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1

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

2

PagePagePage 111 Health and Safety MattersHealth and Safety MattersHealth and Safety Matters  

E-print Network

CHASE notices 5 Radioisotope orders from Perkin Elmer 5 Accidents 6 FAQ: Food Poisoning 7 Day one safetyPagePagePage 111 Health and Safety MattersHealth and Safety MattersHealth and Safety Matters (ex Chair of the Health and Safety Commission) should conduct a review of the UK regulatory framework

3

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories  

E-print Network

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories The Environmental Health group occupies, and low temperature freezer. Major analytical equipment in the Environmental Health group includes the laboratories for Toxicology, Occupational Health, and Global Health. Available equipment includes an aerosol

Stuart, Amy L.

4

Page 1 of 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Chemical Hygiene Programs: Operation of the Chemical: The Environmental Health and Safety Department (EHS) operates the Chemical Storage and Distribution Facility (CSDF.1200, Employee Hazard Communication, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Title 40, Code of Federal

5

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.11 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.11 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date to Their Protected Health Information SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU) System health care facilities Health Sciences Center New Orleans Academic Campus. Nota Bene: All LSU System health care facilities

6

GERIATRIC MEDICINE CAPITAL HEALTH RESEARCH Page 1  

E-print Network

researchers pioneer new methods to assess health and frailty Marian Shannon broke her left thigh bone justGERIATRIC MEDICINE CAPITAL HEALTH RESEARCH Page 1 CAPITAL HEALTH -- RESEARCH FOCUS ON Many people experience increasingly debilitating health problems as they age. Capital Health clinicians and researchers

Brownstone, Rob

7

Jump to first page Promoting Health,  

E-print Network

, Preventing Obesity Objectives: 1. Describe what is known about childhood obesity: Prevalence, risk factors childhood obesity: Prevalence, risk factors, negative consequences #12;Jump to first page T C O E A AffectsJump to first page G F T K Promoting Health, Preventing Obesity M S S P D P J F E C H P S P H L S U

8

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.7 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

Information (HIPAA Privacy Regulations). POLICY: All LSUHSC-NO health care facilities and providers mustPRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.7 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date of LSUHSC-NO's Workforce SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU) System health care facilities

9

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.14 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

of a limited data set. POLICY: All LSUHSC-NO health care facilities and providers may use and disclose PHIPRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.14 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date: All Louisiana State University (LSU) System health care facilities and providers including

10

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.10 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

to in this policy as LSUHSC-NO. PURPOSE: To provide guidance to the health care facilities and providers affiliated or federal laws or regulations. POLICY: All LSUHSC-NO health care facilities and providers must providePRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.10 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date

11

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.8 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

to in this policy as LSUHSC-NO. PURPOSE: The Louisiana State University (LSU) System health care facilities applicable federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations. POLICY: All LSUHSC-NO health care facilitiesPRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.8 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date

12

Page 1 of 6 Health and Safety  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 6 Health and Safety Executive Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work A brief guide). What is PPE? PPE is equipment that will protect the user against health or safety risks at work. It can helmets are legally required under road traffic legislation. The Employment Act 1989 gives an exemption

Bearhop, Stuart

13

Physical Facilities and Services Policy Page 1 Physical Facilities and Services Policy  

E-print Network

Physical Facilities and Services Policy Page 1 Physical Facilities and Services Policy Category facilities requirements and their use, and guide the delivery and use of Properties' services. 2. POLICY and compliance monitoring of the policy. 4. SCOPE OF POLICY This policy applies to all physical facilities

14

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.16 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

, are referred to in this policy as LSUHSC-NO. PURPOSE: To provide guidance to the health care facilities Health Information to carry out treatment, obtain payment or conduct health care operations. POLICY: AllPRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.16 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date

15

Optimization of preventive health care facility locations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility Location (PHCFL) problem is to identify optimal locations for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying locations for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of

Wei Gu; Xin Wang; S. Elizabeth McGregor

2010-01-01

16

JAMA Patient Page: Health Literacy  

MedlinePLUS

... you get information. FINDING RELIABLE INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET The Internet can be a good source for health information ... are some tips to help you start your Internet search: • Government Web sites, like the National Institutes ...

17

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 5 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-011  

E-print Network

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 5 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-011: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 5 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-011 Printed Copies, supervision, and facilities that are necessary to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of workers

deYoung, Brad

18

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY June 2012 Page 1  

E-print Network

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY June 2012 #12;June 2012 Page 1 UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY 2012 Contents Page Foreword by the Principal 2 A) Health and Safety Policy Statement 3 B) Organisation and Responsibilities for Health and Safety 4 C) Health and Safety Management in Schools

Levi, Ran

19

Columbia University Health Sciences Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section -Page 43  

E-print Network

Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page _________ *************************************************************************** Please complete and forward the attached pages to Environmental Health & Safety, Mailbox 8. Keep a copy;ColumbiaUniversityHealthSciences­Health&SafetyManual2003 LaboratorySafetySection-Page44 Attachment

Jia, Songtao

20

Academic Handbook, Admission, Health Risks Page 1 Issued: 2013 11  

E-print Network

of Health Sciences. Students in the Faculty of Health Sciences will be required to care for persons Aid, CPR ­ Health Care Provider (HCP), criminal record check through the Ontario Education ServicesAcademic Handbook, Admission, Health Risks Page 1 Issued: 2013 11 Potential Health Risks

Lennard, William N.

21

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy  

E-print Network

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy #12;Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 2 of 8 Coventry University Health and Safety Policy 1. Introduction, Purpose and Scope The objective of our Health and Safety Policy is to enable the University to operate effectively

Low, Robert

22

Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety Monthly Chemical Waste Collections September 2013 are available from the Environmental Health and Safety Office. Collect and store waste solvents in approved labeled containers (4 L HDPE; approved by the Environmental Health and Safety Office) in locations

Brownstone, Rob

23

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages  

MedlinePLUS

Skip Navigation National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids Pages skip navigation Home Discover & Explore What's That Word Scientific Kids Fun & Games Parents & Teachers About Contact Oil Spills No one really ...

24

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health  

E-print Network

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. Honours in Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. Major in Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. General in Neuroscience and Mental Health · Minor in Neuroscience and Mental Health 1: Objectives 1.1: Mission

25

Page 1 of 11 HEALTH CARE COLLEGES  

E-print Network

, Communication Disorders, Dentistry, Nursing, Physician Assistant Studies, Public Health, Radiation Sciences degree of trust between the professional and the individuals he or she serves. Each health profession has"). The health care colleges are: Dentistry, Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Public Health

Hayes, Jane E.

26

Updated Feb 10, 2014 Shared Facilities and Cores Guidelines & Policies Page 1 of 6 Einstein Shared Facilities and Cores  

E-print Network

and guidelines for the fiscal and administrative operations of Albert Einstein College of Medicine (EinsteinUpdated Feb 10, 2014 Shared Facilities and Cores Guidelines & Policies Page 1 of 6 Einstein Shared and accounting practices within Einstein shared facilities and cores. · Ensure compliance with federal

Kenny, Paraic

27

42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

2014-10-01

28

HealthPoint Occupational Health Program (OHP) Page 1, rv2012  

E-print Network

. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), when no preventionHealthPoint Occupational Health Program (OHP) Page 1, rv2012 Laboratory Animal Allergy Prevention - Information Guide Introduction The University of Texas at Austin has an occupational health program in place

Johnston, Daniel

29

Page 1 of 1 Environmental Health and Safety Department  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 1 Environmental Health and Safety Department 1500 Illinois St, Golden, CO 80401 (303) 273, or Dosimetry Coordinator To whom it may concern: Colorado School of Mines maintains records of cumulative occupational radiation doses for persons who participate in the school's radiation dosimetry program. Under

30

Page 1 of 3 Animal Health Fact Sheet  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 Animal Health Fact Sheet September 5, 2012 Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis What? There is a vaccine available for use in horses that does an excellent job of protecting them from EEE. The frequency of vaccination is based on the horse, the environment, and several other factors. All horse owners should consult

Hayden, Nancy J.

31

Facilities-Site Services Environmental, Health & Safety Committee  

E-print Network

Facilities- Site Services Environmental, Health & Safety Committee Charter (Draft) 1.0 The purpose of this EH&S Committee is: 1.1 To provide an environment, safety and health forum for Facilities Site Services Sr. Manager on safety, health and environmental protection matters that may affect the health

32

Manned Mars mission health maintenance facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) requirements which enable/enhance manned Mars missions (MMMs) are addressed. It does not attempt to resolve any issues that may affect the feasibility of any given element in the HMF. Reference is made to current work being conducted in the design of the space station HMF. The HMF requirements are discussed within the context of two distinctly different scenarios: HMF as part of the Mars surface infrastructure, and HMF as part of the nine months translation from low Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Requirements for an HMF are provided, and a concept of HMF is shown.

Degioanni, Joseph C.

1986-01-01

33

041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY WOMEN'S HEALTH  

E-print Network

041 (a) 1-WH 06/2012 MEDICAL HISTORY--WOMEN'S HEALTH Page 1 of 1 MEDICAL HISTORY ­ WOMEN'S HEALTH: _______________________ DOB: / / Mo. Day Year Please complete for your first Women's Health visit at University Health

Yener, Aylin

34

SmartConnect: Data connectivity for peripheral health facilities  

E-print Network

SmartConnect: Data connectivity for peripheral health facilities Richard Anderson, Eric Blantz/15/2010 2NSDR 2010 The town of Nueva Guinea has few facilities, but the curious traveler may appreciate connection for rural health facilities ­ Which processes can be improved with network connectivity? · Needs

Anderson, Richard

35

Neighbourhood Response to Community Mental Health Facility Locations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this thesis is upon aggregate neighbourhood response to community mental health facilities. The mentally ill are increasingly being moved out of large institutional treatment settings to receive care from a range of small-scale facilities in the community. Opposition to facility locations has impaired the effectiveness of the community mental health movement and had important ramifications for the

John Lawrence Boeckh

1980-01-01

36

Selecting and Effectively Using a Health/Fitness Facility  

MedlinePLUS

... JOINING Visit several facilities prior to making your investment. Some facilities offer a trial membership for a ... and a variety of programs is a sound investment of your money and in your health. STAYING ...

37

Code JEF Facilities Engineering Home Page for the Internet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are always many activities going on in JEF. We work on and manage the Construction of Facilities (C of F) projects at NASA-Ames. We are constantly designing or analyzing a new facility or project, or a modification to an existing facility. Every day we answer numerous questions about engineering policy, codes and standards, we attend design reviews, we count dollars and we make sure that everything at the Center is designed and built according to good engineering judgment. In addition, we study literature and attend conferences to make sure that we keep current on new legislation and standards.

Mahaffey, Valerie A.; Harrison, Marla J. (Technical Monitor)

1995-01-01

38

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

39

Page 1 of 4 Facilities Management Attendance Policy  

E-print Network

sick leave balances will not be paid upon resignation or termination of employment. Employee is the authorized absence of an employee from regular duties due to illness, injury, pregnancy, exposure to contagious disease, family health situations requiring attendance of the employee and health care

Wood, Stephen L.

40

Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 1 of 18 Version 4.0 KINGSTON UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 1 of 18 Version 4.0 KINGSTON UNIVERSITY HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY Release: Final Subject: Health & Safety Policy Issued by: University Safety Office Version: 4.0 Effective From : December 2010 #12;Health & Safety Policy (Dec 2010) Page 2 of 18 Version 4.0 Foreword

Jones, Graeme A.

41

Development of a Master Health Facility List in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Abstract Introduction Routine Health Information Systems (RHIS) are increasingly transitioning to electronic platforms in several developing countries. Establishment of a Master Facility List (MFL) to standardize the allocation of unique identifiers for health facilities can overcome identification issues and support health facility management. The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) recently developed a MFL, and we present the process and outcome. Methods The MFL was developed from the ground up, and includes a state code, a local government area (LGA) code, health facility ownership (public or private), the level of care, and an exclusive LGA level health facility serial number, as part of the unique identifier system in Nigeria. To develop the MFL, the LGAs sent the list of all health facilities in their jurisdiction to the state, which in turn collated for all LGAs under them before sending to the FMOH. At the FMOH, a group of RHIS experts verified the list and identifiers for each state. Results The national MFL consists of 34,423 health facilities uniquely identified. The list has been published and is available for worldwide access; it is currently used for planning and management of health services in Nigeria. Discussion Unique identifiers are a basic component of any information system. However, poor planning and execution of implementing this key standard can diminish the success of the RHIS. Conclusion Development and adherence to standards is the hallmark for a national health information infrastructure. Explicit processes and multi-level stakeholder engagement is necessary to ensuring the success of the effort.

Azeez, Aderemi; Bamidele, Samson; Oyemakinde, Akin; Oyediran, Kolawole Azeez; Adebayo, Wura; Fapohunda, Bolaji; Abioye, Abimbola; Mullen, Stephanie

2014-01-01

42

Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

1993-01-01

43

Fact Sheet: Facilities UC San Diego Health Sciences facilities house leading-edge technologies, investigational therapies,  

E-print Network

March 2014 Fact Sheet: Facilities UC San Diego Health Sciences facilities house leading procedures within its walls. UC San Diego Medical Center Opened: 1966 | Size: 490,000 GSF 200 West Arbor Drive San Diego, CA 92103 Facility Highlights >> 392 beds >> UC San Diego Stroke Center >> The area

Squire, Larry R.

44

Facilities and resources for diabetes care at regional health facilities in southern Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the fall of 1995, each of the five provincial hospitals in southern Ghana was visited and facilities and resources for diabetes care assessed. In addition, health facilities and standards of care questionnaires were completed. Only Korle Bu Teaching Hospital run a diabetes clinic and had diabetologists. Only two facilities had an eye specialist or trained dietician. None of the

Albert G. B Amoah; Samuel K Owusu; J. Terry Saunders; Wei Li Fang; Henrietta A Asare; Joice G Pastors; Cindi Sanborn; Eugene J Barrett; Moses K. A Woode; Kwame Osei

1998-01-01

45

Using Facebook Page Insights Data to Determine Posting Best Practices in an Academic Health Sciences Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library created a Facebook page and a corresponding managing committee in March 2010. Facebook Page Insights data collected from the library's Facebook page were statistically analyzed to investigate patterns of user engagement. The committee hoped to improve posting practices and increase user…

Houk, Kathryn M.; Thornhill, Kate

2013-01-01

46

77 FR 21580 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...market-rate multifamily housing, health care facility, and hospital...

2012-04-10

47

77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums...Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage...programs for multifamily housing or health care facilities. This notice...

2012-08-15

48

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. 415...of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. (a...are furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health agency are...

2012-10-01

49

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. 415...of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. (a...are furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health agency are...

2013-10-01

50

Malaria diagnostic capacity in health facilities in Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Accurate early diagnosis and prompt treatment is one of the key strategies to control and prevent malaria in Ethiopia where both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are sympatric and require different treatment regimens. Microscopy is the standard for malaria diagnosis at the health centres and hospitals whereas rapid diagnostic tests are used at community-level health posts. The current study was designed to assess malaria microscopy capacity of health facilities in Oromia Regional State and Dire Dawa Administrative City, Ethiopia. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February to April 2011 in 122 health facilities, where health professionals were interviewed using a pre-tested, standardized assessment tool and facilities’ laboratory practices were assessed by direct observation. Results Of the 122 assessed facilities, 104 (85%) were health centres and 18 (15%) were hospitals. Out of 94 health facilities reportedly performing blood films, only 34 (36%) used both thin and thick smears for malaria diagnosis. The quality of stained slides was graded in 66 health facilities as excellent, good and poor quality in 11(17%), 31 (47%) and 24 (36%) respectively. Quality assurance guidelines and malaria microscopy standard operating procedures were found in only 13 (11%) facilities and 12 (10%) had involved in external quality assessment activities, and 32 (26%) had supportive supervision within six months of the survey. Only seven (6%) facilities reported at least one staff’s participation in malaria microscopy refresher training during the previous 12 months. Although most facilities, 96 (79%), had binocular microscopes, only eight (7%) had the necessary reagents and supplies to perform malaria microscopy. Treatment guidelines for malaria were available in only 38 (31%) of the surveyed facilities. Febrile patients with negative malaria laboratory test results were managed with artemether-lumefantrine or chloroquine in 51% (53/104) of assessed health facilities. Conclusions The current study indicated that most of the health facilities had basic infrastructure and equipment to perform malaria laboratory diagnosis but with significant gaps in continuous laboratory supplies and reagents, and lack of training and supportive supervision. Overcoming these gaps will be critical to ensure that malaria laboratory diagnosis is of high-quality for better patient management. PMID:25073561

2014-01-01

51

Interstitial space in health care facilities : planning for change & evolution  

E-print Network

Hospitals are most useful material for architectural research for they exhibit all the problems encountered in other building types in an acute and easily measurable form. Health Care Facilities house the greatest range ...

Garcia Alvarez, Angel

1989-01-01

52

041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Page 1  

E-print Network

041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Page 1 Policy Version: Responsible University Officer Chief Information Officer Responsible Office Information Policy Policy Statement Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personal Identifying Information

Whitton, Mary C.

53

Employee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare  

E-print Network

and Benefits Learning · Competitive salary · Overtime payments (dependent on Band) · Good pension scheme learning plans · Learning lunches · Library service · Mentor scheme · On-site training facilities and inEmployee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare · Annual leave of up to 30

Crowther, Paul

54

Violence in Healthcare Facilities: Lessons From the Veterans Health Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals: The authors examined assault frequency and risk factors in health care. Methods: The authors conducted a cross-sectional question­ naire survey in 142 hospitals. Analyses are presented at the level of the individual and aggregated by facility. Results: Thirteen percent of employees described at least 1 assault in the last year; the proportion assaulted per facility ranged from 1% to

Michael J. Hodgson; Richard Reed; Thomas Craig; Frances Murphy; Larry Lehmann; Linda Belton; Nick Warren

2004-01-01

55

Page 1 of 2 Mandatory UMBC Health Form Rev. 2/2013  

E-print Network

. Both the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the American College Health AssociationPage 1 of 2 Mandatory UMBC Health Form Rev. 2/2013 MANDATORY UMBC HEALTH FORM Please complete students are REQUIRED to complete this document and return it to University Health Services (UHS) at least

Adali, Tulay

56

Results of a Study of the Practices Governing the Financing of Capital Projects by Health Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1979, the Wisconsin Health Facilities Authority (the Authority) and the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) studied the practices governing the financing of capital projects by health facilities. The needs, methods, and results of health ca...

1980-01-01

57

Health Seeking Behaviour and Utilization of Health Facilities for Schistosomiasis-Related Symptoms in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Schistosomiasis causes long-term illness and significant economic burden. Morbidity control through integration within existing health care delivery systems is considered a potentially sustainable and cost-effective approach, but there is paucity of information about health-seeking behaviour. Methods A questionnaire-based study involving 2,002 subjects was conducted in three regions of Ghana to investigate health-seeking behaviour and utilization of health facilities for symptoms related to urinary (blood in urine and painful urination) and intestinal schistosomiasis (diarrhea, blood in stool, swollen abdomen and abdominal pain). Fever (for malaria) was included for comparison. Results Only 40% of patients with urinary symptoms sought care compared to >70% with intestinal symptoms and >90% with fever. Overall, about 20% of schistosomiasis-related symptoms were reported to a health facility (hospital or clinic), compared to about 30% for fever. Allopathic self-medication was commonly practiced as alternative action. Health-care seeking was relatively lower for patients with chronic symptoms, but if they took action, they were more likely to visit a health facility. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, perceived severity was the main predictor for seeking health care or visiting a health facility. Age, socio-economic status, somebody else paying for health care, and time for hospital visit occasionally showed a significant impact, but no clear trend. The effect of geographic location was less marked, although people in the central region, and to a lesser extent the north, were usually less inclined to seek health care than people in the south. Perceived quality of health facility did not demonstrate impact. Conclusion Perceived severity of the disease is the most important determinant of seeking health care or visiting a health facility in Ghana. Schistosomiasis control by passive case-finding within the regular health care delivery looks promising, but the number not visiting a health facility is large and calls for supplementary control options. PMID:21072229

Danso-Appiah, Anthony; Stolk, Wilma A.; Bosompem, Kwabena M.; Otchere, Joseph; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Habbema, J. Dik F.; de Vlas, Sake J.

2010-01-01

58

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-006  

E-print Network

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-006, 2011 Page 2 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-006 Printed Copies of this Document: October 26, 2011 Page 3 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-006 Printed Copies

deYoung, Brad

59

Ghost Doctors: Absenteeism in Bangladeshi Health Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chaudhury and Hammer report on a study in which unannounced visits were made to health clinics in Bangladesh with the intention of discovering what fraction of medical professionals were present at their assigned post. This survey represents the first attempt to quantify the extent of the problem on a nationally representative scale.Nationwide the average number of vacancies over all types

Nazmul Chaudhury; Jeffrey S. Hammer

2003-01-01

60

Facility siting and health questions: the burden of health risk uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted several evaluations of occupational health problems at or near hazardous waste disposal facilities. Several examples illustrate the variety of public health concerns, including contamination of water supplies, airborne exposure to toxic substances for nearby residential areas, fires affecting nearby residents and local firefighters, and occupational health hazards for workers at these sites. Most of the potential health problems can be prevented with appropriate planning, orientation, and monitoring of the facility. The most difficult part is assuring the community that the design and operation will minimize risks.

Melius, J.M.; Costello, R.J.; Kominsky, J.R.

1984-01-01

61

34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2012-07-01

62

34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2011-07-01

63

34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2014-07-01

64

34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2010-07-01

65

34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2010-07-01

66

34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2013-07-01

67

34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2011-07-01

68

34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2013-07-01

69

34 CFR 75.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Projects § 75.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2012-07-01

70

34 CFR 76.683 - Health or safety standards for facilities.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Health or safety standards for facilities. ...Certain Programs § 76.683 Health or safety standards for facilities. ...shall comply with any Federal health or safety requirements that apply to...

2014-07-01

71

Version Date: 1/5/2012 Page 1 of 3 Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing  

E-print Network

Version Date: 1/5/2012 Page 1 of 3 Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing Peer Review Guidelines & Manuscript Review Form About Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing Cases in Public in public health communication and social marketing. Two peer-reviewed journal issues are published annually

Vertes, Akos

72

8/25/2009 Page 1 of 3 Occupational Health & Safety  

E-print Network

8/25/2009 Page 1 of 3 Occupational Health & Safety Disciplinary Action Overview Under the Occupational Health & Safety Act, the employer is required to ensure the health & safety of workers engaged of supervision. Ensuring competence means that workers must be provided with job safety orientation prior

Calgary, University of

73

Health, Safety & Environment ICICS/Computer Science Emergency/Fire Safety Plan Disaster Planning Page 1  

E-print Network

Health, Safety & Environment ICICS/Computer Science Emergency/Fire Safety Plan Disaster Planning 2012 Health, Safety & Environment, University of British Columbia Emergency Preparedness Planning #12;Health, Safety & Environment ICICS/Computer Science Emergency/Fire Safety Plan Disaster Planning Page 2

Wilton, Steve

74

PCRM Health & Safety President's Council November 16th , 2005 Page 1  

E-print Network

PCRM ­ Health & Safety President's Council ­ November 16th , 2005 Page 1 REVISED Enterprise Risk for Approval Submitted by Joint Health & Safety Committee UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA Policies by Joint Health & Safety Committee 2) the suspension, when necessary, of the use of any radioisotope

Bolch, Tobias

75

UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-10.7 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY  

E-print Network

UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-10.7 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY Effective: 7/8/10 Issuing Office: Environment, Health & Safety Supersedes: 5/1/98 516-10.7 ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION--WASTE DISPOSAL I. REFERENCES A. California Health and Safety Code B. California Code of Regulations C. UCSD

Aluwihare, Lihini

76

PCRM Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15  

E-print Network

PCRM ­ Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH there is reasonable cause to believe that the work would create an undue hazard to the health or safety of any person meetings as a forum for discussing health or safety concerns whether it be the focus or element

Bolch, Tobias

77

Environmental health and safety in health-care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience and research of a team of environmental practitioners at the University of Minnesota are documented in this book which is concerned with developing solutions to environmental health and safety problems in the institutional setting. The book is designed for medical staff, nurses, dietitians, engineers, laboratory personnel, as well as hospital and nursing home administrators. Historic and administrative aspects

R. G. Bond; G. S. Michaelson; R. L. DeRoos

1973-01-01

78

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-009  

E-print Network

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-009, 2011 Page 2 of 9 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-009 Printed Copies of this Document and responsibilities under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, job-specific health and safety policies

deYoung, Brad

79

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-003  

E-print Network

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-003: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-003 Printed Copies where there are any changes that affect workplace health and safety, represented on health and safety

deYoung, Brad

80

Managing facility risk: external threats and health care organizations.  

PubMed

Clinicians and clinical administrators should have a basic understanding of physical and financial risk to mental health facilities related to external physical threat, including actions usually viewed as "terrorism" and much more common sources of violence. This article refers to threats from mentally ill persons and those acting out of bizarre or misguided "revenge," extortionists and other outright criminals, and perpetrators usually identified as domestic or international terrorists. The principles apply both to relatively small and contained acts (such as a patient or ex-patient attacking a staff member) and to much larger events (such as bombings and armed attack), and are relevant to facilities both within and outside the U.S. Patient care and accessibility to mental health services rest not only on clinical skills, but also on a place to practice them and an organized system supported by staff, physical facilities, and funding. Clinicians who have some familiarity with the non-clinical requirements for care are in a position to support non-clinical staff in preventing care from being interrupted by external threats or events such as terrorist activity, and/or to serve at the interface of facility operations and direct clinical care. Readers should note that this article is an introduction to the topic and cannot address all local, state and national standards for hospital safety, or insurance providers' individual facility requirements. PMID:24733720

Reid, Daniel J; Reid, William H

2014-01-01

81

Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information  

E-print Network

medicine, psychologist offering psychological services and nurses who provide mental health services to patients." · Mental Health Services are defined as "assessment, diagnosis, treatment or counseling, conditions or disorders." · Positions that may qualify as Mental Health Service Providers include

Lichtarge, Olivier

82

Trends in antenatal care attendance and health facility delivery following community and health facility systems strengthening interventions in Northern Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal morbidity and mortality remains high in Uganda; largely due to inadequate antenatal care (ANC), low skilled deliveries and poor quality of other maternal health services. In order to address both the demand and quality of ANC and skilled deliveries, we introduced community mobilization and health facility capacity strengthening interventions. Methods Interventions were introduced between January 2010 and September 2011. These included: training health workers, provision of medical supplies, community mobilization using village health teams, music dance and drama groups and male partner access clubs. These activities were implemented at Kitgum Matidi health center III and its catchment area. Routinely collected health facility data on selected outcomes in the year preceding the interventions and after 21 months of implementation of the interventions was reviewed. Trend analysis was performed using excel and statistical significance testing was performed using EPINFO StatCal option. Results The number of pregnant women attending the first ANC visit significantly increased from 114 to 150 in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.39–2.12) and to 202 in the third quarter of 2011(OR 11.41; 95% CI 7.97–16.34). The number of pregnant women counselled, tested and given results for HIV during the first ANC attendance significantly rose from 92 (80.7%) to 146 (97.3%) in the first and fourth quarter of 2010 and then to 201 (99.5%) in the third quarter of 2011. The number of male partners counseled, tested and given results together with their wives at first ANC visit rose from 13 (16.7%) in the fourth quarter of 2009 to 130 (89%) in the fourth quarter of 2010 and to 180 (89.6%) in the third quarter of 2011. There was a significant rise in the number of pregnant women delivering in the health facility with provision of mama-kits (delivery kits), from 74 (55.2%) to 149 (99.3%) in the second and fourth quarter of 2010. Conclusions Combined community and facility systems strengthening interventions led to increased first ANC visits by women and their partners, and health facility deliveries. Interventions aimed at increasing uptake of maternal health services should address both the demand and availability of quality services. PMID:24134717

2013-01-01

83

Health and Safety Policy Page 1 of 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No.1005 Rev.: 4  

E-print Network

Health and Safety Policy Page 1 of 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No.1005 __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Health and Safety Policy safety awareness; meet requirements of environmental, occupational health, and safety laws

Virginia Tech

84

A spatial national health facility database for public health sector planning in Kenya in 2008  

PubMed Central

Background Efforts to tackle the enormous burden of ill-health in low-income countries are hampered by weak health information infrastructures that do not support appropriate planning and resource allocation. For health information systems to function well, a reliable inventory of health service providers is critical. The spatial referencing of service providers to allow their representation in a geographic information system is vital if the full planning potential of such data is to be realized. Methods A disparate series of contemporary lists of health service providers were used to update a public health facility database of Kenya last compiled in 2003. These new lists were derived primarily through the national distribution of antimalarial and antiretroviral commodities since 2006. A combination of methods, including global positioning systems, was used to map service providers. These spatially-referenced data were combined with high-resolution population maps to analyze disparity in geographic access to public health care. Findings The updated 2008 database contained 5,334 public health facilities (67% ministry of health; 28% mission and nongovernmental organizations; 2% local authorities; and 3% employers and other ministries). This represented an overall increase of 1,862 facilities compared to 2003. Most of the additional facilities belonged to the ministry of health (79%) and the majority were dispensaries (91%). 93% of the health facilities were spatially referenced, 38% using global positioning systems compared to 21% in 2003. 89% of the population was within 5 km Euclidean distance to a public health facility in 2008 compared to 71% in 2003. Over 80% of the population outside 5 km of public health service providers was in the sparsely settled pastoralist areas of the country. Conclusion We have shown that, with concerted effort, a relatively complete inventory of mapped health services is possible with enormous potential for improving planning. Expansion in public health care in Kenya has resulted in significant increases in geographic access although several areas of the country need further improvements. This information is key to future planning and with this paper we have released the digital spatial database in the public domain to assist the Kenyan Government and its partners in the health sector. PMID:19267903

Noor, Abdisalan M; Alegana, Victor A; Gething, Peter W; Snow, Robert W

2009-01-01

85

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual Dempsey Hospital. The overall management of the pandemic emergency might deviate from this policy with the patient's health and safety in mind and that of the patient care provider and the John Dempsey Hospital

Oliver, Douglas L.

