G. [Texas Department for Mental Health and Mental Retardation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Cogeneration is defined as the generation of electric power and coincident recovery of useful thermal energy from a single prime mover using a single fuel. The 1 MW gas turbine cogeneration system at Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), Austin, came on line in March, 1992 and is a unique application of federal and state funds. This system has been analyzed for its present performance and loads using hourly measured data. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A and M University has been collecting hourly data for natural gas use and the electrical energy produced by the engine since August, 1992. Waste heat recovered by the Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) is also monitored. This paper describes the present system, analyzes the system using hourly monitored data, calculates energy and dollar savings, compares the measured results with the estimated savings, and discusses some of the problems encountered during the first year of operation.

  13. Health Professions Advisory Program Page 157Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Darwin Hall 200

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    for careers in various health professions, including allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physi- cal therapy, physician assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for physical therapy and nursing are done by the Departments

  14. Quality of prescribing for hypertension and bronchial asthma at a tertiary health care facility, India using Prescription Quality Index tool

    PubMed Central

    Suthar, Jalpa V.; Patel, Varsha J.; Vaishnav, B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several tools have been introduced to evaluate the quality of prescribing. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of prescribing in hypertension and bronchial asthma in tertiary health care (THC) setting using the new Prescription Quality Index (PQI) tool and to assess the reliability of this tool. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out for 2 months in order to assess the quality of prescribing of antihypertensive and antiasthmatic drugs using recently described PQI at THC facility. Patients with hypertension and bronchial asthma, attending out-patient departments of internal medicine and pulmonary medicine respectively for at least 3 months were included. Complete medical history and prescriptions received were noted. Total and criteria wise PQI scores were derived for each prescription. Prescriptions were categorized as poor, medium and high quality based on total PQI scores. Results: A total of 222 patients were included. Mean age was 56 ± 15.1 years (range 4-87 years) with 67 (30.2%) patients above 65 years of age. Mean total PQI score was 32.1 ± 5.1. Of 222 prescriptions, 103 (46.4%) prescriptions were of high quality with PQI score ?34. Quality of prescribing did not differ between hypertension and bronchial asthma (P > 0.05). The value of Cronbach's ? for the entire 22 criteria of PQI was 0.71. Conclusion: As evaluated by PQI tool, the quality of prescribing for hypertension and bronchial asthma is good in about 47% of prescriptions at THC facility. PQI is valid for measuring prescribing quality in these chronic diseases in Indian setting. PMID:25538464

  15. Factors affecting acceptance of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling services among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar Town, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abdurahman, Sami; Seyoum, Berhanu; Oljira, Lemessa; Weldegebreal, Fitsum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To improve the slow uptake of HIV counseling and testing, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) have developed draft guidelines on provider-initiated testing and counseling (PITC). Both in low- and high-income countries, mainly from outpatient clinics and tuberculosis settings, indicates that the direct offer of HIV testing by health providers can result in significant improvements in test uptake. In Ethiopia, there were limited numbers of studies conducted regarding PITC in outpatient clinics. Therefore, in this study, we have assessed the factors affecting the acceptance of PITC among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. Materials and methods Institutional-based, cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative studies were conducted from February 12–30, 2011 in selected health facilities in Harar town, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. The study participants were recruited from the selected health facilities of Harar using a systematic random sampling technique. The collected data were double entered into a data entry file using Epi Info version 3.5.1. The data were transferred to SPSS software version 16 and analyzed according to the different variables. Results A total of 362 (70.6%) clients accepted PITC, and only 39.4% of clients had heard of PITC in the outpatient department service. Age, occupation, marital status, anyone who wanted to check their HIV status, and the importance of PITC were the variables that showed significant associations with the acceptance of PITC upon bivariate and multivariate analyses. The main reasons given for not accepting the tests were self-trust, not being at risk for HIV, not being ready, needing to consult their partners, a fear of the results, a shortage of staff, a busy work environment, a lack of private rooms, and a lack of refresher training, which were identified as the main barriers for PITC. Conclusion There is evidence of the relatively increased acceptability of PITC services by outpatient department clients. A program needs to be strengthened to enhance the use of PITC; the Ministry of Health, Regional Health Bureau, and other responsible bodies – including health facilities – should design and strengthen information education and communication/behavioral change and communication interventions and promote activities related to PITC and HIV counseling and testing in both health facilities and the community at large. PMID:26028979

  16. The Small Area Health Statistics Unit: a national facility for investigating health around point sources of environmental pollution in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, P; Westlake, A J; Hills, M; Kleinschmidt, I; Rodrigues, L; McGale, P; Marshall, K; Rose, G

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The Small Area Health Statistics Unit (SAHSU) was established at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in response to a recommendation of the enquiry into the increased incidence of childhood leukaemia near Sellafield, the nuclear reprocessing plant in West Cumbria. The aim of this paper was to describe the Unit's methods for the investigation of health around point sources of environmental pollution in the United Kingdom. DESIGN--Routine data currently including deaths and cancer registrations are held in a large national database which uses a post code based retrieval system to locate cases geographically and link them to the underlying census enumeration districts, and hence to their populations at risk. Main outcome measures were comparison of observed/expected ratios (based on national rates) within bands delineated by concentric circles around point sources of environmental pollution located anywhere in Britain. MAIN RESULTS--The system is illustrated by a study of mortality from mesothelioma and asbestosis near the Plymouth naval dockyards during 1981-87. Within a 3 km radius of the docks the mortality rate for mesothelioma was higher than the national rate by a factor of 8.4, and that for asbestosis was higher by a factor of 13.6. CONCLUSIONS--SAHSU is a new national facility which is rapidly able to provide rates of mortality and cancer incidence for arbitrary circles drawn around any point in Britain. The example around Plymouth of mesothelioma and asbestosis demonstrates the ability of the system to detect an unusual excess of disease in a small locality, although in this case the findings are likely to be related to occupational rather than environmental exposure. PMID:1431704

  17. Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Health and safety plan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.; McKown, G.; Waugh, J.; Houser, W.; Joy, G.

    1995-09-01

    The requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1910.120(f), shall be met for all employees performing or supervising hazardous waste operations. Medical exams shall be conducted as soon as possible upon notification by an employee that he/she has developed signs or symptoms indicating possible health hazards or overexposure to hazardous substances. Subcontractor personnel shall provide documentation of current status of participation in a medical surveillance program as required by 29 CFR 1910.120(f). Subcontractors unable to provide such documentation shall have successfully completed a medical examination as described in the above referenced OSHA standard prior to beginning work in a contaminated zone. Specific protocols for medical examinations are designed by an occupational physician. Common components include: (a) medical history and physical examination; (b) dipstick urinalysis, vision screen and vital signs; (c) spirometry ;(d) audiometry; (e) blood chemistry (complete blood count, liver function, kidney function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism); (f) resting EkG (with approval); (g) chest radiograph (P/A). No project-specific medical examinations, or biological monitoring is required for this project.

  18. DHHS, NIH, Report to the United States Congress, NIH Response to the Conference Rep... Page 1 of 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    DHHS, NIH, Report to the United States Congress, NIH Response to the Conference Rep... Page 1 of 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH Response 4. The Road to Innovation 5. Return on Investment 6. NIH "Reasonable Pricing" Clause Experience 7

  19. PAGE 1 of 4 The Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) Program and the Dependent Care Assistance Program (DeCAP)

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Weigang

    PAGE 1 of 4 The Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) Program and the Dependent Care YEAR 2013 ENROLLMENT/CHANGE FORM FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS (FSA) PROGRAM 40 Rector Street, 3rd Floor for you and your spouse cannot exceed $5,000. Health Care Flexible Spending Account

  20. Environment, safety, health at DOE Facilities. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy's occupational safety and property protection performance in fiscal year 1980 was excellent in all reported categories with loss rates generally less than one-third of comparable industry figures. The Department of Energy's fiscal year 1980 incidence rate per 200,000 work hours was 1.1 lost workday cases and 18.2 lost workdays compared to 1.1 lost workday cases and 17.2 lost workdays during fiscal year 1979. The recorded occupational illness rate, based on only 70 cases, was 0.05 cases per 200,000 work hours compared to 0.06 cases per 200,000 work hours for fiscal year 1979. Ten fatalities involving Federal or contractor employees occurred in fiscal year 1980 compared to nine for fiscal year 1979. Four of those in fiscal year 1980 resulted from two aircraft accidents. Total reported property loss during fiscal year 1980 was $7.1 million with $3.5 million attributable to earthquake damage sustained by the Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories on January 24, 1980. A total of 131 million vehicle miles of official vehicular travel during fiscal year 1980 resulted in 768 accidents and $535,145 in property damages. The 104,986 monitored Department of Energy and Department of Energy contractor employees received a total dose of 9040 REM in calendar year 1979. Both the total dose and the 1748 employees receiving radiation exposures greater than 1 REM in 1979 represent a continuing downward trend from the calendar year 1978 total dose of 9380 REM and the 1826 employees who received radiation exposures greater than 1 REM. The fifty-nine appraisals conducted indicate that generally adequate plans have been developed and effective organizational structures have been established to carry out the Department of Energy's Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection (ES and H) Program.

  1. Communicating health risks to the community from a state-of-the art waste-to-energy resource recovery facility through multimedia environmental monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, R.K.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1986, when Montgomery County, Maryland decided to construct a municipal solid waste Resource Recovery Facility (RRF), the County has been seeking citizen input through citizen advisory committee meetings. Due to public concern that organics, primarily dioxins, that are released from municipal waste combustion create the risk of potential health-effects including cancer, the County conducted a multiple pathway health-risk study in 1989. In this study, organics and trace metals that are known to be released from municipal waste combustors and are generally considered to be of importance from a public health perspective were addressed. The County conducted several citizen meetings for communicating the results of the health risk studies. In these meetings, some citizens living in the neighborhood of the facility still expressed concern, and asked the County to conduct an ambient monitoring program prior to and during the operation of the facility. The County agreed to conduct a multimedia environmental monitoring program. The County Council endorsed this program. The major objective of the program was to determine the existing background levels of toxics prior to the operation of the facility and incremental increases, if any, resulting from the operation of the facility. In this program organics and trace metals discussed earlier, were periodically sampled. The media sampled were: air, soil, garden vegetables, surface water, fish and sediment from the farm ponds, dairy milk and hay. This paper discusses the original design of the program, citizen input to the design of the program, results of the program, and typical issues raised by the citizens in numerous public briefing conducted by the County, and the County's responses.

  2. Nationwide reduction of health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Veterans Affairs long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Freyberg, Ron W; Obrosky, D Scott; Roselle, Gary A; Jain, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    The Veterans Affairs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Prevention Initiative was implemented in its 133 long-term care facilities in January 2009. Between July 2009 and December 2012, there were ~12.9 million resident-days in these facilities nationwide. During this period, the mean quarterly MRSA admission prevalence increased from 23.3% to 28.7% (P < .0001, Poisson regression for trend), but the overall rate of MRSA health care-associated infections decreased by 36%, from 0.25 to 0.16/1,000 resident-days (P < .0001, Poisson regression for trend). PMID:24388470

  3. 'I was raped by Santa Claus': responding to disclosures of sexual assault in mental health inpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Toni; Spangaro, Jo; McNamara, Lorna

    2015-04-01

    Sexual violence is significantly higher among those with mental illness than the rest of the population. The risk of sexual violence posed to patients during inpatient admissions is now also beginning to be recognized, but remains a challenging area of practice. This paper introduces a trauma-informed care approach for responding to disclosures of sexual violence by people with serious mental illness, taking into account the complexities of caring for individuals who might be unable to provide coherent accounts of assaults and/or who might be experiencing varying degrees of psychosis. A framework for understanding and responding to disclosures of sexual violence that occur in mental health facilities is described, recognizing that such disclosures take many forms, including plausible and implausible accounts of recent sexual violence, as well as disclosures of past abuse triggered by current traumatic experiences. Illustrated by case studies, the practice implications for each type of disclosure described in the framework are explored in relation to investigation, care planning, and prevention. PMID:25582409

  4. Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover among Nurses in Sidama Zone Public Health Facilities, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belachew, Tefera; Yimam, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Workplace turnover is destructive to nursing and patient outcomes as it leads to losing competent and qualified nurses. However, developments of coping strategies demand a clear understanding of workplace variables that either motivate nurses to remain employed or lead them to leave their current jobs. Objective. This study was designed toassess factors influencing job satisfaction and intention to turnover among nurses in Sidama zone public health facilities, in Southern Ethiopia. Method. Cross-sectional study design was carried out on 278 nurses using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods from May 12 to June 05, 2010. Result. A total of 242 nurses were interviewed giving a response rate of 87%. Nearly two-third (68.6%) of the participants were female, and the mean age was 28 (±6.27) years for both sexes. All job satisfaction subscale except benefit and salary subscale were significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Satisfactions with work environment and group cohesion (AOR: 0.25 [95% CI: 0.12, 0.51]), single cohesion (AOR: 2.56 [95% CI: 1.27, 5.13]), and working in hospital (AOR: 2.19 [95% CI: 1.12, 4.30]) were the final significant predictors of anticipated turnover of Sidama zone nurses. Conclusions. More than any factors managers should consider the modification of working environment and group cohesions rather than trying to modify nurses to retain and maintain more experienced nurses for the organizations. PMID:24707397

  5. University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 3 John Dempsey Hospital

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    that will prevent or reduce contact with bloodborne diseases. Refer to the policy Standard Precautions Number 1.2. f in compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard as outlined in 29 CFR 1910 is responsible for full compliance with the Occupational Exposure of Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR 10

  6. UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-10.7 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    frequently enough to prevent fly, rodent, or other nuisance problems. B. Toxic and Special Wastes 1. Toxic/8/10 Issuing Office: Environment, Health & Safety Supersedes: 5/1/98 516-10.7 ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION--WASTE Policy and Procedure Manual (PPM) 516-14 Hazardous Waste Disposal II. POLICY All waste materials shall

  7. Systematic review of facility-based sexual and reproductive health services for female sex workers in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several biological, behavioural, and structural risk factors place female sex workers (FSWs) at heightened risk of HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and other adverse sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes. FSW projects in many settings have demonstrated effective ways of altering this risk, improving the health and wellbeing of these women. Yet the optimum delivery model of FSW projects in Africa is unclear. This systematic review describes intervention packages, service-delivery models, and extent of government involvement in these services in Africa. Methods On 22 November 2012, we searched Web of Science and MEDLINE, without date restrictions, for studies describing clinical and non-clinical facility-based SRH prevention and care services for FSWs in low- and middle-income countries in Africa. We also identified articles in key non-indexed journals and on websites of international organizations. A single reviewer screened titles and abstracts, and extracted data from articles using standardised tools. Results We located 149 articles, which described 54 projects. Most were localised and small-scale; focused on research activities (rather than on large-scale service delivery); operated with little coordination, either nationally or regionally; and had scanty government support (instead a range of international donors generally funded services). Almost all sites only addressed HIV prevention and STIs. Most services distributed male condoms, but only 10% provided female condoms. HIV services mainly encompassed HIV counselling and testing; few offered HIV care and treatment such as CD4 testing or antiretroviral therapy (ART). While STI services were more comprehensive, periodic presumptive treatment was only provided in 11 instances. Services often ignored broader SRH needs such as family planning, cervical cancer screening, and gender-based violence services. Conclusions Sex work programmes in Africa have limited coverage and a narrow scope of services and are poorly coordinated with broader HIV and SRH services. To improve FSWs’ health and reduce onward HIV transmission, access to ART needs to be addressed urgently. Nevertheless, HIV prevention should remain the mainstay of services. Service delivery models that integrate broader SRH services and address structural risk factors are much needed. Government-led FSW services of high quality and scale would markedly reduce SRH vulnerabilities of FSWs in Africa. PMID:24916010

  8. Use of facility assessment data to improve reproductive health service delivery in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara E Casey; Kathleen T Mitchell; Immaculée Mulamba Amisi; Martin Migombano Haliza; Blandine Aveledi; Prince Kalenga; Judy Austin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prolonged exposure to war has severely impacted the provision of health services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Health infrastructure has been destroyed, health workers have fled and government support to health care services has been made difficult by ongoing conflict. Poor reproductive health (RH) indicators illustrate the effect that the prolonged crisis in DRC has had

  9. Getting antimalarials on target: impact of national roll-out of malaria rapid diagnostic tests on health facility treatment in three regions of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Kalolella, Admirabilis; Nchimbi, Happy; Festo, Charles; Taylor, Mark; Thomson, Rebecca; Cairns, Matthew; Thwing, Julie; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Parasitological confirmation of malaria prior to treatment is recommended for patients of all ages, with malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) an important tool to target artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) to patients with malaria. To evaluate the impact on case management practices of routine government implementation of mRDTs, we conducted large-scale health facility surveys in three regions of Tanzania before and after mRDT roll-out. Methods Febrile patients at randomly selected health facilities were interviewed about care received at the facility, and blood samples were collected for reference blood smears. Health facility staff were interviewed about their qualifications and availability of malaria diagnostics and drugs. Results The percentage of febrile patients tested for malaria at the facility increased from 15.8% in 2010 to 54.9% in 2012. ACTs were obtained by 65.8% of patients positive by reference blood smear in 2010 and by 50.2% in 2012 (P = 0.0675); no antimalarial was obtained by 57.8% of malaria-negative patients in 2010 and by 82.3% in 2012 (P < 0.0001). Overall, ACT use decreased (39.9–21.3%, P < 0.0001) and antibiotic use increased (31.2–48.5%, P < 0.0001). Conclusion Roll-out of mRDTs in Tanzania dramatically improved diagnostic testing for malaria and reduced overuse of ACTs for patients without parasitemia. However, post–roll-out almost 50% of febrile patients did not receive a diagnostic test, and almost 50% of patients testing positive did not receive ACTs. Stock-outs of ACTs and mRDTs were important problems. Further investigation is needed to determine reasons for not providing ACTs to patients with malaria and potential for inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:23937722

  10. Illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic substances from a generic geological disposal facility for radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James C; Thorne, Michael C; Towler, George; Norris, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Many countries have a programme for developing an underground geological disposal facility for radioactive waste. A case study is provided herein on the illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic and radioactive substances from a generic geological disposal facility (GDF) for radioactive waste. The illustrative assessment uses a source-pathway-receptor methodology and considers a number of human exposure pathways. Estimated exposures are compared with authoritative toxicological assessment criteria. The possibility of additive and synergistic effects resulting from exposures to mixtures of chemical contaminants or a combination of radiotoxic and chemotoxic substances is considered. The case study provides an illustration of how to assess human health issues arising from chemotoxic species released from a GDF for radioactive waste and highlights potential difficulties associated with a lack of data being available with which to assess synergistic effects. It also highlights how such difficulties can be addressed. PMID:22089948

  11. Comparison of medicine availability measurements at health facilities: evidence from Service Provision Assessment surveys in five sub-Saharan African countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With growing emphasis on health systems strengthening in global health, various health facility assessment methods have been used increasingly to measure medicine and commodity availability. However, few studies have systematically compared estimates of availability based on different definitions. The objective of this study was to compare estimates of medicine availability based on different definitions. Methods A secondary data analysis was conducted using data from the Service Provision Assessment (SPA) – a nationally representative sample survey of health facilities – conducted in five countries: Kenya SPA 2010, Namibia SPA 2009, Rwanda SPA 2007, Tanzania SPA 2006, and Uganda SPA 2007. For 32 medicines, percent of facilities having the medicine were estimated using five definitions: four for current availability and one for six-month period availability. ‘Observed availability of at least one valid unit’ was used as a reference definition, and ratios between the reference and each of the other four estimates were calculated. Summary statistics of the ratios among the 32 medicines were calculated by country. The ratios were compared further between public and non-public facilities within each country. Results Across five countries, compared to current observed availability of at least one valid unit, ‘reported availability without observation’ was on average 6% higher (ranging from 3% in Rwanda to 8% in Namibia), ‘observed availability where all units were valid’ was 11% lower (ranging from 2% in Tanzania to 19% in Uganda), and ‘six-month period availability’ was 14% lower (ranging from 5% in Namibia to 25% in Uganda). Conclusions Medicine availability estimates vary substantially across definitions, and need to be interpreted with careful consideration of the methods used. PMID:23837467

  12. Road map to scaling-up: translating operations research study’s results into actions for expanding medical abortion services in rural health facilities in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying unsafe abortion among the major causes of maternal deaths and respecting the rights to health of women, in 2002, the Nepali parliament liberalized abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy on request. However, enhancing women’s awareness on and access to safe and legal abortion services, particularly in rural areas, remains a challenge in Nepal despite a decade of the initiation of safe abortion services. Methods Between January 2011 and December 2012, an operations research study was carried out using quasi-experimental design to determine the effectiveness of engaging female community health volunteers, auxiliary nurse midwives, and nurses to provide medical abortion services from outreach health facilities to increase the accessibility and acceptability of women to medical abortion. This paper describes key components of the operations research study, key research findings, and follow-up actions that contributed to create a conducive environment and evidence in scaling up medical abortion services in rural areas of Nepal. Results It was found that careful planning and implementation, continuous advocacy, and engagement of key stakeholders, including key government officials, from the planning stage of study is not only crucial for successful completion of the project but also instrumental for translating research results into action and policy change. While challenges remained at different levels, medical abortion services delivered by nurses and auxiliary nurse midwives working at rural outreach health facilities without oversight of physicians was perceived to be accessible, effective, and of good quality by the service providers and the women who received medical abortion services from these rural health facilities. Conclusions This research provided further evidence and a road-map for expanding medical abortion services to rural areas by mid-level service providers in minimum clinical settings without the oversight of physicians, thus reducing complications and deaths due to unsafe abortion. PMID:24886393

  13. Home Page

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Home Page Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  14. Where Do the Rural Poor Deliver When High Coverage of Health Facility Delivery Is Achieved? Findings from a Community and Hospital Survey in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Straneo, Manuela; Fogliati, Piera; Azzimonti, Gaetano; Mangi, Sabina; Kisika, Firma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As part of maternal mortality reducing strategies, coverage of delivery care among sub-Saharan African rural poor will improve, with a range of facilities providing services. Whether high coverage will benefit all socio-economic groups is unknown. Iringa rural District, Southern Tanzania, with high facility delivery coverage, offers a paradigm to address this question. Delivery services are available in first-line facilities (dispensaries, health centres) and one hospital. We assessed whether all socio-economic groups access the only comprehensive emergency obstetric care facility equally, and surveyed existing delivery services. Methods District population characteristics were obtained from a household community survey (n?=?463). A Hospital survey collected data on women who delivered in this facility (n?=?1072). Principal component analysis on household assets was used to assess socio-economic status. Hospital population socio-demographic characteristics were compared to District population using multivariable logistic regression. Deliveries' distribution in District facilities and staffing were analysed using routine data. Results Women from the hospital compared to the District population were more likely to be wealthier. Adjusted odds ratio of hospital delivery increased progressively across socio-economic groups, from 1.73 for the poorer (p?=?0.0031) to 4.53 (p<0.0001) for the richest. Remarkable dispersion of deliveries and poor staffing were found. In 2012, 5505/7645 (72%) institutional deliveries took place in 68 first-line facilities, the remaining in the hospital. 56/68 (67.6%) first-line facilities reported ?100 deliveries/year, attending 33% of deliveries. Insufficient numbers of skilled birth attendants were found in 42.9% of facilities. Discussion Poorer women remain disadvantaged in high coverage, as they access lower level facilities and are under-represented where life-saving transfusions and caesarean sections are available. Tackling the challenges posed by low caseloads and staffing on first-line rural care requires confronting a dilemma between coverage and quality. Reducing number of delivery sites is recommended to improve quality and equity of care. PMID:25460007

  15. Health and safety plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This HASP describes the process for identifying the requirements, written safety documentation, and procedures for protecting personnel involved in the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. Objective of this project is to place 19 former isotope production facilities at ORNL in a safe condition in anticipation of an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance.

  16. Health, United States, 2000 With Adolescent Health Chartbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Duran, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    This week, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released this major report on health in the United States. It is an electronic edition of the annual report which details a variety of health statistics, such as "birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, morbidity and health status, risk factors, use of ambulatory care and inpatient care, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and other health topics." Users can download the full text of the 450-page report by topical section or in its entirety. Additionally, the report also includes a chartbook and trend tables that may be downloaded in Excel or Lotus formats. Updated tables, the official news releases, and previous editions of the report are also available at the site.

  17. Prevalence and determinants of caesarean section in private and public health facilities in underserved South Asian communities: cross-sectional analysis of data from Bangladesh, India and Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Melissa; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Osrin, David; More, Neena Shah; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Sikorski, Catherine; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Colbourn, Tim; Houweling, Tanja A J; Seward, Nadine; Manandhar, Dharma S; Shrestha, Bhim P; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and determinants of births by caesarean section in private and public health facilities in underserved communities in South Asia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 81 community-based geographical clusters in four locations in Bangladesh, India and Nepal (three rural, one urban). Participants 45?327 births occurring in the study areas between 2005 and 2012. Outcome measures Proportion of caesarean section deliveries by location and type of facility; determinants of caesarean section delivery by location. Results Institutional delivery rates varied widely between settings, from 21% in rural India to 90% in urban India. The proportion of private and charitable facility births delivered by caesarean section was 73% in Bangladesh, 30% in rural Nepal, 18% in urban India and 5% in rural India. The odds of caesarean section were greater in private and charitable health facilities than in public facilities in three of four study locations, even when adjusted for pregnancy and delivery characteristics, maternal characteristics and year of delivery (Bangladesh: adjusted OR (AOR) 5.91, 95% CI 5.15 to 6.78; Nepal: AOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.62 to 3.44; urban India: AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.38). We found that highly educated women were particularly likely to deliver by caesarean in private facilities in urban India (AOR 2.10; 95% CI 1.61 to 2.75) and also in rural Bangladesh (AOR 11.09, 95% CI 6.28 to 19.57). Conclusions Our results lend support to the hypothesis that increased caesarean section rates in these South Asian countries may be driven in part by the private sector. They also suggest that preferences for caesarean delivery may be higher among highly educated women, and that individual-level and provider-level factors interact in driving caesarean rates higher. Rates of caesarean section in the private sector, and their maternal and neonatal health outcomes, require close monitoring. PMID:25550293

  18. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Examination of the operations and records of health...88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities...Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement... Examination of the operations and records of...

  19. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume III, facilities and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This is the third in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume M is to describe record series pertaining to facilities and equipment at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of facilities and equipment practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to facilities and equipment policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, production and materials handling, workplace and environmental monitoring, employee health, and waste management. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  20. Specifying and Testing a Multi-Dimensional Model of Publicness: An Analysis of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities

    E-print Network

    Merritt, Cullen

    2014-05-31

    abuse treatment facilities collected from the 2011 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) provides the basis for conducting a series of confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). In addition, interviews with 21 senior managers of mental...

  1. State Requirements for Educational Facilities

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    of Education, Office of Educational Facilities home page: http://www.fldoe.org/edfacil/ Florida Building CodeState Requirements for Educational Facilities 2012 Florida Department of Education Office of Educational Facilities #12;#12;State Requirements for Educational Facilities 2012 Adopted by the State Board

  2. Anthem Blue Cross/Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (P-NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 University of California

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Anthem Blue Cross/Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (P-NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 services in detail. Getting a Prescription Filled at an Anthem Blue Cross Participating Pharmacy To get the relation between drug type and your copay amount at Anthem Blue Cross participating pharmacies: FDA

  3. G: Occ Health/Paperwork/Forms/Seasonal InfluenzaVirusVaccine 9-9-11 Page 1 of 1 Seasonal Influenza Virus Vaccine 2011-2012 (INACTIVATED)

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    G: Occ Health/Paperwork/Forms/Seasonal InfluenzaVirusVaccine 9-9-11 Page 1 of 1 Seasonal Influenza Virus Vaccine 2011-2012 (INACTIVATED) This vaccine contains no preservative Please print or type Last/dd/yy) Vaccination at No Charge Vaccination for $26.00 Charge Active University Faculty/Staff Spouse/Domestic Partner

  4. Contamination of the cold water distribution system of health care facilities by Legionella pneumophila: do we know the true dimension?

    PubMed

    Arvand, M; Jungkind, K; Hack, A

    2011-01-01

    German water guidelines do not recommend routine assessment of cold water for Legionella in healthcare facilities, except if the water temperature at distal sites exceeds 25°C. This study evaluates Legionella contamination in cold and warm water supplies of healthcare facilities in Hesse, Germany, and analyses the relationship between cold water temperature and Legionella contamination. Samples were collected from four facilities, with cases of healthcare-associated Legionnaires' disease or notable contamination of their water supply. Fifty-nine samples were from central lines and 625 from distal sites, comprising 316 cold and 309 warm water samples. Legionella was isolated from central lines in two facilities and from distal sites in four facilities. 17% of all central and 32% of all distal samples were contaminated. At distal sites, cold water samples were more frequently contaminated with Legionella (40% vs 23%, p <0.001) and with higher concentrations of Legionella (?1,000 colony-forming unit/100 ml) (16% vs 6%, p<0.001) than warm water samples. There was no clear correlation between the cold water temperature at sampling time and the contamination rate. 35% of cold water samples under 20 °C at collection were contaminated. Our data highlight the importance of assessing the cold water supply of healthcare facilities for Legionella in the context of an intensified analysis. PMID:21527132

  5. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Testimony on the safety of nuclear facility workers by P. J. Bierbaum on April 22, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-22

    The testimony concerned the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) activities related to the health and safety of workers employed at nuclear facilities. Three NIOSH studies were noted, including an evaluation in progress at the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio, a study of radiation exposure at the Goodyear Atomic Corporation (GAC) in Piketon, Ohio, and a study of deaths from cancer at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine. In the first study the union representatives at the FMPC had several health and safety issues that they wanted NIOSH to evaluate. Additional requests have been made by the union at this facility in relation to reported uranium releases from the site. NIOSH recommended that all potentially exposed workers undergo bioassay testing to determine lung burdens of uranium. At GAC workers requested an evaluation because of exposure to radiation from uranium hexafluoride. Total mortality for radiation workers was significantly below that expected, including cancer deaths, even those from leukemia. Total mortality for nonradiation-exposed workers indicated an increase in the number of deaths due to leukemia. In a further study a significantly increased risk for workers whose cumulative lifetime exposure was at least 1.00 rem was noted for malignancies of the trachea, bronchus, or lung.