86

Asbestos Safety Plan Page 1 of 4 Environmental Health and Safety Original: August 30, 2006  

E-print Network

Asbestos Safety Plan Page 1 of 4 Environmental Health and Safety Original: August 30, 2006 Most and procedures in the operations and maintenance of asbestos containing materials at Ramapo College to protect all employees, contractors, visitors and vendors from potential health hazards of asbestos related

Rainforth, Emma C.

87

42 CFR 431.110 - Participation by Indian Health Service facilities.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Participation by Indian Health Service facilities. 431.110 Section 431.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

2014-10-01

88

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 2 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-004  

E-print Network

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 2 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-004: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 2 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety G-004 Printed Copies of the Occupational Health and Safety inspection Division of the Department of Labor. The Director of the Department

deYoung, Brad

89

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-021  

E-print Network

Latest revised date: October 26, 2011 Page 1 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S date: October 26, 2011 Page 2 of 4 Prepared by: Department of Health & Safety S-021 Printed Copies & legislative requirements as set out in Section 4 of the Newfoundland & Labrador Occupational Health & Safety

deYoung, Brad

90

P:\\Policy & Procedures\\FP\\FP#23-Minor Project Status Report.doc Page 1 of 3 Facilities Planning  

E-print Network

dissemination of information regarding minor capital projects. Minor projects have a construction cost less than, building number, project manager, date, account source, if known, and if a building permit is requiredP:\\Policy & Procedures\\FP\\FP#23-Minor Project Status Report.doc Page 1 of 3 Facilities Planning

Fernandez, Eduardo

91

June 2005 Page 1 of 7 Environmental Public Health Tracking  

E-print Network

's Public Health and Environmental Testing Laboratory, and Vermont's Public Health Laboratory in a regional substances or their metabolites in blood, urine, or other specimens. · The Environmental Health Laboratory-relevant method of determining human exposure to environmental hazards is biomonitoring. · Laboratory personnel

92

Health facility committees and facility management - exploring the nature and depth of their roles in Coast Province, Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background Community participation has been emphasized internationally as a way of enhancing accountability, as well as a means to enhance health goals in terms of coverage, access and effective utilization. In rural health facilities in Kenya, initiatives to increase community accountability have focused on Health Facility Committees (HFCs). In Coast Province the role of HFCs has been expanded with the introduction of direct funding of rural facilities. We explored the nature and depth of managerial engagement of HFCs at the facility level in two rural districts in this Coastal setting, and how this has contributed to community accountability Methods We conducted structured interviews with the health worker in-charge and with patients in 30 health centres and dispensaries. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with district managers, and with health workers and HFC members in 12 health centres and dispensaries. In-depth interviews with health workers and HFC members included a participatory exercise to stimulate discussion of the nature and depth of their roles in facility management. Results HFCs were generally functioning well and played an important role in facility operations. The breadth and depth of engagement had reportedly increased after the introduction of direct funding of health facilities which allowed HFCs to manage their own budgets. Although relations with facility staff were generally good, some mistrust was expressed between HFC members and health workers, and between HFC members and the broader community, partially reflecting a lack of clarity in HFC roles. Moreover, over half of exit interviewees were not aware of the HFC's existence. Women and less well-educated respondents were particularly unlikely to know about the HFC. Conclusions There is potential for HFCs to play an active and important role in health facility management, particularly where they have control over some facility level resources. However, to optimise their contribution, efforts are needed to improve their training, clarify their roles, and improve engagement with the wider community. PMID:21936958

2011-01-01

93

Does the Health Maintenance Facility Provide Speciality Capabilities?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) is capable of handling all minor illnesses, most moderate illnesses, and some major illnesses on board a space station. Its primary purpose should be to treat problems that are mission threatening, not life threatening. The HMF will have greater medical capabilities than those currently on Navy submarines. Much of the discussion in this document focuses on the possibilities of treating specific medical conditions on board a space station. The HMF will be limited to caring for critically ill patients for a few days, so a crew return vehicle will be important.

Boyce, Joey; Wurgler, James; Broadwell, Kim; Martin, William; Stiernberg, Charles M.; Bove, Alfred; Fromm, Rob; O'Neill, Daniel

1991-01-01

94

Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 University of California  

E-print Network

Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 University of California as determined by Anthem Blue Cross. When using Non-PPO and Other Health Care Providers, insured persons

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

95

42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities, affiliates, and payor organizations.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities, affiliates, and payor...475.105 Section 475.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

2014-10-01

96

Health system support for childbirth care in Southern Tanzania: results from a health facility census  

PubMed Central

Background Progress towards reaching Millennium Development Goals four (child health) and five (maternal health) is lagging behind, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, despite increasing efforts to scale up high impact interventions. Increasing the proportion of birth attended by a skilled attendant is a main indicator of progress, but not much is known about the quality of childbirth care delivered by these skilled attendants. With a view to reducing maternal mortality through health systems improvement we describe the care routinely offered in childbirth at dispensaries, health centres and hospitals in five districts in rural Southern Tanzania. We use data from a health facility census assessing 159 facilities in five districts in early 2009. A structural and operational assessment was undertaken based on staff reports using a modular questionnaire assessing staffing, work load, equipment and supplies as well as interventions routinely implemented during childbirth. Results Health centres and dispensaries attended a median of eight and four deliveries every month respectively. Dispensaries had a median of 2.5 (IQR 2–3) health workers including auxiliary staff instead of the recommended four clinical officer and certified nurses. Only 28% of first-line facilities (dispensaries and health centres) reported offering active management in the third stage of labour (AMTSL). Essential childbirth care comprising eight interventions including AMTSL, infection prevention, partograph use including foetal monitoring and newborn care including early breastfeeding, thermal care at birth and prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum was offered by 5% of dispensaries, 38% of health centres and 50% of hospitals consistently. No first-line facility had provided all signal functions for emergency obstetric complications in the previous six months. Conclusions Essential interventions for childbirth care are not routinely implemented in first-line facilities or hospitals. Dispensaries have both low staffing and low caseload which constrains the ability to provide high-quality childbirth care. Improvements in quality of care are essential so that women delivering in facility receive “skilled attendance” and adequate care for common obstetric complications such as post-partum haemorrhage. PMID:24171904

2013-01-01

97

Page 1 | B.S. in Public Health | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Public Health  

E-print Network

Page 1 | B.S. in Public Health | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Public Health Academic Plan of Study College of Health & Human Services Department of Public Health Sciences publichealth required prior to declaration. Focus on completing Public Health prerequisite curriculum prior to applying

Raja, Anita

98

NIF conventional facilities construction health and safety plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Plan is to outline the minimum health and safety requirements to which all participating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and non-LLNL employees (excluding National Ignition Facility [NIF] specific contractors and subcontractors covered under the construction subcontract packages (e.g., CSP-9)-see Construction Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility [CSP] Section I.B. ''NIF Construction Contractors and Subcontractors'' for specifics) shall adhere to for preventing job-related injuries and illnesses during Conventional Facilities construction activities at the NIF Project. For the purpose of this Plan, the term ''LLNL and non-LLNL employees'' includes LLNL employees, LLNL Plant Operations staff and their contractors, supplemental labor, contract labor, labor-only contractors, vendors, DOE representatives, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, and others such as visitors, students, consultants etc., performing on-site work or services in support of the NIF Project. Based upon an activity level determination explained in Section 1.2.18, in this document, these organizations or individuals may be required by site management to prepare their own NIF site-specific safety plan. LLNL employees will normally not be expected to prepare a site-specific safety plan. This Plan also outlines job-specific exposures and construction site safety activities with which LLNL and non-LLNL employees shall comply.

Benjamin, D W

1998-05-14

99

Health facilities' obligations when a patient refuses treatment.  

PubMed

Recent cases involving the decisions of Elizabeth Bouvia and G. Ross Henninger to starve themselves to death highlight the ethical obligations of patients, health care facilities, and the courts. When a patient seeks the hospital's cooperation in his or her attempt to commit suicide, society's responsibility is not merely to restrain the patient from suicide but to offer physical care, financial aid, and personal support. The hospital's duty is to intervene, and the court's responsibility is to allow such intervention. The most compassionate way in which the hospital can help is to force-feed the patient. If a patient is mentally competent, the refusal to eat is morally wrong. The patient is morally not permitted to commit suicide, though the avoidance of treatment may be justified in cases when force-feeding would be considered an extraordinary means, because of the patient's age or physical condition, for example. If a patient is incompetent, the refusal to eat is not a fully rational act; for the hospital to refrain from force-feeding would not be considered cooperation in suicide, since the incompetent patient cannot commit suicide. To avoid court rulings that order compliance with a patient's wishes, health care facilities in the future may have to require patients or their families to agree in writing to treatment by ordinary means. PMID:10268324

Gallagher, J

1984-09-01

100

Keynote Paper, Shah, Page 1/13 HEALTH MONITORING OF EARLY AGE CONCRETE  

E-print Network

Keynote Paper, Shah, Page 1/13 HEALTH MONITORING OF EARLY AGE CONCRETE Thomas Voigt, Zhihui Sun The setting and hardening process of concrete can be considered as the most critical time period during the life of a concrete structure. To assure high quality and avoid problems in performance throughout

101

Indoor Air Quality Plan Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety Original: December 15, 2007  

E-print Network

Indoor Air Quality Plan Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety Original: December 15, 2007 and adopted on May 21, 2007. Ramapo College recognizes that good indoor air quality is essential to employee Standard as it applies to our workplace. This Indoor Air Quality Plan applies to all buildings on campus

Rainforth, Emma C.

102

UAVP/policy/EHS #12 Page 1 of 3 Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

UAVP/policy/EHS #12 Page 1 of 3 Environmental Health & Safety Policy & Procedure #12 TITLE EMERGENCY EYE/FACE WASH & SAFETY SHOWER INSPECTION POLICY OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To ensure that emergency eye/face washes and safety showers will work when they are required and to maintain the system free from

Fernandez, Eduardo

103

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 4 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 4 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual or body fluid that is removed during a surgical procedure, medical procedure or autopsy. It has always been our policy to incinerate all pathological waste on-site and this will not change under the new

Oliver, Douglas L.

104

Page 1 of 3 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine BAH-Science 4.; Kaare, M.; Haydon, D.T. Metapopulation dynamics of rabies and the efficacy of vaccination PROCEEDINGS) Evaluation of cost-effective strategies for rabies post-exposure vaccination in low-income countries. PLo

Guo, Zaoyang

105

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

. Blood, tissue, and biologic products from possible CJD patients shall not be used for transfusion of infectivity. Other body substances are also considered hazardous. 3. Items or surfaces contaminated with bloodUniversity of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital Infection Control Manual

Oliver, Douglas L.

106

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.2 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.2 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1 Date Effective: April 14, 2003 Patient Information Policy Privacy Official and Complaint Contact SCOPE: All, are referred to in this policy as LSUHSC-NO. PURPOSE: To establish the requirements and guidelines for each

107

PCRM Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15  

E-print Network

PCRM ­ Health & Safety President's Council Page 1 Motion: 200409.15 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA Policies and Procedures SUBJECT: SAFETY TRAINING FOR NEW UNBC EMPLOYEES , VOLUNTEERS, AND STUDENTS, and students working for or at the University. 3. Authority The Risk & Safety Manager, reporting

Bolch, Tobias

108

Page 1 of 3 One Health Leadership Experience  

E-print Network

Diseases, Public Health Agency of Canada · Dr. Lonnie King, Dean, Ohio State University CVM and Executive 8:15 AM Dr. Lonnie King 9:00 AM Dr. Mark Raizenne 9:45 AM Break and Networking 10:15 AM Dr Guest Leaders: · Dr. Brian Evans, Chief Veterinary Officer and Chief Food Safety Officer for Canada

Peak, Derek

109

School Health Services: A Facility Planning and Design Guide for School Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide for Maryland schools outlines the role of school health services and proper facility design for these services. Chapter 1 provides an overview, describing coordinated school health programs, school health services programs, school health services programs in Maryland, how school health services are delivered, trends, the number of…

Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

110

Nevada Institute for Children's Research and Policy, UNLV April 2014 Results of the 2013-2014 Nevada Kindergarten Health Survey Page 6  

E-print Network

-2014 Nevada Kindergarten Health Survey Page 6 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY To gather additional data on the health status Division of Public and Behavioral Health, conducted a health survey of children entering kindergarten's Research and Policy, UNLV April 2014 Results of the 2013-2014 Nevada Kindergarten Health Survey Page 7

Hemmers, Oliver

111

Mine Safety and Health Administration: Kids Page (title enhanced or provided by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This kid's page offers information on mine safety and the dangers of abandoned mines, an interactive map illustrating which minerals are mined in each state, a presentation on the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and their role in mining, a pictorial history of children working in mines, the amount of minerals, metals and fuels each American will use in a lifetime, and a story based on the practice of taking a canary bird into the mines to warn of low oxygen supply.

112

Oral health champions in long-term care facilities-a pilot study.  

PubMed

This preintervention/postintervention pilot study examined impact of onsite support by a dental hygiene champion (DHC) on oral health and quality of life (QOL) of elderly residents in three long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in Arkansas. Oral health and oral health-related QOL were operationalized using the Oral Health Assessment Tool (OHAT) and Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI), respectively. CNAs in Facility A received standardized oral health education/materials with onsite DHC support. Facility B received education/materials only. Facility C served as control. Data analyses included Wilcoxon-signed rank tests (OHAT) and repeated measures ANOVA (GOHAI) (p ? .05). OHAT postintervention data in Facility A showed significant improvements in three measured areas (tongue health, denture status, and oral cleanliness); in Facility B, one area (tongue health); and none in Facility C. No significant differences were found in GOHAI scores across facilities. Findings suggest that the presence of DHCs in LTCFs may positively impact the oral health of CNA-assisted residents. PMID:25039379

Amerine, Carol; Boyd, Linda; Bowen, Denise M; Neill, Karen; Johnson, Tara; Peterson, Teri

2014-01-01

113

Implementation of tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Mukono and Wakiso districts, Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis infection control (TBIC) is rarely implemented in the health facilities in resource limited settings. Understanding the reasons for low level of implementation is critical. The study aim was to assess TBIC practices and barriers to implementation in two districts in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 51 health facilities in districts of Mukono and Wakiso. The study included: a facility survey, observations of practices and eight focus group discussions with health workers. Results Quantitative: Only 16 facilities (31%) had a TBIC plan. Five facilities (10%) were screening patients for cough. Two facilities (4%) reported providing masks to patients with cough. Ventilation in the waiting areas was inadequate for TBIC in 43% (22/51) of the facilities. No facility possessed N95 particulate respirators. Qualitative: Barriers that hamper implementation of TBIC elicited included: under-staffing, lack of space for patient separation, lack of funds to purchase masks, and health workers not appreciating the importance of TBIC. Conclusion TBIC measures were not implemented in health facilities in the two Ugandan districts where the survey was done. Health system factors like lack of staff, space and funds are barriers to implement TBIC. Effective implementation of TBIC measures occurs when the fundamental health system building blocks -governance and stewardship, financing, infrastructure, procurement and supply chain management are in place and functioning appropriately. PMID:23915376

2013-01-01

114

Page 1 of 5 Alison Van Eenennaam, UC Davis Applications of Animal Biotechnology in Animal Health, January 2009  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 5 Alison Van Eenennaam, UC Davis Applications of Animal Biotechnology in Animal Health, January 2009 POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY ON ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Written by Bill Pohlmeier disapproval among consumers. In addition to enhancing animal well-being, improving animal health has the added

Delany, Mary E.

115

Using scorecards to achieve facility improvements for maternal and newborn health.  

PubMed

The Government of Sierra Leone launched the Free Health Care Initiative in 2010, which contributed to increased use of facility based maternity services. However, emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) facilities were few and were inadequately equipped to meet the increased demand. To ensure provision of EmONC in some priority facilities, the Ministry of Health and Sanitation undertook regular facility assessments. With the use of assessment tools and scorecards it is possible to make improvements to the services provided in the period after assessment. The exercise shows that evidence that is shared with providers in visually engaging formats can help decision-making for facility based improvements. PMID:25097140

Yilla, Mohamed; Nam, Sara L; Adeyemo, Austine; Kargbo, Samuel A

2014-10-01

116

Participation in health planning in a decentralised health system: Experiences from facility governing committees in the Kongwa district of Tanzania.  

PubMed

Tanzania introduced the decentralisation of its health systems in the 1990s in order to provide opportunities for community participation in health planning. Health facility governing committees (HFGCs) were then established to provide room for communities to participate in the management of health service delivery. The objective of this study was to explore the challenges and benefits for the participation of HFGCs in health planning in a decentralised health system. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs). A total of 13 key informants were interviewed from the council and lower-level health facilities. Five FGDs were conducted from five health facilities in one district. Data generated were analysed for themes and patterns. The results of the study suggest that HFGCs are instrumental organs in health planning at the community level and there are several benefits resulting from their participation including an opportunity to address community needs and mobilisation of resources. However, there are some challenges associated with the participation of HFGCs in health planning including a low level of education among committee members and late approval of funds for running health facilities. In conclusion, HFGCs potentially play a significant role in health planning. However, their participation is ineffective due to their limited capacities and disabling environment. PMID:25248312

Frumence, Gasto; Nyamhanga, Tumaini; Mwangu, Mughwira; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

2014-12-01

117

Uses of inorganic hypochlorite (bleach) in health-care facilities.  

PubMed Central

Hypochlorite has been used as a disinfectant for more than 100 years. It has many of the properties of an ideal disinfectant, including a broad antimicrobial activity, rapid bactericidal action, reasonable persistence in treated potable water, ease of use, solubility in water, relative stability, relative nontoxicity at use concentrations, no poisonous residuals, no color, no staining, and low cost. The active species is undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Hypochlorites are lethal to most microbes, although viruses and vegetative bacteria are more susceptible than endospore-forming bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Activity is reduced by the presence of heavy metal ions, a biofilm, organic material, low temperature, low pH, or UV radiation. Clinical uses in health-care facilities include hyperchlorination of potable water to prevent Legionella colonization, chlorination of water distribution systems used in hemodialysis centers, cleaning of environmental surfaces, disinfection of laundry, local use to decontaminate blood spills, disinfection of equipment, decontamination of medical waste prior to disposal, and dental therapy. Despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants, hypochlorites continue to find wide use in hospitals. PMID:9336664

Rutala, W A; Weber, D J

1997-01-01

118

System retrofit provides decentralized heating for mental health facility  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a low temperature/pressure unitary heating equipment which significantly improves building environmental conditions. In 1988, the State of Georgia Department of Human Resources considered closing Brook Run, then named the Georgia Retardation Center. Closing the 101-acre (41-hectare) mental health campus and relocating 377 permanent residents and 925 staff were being considered because of trauma caused by repeated failures of the campus' heating system. The 22-year-old central high temperature water (HTW) campus underground piping system that served HVAC and domestic hot water loads had been leaking 40 gallons per minute (21 million gallons per year) of water at 350F (177C) and 290 psig (1999 kPa). The campus heating system was no longer serviceable. The cost for repairing routine leaks had averaged $100,000 per year. In addition, over $5,000,000 in capital expenditures had been previously spent for system restoration. The facility had been cited for failure to meet federal and state temperature guidelines as a result of repeated wintertime catastrophic heating system failures. Discouraged residents' parents wrote personal checks payable to then-Governor Joe Frank Harris for Heat at Georgia Retardation Center. Ten buildings totaling 191,000 ft[sup 2] (17 744m[sup 2]) were included in the retrofit project. These included five permanent resident cottages, two workshop buildings, a theater, the administration building and the maintenance shop.

Gabriel, G.R. (Krewson Vickrey Gabriel Engineers, P.C., Marietta, GA (United States))

1993-03-01

119

Quality along the Continuum: A Health Facility Assessment of Intrapartum and Postnatal Care in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate “effective coverage” of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana. Methods We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC), emergency newborn care (EmNC) and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated “effective coverage” of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality. Findings Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as “low” or “substandard” for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was “low” or “substandard” in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with “high” or “highest” quality in all dimensions. Conclusion Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated “effective coverage” of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large “quality gap.” Effective coverage could be a meaningful indicator of progress towards reducing maternal and newborn mortality. PMID:24312265

Nesbitt, Robin C.; Lohela, Terhi J.; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Edmond, Karen; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R.; Gabrysch, Sabine

2013-01-01

120

Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response.  

PubMed

Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system. PMID:25276595

Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

2014-08-01

121

Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system. PMID:25276595

Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

2014-01-01

122

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) legislation and its implication on speech privacy design in health care facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 (104th Congress, H.R. 3103, January 3, 1986), among many things, individual patient records and information be protected from unnecessary issue. This responsibility is assigned to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) which has issued a Privacy Rule most recently dated August 2002 with a revision being proposed in 2005 to strengthen penalties for inappropriate breaches of patient privacy. Despite this, speech privacy, in many instances in health care facilities need not be guaranteed by the facility. Nevertheless, the regulation implies that due regard be given to speech privacy in both facility design and operation. This presentation will explore the practical aspects of implementing speech privacy in health care facilities and make recommendations for certain specific speech privacy situations.

Tocci, Gregory C.; Storch, Christopher A.

2005-09-01

123

SDS-PAGE PROTOCOL: NCBS MS-FACILITY H2O (HPLC grade-Spectrochem)  

E-print Network

. Instrument: Amersham Biosciences SE 250 10% SDS PAGE Cocktail Sr No. 10% Separating Gel (ml) Stacking gel (ml 0.1 0.02 TEMED 0.004 0.002 Total volume (ml) 10 2 Casting the gel 1. Before and after experiment make separating gel cocktail and pour into cassette, Overlay the poured gels with several drops

Bhalla, Upinder S.

124

The ownership of health facilities and clinical decisionmaking. The case of the ESRD industry.  

PubMed

The growth of investor-owned health care facilities raises questions about the relationship between profit seeking and medical decisionmaking. The authors compared the treatment received by patients with end-stage renal disease in private nonprofit, for-profit, and public facilities. Using data collected by the Health Care Financing Administration in 1981, they found that facility ownership had a significant independent effect on treatment of renal failure. In particular, patients at for-profit facilities were more likely to be dialyzed in the center and less likely to receive kidney transplants, home dialysis, or peritoneal dialysis than were their counterparts in nonprofit and public facilities. These findings persisted after controlling for characteristics of patients, the facility, and the local health care system, suggesting the need for further research and policy initiatives to deal with this issue. PMID:2648087

Schlesinger, M; Cleary, P D; Blumenthal, D

1989-03-01

125

Health status and socio-economic factors associated with health facility utilization in rural and urban areas in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Abstracts Background With regards to equity, the objective for health care systems is “equal access for equal needs”. We examined associations of predisposing, enabling and need factors with health facility utilization in areas with high HIV prevalence and few people being aware of their HIV status. Methods The data is from a population-based survey among adults aged 15years or older conducted in 2003. The current study is based on a subset of this data of adults 15–49 years with a valid HIV test result. A modified Health behaviour model guided our analytical approach. We report unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals from logistic regression analyses. Results Totals of 1042 males and 1547 females in urban areas, and 822 males and 1055 females in rural areas were included in the study. Overall, 53.1% of urban and 56.8% of rural respondents utilized health facilities past 12 months. In urban areas, significantly more females than males utilized health facilities (OR=1.4 (95% CI [1.1, 1.6]). Higher educational attainment (10+ years of schooling) was associated with utilization of health facilities in both urban (OR=1.7, 95% CI [1.3, 2.1]) and rural (OR=1.4, 95% CI [1.0, 2.0]) areas compared to respondents who attained up to 7 years of schooling. Respondents who self-rated their health status as very poor/ poor/fair were twice more likely to utilize health facilities compared to those who rated their health as good/excellent. Respondents who reported illnesses were about three times more likely to utilize health facilities compared to those who did not report the illnesses. In urban areas, respondents who had mental distress were 1.7 times more likely to utilize health facilities compare to those who had no mental distress. Compared to respondents who were HIV negative, respondents who were HIV positive were 1.3 times more likely to utilize health facilities. Conclusion The health care needs were the factors most strongly associated with health care seeking. After accounting for need differentials, health care seeking differed modestly by urban and rural residence, was somewhat skewed towards women, and increased substantially with socioeconomic position. PMID:23145945

2012-01-01

126

Physical access to health facilities and contraceptive use in Kenya: evidence from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to determine the spatial variation in modern contraceptive use and unmet need for family planning across the counties of Kenya and to examine whether the spatial patterns were associated with inequalities in physical access to health facilities. Data were obtained from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey and linked to the location of health facilities in the country. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the influence of distance to the nearest health facility and health facility density, in addition to other covariates, on modern contraceptive use and unmet need. Overall, the prevalence of modern contraceptive use and unmet need among women aged 15-49 in Kenya was 42.1% and 19.7% respectively. Among the respondents who lived more than 5 km from the nearest health facility modern contraceptive use was significantly less likely compared to women resident 5 km or less from the nearest health facility. Women from counties with higher health facility density were 53% more likely to use modern contraceptives compared to women in counties with low health facility density. Distance and health facility density in the county were not significantly associated with unmet need. Physical access to health facilities is an important determinant of modern contraceptive use and unmet need in Kenya. Strategies should be developed in underserved counties to mitigate the challenge of distance to health facilities, such as delivering services by outreach and mobile facilities. PMID:23437499

Ettarh, Remare R; Kyobutungi, Catherine

2012-09-01

127

Monitoring child survival in ‘real time’ using routine health facility records: results from Malawi  

PubMed Central

Objectives Few developing countries have the accurate civil registration systems needed to track progress in child survival. However, the health information systems in most of these countries do record facility births and deaths, at least in principle. We used data from two districts of Malawi to test a method for monitoring child mortality based on adjusting health facility records for incomplete coverage. Methods Trained researchers collected reports of monthly births and deaths among children younger than 5 years from all health facilities in Balaka and Salima districts of Malawi in 2010–2011. We estimated the proportion of births and deaths occurring in health facilities, respectively, from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey and a household mortality survey conducted between October 2011 and February 2012. We used these proportions to adjust the health facility data to estimate the actual numbers of births and deaths. The survey also provided ‘gold-standard’ measures of under-five mortality. Results Annual under-five mortality rates generated by adjusting health facility data were between 35% and 65% of those estimated by the gold-standard survey in Balaka, and 46% and 50% in Salima for four overlapping 12-month periods in 2010–2011. The ratios of adjusted health facility rates to gold-standard rates increased sharply over the four periods in Balaka, but remained relatively stable in Salima. Conclusions Even in Malawi, where high proportions of births and deaths occur in health facilities compared with other countries in sub-Saharan Africa, routine Health Management Information Systems data on births and deaths cannot be used at present to estimate annual trends in under-five mortality. PMID:23906285

Amouzou, Agbessi; Kachaka, Willie; Banda, Benjamin; Chimzimu, Martina; Hill, Kenneth; Bryce, Jennifer

2013-01-01

128

Effects of the community mental health centers program on the growth of mental health facilities in nonmetropolitan areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a quasi-experimental design, changes in the numbers of mental health facilities between 1964 and 1974 were examined for a sample of 50 nonmetropolitan catchment areas that established a Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) before January 1973 and a sample that did not. Compared to non-CMHC areas, CMHC areas had a slightly greater number of general hospital psychiatric units in

Jeffrey A. Buck

1984-01-01

129

PAGE 1 Northwestern University Health Service 633 Emerson Street Evanston, IL. 60208 | Phone: 847-491-8100 | Fax: 847-491-8699 rev.3/2013 lat Northwestern University Health Service  

E-print Network

PAGE 1 Northwestern University Health Service ­ 633 Emerson Street ­ Evanston, IL. 60208 | Phone. Mail to: Northwestern University Health Service, Health Information Management Services, 633 Emerson St will be applied to your account. #12;PAGE 2 Northwestern University Health Service ­ 633 Emerson Street ­ Evanston

Chisholm, Rex L.