  6. The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST): an effectiveness study on improving newborn health and survival in rural Uganda through a community-based intervention linked to health facilities - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reducing neonatal-related deaths is one of the major bottlenecks to achieving Millennium Development Goal 4. Studies in Asia and South America have shown that neonatal mortality can be reduced through community-based interventions, but these have not been adapted to scalable intervention packages for sub-Saharan Africa where the culture, health system and policy environment is different. In Uganda, health outcomes are poor for both mothers and newborn babies. Policy opportunities for neonatal health include the new national Health Sector Strategic Plan, which now prioritizes newborn health including use of a community model through Village Health Teams (VHT). The aim of the present study is to adapt, develop and cost an integrated maternal-newborn care package that links community and facility care, and to evaluate its effect on maternal and neonatal practices in order to inform policy and scale-up in Uganda. Methods/Design Through formative research around evidence-based practices, and dialogue with policy and technical advisers, we constructed a home-based neonatal care package implemented by the responsible VHT member, effectively a Community Health Worker (CHW). This CHW was trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits - two before and three just after birth - so that linkages will be made to facility care and targeted messages for home-care and care-seeking delivered. The project is improving care in health units to provide standardized care for the mother and the newborn in both intervention and comparison areas. The study is taking place in a new Demographic Surveillance Site in two rural districts, Iganga and Mayuge, in Uganda. It is a two-arm cluster randomized controlled design with 31 intervention and 32 control areas (villages). The comparison parishes receive the standard care already being provided by the district, but to the intervention villages are added a system for CHWs to visit the mother five times in her home during pregnancy and the neonatal period. Both areas benefit from a standardized strengthening of facility care for mothers and neonates. Discussion UNEST is designed to directly feed into the operationalization of maternal and newborn care in the national VHT strategy, thereby helping to inform scale-up in rural Uganda. The study is registered as a randomized controlled trial, number ISRCTN50321130. PMID:23153395

  7. 42 CFR 124.513 - Public facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...facility compliance alternative. 124.513 Section 124.513 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume...

  8. 42 CFR 124.516 - Charitable facility compliance alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...facility compliance alternative. 124.516 Section 124.516 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume...

  9. Evaluation of prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) pack for use by the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) Pack which was developed for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). This pack will enable the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) to have ready access to advanced life support supplies and equipment for time critical responses to any situation within the Space Station Freedom. The objectives are: (1) to evaluate the design of the pack; and (2) to collect comments for revision to the design of the pack. The in-flight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic test flight to simulate weightlessness are presented.

  10. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  11. 28/05/2008 18:53Malaria parasites fine-tune offspring's gender: study | Health | Reuters Page 1 of 2http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSL2887819620080528?sp=true

    E-print Network

    Gardner, Andy

    28/05/2008 18:53Malaria parasites fine-tune offspring's gender: study | Health | Reuters Page 1 EDT Malaria parasites fine-tune offspring's gender: study powered by Sphere By Michael Kahn LONDON (Reuters) - Malaria parasites fine-tune the number of male and female offspring they produce to maximize

  12. Indian Health Service: Find Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Human Services Indian Health Service The Federal Health Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives Feedback ... Home Find Health Care Share This Page: Find Health Care IMPORTANT If you are having a health ...

  13. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Council on Education for Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Between 1945-1973, the American Public Health Association (APHA), a membership organization for public professionals, accredited graduate programs in public health. In 1974, the APHA and the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), a national association representing deans, faculty, and students of accredited schools of public health

  14. Assets for policy making in health promotion: Overcoming political barriers inhibiting women in difficult life situations to access sport facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfred Rütten; Karim Abu-Omar; Annika Frahsa; Antony Morgan

    2009-01-01

    Although the need for intersectoral policy making in health promotion has been commonplace and a high priority for several decades, there is still a lack of appropriate methods available to assess the inputs, processes, and outcomes associated with the effectiveness of such approaches, particularly in relation to sectors outside of health. This paper demonstrates how asset based models to intersectoral

  15. Facilities 2009/10 Annual Statement

    E-print Network

    Facilities 2009/10 Annual Statement Welcome to the Facilities Annual Statement Our vision (Hons) MRICS MAPM Director of Facilities Welcome to this our, 2009/10 Annual Statement which sets out In Our Work ­ Page 4 Develop Our Teams ­ Page 4 #12;2 Facilities 2009/10 Annual Statement Key Priority 1

  16. Radiological controls and worker and public health and safety: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Tew; M. E. Miles; D. Knuth; R. Boyd

    1981-01-01

    DOE has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors were reviewed by the Committee. This report was prepared to provide a measure of how the radiological control

  17. Attachment B: Accounting of Disclosures of Protected Health Information For Research Name and Address of Facility Making Disclosure

    E-print Network

    and Address of Facility Making Disclosure: Patient Name: Medical Record Number: Billing Number: Accounting, Including Date of Last Disclosure Date or Period of Disclosures: Date of Last Disclosure: Name, Address, Telephone Number of Research Sponsor to Whom PHI was Disclosed Name: Address: Phone: Name, Address

  18. Parent and Health Care Professional Perspectives on Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We on the Same Page?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellin, Melissa H.; Osteen, Philip; Heffernan, Caitlin; Levy, Judy M.; Snyder-Vogel, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    A family-centered approach to health care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) is widely acknowledged as the ideal model of service delivery, but less is known about the actual practice of family-centered care (FCC), especially from the viewpoints of parents and health care professionals. This cross-sectional research compared…

  19. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.51 Section 3.51...Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...Standards § 3.51 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for...

  20. 42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136...HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation of Facilities...Services § 136.110 Facilities construction. In addition to other...

  1. 42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136...HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation of Facilities...Services § 136.110 Facilities construction. In addition to other...

  2. 42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136...HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation of Facilities...Services § 136.110 Facilities construction. In addition to other...

  3. Please cite this article in press as: Y. Zhang, et al., The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.013

    E-print Network

    Yu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012.ijmijournal.com The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case Electronic health records (EHR) Electronic nursing documentation Interview Nursing home Residential aged care

  4. Quality of Longer Term Mental Health Facilities in Europe: Validation of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care against Service Users’ Views

    PubMed Central

    Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Wright, Christine; Taylor, Tatiana L.; Turton, Penny; Kallert, Thomas; Schuster, Mirjam; Cervilla, Jorge A.; Brangier, Paulette; Raboch, Jiri; Kalisova, Lucie; Onchev, Georgi; Alexiev, Spiridon; Mezzina, Roberto; Ridente, Pina; Wiersma, Durk; Visser, Ellen; Kiejna, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Ploumpidis, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Cardoso, Graça; King, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background The Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) is a staff rated, international toolkit that assesses care in longer term hospital and community based mental health facilities. The QuIRC was developed from review of the international literature, an international Delphi exercise with over 400 service users, practitioners, carers and advocates from ten European countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation, and review of the care standards in these countries. It can be completed in under an hour by the facility manager and has robust content validity, acceptability and inter-rater reliability. In this study, we investigated the internal validity of the QuIRC. Our aim was to identify the QuIRC domains of care that independently predicted better service user experiences of care. Method At least 20 units providing longer term care for adults with severe mental illness were recruited in each of ten European countries. Service users completed standardised measures of their experiences of care, quality of life, autonomy and the unit’s therapeutic milieu. Unit managers completed the QuIRC. Multilevel modelling allowed analysis of associations between service user ratings as dependent variables with unit QuIRC domain ratings as independent variables. Results 1750/2495 (70%) users and the managers of 213 units from across ten European countries participated. QuIRC ratings were positively associated with service users’ autonomy and experiences of care. Associations between QuIRC ratings and service users’ ratings of their quality of life and the unit’s therapeutic milieu were explained by service user characteristics (age, diagnosis and functioning). A hypothetical 10% increase in QuIRC rating resulted in a clinically meaningful improvement in autonomy. Conclusions Ratings of the quality of longer term mental health facilities made by service managers were positively associated with service users’ autonomy and experiences of care. Interventions that improve quality of care in these settings may promote service users’ autonomy. PMID:22675508

  5. Human health risk assessment of occupational and residential exposures to dechlorane plus in the manufacturing facility area in China and comparison with e-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Byer, Jonathan D; Brimble, Samantha; Pacepavicius, Grazina

    2013-02-15

    A screening level human health risk assessment based on the worst-case scenario was conducted on the occupational and residential exposures to dechlorane plus (DP) in the manufacturing facility region and an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site in China, which are two of the most polluted areas of DP in the world. Total estimated exposure doses (EEDs) via dietary intake, dermal contact, and inhalation was approximately 0.01 mg kg(-1) d(-1) for people living in the manufacturing facility region. In comparison, total EEDs (approximate 0.03 ?g kg(-1), d(-1)) were 300-fold lower in people living near an e-waste recycling site in China. Chronic oral, dermal, and inhalation reference doses (RfDs) were estimated to be 5.0, 2.0, and 0.01 mg kg(-1)d (-1), respectively. The oral RfD was markedly greater than Mirex (2×10(-4) mg kg(-1) d(-1)) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209; 7×10(-3) mg kg(-1) d(-1)), which have been or might be replaced by DP as a flame retardant with less toxicity. Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate the probability densities and functions for the hazard index which was calculated from the EEDs and RfDs to assess the human health risk. The hazard index was three orders of magnitude lower than 1, suggesting that occupational and residential exposures were relatively safe in the manufacturing facility region and e-waste recycling site. PMID:23354373

  6. Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jasim Anwar; Elias Mpofu; Lynda R Matthews; Ahmed Farah Shadoul; Kaye E Brock

    2011-01-01

    Background  The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium\\u000a Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading\\u000a causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the\\u000a most prevalent. In

  7. Assessment and documentation of non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient health care facilities in the Czech Republic: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Andrea; Leaper, David

    2015-04-01

    The foundation of health care management of patients with non-healing, chronic wounds needs accurate evaluation followed by the selection of an appropriate therapeutic strategy. Assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in clinical practice in the Czech Republic is not standardised. The aim of this study was to analyse the methods being used to assess non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient facilities in the Czech Republic. The research was carried out at 77 inpatient medical facilities (8 university/faculty hospitals, 63 hospitals and 6 long- term hospitals) across all regions of the Czech Republic. A mixed model was used for the research (participatory observation including creation of field notes and content analysis of documents for documentation and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data). The results of this research have corroborated the suspicion of inconsistencies in procedures used by general nurses for assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds. However, the situation was found to be more positive with regard to evaluation of basic/fundamental parameters of a wound (e.g. size, depth and location of a wound) compared with the evaluation of more specific parameters (e.g. exudate or signs of infection). This included not only the number of observed variables, but also the action taken. Both were significantly improved when a consultant for wound healing was present (P?=?0·047). The same applied to facilities possessing a certificate of quality issued by the Czech Wound Management Association (P?=?0·010). In conclusion, an effective strategy for wound management depends on the method and scope of the assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in place in clinical practice in observed facilities; improvement may be expected following the general introduction of a 'non-healing, chronic wound assessment' algorithm. PMID:25224308

  8. Energy management system optimization for on-site facility staff - a case history of the New York State Office of Mental Health

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdon, M.J.; Martin, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    In 1994, Novus Engineering and EME Group began a project for the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) to maximize the use and benefit of energy management systems (EMS) installed at various large psychiatric hospitals throughout New York State. The project, which was funded and managed by the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY), had three major objectives: (1) Maximize Energy Savings - Novus staff quickly learned that EMS systems as set up by contractors are far from optimal for generating energy savings. This part of the program revealed numerous opportunities for increased energy savings, such as: fine tuning proportional/integral/derivative (PID) loops to eliminate valve and damper hunting; adjusting temperature reset schedules to reduce energy consumption and provide more uniform temperature conditions throughout the facilities; and modifying equipment schedules. (2) Develop Monitoring Protocols - Large EMS systems are so complex that they require a systematic approach to daily, monthly and seasonal monitoring of building system conditions in order to locate system problems before they turn into trouble calls or equipment failures. In order to assist local facility staff in their monitoring efforts, Novus prepared user-friendly handbooks on each EMS. These included monitoring protocols tailored to each facility. (3) Provide Staff Training - When a new EMS is installed at a facility, it is frequently the maintenance staffs first exposure to a complex computerized system. Without proper training in what to look for, staff use of the EMS is generally very limited. With proper training, staff can be taught to take a pro-active approach to identify and solve problems before they get out of hand. The staff then realize that the EMS is a powerful preventative maintenance tool that can be used to make their work more effective and efficient. Case histories are presented.

  9. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 17 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-002

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    : undesired event resulting in death, ill health, injury, damage or other loss. Occupational Health & Safety-existing condition, but does not include stress other than stress that is an acute reaction to a sudden

  10. Evaluation of an oral health education program for nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, G; Fridlund, B; Holmén, A; Nederfors, T

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of an oral health education program (OHEP) on attitudes among the responsible nursing personnel toward performing oral health procedures for care receivers. A total of 2882 nursing personnel were offered participation in the OHEP, and the effect was evaluated by means of a questionnaire distributed pre-educationally as well as 1-2 months post-educationally. The nursing personnel were allocated, on the basis of nursing education, to either a "high level of health care education" group (HHCE), including registered and enrolled nurses, or a "low level of health care education" group (LHCE), including nursing assistants and home care aides. Statistical analysis was performed by means of descriptive and analytical statistics. After the OHEP, the nursing personnel estimated their ability to perform oral hygiene procedures for care receivers to be significantly increased. Post-educationally, a significant shift in importance was observed from knowledge regarding the diseased oral cavity to knowledge regarding the healthy oral cavity. It was also observed that, in the LHCE group, the OHEP favored practical procedures, while in the HHCE group, theoretical considerations were favored. This indicates that, when oral health education programs are designed, due attention should be paid to the nursing personnel's education level. PMID:10483451

  11. OHS 11-119 *Reference Health & Safety Requirements for Minors in Laboratories at Stanford University for additional guidance: Page 1

    E-print Network

    facilities, and research projects. 2.Cutting Edge of Human Anatomy and Surgical. Program Participants Activities 1.Clinical Anatomy Research Scholars (CARS) Host: School of Medicine Contact: anatomy@stanford.edu Website: http://anatomy

  12. Health, United States, 2012 With Urban and Rural Health Chartbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eberhardt, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Released Monday, this large statistical report presents data on the nation's health in 460 pages, including birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and much more. This is the 25th annual report of its kind (see the July 28, 2000 Scout Report for a review of 2000's report), and this year is the first to give statistics on health status relative to level of urbanization, finding that suburban Americans "fare significantly better in many key health measures than those who live in the most rural and most urban areas." The report is available in its entirety or by section in .pdf format, and trendtables are available in Lotus or Excel formats.

  13. The Utah Beacon Experience: Integrating Quality Improvement, Health Information Technology, and Practice Facilitation to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Small Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Tennison, Janet; Rajeev, Deepthi; Woolsey, Sarah; Black, Jeff; Oostema, Steven J.; North, Christie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Utah Improving Care through Connectivity and Collaboration (IC3) Beacon community (2010–2013) was spearheaded by HealthInsight, a nonprofit, community-based organization. One of the main objectives of IC3 was to improve health care provided to patients with diabetes in three Utah counties, collaborating with 21 independent smaller clinics and two large health care enterprises. This paper will focus on the use of health information technology (HIT) and practice facilitation to develop and implement new care processes to improve clinic workflow and ultimately improve patients’ diabetes outcomes at 21 participating smaller, independent clinics. Innovation: Early in the project, we learned that most of the 21 clinics did not have the resources needed to successfully implement quality improvement (QI) initiatives. IC3 helped clinics effectively use data generated from their electronic health records (EHRs) to design and implement interventions to improve patients’ diabetes outcomes. This close coupling of HIT, expert practice facilitation, and Learning Collaboratives was found to be especially valuable in clinics with limited resources. Findings: Through this process we learned that (1) an extensive readiness assessment improved clinic retention, (2) clinic champions were important for a successful collaboration, and (3) current EHR systems have limited functionality to assist in QI initiatives. In general, smaller, independent clinics lack knowledge and experience with QI and have limited HIT experience to improve patient care using electronic clinical data. Additionally, future projects like IC3 Beacon will be instrumental in changing clinic culture so that QI is integrated into routine workflow. Conclusion and Discussion: Our efforts led to significant changes in how practice staff optimized their EHRs to manage and improve diabetes care, while establishing the framework for sustainability. Some of the IC3 Beacon practices are currently smoothly transitioning to new models of care such as Patient-Centered Medical Homes. Thus, IC3 Beacon has been instrumental in creating a strong community partnership among various organizations to meet the shared vision of better health and lower costs, and the experience over the last few years has helped the community prepare for the changing health care landscape. PMID:25848624

  14. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care What is Home Health Care? How Do I ... More About Home Health Care? What is Home Health Care? Home health care helps seniors live independently for ...

  15. Analysis of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems for Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neglia

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary analysis and comparison of various environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems required of, or suggested for use by, the Departrnent of Energy Defense Programs` sites. The summary analysis is provided by means of a comparison matrix, a set of Vean diagrams that highlights the focus of the systems, and

  16. Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses. Also: Wraparound Milwaukee Program: Suicide Prevention in Juvenile Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juvenile Justice, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue of Juvenile Justice presents three main articles. "Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses" (J. J. Cocozza and K. Skowyra) discusses tragic mass homicides by juveniles, documented cases of neglect and inadequate services, and federal policy focusing on providing systems of care for at-risk juveniles that have…

  17. Recent changes in human resources for health and health facilities at the district level in Indonesia: evidence from 3 districts in Java

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Heywood; Nida P Harahap; Siska Aryani

    2011-01-01

    Background  There is continuing discussion in Indonesia about the need for improved information on human resources for health at the district\\u000a level where programs are actually delivered. This is particularly the case after a central government decision to offer doctors,\\u000a nurses and midwives on contract the chance to convert to permanent civil service status. Our objective here is to report changes

  18. Impact of an electronic clinical decision support system on workflow in antenatal care: the QUALMAT eCDSS in rural health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Nathan; Sukums, Felix; Awine, Timothy; Meid, Andreas; Williams, John; Akweongo, Patricia; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E.; Blank, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background The implementation of new technology can interrupt established workflows in health care settings. The Quality of Maternal Care (QUALMAT) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (eCDSS) for antenatal care (ANC) and delivery in rural primary health care facilities in Africa. Objective This study was carried out to investigate the influence of the QUALMAT eCDSS on the workflow of health care workers in rural primary health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania. Design A direct observation, time-and-motion study on ANC processes was conducted using a structured data sheet with predefined major task categories. The duration and sequence of tasks performed during ANC visits were observed, and changes after the implementation of the eCDSS were analyzed. Results In 24 QUALMAT study sites, 214 observations of ANC visits (144 in Ghana, 70 in Tanzania) were carried out at baseline and 148 observations (104 in Ghana, 44 in Tanzania) after the software was implemented in 12 of those sites. The median time spent combined for all centers in both countries to provide ANC at baseline was 6.5 min [interquartile range (IQR) =4.0–10.6]. Although the time spent on ANC increased in Tanzania and Ghana after the eCDSS implementation as compared to baseline, overall there was no significant increase in time used for ANC activities (0.51 min, p=0.06 in Ghana; and 0.54 min, p=0.26 in Tanzania) as compared to the control sites without the eCDSS. The percentage of medical history taking in women who had subsequent examinations increased after eCDSS implementation from 58.2% (39/67) to 95.3% (61/64) p<0.001 in Ghana but not in Tanzania [from 65.4% (17/26) to 71.4% (15/21) p=0.70]. Conclusions The QUALMAT eCDSS does not increase the time needed for ANC but partly streamlined workflow at sites in Ghana, showing the potential of such a system to influence quality of care positively. PMID:25630707

  19. Reported Sexual Violence among Women and Children Seen at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Rural Tertiary Health Facility, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ashimi, AO; Amole, TG; Ugwa, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various forms of sexual violence including: Coerced marriage or wife inheritance, female genital mutilation, forced exposure to pornography, rape by intimate partner or strangers, unwanted sexual advances, and sexual abuse occurs, especially in vulnerable groups. However, most of these cases are not reported. Aim: The aim was to review reported cases in the facility, determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective longitudinal study undertaken at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Health Facility in a rural setting Northwest Nigeria. A study of survivors of alleged sexual violence who presented to the hospital from the September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2013. Results: During the study period, there were 24 cases of sexual violence (22 were alleged rape and 2 were others) of 973 gynecological consultations at the emergency unit, giving a prevalence of 3% (24/973) for sexual violence and 2.3% (22/973) for alleged rape. Majority 91.7% (22/24) of the cases were children < 16 years; 45.8% (11/24) had no formal education while 33.3% (8/24) hawked homemade drinks and snacks. The assailants were known in 83.3% (20/24) of the cases; of which 45.8% (11/24) were neighbors, 29.2% (7/24) were buyers of snacks and drinks while 8.3% (2/24) were family members. Conclusion: The prevalence of reported sexual violence in this facility was low with the majority of the survivors being children and nonstranger assailants’, mostly neighbors. PMID:25745572

  20. Educational facilities and financial assistance for graduate students in psychology: 1964-65

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherman Ross; Jacqueline J. Harmon

    1963-01-01

    A table 5 pages in length summarizes requirements for admission to graduate programs in psychology. Information is also descriptively summarized on facilities, tuition, financial assistance for graduate students (fellowships, scholarships, assistantships, stipends), sex preferred, the existence of VA programs, US Public Health Service stipends, and other data concerning institutions providing graduate work in psychology.

  1. Comparison of activities of daily living after osteoporotic hip fracture surgery in patients admitted from home and from geriatric health service facilities

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Akira; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi; Kodama, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    With the population and proportion of the elderly increasing each year, difficulties with postoperative treatment outcomes after osteoporotic hip fracture are increasing. This study focused on activities of daily living (ADL) in patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture through an investigation of living arrangements, the presence of dementia, and other complications of aging. Information from 99 patients who lived either at home or in geriatric health service facilities was collected for this trial. Most patients were over 65 years of age and female, and about half of them had dementia. The postoperative ADL score (focusing on patients’ walking ability) was significant for those living at home than for those living in facilities. In addition, patients with dementia were divided into the following two categories: an early-rising group, comprising patients who were able to use a wheelchair within 48 hours of their operation; and a late-rising group, who did not start using a wheelchair until more than 48 hours after surgery. The ADL scores for the two groups were compared. Although the preoperative ADL scores were not significantly different between the two groups, postoperative ADL scores were significantly higher in the early-rising group than in the late-rising group, especially in patients who had undergone hemiarthroplasty. These data suggest that ADL in dementia patients following hip fracture depends on the surgical procedure performed and whether they are late or early risers after surgery. PMID:25378917

  2. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.4 Use of Library facilities. (a) General. The Library facilities are available to any person...

  3. Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Women's Health Share Compartir Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips Having ... and Teens Chronic Disease Prevention Family History National Women's Health Information Center (HHS) Top of Page Print page ...

  4. FDA Kids' Home Page

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training and Continuing Education Inspections/Compliance State & Local Officials Consumers Industry Health Professionals FDA Archive Links on this page:

  5. The electronic version is the official version of this policy. Page 1 of 4 Occupational Health and Safety Policy

    E-print Network

    Habib, Ayman

    the Occupational Health and Safety Management System and includes all components (e.g. procedures, instructions and Safety Policy Classification Health, Safety & Environment Table of Contents Purpose 1 Scope 2 Definitions 3 Policy Statement 4 Responsibilities 5 Related Policies 6 Related Procedures 7 Related Information

  6. Health, United States, 2012: Men's Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NCHS Home Publications & Information Products Health, United States Health, United States, 2014 Users with Internet Explorer may ... the file to your desktop before opening. Men's Health On this Page Access and utilization of health ...

  7. Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

  8. P:\\Policy & Procedures\\EHS\\EH&S#11-firealarmresponse.doc Page 1 of 2 Environmental Health & Safety

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    . ACTION FACILITIES PLANNING Ensure fire alarm systems are carefully designed, installed and commissioned and reliability of the fire alarm systems. Audit records to ensure all alarm aspects are maintained as required to the University Community. PHYSICAL PLANT/HOUSING Maintain or oversee the maintenance of the fire alarm system

  9. Characteristics and treatment outcomes of tuberculosis patients who “transfer-in” to health facilities in Harare City, Zimbabwe: a descriptive cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Zimbabwe is among the 22 Tuberculosis (TB) high burden countries worldwide and runs a well-established, standardized recording and reporting system on case finding and treatment outcomes. During TB treatment, patients transfer-out and transfer-in to different health facilities, but there are few data from any national TB programmes about whether this process happens and if so to what extent. The aim of this study therefore was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of TB patients that transferred into Harare City health department clinics under the national TB programme. Specific objectives were to determine i) the proportion of a cohort of TB patients registered as transfer-in, ii) the characteristics and treatment outcomes of these transfer-in patients and iii) whether their treatment outcomes had been communicated back to their respective referral districts after completion of TB treatment. Methods Data were abstracted from patient files and district TB registers for all transfer-in TB patients registered from January to December 2010 within Harare City. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results Of the 7,742 registered TB patients in 2010, 263 (3.5%) had transferred-in: 148 (56%) were males and overall median age was 33 years (IQR, 26–40). Most transfer-in patients (74%) came during the intensive phase of TB treatment, and 58% were from rural health-facilities. Of 176 patients with complete data on the time period between transfer-in and transfer-out, only 85 (48%) arrived for registration in Harare from referral districts within 1 week of being transferred-out. Transfer-in patients had 69% treatment success, but in 21% treatment outcome status was not evaluated. Overall, 3/212 (1.4%) transfer-in TB patients had their TB treatment outcomes reported back to their referral districts. Conclusion There is need to devise better strategies of following up TB patients to their referral Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) centres from TB diagnosing centres to ensure that they arrive promptly and on time. Recording and reporting of information must improve and this can be done through training and supervision. Use of mobile phones and other technology to communicate TB treatment outcomes back to the referral districts would seem the obvious way to move forward on these issues. PMID:23150928

  10. Advanced Bio-Imaging for Nanomaterial Environmental Health and Safety: Post-Event Summary The NNIN-Nano Research Facility at Washington University in St. Louis held a short course, Advanced

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Advanced Bio-Imaging for Nanomaterial Environmental Health and Safety: Post-Event Summary The NNIN-Nano Research Facility at Washington University in St. Louis held a short course, Advanced Bio the applications and technical requirements of electron microscopy for nano-bio- imaging. An introductory lecture

  11. File: How to Meet the Health Check Secure Remote Access Page 1 of 7 January 2013 Security Requirements

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    .....................................................................................................................................................1 Anti-Virus Protection: Symantec Endpoint Protection is the University's recommended and officially supported anti-virus solution.....................................................................................................................................................................................................6 Appendix: Anti-virus Tools (Products and Versions) Compatible with the Health Check

  12. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  13. Overview of Dose Assessment Developments and the Health of Riverside Residents Close to the “Mayak” PA Facilities, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Standring, William J.F.; Dowdall, Mark; Strand, Per

    2009-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) has been involved in studies related to the Mayak PA and the consequences of activities undertaken at the site for a number of years. This paper strives to present an overview of past and present activities at the Mayak PA and subsequent developments in the quantification of health effects on local populations caused by discharges of radioactive waste into the Techa River. Assessments of doses to affected populations have relied on the development of dose reconstruction techniques for both external and internal doses. Contamination levels are typically inhomogeneous and decrease with increasing distance from the discharge point. Citations made in this paper give a comprehensive, though not exhaustive, basis for further reading about this topic. PMID:19440276

  14. Distribution and health risk assessment of some organic and inorganic substances in a petroleum facility in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Serrano, R. M.; Torres, L. G.; Flores, C.; Castro, A.; Iturbe, R.

    An oil distribution and storage station was subjected to an Environmental Auditory and results showed soil contamination in part of the surface. An assessment of the site was required in order to fulfill a complete characterization of the contaminants present in soil and groundwater, as well as to establish the probable sources of contamination. Besides, a health risk assessment was performed to set remediation goals. The aim of this work is to show how the entire characterization and risk assessment process performed in this storage station from central Mexico, regarding to subsoil and groundwater. Thirty sample points were examined. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations in soil were in a very low range (20-268 mg/kg). Ethylbenzene, methyl tert-butyl ether, tert-amyl methyl ether, and lead were identified in one sampling point. Iron and zinc were found in all soil samples. There was no correlation between total petroleum hydrocarbons and any of the metals or between both metals. Only two out of four monitoring wells showed total petroleum hydrocarbons levels (1.4 and 66 mg/L, respectively). Regarding lead, all four monitored wells showed lead concentrations (0.043-0.15 mg/L). Results suggested that metal concentrations were not associated to petroleum contamination, but to iron scrap deposits placed over the soil; nevertheless more data is needed to make a clear conclusion. Health risk assessment showed that none of the evaluated contaminants represented a risk either for the on-site or the off-site receptors, since the hazardous quotients estimated did not exceed the acceptable values.