130

Sharps injury recordkeeping activities and safety product use in California health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In 1999, licensed health care facilities in California (N = 2532) were invited to participate in a survey about occupational bloodborne pathogens exposure surveillance activities, recordkeeping methods, and use of safety-enhanced sharps devices. Results: A total of 1274 facilities responded to the survey from January 1999 through August 1999 (response rate = 50%). Sharps-related injuries were recorded for multiple

Marion Gillen; Martha Davis; Jennifer McNary; Alisa Boyd; Julieann Lewis; Chris Curran; Carol A. Young; Mary Schuller; James Cone

2002-01-01

131

Developing a community-based neonatal care intervention: a health facility assessment to inform intervention design.  

PubMed

Community-based interventions are an important way of improving health in low-income countries. A necessary prerequisite for the design of such interventions is an understanding of the local health system. This will inform intervention design, help ensure the community-intervention forms part of a continuum of care, and provide information about health system strengthening activities that may be necessary for success. Such formative research processes, however, are seldom reported in the literature. We present the results of a health facility assessment used in the design stage of Newhints, a community-based intervention to improve neonatal survival in rural Ghana. We illustrate the methodology, findings and how these were used to inform the design and implementation of Newhints. The assessment involved key informant interviews with staff members at seven health facilities within the study area, including a brief inventory of available drugs and equipment. The key informant interviews identified that practices and health promotion messages at the health facilities were not consistent with one of the key target behaviours of the Newhints intervention - thermal care through delayed infant bathing. Health workers were bathing neonates soon after delivery and also advising women to do the same, which is a potential cause of hypothermia for the newborn. We found that health centres other than large district hospitals were ill-equipped to treat serious complications of labour or illness in the newborn, which had implications for advice on health seeking behaviour within the intervention. As a result of the health facility assessment, it was deemed necessary to undertake both health worker training and sensitisation activities. We demonstrate that important information can be yielded from a relatively simple health facility assessment involving key informant interviews. PMID:21281331

Howe, Laura D; Manu, Alexander; Tawiah-Agyemang, Charlotte; Kirkwood, Betty R; Hill, Zelee

2011-03-01

132

Page 1 D. Dilling, T. Brown FIRE FACILITIES AND SITE REQUIREMENTS  

E-print Network

-T shots, will be about 1.5 kg. All fuel reprocessing equipment will be doubly confined, by gloveboxes with regulations for nuclear facilities. They must also include systems to manage tritium and tritiated water implications for the fuel supply, vacuum pumping, fuel recovery, cooling, and other balance of plant systems

133

Prevalence and predictors of giving birth in health facilities in Bugesera District, Rwanda  

PubMed Central

Background The proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel is one of two indicators used to measure progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5, which aims for a 75% reduction in global maternal mortality ratios by 2015. Rwanda has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world, estimated between 249–584 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. The objectives of this study were to quantify secular trends in health facility delivery and to identify factors that affect the uptake of intrapartum healthcare services among women living in rural villages in Bugesera District, Eastern Province, Rwanda. Methods Using census data and probability proportional to size cluster sampling methodology, 30 villages were selected for community-based, cross-sectional surveys of women aged 18–50 who had given birth in the previous three years. Complete obstetric histories and detailed demographic data were elicited from respondents using iPad technology. Geospatial coordinates were used to calculate the path distances between each village and its designated health center and district hospital. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with delivery in health facilities. Results Analysis of 3106 lifetime deliveries from 859 respondents shows a sharp increase in the percentage of health facility deliveries in recent years. Delivering a penultimate baby at a health facility (OR = 4.681 [3.204 - 6.839]), possessing health insurance (OR = 3.812 [1.795 - 8.097]), managing household finances (OR = 1.897 [1.046 - 3.439]), attending more antenatal care visits (OR = 1.567 [1.163 - 2.112]), delivering more recently (OR = 1.438 [1.120 - 1.847] annually), and living closer to a health center (OR = 0.909 [0.846 - 0.976] per km) were independently associated with facility delivery. Conclusions The strongest correlates of facility-based delivery in Bugesera District include previous delivery at a health facility, possession of health insurance, greater financial autonomy, more recent interactions with the health system, and proximity to a health center. Recent structural interventions in Rwanda, including the rapid scale-up of community-financed health insurance, likely contributed to the dramatic improvement in the health facility delivery rate observed in our study. PMID:23217157

2012-01-01

134

page 1Student Health and Counseling Services Resource Guide: 2013-2014 Health Contact Information  

E-print Network

that facilitates health partnerships between individual patients and their personal physicians. All students Services) 530.752.2300 Advice Nurse/ Appointment Desk (Medical Services) 530.752.2349 Appointment in their own care. A patient/ provider partnership fosters better communication, understanding

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

135

Health workers' knowledge of and attitudes towards computer applications in rural African health facilities  

PubMed Central

Background The QUALMAT (Quality of Maternal and Prenatal Care: Bridging the Know-do Gap) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pre-natal and maternal care services in rural primary health facilities in Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Tanzania. Objective To report an assessment of health providers’ computer knowledge, experience, and attitudes prior to the implementation of the QUALMAT electronic CDSS. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted with providers in 24 QUALMAT project sites. Information was collected using structured questionnaires. Chi-squared tests and one-way ANOVA describe the association between computer knowledge, attitudes, and other factors. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted to gain further insights. Results A total of 108 providers responded, 63% were from Tanzania and 37% from Ghana. The mean age was 37.6 years, and 79% were female. Only 40% had ever used computers, and 29% had prior computer training. About 80% were computer illiterate or beginners. Educational level, age, and years of work experience were significantly associated with computer knowledge (p<0.01). Most (95.3%) had positive attitudes towards computers – average score (±SD) of 37.2 (±4.9). Females had significantly lower scores than males. Interviews and group discussions showed that although most were lacking computer knowledge and experience, they were optimistic about overcoming challenges associated with the introduction of computers in their workplace. Conclusions Given the low levels of computer knowledge among rural health workers in Africa, it is important to provide adequate training and support to ensure the successful uptake of electronic CDSSs in these settings. The positive attitudes to computers found in this study underscore that also rural care providers are ready to use such technology. PMID:25361721

Sukums, Felix; Mensah, Nathan; Mpembeni, Rose; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E.; Blank, Antje

2014-01-01

136

42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

2014-10-01

137

Health Professions Education Facilities in the Non-Profit Sector. 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study of the physical facilities of the nation's health professions schools, all schools of dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, public health, and veterinary medicine, and all parent institutions of the schools, were surveyed in May of 1973. The major goals of this pioneering survey were to assess the nature and…

Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

138

Management of Childhood Illness at Health Facilities in Benin: Problems and Their Causes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. To prepare for the implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in Benin, we studied the management of ill children younger than 5 years at outpatient health facilities. Methods. We observed a representative sample of consultations; after each consultation, we interviewed caregivers and reexamined children. Health workers' performance was evaluated against IMCI guidelines. To identify determinants of performance,

Alexander K. Rowe; Faustin Onikpo; Marcel Lama; Francois Cokou; Michael S. Deming

139

The Status of Optometric Residency Programs at Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An overview of the 68 optometric residencies offered at 35 health care facilities of the Department of Veterans Affairs looks at the resident selection system, accrediting and position funding, and growth in residency positions since 1975. A new primary care education program open to a number of health care disciplines is highlighted. (MSE)

Messer, Timothy I.

1995-01-01

140

Police and public health partnerships: Evidence from the evaluation of Vancouver's supervised injection facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In various settings, drug market policing strategies have been found to have unintended negative effects on health service use among injection drug users (IDU). This has prompted calls for more effective coordination of policing and public health efforts. In Vancouver, Canada, a supervised injection facility (SIF) was established in 2003. We sought to determine if local police impacted utilization of

Kora DeBeck; Evan Wood; Ruth Zhang; Mark Tyndall; Julio Montaner; Thomas Kerr

2008-01-01

141

Training the Auxiliary Health Workers; An Analysis of Functions, Training Content, Training Costs, and Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The booklet describes what each type of worker is allowed to do and presents an overview of the substantive content of the training, length of training, training costs, and kinds of facilities and staff needed. The types of workers include community health aide, homemaker-home health aide, social worker aide, food service supervisor, physical…

Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

142

Health sciences libraries in Kuwait: a study of their resources, facilities, and services  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of health sciences libraries in Kuwait in terms of their staff, collections, facilities, use of information technology, information services, and cooperation. Seventeen libraries participated in the study. Results show that the majority of health sciences libraries were established during the 1980s. Their collections are relatively small. The majority of their staff is nonprofessional. The majority of libraries provide only basic information services. Cooperation among libraries is limited. Survey results also indicate that a significant number of health sciences libraries are not automated. Some recommendations for the improvement of existing resources, facilities, and services are made. PMID:11465688

Al-Ansari, Husain A.; Al-Enezi, Sana

2001-01-01

143

Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T. [and others

1991-12-01

144

Needs and opportunities for improving the health, safety, and productivity of medical research facilities.  

PubMed

Medical research facilities, indeed all the nation's constructed facilities, must be designed, operated, and maintained in a manner that supports the health, safety, and productivity of the occupants. The National Construction Goals, established by the National Science and Technology Council, envision substantial improvements in occupant health and worker productivity. The existing research and best practices case studies support this conclusion, but too frequently building industry professionals lack the knowledge to design, construct, operate, and maintain facilities at these optimum levels. There is a need for more research and more collaborative efforts between medical and facilities engineering researchers and practitioners in order to attain the National Construction Goals. Such collaborative efforts will simultaneously support attainment of the National Health Goals. This article is the summary report of the Healthy Buildings Committee for the Leadership Conference: Biomedical Facilities and the Environment sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the National Association of Physicians for the Environment, and the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers on 1--2 November 1999 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. PMID:11124125

Hodgson, M; Brodt, W; Henderson, D; Loftness, V; Rosenfeld, A; Woods, J; Wright, R

2000-12-01

145

Needs and opportunities for improving the health, safety, and productivity of medical research facilities.  

PubMed Central

Medical research facilities, indeed all the nation's constructed facilities, must be designed, operated, and maintained in a manner that supports the health, safety, and productivity of the occupants. The National Construction Goals, established by the National Science and Technology Council, envision substantial improvements in occupant health and worker productivity. The existing research and best practices case studies support this conclusion, but too frequently building industry professionals lack the knowledge to design, construct, operate, and maintain facilities at these optimum levels. There is a need for more research and more collaborative efforts between medical and facilities engineering researchers and practitioners in order to attain the National Construction Goals. Such collaborative efforts will simultaneously support attainment of the National Health Goals. This article is the summary report of the Healthy Buildings Committee for the Leadership Conference: Biomedical Facilities and the Environment sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the National Association of Physicians for the Environment, and the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers on 1--2 November 1999 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. PMID:11124125

Hodgson, M; Brodt, W; Henderson, D; Loftness, V; Rosenfeld, A; Woods, J; Wright, R

2000-01-01

146

Chapter to appear in book "Future of Health Technology", 2001, OIS Press. Page 1 Affective Medicine: Technology with  

E-print Network

by stress in the human body, influencing not only immune system functioning but also heart rate variabilityChapter to appear in book "Future of Health Technology", 2001, OIS Press. Page 1 Affective Medicine at giving computers the ability to comfortably sense, recognize, and respond to certain aspects of human

147

O:\\AVP\\EHS\\EH&S #20-Contractors-MinorProjects.doc Page 1 of 3 Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

of work to building occupants, and unexpected cost to the University. This policy applies to workO:\\AVP\\EHS\\EH&S #20- Contractors-MinorProjects.doc Page 1 of 3 Environmental Health & Safety Policy & Procedure #20 TITLE CONTRACTORS RESPONSIBIITIES ON MINOR PROJECTS OVERVIEW Florida Atlantic University (FAU

Fernandez, Eduardo

148

Engineering Control of Airborne Disease Transmission in Health Care Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Hospital acquired illness or “nosocomial” illness is of increasing concern to public health administrators, hospitals, physicians\\u000a and patients. Engineering infection control measures are used to reduce the concentration and prevent the spread of these\\u000a particles throughout a building in order to decrease exposure to and risk of illness from infectious pathogens. The engineer\\u000a who attempts to deal with microbial indoor

D. Curseu; M. Popa; D. Sirbu

149

Preventing Airborne Disease Transmission: Review of Methods for Ventilation Design in Health Care Facilities  

PubMed Central

Health care facility ventilation design greatly affects disease transmission by aerosols. The desire to control infection in hospitals and at the same time to reduce their carbon footprint motivates the use of unconventional solutions for building design and associated control measures. This paper considers indoor sources and types of infectious aerosols, and pathogen viability and infectivity behaviors in response to environmental conditions. Aerosol dispersion, heat and mass transfer, deposition in the respiratory tract, and infection mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on experimental and modeling approaches. Key building design parameters are described that include types of ventilation systems (mixing, displacement, natural and hybrid), air exchange rate, temperature and relative humidity, air flow distribution structure, occupancy, engineered disinfection of air (filtration and UV radiation), and architectural programming (source and activity management) for health care facilities. The paper describes major findings and suggests future research needs in methods for ventilation design of health care facilities to prevent airborne infection risk. PMID:22162813

Aliabadi, Amir A.; Rogak, Steven N.; Bartlett, Karen H.; Green, Sheldon I.

2011-01-01

150

Food security practice in Kansas schools and health care facilities.  

PubMed

This pilot study investigated perceived importance and frequency of specific preventive measures, and food and nutrition professionals' and foodservice directors' willingness to develop a food defense management plan. A mail questionnaire was developed based on the US Department of Agriculture document, Biosecurity Checklist for School Foodservice Programs--Developing a Biosecurity Management Plan. The survey was sent to food and nutrition professionals and foodservice operators in 151 acute care hospitals, 181 long-term-care facilities, and 450 school foodservice operations. Chemical use and storage was perceived as the most important practice to protect an operation and was the practice implemented most frequently. Results of the study indicate training programs on food security are needed to increase food and nutrition professionals' motivation to implement preventive measures. PMID:17258972

Yoon, Eunju; Shanklin, Carol W

2007-02-01

151

Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. Methods All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75 % in 2005, 71 % in 2007, and 94 % in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form) for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support) model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. Results One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Conclusion Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors. PMID:22551645

2012-01-01

152

On the value of architecture and facility management in health administration education.  

PubMed

This article discusses the role and function of architecture and facility management in health administration education vis-à-vis an interdisciplinary set of courses taught in a graduate-level health administration program. These courses provide the future health care executive with theory and applied knowledge on a variety of topics. These include the history of health care facilities, issues in facility planning and management, principles of patient and staff-focused design, campus master planning, participatory methods to involve end users in the design of their work, and care settings. Additional skills acquired include an introduction to contract negotiations, the reading of technical documents such as blueprints, the post-occupancy assessment of facilities-in-use, and familiarity with future trends. Students address the topic of managerial ethics in relation to the built environment in some detail as a vehicle to illustrate the nature of key fine-grain issues of importance to the health administration scholar and professional. The discussion concludes with the presentation of a model curriculum in this subject area. PMID:12199634

Verderber, Stephen F

2002-01-01

153

Determining health-care facility catchment areas in Uganda using data on malaria-related visits  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To illustrate the use of a new method for defining the catchment areas of health-care facilities based on their utilization. Methods The catchment areas of six health-care facilities in Uganda were determined using the cumulative case ratio: the ratio of the observed to expected utilization of a facility for a particular condition by patients from small administrative areas. The cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to these facilities was determined using data from the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project. Catchment areas were also derived using various straight line and road network distances from the facility. Subsequently, the 1-year cumulative malaria case rate was calculated for each catchment area, as determined using the three methods. Findings The 1-year cumulative malaria case rate varied considerably with the method used to define the catchment areas. With the cumulative case ratio approach, the catchment area could include noncontiguous areas. With the distance approaches, the denominator increased substantially with distance, whereas the numerator increased only slightly. The largest cumulative case rate per 1000 population was for the Kamwezi facility: 234.9 (95% confidence interval, CI: 226.2–243.8) for a straight-line distance of 5 km, 193.1 (95% CI: 186.8–199.6) for the cumulative case ratio approach and 156.1 (95% CI: 150.9–161.4) for a road network distance of 5 km. Conclusion Use of the cumulative case ratio for malaria-related visits to determine health-care facility catchment areas was feasible. Moreover, this approach took into account patients’ actual addresses, whereas using distance from the facility did not. PMID:24700977

Charland, Katia; Kigozi, Ruth; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R; Buckeridge, David L

2014-01-01

154

Potential community and public health impacts of medically supervised safer smoking facilities for crack cocaine users  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is growing evidence of the public health and community harms associated with crack cocaine smoking, particularly the risk of blood-borne transmission through non-parenteral routes. In response, community advocates and policy makers in Vancouver, Canada are calling for an exemption from Health Canada to pilot a medically supervised safer smoking facility (SSF) for non-injection drug users (NIDU). Current reluctance on

Kate Shannon; Tomiye Ishida; Robert Morgan; Arthur Bear; Megan Oleson; Thomas Kerr; Mark W Tyndall

2006-01-01

155

New NFPA-99 requirements for electrical systems in health care facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1990 Edition of NFPA-99 Standard for Health Care Facilities was approved by the National Fire Protection Association at its November 13-15, 1989 fall meeting in Seattle, Washington. An analysis of the changes affecting the essential electrical system, with specific consideration of the transfer equipment, is presented. How the new edition can help improve the dependability and proper continuity of

L. F. Hogreb

1990-01-01

156

Understanding NUI-supported Nomadic Social Places in a Brazilian Health Care Facility  

E-print Network

Understanding NUI-supported Nomadic Social Places in a Brazilian Health Care Facility Roberto the natural socializing practices of Brazilians within a chronic care hospital setting in order to understand and the privateness of home, where social links are exercised through inclusive and playful conversation. We performed

British Columbia, University of

157

INVITED EDITORIAL: Health effects of radiation exposure at uranium processing facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial public and scientific interest in the health consequences of exposures to ionising radiation in nuclear installations, in particular at nuclear fuels enrichment and production facilities. In this issue of Journal of Radiological Protection, McGeoghegan and Binks report on the follow-up of a cohort of over 19 000 uranium fuel and uranium hexafluoride production workers employed at the

Elisabeth Cardis; David Richardson

2000-01-01

158

Lessons Learned from the On-Site Distillation of Used Solvents Generated by Health Care Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the sources of contaminants found in used solvents generated by the histopathological laboratories at health care facilities and the technical problems, corrective measures, and economic analysis associated with the on-site recycling and reusing of these solvents. An appendix contains an economic analysis for a used-solvent recycling…

Huang, Ching-San; Ciesla, John

1992-01-01

159

Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient facilities that provide health services to the  

E-print Network

Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient, primary care, college health care, school- based care, and occupational health, Pohl, et. al. (2010). A Nurse Managed Health Center can be independently operated, be based in a public school, or University

Firestone, Jeremy

160

Exploring the perspectives and experiences of health workers at primary health facilities in Kenya following training  

PubMed Central

Background A cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a national Kenyan mental health primary care training programme demonstrated a significant impact for health workers on the health, disability and quality of life of their clients, despite a severe shortage of medicines in the clinics. In order to better understand the potential reasons for the improved outcomes in the intervention group, the experiences of the participating health workers were explored through qualitative focus group discussions, as focus group methodology has been found to be a useful method of obtaining a detailed understanding of client and health worker perspectives within health systems. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 10 health workers from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training during the earlier randomised controlled trial. Results These focus group discussions suggest that the health workers in the intervention group perceived an increase in their communication, diagnostic and counselling skills, and that the clients in the intervention group noticed and appreciated these enhanced skills, while health workers and clients in the control group were both aware of the lack of these skills. Conclusion Enhanced health worker skills conferred by the mental health training programme may be responsible for the significant improvement in outcome of patients in the intervention clinics found in the randomised controlled trial, despite the general shortage of medicines and other health system weaknesses. These findings suggest that strengthening mental health training for primary care staff is worthwhile even where health systems are not strong and where the medicine supply cannot be guaranteed. Trial registration ISRCTN 53515024 PMID:23379737

2013-01-01

161

Measuring governance at health facility level: developing and validation of simple governance tool in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Background Governance has been cited as a key determinant of economic growth, social advancement and overall development. Achievement of millennium development goals is partly dependant on governance practices. In 2007, Health Systems 20/20 conducted an Internet-based survey on the practice of good governance. The survey posed a set of good practices related to health governance and asked respondents to indicate whether their experience confirmed or disconfirmed those practices. We applied the 17 governance statements in rural health facilities of Zambia. The aim was to establish whether the statements were reliable and valid for assessing governance practices at primary care level. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. We first applied the governance statements developed by the health system 20/20 and then conducted focus group discussion and In-depth interviews to explore some elements of governance including accountability and community participation. The target respondents were the health facility management team and community members. The sample size include 42 health facilities. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 and Nvivo version 9. Results The 95% one-sided confidence interval for Cronbach’s alpha was between 0.69 and 0.74 for the 16 items. The mean score for most of the items was above 3. Factor analysis yielded five principle components: Transparency, community participation, Intelligence & vision, Accountability and Regulation & oversight. Most of the items (6) clustered around the transparency latent factor. Chongwe district performed poorly in overall mean governance score and across the five domains of governance. The overall scores in Chongwe ranged between 51 and 94% with the mean of 80%. Kafue and Luangwa districts had similar overall mean governance scores (88%). Community participation was generally low. Generally, it was noted that community members lacked capacity to hold health workers accountable for drugs and medical supplies. Conclusions The study successfully validated and applied the new tool for evaluating health system governance at health facility level. The results have shown that it is feasible to measure governance practices at health facility level and that the adapted tool is fairly reliable with the 95% one-sided confidence interval for Cronbach’s alpha laying between 0.69 and 0.74 for the 16 items. Caution should be taken when interpreting overall scores as they tended to mask domain specific variations. PMID:23927531

2013-01-01

162

Health facilities safety in natural disasters: experiences and challenges from South East Europe.  

PubMed

The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations. PMID:22754465

Radovic, Vesela; Vitale, Ksenija; Tchounwou, Paul B

2012-05-01

163

Page 1 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE Form WH-380-E Revised January2009 Certification of HealthCareProviderfor  

E-print Network

CareProviderfor Employee's Serious Health Condition Family Leave (Family and Medical Leave Act) U.S. Department of Labor: For Completion by the EMPLOYER INSTRUCTIONS to the EMPLOYER: The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides.g., physical therapist)? No Yes. If so, state the nature of such treatments and expected duration of treatment

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

164

Prevalence of Malaria during Pregnancy and Antimalarial Intervention in an Urban Secondary Health Care Facility in Southern Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of malaria during pregnancy and antimalarial interventions in an urban secondary health care facility. Subjects and Methods: Of 432 pregnant women who delivered or were attending an antenatal clinic in a secondary health care facility in Benin City, Nigeria, 199 were recruited for the study. Demographic data were obtained from the pregnant women at delivery,

Ehijie F. O. Enato; Augustine O. Okhamafe; Eugene E. Okpere; Frederick I. Oseji

2007-01-01

165

Birth in a Health Facility -Inequalities among the Ethiopian Women: Results from Repeated National Surveys  

PubMed Central

Background Uptake of health facilities for delivery care in Ethiopia has not been examined in the light of equality. We investigated differences in institutional deliveries by urbanity, administrative region, economic status and maternal education. Methods This study was based on nation-wide repeated surveys undertaken in the years 2000, 2005, and 2011. The surveys used a cluster sampling design. Women of reproductive age were interviewed on the place of their last delivery. Data was analyzed using logistic regressions to estimate the weighted association between birth in a health facility and study's predictors. Results Utilization of health institutions for deliveries has improved throughout the study period, however, rates remain low (5.4%,2000 and 11.8%,2011). Compared with women from rural places, women from urban areas had independent OR of a health facility delivery of 4.9 (95% CI: 3.4, 7.0), 5.0 (95% CI: 3.6, 6.9), and 4.6 (95% CI: 3.5, 6.0) in 2000, 2005, and 2011, respectively. Women with secondary/higher education had more deliveries in a healthcare facility than women with no education, and these gaps widened over the years (OR: 35.1, 45.0 and 53.6 in 2000, 2005, and 2011, respectively). Women of the upper economic quintile had 3.0–7.2 times the odds of healthcare facility deliveries, compared with the lowest quintile, with no clear trend over the years. While Addis-Ababa and Dire Dawa remained with the highest OR for deliveries in a health facility compared with Amhara, other regions displayed shifts in their relative ranking with Oromiya, SNNPR, Afar, Harari, and Somali getting relatively worse over time. Conclusions The disparity related to urbanity or education in the use of health facility for birth in Ethiopia is staggering. There is a small inequality between most regions except Addis Ababa/Dire Dawa and sign of abating inequity between economic strata except for the richest households. PMID:24751600

Yesuf, Elias Ali; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

2014-01-01

166

Formal and informal maternal health care: comparing the service provision of health facilities and village health volunteers in East Sepik Province.  

PubMed

Maternal health across Papua New Guinea (PNG) is of extreme public health concern. In response, the National Department of Health explicitly prioritized improving maternal, neonatal and child health services, envisaging increased collaboration between the formal health system and community-based initiatives as one method for achieving this. This study examined the patterns of formal and non-formal service utilization during pregnancy and childbirth in one province. We analysed the activity database of the East Sepik Women and Children's Health Project's Village Health Volunteer (VHV) program, an informal health service in East Sepik Province of PNG, estimating VHV activity and coverage for two maternal health care services (first antenatal care visit and VHV-attended deliveries) and comparing these to the volume and estimated coverage of these services delivered by the formal health system in East Sepik over the years 2007 to 2010. We found a significant increase in women's utilization of VHVs for first antenatal care and for an attended delivery. Reported coverage of these services delivered by the formal health service declined or at best remained static over the same time period. Our data cannot illuminate the causes of an apparent and highly concerning decline in health facility usage for assisted delivery, nor the reasons for increased usage of VHVs. The factors contributing to these trends in service provision require urgent study, to improve our understanding of the drivers of utilization of critical maternal health services. Our study demonstrates that VHVs deliver a substantial proportion of maternal health services in East Sepik. This finding alone highlights the importance of considering this cadre when planning health service improvements and suggests that a national VHV policy that builds on the work of the National Health Plan in defining the most appropriate role for VHVs in maternal health care is long overdue. PMID:24494511

O'Keefe, Daniel; Davis, Jessica; Yakuna, Glenda; Van Gemert, Caroline; Morgan, Chris

2011-01-01

167

Nursing attrition and the work environment in South African health facilities.  