  15. 18/03/2010 11:46IRIN Global | GLOBAL: Is humanitarianism genetic? | Asia East Africa ...Zambia Zimbabwe | In Brief Health & Nutrition Aid Policy | News Item Page 1 of 2http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=88437

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    Zimbabwe | In Brief Health & Nutrition Aid Policy | News Item Page 1 of 2http: Is humanitarianism genetic? | Asia East Africa ...Zambia Zimbabwe | In Brief Health & Nutrition Aid Policy | News Français PlusNews Film & TV Photo Radio free subscription Mobile humanitarian news and analysis a project

  16. 17/03/2010 16:03IRIN Global | GLOBAL: Is humanitarianism genetic? | Asia East Africa ...Zambia Zimbabwe | In Brief Health & Nutrition Aid Policy | News Item Page 1 of 2http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=88437

    E-print Network

    Gardner, Andy

    Zimbabwe | In Brief Health & Nutrition Aid Policy | News Item Page 1 of 2http: Is humanitarianism genetic? | Asia East Africa ...Zambia Zimbabwe | In Brief Health & Nutrition Aid Policy | News Français PlusNews Film & TV Photo Radio free subscription Mobile humanitarian news and analysis a project

  17. QUALITY OF LIFE IN A SAMPLE OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS ATTENDING PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES IN AL-KHOBAR, SAUDI ARABIA

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Mohammed S.; Taha, Attia Z.; Ahmad, Bahnassy; Khalil, Mohammed S.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in Saudi Arabia. It is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and a major reason for visits to clinic and prescription of medications. Inspite of this, the degree of its control is not to the optimum. This could be due to its impact on patients’ quality of life (QOL). Impaired physical and psychological well-being may lead to non-compliance or even the withdrawal of treatment . The aim of this study was to assess QOL of hypertensive patients registered in Al-Khobar. Methods: The QOL of hypertensive patients was compared with QOL of a control group. A total of 404 subjects (202 cases and 202 controls) were interviewed. The cases and controls were matched for age and sex. Patients’ self-assessment of QOL was measured with an Arabic version of SF-36, a 36-item Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire encompassing two main dimensions, physical and mental. Results: The QOL of hypertensive patients was substantially impaired in comparison to the control group. The mean scores for the physical component summary scale (PCS) were 39.3 and 50.8 for cases and controls respectively. The mean scores for the mental component summary scale (MCS) were 43.7 and 50.8 for cases and controls respectively. The burden of hypertension was concentrated in the physical dimension of health. Older age, female gender, unmarried patients, patients with hypertension complications, comorbid DM, use of Aldomet and shorter duration of hypertension were independently related to poorer QOL. The variability of the two summary measures explained by selected demographic and clinical characteristics was 24.3% and 10% for the PCS and MCS respectively. Conclusions and recommendations: The QOL of hypertensive patients was substantially impaired in comparison to the control group. Notably, the total explained variation of QOL by the selected characteristics was small, suggesting that the determinants of QOL are multi-factorial. Further research to explore the determinants and indices of QOL in hypertensive patients is warranted. From a clinical perspective, QOL should be considered in the monitoring of hypertensive patients to estimate the burden of hypertension and monitor their outcome. PMID:23008659

  18. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Health Care Survey (NHCS) encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  19. Acceptability and Use of Portable Drinking Water and Hand Washing Stations in Health Care Facilities and Their Impact on Patient Hygiene Practices, Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Ronald; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H.

    2015-01-01

    Many health care facilities (HCF) in developing countries lack access to reliable hand washing stations and safe drinking water. To address this problem, we installed portable, low-cost hand washing stations (HWS) and drinking water stations (DWS), and trained healthcare workers (HCW) on hand hygiene, safe drinking water, and patient education techniques at 200 rural HCFs lacking a reliable water supply in western Kenya. We performed a survey at baseline and a follow-up evaluation at 15 months to assess the impact of the intervention at a random sample of 40 HCFs and 391 households nearest to these HCFs. From baseline to follow-up, there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of dispensaries with access to HWSs with soap (42% vs. 77%, p<0.01) and access to safe drinking water (6% vs. 55%, p<0.01). Female heads of household in the HCF catchment area exhibited statistically significant increases from baseline to follow-up in the ability to state target times for hand washing (10% vs. 35%, p<0.01), perform all four hand washing steps correctly (32% vs. 43%, p = 0.01), and report treatment of stored drinking water using any method (73% vs. 92%, p<0.01); the percentage of households with detectable free residual chlorine in stored drinking water did not change (6%, vs. 8%, p = 0.14). The installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs without access to 24-hour piped water helped assure that health workers had a place to wash their hands and provide safe drinking water. This HCF intervention may have also contributed to the improvement of hand hygiene and reported safe drinking water behaviors among households nearest to HCFs. PMID:25961293

  20. Acceptability and use of portable drinking water and hand washing stations in health care facilities and their impact on patient hygiene practices, Western kenya.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sarah D; Otieno, Ronald; Ayers, Tracy L; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H; Quick, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Many health care facilities (HCF) in developing countries lack access to reliable hand washing stations and safe drinking water. To address this problem, we installed portable, low-cost hand washing stations (HWS) and drinking water stations (DWS), and trained healthcare workers (HCW) on hand hygiene, safe drinking water, and patient education techniques at 200 rural HCFs lacking a reliable water supply in western Kenya. We performed a survey at baseline and a follow-up evaluation at 15 months to assess the impact of the intervention at a random sample of 40 HCFs and 391 households nearest to these HCFs. From baseline to follow-up, there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of dispensaries with access to HWSs with soap (42% vs. 77%, p<0.01) and access to safe drinking water (6% vs. 55%, p<0.01). Female heads of household in the HCF catchment area exhibited statistically significant increases from baseline to follow-up in the ability to state target times for hand washing (10% vs. 35%, p<0.01), perform all four hand washing steps correctly (32% vs. 43%, p = 0.01), and report treatment of stored drinking water using any method (73% vs. 92%, p<0.01); the percentage of households with detectable free residual chlorine in stored drinking water did not change (6%, vs. 8%, p = 0.14). The installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs without access to 24-hour piped water helped assure that health workers had a place to wash their hands and provide safe drinking water. This HCF intervention may have also contributed to the improvement of hand hygiene and reported safe drinking water behaviors among households nearest to HCFs. PMID:25961293

  1. P:\\Policy & Procedures\\EHS\\EH&S#2-firedalarmaccess.doc Page 1 of 1 Environmental Health & Safety

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Policy & Procedure #2 TITLE: FIRE ALARM SYSTEM ACCESS POLICY OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE: Environmental Health Fire Alarm System Log indicating when licensed contractors or vendors sign in and out when performing and Safety establishes this procedure to ensure security of the Fire Alarm Control Panels (FACP

  2. CULC General Regulations, Appendix 2 Version 2010, Page 1 of 2 Appendix 2 Health and safety: student responsibilities

    E-print Network

    Low, Robert

    and healthy environment for all students when on campus. CULC will take all reasonable steps to achieve a responsibility to take reasonable care of the health and safety of themselves and others by their acts an indication of the type of areas students are prohibited from entering. If in doubt students should seek

  3. Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 7 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-008

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    to cause a lost-time injury or occupational disease. There are two major categories of hazards ­ health, viruses, blood borne pathogens, fungus and molds, and parasites 3.3 Physical hazards noise, temperature Confined spaces - places not intended for human occupancy such as places with restricted entry or exit

  4. 42 CFR 124.517 - Unrestricted availability compliance alternative for Title VI-assisted facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Title VI-assisted facilities. 124.517 Section 124.517 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume...

  5. 42 CFR 124.708 - Waiver of recovery-good cause for other use of facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...for other use of facility. 124.708 Section 124.708 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Recovery of Grant...

  6. Donor blood procurement and the risk of transfusion transmissible viral infections in a tertiary health facility in South-South Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nwogoh, Benedict; Ikpomwen, O. D.; Isoa, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Blood and blood products are scarce commodities. The demand often outweighs the supply. This study is directed at investigating the blood procurement sources and the risk of viral transfusion transmissible infection. Materials and Methods: The records of the blood transfusion unit of a tertiary health facility in south-south Nigeria were studied. The procurement and screening records from 1 January to 31 December 2009 were analyzed. Results: 7,552 donor records were analyzed, 6,931 were commercial donor and 621 replacement donors. 891 commercial donors were infected, 500 (7.2%) were HIV positive, 323 (4.7%) HBV positive, 42 (0.6%) had HIV and HBV co-infection, while 28 (0.4%) were HCV positive. Twenty-three replacement donors were infected, 16 (2.6%) were HIV positive, 6 (1%) were HBV positive, while 1 (0.2%) were HCV positive. None of the replacement donors had co-infection. The risk of infection was significantly higher with commercial donor procurement (X2=45.07, P<0.001, OD=3.845). Conclusion: Commercial blood donors are still the major source of blood to the hospital and they also have the highest prevalence of transfusion transmissible viral infections in this region thus constitute a major risk transmitting infections to potential recipients. PMID:22529503

  7. Expediting support for the pregnant mothers to obtain antenatal care at public health facilities in rural areas of Balochistan province, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffar, Abdul; Pongpanich, Sathirakorn; Ghaffar, Najma; Chapman, Robert Sedgwick; Mureed, Sheh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify, and compare relative importance of, factors associated with antenatal care (ANC) utilization in rural Balochistan, toward framing a policy to increase such utilization. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted among 513 pregnant women in Jhal Magsi District, Balochistan, in 2011. A standardized interviewer-administered questionnaire was used. Predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors were evaluated with generalized linear models (Poisson distribution and log link). Results: Prevalence of any ANC was only 14.4%. Predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors were all important determinants of ANC utilization. Reinforcing factors were clearly most important, husband’s support for ANC was more important than support from other community members. Among predisposing factors, higher income, education, occupation, and better knowledge regarding benefits of ANC were positively and statistically significantly associated with ANC However increased number of children showed negative association. Complications free pregnancy showed positive significant association with ANC at public health facility among enabling factors. Conclusion: It is very important to increase antenatal care utilization in the study area and similar areas. Policy to achieve this should focus on enhancing support from the husband.

  8. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  9. Safe design of healthcare facilities

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, J

    2006-01-01

    The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety?driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety?driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety. PMID:17142606

  10. NIEHS Kids Pages

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Kids Pages teach children about the connections between their health and the environment. The site encourages children to pursue careers in health, science, and the environment; explains the mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; and assists children in learning to read and master challenging mathematics and science. It offers games and activities, a story time section, information on environmental health and science topics and careers, sing-along songs and a 'Guess this Tune' game, coloring pages, brainteasers and riddles, and jokes. This is available in Spanish as well.

  11. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

  12. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

  13. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

  14. Health.

    PubMed Central

    Hare, R M

    1986-01-01

    Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment is then suggested, and used to shed light on some problems about mental illness and to compare and contrast it with physical illness and with political and other deviancies which are not illnesses. PMID:3806628

  15. Implementation Research to Inform the Use of Xpert MTB/RIF in Primary Health Care Facilities in High TB and HIV Settings in Resource Constrained Settings

    PubMed Central

    Muyoyeta, Monde; Moyo, Maureen; Kasese, Nkatya; Ndhlovu, Mapopa; Milimo, Deborah; Mwanza, Winfridah; Kapata, Nathan; Schaap, Albertus; Godfrey Faussett, Peter; Ayles, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background The current cost of Xpert MTB RIF (Xpert) consumables is such that algorithms are needed to select which patients to prioritise for testing with Xpert. Objective To evaluate two algorithms for prioritisation of Xpert in primary health care settings in a high TB and HIV burden setting. Method Consecutive, presumptive TB patients with a cough of any duration were offered either Xpert or Fluorescence microscopy (FM) test depending on their CXR score or HIV status. In one facility, sputa from patients with an abnormal CXR were tested with Xpert and those with a normal CXR were tested with FM (“CXR algorithm”). CXR was scored automatically using a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) program. In the other facility, patients who were HIV positive were tested using Xpert and those who were HIV negative were tested with FM (“HIV algorithm”). Results Of 9482 individuals pre-screened with CXR, Xpert detected TB in 2090/6568 (31.8%) with an abnormal CXR, and FM was AFB positive in 8/2455 (0.3%) with a normal CXR. Of 4444 pre-screened with HIV, Xpert detected TB in 508/2265 (22.4%) HIV positive and FM was AFB positive in 212/1920 (11.0%) in HIV negative individuals. The notification rate of new bacteriologically confirmed TB increased; from 366 to 620/ 100,000/yr and from 145 to 261/100,000/yr at the CXR and HIV algorithm sites respectively. The median time to starting TB treatment at the CXR site compared to the HIV algorithm site was; 1(IQR 1-3 days) and 3 (2-5 days) (p<0.0001) respectively. Conclusion Use of Xpert in a resource-limited setting at primary care level in conjunction with pre-screening tests reduced the number of Xpert tests performed. The routine use of Xpert resulted in additional cases of confirmed TB patients starting treatment. However, there was no increase in absolute numbers of patients starting TB treatment. Same day diagnosis and treatment commencement was achieved for both bacteriologically confirmed and empirically diagnosed patients where Xpert was used in conjunction with CXR. PMID:26030301

  16. Public Health Resources: State Health Departments

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Mortality Weekly Report ( MMWR ) Share Compartir Public Health Resources: State or Territorial Health Departments Click on a region above or choose a state or territorial to go to its health department's site: Print page MMWR RSS Feeds Listen ...

  17. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--U.S. 2013

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health LGBT Health Disability & Health Tribal Support CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report (CHDIR) On this Page CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report 2013 Introduction The 2013 Report Disparities Analytics ...

  18. 9 CFR 3.76 - Indoor housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Indoor housing facilities. 3.76...Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...Operating Standards § 3.76 Indoor housing facilities. (a...cooling, and temperature. Indoor housing facilities...

  19. 45 CFR 158.501 - Access to facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH...premises, facilities and records, including computer and other electronic systems, to...the facilities and records, including computer and other electronic systems,...

  20. 45 CFR 158.501 - Access to facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH...premises, facilities and records, including computer and other electronic systems, to...the facilities and records, including computer and other electronic systems,...

  1. 45 CFR 158.501 - Access to facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH...premises, facilities and records, including computer and other electronic systems, to...the facilities and records, including computer and other electronic systems,...

  2. 45 CFR 3.41 - Admission to facilities or grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...facilities or grounds. 3.41 Section 3.41 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds §...