PubMed

A number of media reports appeared on the shortages of professional health workers in the public health sector. Unsatisfactory working conditions in health facilities were mentioned as one of the key aspects responsible for the shortages. Literature indicates that stress caused by unsatisfactory work environments may play a major role in employees' decision to resign their jobs, in spite of enjoying the nature of their work. The aim of this article is to explore the current human resource situation in nursing i.e. to determine if a shortage of nursing skills exists, to establish the challenges that nurses have to face in performing their duties and to establish the potential effect of the work environment on attrition. Currently 155 484 nurses are practicing in South Africa at a rate of 343 nurses per 100 000 of the population, which compares favourably with the World Health Organisation minimum of 200:100 000. The lack of reliable data on the supply of and demand for nurses makes it difficult to determine whether real shortages exist. However the supply of nursing services is influenced by the uneven distribution of skills across regions and the outflow of professional skills. It seems that the existing situation will deteriorate because fewer people are interested in taking up or pursuing nursing as a career in South Africa. At the same time a need for more nurses was identified because of the growth in the population as well as a change in health care needs. Workplace conditions for health workers employed at hospitals and clinics in South Africa were explored as part of a recent national study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on the health sector. Health workers' opinions on aspects such as workload, staff morale and working hours were obtained during personal interviews, which were conducted at 222 health facilities. Nine hundred and twenty four professional nurses, enrolled nurses and nursing assistants, who were mostly employed in the public health sector, participated. A stressful work environment was identified in public hospitals and clinics. An increase in the number of patients visiting these facilities, accompanied by a lack of equipment, unsatisfactory work environment and a shortage of nurses were pointed out. Many patients cannot be accommodated elsewhere because of a lack of finance and alternative health care options. Nurses also indicated that they do not get much support from their employers. The effect of all these factors culminates in a stressed workforce who may be forced to consider alternative career options. This will be to the detriment of health care in the country. PMID:15712823

Hall, E J

2004-11-01

168

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina--29 Counties Report #2.201, May 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina--29 Counties Report #2.201, May 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.201 May 2012 Center for Health Systems Research and Development East Carolina

169

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, August 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, August 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.203 August 2014 Center for Health Systems Research and Development

170

Trends and Disparities in Specific Cancer Mortality in Eastern North Carolina Report #2.203, September 2009 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Specific Cancer Mortality in Eastern North Carolina Report #2.203, September 2009 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.203 September 2009 Center for Health Services Research

171

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, February 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, February 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.203 February 2014 Center for Health Systems Research and Development

172

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina--29 Counties Report #2.201, September 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina--29 Counties Report #2.201, September 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.201 September 2012 Center for Health Systems Research and Development

173

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, September 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, September 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.203 September 2012 Center for Health Systems Research and Development

174

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-29 Counties Report #2.201, August 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-29 Counties Report #2.201, August 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.201 August 2014 Center for Health Systems Research and Development

175

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, May 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-41 Counties Report #2.203, May 2012 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.203 May 2012 Center for Health Systems Research and Development East Carolina

176

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-29 Counties Report #2.201, February 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Eastern North Carolina-29 Counties Report #2.201, February 2014 PageCenter for Health Systems Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.201 February 2014 Center for Health Systems Research and Development

177

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Robeson County Report #2.155, November 2011 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU  

E-print Network

Trends and Disparities in Mortality in Robeson County Report #2.155, November 2011 PageCenter for Health Services Research and Development, ECU A Resource for Healthy Communities Health Indicator Series - Report #2.155 November 2011 Center for Health Services Research and Development East Carolina University

178

Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in rural health facilities in southern Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: One year after the adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS\\/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, this study was designed to assess the treatment practices regarding anti-malarial drugs at health facilities in four rural areas in southern Cameroon. METHODS: Between April and August 2005, information was collected by interviewing fifty-two health professionals from twelve rural health facilities, using

Collins Sayang; Mathieu Gausseres; Nicole Vernazza-Licht; Denis Malvy; Daniel Bley; Pascal Millet

2009-01-01

179

28.99.99.M1 Student Health Services Page 1 of 1 UNIVERSITY RULE  

E-print Network

The Department of Student Health Services (A.P. Beutel Health Center) is an ambulatory health care provider serving the Texas A&M University student body through the provision of primary health care services and the capabilities of Student Health Services, transportation will be provided to A.P. Beutel Health Center

180

The legal regulation of seclusion and restraint in mental health facilities.  

PubMed

A recent report submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Council by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, has called for "an absolute ban" on the use of seclusion and restraint in mental health facilities. In Australia, seclusion and some, but not all, forms of restraint are regulated either by legislation or guidelines. This column explores some of the issues raised by the lack of national reporting requirements for these practices and moves by the National Mental Health Commission towards their reduction or elimination. PMID:24597370

McSherry, Bernadette

2013-12-01

181

Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

Santy, Patricia A.

1987-01-01

182

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

required. Such report shall be made in writing, as specified above, within twenty-four hours of diagnosis Communicable Diseases in Connecticut ­ Attachment on the Infection Control page on the nursing website: http://nursing

Oliver, Douglas L.

183

Compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Many publications are available on the topic of compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities all over the world. The approaches of developing and developed countries show wide variation, but the principles of infection prevention and control are the same globally. This study is a systematic review and global perspective of the available literature on infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities. Nine focus areas on compliance with infection-control measures were investigated: knowledge of infectious occupational hazards; personal hygiene and care of hands; correct application of personal protective equipment; use of environmental barriers and disposable items; sterilisation (recirculation) of instruments and handpieces; disinfection (surfaces) and housekeeping; management of waste disposal; quality control of dental unit waterlines, biofilms and water; and some special considerations. Various international studies from developed countries have reported highly scientific evidence-based information. In developed countries, the resources for infection prevention and control are freely available, which is not the case in developing countries. The studies in developing countries also indicate serious shortcomings with regard to infection prevention and control knowledge and education in oral health-care facilities. This review highlights the fact that availability of resources will always be a challenge, but more so in developing countries. This presents unique challenges and the opportunity for innovative thinking to promote infection prevention and control. PMID:25244364

Oosthuysen, Jeanné; Potgieter, Elsa; Fossey, Annabel

2014-12-01

184

Regional health care planning: a methodology to cluster facilities using community utilization patterns  

PubMed Central

Background Community-based health care planning and regulation necessitates grouping facilities and areal units into regions of similar health care use. Limited research has explored the methodologies used in creating these regions. We offer a new methodology that clusters facilities based on similarities in patient utilization patterns and geographic location. Our case study focused on Hospital Groups in Michigan, the allocation units used for predicting future inpatient hospital bed demand in the state’s Bed Need Methodology. The scientific, practical, and political concerns that were considered throughout the formulation and development of the methodology are detailed. Methods The clustering methodology employs a 2-step K-means + Ward’s clustering algorithm to group hospitals. The final number of clusters is selected using a heuristic that integrates both a statistical-based measure of cluster fit and characteristics of the resulting Hospital Groups. Results Using recent hospital utilization data, the clustering methodology identified 33 Hospital Groups in Michigan. Conclusions Despite being developed within the politically charged climate of Certificate of Need regulation, we have provided an objective, replicable, and sustainable methodology to create Hospital Groups. Because the methodology is built upon theoretically sound principles of clustering analysis and health care service utilization, it is highly transferable across applications and suitable for grouping facilities or areal units. PMID:23964905

2013-01-01

185

Assessments of oral health care in dependent older persons in nursing facilities.  

PubMed

The number of dependent elderly with natural teeth is increasing dramatically. If these elderly persons do not receive proper oral health care, severe oral problems are likely to result. In conjunction with an oral health care education program for the staff of nursing facilities, oral health status was assessed and semi-structured interviews performed with residents and their relatives about oral health care. The assessments were made at baseline and at an 18-month follow-up. The project was conducted as a longitudinal, controlled study with an intervention and a control group. The aim of the study was to evaluate differences between the intervention and control group after oral health care intervention. At follow-up, it was shown that the intervention group had established more dental contacts. However, the results also indicated that the residents were not concerned about their oral health. Nursing staff therefore have to be responsible for oral health care if improved care for residents is to be realized. PMID:12512881

Wårdh, Inger; Berggren, Ulf; Andersson, Lars; Sörensen, Stefan

2002-12-01

186

Physical Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

Rodriguez, S. M.; Novelo Casanova, D.

2010-12-01

187

CHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Health Economics Health Economics Competencies October 2012 --Page 1 of 4  

E-print Network

, both within and outside of health care, as well as evaluation of policy options at the systems level or policy options, and assist decision makers to allocate scarce health resources to their most beneficialCHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Health Economics Health Economics Competencies

Habib, Ayman

188

Utah Department of Health Bureau of Health Facility Licensing, Certification and Resident Assessment  

E-print Network

: Physician's Phone: Last Name of Patient: First Name/Middle Initial: Date of Birth: Effective Date Assessment Physician Order for Life Sustaining Treatment Utah Life with Dignity Order Version 2 � 9/09 State of Utah Rule R432-31 (http://health.utah.gov/hflcra/forms.php) This is a physician order sheet based

Tipple, Brett

189

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE CHOICE OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDING FACILITY AMONG WORKERS IN A LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECRETARIAT IN SOUTH WESTERN NIGERIA  

PubMed Central

Background: There is increasing interest in the choice of health care providing facility in Nigeria. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the factors influencing choice and satisfaction with health service providers among local government staff. Methods: A cross sectional survey of all 312 workers in a Local Government Secretariat in South West Nigeria was done. Chi Square and logistic regression analysis was done. Results: The mean age was 38.6 ± 7.5 years, 55% were females and 71.7% had tertiary education. The median monthly family income of the respondents was N 28, 000 (N3,000 – N500,000), with 24.4% earning a monthly income of N21, 000 to N30, 000. Many (72.3%) utilized public health facilities attributing the choice to the low cost of services. Respondents who are satisfied with their usual care providing facilities are 12.2 times more likely to have used public facilities than private facilities (95%, CI 3.431 – 43.114). Respondents who described the quality with ease of getting care/short waiting times as being good are 3.9 times more likely to have private facilities as their chosen health care providing facility (95%, CI 1.755 – 8.742). Cost/payment for service is 2.9 times more likely to predict the use of public health facility as the usual health care provider. Conclusion: Private facilities though costlier do not appear to be providing better services than public facilities. To increase access to health care the cost of services and the waiting time are important factors to address. PMID:25161426

Uchendu, O.C.; Ilesanmi, O.S.; Olumide, A.E.

2013-01-01

190

10/11/2007 06:06 PMSoon, robots with human gaze-Health/Science-The Times of India Page 1 of 2http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/HealthScience/Soon_robots_with_human_gaze/articleshow/2449375.cms  

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Indians Abroad World Business Sports Health/Science Infotech Education Opinion Entertainment Classifieds, Cricket, Movies & more via 58888 More>> Indiatimesl My Mail l Make TOI your home page l NRIs Free DD

Itti, Laurent

191

A comparison of the health status of residents of sheltered care facilities in Monmouth County, New Jersey.  

PubMed

In the past 20 to 30 years the number of sheltered care facilities in the United States has risen dramatically. Serving what many consider to be marginal populations, they are often poorly regulated or unregulated, with little or no attention to the health of residents. A retrospective record review of 647 clients residing in boarding homes, rooming houses, a homeless shelter, and residential facilities in Monmouth County, New Jersey, suggested that whereas some differences exist among facilities in terms of clients' physical and psychosocial health problems, these differences may not be meaningful. Since New Jersey regulations require some minimal health supervision to be provided by residential facilities but not by the others, these results suggest that regulations of the other facilities should be revised to reflect better the needs and problems of the populations they serve. PMID:1946154

Knight, K; Mason, D J; Christopher, M A; Beck, T L; Toughill, E

1991-09-01

192

Competence of health care providers on care of newborns at birth in a level-1 health facility in Yaound?, Cameroon  

PubMed Central

Introduction This is an observational study which was carried out at a level one health facility in Yaoundé from June to July 2009. The aim was to evaluate the competence of health care providers towards newborns’ care at birth Methods Ten health care providers took care of three hundred and thirty-five pregnant women who were enrolled for the study after informed verbal consent in the delivery room. Results Out of 340 offspring delivered and taken care of, 179 (52.6%) were male and 161 (47.4%) were female. Only two out of ten health workers had a WHO Essential Newborn Care (ENC) training. None of them had received any refresher course for the past two years. The mean gestational age of women was 39.5±3.5 weeks. Resuscitation was carried out on 21 (6.2%) of the newborns including 7 (33.3%) who had birth asphyxia. Health care providers scored 100% in performing the following tasks: warming up the baby, applying eye drops, injecting vitamin K, identifying the neonate, searching for any apparent life threatening congenital malformations, preventing for infection after procedures and initiating breastfeeding. The score was 24% at neonatal resuscitation tasks. Low level of education was associated with poor competence on applying ENC tasks (p<0.001). Lack of WHO ENC training was associated with poor competence on ENC tasks (p<0.001) and poor skills on resuscitation (p=0.03). Conclusion There is a need to reinforce the capacity of health care providers by training in WHO ENC course with emphasis on providing skills on resuscitation in order to reduce the burden of neonatal intrapartum-related deaths. PMID:22593781

Monebenimp, Francisca; Tenefopa, Makudjou; Mve Koh, Valere; Kago, Innocent

2012-01-01

193

Guide to Assessing Patient Needs and Planning Nursing Care. A Reference for Nurses in Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guidelines are presented for use by nurses in health care facilities in the assessment of patient needs and the development of nursing care plans. Nursing care is viewed as a continuing process of observing, evaluating, reporting, and recording physiologi...

M. Ayers, M. E. Adams, M. O'Boyle

1972-01-01

194

Household Decision-making about Delivery in Health Facilities: Evidence from Tanzania  

PubMed Central

This study investigated how partners’ perceptions of the healthcare system influence decisions about delivery-location in low-resource settings. A multistage population-representative sample was used in Kasulu district, Tanzania, to identify women who had given birth in the last five years and their partners. Of 826 couples in analysis, 506 (61.3%) of the women delivered in the home. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with delivery in a health facility were agreement of partners on the importance of delivering in a health facility and agreement that skills of doctors are better than those of traditional birth attendants. When partners disagreed, the opinion of the woman was more influential in determining delivery-location. Agreement of partners regarding perceptions about the healthcare system appeared to be an important driver of decisions about delivery-location. These findings suggest that both partners should be included in the decision-making process regarding delivery to raise rates of delivery at facility. PMID:19902806

Danforth, E.J.; Rockers, P.C.; Mbaruku, G; Galea, S

2009-01-01

195

Health Risks Assessment in Children for Phthalate Exposure Associated with Childcare Facilities and Indoor Playgrounds  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study assessed the health risks for children exposed to phthalate through several pathways including house dust, surface wipes and hand wipes in child facilities and indoor playgrounds. Methods The indoor samples were collected from various children's facilities (40 playrooms, 42 daycare centers, 44 kindergartens, and 42 indoor-playgrounds) in both summer (Jul-Sep, 2007) and winter (Jan-Feb, 2008). Hazard index (HI) was estimated for the non-carcinogens and the examined phthalates were diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), and butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP). The present study examined these four kinds of samples, i.e., indoor dust, surface wipes of product and hand wipes. Results Among the phthalates, the detection rates of DEHP were 98% in dust samples, 100% in surface wipe samples, and 95% in hand wipe samples. In this study, phthalate levels obtained from floor dust, product surface and children's hand wipe samples were similar to or slightly less compared to previous studies. The 50th and 95th percentile value of child-sensitive materials did not exceed 1 (HI) for all subjects in all facilities. Conclusions For DEHP, DnBP and BBzP their detection rates through multi-routes were high and their risk based on health risk assessment was also observed to be acceptable. This study suggested that ingestion and dermal exposure could be the most important pathway of phthalates besides digestion through food. PMID:22125769

Kim, Ho-Hyun; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Sun-Duk; Yang, Su-Hee; Lee, Chung-Soo; Shin, Dong-Chun

2011-01-01

196

HIPAA Security Job-Specific Training Module -Strong Health Page 1 of 2 HIPAA Security Compliance, v.1 (3/05) 0S1  

E-print Network

HIPAA Security Job-Specific Training Module - Strong Health Page 1 of 2 HIPAA Security Compliance, v.1 (3/05) 0S1 URMC/Strong Health HIPAA Security Training Module POLICY SUMMARY: 0S1 (for full policy, refer to http://intranet.urmc.rochester.edu/policy/HIPAA/ ) HIPAA Security Compliance

Goldman, Steven A.

197

PAGE 1 of 4 The Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) Program and the Dependent Care Assistance Program (DeCAP)  

E-print Network

PAGE 1 of 4 The Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) Program and the Dependent Care for you and your spouse cannot exceed $5,000. Health Care Flexible Spending Account YEAR 2013 ENROLLMENT/CHANGE FORM FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS (FSA) PROGRAM 40 Rector Street, 3rd Floor

Qiu, Weigang

198

Newborn care practices at home and in health facilities in 4 regions of Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Ethiopia is one of the ten countries with the highest number of neonatal deaths globally, and only 1 in 10 women deliver with a skilled attendant. Promotion of essential newborn care practices is one strategy for improving newborn health outcomes that can be delivered in communities as well as facilities. This article describes newborn care practices reported by recently-delivered women (RDWs) in four regions of Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a household survey with two-stage cluster sampling to assess newborn care practices among women who delivered a live baby in the period 1 to 7 months prior to data collection. Results The majority of women made one antenatal care (ANC) visit to a health facility, although less than half made four or more visits and women were most likely to deliver their babies at home. About one-fifth of RDWs in this survey had contact with Health Extension Workers (HEWS) during ANC, but nurse/midwives were the most common providers, and few women had postnatal contact with any health provider. Common beneficial newborn care practices included exclusive breastfeeding (87.6%), wrapping the baby before delivery of the placenta (82.3%), and dry cord care (65.2%). Practices contrary to WHO recommendations that were reported in this population of recent mothers include bathing during the first 24 hours of life (74.7%), application of butter and other substances to the cord (19.9%), and discarding of colostrum milk (44.5%). The results suggest that there are not large differences for most essential newborn care indicators between facility and home deliveries, with the exception of delayed bathing and skin-to-skin care. Conclusions Improving newborn care and newborn health outcomes in Ethiopia will likely require a multifaceted approach. Given low facility delivery rates, community-based promotion of preventive newborn care practices, which has been effective in other settings, is an important strategy. For this strategy to be successful, the coverage of counseling delivered by HEWs and other community volunteers should be increased. PMID:24289501

2013-01-01

199

Factors determining intention to quit tobacco: exploring patient responses visiting public health facilities in India  

PubMed Central

Introduction Intention to quit and setting a quit date are key steps in the process towards improving quit rates and are thus an integral part of tobacco cessation efforts. The present study examined various motivating factors of “intention to quit” and “setting a quit date” in patients visiting public health facilities in two states of India. Methods A total of 1569 tobacco-users visiting public health facilities in 12 districts of the states of Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat were assessed through an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was performed to assess the effect of socio-demographic characteristics, nicotine dependence, previous quit attempts and motivational factors on “intention to quit within 30 days” and “setting a quit date”. Results Only 12% of patients intended to quit tobacco within 30 days and about 11% of them were ready to set a quit date. Respondents aged above 25 years were 53% less likely to quit tobacco within 30 days when compared to those below 25 years (95% Confidence Intervals [CI]: 0.22 to 0.99). Smokeless tobacco users were associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.05 (95% CI: 1.15 to 3.65) for “setting a quit date” when compared to smokers. Those with 1 to 5 previous quit attempts (in the past twelve months) were associated with an OR of 2.2 (95% CI: 1.38 to 3.51) for “intention to quit” and 2.46 (95% CI: 1.52 to 3.96) for “setting a quit date”. “Concern for personal health” and “setting an example for children” were associated with ORs of 3.42 (95% CI: 1.35 to 8.65) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.03 to 6.03) respectively for “setting a quit date”. Conclusions This study is amongst the first in India to explore factors associated with the “intention to quit” and “setting a quit date” among patients visiting public health facilities. Our findings suggest that socio-economic and individual-level factors are important factors depicting intention to quit and setting a quit date. We recommend the need for well-defined studies to understand the long term effects of factors influencing tobacco cessation for patients visiting public health facilities in India. PMID:24444137

2014-01-01

200

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

NONE

1998-05-01

201

Long-term robot therapy in a health service facility for the aged - A case study for 5 years -  

Microsoft Academic Search

A long-term experiment of robot therapy for elderly people has been conducted at a health service facility for the aged since Aug. 2003. Three therapeutic seal robots, Paro, were introduced there. This paper describes the results of the experiment for five year. We regularly visited the facility twice or once a month and observed their interaction with the robots. Moreover,

Kazuyoshi Wada; Takanori Shibata; Yukitaka Kawaguchi

2009-01-01

202

Induced Abortion and Associated Factors in Health Facilities of Guraghe Zone, Southern Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR?=?4.28, CI: (1.24–14.71)), age of 30–34 years (AOR?=?0.15, CI: (0.04–0.55)), primary education (AOR?=?0.26, CI: (0.13–0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR?=?0.44, CI: (0.14–0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

2014-01-01

203

Beaumont health system biobank: a multidisciplinary biorepository and translational research facility.  

PubMed

The Beaumont BioBank model is a multidisciplinary facility that is designed to provide access and opportunity for research-minded clinicians to become involved in research without the need for their own research infrastructure, thus increasing the research effort across the Health System. We describe a biobank model that works primarily in operating rooms for tissue collection and utilizes a generic consent process to facilitate rapid and accurate collection of biospecimens. The model combines both a biorepository that collects specimens based on clinical questions and also a translational research facility that undertakes biomarker-based research on those specimens in a seamless and efficient process. We believe that the Beaumont BioBank model would be readily applicable and reproducible in other academic healthcare systems. PMID:24845589

Akervall, Jan; Pruetz, Barbara L; Geddes, Timothy J; Larson, Dianna; Felten, David J; Wilson, George D

2013-08-01

204

Revolving drug funds at front-line health facilities in Vientiane, Lao PDR.  

PubMed

Pharmaceutical cost recovery programmes, which have been mainly implemented in Africa, are gradually spreading to Southeast Asian countries that formerly belonged to the socialist bloc. This report describes the economic and operational realities of revolving drug funds (RDFs) at district hospitals and health centres in the capital of the Lao PDR by reviewing research conducted by the implementing department. People in the municipality spent an average of US$11 on drugs in 1996. The RDFs comprised only 3% of the total yearly drug sales in the municipality, whereas private pharmacies accounted for 75%. The RDFs were forced to operate in conjunction with the remaining government drug endowment and the thriving private pharmacies. This scheme has provided a stable supply of essential drugs. The assurance of drug availability at the front-line health facilities has resulted in increased utilization of the facilities despite the introduction of a drug fee. The cost recovery rate was 107% at health centres and 108% at district hospitals in two monitored districts during the 10 months from November 1997. Decentralized financial management was essential for cost recovery, allowing timely adjustment of selling prices as purchase prices rapidly inflated after the Asian economic crisis. The health staff observed that the people perceived drugs as everyday commodities that they should buy and take based on self-diagnosis and personal preference. Adaptation of the public health authorities to market-oriented thinking along with the establishment of pharmaceutical cost recovery occurred with few problems. However, both financial and operational management capacity at the municipal level pose a major challenge to policy clarification and scheme setting, especially in procurement, control of prescribing practices and the integration of drug dispensing with other components of quality clinical care. PMID:11238436

Murakami, H; Phommasack, B; Oula, R; Sinxomphou, S

2001-03-01

205

Page 1 of 4 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine  

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pressures. EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY 2011, 25(3) 589-604 #12;Page 2 of 4 Krause, J.; Ruxton, G. D. :The dynamics in response to inoculation with the biotrophic parasite Albugo candida JOURNAL OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY 2011 of collective human behaviour LANCET - 2011, 377 (9769) 903-904 Krause, S.; James, R.; Faria, J. J.; Ruxton, G

Guo, Zaoyang

206

-Page 1 -10/11 JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING PRE-ENTRANCE HEALTH FORM  

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on your course registration. Please provide titer documentation for MEASLES, RUBELLA, MUMPS, VARICELLA;- Page 2 - 10/11 2. RUBELLA (German Measles) Please provide documentation of positive rubella IgG titer/DD/Year) __ __ / __ __ / ________. IF TITER IS NEGATIVE, please see your Healthcare Provider to receive the MMR vaccine. Repeat Rubella Titer

Connor, Ed

207

Reproductive Health Voucher Program and Facility Based Delivery in Informal Settlements in Nairobi: A Longitudinal Analysis  

PubMed Central

Introduction In Kenya, the maternal mortality rate had ranged from 328 to 501 deaths per 100,000 live births over the last three decades. To reduce these rates, the government launched in 2006 a means-tested reproductive health output-based approach (OBA) voucher program that covers costs of antenatal care, a facility-based delivery (FBD) and a postnatal visit in prequalified healthcare facilities. This paper investigated whether women who bought the voucher for their index child and had a FBD were more likely to deliver a subsequent child in a facility compared to those who did not buy vouchers. Methods and Findings We used population-based cohort data from two Nairobi slums where the voucher program was piloted. We selected mothers of at least two children born between 2006 and 2012 and divided the mothers into two groups: Index-OBA mothers bought the voucher for the index child (N=352), and non-OBA mothers did not buy the voucher during the study period (N=514). The most complete model indicated that the adjusted odds-ratio of FBD of subsequent child when the index child was born in a facility was 3.89 (p<0.05) and 4.73 (p<0.01) in Group 2. Discussion and Conclusion The study indicated that the voucher program improved poor women access to FBD. Furthermore, the FBD of an index child appeared to have a persistent effect, as a subsequent child of the same mother was more likely to be born in a facility as well. While women who purchased the voucher have higher odds of delivering their subsequent child in a facility, those odds were smaller than those of the women who did not buy the voucher. However, women who did not buy the voucher were less likely to deliver in a good healthcare facility, negating their possible benefit of facility-based deliveries. Pathways to improve access to FBD to all near poor women are needed. PMID:24260426

Amendah, Djesika D.; Mutua, Martin Kavao; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Buliva, Evans; Bellows, Ben

2013-01-01

208

Utility of Health Facility-based Malaria Data for Malaria Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Background Currently, intensive malaria control programs are being implemented in Africa to reduce the malaria burden. Clinical malaria data from hospitals are valuable for monitoring trends in malaria morbidity and for evaluating the impacts of these interventions. However, the reliability of hospital-based data for true malaria incidence is often questioned because of diagnosis accuracy issues and variation in access to healthcare facilities among sub-groups of the population. This study investigated how diagnosis and treatment practices of malaria cases in hospitals affect reliability of hospital malaria data. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was undertaken in health facilities in western Kenya. A total of 3,569 blood smears were analyzed after being collected from patients who were requested by clinicians to go to the hospital’s laboratory for malaria testing. We applied several quality control measures for clinical malaria diagnosis. We compared our slide reading results with those from the hospital technicians. Among the 3,390 patients whose diagnoses were analyzed, only 36% had clinical malaria defined as presence of any level of parasitaemia and fever. Sensitivity and specificity of clinicians’ diagnoses were 60.1% (95% CI: 61.1?67.5) and 75.0% (95% CI: 30.8?35.7), respectively. Among the 980 patients presumptively treated with an anti-malarial by the clinicians without laboratory diagnosis, only 47% had clinical malaria. Conclusions/Significance These findings revealed substantial over-prescription of anti-malarials and misdiagnosis of clinical malaria. More than half of the febrile cases were not truly clinical malaria, but were wrongly diagnosed and treated as such. Deficiency in malaria diagnosis makes health facility data unreliable for monitoring trends in malaria morbidity and for evaluating impacts of malaria interventions. Improving malaria diagnosis should be a top priority in rural African health centers. PMID:23418427

Afrane, Yaw A.; Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K.; Yan, Guiyun

2013-01-01

209

Interactions between Native American Women and Their White Male Doctor: The Stages of a Health Care Visit at a Public Health Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the stages of health care visits between a White male doctor and Native American women at a public health facility. The seven stages provide a framework of analysis wherein conflict between the patients and physician emerges. The nonsequential organizing features of the medical visit emerged during analysis using perspectival rhetorical analysis of audio-tape recordings and verbatim transcripts

Lynda Dee Dixon

2003-01-01

210

The Global Health Group Page 1 of 2 Private Sector Healthcare Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow Position Description  

E-print Network

determinants of maternal health outcomes in urban settings. The objectives of the study are to: 1) assess, and the quality of maternal and neonatal care; and 3) understand the determinants of maternal health inequities

Mullins, Dyche

211

Why give birth in health facility? Users' and providers' accounts of poor quality of birth care in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background In Tanzania, half of all pregnant women access a health facility for delivery. The proportion receiving skilled care at birth is even lower. In order to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, the government has set out to increase health facility deliveries by skilled care. The aim of this study was to describe the weaknesses in the provision of acceptable and adequate quality care through the accounts of women who have suffered obstetric fistula, nurse-midwives at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities and local community members. Methods Semi-structured interviews involving 16 women affected by obstetric fistula and five nurse-midwives at maternity wards at both BEmOC and CEmOC health facilities, and Focus Group Discussions with husbands and community members were conducted between October 2008 and February 2010 at Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania and Temeke hospitals in Dar es Salaam, and Mpwapwa district in Dodoma region. Results Health care users and health providers experienced poor quality caring and working environments in the health facilities. Women in labour lacked support, experienced neglect, as well as physical and verbal abuse. Nurse-midwives lacked supportive supervision, supplies and also seemed to lack motivation. Conclusions There was a consensus among women who have suffered serious birth injuries and nurse midwives staffing both BEmOC and CEmOC maternity wards that the quality of care offered to women in birth was inadequate. While the birth accounts of women pointed to failure of care, the nurses described a situation of disempowerment. The bad birth care experiences of women undermine the reputation of the health care system, lower community expectations of facility birth, and sustain high rates of home deliveries. The only way to increase the rate of skilled attendance at birth in the current Tanzanian context is to make facility birth a safer alternative than home birth. The findings from this study indicate that there is a long way to go. PMID:23663299

2013-01-01

212

Unfulfilled expectations to services offered at primary health care facilities: Experiences of caretakers of underfive children in rural Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background There is growing evidence that patients frequently bypass primary health care (PHC) facilities in favour of higher level hospitals regardless of substantial additional time and costs. Among the reasons given for bypassing are poor services (including lack of drugs and diagnostic facilities) and lack of trust in health workers. The World Health Report 2008 “PHC now more than ever” pointed to the importance of organizing health services around people’s needs and expectations as one of the four main issues of PHC reforms. There is limited documentation of user’s expectations to services offered at PHC facilities. The current study is a community extension of a hospital-based survey that showed a high bypassing frequency of PHC facilities among caretakers seeking care for their underfive children at two district hospitals. We aimed to explore caretakers’ perceptions and expectations to services offered at PHC facilities in their area with reference to their experiences seeking care at such facilities. Methods We conducted four community-based focus group discussions (FGD’s) with 47 caretakers of underfive children in Muheza district of Tanga region, Tanzania in October 2009. Results Lack of clinical examinations and laboratory tests, combined with shortage of drugs and health workers, were common experiences. Across all the focus group discussions, unpleasant health workers’ behaviors, lack of urgency and unnecessary delays were major complaints. In some places, unauthorized fees reduced access to services. Conclusion The study revealed significant disappointments among caretakers with regard to the quality of services offered at PHC facilities in their areas, with implications for their utilization and proper functioning of the referral system. Practices regarding partial drugs administrations, skipping of injections, unofficial payments and consultations by unskilled health care providers need urgent action. There is also a need for proper accountability mechanisms to govern appropriate allocation and monitoring of health care resources and services in Tanzania. PMID:22697458

2012-01-01

213

Mapping the capacities of fixed health facilities to cover people at risk of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis  

PubMed Central

Background The emphasis placed on the activities of mobile teams in the detection of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can at times obscure the major role played by fixed health facilities in HAT control and surveillance. The lack of consistent and detailed data on the coverage of passive case-finding and treatment further constrains our ability to appreciate the full contribution of the health system to the control of HAT. Methods A survey was made of all fixed health facilities that are active in the control and surveillance of gambiense HAT. Information on their diagnostic and treatment capabilities was collected, reviewed and harmonized. Health facilities were geo-referenced. Time-cost distance analysis was conducted to estimate physical accessibility and the potential coverage of the population at-risk of gambiense HAT. Results Information provided by the National Sleeping Sickness Control Programmes revealed the existence of 632 fixed health facilities that are active in the control and surveillance of gambiense HAT in endemic countries having reported cases or having conducted active screening activities during the period 2000-2012. Different types of diagnosis (clinical, serological, parasitological and disease staging) are available from 622 facilities. Treatment with pentamidine for first-stage disease is provided by 495 health facilities, while for second-stage disease various types of treatment are available in 206 health facilities only. Over 80% of the population at-risk for gambiense HAT lives within 5-hour travel of a fixed health facility offering diagnosis and treatment for the disease. Conclusions Fixed health facilities have played a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment and coverage of at-risk-population for gambiense HAT. As the number of reported cases continues to dwindle, their role will become increasingly important for the prospects of disease elimination. Future updates of the database here presented will regularly provide evidence to inform and monitor a rational deployment of control and surveillance efforts. Support to the development and, if successful, the implementation of new control tools (e.g. new diagnostics and new drugs) is crucial, both for strengthening and expanding the existing network of fixed health facilities by improving access to diagnosis and treatment and for securing a sustainable control and surveillance of gambiense HAT. PMID:24517513

2014-01-01

214

Prepared by: Facilities and Environmental Health & Safety Divisions June 17, 2011  

E-print Network

.0 Integrated Safety Management System page 6 Section 5.0 Communication and Training Tools 5.6.5 Job Hazard Analysis (JHA's) page 11 5.6.6 Material Hazards Communication page 12 support this mission through our quality standards: Safety, Customer Satisfaction, Teamwork

Eisen, Michael

215

Quality of newborn care: a health facility assessment in rural Ghana using survey, vignette and surveillance data  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the structural capacity for, and quality of, immediate and essential newborn care (ENC) in health facilities in rural Ghana, and to link this with demand for facility deliveries and admissions. Design Health facility assessment survey and population-based surveillance data. Setting Seven districts in Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana. Participants Heads of maternal/neonatal wards in all 64 facilities performing deliveries. Main outcome measures Indicators include: the availability of essential infrastructure, newborn equipment and drugs, and personnel; vignette scores and adequacy of reasons given for delayed discharge of newborn babies; and prevalence of key immediate ENC practices that facilities should promote. These are matched to the percentage of babies delivered in and admitted to each type of facility. Results 70% of babies were delivered in health facilities; 56% of these and 87% of neonatal admissions were in four referral level hospitals. These had adequate infrastructure, but all lacked staff trained in ENC and some essential equipment (including incubators and bag and masks) and/or drugs. Vignette scores for care of very low-birth-weight babies were generally moderate-to-high, but only three hospitals achieved high overall scores for quality of ENC. We estimate that only 33% of babies were born in facilities capable of providing high quality, basic resuscitation as assessed by a vignette plus the presence of a bag and mask. Promotion of immediate ENC practices in facilities was also inadequate, with coverage of early initiation of breastfeeding and delayed bathing both below 50% for babies born in facilities; this represents a lost opportunity. Conclusions Unless major gaps in ENC equipment, drugs, staff, practices and skills are addressed, strategies to increase facility utilisation will not achieve their potential to save newborn lives. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov NCT00623337. PMID:23667161

Vesel, Linda; Manu, Alexander; Lohela, Terhi J; Gabrysch, Sabine; Okyere, Eunice; ten Asbroek, Augustinus H A; Hill, Zelee; Agyemang, Charlotte Tawiah; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R

2013-01-01

216

Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed -Print -MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM  

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Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM] Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed In 3 help illuminate the underpinnings of breast and ovarian cancers and point the way, someday, to better

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

217

The food and beverage vending environment in health care facilities participating in the healthy eating, active communities program. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

218

Coverage and Quality of Antenatal Care Provided at Primary Health Care Facilities in the ‘Punjab’ Province of ‘Pakistan’  

PubMed Central

Background Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In ‘Pakistan’ antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to ‘Divisions’ and ‘Districts’. By population ‘Punjab’ is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in ‘Punjab’ province of ‘Pakistan’. Methods Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. Results The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. Conclusion The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in ‘Punjab’ are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and out of those 1/3 drop out in follow-up visits. PMID:25409502

Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif; Memon, Zahid Ali

2014-01-01

219

Police and public health partnerships: Evidence from the evaluation of Vancouver's supervised injection facility  

PubMed Central

In various settings, drug market policing strategies have been found to have unintended negative effects on health service use among injection drug users (IDU). This has prompted calls for more effective coordination of policing and public health efforts. In Vancouver, Canada, a supervised injection facility (SIF) was established in 2003. We sought to determine if local police impacted utilization of the SIF. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) to prospectively identify the prevalence and correlates of being referred by local police to Vancouver's SIF among IDU participating in the Scientific Evaluation of Supervised Injecting (SEOSI) cohort during the period of December 2003 to November 2005. Among 1090 SIF clients enrolled in SEOSI, 182 (16.7%) individuals reported having ever been referred to the SIF by local police. At baseline, 22 (2.0%) participants reported that they first learned of the SIF via police. In multivariate analyses, factors positively associated with being referred to the SIF by local police when injecting in public include: sex work (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.80, 95%CI 1.28 – 2.53); daily cocaine injection (AOR = 1.54, 95%CI 1.14 – 2.08); and unsafe syringe disposal (AOR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.00 – 2.11). These findings indicate that local police are facilitating use of the SIF by IDU at high risk for various adverse health outcomes. We further found that police may be helping to address public order concerns by referring IDU who are more likely to discard used syringes in public spaces. Our study suggests that the SIF provides an opportunity to coordinate policing and public health efforts and thereby resolve some of the existing tensions between public order and health initiatives. PMID:18462491

DeBeck, Kora; Wood, Evan; Zhang, Ruth; Tyndall, Mark; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

2008-01-01

220

University of Connecticut Health Center Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital  

E-print Network

: The University of Connecticut Health Center has implemented a Biomedical Waste Disposal program ("Red-Bag" Waste Health Center "Red-Bag" waste 2. "Red-Bag" waste will be identified, handled following universal on any biomedical wastes not covered above can be brought to the attention of #12;University

Oliver, Douglas L.

221

PCH 7935 Page 1 of 3 Fall 2007 Environmental Health Research Discussions  

E-print Network

on environmental health research topics 3) Confidence and experiences with interactive research discussions 4 minute session will feature a discussion or presentation on an environmental health research topic or on a general research tools topic. Discussions will be led by the instructor, other faculty, outside speakers

Stuart, Amy L.

222

PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.12 LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Page: 1  

E-print Network

Communications by Alternative Means or at Alternative Locations SCOPE: All Louisiana State University (LSU, clinics, schools, etc. on the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Academic Campus. Nota Bene: All LSU, schools, etc. on the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Academic Campus, are referred

223

[page 24] [Nursing Reports 2011; 1:e6] Respecting a Korean health  

E-print Network

in general. Though highlighting subtleties in cultural differences in health care, via case reports, we can providers to keep an open mind in the clinics or with home health care when treating clients with diverse clinics but as nurses we are trained to assess the value and impact of cultural differences in care

Cooper, Robin L.

224

Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care facilities. Such evidence about electricity needs and gaps would optimize use of limited resources, which can help to strengthen health systems.

Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

2013-01-01

225

Primary Headache Disorders at a Tertiary Health Facility in Lagos, Nigeria: Prevalence and Consultation Patterns  

PubMed Central

Background. Primary headaches are underdiagnosed and undertreated, with a significant impact on social activities and work. Aim. To determine the last-year prevalence and health care utilization pattern of primary headaches at a tertiary centre. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out amongst staff of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. 402 staff members were selected by simple random sampling and administered a detailed structured headache assessment questionnaire. Migraine and tension-type headache were diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Headache Society (2004). Results. The participants comprised 168 males and 234 females. The mean age was 36.9 ± 7.9 years. The overall headache prevalence was 39.3% with female predominance (P < 0.0001). Tension-type headache was the most prevalent at 72.8% and migraine at 18.9%. Unclassifiable headache constituted 8.2%. Migraine headache showed female preponderance (P = 0.000). 80.4% of participants did not seek medical consultation compared with 19.6% who did (P = 0.000). Of the latter, 83.9% consulted the general practitioner (GP), whilst 16.1% consulted the neurologist. Conclusions. Primary headache prevalence is high in our population. It is not recognised as that requiring care by most of the staff of this tertiary health facility; thus education is required to increase health care utilization. PMID:24587991

Okubadejo, Njideka; Ojelabi, Olaitan; Dada, Akinola

2014-01-01

226

Created by Jeff Pelton Page 1 of 10 2/12/2013 Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

NMR Facility at UC Berkeley ­ Stanley Hall ­ Rm B-304. Room B-304 Stanley Hall houses five attractive forces near to the NMR magnet system. This could result in injury or death. Safety zone line of all of the magnets. Use the non-magnetic aluminum cart to transport the cylinders. Hazard

Pines, Alexander

227

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-04-21

228

First experiences in the implementation of biometric technology to link data from Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems with health facility data  

PubMed Central

Background In developing countries, Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs) provide a framework for tracking demographic and health dynamics over time in a defined geographical area. Many HDSSs co-exist with facility-based data sources in the form of Health Management Information Systems (HMIS). Integrating both data sources through reliable record linkage could provide both numerator and denominator populations to estimate disease prevalence and incidence rates in the population and enable determination of accurate health service coverage. Objective To measure the acceptability and performance of fingerprint biometrics to identify individuals in demographic surveillance populations and those attending health care facilities serving the surveillance populations. Methodology Two HDSS sites used fingerprint biometrics for patient and/or surveillance population participant identification. The proportion of individuals for whom a fingerprint could be successfully enrolled were characterised in terms of age and sex. Results Adult (18–65 years) fingerprint enrolment rates varied between 94.1% (95% CI 93.6–94.5) for facility-based fingerprint data collection at the Africa Centre site to 96.7% (95% CI 95.9–97.6) for population-based fingerprint data collection at the Agincourt site. Fingerprint enrolment rates in children under 1 year old (Africa Centre site) were only 55.1% (95% CI 52.7–57.4). By age 5, child fingerprint enrolment rates were comparable to those of adults. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of fingerprint-based individual identification for population-based research in developing countries. Record linkage between demographic surveillance population databases and health care facility data based on biometric identification systems would allow for a more comprehensive evaluation of population health, including the ability to study health service utilisation from a population perspective, rather than the more restrictive health service perspective. PMID:20200659

Serwaa-Bonsu, Adwoa; Herbst, Abraham J.; Reniers, Georges; Ijaa, Wilfred; Clark, Benjamin; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa; Sankoh, Osman

2010-01-01

229

Direct facility funding as a response to user fee reduction: implementation and perceived impact among Kenyan health centres and dispensaries  

PubMed Central

There is increasing pressure for reduction of user fees, but this can have adverse effects by decreasing facility-level funds. To address this, direct facility funding (DFF) was piloted in Coast Province, Kenya, with health facility committees (HFCs) responsible for managing the funds. We evaluated the implementation and perceived impact 2.5 years after DFF introduction. Quantitative data collection at 30 public health centres and dispensaries included a structured interview with the in-charge, record reviews and exit interviews. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with the in-charge and HFC members at 12 facilities, and with district staff and other stakeholders. DFF procedures were well established: HFCs met regularly and accounting procedures were broadly followed. DFF made an important contribution to facility cash income, accounting for 47% in health centres and 62% in dispensaries. The main items of expenditure were wages for support staff (32%), travel (21%), and construction and maintenance (18%). DFF was perceived to have a highly positive impact through funding support staff such as cleaners and patient attendants, outreach activities, renovations, patient referrals and increasing HFC activity. This was perceived to have improved health worker motivation, utilization and quality of care. A number of problems were identified. HFC training was reportedly inadequate, and no DFF documentation was available at facility level, leading to confusion. Charging user fees above those specified in the national policy remained common, and understanding of DFF among the broader community was very limited. Finally, relationships between HFCs and health workers were sometimes characterized by mistrust and resentment. Relatively small increases in funding may significantly affect facility performance when the funds are managed at the periphery. Kenya plans to scale up DFF nationwide. Our findings indicate this is warranted, but should include improved training and documentation, greater emphasis on community engagement, and insistence on user fee adherence. PMID:20211967

Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

2010-01-01

230

Status of the implementation of the World Health Organization multimodal hand hygiene strategy in United States of America health care facilities  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization (WHO) launched a multimodal strategy and campaign in 2009 to improve hand hygiene practices worldwide. Our objective was to evaluate the implementation of the strategy in United States health care facilities. Methods From July through December 2011, US facilities participating in the WHO global campaign were invited to complete the Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework online, a validated tool based on the WHO multimodal strategy. Results Of 2,238 invited facilities, 168 participated in the survey (7.5%). A detailed analysis of 129, mainly nonteaching public facilities (80.6%), showed that most had an advanced or intermediate level of hand hygiene implementation progress (48.9% and 45.0%, respectively). The total Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework score was 36 points higher for facilities with staffing levels of infection preventionists > 0.75/100 beds than for those with lower ratios (P = .01) and 41 points higher for facilities participating in hand hygiene campaigns (P = .002). Conclusion Despite the low response rate, the survey results are unique and allow interesting reflections. Whereas the level of progress of most participating facilities was encouraging, this may reflect reporting bias, ie, better hospitals more likely to report. However, even in respondents, further improvement can be achieved, in particular by embedding hand hygiene in a stronger institutional safety climate and optimizing staffing levels dedicated to infection prevention. These results should encourage the launch of a coordinated national campaign and higher participation in the WHO global campaign. PMID:24581011

Allegranzi, Benedetta; Conway, Laurie; Larson, Elaine; Pittet, Didier

2014-01-01

231

Evaluation of prototype air/fluid separator for Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype air/fluid separator suction apparatus proposed as a possible design for use with the Health Maintenance Facility aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF) was evaluated. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed for this purpose. The flights followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. A protocol was prepared to evaluate the prototype device in several regulator modes (or suction force), using three fluids of varying viscosity, and using either continuous or intermittent suction. It was felt that a matrixed approach would best approximate the range of utilization anticipated for medical suction on SSF. The protocols were performed in one-gravity in a lab setting to familiarize the team with procedures and techniques. Identical steps were performed aboard the KC-135 during parabolic flight.

Billica, Roger; Smith, Maureen; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

1991-01-01

232

Management of scales and other insect debris: occupational health hazard in a lepidopterous rearing facility.  

PubMed

Scales and other body parts of Lepidoptera are known allergens and pose a serious health hazard for workers in rearing programs. Researchers of the Crop Science Research Laboratory (USDA-ARS), located at Mississippi State, MS, have reared lepidopterous insects since the late 1960s. Efforts have been made by them to continuously improve management of the moth scale problem and reduce allergic reactions suffered by workers. We developed strategy that requires a separate facility for housing the moth colonies, oviposition cages that facilitate exit of scales and other debris, an improved air filtration system, and sanitation procedures. The strategy used currently (coined ALERT for Advanced Lepidoptera Environmental Rearing Technology) for scale management efficiently minimizes this serious occupational hazard. PMID:7722080

Davis, F M; Jenkins, J N

1995-04-01

233

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard  

SciTech Connect

This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

NONE

1998-05-01

234

Observation of the extent of smoking in a mental health inpatient facility with a smoke-free policy  

PubMed Central

Background People with a mental illness experience a higher burden of smoking-related disease. Smoke-free policies in mental health facilities provide an opportunity to reduce smoking-related harms for patients and staff alike. Limited evidence regarding the effect of such policies on preventing smoking in mental health facilities has been reported. The aims of this study are to describe the extent of smoking and the provision of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to patients in a mental health facility with a smoke-free policy. Methods Cross-sectional studies of smoking (cigarette butt count and observed smoking) and nicotine dependence treatment (patient record audit) were undertaken over 9 consecutive weekdays in one mental health facility in Australia. A smoke-free policy incorporating a total smoking ban and guidelines for treating nicotine dependence among patients was implemented in the facility 4 years prior to the study. Results Two thousand one hundred and thirty seven cigarette butts were collected and 152 occasions of people smoking were observed. Staff members were observed to enforce the policy on 66% of occasions. Use of NRT was recorded for 53% of patients who were smokers. Conclusion Implementation of the smoke-free policy was less than optimal and as a consequence ineffective in eliminating smoking and in optimising the provision of NRT. Additional strategies to improve the provision of nicotine dependence treatment to patients and the monitoring of adherence are needed to ensure the intended benefits of smoke-free policies are realised. PMID:24679109

2014-01-01

235

G: Occ Health/Paperwork/Forms/Seasonal InfluenzaVirusVaccine 9-9-11 Page 1 of 1 Seasonal Influenza Virus Vaccine 2011-2012 (INACTIVATED)  

E-print Network

G: Occ Health/Paperwork/Forms/Seasonal InfluenzaVirusVaccine 9-9-11 Page 1 of 1 Seasonal Influenza Virus Vaccine 2011-2012 (INACTIVATED) This vaccine contains no preservative Please print or type Last/dd/yy) Vaccination at No Charge Vaccination for $26.00 Charge Active University Faculty/Staff Spouse/Domestic Partner

Wechsler, Risa H.

236

Anthem Blue Cross/Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (P-NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 University of California  

E-print Network

Anthem Blue Cross/Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (P-NP) 5/18/2012 Page 1 services in detail. Getting a Prescription Filled at an Anthem Blue Cross Participating Pharmacy To get the relation between drug type and your copay amount at Anthem Blue Cross participating pharmacies: FDA

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

237

Expansion of health facilities in Iraq a decade after the US-led invasion, 2003-2012  

PubMed Central

Background In the last few decades, Iraq’s health care capacity has been severely undermined by the effects of different wars, international sanctions, sectarian violence and political instability. In the aftermath of the 2003 US-led invasion, the Ministry of Health has set plans to expand health service delivery, by reorienting the public sector towards primary health care and attributing a larger role to the private sector for hospital care. Quantitative assessments of the post-2003 health policy outcomes have remained scant. This paper addresses this gap focusing on a key outcome indicator that is the expansion of health facilities. Methods The analysis is based on data on health facilities provided by the World Health Organisation and Iraq’s Ministry of Health. For each governorate, we calculated the change in the absolute number of facilities by type from early 2003 to the end of 2012. To account for population growth, we computed the change in the number of facilities per 100,000 population. We compared trends in the autonomous northern Kurdistan region, which has been relatively stable from 2003 onwards, and in the rest of Iraq (centre/south), where fragile institutions and persistent sectarian strife have posed major challenges to health system recovery. Results The countrywide number of primary health care centres per 100,000 population rose from 5.5 in 2003 to 7.4 in 2012. The extent of improvement varied significantly within the country, with an average increase of 4.3 primary health care centres per 100,000 population in the Kurdistan region versus an average increase of only 1.4 in central/southern Iraq. The average number of public hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 1.3 to 1.5 in Kurdistan, whereas it remained at 0.6 in centre/south. The average number of private hospitals per 100,000 population rose from 0.2 to 0.6 in Kurdistan, whereas it declined from 0.3 to 0.2 in centre/south. Conclusions The expansion of both public and private health facilities in the Kurdistan region appears encouraging, but still much should be done to reach the standards of neighbouring countries. The slow pace of improvement in the rest of Iraq is largely attributable to the dire security situation and should be a cause for major concern. PMID:25221620

2014-01-01

238

Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in urban health facilities in Yaoundé, central province, Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: After adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS\\/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria by the malaria control programme, this study was designed to assess the availability of anti-malarial drugs, treatment practices and acceptability of the new protocol by health professionals, in the urban health facilities and drugstores of Yaoundé city, Cameroon. METHODS: Between April and August 2005, retrospective

Collins Sayang; Mathieu Gausseres; Nicole Vernazza-Licht; Denis Malvy; Daniel Bley; Pascal Millet

2009-01-01

239

Pilot program provides oral health services to long term care facility residents through service learning and community partnership.  

PubMed

Old Dominion University School of Dental Hygiene in Norfolk, Virginia, created an innovative preventive oral health program at Lake Taylor Transitional Care Hospital, a long term care facility located in coastal Virginia. The program had two main short-term goals: to increase the number of residents who receive preventive and therapeutic oral health services and to enhance future dental hygienists' learning experience with this diverse vulnerable population through service learning. The anticipated long-term goals are to improve quality of oral health care and overall health of long term care residents, to prevent potential disease, and to reproduce this model at other long term care facilities to improve access to care. PMID:23375477

Lemaster, Margaret

2013-05-01

240

[A guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel in ambulatory care facilities].  

PubMed

The appearance of electronic health records has led to the need to strengthen the security of personal health data in order to ensure privacy. Despite the large number of technical security measures and recommendations that exist to protect the security of health data, there is an increase in violations of the privacy of patients' personal data in healthcare organizations, which is in many cases caused by the mistakes or oversights of healthcare professionals. In this paper, we present a guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel, drawn from recommendations, regulations and national and international standards. The material presented in this paper can be used in the security audit of health professionals, or as a part of continuing education programs in ambulatory care facilities. PMID:24582808

Sánchez-Henarejos, Ana; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Hernández-Hernández, Isabel; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Carrillo de Gea, Juan Manuel

2014-04-01

241

WWU, Environmental Health and Safety Page 1 of 5 Effective Date: 06-09-2004  

E-print Network

.01 ­Health, Safety and Environmental Protection PRO-U5950.01B INDOOR AIR QUALITY Reports of smoke, natural/09/2004, Procedure U5950.01B Indoor Air Quality.DOC.doc University personnel With concerns about Indoor air quality Students University personnel with continued concerns about indoor air quality Personnel in other

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

242

Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program  

E-print Network

health programs and includes: 1. Laboratory Self-Inspections 2. EHS Assessment Activities 3. Results and Corrective Measures 4. Laboratory Assessment Program Review Laboratory Self-Inspections Properly conducted self-inspections assure safe working conditions and compliance with environmental regulations. Lab

243

UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-14 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY  

E-print Network

Waste Electronic Devices (UWED) Universal Waste Electronic Devices are hazardous waste and includes/10/2011 Supersedes: 5/1/1998 Issuing Office: Environment, Health & Safety HAZARDOUS WASTE AND MATERIAL MANAGEMENT I. POLICY All hazardous materials shall be inventoried and waste removed from individual spaces and from

Aluwihare, Lihini

244

Page 1 2011 Commencement Address for the College of Health Sciences  

E-print Network

society. · In most societies, both health and education are basic human rights. · Both attempt to shape of the things that I have learned during the course of my career that I wish I had known at the beginning. When influence future decisions. You might not want to hear this after spending your entire life in school

Stanford, Kyle

245

UK HealthCare HIPAA Education Page 1 September 1, 2009 HIPAA Education Level One  

E-print Network

Information may be used and disclosed. Accounting of Disclosures ­ A history of non-routine disclosures ­ those other than treatment, payment and health care operations, or those for which authorizations have of their medical records, and also may request amendments to those records. Restrictions ­ Individuals will have

MacAdam, Keith

246

State Regulation of Residential Facilities for Children with Mental Illness. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little national information on the policies and procedures used by states to regulate residential treatment facilities for adults and children with mental illness. As a result, policymakers and program administrators face major difficulties in determining both the effectiveness of current policies and the potential need for new policies that are responsive to emerging trends in mental health care.

Henry Ireys; Lori Achman; Ama Takyi

2006-01-01

247

State Regulation of Residential Facilities for Adults with Mental Illness. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little national information on the policies and procedures used by states to regulate residential treatment facilities for adults and children with mental illness. As a result, policymakers and program administrators face major difficulties in determining both the effectiveness of current policies and the potential need for new policies that are responsive to emerging trends in mental health care.