  3. 45 CFR 3.41 - Admission to facilities or grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...facilities or grounds. 3.41 Section 3.41 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds §...

  4. 45 CFR 3.41 - Admission to facilities or grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...facilities or grounds. 3.41 Section 3.41 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds §...

  5. 45 CFR 3.41 - Admission to facilities or grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...facilities or grounds. 3.41 Section 3.41 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds §...

  6. 45 CFR 3.41 - Admission to facilities or grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...facilities or grounds. 3.41 Section 3.41 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds §...

  7. 42 CFR 417.482 - Access to facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Contract Requirements...482 Access to facilities and records. The contract must...

  8. Suicide Prevention in Juvenile Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Lindsay M.

    2000-01-01

    Youth suicide is recognized as a serious public health problem, but suicide within juvenile facilities has not received comparable attention, and the extent and nature of these deaths remain unknown. This article utilizes an example of a young man in a juvenile justice facility who succeeded in committing suicide to illustrate these points.…

  9. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    the steps required to gain access to the facility, the proper method for entering the facility2 Suite is locked at all times. All Research personnel must receive appropriate training, health taking shower. 2. Ensure soap, shampoo, towels and clean clothes are provided in lockers. 3. If shower

  10. Health Service Areas used in SEER*Stat

    Cancer.gov

    Health Service AreaPage ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17 excl AK)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 13)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 9)Page ofHSA # (NCI Modified) Health Service Area (NCI Modified) Description State-county FIPS Butler,

  11. Normalization and mental health support: a comparative study on day-activity facilities for people with mental disabilities in Japan and Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bengt G. Eriksson; Shinji Ishida; Masahiro Ishibashi; Masahiro Iwakiri; Kirsti Kuusela; Masaaki Nimonji

    2012-01-01

    In many countries, including Japan and Sweden, societal help and support for people with mental disabilities have been reformed, with the aim of achieving a more normalized life and closer integration in the local community for this group. Day-activity facilities may be one tool for such a transition. In this article, three day-activity facilities in Japan and Sweden respectively are

  12. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 2Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College

  13. Do loss to follow-up and death rates from ART care vary across primary health care facilities and hospitals in south Ethiopia? A retrospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Teshome, Wondu; Belayneh, Mehretu; Moges, Mathewos; Mekonnen, Emebet; Endrias, Misganu; Ayele, Sinafiksh; Misganaw, Tebeje; Shiferaw, Mekonnen; Tesema, Tigist

    2015-01-01

    Background Decentralization and task shifting has significantly improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Many studies conducted to determine the attrition rate in Ethiopia have not compared attrition rates between hospitals and health centers in a relatively recent cohort of patients. This study compared death and loss to follow-up (LTFU) rates among ART patients in hospitals and health centers in south Ethiopia. Methods Data routinely collected from patients aged older than 15 years who started ART between July 2011 and August 2012 in 20 selected health facilities (12 being hospitals) were analyzed. The outcomes of interest were LTFU and death. The data were entered, cleaned, and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0 and Stata version 12.0. Competing-risk regression models were used. Results The service years of the facilities were similar (median 8 and 7.5 for hospitals and health centers, respectively). The mean patient age was 33.7±9.6 years. The median baseline CD4 count was 179 (interquartile range 93–263) cells/mm3. A total of 2,356 person-years of observation were made with a median follow-up duration of 28 (interquartile range 22–31) months; 24.6% were either dead or LTFU, resulting in a retention rate of 75.4%. The death rates were 3.0 and 1.5 and the LTFU rate were 9.0 and 10.9 per 100 person-years of observation in health centers and hospitals, respectively. The competing-risk regression model showed that the gap between testing and initiation of ART, body mass index, World Health Organization clinical stage, isoniazid prophylaxis, age, facility type, and educational status were independently associated with LTFU. Moreover, baseline tuberculous disease, poor functional status, and follow-up at a health center were associated with an elevated probability of death. Conclusion We observed a higher death rate and a lower LTFU rate in health centers than in hospitals. Most of the associated variables were also previously documented. Higher LTFU was noticed for patients with a smaller gap between testing and initiation of treatment. PMID:26064071

  14. Communicating advance directives from long-term care facilities to emergency departments 1 1 Administration of Emergency Medicine is coordinated by Eugene Kercher, md, of Kern Medical Center, Bakersfield, California and Richard F. Salluzzo, md, of Conemaugh Meridian Health Group, Johnstown, Pennsylvania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Merril A Pauls; Peter A Singer; Isser Dubinsky

    2001-01-01

    Many residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities are transferred to Emergency Departments without advance directives (AD). The goal of this study was to describe an ideal model for the transfer of AD from LTC facilities to Emergency Departments. Health care providers were asked to describe their ideal model for the completion and transfer of the ADs of LTC residents. A

  15. JAMA Patient Page: Malaria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE Malaria M alaria is a potentially deadly disease caused ... the parasite. According to the World Health Organization, malaria is present in more than 100 countries—mostly ...

  16. Wellness, Health & Counseling Services

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Center Anteater Recreation Center Counseling Center Disability Services Center Health Education Center through participatory sports and fitness programs and services Facilities: · Anteater Recreation Center

  17. Page 1 of 7 DATE_________________

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    (07) Page 1 of 7 DATE_________________ UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI INITIAL ATHLETIC HEALTH APPRAISAL/Convulsion/Seizure ___ ___ ___ Recurrent Headaches ___ ___ ___ Concussion ___ ___ ___ Confusion from an injury ___ ___ ___ Loss of memory

  18. Environmental Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    Environmental Health and Safety Approved by Document No. Version Date Replaces Page EHS EHS). 1. INTRODUCTION I was informed of McGill's Health & Safety Policies, including: Laboratory Responsibilities Health & Safety Internal Responsibility System Personal Protective Equipment Policy Accident

  19. Health Insurance Data

    MedlinePLUS

    ... See what's coming up in releases and reports. Health Insurance Skip top of page navigation Census.gov › Population › ... Help for ACS Users Help for SIPP Users Health Insurance Main The Census Bureau collects health insurance data ...

  20. 9/2/2014 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa | Travelers' Health | CDC http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa 1/5

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    9/2/2014 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa | Travelers' Health | CDC http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa 1/5 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa For Colleges

  1. Hanford facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.

    1996-07-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

  2. page 1 page 3

    E-print Network

    Yeom, Heon Young

    capability Technology Culture Costomer's Royalty HIGH LOW LOW HIGHEnvironment Scratch Level Labor ­ ... Target system Function NN Circuit Regression Analysis GA HeuristicsTS Information IO Pairs Log data data » ­ Articulation #12;page 20 page 20 3. #12; S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 KOSPI

  3. Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 01/10/2013 Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 01 authorities (primarily the Health and Safety Executive (HSE)) immediately under the requirements details are available on the Health and Safety Executive website at http

  4. 9 CFR 3.102 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.102 Section 3.102...Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...Standards § 3.102 Facilities, indoor. (a) Ambient temperature...air and water temperatures in indoor facilities shall...

  5. Review of the Tritium Extraction Facility Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald W. Barton; Farid Bamdad; Joel Blackman

    2000-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) is an independent executive branch agency responsible for technical safety oversight of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) defense nuclear facilities. One of DNFSB's responsibilities is the review of design and construction projects for DOE's defense nuclear facilities to ensure that adequate health and safety requirements are identified and implemented. These reviews are

  6. Review of the Tritium Extraction Facility design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Barton; F. Bamdad; J. Blackman

    2000-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) is an independent executive branch agency responsible for technical safety oversight of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) defense nuclear facilities. One of DNFSB's responsibilities is the review of design and construction projects for DOE's defense nuclear facilities to ensure that adequate health and safety requirements are identified and implemented. These reviews are

  7. Educational facilities and financial assistance for graduate students in psychology: 1961-62

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherman Ross

    1960-01-01

    A table 4 pages in length summarizes requirements for admission to graduate programs in psychology. Information is also descriptively summarized on facilities, tuition, financial assistance for graduate students (fellowships, scholarships, assistantship stipends), sex preferred, the existence of Veterans Administration programs, United States Public Health Service stipends, and other data concerning institutions providing graduate work in psychology. From Psyc Abstracts 36:02:2AM00R.

  8. page 1 page 3

    E-print Network

    Yeom, Heon Young

    building blocks Outsourcing capability Technology Culture Costomer's Royalty HIGH LOW LOW HIGHEnvironmentTS Information IO Pairs Log data Modeling & Extraction Approximation #12;page 18 Optimization ProblemsObstacles · ­ Hierarchical model ­ · Abstraction, articulation, event ­ Dream: Raw data » ­ Articulation #12

  9. Career Minors Page 81Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog either of two significant dimensions of health care: technical and mana-

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    in minor electives 8 total units in the minor 20 Career Minor in Women's Health Women's health is a large minor in women's health is designed to provide students with interdisciplinary course work, training, and work experience in the politics, practice, and experience of women's health. Career needs of both

  10. Nuclear Facilities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Griffith

    In order to produce nuclear weapons, each country must have facilities to produce and refine the nuclear materials, conduct research on weapon design, and store the completed weapons. The interactives in this collection allow you to explore the nuclear facilities of the nuclear powers (both declared and undeclared).

  11. Using business intelligence for efficient inter-facility patient transfer.

    PubMed

    Haque, Waqar; Derksen, Beth Ann; Calado, Devin; Foster, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In the context of inter-facility patient transfer, a transfer operator must be able to objectively identify a destination which meets the needs of a patient, while keeping in mind each facility's limitations. We propose a solution which uses Business Intelligence (BI) techniques to analyze data related to healthcare infrastructure and services, and provides a web based system to identify optimal destination(s). The proposed inter-facility transfer system uses a single data warehouse with an Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) cube built on top that supplies analytical data to multiple reports embedded in web pages. The data visualization tool includes map based navigation of the health authority as well as an interactive filtering mechanism which finds facilities meeting the selected criteria. The data visualization is backed by an intuitive data entry web form which safely constrains the data, ensuring consistency and a single version of truth. The overall time required to identify the destination for inter-facility transfers is reduced from hours to a few minutes with this interactive solution. PMID:25676968

  12. Health facility-based data on women receiving sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy in Tanzania: lessons to learn from a cross-sectional survey in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts and other national survey reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A study of health facility (HF) data on women receiving sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) was carried out at antenatal care clinics in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods A review of health management information system (HMIS) registers, interviews with health-care workers (HWs) and district and national level malaria control program managers corroborated by inter-temporal assessment through observations at HF levels. Statistical data were analyzed in Excel and interpreted in triangulation with qualitative data from interviews and observations. Results Data indicated that IPTp doses administered to women were inadequate and partly inconsistent. HMIS registers lacked space for IPT records, forcing HWs to manipulate their record-keeping. The proportion/number of IPTp recipients in related to the supply of SP for free delivery, to women’s attendance behaviours, showed variation by quarter and year of reporting. Conclusion It is impossible to achieve rational health service planning when the HMIS is weak. Whilst it is acknowledged that the HMIS is already overloaded, concerted measures are urgently needed to accommodate data on new interventions and other vertical programs if malaria programs are to achieve their goals. PMID:24433529

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 62 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities. Health Care Providers can Know if patients in your facility ...

  14. Roadmap: Public Health -Health Promotion and Education Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    30033 Public Health Policy and Decision-Making 3 See note 1 on page 2 Kent Core Requirement 3 See KentRoadmap: Public Health - Health Promotion and Education ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HPED] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap

  15. Roadmap: Public Health -Health Promotion and Education Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    30033 Public Health Policy and Decision-Making 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on pageRoadmap: Public Health - Health Promotion and Education ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HPED] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap

  16. 09/13/2007 08:42 PMTweaking Genes Could Extend ALS Survival Page 1 of 1http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/healthday/070913/tweaking-genes-could-extend-als-survival.htm

    E-print Network

    Engelhardt, John F.

    suggests new targets to treat the brain disease Posted 9/13/07 THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- U. Copyright © 2007 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved. Health Home > Health Thursday, September 13, 2007 Nation & World Health Money & Business Education Opinion Photos & Video Rankings Copyright © 2007 U.S.News

  17. INTEGRATED APPLICATION Page 1 ----------------------------SIGNATURE APPLICANT & DATE

    E-print Network

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Full Name Telephone Home Work Fax Home Work Cell phone Home Work Email Web page NEW APPLICATION RENEWAL - Personal Effects Facility-Aquarium / Zoo Book - Nursery Possession Facility-Exhibition / Education Breed-Scientific / Veterinarian Sell / Trade / Buy / Receive / Donate Research #12;INTEGRATED APPLICATION Page 2

  18. National Institutes of Health: Health Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Health Information portion of the National Institutes of Health website covers a wide range of topics. This consumer-oriented site includes Quick Links, on the left side of the page, to such topics as "Child & Teen Health", "Men's Health", "Minority Health", and "Seniors' Health". To browse health categories, the visitor can browse several different ways. They can browse under "Body Location/Systems", "Conditions/Diseases", "Procedures", and "Health and Wellness". On the left side of the page the visitor can also choose to search for Health Topics alphabetically and for those more inclined toward audio learning, visitors can listen to NIH Radio by clicking on "MP3 audio reports" on the right side of the page. The Research in Action feature in the top middle of the page offers insight into how humans hear. Just click on the picture above Research in Action to be taken to the article. For visitors who just can't find what they need on the Health Information site, there are a slew of Related Links near the bottom of the page, including Health Information on the Web, Health Newsletters, Health Databases, and Federal Health Agencies.

  19. FACILITY DATABASE

    Cancer.gov

    LASP Administrative Use Only Data Entry Start Date _______________ July 2007 LASP FACILTY Database Form 1.000 FACILITY DATABASE Principal Investigator – Data Entry Requirements This form is used to identify the level of data that each investigator

  20. Research Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Donald E. Bohringer, Argonne engineering specialist employed NASA information in two projects associated with the laboratory's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility. The NASA technology Bohringer employed involved improved vibration protection for a gamma ray detector in one project, and in the other a new leak detection technology. IPNS and other Argonne facilities have many vacuum and pressure vessels and early detection of leaks is highly important. Bohringer learned of both items in Tech Briefs.

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  2. Satisfaction with focused antenatal care service and associated factors among pregnant women attending focused antenatal care at health centers in Jimma town, Jimma zone, South West Ethiopia; a facility based cross-sectional study triangulated with qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Client satisfaction is essential for further improvement of quality of focused antenatal care and to provide uniform health care services for pregnant women. However, studies on level of client satisfaction with focused antenatal care and associated factors are lacking. So, the purpose of this study is to assess satisfaction with focused antenatal care service and associated factors among pregnant women attending focused antenatal care at health centers in Jimma town. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study involving both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection was used from Feb 1-30/2013. Three hundred eighty nine pregnant women those come to the health centers were included in the study. A semi-structured questionnaire and focus group discussion guide was employed to obtain the necessary information for this study. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS for windows version 16.0. Logistic regression model was used to compare level of satisfaction by predictors’ variables. Qualitative data was analyzed based on thematic frameworks to support the quantitative results. Result More than half of the respondents (60.4%) were satisfied with the service that they received. As to specific components, most of the respondents (80.7%) were satisfied with interpersonal aspects, and 62.2% were satisfied with organization of health care aspect. Meanwhile, 49.9% of the respondents were not satisfied with technical quality aspect and 67.1% were not satisfied with physical environment aspect. Multivariate logistic regression analysis result showed that type of health center, educational status of mother, monthly income of the family, type of pregnancy and history of stillbirth were the predictors of the level of satisfaction. The study found out that dissatisfaction was high in mothers utilizing service at Jimma health center, in mothers with tertiary educational level, in mothers with average monthly family income >1000birr, in mothers with unplanned pregnancy and in mothers with history of stillbirth. Conclusions Even though greater percentages of women (60.4%) were satisfied with the focused antenatal care service, the level of satisfaction was lower compared to other studies. The investigator recommends that patient feedback should be recognized as a legitimate method of evaluating health services in the health center as a whole. PMID:24646407

  3. NASA Critical Facilities Maintenance Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Critical Facilities Maintenance Assessment (CFMA) was first implemented by NASA following the March 2000 overtest of the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) spacecraft. A sine burst dynamic test using a 40 year old shaker failed. Mechanical binding/slippage of the slip table imparted 10 times the planned force to the test article. There was major structural damage to HESSI. The mechanical "health" of the shaker had not been assessed and tracked to assure the test equipment was in good working order. Similar incidents have occurred at NASA facilities due to inadequate maintenance (e.g., rainwater from a leaky roof contaminated an assembly facility that housed a spacecraft). The HESSI incident alerted NASA to the urgent need to identify inadequacies in ground facility readiness and maintenance practices. The consequences of failures of ground facilities that service these NASA systems are severe due to the high unit value of NASA products.

  4. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume...

  5. 9 CFR 108.9 - Dressing rooms and other facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS FACILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.9 Dressing rooms and other facilities. Each...

  6. 9 CFR 108.9 - Dressing rooms and other facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS FACILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.9 Dressing rooms and other facilities. Each...

  7. 9 CFR 108.9 - Dressing rooms and other facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS FACILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.9 Dressing rooms and other facilities. Each...

  8. Learn about Health Literacy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Region 7 Activities by State Contact Form Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, ... in improving health literacy in our society. Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, ...

  9. Meditation and Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, ... topic . Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, ...

  10. 76 FR 11339 - Update to NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, for State Home Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ...012, Veterans Prescription Service; 64.013, Veterans Prosthetic Appliances; 64.014, Veterans State Domiciliary Care...programs-- veterans, Health care, Health facilities, Health professions, Health records, Incorporation by reference, Mental...

  11. 42 CFR 124.514 - Compliance alternative for facilities with small annual obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...with small annual obligations. 124.514 Section 124.514 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Reasonable Volume...

  12. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human ServicesRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College

  13. Being Gay and Mentally Ill: The Case Study of a Gay Man with Schizophrenia Treated at a Community Mental Health Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael C. Singer

    2004-01-01

    Gays and lesbians with major mental illness often spend their lives within the public mental health system, in which the existence of gay-affirmative programs is a rarity. This potentially alienating situation is often exacerbated by gaps in the training of psychodynamic clinicians that leave important issues of sexuality unexplored in most programs' core curricula. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

  14. HEALTH AND MEDICAL ANNEX H -HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES

    E-print Network

    ANNEX H HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES #12;ANNEX H - HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES 07/25/2012 v.1.0 Page H-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex H: Health and Medical Services, and contents within, is a guide and Security Texas A&M University #12;ANNEX H - HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES 07/25/2012 v.1.0 Page H-2 TABLE

  15. Review of the Tritium Extraction Facility design

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, R.W.; Bamdad, F.; Blackman, J.

    2000-07-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) is an independent executive branch agency responsible for technical safety oversight of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) defense nuclear facilities. One of DNFSB's responsibilities is the review of design and construction projects for DOE's defense nuclear facilities to ensure that adequate health and safety requirements are identified and implemented. These reviews are performed with the expectation that facility designs are being developed within the framework of a site's Integrated Safety Management (ISM) program. This paper describes the application of ISM principles in DNFSB's ongoing review of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) design/construction project.

  16. Health Care Visits to Check More Than Just Health?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Spotlights Media Resources Interviews & Selected Staff Profiles Multimedia Health Care Visits to Check More Than Just Health? Skip ... media links Share this: Page Content Study Shows Health Care Providers Can Help with School Readiness During Primary ...

  17. December 2010 FACILITIES & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    REPORT 2009/10 #12;Contents Page · Introduction 1 · Carbon and Energy Management 3 · Waste and Recycling and water management and issued our Sustainability Specification for construction projects. The CollegeDecember 2010 FACILITIES & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT CARBON MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY ACTIVITIES

  18. Interactive Health Games

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Boost your health knowledge by playing these interactive health games. Go to: ... Homeland Security) Drugs and Young People Test Your Knowledge (National Institute on Drug Abuse) E E. Coli ...

  19. Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Enter Search terms Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products ... Search Mammography Facilities Help | Download File | More About MQSA Enter the First 3 Digits of your Zip Code ...

  20. Roadmap: Public Health Environmental and Occupational Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Health Research 3 PH 30033 Public Health Policy and Decision-Making 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 SeeRoadmap: Public Health ­ Environmental and Occupational Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-EVOH] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10

  1. Implementing routine provider-initiated HIV testing in public health care facilities in Kenya: a qualitative descriptive study of nurses' experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catrin Evans; Eunice Ndirangu

    2011-01-01

    Routine “provider-initiated testing and counselling” (PITC) for HIV has been implemented amidst concern over how consent, confidentiality and counselling (the 3Cs) can be maintained in under-resourced health care settings. In Kenya, PITC has been rolled out since 2005, HIV prevalence is 7.1% and more than 86% of adults have not been tested. Kenyan nurses are the main cadre implementing PITC,

  2. What are the factors that interplay from normal pregnancy to near miss maternal morbidity in a Nigerian tertiary health care facility?

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Ikeola A; Ijarotimi, Omotade O; Fatusi, Adesegun O

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in Nigeria examined the epidemiological characteristics and factors associated with maternal outcomes using a mixed method approach: a prospective case control study design involving 375 pregnant women who received maternal care from a tertiary facility and in-depth interviews reporting the experience of near-miss survivors. A generalized ordered logit model was used to generate the estimates of partial proportional odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) across categories of the outcome variable. Factors strongly associated with maternal morbidity were late referral of women, presence of complications at booking antenatal visits, low birth weight, and severe birth asphyxia. The nearmiss women were further characterized, and a low proportion (25%) had organ dysfunction or failure. The challenge of such diagnoses in resource-constrained settings raises questions about the appropriateness of using organ dysfunction criteria in developing countries. PMID:25119488

  3. Diarrheal Disease in Rural Mozambique: Burden, Risk Factors and Etiology of Diarrheal Disease among Children Aged 0–59 Months Seeking Care at Health Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Nhampossa, Tacilta; Mandomando, Inacio; Acacio, Sozinho; Quintó, Llorenç; Vubil, Delfino; Ruiz, Joaquin; Nhalungo, Delino; Sacoor, Charfudin; Nhabanga, Arnaldo; Nhacolo, Ariel; Aide, Pedro; Machevo, Sónia; Sigaúque, Betuel; Nhama, Abel; Kotloff, Karen; Farag, Tamer; Nasrin, Dilruba; Bassat, Quique; Macete, Eusebio; Levine, Myron M.; Alonso, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrheal disease remains a leading cause of illness and death, particularly in low-income countries. Its burden, microbiological causes and risk factors were examined in children aged 0–59 months living in Manhiça, rural southern Mozambique. Methods Trends of diarrhea-related burden of disease were estimated during the period 2001–2012. A prospective, age-stratified and matched (by age, gender and geographical origin), case-control study was conducted during 2007–2011. Clinical, epidemiology, anthropometric measurement and fecal samples obtained from recruited children were used to estimate moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) weighted attributable fractions. Results Over the last decade the incidence of acute diarrhea has dropped by about 80%. Incidence of MSD per 100 child years at risk for the period 2007–2011 was 9.85, 7.73 and 2.10 for children aged 0–11, 12–23 and 24–59 months respectively. By adjusted population attributable fractions, most cases of MSD were due to rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, ETEC ST (ST only or ST/LT), Shigella and Adenovirus 40/41. Washing hands and having facilities to dispose child’s stools were associated with a reduced risk of MSD, while giving stored water to the child was associated with an increased risk of MSD. Conclusions Despite the predominantly decreasing trends observed throughout the last decade, diarrheal diseases remain today a major cause of morbidity among children aged 0–59 months living in this rural Mozambican area. Rotavirus, cryptosporidium, Shigella, ETEC ST and Adenovirus 40/41 were the most important aetiologies of MSD. Thus, well-known preventive strategies such as washing hands, improving the treatment of stored water, having facilities to dispose children stools, and accelerating the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine should be promoted on a wider scale to reduce the current burden of diarrheal diseases. PMID:25973880

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  5. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    3.F.3 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for Occupational Health Monitoring Program 1. Purpose: a. This SOP details the process and testing requirements at UB who have contact with lab animals or their tissues/fluids for the purpose of teaching or research

  6. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

  7. Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

    2006-01-01

    A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans…

  8. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental impacts of transporting M55 rockets from Lexington-Blue Grass Depot activity, Anniston Army depot, and Umatilla depot activity to alternative disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, S.A.; Breck, J.E.; Copenhaver, E.D.; Coleman, P.R.; Griffin, G.D.; Hillsman, E.L.; Holcomb, M.C.; Johnson, P.E.; Kornegay, F.C.; Peterson, B.E.

    1986-03-01

    This assessment discusses the potential health and environmental impacts of transporting M55 rockets filled with nerve agent GB or VX from various existing Army storage depots to alternative Army depots for disposal. The origin depots include Anniston Army Depot in Alabama, Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity in Kentucky, and Umatilla Depot Activity in Oregon. The destination depots include Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas, Tooele Army Depot in Utah, and the facility on Johnston Island in the central Pacific Ocean. This assessment considers the possible impacts of normal transport operations and of two postulated accident scenarios on the air quality, ground and surface water, aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, human health, and cultural and socioeconomic resources of the various transport corridors involved. The impacts of these scenarios are assessed for truck, train, and air transport for each orgin-destination pair. The analysis considers three basic scenario during transport: (1) normal operations with no atmospheric release of nerve agent; (2) a minor agent spill (the contents of one rocket being released to the biosphere); and (3) a worst-case accident involving the release of a large, specified quantity of nerve agent to the biosphere. The extremely low probabilities of such accidents, which are reported elsewhere, are noted.

  9. 11/26/12 4:27 PMCoal mine fossils: Paleontology shows us past climate change. -Slate Magazine Page 1 of 4http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/coal/2012/11/coal_mine_fossils_paleontology_shows_us_past_climate_change.single.html

    E-print Network

    Montañez, Isabel Patricia

    11/26/12 4:27 PMCoal mine fossils: Paleontology shows us past climate change. - Slate Magazine Page 1 of 4http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/coal/2012/11/coal_mine_fossils_paleontology mine fossils: Paleontology shows us past climate change. - Slate Magazine Page 2 of 4http

  10. Nursing Facilities (Medicaid)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... provided by Medicaid or other state agencies. Where Nursing Facility Services are provided Medicaid coverage of Nursing ... the Medicaid Nursing Facility benefit. Who may receive Nursing Facility Services Nursing facility services for are required ...

  11. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Search Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    This page allows users to search the CDC and National Center for Health Statistics sites (NCHS). Collectively, these sites contain a huge amount of health and disease data from a large number of surveys. These include: National Health Interview Survey, National Immunization Survey, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, National Survey of Family Growth, National Health Care Survey , National Employer Health Insurance Survey, National Vital Statistics System, and Mortality Data.

  12. The effects of utility evaluations, biomedical knowledge and modernization on intention to exclusively use biomedical health facilities among rural households in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mukolo, Abraham; Cooil, Bruce; Victor, Bart

    2015-08-01

    In resource-limited settings, the choice between utilizing biomedical health services and/or traditional healers is critical to the success of the public health mission. In the literature, this choice has been predicted to be influenced by three major factors: knowledge about biomedical etiologies; cultural modernization; and rational choice. The current study investigated all three of these predicted determinants, applying data from a general household survey conducted in 2010 in Zambézia Province of Mozambique involving 1045 randomly sampled rural households. Overall, more respondents (N = 802) intended to continue to supplement their biomedical healthcare with traditional healer services in comparison with those intending to utilize biomedical care exclusively (N = 243). The findings strongly supported the predicted association between rational utility (measured as satisfaction with the quality of service and results from past care) with the future intention to continue to supplement or utilize biomedical care exclusively. Odds of moving away from supplementation increase by a factor of 2.5 if the respondent reported seeing their condition improve under government/private biomedical care. Odds of staying with supplementation increase by a factor 3.1 if the respondent was satisfied with traditional care and a factor of 16 if the condition had improved under traditional care. Modernization variables (education, income, religion, and Portuguese language skills) were relevant and provided a significant component of the best scientific model. Amount of biomedical knowledge was not a significant predictor of choice. There was a small effect on choice from knowing the limitations of biomedical care. The findings have implications for public healthcare promotion activities in areas where biomedical care is introduced as an alternative to traditional healing. PMID:26123881

  13. Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    and Control of Diseases 3 See note 1 on page 2 PH 30033 Public Health Policy and Decision-Making 3 SeeRoadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap

  14. Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    30033 Public Health Policy and Decision-Making 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on pageRoadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap

  15. Udaipur Health Study

    E-print Network

    Abhijit Banerjee

    2007-10-05

    This data set contains data on the health histories of, and access to healthcare facilities for, individuals located in the Udaipur districts of Rajasthan, India. Data was collected at the household level, as well as at ...