Henry Ireys; Lori Achman; Ama Takyi

2006-01-01

248

Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya  

PubMed Central

Objective Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals and within a stratified random sampling of 30 dispensaries and health centres in western Kenya. The key informants were the most senior facility healthcare provider and manager available. Emergency physician researchers utilised a semistructured assessment tool, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic coding. Results No lower level facilities and 30% of higher level facilities reported having a defined, organised approach to trauma. 43% of higher level facilities had access to an anaesthetist. The majority of lower level facilities had suture and wound care supplies and gloves but typically lacked other basic trauma supplies. For cardiac care, 50% of higher level facilities had morphine, but a minority had functioning ECG, sublingual nitroglycerine or a defibrillator. Only 20% of lower level facilities had glucometers, and only 33% of higher level facilities could care for diabetic emergencies. No facilities had sepsis clinical guidelines. Conclusions Large gaps in essential emergency care capabilities were identified at all facility levels in western Kenya. There are great opportunities for a universally deployed basic emergency care package, an advanced emergency care package and facility designation scheme, and a reliable prehospital care transportation and communications system in resource-limited settings. PMID:25260371

Burke, Thomas F; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

2014-01-01

249

Use of facility assessment data to improve reproductive health service delivery in the Democratic Republic of the Congo  

PubMed Central

Background Prolonged exposure to war has severely impacted the provision of health services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Health infrastructure has been destroyed, health workers have fled and government support to health care services has been made difficult by ongoing conflict. Poor reproductive health (RH) indicators illustrate the effect that the prolonged crisis in DRC has had on the on the reproductive health (RH) of Congolese women. In 2007, with support from the RAISE Initiative, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and CARE conducted baseline assessments of public hospitals to evaluate their capacities to meet the RH needs of the local populations and to determine availability, utilization and quality of RH services including emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and family planning (FP). Methods Data were collected from facility assessments at nine general referral hospitals in five provinces in the DRC during March, April and November 2007. Interviews, observation and clinical record review were used to assess the general infrastructure, EmOC and FP services provided, and the infection prevention environment in each of the facilities. Results None of the nine hospitals met the criteria for classification as an EmOC facility (either basic or comprehensive). Most facilities lacked any FP services. Shortage of trained staff, essential supplies and medicines and poor infection prevention practices were consistently documented. All facilities had poor systems for routine monitoring of RH services, especially with regard to EmOC. Conclusions Women's lives can be saved and their well-being improved with functioning RH services. As the DRC stabilizes, IRC and CARE in partnership with the local Ministry of Health and other service provision partners are improving RH services by: 1) providing necessary equipment and renovations to health facilities; 2) improving supply management systems; 3) providing comprehensive competency-based training for health providers in RH and infection prevention; 4) improving referral systems to the hospitals; 5) advocating for changes in national RH policies and protocols; and 6) providing technical assistance for monitoring and evaluation of key RH indicators. Together, these initiatives will improve the quality and accessibility of RH services in the DRC - services which are urgently needed and to which Congolese women are entitled by international human rights law. PMID:20025757

2009-01-01

250

TRICARE; sub-acute care program; uniform skilled nursing facility benefit; home health care benefit; adopting Medicare payment methods for skilled nursing facilities and home health care providers. Final rule.  

PubMed

This rule partially implements the TRICARE "sub-acute and long-term care program reform" enacted by Congress in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, specifically: Establishment of "an effective, efficient, and integrated sub-acute care benefits program," with skilled nursing facility (SNF) and home health care benefits modeled after those of the Medicare program; adoption of Medicare payment methods for skilled nursing facility, home health care, and certain other institutional health care providers; adoption of Medicare rules on balance billing of beneficiaries, prohibiting it by institutional providers and limiting it by non-institutional providers; and change in the statutory exclusion of coverage for custodial and domiciliary care. PMID:16250112

2005-10-24

251

Psychological, physiological and social effects to elderly people by robot assisted activity at a health service facility for the aged  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have been developing mental commit robots that provide psychological, physiological, and social effects to human beings through physical interaction. The appearances of these robots look like real animals such as cat and seal. The seal robot was developed especially for therapy. We have applied seal robots to assisting activity of elderly people at a health service facility for the

Kazuyosbi Wada; Takanori Shibata; Tomoko Saito; Kazuo Tanie

2003-01-01

252

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the

T. E. McKone; K. P. Brand; C. Shan

1997-01-01

253

77 FR 1495 - Criteria for Determining Priorities Among Correctional Facility Health Professional Shortage Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration...Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration...Bureau of Clinician Recruitment and Service, Health Resources and Services...

2012-01-10

254

South Yorkshire Cohort: a 'cohort trials facility' study of health and weight - Protocol for the recruitment phase  

PubMed Central

Background Growing levels of both obesity and chronic disease in the general population pose a major public health problem. In the UK, an innovative 'health and weight' cohort trials facility, the 'South Yorkshire Cohort', is being built in order to provide robust evidence to inform policy, commissioning and clinical decisions in this field. This protocol reports the design of the facility and outlines the recruitment phase methods. Method/Design The South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight study uses the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design. This design recruits a large observational cohort of patients with the condition(s) of interest which then provides a facility for multiple randomised controlled trials (with large representative samples of participants, long term outcomes as standard, increased comparability between each trial conducted within the cohort and increased efficiency particularly for trials of expensive interventions) as well as ongoing information as to the natural history of the condition and treatment as usual. This study aims to recruit 20,000 participants to the population based South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight research trials facility. Participants are recruited by invitation letters from their General Practitioners. Data is collected using postal and/or online patient self completed Health Questionnaires. NHS numbers will be used to facilitate record linkage and access to routine data. Participants are eligible if they are: aged 16 - 85 years, registered with one of 40 practices in South Yorkshire, provide consent for further contact from the researchers and to have their information used to look at the benefit of health treatments. The first wave of data is being collected during 2010/12 and further waves are planned at 2 - 5 year intervals for the planned 20 year duration of the facility. Discussion The South Yorkshire Cohort combines the strengths of the standard observational, longitudinal cohort study design with a population based cohort facility for multiple randomised controlled trials in a range of long term health and weight related conditions (including obesity). This infrastructure will allow the rapid and cheap identification and recruitment of patients, and facilitate the provision of robust evidence to inform the management and self-management of health and weight. PMID:21834964

2011-01-01

255

Safe motherhood voucher programme coverage of health facility deliveries among poor women in South-western Uganda.  

PubMed

There has been increased interest in and experimentation with demand-side mechanisms such as the use of vouchers that place purchasing power in the hands of targeted consumers to improve the uptake of healthcare services in low-income settings. A key measure of the success of such interventions is the extent to which the programmes have succeeded in reaching the target populations. This article estimates the coverage of facility deliveries by a maternal health voucher programme in South-western Uganda and examines whether such coverage is correlated with district-level characteristics such as poverty density and the number of contracted facilities. Analysis entails estimating the voucher coverage of health facility deliveries among the general population and poor population (PP) using programme data for 2010, which was the most complete calendar year of implementation of the Uganda safe motherhood (SM) voucher programme. The results show that: (1) the programme paid for 38% of estimated deliveries among the PP in the targeted districts, (2) there was a significant negative correlation between the poverty density in a district and proportions of births to poor women that were covered by the programme and (3) improving coverage of health facility deliveries for poor women is dependent upon increasing the sales and redemption rates. The findings suggest that to the extent that the programme stimulated demand for SM services by new users, it has the potential of increasing facility-based births among poor women in the region. In addition, the significant negative correlation between the poverty density and the proportions of facility-based births to poor women that are covered by the voucher programme suggests that there is need to increase both voucher sales and the rate of redemption to improve coverage in districts with high levels of poverty. PMID:24173430

Kanya, Lucy; Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Abuya, Timothy; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

2014-07-01

256

Use of a Balanced Scorecard in strengthening health systems in developing countries: an analysis based on nationally representative Bangladesh Health Facility Survey.  

PubMed

This paper illustrates the importance of collecting facility-based data through regular surveys to supplement the administrative data, especially for developing countries of the world. In Bangladesh, measures based on facility survey indicate that only 70% of very basic medical instruments and 35% of essential drugs were available in health facilities. Less than 2% of officially designated obstetric care facilities actually had required drugs, injections and personnel on-site. Majority of (80%) referral hospitals at the district level were not ready to provide comprehensive emergency obstetric care. Even though the Management Information System reports availability of diagnostic machines in all district-level and sub-district-level facilities, it fails to indicate that 50% of these machines are not functional. In terms of human resources, both physicians and nurses are in short supply at all levels of the healthcare system. The physician-nurse ratio also remains lower than the desirable level of 3.0. Overall job satisfaction index was less than 50 for physicians and 66 for nurses. Patient satisfaction score, however, was high (86) despite the fact that process indicators of service quality were poor. Facility surveys can help strengthen not only the management decision-making process but also the quality of administrative data. PMID:22887590

Khan, M Mahmud; Hotchkiss, David R; Dmytraczenko, Tania; Zunaid Ahsan, Karar

2013-01-01

257

MOVE: weight management program across the veterans health administration: patient- and facility-level predictors of utilization  

PubMed Central

Background Health care systems initiating major behavioral health programs often face challenges with variable implementation and uneven patient engagement. One large health care system, Veterans Health Administration (VHA), recently initiated the MOVE!® Weight Management Program, but it is unclear if veterans most in need of MOVE!® services are accessing them. The purpose of this study was to examine patient and facility factors associated with MOVE!® utilization (defined as 1 or more visits) across all VHA facilities. Methods Using national administrative data in a retrospective cohort study of eligible overweight (25??=30) VHA outpatients, we examined variation in and predictors of MOVE!® utilization in fiscal year (FY) 2010 using generalized linear mixed models. Results 4.39% (n?=?90,230) of all eligible overweight and obese patients using VHA services utilized MOVE!® services at least once in FY 2010. Facility-level MOVE! Utilization rates ranged from 0.05% to 16%. Veterans were more likely to have at least one MOVE!® visit if they had a higher BMI, were female, unmarried, younger, a minority, or had a psychiatric or obesity-related comorbidity. Conclusions Although substantial variation exists across VHA facilities in MOVE!® utilization rates, Veterans most in need of obesity management services were more likely to access MOVE!®, although at a low level. However, there may still be many Veterans who might benefit but are not accessing these services. More research is needed to examine the barriers and facilitators of MOVE!® utilization, particularly in facilities with unusually high and low reach. PMID:24325730

2013-01-01

258

Evidence from facility level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings.  

PubMed

Most of the maternal and newborn deaths occur at birth or within 24 hours of birth. Therefore, essential lifesaving interventions need to be delivered at basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care facilities. Facilities provide complex interventions including advice on referrals, post discharge care, long-term management of chronic conditions along with staff training, managerial and administrative support to other facilities. This paper reviews the effectiveness of facility level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined facility level interventions and included 32 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that additional social support during pregnancy and labour significantly decreased the risk of antenatal hospital admission, intrapartum analgesia, dissatisfaction, labour duration, cesarean delivery and instrumental vaginal birth. However, it did not have any impact on pregnancy outcomes. Continued midwifery care from early pregnancy to postpartum period was associated with reduced medical procedures during labour and shorter length of stay. Facility based stress training and management interventions to maintain well performing and motivated workforce, significantly reduced job stress and improved job satisfaction while the interventions tailored to address identified barriers to change improved the desired practice. We found limited and inconclusive evidence for the impacts of physical environment, exit interviews and organizational culture modifications. At the facility level, specialized midwifery teams and social support during pregnancy and labour have demonstrated conclusive benefits in improving maternal newborn health outcomes. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited to high income countries. Future programs in resource limited settings should utilize these findings to implement relevant interventions tailored to their needs. PMID:25208539

Das, Jai K; Kumar, Rohail; Salam, Rehana A; Lassi, Zohra S; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

2014-09-01

259

Evidence from facility level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings  

PubMed Central

Most of the maternal and newborn deaths occur at birth or within 24 hours of birth. Therefore, essential lifesaving interventions need to be delivered at basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care facilities. Facilities provide complex interventions including advice on referrals, post discharge care, long-term management of chronic conditions along with staff training, managerial and administrative support to other facilities. This paper reviews the effectiveness of facility level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined facility level interventions and included 32 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that additional social support during pregnancy and labour significantly decreased the risk of antenatal hospital admission, intrapartum analgesia, dissatisfaction, labour duration, cesarean delivery and instrumental vaginal birth. However, it did not have any impact on pregnancy outcomes. Continued midwifery care from early pregnancy to postpartum period was associated with reduced medical procedures during labour and shorter length of stay. Facility based stress training and management interventions to maintain well performing and motivated workforce, significantly reduced job stress and improved job satisfaction while the interventions tailored to address identified barriers to change improved the desired practice. We found limited and inconclusive evidence for the impacts of physical environment, exit interviews and organizational culture modifications. At the facility level, specialized midwifery teams and social support during pregnancy and labour have demonstrated conclusive benefits in improving maternal newborn health outcomes. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited to high income countries. Future programs in resource limited settings should utilize these findings to implement relevant interventions tailored to their needs. PMID:25208539

2014-01-01

260

The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system  

PubMed Central

Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre — Community Health Agents (CHA) — who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connect’s district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzania’s need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844 PMID:23819587

2013-01-01

261

Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience  

PubMed Central

Background The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the most prevalent. In the context of slower progress in achieving Millennium Development Goals in developing countries and the ever-increasing man-made and natural disasters in these areas, it is important to understand the association between reproductive health and mental health among women with post-disaster experiences. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 387 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) randomly selected from the October 2005 earthquake affected areas of Pakistan. Data on reproductive health was collected using the Centers for Disease Control reproductive health assessment toolkit. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, while earthquake experiences were captured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The association of either depression or anxiety with socio-demographic variables, earthquake experiences, reproductive health and access to health facilities was estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results Post-earthquake reproductive health events together with economic deprivation, lower family support and poorer access to health care facilities explained a significant proportion of differences in the experiencing of clinical levels of depression and anxiety. For instance, women losing resources for subsistence, separation from family and experiencing reproductive health events such as having a stillbirth, having had an abortion, having had abnormal vaginal discharge or having had genital ulcers, were at significant risk of depression and anxiety. Conclusion The relationship between women's post-earthquake mental health and reproductive health, socio-economic status, and health care access is complex and explained largely by the socio-cultural role of women. It is suggested that interventions that consider gender differences and that are culturally appropriate are likely to reduce the incidence. PMID:21718519

2011-01-01

262

Health Facility Characteristics and Their Relationship to Coverage of PMTCT of HIV Services across Four African Countries: The PEARL Study  

PubMed Central

Background Health facility characteristics associated with effective prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) coverage in sub-Saharan are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted surveys in health facilities with active PMTCT services in Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, South Africa, and Zambia. Data was compiled via direct observation and exit interviews. We constructed composite scores to describe provision of PMTCT services across seven topical areas: antenatal quality, PMTCT quality, supplies available, patient satisfaction, patient understanding of medication, and infrastructure quality. Pearson correlations and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) to account for clustering of facilities within countries were used to evaluate the relationship between the composite scores, total time of visit and select individual variables with PMTCT coverage among women delivering. Between July 2008 and May 2009, we collected data from 32 facilities; 78% were managed by the government health system. An opt-out approach for HIV testing was used in 100% of facilities in Zambia, 63% in Cameroon, and none in Côte d'Ivoire or South Africa. Using Pearson correlations, PMTCT coverage (median of 55%, (IQR: 33–68) was correlated with PMTCT quality score (rho?=?0.51; p?=?0.003); infrastructure quality score (rho?=?0.43; p?=?0.017); time spent at clinic (rho?=?0.47; p?=?0.013); patient understanding of medications score (rho?=?0.51; p?=?0.006); and patient satisfaction quality score (rho?=?0.38; p?=?0.031). PMTCT coverage was marginally correlated with the antenatal quality score (rho?=?0.304; p?=?0.091). Using GEE adjustment for clustering, the, antenatal quality score became more strongly associated with PMTCT coverage (p<0.001) and the PMTCT quality score and patient understanding of medications remained marginally significant. Conclusions/Results We observed a positive relationship between an antenatal quality score and PMTCT coverage but did not identify a consistent set of variables that predicted PMTCT coverage. PMID:22276130

Ekouevi, Didier K.; Stringer, Elizabeth; Coetzee, David; Tih, Pius; Creek, Tracy; Stinson, Kathryn; Westfall, Andrew O.; Welty, Thomas; Chintu, Namwinga; Chi, Benjamin H.; Wilfert, Cathy; Shaffer, Nathan; Stringer, Jeff; Dabis, Francois

2012-01-01

263

NIEHS Kids Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Kids Pages teach children about the connections between their health and the environment. The site encourages children to pursue careers in health, science, and the environment; explains the mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; and assists children in learning to read and master challenging mathematics and science. It offers games and activities, a story time section, information on environmental health and science topics and careers, sing-along songs and a 'Guess this Tune' game, coloring pages, brainteasers and riddles, and jokes. This is available in Spanish as well.

264

The Interaction of Race\\/Ethnicity and Mental Health Problems on Visitation in State Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the relationship between mental health problems and visitation for prison inmates. Logistic regression analyses indicated that inmates with mental health problems have lower odds of visitation. Interaction effects indicated that visitation for Hispanic inmates differed depending upon whether inmates reported mental health problems. Hispanic males reporting a history of mental health problems had increased probabilities of visitation

Melissa J. Stacer

2012-01-01

265

Impact of permethrin-treated bed nets on the incidence of sick child visits to peripheral health facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Duringa randomized controlled trial of insecticide (permethrin)-treat ed bed nets (ITNs) in an area with intense malaria transmission in western Kenya, we monitored 20,915 sick child visits (SCVs) by children less than five years of age visiting seven peripheral health facilities. The SCVs were monitored over a four-year period both before (1995-1996) and duringthe intervention (1997-1998). Results are used to

PENELOPE A. PHILLIPS-HOWARD; BERNARD L. NAHLEN; KATHLEEN A. WANNEMUEHLER; MARGARETTE S. KOLCZAK; Kuile ter F. O; JOHN E. GIMNIG; KRIS OLSON; JANE A. ALAII; AMOS ODHACHA; JOHN M. VULULE; WILLIAM A. HAWLEY

2003-01-01

266

Management of severely ill children at first-level health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa when referral is difficult.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To quantify the main reasons for referral of infants and children from first-level health facilities to referral hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa and to determine what further supplies, equipment, and legal empowerment might be needed to manage such children when referral is difficult. METHODS: In an observational study at first-level health facilities in Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Niger, over 3-5 months, we prospectively documented the diagnoses and severity of diseases in children using the standardized Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines. We reviewed the facilities for supplies and equipment and examined the legal constraints of health personnel working at these facilities. FINDINGS: We studied 7195 children aged 2-59 months, of whom 691 (9.6%) were classified under a severe IMCI classification that required urgent referral to a hospital. Overall, 226 children had general danger signs, 292 had severe pneumonia or very severe disease, 104 were severely dehydrated, 31 had severe persistent diarrhoea, 207 were severely malnourished, and 98 had severe anaemia. Considerably more ill were 415 young infants aged one week to two months: nearly three-quarters of these required referral. Legal constraints and a lack of simple equipment (suction pumps, nebulizers, and oxygen concentrators) and supplies (nasogastric tubes and 50% glucose) could prevent health workers from dealing more appropriately with sick children when referral was not possible. CONCLUSION: When referral is difficult or impossible, some additional supplies and equipment, as well as provision of simple guidelines, may improve management of seriously ill infants and children. PMID:12973645

Simoes, Eric A. F.; Peterson, Stefan; Gamatie, Youssouf; Kisanga, Felix S.; Mukasa, Gelasius; Nsungwa-Sabiiti, Jesca; Were, M. Wilson; Weber, Martin W.

2003-01-01

267

Spatial Analysis of the Level of Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their vulnerability. For proper interpretation, our results are also presented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides elements to support government plans to mitigate the impact of future earthquakes.

Moran, S.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

2011-12-01

268

Oral Health in Women of Childbearing Age Needs Improvement  

MedlinePLUS

... September 19, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Dental Health Health Disparities Women's Health FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ... rights reserved. More Health News on: Dental Health Health Disparities Women's Health Recent Health News Page last updated ...

269

Delivery at Home Versus Delivery at a Health Care Facility – A Case Study of Bihar, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improvement in maternal health care is at the center stage of policy making for many developing countries including India, which is faced with a high maternal mortality rate of 540 deaths per 100,000 live births. In India, 36% of women are underweight and an important policy question is whether maternal health care has any effect on the longterm health of

Sapna Kaul; Wen You; Kevin J. Boyle

2012-01-01

270

Tuberculosis case finding and isoniazid preventive therapy among people living with HIV at public health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional facility based study  

PubMed Central

Background Activities to decrease the burden of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) include intensified TB case-finding (ICF), Isoniaizid (INH) preventive therapy (IPT) and infection control in health-care and congregate settings (IC). Information about the status of collaborative TB/HIV care services which decreases the burden of TB among PLHIV in Ethiopia is limited. The purpose of the study was to assess TB case finding and provision of IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross sectional, facility-based survey was conducted between June 2011 and August 2011. Data was collected by interviewing 849 PLHIV from ten health facilities in Addis Ababa. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze findings and the results are described in this report. Results The proportion of PLHIV who have been screened for TB during any one of their follow-up cares was 92.8%. Eighty eight (10.4%) of the study participants have been diagnosed for TB during their HIV follow-up cares. PLHIV who had never been diagnosed for TB before they knew their positive HIV status were nearly four times more likely to be diagnosed for TB during follow-up cares than those diagnosed before (AOR [95% CI]: 3.78 [1.69-8.43]). Nearly a third (28.7%) of all interviewed PLHIV self reported that they had been treated with IPT. Conclusions It can be concluded that ICF for TB and IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa need boosting. Hence, it is recommended to put into practice the national and global guidelines to improve ICF and IPT among PLHIV in the city. PMID:24438508

2014-01-01

271

The duty to disclose in Kenyan health facilities: a qualitative investigation of HIV disclosure in everyday practice.  

PubMed

Disclosure of HIV status is routinely promoted as a public health measure to prevent transmission and enhance treatment adherence support. While studies show a range of positive and negative outcomes associated with disclosure, it has also been documented that disclosing is a challenging and ongoing process. This article aims to describe the role of health-care workers in Central and Nairobi provinces in Kenya in facilitating disclosure in the contexts of voluntary counselling and testing and provider-initiated testing and counselling and includes a discussion on how participants perceive and experience disclosure as a result. We draw on in-depth qualitative research carried out in 2008-2009 among people living with HIV (PLHIV) and the health workers who provide care to them. Our findings suggest that in everyday practice, there are three models of disclosure at work: (1) voluntary-consented disclosure, in alignment with international guidelines; (2) involuntary, non-consensual disclosure, which may be either intentional or accidental; and (3) obligatory disclosure, which occurs when PLHIV are forced to disclose to access services at health facilities. Health-care workers were often caught between the three models and struggled with the competing demands of promoting prevention, adherence, and confidentiality. Findings indicate that as national and global policies shift to normalize HIV testing as routine in a range of clinical settings, greater effort must be made to define suitable best practices that balance the human rights and the public health perspectives in relation to disclosure. PMID:23826931

Moyer, Eileen; Igonya, Emmy Kageha; Both, Rosalijn; Cherutich, Peter; Hardon, Anita

2013-07-01

272

Concentration, distribution, and human health risk assessment of endosulfan from a manufacturing facility in Huai'an, China.  

PubMed

Endosulfan concentrations and its distribution in air, soil, sediment and foodstuffs in the area surrounding a production facility in Huai'an, China were investigated because of its threats to the environment and human health. Air concentrations for endosulfan ?, endosulfan II and endosulfan sulfate measured in this study were several orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for this region. Surface soil concentration ranges of endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and endosulfan sulfate were greater than in sediment. Endosulfan II was the greatest contributor to total endosulfan concentrations in both surface sediment and soil followed by endosulfan sulfate and endosulfan ?. However, a different concentration profile was observed in fish and crop samples, with endosulfan sulfate having the highest concentration followed by endosulfan I and endosulfan II. The concentration of ?endosulfans (endosulfans ? and II) in soil decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the plant by a factor of 10 within 45 km. Trace amounts of ?endosulfans were observed in deep soil layers which implied that these compounds are transported through the leaching of pore water in soil. This demonstrated that emissions from the manufacturing facility can lead to ground water contamination in the area near the plant. A screening level human health risk assessment of ?endosulfans based on the worst-case scenario was performed for people living in the vicinity of the manufacturing facility. The hazard indices were at least 2 orders of magnitude of <1, indicating no adverse health effects are likely to occur at current exposure levels, and the risk to human health is generally acceptable. PMID:24491393

Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Guo, Ming-Xing; Pei, Wei; Wu, Qian

2014-09-01

273

Health impact of a proposed waste-to-energy facility in Illinois  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) has given the Robbins Resource Recovery Company (RRRC) a permit to construct a Regional Pollution Control Facility in Robbins, Illinois. Site approval for this waste-to-energy (WTE) combustor has been granted by the Village of Robbins which is located about three miles south of Chicago. The facility is designed to operate continuously for 40-45 years,

W. H. Hallenbeck

1995-01-01

274

Reasons and circumstances for the late notification of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) cases in health facilities in Luanda  

PubMed Central

Introduction As the polio eradication effort enters the end game stage, surveillance for Acute Flaccid Paralysis in children becomes a pivotal tool. Thus given the gaps in AFP surveillance as identified in the cases of late notification, this study was designed to explore the reasons and circumstances responsible for late notification of AFP and collection of inadequate stools (more than 14 days of onset of paralysis until collection of the 2nd stool specimen) of AFP cases in health facilities equipped to manage AFP cases. Methods Eleven AFP cases with inadequate stools were reported from January 2 to July 8, 2012 - Epidemiological Weeks 1-27. The families of these cases were interviewed with an in-depth interview guide. The staff of the seven health units, where they later reported, was also enlisted for the study which used in-depth interview guide in eliciting information from them. Results Ignorance and wrong perception of the etiology of the cases as well as dissatisfaction with the health units as the major reasons for late reporting of AFP cases. The first port of call is usually alternative health care system such as traditional healers and spiritualists because the people hold the belief that the problem is spiritually induced. The few, who make it to health units, are faced with ill equipped rural health workers who wait for the arrival of more qualified staff, who may take days to do so. Conclusion An understanding of the health seeking behavior of the population is germane to effective AFP surveillance. There is thus a need to tailor AFP surveillance to the health seeking behavior of the populations and expand it to community structures.

Macama, Arciolanda; Okeibunor, Joseph; Grando, Silvia; Djibaoui, Karim; Yameogo, Robert Koudounoaga; Morais, Alda; Gasasira, Alex Ntale; Mbaye, Salla; Mihigo, Richard; Nshimirimana, Deo

2014-01-01

275

Notice regarding section 602 of the Veterans Health Care Act of 1992 inclusion of outpatient hospital facilities--PHS. Notice.  

PubMed

Section 602 of Public Law 102-585, the "Veterans Health Care Act of 1992" (the "Act"), enacted section 340B of the Public Health Service Act ("PHS Act"), "Limitation on Prices of Drugs Purchased by Covered Entities." Section 340B provides that a manufacturer who sells covered outpatient drugs to eligible entities must sign a pharmaceutical pricing agreement (the "Agreement") with the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, in which the manufacturer agrees to charge a price for covered outpatient drugs that will not exceed the amount determined under a statutory formula. Section 340B(a)(4) lists the entities eligible to receive discount outpatient drug pricing (i.e., certain disproportionate share hospitals (DSHs) and PHS grantees). The definition of a disproportionate share hospital found in section 340B(a)(4)(L) provides criteria to determine which such hospitals are eligible to participate in the program. However, the definition does not include criteria to determine which outpatient facilities (including off-site or satellite clinics) working in conjunction with the eligible hospital would be considered part of the hospital for purposes of eligibility for section 340B drug discounts. The Office of Drug Pricing, which administers this program with PHS, is proposing certain procedures to determine which outpatient hospital facilities are included as part of an eligible disproportionate share hospital. PMID:10135125

1994-06-01

276

Community accountability at peripheral health facilities: a review of the empirical literature and development of a conceptual framework.  

PubMed

Public accountability has re-emerged as a top priority for health systems all over the world, and particularly in developing countries where governments have often failed to provide adequate public sector services for their citizens. One approach to strengthening public accountability is through direct involvement of clients, users or the general public in health delivery, here termed 'community accountability'. The potential benefits of community accountability, both as an end in itself and as a means of improving health services, have led to significant resources being invested by governments and non-governmental organizations. Data are now needed on the implementation and impact of these initiatives on the ground. A search of PubMed using a systematic approach, supplemented by a hand search of key websites, identified 21 papers from low- or middle-income countries describing at least one measure to enhance community accountability that was linked with peripheral facilities. Mechanisms covered included committees and groups (n = 19), public report cards (n = 1) and patients' rights charters (n = 1). In this paper we summarize the data presented in these papers, including impact, and factors influencing impact, and conclude by commenting on the methods used, and the issues they raise. We highlight that the international interest in community accountability mechanisms linked to peripheral facilities has not been matched by empirical data, and present a conceptual framework and a set of ideas that might contribute to future studies. PMID:22279082

Molyneux, Sassy; Atela, Martin; Angwenyi, Vibian; Goodman, Catherine

2012-10-01

277

Health and safety plan for characterization sampling of ETR and MTR facilities  

SciTech Connect

This health and safety plan establishes the procedures and requirements that will be used to minimize health and safety risks to persons performing Engineering Test Reactor and Materials Test Reactor characterization sampling activities, as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard, 29 CFR 1910.120. It contains information about the hazards involved in performing the tasks, and the specific actions and equipment that will be used to protect persons working at the site.

Baxter, D.E.