  16. Spectrum of Diseases and Diagnostic Values of Ultrasound in Adult Patients with Nontraumatic Acute Abdomen in a Nigerian Tertiary Health Facility

    PubMed Central

    Ashaolu, Bimbo Ayoola; Asaleye, Mopelola Christianah; Adetiloye, Adebayo Victor; Alatise, Isaac Olusegun

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of disease on abdominal ultrasound (US) and the diagnostic efficacy of US in adult patients with nontraumatic acute abdomen at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife. Materials and Methods: The study population included consecutive 150 adult patients aged 15 years and above presenting with nontraumatic acute abdomen via the adult emergency unit or as inpatients referred to the Radiology Department of OAUTHC, Ile-Ife for abdominal US. MINDRAY D.C-6 real-time US scanner with 3.5, 5.0, and 7.5 MHz probes and Doppler facilities were used to assess the intra-abdominal organs and the findings were compared with the clinical and surgical findings in those cases that were operated. Results: The common spectrum of diseases encountered on US in this study included appendicitis (66 [44%]), ectopic pregnancy (34 [22%]), intestinal obstruction (13 [8.7%]) while the least finding was renal abscess 1 (0.7%). The correlation of US findings with surgical findings in this study showed sensitivity, specificity, and kappa agreement for appendicitis of 83.3%, 100.0%, and 0.808; ectopic pregnancy of 100.0%, 97.8%, and 0.958; acute cholecystitis of 100.0%, 100.0%, and 1.0. However, perforated viscus showed the least sensitivity (60.0%), specificity (99.2%), and kappa agreement 0.654. All the disease entities showed good kappa agreement beyond chance, and they were all statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study has shown a relatively high sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of US in cases of nontraumatic acute abdomen in a careful hand. We, therefore, recommended that these advantages of US should be capitalized upon in settings where other advanced diagnostic modalities are not available. PMID:25838758

  17. GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health Graduate Certificate of Public Health and Public Health Sciences Wayne State University School of Medicine September 2013 Accredited by #12;_____________________________Graduate Programs in Public Health 2013-2014___________________________ Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  18. Roadmap: Public Health Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Public Health ­ Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-EOHS] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Mathematics and Critical Reasoning PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent

  19. Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Robeson County Report #2.155, November 2011 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU

    E-print Network

    Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Robeson County Report #2.155, November 2011 Page Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Robeson County Total Deaths, Premature Mortality and Deaths for Ten Leading Causes; 1979-2008 #12;Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Robeson County Report #2

  20. Get more tips at NHLBI's "Aim for a Healthy Weight" Web page at www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/index.htm

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Get more tips at NHLBI's "Aim for a Healthy Weight" Web page at www.nhlbi.nih will treat myself to a well-deserved (Fill in a reward here, but not a food reward.)." Think of something you your goal. Balance your (food) checkbook. Keep a diary of what you eat and how much physical activity

  1. David Baldwin's Trauma Information Pages

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Baldwin, David V.

    The Trauma Information Pages, provided by psychologist David Baldwin, provide information about traumatic stress for clinicians and researchers in the field. The pages include information on trauma symptoms, connections to trauma resources including full text articles and an EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing) bibliography, general support information including grief, stress, and mental health pointers, disaster handouts and links, and links to other trauma and trauma related sites. The Trauma Pages are searchable.

  2. The Ohio State University Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Health Plan Contribution Rates for Sponsored Dependent Coverage for 2013 Revised 09/07/12

    E-print Network

    on Medicare eligibility. If the sponsored dependent is Medicare-eligible, he or she must enroll for such coverage and the university's health plan will be secondary payor to Medicare. These rates are in addition. Biweekly Monthly Medical Contributions per Sponsored Dependent Plan Non-Medicare Medicare-eligible 1 Non-Medicare

  3. Page 1 of 3 UW EH&S Radiation Safety Office Box 354400 201 Hall Health Seattle WA 98195 206-543-0463

    E-print Network

    Wilcock, William

    -543-0463 Declaration of Decay in Storage (DIS) (Radioactive Waste with a Half-life : This waste container does not contain any radioactive labels or hazardous waste. It also does not contain any 201 Hall Health Seattle WA 98195 206-543-0463 Final Disposition of Decay in Storage (DIS) (Radioactive

  4. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  5. Overview of Home Health Aides: United States, 2007

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Aide Survey, 2007. Figure 5. Source of health insurance for home health aides: United States, 2007 Page ... 4. Home health aides employed by agencies offering health insurance, by agency type and size: United States, 2007 ...

  6. Documented safety analysis for 209-E Facility critical mass laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.

    2003-04-23

    This documented safety analysis (DSA) addresses the 209-E facility and associated requirements that apply to 200 Area Facility Deactivation (AFD) activities. The DSA was developed in accordance with DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities''.

  7. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-03-28

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

  8. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Improved community health: The Franklin county success story

    MedlinePLUS

    ... concerns health topic page) provide information about rural health disparities, as well as specific topics such as rural ... to farm health and safety as well as health disparities. Before I go, this reminder... MedlinePlus.gov is ...

  9. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    E-print Network

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-06

    by evidence of effectiveness. [5,6] Practice patterns differ across institutions and regions, re- sulting in varying health outcomes and costs of care. [7] Patients trying to make informed health decisions often encounter conflicting information with varying... on patientPage 5 of 12 (page number not for citation purposes) widely. Although an increasing number of institutions rely on an information infrastructure to practice evidence- and citizen access to ICT, health care professionals willing to interact...

  10. Part I: Allows you to name another person to make health care decisions for you when you cannot make decisions or speak for yourself.

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    resuscitation), and dialysis, and mental health care, such as convulsive therapy and psychoactive medications or transfer to a health care provider or health care facility, including a mental health facility, subject to a licensed health care facility, such as a hospital, nursing home, assisted living, or other facility

  11. Association between HRP-2/pLDH rapid diagnostic test band positivity and malaria-related anemia at a peripheral health facility in Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Ross; Reyes, Raquel; Ntaro, Moses; Mulogo, Edgar; Matte, Michael; Boum, Yap; Siedner, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The detection of severe malaria in resource-constrained settings is often difficult because of requirements for laboratory infrastructure and/or clinical expertise. The aim of this study, therefore, was to explore the utility of a multiple antigen (HRP-2/pLDH) rapid diagnostic test (RDT) as a low-cost, surrogate marker of patients at high risk for complications of severe malaria. We reviewed programmatic data at a peripheral health center in Western Uganda. Available demographic and clinical data on all individuals presenting to the center who underwent an RDT for suspected malaria infection were reviewed. We fit logistic regression models to identify correlates of two outcomes of interest: 1) severe malaria-related anemia, defined here as hemoglobin ?7g/dL and 2) receipt of parenteral quinine. 1509 patients underwent malaria testing with an SD FK60 RDT during the observation period. A total of 637 (42%) RDTs were positive for at least one species of malaria, of which 326 (51%) exhibited a single HRP-2 band and 307 (48%) exhibited both HRP-2 and pLDH bands, while 4 exhibited only a single pLDH band. There was a trend towards more severe anemia in patients with a HRP-2/pLDH positive RDT compared to a HRP-2 only RDT (??=?-0.99 g/dl, 95% CI -1.99 to 0.02, P?=?0.055). A HRP-2/pLDH positive RDT was associated with an increased risk of severe malaria-related anemia compared to a negative RDT (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 18.8, 95% CI 4.32 to 82.0, P?

  12. Effect of the continuous intake of probiotic-fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on fever in a mass outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis and the faecal microflora in a health service facility for the aged.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Satoru; Asahara, Takashi; Ohta, Toshihisa; Yamada, Toshihiko; Kondo, Shigemi; Bian, Lei; Wang, Chongxin; Yamashiro, Yuichiro; Nomoto, Koji

    2011-08-01

    For conducting effective risk management in long-stay elderly people at a health service facility, we performed an open case-controlled study to evaluate the effect of the intake of probiotic-fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS-fermented milk) on norovirus gastroenteritis occurring in the winter season during the intake period. A total of seventy-seven elderly people (mean age 84 years) were enrolled in the study. During a 1-month period, there was no significant difference in the incidence of norovirus gastroenteritis between the LcS-fermented milk-administered (n 39) and the non-administered (n 38) groups; however, the mean duration of fever of >37°C after the onset of gastroenteritis was 1·5 (SD 1·7) d in the former and 2·9 (SD 2·3) d in the latter group, showing a significant shortening in the former group (P < 0·05). RT-quantitative PCR analysis targeting ribosomal RNA showed both Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus to be significantly dominant, whereas Enterobacteriaceae decreased in faecal samples from the administered group (n 10, mean age 83 years), with a significant increase in faecal acetic acid concentration. Continuous intake of LcS-fermented milk could positively contribute to the alleviation of fever caused by norovirus gastroenteritis by correcting the imbalance of the intestinal microflora peculiar to the elderly, although such consumption could not protect them from the disease. PMID:21521545

  13. 42 CFR 71.47 - Special provisions relating to airports: Office and isolation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE...facilities. Each U.S. airport which receives international traffic shall provide without cost to the Government suitable...

  14. 42 CFR 71.47 - Special provisions relating to airports: Office and isolation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE...facilities. Each U.S. airport which receives international traffic shall provide without cost to the Government suitable...

  15. 42 CFR 71.47 - Special provisions relating to airports: Office and isolation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE...facilities. Each U.S. airport which receives international traffic shall provide without cost to the Government suitable...

  16. 42 CFR 71.47 - Special provisions relating to airports: Office and isolation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE...facilities. Each U.S. airport which receives international traffic shall provide without cost to the Government suitable...

  17. 42 CFR 71.47 - Special provisions relating to airports: Office and isolation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE...facilities. Each U.S. airport which receives international traffic shall provide without cost to the Government suitable...

  18. 78 FR 64873 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...into compliance with changes to health insurance coverage for children under...concerning the tax treatment of health insurance benefits; therefore this comment...employees, Health facilities, Health insurance, Health professions,...

  19. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. Cook; S. M. Adams; J. J. Beauchamp; M. S. Bevelhimer; B. G. Blaylock; C. C. Brandt; E. L. Etnier; C. J. Ford; M. L. Frank; M. J. Gentry; M. S. Greeley; R. S. Halbrook; R. A. Harris; S. K. Holladay; L. A. Hook; P. L. Howell; L. A. Kszos; D. A. Levine; J. L. Skiles; G. W. Suter

    1992-01-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory

  20. Stanford Health Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Stanford Health Library is a "free and open-to-the-public consumer health information library that provides scientifically-based medical information to help people make informed decisions about their health and health care." Users will find a mountain of health-related resources, including an extensive collection of links to informative Web pages from hospitals, research foundations, government agencies, and other reliable sources. The Health Library also includes dozens and dozens of online videos addressing common health topics, each about 30-60 minutes long. Likewise, users may create a free netLibrary account to access many of the Library's electronic books.

  1. Real estate planning for population health.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Margie

    2014-11-01

    Factors that health systems should consider when performing strategic assessments of their portfolios of ambulatory facilities include: Inventory. Location Facility condition. Service mix. Space use and capacity. Occupancy metrics. Strategic and economic opportunities. PMID:25647921

  2. Correctional health care: implications for public health policy.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Diane L.; Leath, Brenda A.

    2002-01-01

    "Correctional Health Care: Implications for Public Health Policy" is the first in a series of articles that examines the special health care needs of persons who are incarcerated in America's correctional facilities. The intent of the series is to gain a better understanding about the unmet health needs of incarcerated persons, the importance of addressing the health service delivery system in correctional facilities, and the implications that may arise from neglecting to address these health issues on health outcomes for individual detainees and society at-large when detainees transition back into the community. This article provides a descriptive overview of the corrections population, their sociodemographics, health care needs, and health concerns that are in need of improvement. This article also offers recommendations for public policy consideration to improve the overall health of inmates and society at large. PMID:12069208

  3. A College Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Bernard

    This report considers problems and solutions related to the design and establishment of college health facilities. This includes the results of a study involving Colorado, Knox, and Wittenberg Colleges in which personal visits and expert testimony concluded that the health services of small colleges in the central and western states were seriously…

  4. A COLLEGE HEALTH CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRAD, BERNARD

    THIS REPORT CONSIDERS PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS RELATED TO THE DESIGN AND ESTABLISHMENT OF COLLEGE HEALTH FACILITIES. THIS INCLUDES THE RESULTS OF A STUDY INVOLVING COLORADO, KNOX, AND WITTENBERG COLLEGES IN WHICH PERSONAL VISITS AND EXPERT TESTIMONY CONCLUDED THAT THE HEALTH SERVICES OF SMALL COLLEGES IN THE CENTRAL AND WESTERN STATES WERE SERIOUSLY…

  5. The Community Health Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Garza

    2004-01-01

    The onset of the AIDS crisis led to a coalition of various community agencies and medical professional volunteers to form the Community Health Project (CHP) in the Chelsea area of New York City. The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals that frequented this primary care facility led to its further development into the Michael C alien-Audre Lorde Community Health

  6. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  7. R2 REGULATED FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Facility Registry System (FRS) is a centrally managed database that identifies facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. FRS creates high-quality, accurate, and authoritative facility identification records through rigorous...

  8. BioMed Central Page 1 of 4

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 4 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Women's Health Open Access, the Published: 26 October 2004 BMC Women's Health 2004, 4:8 doi:10.1186/1472-6874-4-8 Received: 08 July 2004. #12;BMC Women's Health 2004, 4:8 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/4/8 Page 2 of 4 (page number

  9. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Approval of radiographic facilities that use film. 37.43 Section 37.43 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...Examinations § 37.43 Approval of radiographic facilities that use film. (a) Facilities become eligible to participate...

  10. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Approval of radiographic facilities that use film. 37.43 Section 37.43 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...Examinations § 37.43 Approval of radiographic facilities that use film. (a) Facilities become eligible to participate...

  11. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-09-07

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively.

  12. Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    2003-10-08

    This document provides the documented safety analysis (DSA) and Central Plateau Remediation Project (CP) requirements that apply to surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility. This DSA was developed in accordance with DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities''. Upon approval and implementation of this document, the current safety basis documents will be retired.

  13. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Health Assistant. Volume I, Units 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This volume consists of the first four units of a basic core curriculum that is intended for all health workers. The units deal with the following topics: (1) the health care facility, the long-term care facility, the health team, and the nursing team; (2) verbal and nonverbal communication, written communication, human behavior, ethical behavior,…

  14. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...non-hospital based health care facility or at a hospital...board, general nursing care, meals and special diets...related facilities, use of intensive care unit and services...Prescribed drugs and medicines incidental to...

  15. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...non-hospital based health care facility or at a hospital...board, general nursing care, meals and special diets...related facilities, use of intensive care unit and services...Prescribed drugs and medicines incidental to...

  16. Closing the Health Gap

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and ABC Radio Networks are working together to help African-Americans gain access to the best possible information regarding health issues. HHS reports that life expectancies for African-Americans lag five years behind expectancies for White Americans. The new Website Closing the Health Gap has links to information on health conditions such as diabetes and cancer as well as consumer health resources that relate to African-Americans' particular needs. Each page offers links, publications, and any news related to the subject, all in an effort to close "the health gap."

  17. Mental Health Statistics; Current Facility Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    Data collected on the number of resident patients, total admissions, net releases, and deaths in public institutions for the mentally retarded in the United States from 1950 to 1968 are given. Tables present information on trends of patient movement and administrative data from 1963 to 1968; similar information is presented for each state from…

  18. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  19. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY...community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV...response to ``RIN 2900-AN73, Health Care for Homeless Veterans...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions. 75.1903 Section 75.1903 ...SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered...facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions. (a) Permanent underground...