1994-10-01

278

New York State School Facilities and Student Health, Achievement, and Attendance: A Data Analysis Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students who attend schools with environmental hazards that impact indoor air quality are more likely to miss class, and therefore lose learning opportunities. Yet school environmental health and safety remains largely unregulated and there is no state or federal agency in charge of protecting children's environmental health in schools. This…

Boese, Stephen; Shaw, John

2005-01-01

279

Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery  

E-print Network

facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

Schilling, Anne

280

SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES TOXIC/HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER FACILITY DESIGN  

E-print Network

of Article 12, "Underground Tank Design Guidelines", and necessary details. The following items must vehicular use; B) the transfer of fuel oil to a storage facility used solely for on-site heating existing and proposed tank locations; D) North arrow; E) piping; F) overfill and leak alarm panels. #12;3 3

281

Osteoporosis: Health beliefs and barriers to treatment in an assisted living facility.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe residents' perceptions of osteoporosis and barriers to treatment in an assisted living setting. An exploratory, qualitative design was used. Five residents and the Director of Nursing participated in semi-structured interviews. Common health behaviors themes related to osteoporosis emerged that provide insight for nursing education and practice. The themes are discussed in light of the Health Belief Model, providing a framework for understanding osteoporosis-related health beliefs. This model lays a foundation upon which future interventions can be tested for effectiveness in improving osteoporosis-related care in assisted living. PMID:15675781

Jachna, Carolyn M; Forbes-Thompson, Sarah

2005-01-01

282

Administrator's Guide for Animal Facilitated Therapy Programs in Federal Health Care Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Animal facilitated therapy has positively impacted upon a wide variety of both in-patient and outpatient medical treatment programs. This study outlines a variety of issues and answers surrounding the inclusion of animals into health care organizations an...

T. E. Catanzaro

1983-01-01

283

Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects*  

PubMed Central

Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings. PMID:12883559

Nelson, Patricia P.

2003-01-01

284

Building better healthcare facilities through evidence-based design: breaking new ground at Vancouver Island Health Authority.  

PubMed

Many of today's healthcare facilities were constructed at least 50 years ago, and a growing number have outlived their useful lives. Despite renovations and renewals, they often fall short of providing an appropriate care setting. Clinicians and staff develop a mixture of compromises and workarounds simply to make things function. Evidence-based design principles are often absent from new healthcare facilities, perhaps because of lack of awareness of the principles or because implementing them may fall foul of short-term and short-sighted budgetary decisions. In planning a new healthcare facility in 2008, the executive team at Vancouver Island Health Authority decided to adopt the evidence-based design approach. They conducted site visits to newly constructed hospitals across North America and beyond, to determine best practices in terms of design and construction. These engagements resulted in the implementation of 102 evidence-based design principles and attributes in Victoria's Royal Jubilee hospital, a 500-bed Patient Care Centre. This $350M project was completed on time and on budget, showing that using evidence need not result in delays or higher costs. To date, the results of the evidence-based design are promising, with accolades coming from patients, staff and clinical partners, and a number of immediate and practical benefits for patients, families and care teams alike. PMID:24863125

Waldner, Howard; Johnson, Bart; Sadler, Blair

2012-12-01

285

Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.  

PubMed

The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite. PMID:20140506

Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

2011-01-01

286

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive

N. C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-01-01

287

Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain  

PubMed Central

Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory mechanisms. Measures to stop the availability of poor-quality medicines should include limiting procurement to WHO prequalified products and implementing routine quality testing. PMID:24828338

Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

2014-01-01

288

Equity of inpatient health care in rural Tanzania: a population- and facility-based survey  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore the equity of utilization of inpatient health care at rural Tanzanian health centers through the use of a short wealth questionnaire. Methods Patients admitted to four rural health centers in the Kigoma Region of Tanzania from May 2008 to May 2009 were surveyed about their illness, asset ownership and demographics. Principal component analysis was used to compare the wealth of the inpatients to the wealth of the region's general population, using data from a previous population-based survey. Results Among inpatients, 15.3% were characterized as the most poor, 19.6% were characterized as very poor, 16.5% were characterized as poor, 18.9% were characterized as less poor, and 29.7% were characterized as the least poor. The wealth distribution of all inpatients (p < 0.0001), obstetric inpatients (p < 0.0001), other inpatients (p < 0.0001), and fee-exempt inpatients (p < 0.001) were significantly different than the wealth distribution in the community population, with poorer patients underrepresented among inpatients. The wealth distribution of pediatric inpatients (p = 0.2242) did not significantly differ from the population at large. Conclusion The findings indicated that while current Tanzanian health financing policies may have improved access to health care for children under five, additional policies are needed to further close the equity gap, especially for obstetric inpatients. PMID:22333044

2012-01-01

289

The electronic version is the official version of this policy. Page 1 of 4 Occupational Health and Safety Policy  

E-print Network

of this policy is to: a) define the roles and responsibilities for occupational health and safety within" means the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code (as amended from time to time). c) "Contractor" means the Occupational Health and Safety Act of Alberta (as amended from time to time). g) "OHSMS" means

Habib, Ayman

290

OHS 11-119 *Reference Health & Safety Requirements for Minors in Laboratories at Stanford University for additional guidance: Page 1  

E-print Network

facilities, and research projects. 2.Cutting Edge of Human Anatomy and Surgical. Program Participants Activities 1.Clinical Anatomy Research Scholars (CARS) Host: School of Medicine Contact: anatomy@stanford.edu Website: http://anatomy

291

TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo  

PubMed Central

Background: HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB) are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities). Twenty-three facilities (29%) offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24%) reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases’ control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. Conclusion: HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region. PMID:24596866

Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Ogwang, Brenda. A.; Namegabe, Edmond Ntabe; Mbasa, Ndemo; Kabunga, Deka Kambale; Karafuli, Kambale

2013-01-01

292

The impact of Title V regulations on hospitals and health care facilities.  

PubMed

The Clean Air Act, enacted in 1970, failed to provide for an enforceable regulatory scheme at any level of government. In late 1990, Congress passed the Clean Air Act Amendments, of which Title V is the focal point. This amendment includes the Operating Permit Program, which states that all "major sources" are required to obtain Title V operating permits on or before November 15, 1995. Under Title V, the burden of demonstrating compliance will now fall directly to the facility itself. This document both summarizes and highlights the requirements of the Operating Permit Program and presents guidelines for preparing to file a Title V Operator Permit application. PMID:10157694

Christakos-Cormack, E; Urbanowicz, G R

1995-07-01

293

Health Service Areas used in SEER*Stat  

Cancer.gov

Health Service AreaPage ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 17 excl AK)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 13)Page ofHealth Service Area (SEER 9)Page ofHSA # (NCI Modified) Health Service Area (NCI Modified) Description State-county FIPS Butler,

294

Parent and Health Care Professional Perspectives on Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We on the Same Page?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A family-centered approach to health care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) is widely acknowledged as the ideal model of service delivery, but less is known about the actual practice of family-centered care (FCC), especially from the viewpoints of parents and health care professionals. This cross-sectional research compared…

Bellin, Melissa H.; Osteen, Philip; Heffernan, Caitlin; Levy, Judy M.; Snyder-Vogel, Mary E.

2011-01-01

295

JAMA Patient Page: Basic Science Research  

MedlinePLUS

... of Health and Human Services VALUE OF BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCH Basic science research can help in a ... dedicated to basic science and translational research. Basic Science Research JAMA PATIENT PAGE The JAMA Patient Page ...

296

Information technology systems in public sector health facilities in developing countries: the case of South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The public healthcare sector in developing countries faces many challenges including weak healthcare systems and under-resourced facilities that deliver poor outcomes relative to total healthcare expenditure. Global references demonstrate that information technology has the ability to assist in this regard through the automation of processes, thus reducing the inefficiencies of manually driven processes and lowering transaction costs. This study examines the impact of hospital information systems implementation on service delivery, user adoption and organisational culture within two hospital settings in South Africa. Methods Ninety-four interviews with doctors, nurses and hospital administrators were conducted in two public sector tertiary healthcare facilities (in two provinces) to record end-user perceptions. Structured questionnaires were used to conduct the interviews with both qualitative and quantitative information. Results Noteworthy differences were observed among the three sample groups of doctors, nurses and administrators as well as between our two hospital groups. The impact of automation in terms of cost and strategic value in public sector hospitals is shown to have yielded positive outcomes with regard to patient experience, hospital staff workflow enhancements, and overall morale in the workplace. Conclusion The research provides insight into the reasons for investing in system automation, the associated outcomes, and organisational factors that impact the successful adoption of IT systems. In addition, it finds that sustainable success in these initiatives is as much a function of the technology as it is of the change management function that must accompany the system implementation. PMID:23347433

2013-01-01

297

Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been promoted as a means to reduce malaria transmission due to their ability to kill both asexual blood stages of malaria parasites, which sustain infections over long periods and the immature derived sexual stages responsible for infecting mosquitoes and onward transmission. Early studies reported a temporal association between ACT introduction and reduced malaria transmission in a number of ecological settings. However, these reports have come from areas with low to moderate malaria transmission, been confounded by the presence of other interventions or environmental changes that may have reduced malaria transmission, and have not included a comparison group without ACT. This report presents results from the first large-scale observational study to assess the impact of case management with ACT on population-level measures of malaria endemicity in an area with intense transmission where the benefits of effective infection clearance might be compromised by frequent and repeated re-infection. Methods A pre-post observational study with a non-randomized comparison group was conducted at two sites in Tanzania. Both sites used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) monotherapy as a first-line anti-malarial from mid-2001 through 2002. In 2003, the ACT, artesunate (AS) co-administered with SP (AS?+?SP), was introduced in all fixed health facilities in the intervention site, including both public and registered non-governmental facilities. Population-level prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia were assessed using light microscopy from samples collected during representative household surveys in 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 and 2006. Findings Among 37,309 observations included in the analysis, annual asexual parasitaemia prevalence in persons of all ages ranged from 11% to 28% and gametocytaemia prevalence ranged from <1% to 2% between the two sites and across the five survey years. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to adjust for age, socioeconomic status, bed net use and rainfall. In the presence of consistently high coverage and efficacy of SP monotherapy and AS?+?SP in the comparison and intervention areas, the introduction of ACT in the intervention site was associated with a modest reduction in the adjusted asexual parasitaemia prevalence of 5 percentage-points or 23% (p?health facilities only modestly reduced asexual parasitaemia prevalence. ACT is effective for treatment of uncomplicated malaria and should have substantial public health impact on morbidity and mortality, but is unlikely to reduce malaria transmission substantially in much of sub-Saharan Africa where individuals are rapidly re-infected. PMID:22545573

2012-01-01

298

Antiretroviral Therapy Program Expansion in Zamb?zia Province, Mozambique: Geospatial Mapping of Community-Based and Health Facility Data for Integrated Health Planning  

PubMed Central

Objective To generate maps reflecting the intersection of community-based Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) delivery points with facility-based HIV program demographic information collected at the district level in three districts (Ile, Maganja da Costa and Chinde) of Zambézia Province, Mozambique; in order to guide planning decisions about antiretroviral therapy (ART) program expansion. Methods Program information was harvested from two separate open source databases maintained for community-based VCT and facility-based HIV care and treatment monitoring from October 2011 to September 2012. Maps were created using ArcGIS 10.1. Travel distance by foot within a 10 km radius is generally considered a tolerable distance in Mozambique for purposes of adherence and retention planning. Results Community-based VCT activities in each of three districts were clustered within geographic proximity to clinics providing ART, within communities with easier transportation access, and/or near the homes of VCT volunteers. Community HIV testing results yielded HIV seropositivity rates in some regions that were incongruent with the Ministry of Health’s estimates for the entire district (2–13% vs. 2% in Ile, 2–54% vs. 11.5% in Maganja da Costa, and 23–43% vs. 14.4% in Chinde). All 3 districts revealed gaps in regional disbursement of community-based VCT activities as well as access to clinics offering ART. Conclusions Use of geospatial mapping in the context of program planning and monitoring allowed for characterizing the location and size of each district’s HIV population. In extremely resource limited and logistically challenging settings, maps are valuable tools for informing evidence-based decisions in planning program expansion, including ART. PMID:25329169

Moon, Troy D.; Ossemane, Ezequiel B.; Green, Ann F.; Ndatimana, Elisee; Jose, Eurico; Buehler, Charlotte P.; Wester, C. William; Vermund, Sten H.; Olupona, Omo

2014-01-01

299

Measuring client satisfaction and the quality of family planning services: A comparative analysis of public and private health facilities in Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Public and private family planning providers face different incentive structures, which may affect overall quality and ultimately the acceptability of family planning for their intended clients. This analysis seeks to quantify differences in the quality of family planning (FP) services at public and private providers in three representative sub-Saharan African countries (Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana), to assess how these quality differentials impact upon FP clients' satisfaction, and to suggest how quality improvements can improve contraceptive continuation rates. Methods Indices of technical, structural and process measures of quality are constructed from Service Provision Assessments (SPAs) conducted in Tanzania (2006), Kenya (2004) and Ghana (2002) using direct observation of facility attributes and client-provider interactions. Marginal effects from multivariate regressions controlling for client characteristics and the multi-stage cluster sample design assess the relative importance of different measures of structural and process quality at public and private facilities on client satisfaction. Results Private health facilities appear to be of higher (interpersonal) process quality than public facilities but not necessarily higher technical quality in the three countries, though these differentials are considerably larger at lower level facilities (clinics, health centers, dispensaries) than at hospitals. Family planning client satisfaction, however, appears considerably higher at private facilities - both hospitals and clinics - most likely attributable to both process and structural factors such as shorter waiting times and fewer stockouts of methods and supplies. Conclusions Because the public sector represents the major source of family planning services in developing countries, governments and Ministries of Health should continue to implement and to encourage incentives, perhaps performance-based, to improve quality at public sector health facilities, as well as to strengthen regulatory and monitoring structures to ensure quality at both public and private facilities. In the meantime, private providers appear to be fulfilling an important gap in the provision of FP services in these countries. PMID:21864335

2011-01-01

300

Strengthening Health Systems at Facility-Level: Feasibility of Integrating Antiretroviral Therapy into Primary Health Care Services in Lusaka, Zambia  

PubMed Central

Introduction HIV care and treatment services are primarily delivered in vertical antiretroviral (ART) clinics in sub-Saharan Africa but there have been concerns over the impact on existing primary health care services. This paper presents results from a feasibility study of a fully integrated model of HIV and non-HIV outpatient services in two urban Lusaka clinics. Methods Integration involved three key modifications: i) amalgamation of space and patient flow; ii) standardization of medical records and iii) introduction of routine provider initiated testing and counseling (PITC). Assessment of feasibility included monitoring rates of HIV case-finding and referral to care, measuring median waiting and consultation times and assessing adherence to clinical care protocols for HIV and non-HIV outpatients. Qualitative data on patient/provider perceptions was also collected. Findings Provider and patient interviews at both sites indicated broad acceptability of the model and highlighted a perceived reduction in stigma associated with integrated HIV services. Over six months in Clinic 1, PITC was provided to 2760 patients; 1485 (53%) accepted testing, 192 (13%) were HIV positive and 80 (42%) enrolled. Median OPD patient-provider contact time increased 55% (6.9 vs. 10.7 minutes; p<0.001) and decreased 1% for ART patients (27.9 vs. 27.7 minutes; p?=?0.94). Median waiting times increased by 36 (p<0.001) and 23 minutes (p<0.001) for ART and OPD patients respectively. In Clinic 2, PITC was offered to 1510 patients, with 882 (58%) accepting testing, 208 (24%) HIV positive and 121 (58%) enrolled. Median OPD patient-provider contact time increased 110% (6.1 vs. 12.8 minutes; p<0.001) and decreased for ART patients by 23% (23 vs. 17.7 minutes; p<0.001). Median waiting times increased by 47 (p<0.001) and 34 minutes (p<0.001) for ART and OPD patients, respectively. Conclusions Integrating vertical ART and OPD services is feasible in the low-resource and high HIV-prevalence setting of Lusaka, Zambia. Integration enabled shared use of space and staffing that resulted in increased HIV case finding, a reduction in stigma associated with vertical ART services but resulted in an overall increase in patient waiting times. Further research is urgently required to assess long-term clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness in order to evaluate scalability and generalizability. PMID:20644629

Topp, Stephanie M.; Chipukuma, Julien M.; Giganti, Mark; Mwango, Linah K.; Chiko, Like M.; Tambatamba-Chapula, Bushimbwa; Wamulume, Chibesa S.; Reid, Stewart

2010-01-01

301

Health impact assessment of waste management facilities in three European countries  

PubMed Central

Background Policies on waste disposal in Europe are heterogeneous and rapidly changing, with potential health implications that are largely unknown. We conducted a health impact assessment of landfilling and incineration in three European countries: Italy, Slovakia and England. Methods A total of 49 (Italy), 2 (Slovakia), and 11 (England) incinerators were operating in 2001 while for landfills the figures were 619, 121 and 232, respectively. The study population consisted of residents living within 3 km of an incinerator and 2 km of a landfill. Excess risk estimates from epidemiological studies were used, combined with air pollution dispersion modelling for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). For incinerators, we estimated attributable cancer incidence and years of life lost (YoLL), while for landfills we estimated attributable cases of congenital anomalies and low birth weight infants. Results About 1,000,000, 16,000, and 1,200,000 subjects lived close to incinerators in Italy, Slovakia and England, respectively. The additional contribution to NO2 levels within a 3 km radius was 0.23, 0.15, and 0.14 ?g/m3, respectively. Lower values were found for PM10. Assuming that the incinerators continue to operate until 2020, we are moderately confident that the annual number of cancer cases due to exposure in 2001-2020 will reach 11, 0, and 7 in 2020 and then decline to 0 in the three countries in 2050. We are moderately confident that by 2050, the attributable impact on the 2001 cohort of residents will be 3,621 (Italy), 37 (Slovakia) and 3,966 (England) YoLL. The total exposed population to landfills was 1,350,000, 329,000, and 1,425,000 subjects, respectively. We are moderately confident that the annual additional cases of congenital anomalies up to 2030 will be approximately 2, 2, and 3 whereas there will be 42, 13, and 59 additional low-birth weight newborns, respectively. Conclusions The current health impacts of landfilling and incineration can be characterized as moderate when compared to other sources of environmental pollution, e.g. traffic or industrial emissions, that have an impact on public health. There are several uncertainties and critical assumptions in the assessment model, but it provides insight into the relative health impact attributable to waste management. PMID:21635784

2011-01-01

302

A hospital-based estimate of major causes of death among under-five children from a health facility in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria: possible indicators of health inequality  

PubMed Central

Introduction Current evidence on the root-causes of deaths among children younger than 5years is critical to direct international efforts to improve child survival, focus on health promotion and achieve Millennium Development Goal 4. We report a hospital-based estimate for 2005-2007 of the major causes of death in children in this age-group in south-west Nigeria. Methods We used retrospective data from the intensive care unit of a second-tier health facility to extract the presenting complaints, clinical diagnosis, treatment courses, prognosis and outcome among children aged 6—59months. SPSS-19 was used for data analysis. Results Of the 301 children (58% males, 42% females) admitted into the ICU within the period of study, 173 (26%) presented with complaints related to the gastrointestinal system, 138 (21%) with respiratory symptoms and 196 (29%) with complaints of fever. Overall, 708 investigations were requested for among which were full blood count (215, 30%) and blood slides for malaria parasite (166, 23%). Infection ranked highest (181, 31%) in clinicians’ diagnosis, followed by haematological health problems (109, 19%) and respiratory illnesses (101, 17%). There were negative correlations between outcome of the illness and patient’s weight (r=-0.195, p=0.001) and a strong positive correlation between prognosis and outcome of admission (r=0.196, p=0.001). Of the 59 (20%) children that died, presentation of respiratory tract illnesses were significantly higher in females (75%) than in males (39%) (?²=7.06; p=0.008) and diagnoses related to gastrointestinal pathology were significantly higher in males (18%) than in females (0%) (?²=4.07; p=0.05). Majority of the deaths (21%) occurred among children aged 1.0 to 1.9years old and among weight group of 5.1-15.0kg. Conclusion The major causes of deaths among under-five years old originate from respiratory, gastrointestinal and infectious diseases – diseases that were recognized as major causes of childhood mortality about half a century earlier. Realization of MDG4 - to reduce child mortality by two-thirds – is only possible if the government and donor agencies look beyond the health sector to find hidden causative factors such as education and housing and within the health sector such as vibrant maternal, new-born, and child health interventions. PMID:22873746

2012-01-01

303

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control federal facility agreement. Annual progress report, fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) reviewed 105 primary documents during fiscal year 1995 (October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995). The primary documents reviewed consisted of 27 RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) workplans, 13 RFI/RI Reports, 12 Baseline Risk Assessments (BRA`s), 27 Site Evaluation (SE) Reports, 8 Proposed Plans, 5 Record of Decisions (ROD`s), 6 Remedial Design Workplans, 6 Remedial Action Workplans and 10 miscellaneous primary documents. Numerous other administrative duties were conducted during the reporting period that are not accounted for above. These included, but were not limited to, extension requests, monitoring well approvals, and Treatability Studies. The list of outgoing correspondence from SCDHEC to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is attached.

Hucks, R.L.

1996-01-30

304

An overview of the space medicine program and development of the Health Maintenance Facility for Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because the prolonged stay on board the Space Station will increase the risk of possible inflight medical problems from that on Skylab missions, the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) planned for the Space Station is much more sophisticated than the small clinics of the Skylab missions. The development of the HMF is directed by the consideration of three primary factors: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries and illnesses that may occur in flight. The major components of the HMF include the clinical laboratory, pharmacy, imaging system, critical-care system, patient-restraint system, data-management system, exercise system, surgical system, electrophysiologic-monitoring system, introvenous-fluid system, dental system, and hyperbaric-treatment-support system.

Pool, Sam Lee

1988-01-01

305

Knowledge among drug dispensers and antimalarial drug prescribing practices in public health facilities in Dar es Salaam  

PubMed Central

Background Irrational prescribing and dispensing of antimalarials has been identified as a contributing factor in the emergence of malaria parasites resistant to existing antimalarial drugs. Factors that contribute to such irrational prescribing and dispensing should therefore be identified to address this problem. The aim of this study was to assess irrational antimalarial drug dispensing and prescribing practices in public health facilities. Methods A descriptive-retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted between January and June 2011 in order to assess prescribing and dispensing practices for antimalarial drugs in three public hospitals and nine health centers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Thirty-two drug dispensers were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. A total of 4,320 prescriptions for the period January to December 2010 were collected and assessed for antimalarial drug prescribing patterns. Results The majority (84.6%) of drug dispensers had poor knowledge regarding the basic information required from patients before dispensing artemether-lumefantrine. Seventeen of 32 drug dispensers did not know the basic information that should be given to patients in order to increase absorption of artemether-lumefantrine after oral intake. Most drug dispensers also showed limited knowledge about the dosage and contraindications for artemether-lumefantrine. Eighty-seven percent of all prescriptions contained artemether-lumefantrine as the only antimalarial drug, 77.1% contained at least one analgesic, and 26.9% contained at least one antibiotic, indicating unnecessary use of analgesics and antibiotics with antimalarial drugs. A substantial number of prescriptions contained antimalarial drugs that have already been declared ineffective for the treatment of malaria in Tanzania, providing additional evidence of inadequate knowledge among health care workers concerning treatment policy. Conclusion Despite the government’s efforts to increase public awareness regarding use of artemether-lumefantrine as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, there is still irrational prescribing, dispensing, and use of this combination. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that regular on-the-job training and continuing education be provided to drug dispensers and prescribers in public health facilities. PMID:24039454

Kamuhabwa, Appolinary AR; Silumbe, Richard

2013-01-01

306

In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

Lloyd, Charles W.

1993-01-01

307

The Effect of Health-Facility Admission and Skilled Birth Attendant Coverage on Maternal Survival in India: A Case-Control Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Research in areas of low skilled attendant coverage found that maternal mortality is paradoxically higher in women who seek obstetric care. We estimated the effect of health-facility admission on maternal survival, and how this effect varies with skilled attendant coverage across India. Methods/Findings Using unmatched population-based case-control analysis of national datasets, we compared the effect of health-facility admission at any time (antenatal, intrapartum, postpartum) on maternal deaths (cases) to women reporting pregnancies (controls). Probability of maternal death decreased with increasing skilled attendant coverage, among both women who were and were not admitted to a health-facility, however, the risk of death among women who were admitted was higher (at 50% coverage, OR?=?2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.85–2.92) than among those women who were not; while at higher levels of coverage, the effect of health-facility admission was attenuated. In a secondary analysis, the probability of maternal death decreased with increasing coverage among both women admitted for delivery or delivered at home but there was no effect of admission for delivery on mortality risk (50% coverage, OR?=?1.0, 0.80–1.25), suggesting that poor quality of obstetric care may have attenuated the benefits of facility-based care. Subpopulation analysis of obstetric hemorrhage cases and report of ‘excessive bleeding’ in controls showed that the probability of maternal death decreased with increasing skilled attendant coverage; but the effect of health-facility admission was attenuated (at 50% coverage, OR?=?1.47, 0.95–1.79), suggesting that some of the effect in the main model can be explained by women arriving at facility with complications underway. Finally, highest risk associated with health-facility admission was clustered in women with education 8 years. Conclusions The effect of health-facility admission did vary by skilled attendant coverage, and this effect appears to be driven partially by reverse causality; however, inequitable access to and possibly poor quality of healthcare for primary and emergency services appears to play a role in maternal survival as well. PMID:24887586

Montgomery, Ann L.; Fadel, Shaza; Kumar, Rajesh; Bondy, Sue; Moineddin, Rahim; Jha, Prabhat

2014-01-01

308

Availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care: experience of health facility managers in a rural District of Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Provision of quality emergency obstetric care relies upon the presence of skilled health attendants working in an environment where drugs and medical supplies are available when needed and in adequate quantity and of assured quality. This study aimed to describe the experience of rural health facility managers in ensuring the timely availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a total of 17 health facility managers: 14 from dispensaries and three from health centers. Two members of the Council Health Management Team and one member of the Council Health Service Board were also interviewed. A survey of health facilities was conducted to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Participants reported on the unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies for EmOC; this was supported by the absence of essential items observed during the facility survey. The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies was reported to result in the provision of untimely and suboptimal EmOC services. An insufficient budget for drugs from central government, lack of accountability within the supply system and a bureaucratic process of accessing the locally mobilized drug fund were reported to contribute to the current situation. Conclusion The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies compromises the timely provision of quality EmOC. Multiple approaches should be used to address challenges within the health system that prevent access to essential drugs and supplies for maternal health. There should be a special focus on improving the governance of the drug delivery system so that it promotes the accountability of key players, transparency in the handling of information and drug funds, and the participation of key stakeholders in decision making over the allocation of locally collected drug funds. PMID:24646098

2014-01-01

309

ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

NONE

1998-07-01

310

David Baldwin's Trauma Information Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Trauma Information Pages, provided by psychologist David Baldwin, provide information about traumatic stress for clinicians and researchers in the field. The pages include information on trauma symptoms, connections to trauma resources including full text articles and an EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing) bibliography, general support information including grief, stress, and mental health pointers, disaster handouts and links, and links to other trauma and trauma related sites. The Trauma Pages are searchable.

Baldwin, David V.

1997-01-01

311

Giving cell phones to pregnant women and improving services may increase primary health facility utilization: a case-control study of a Nigerian project  

PubMed Central

Background Worldwide, about 287 000 women die each year from mostly preventable complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. A disproportionately high number of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The Abiye (‘Safe Motherhood’) project in the Ifedore Local Government Area (LGA) of Ondo-State of Nigeria aimed at improving facility utilization and maternal health through the use of cell phones and generally improved health care services for pregnant women, including Health Rangers, renovated Health Centres, and improved means of transportation. Methods A one-year sample of retrospective data was collected from hospital records and patients’ case files from Ifedore (the project area) and Idanre (control area) and was analyzed to determine healthcare facility utilization rates in each location. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to generate supplemental data. Results The total facility utilization rate of pregnant women was significantly higher in Ifedore than in Idanre. The facility utilization rate of the primary health care centres was significantly higher in Ifedore than in Idanre. The number of recorded cases of the five major causes of maternal death in the two LGAs was not significantly different, possibly because the project was new. Conclusions Giving cell phones to pregnant women and generally improving services could increase their utilization of the primary healthcare system. PMID:24438150

2014-01-01

312

Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone  

E-print Network

Page 5 VISION, MISSION AND VALUES Page 7 DEPARTMENTAL STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION Page 8 Governance Department of Psychiatry Page 14 ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND HIGHLIGHTS Page 15 Clinical Service Page 15 1. Child with the increase in initiatives in child and youth mental health, we divided the Section Chief position for child

Habib, Ayman

313

1/15/2014, 11:10 AMThe nocebo response -Harvard Health Publications Page 1 of 2http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/The_nocebo_response.htm  

E-print Network

Balance Gentle Core Exercises Hearing Loss Strength and Power Training The Joint Pain Relief Workout By Category Common Medical Conditions Emotional Well Being & Mental Health Heart & Circulatory Health Men if they are asked. These effects are one kind of nocebo -- a word that means in Latin "I will harm," as placebo

Reid, Nancy

314

Evaluating the level of satisfaction of patients utilizing first-level health facilities as a function of health system performance rating in the province of Elazig, Turkey  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study was conducted to determine the level of satisfaction of patients utilizing first-level health care facilities as a function of health system performance rating in Elazig province of Turkey. Methods The study was conducted between December 2013 and March 2014 at the family health centers in the Elazig province center. For collecting the data in the cross-sectional study conducted with 1,290 patients, personal data form for patients and the Turkish version of European Patients Evaluate General/Family Practice scale was used. Results Of the patients who participated in the study, 54.3% were female. According to the general average scores received by the patients from European Patients Evaluate General/Family Practice-TR Patient Satisfaction Survey questions, average scores of male patients were found to be higher than those of female patients. Scores of the divorced and widow patients were higher compared to other groups, but this was not statistically significant. Average scores of the patients whose educational status is secondary school were higher compared to other groups. Scores of the patients with children were higher compared to those without children. Scores of the patients whose occupation was farming were higher compared to the other groups of occupation. Scores of the patients whose income was TL 1,001–2,500 were found to be higher compared to other patients. Scores of the patients who stated that they never had difficulty in access were higher compared to others, but this was not statistically significant. Average scores of the patients who had chronic diseases and patients who stated to have physical handicap were higher compared to those who did not have chronic disease and physical handicap, but these differences were not found to be statistically significant, either. Conclusion There is a statistically significant difference between the patients’ demographic characteristics (sex, educational status, occupation, and income status) and their levels of satisfaction with the family medicine practice.

Bulut, Aliye; Oguzoncul, A Ferdane

2014-01-01

315

The influences of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on women's choice of prenatal care facility: Investigation of differences between rural and non-rural areas  

PubMed Central

Background Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI), implemented in 1995, substantially increased the number of health care facilities that can deliver free prenatal care. Because of the increase in such facilities, it is usually assumed that women would have more choices regarding prenatal care facilities and thus experience reduction in travel cost. Nevertheless, there has been no research exploring these issues in the literature. This study compares how Taiwan's NHI program may have influenced choice of prenatal care facility and perception regarding convenience in transportation for obtaining such care for women in rural and non-rural areas in Taiwan. Methods Based on data collected by a national survey conducted by Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) in 2000, we tried to compare how women chose prenatal care facility before and after Taiwan's National Health Insurance program was implemented. Basing our analysis on how women answered questionnaire items regarding "the type of major health care facility used and convenience of transportation to and from prenatal care facility," we investigated whether there were disparities in how women in rural and non-rural areas chose prenatal care facilities and felt about the transportation, and whether the NHI had different influences for the two groups of women. Results After NHI, women in rural areas were more likely than before to choose large hospitals for prenatal care services. For women in rural areas, the relative probability of choosing large hospitals to choosing non-hospital settings in 1998–1999 was about 6.54 times of that in 1990–1992. In contrast, no such change was found in women in non-rural areas. For a woman in a non-rural area, she was significantly more likely to perceive the transportation to and from prenatal care facilities to be very convenient between 1998 and 1999 than in the period between 1990 and 1992. No such improvement was found for women in rural areas. Conclusion We concluded that women in rural areas were more likely to seek prenatal care in large hospitals, but were not more likely to perceive very convenient transportation to and from prenatal care facilities in the late 1990s than in the early 1990s. In contrast, women in non-rural areas did not have a stronger tendency to seek prenatal care in large hospitals in the late 1990s than in earlier periods. In addition, they did perceive an improvement in transportation for acquiring prenatal care in the late 1990s. More efforts should be made to reduce these disparities. PMID:18373869

Chen, Likwang; Chen, Chi-Liang; Yang, Wei-Chih

2008-01-01

316

Savings analysis of a 1 MW cogeneration system at a Texas mental health facility  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration is defined as the generation of electric power and coincident recovery of useful thermal energy from a single prime mover using a single fuel. The 1 MW gas turbine cogeneration system at Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), Austin, came on line in March, 1992 and is a unique application of federal and state funds. This system has been analyzed for its present performance and loads using hourly measured data. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A and M University has been collecting hourly data for natural gas use and the electrical energy produced by the engine since August, 1992. Waste heat recovered by the Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) is also monitored. This paper describes the present system, analyzes the system using hourly monitored data, calculates energy and dollar savings, compares the measured results with the estimated savings, and discusses some of the problems encountered during the first year of operation.

Athar, A.; Turner, W.D.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); McClean, G. [Texas Department for Mental Health and Mental Retardation, Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

317

[Energy and environmental in hospital evaluation of consumptions and impacts of Health Facilities in Region Lombardia].  

PubMed

The research moves from the current global and local context and from shared development strategies. From the observation and the analysis of contemporary environmental and energy issues and redefined directions of growth of human activity, it is addressing the question of environmental sustainability and energy conservation of building hospital systems. The work has developed a field survey relating the specific topic of energy saving and efficiency of the Park Hospital in the Italian Lombardy Region. This has been articulated in a diagnosis of technology and efficiency of regional hospitals, implemented through a census, and in a subsequent identification of interventional cases, in order to show its economic, environmental and health performance of the energy efficiency consumption and the environmentally sound. PMID:21425653

Brioschi, A; Capolongo, S; Buffoli, M

2010-01-01

318

9/2/2014 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa | Travelers' Health | CDC http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa 1/5  

E-print Network

9/2/2014 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa | Travelers' Health | CDC http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa 1/5 Advice for Colleges, Universities, and Students about Ebola in West Africa For Colleges

Qian, Ning

319

Counting the cost of not costing HIV health facilities accurately: pay now, or pay more later.  

PubMed

The HIV pandemic continues to be one of our greatest contemporary public health threats. Policy makers in many middle- and low-income countries are in the process of scaling up HIV prevention, treatment and care services in the context of a reduction in international HIV funding due to the global economic downturn. In order to scale up services that are sustainable in the long term, policy makers and implementers need to have access to robust and contemporary strategic information, including financial information on expenditure and cost, in order to be able to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate HIV services. A major problem in middle- and low-income countries continues to be a lack of basic information on the use of services, their cost, outcome and impact, while those few costing studies that have been performed were often not done in a standardized fashion. Some researchers handle this by transposing information from one country to another, developing mathematical or statistical models that rest on assumptions or information that may not be applicable, or using top-down costing methods that only provide global financial costs rather than using bottom-up ingredients-based costing. While these methods provide answers in the short term, countries should develop systematic data collection systems to store, transfer and produce robust and contemporary strategic financial information for stakeholders at local, sub-national and national levels. National aggregated information should act as the main source of financial data for international donors, agencies or other organizations involved with the global HIV response. This paper describes the financial information required by policy makers and other stakeholders to enable them to make evidence-informed decisions and reviews the quantity and quality of the financial information available, as indicated by cost studies published between 1981 and 2008. Among the lessons learned from reviewing these studies, a need was identified for providing countries with practical guidance to produce reliable and standardized costing data to monitor performance, as countries want to improve programmes and services, and have to demonstrate an efficient use of resources. Finally, the issues raised in this paper relate to the provision of all areas of healthcare in countries and it is going to be increasingly important to leverage the lessons learned from the HIV experience and use resources more effectively and efficiently to improve health systems in general. PMID:22830633

Beck, Eduard J; Avila, Carlos; Gerbase, Sofia; Harling, Guy; De Lay, Paul

2012-10-01

320

Interrater reliability of the Observer Rating of Medication Taking scale in an inpatient mental health facility.  

PubMed

Non-adherence to medication remains a major barrier to recovery from mental illnesses. Identification of those patients likely to experience adherence difficulties is best undertaken during inpatient treatment, prior to discharge into the community. More objective assessments of adherence behaviours might assist staff to more effectively target support to those patients most in need. This study investigated the interrater reliability of an inpatient behavioural observation scale of patient engagement with medication: the Observer Rating of Medication Taking (ORMT) scale. Eight mental health nurses working in a psychiatric hospital inpatient setting were trained in the use of the ORMT using video-based vignettes. Working in pairs, staff then independently rated adherence behaviours of 13 inpatients in a rehabilitation unit (total of 160 ratings) over a 1-week period. Concurrently, two expert raters also undertook independent ratings of patient medication-taking behaviour using the ORMT. Interrater reliability was assessed across both staff and expert raters. The results indicated that the ORMT has satisfactory interrater reliability, and can be appropriately used in an inpatient setting. The observational location of raters on the ward influenced the range of medication-taking behaviours observed, and thus the extent of concordance between raters. Further research to determine if the ORMT predicts adherence in the community is warranted. PMID:25069738

Byrne, Mitchell K; Deane, Frank P; Murugesan, Ganapathi; Connaughton, Elizabeth

2014-12-01

321

Student Health and Counseling Resource Guide  

E-print Network

................................................page 8 SHCS Patient Centered Medical Home Model ..........................................page 9 ...................................................................................... page 28 UC Davis Police Department (Campus Safety) ....................................... page 30 ........................... inside back cover shcs.ucdavis.edu This resource guide has been developed to address health issues

Todd, Brian

322

Office of Emergency Management UCF Facilities and Safety  

E-print Network

Office of Emergency Management UCF Facilities and Safety Page 1 of 3 Departments within of Emergency Management UCF Facilities and Safety Page 2 of 3 Action/Task Location Staff Responsible Notes preparations #12;Office of Emergency Management UCF Facilities and Safety Page 3 of 3 Action/Task Location

Wu, Shin-Tson

323

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01

324

Lack of access to treatment as a barrier to HCV screening: a facility-based assessment in the Indian health service.  

PubMed

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued new recommendations to screen persons born between 1945 and 1965 for hepatitis C virus. Federal facilities in the US Indian Health Service were surveyed on knowledge and support for the hepatitis C virus recommendations, as well as barriers and concerns. PMID:23838897

Reilley, Brigg; Leston, Jessica; Redd, John T; Geiger, Rebecca

2014-01-01

325

Robot assisted activity at a health service facility for the aged for 17 months: an interim report of long-term experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A long-term experiment of robot assisted activity for elderly people has been conducted at a health service facility for the aged since Aug. 2003. Three therapeutic seal robots, Paro, were introduced there. This paper describes the results of the experiment for 17 months. Face scales that consist of illustrations of person's faces were used to evaluate person's moods. In addition,

Kazuyoshi Wada; Takanori Shibata; Tomoko Saito; Kayoko Sakamoto; Kazuo Tanie

2005-01-01

326

Psychological and Social Effects of One Year Robot Assisted Activity on Elderly People at a Health Service Facility for the Aged  

Microsoft Academic Search

A long-term experiment of robot assisted activity for elderly people has been conducted at a health service facility for the aged since Aug. 2003. Three therapeutic seal robots, Paro, were introduced there. This paper describes the results of the experiment for one year. Face scales that consist of illustrations of person's faces were used to evaluate person's moods. In addition,

Kazuyoshi Wada; Takanori Shibata; Tomoko Saito; Kayoko Sakamoto; Kazuo Tanie

2005-01-01

327

Psychological and social effects in long-term experiment of robot assisted activity to elderly people at a health service facility for the aged  

Microsoft Academic Search

A long-term experiment of robot assisted activity for elderly people has been conducted at a health service facility for the aged since Aug. 2003. Two therapeutic seal robots, Paro, were introduced there. This paper describes the first interim report of the experiment for three months. Face scales that consist of illustrations of person's faces were used to evaluate person's moods.

Kazuyoshi Wada; Takanori Shibata; Tomoko Saito; Kazuo Tanie

2004-01-01

328

Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Hong Kong's Residential Care Facilities: A Descriptive Analysis of Health and Disease Patterns by Sex, Age, and Presence of Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to describe the health status profile and identify the healthcare needs of adults with intellectual disability (ID) residing in 18 of Hong Kong's residential care facilities. The author employed a cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire survey to collect data on 811 persons with ID (432 males, 53.3%, and…

Wong, Chi Wai

2011-01-01

329

Risk Factors for Birth Asphyxia in an Urban Health Facility in Cameroon  

PubMed Central

Objective The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 4 million children are born with asphyxia every year, of which 1 million die and an equal number survive with severe neurologic sequelae. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors of birth asphyxia and the hospital outcome of affected neonates. Materials & Methods This study was a prospective case-control study on term neonates in a tertiary hospital in Yaounde, with an Apgar score of < 7 at the 5th minute as the case group, that were matched with neonates with an Apgar score of ? 7 at the 5th minute as control group. Statistical analysis of relevant variables of the mother and neonates was carried out to determine the significant risk factors. Results The prevalence of neonatal asphyxia was 80.5 per 1000 live births. Statistically significant risk factors were the single matrimonial status, place of antenatal visits, malaria, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, prolonged labor, arrest of labour, prolonged rupture of membranes, and non-cephalic presentation. Hospital mortality was 6.7%, that 12.2% of them had neurologic deficits and/or abnormal transfontanellar ultrasound/electroencephalogram on discharge, and 81.1% had a satisfactory outcome. Conclusion The incidence of birth asphyxia in this study was 80.5% per1000 live birth with a mortality of 6.7%. Antepartum risk factors were: place of antenatal visit, malaria during pregnancy, and preeclampsia/eclampsia. Whereas prolonged labor, stationary labor, and term prolonged rupture of membranes were intrapartum risk faktors. Preventive measures during prenatal visits through informing and communicating with pregnant women should be reinforced. PMID:24665306

CHIABI, Andreas; NGUEFACK, Seraphin; MAH, Evelyne; NODEM, Sostenne; MBUAGBAW, Lawrence; MBONDA, Elie; TCHOKOTEU, Pierre-Fernand; DOH FRCOG, Anderson

2013-01-01

330

General Regulations, Appendix 4 Version 2012b, Page 1 of 12 Appendix 4 Code of Conduct for Use of ICT Facilities  

E-print Network

University systems and Services or the reputation of the University. Every User is responsible the University's presence to the world. In order to protect the University's ICT assets, services and reputation for the use of Coventry University's Information Technology facilities. The University is connected to the UK

Low, Robert

331

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque 0,5, supplment au n 11, Tome 37, Novembre 1976., page C5-223 THE NUCLEAR STRUCTURE FACILITY TANDEM AT DARESBURY LABORATORY  

E-print Network

-223 THE NUCLEAR STRUCTURE FACILITY TANDEM AT DARESBURY LABORATORY R. G. P. Voss Daresbury Laboratory, Science Research Council, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD, England Résumé. -- Un accélérateur électrostatique tandem pour ions de toutes sortes, y compris les ions lourds, et en construction au Laboratoire de Daresbury

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary...Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary...perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

2013-01-01

333

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary...Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary...perform laboratory seed health testing or seed crop...

2012-01-01

334

[Relationships between characteristics of community and health service and activity states of medical care facilities in four regions of Fukuoka Prefecture].  

PubMed

In the present study, we assigned a geographical range to promote community health service planning according to the life-behavior spaces of inhabitants in Fukuoka prefecture and regarded the country-life zone, defined by the Ministry of Construction, as a region in which health services should be investigated. The social and economic characteristics of each individual region were then analyzed. As a result, four factors related to "Industrialization" and "Urbanization" were detected. Further, the states of space distribution of medical care facilities and medical care-related facilities were clarified, and relationships between the states and the above socio-economic characteristics were investigated. The states of space distribution in both facilities in Fukuoka prefecture were proved to be remarkably similar on an axis of the "Accumulation of Urbanism" factor. Moreover, Path Analysis was performed in order to clarify the patterns of treatment received by the inhabitants, and a model of these trends in relation to health care received was constructed, highlighting problems in the necessary planning of health service provision. It was specifically indicated that the problem of aging in Chikuho region would be an important factor affecting such planning in the future. We also analyzed the present state of emergency medical services in Fukuoka prefecture and the activities of health nurses in each individual region. PMID:3726321

Egawa, H; Osada, H; Funatani, F; Nito, T; Yusu, K; Yokota, A; Ito, H; Matsuda, A

1986-03-20

335

THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER JOHN DEMPSEY HOSPITAL  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER JOHN DEMPSEY HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL SECTION: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT NUMBER: 04-008 SUBJECT: Hospital Evaluation and Management (E/M) Services PAGE: 1 of 1 BACKGROUND: Hospital or facility E/M is the hospital technical portion of the E/M visit and indicates

Oliver, Douglas L.

336

Periodontal conditions, low birth weight and preterm birth among postpartum mothers in two tertiary health facilities in Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Literature reports have indicated an increase in research evidence suggesting association between periodontal disease and the risk of pre-term birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). Periodontal diseases in Uganda have been documented as a public health problem, but their association to adverse pregnancy outcomes is unknown. This study was conducted to assess the association between periodontital diseases in postpartum mothers and PTB and LBW of babies in Mulago and Mbarara referral hospitals. Methods This was a cross sectional study using medical records, clinical examination and oral interview of mothers at the two tertiary health facilities. Mothers with singleton babies from Mulago (n?=?300) and Mbarara Hospital (n?=?100) were recruited for the study. The women were clinically examined for periodontal disease by 2 trained and calibrated dentists. Data on PTB and LBW were retrieved from medical records. The data were analyzed to determine the relationship between the four parameters for periodontal disease (bleeding gingiva, periodontal pockets, gingival recession and calculus with plaque deposits) and the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Frequency distribution was used to describe the data. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to study the association between the periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Results Approximately 26% and 29% of the postpartum mothers examined had bleeding gingiva and periodontal pockets of 4 mm or more deep, respectively. Advanced periodontitis i.e. pocket depth???6 mm was recorded in 13 (3.6%) of the mothers. Calculus with plaque deposits were recorded in 86% (n?=?343) of the mothers. Gingival recession was recorded in 9.0% of the mothers and significantly and directly related to birth weight (p?

2014-01-01

337

APPENDIX G, Page G1Page G2  

E-print Network

APPENDIX G, Page G1Page G2 #12;Page G3 #12;Page G4 #12;Page G5 #12;Page G6 #12;Page G7 #12;Page G8 #12;Page G9 #12;Page G10 #12;Page G11 #12;Page G12 #12;Page G13 #12;Page G14 #12;Page G15 #12;Page G16 #12;Page G17 #12;Page G18 #12;Page G19 #12;Page G20 #12;Page G21 #12;Page G22 #12;Page G23 #12;Page G

Omiecinski, Curtis

338

Efficiency of antenatal care and childbirth services in selected primary health care facilities in rural Tanzania: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Cost studies are paramount for demonstrating how resources have been spent and identifying opportunities for more efficient use of resources. The main objective of this study was to assess the actual dimension and distribution of the costs of providing antenatal care (ANC) and childbirth services in selected rural primary health care facilities in Tanzania. In addition, the study analyzed determining factors of service provision efficiency in order to inform health policy and planning. Methods This was a retrospective quantitative cross-sectional study conducted in 11 health centers and dispensaries in Lindi and Mtwara rural districts. Cost analysis was carried out using step down cost accounting technique. Unit costs reflected efficiency of service provision. Multivariate regression analysis on the drivers of observed relative efficiency in service provision between the study facilities was conducted. Reported personnel workload was also described. Results The health facilities spent on average 7 USD per capita in 2009. As expected, fewer resources were spent for service provision at dispensaries than at health centers. Personnel costs contributed a high approximate 44% to total costs. ANC and childbirth consumed approximately 11% and 12% of total costs; and 8% and 10% of reported service provision time respectively. On average, unit costs were rather high, 16 USD per ANC visit and 79.4 USD per childbirth. The unit costs showed variation in relative efficiency in providing the services between the health facilities. The results showed that efficiency in ANC depended on the number of staff, structural quality of care, process quality of care and perceived quality of care. Population-staff ratio and structural quality of basic emergency obstetric care services highly influenced childbirth efficiency. Conclusions Differences in the efficiency of service provision present an opportunity for efficiency improvement. Taking into consideration client heterogeneity, quality improvements are possible and necessary. This will stimulate utilization of ANC and childbirth services in resource-constrained health facilities. Efficiency analyses through simple techniques such as measurement of unit costs should be made standard in health care provision, health managers can then use the performance results to gauge progress and reward efficiency through performance based incentives. PMID:24581003

2014-01-01

339

Page 1 of 1 Last Revision 06/24/2008 Purdue University Student Health Center, 601 Stadium Mall Dr., Health Information Management, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2052  

E-print Network

and alcohol abuse treatment information, if any, as may be contained in said medical record including release and use of medical information pertaining to treatment for alcohol or drug abuse. No Unless UNIVERSITY AUTHORIZATION FOR USE, DISCLOSURE OR RELEASE OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION AND MEDICAL RECORDS I

Ginzel, Matthew

340

LBMS Facility Use Only Log in # ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Operator:____________________  

E-print Network

acknowledgements of facility and staff members. See our acknowledgment policy details on our web page. Sample:________ Storage Requirement Refrigerate Freeze Keep Dark Other (Describe)__________ Sample Form and Estimated

Meagher, Mary

341

Systematic review of facility-based sexual and reproductive health services for female sex workers in Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Several biological, behavioural, and structural risk factors place female sex workers (FSWs) at heightened risk of HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and other adverse sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes. FSW projects in many settings have demonstrated effective ways of altering this risk, improving the health and wellbeing of these women. Yet the optimum delivery model of FSW projects in Africa is unclear. This systematic review describes intervention packages, service-delivery models, and extent of government involvement in these services in Africa. Methods On 22 November 2012, we searched Web of Science and MEDLINE, without date restrictions, for studies describing clinical and non-clinical facility-based SRH prevention and care services for FSWs in low- and middle-income countries in Africa. We also identified articles in key non-indexed journals and on websites of international organizations. A single reviewer screened titles and abstracts, and extracted data from articles using standardised tools. Results We located 149 articles, which described 54 projects. Most were localised and small-scale; focused on research activities (rather than on large-scale service delivery); operated with little coordination, either nationally or regionally; and had scanty government support (instead a range of international donors generally funded services). Almost all sites only addressed HIV prevention and STIs. Most services distributed male condoms, but only 10% provided female condoms. HIV services mainly encompassed HIV counselling and testing; few offered HIV care and treatment such as CD4 testing or antiretroviral therapy (ART). While STI services were more comprehensive, periodic presumptive treatment was only provided in 11 instances. Services often ignored broader SRH needs such as family planning, cervical cancer screening, and gender-based violence services. Conclusions Sex work programmes in Africa have limited coverage and a narrow scope of services and are poorly coordinated with broader HIV and SRH services. To improve FSWs’ health and reduce onward HIV transmission, access to ART needs to be addressed urgently. Nevertheless, HIV prevention should remain the mainstay of services. Service delivery models that integrate broader SRH services and address structural risk factors are much needed. Government-led FSW services of high quality and scale would markedly reduce SRH vulnerabilities of FSWs in Africa. PMID:24916010

2014-01-01

342

Communicating health risks to the community from a state-of-the art waste-to-energy resource recovery facility through multimedia environmental monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

Since 1986, when Montgomery County, Maryland decided to construct a municipal solid waste Resource Recovery Facility (RRF), the County has been seeking citizen input through citizen advisory committee meetings. Due to public concern that organics, primarily dioxins, that are released from municipal waste combustion create the risk of potential health-effects including cancer, the County conducted a multiple pathway health-risk study in 1989. In this study, organics and trace metals that are known to be released from municipal waste combustors and are generally considered to be of importance from a public health perspective were addressed. The County conducted several citizen meetings for communicating the results of the health risk studies. In these meetings, some citizens living in the neighborhood of the facility still expressed concern, and asked the County to conduct an ambient monitoring program prior to and during the operation of the facility. The County agreed to conduct a multimedia environmental monitoring program. The County Council endorsed this program. The major objective of the program was to determine the existing background levels of toxics prior to the operation of the facility and incremental increases, if any, resulting from the operation of the facility. In this program organics and trace metals discussed earlier, were periodically sampled. The media sampled were: air, soil, garden vegetables, surface water, fish and sediment from the farm ponds, dairy milk and hay. This paper discusses the original design of the program, citizen input to the design of the program, results of the program, and typical issues raised by the citizens in numerous public briefing conducted by the County, and the County's responses.

Rao, R.K.

1998-07-01

343

Facility safety study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

1979-01-01

344

Use of facility assessment data to improve reproductive health service delivery in the Democratic Republic of the Congo  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Prolonged exposure to war has severely impacted the provision of health services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Health infrastructure has been destroyed, health workers have fled and government support to health care services has been made difficult by ongoing conflict. Poor reproductive health (RH) indicators illustrate the effect that the prolonged crisis in DRC has had

Sara E Casey; Kathleen T Mitchell; Immaculée Mulamba Amisi; Martin Migombano Haliza; Blandine Aveledi; Prince Kalenga; Judy Austin

2009-01-01

345

Site specific risk assessment of an energy-from-waste thermal treatment facility in Durham Region, Ontario, Canada. Part A: Human health risk assessment.  

PubMed

The regions of Durham and York in Ontario, Canada have partnered to construct an energy-from-waste thermal treatment facility as part of a long term strategy for the management of their municipal solid waste. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive human health risk assessment for this facility. This assessment was based on extensive sampling of baseline environmental conditions (e.g., collection and analysis of air, soil, water, and biota samples) as well as detailed site specific modeling to predict facility-related emissions of 87 identified contaminants of potential concern. Emissions were estimated for both the approved initial operating design capacity of the facility (140,000 tonnes per year) and for the maximum design capacity (400,000 tonnes per year). For the 140,000 tonnes per year scenario, this assessment indicated that facility-related emissions are unlikely to cause adverse health risks to local residents, farmers, or other receptors (e.g., recreational users). For the 400,000 tonnes per year scenarios, slightly elevated risks were noted with respect to inhalation (hydrogen chloride) and infant consumption of breast milk (dioxins and furans), but only during predicted 'upset conditions' (i.e. facility start-up, shutdown, and loss of air pollution control) that represent unusual and/or transient occurrences. However, current provincial regulations require that additional environmental screening would be mandatory prior to expansion of the facility beyond the initial approved capacity (140,000 tonnes per year). Therefore, the potential risks due to upset conditions for the 400,000 tonnes per year scenario should be more closely investigated if future expansion is pursued. PMID:23911923

Ollson, Christopher A; Knopper, Loren D; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Jayasinghe, Ruwan

2014-01-01

346

FastStats: Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... this site? Print Page last updated: July 14, 2014 Page last reviewed: November 21, 2013 Content source: CDC/National Center for Health Statistics Page maintained by: Office of Information Services Home ...

347

Virginia Key, Florida (Continued on page 2)  

E-print Network

beautiful work environment. Do you have any hobbies? Most of my hobbies have been put on hold as I pursue) (Continued from page 1) FACILITIES UPDATE Renovations are underway to update the lobby in North Grosvenor

Miami, University of

348

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01

349

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents  

SciTech Connect

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01

350

Page 1 of 2 OVERCROWDING  

E-print Network

systems and cooking appliances; this leads to blown fuses and power outages. 2. Health and the Lack impact your health and compromise hygiene standards and general living conditions. #12;Page 2 of 2 3 of Space The number of bedrooms in a property is not the only determinate in assessing occupancy standards

Blennerhassett, Peter

351

Geographic access to care is not a determinant of child mortality in a rural Kenyan setting with high health facility density  

PubMed Central

Background Policy-makers evaluating country progress towards the Millennium Development Goals also examine trends in health inequities. Distance to health facilities is a known determinant of health care utilization and may drive inequalities in health outcomes; we aimed to investigate its effects on childhood mortality. Methods The Epidemiological and Demographic Surveillance System in Kilifi District, Kenya, collects data on vital events and migrations in a population of 220,000 people. We used Geographic Information Systems to estimate pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospitals and vaccine clinics and developed proportional-hazards models to evaluate the effects of travel time on mortality hazard in children less than 5 years of age, accounting for sex, ethnic group, maternal education, migrant status, rainfall and calendar time. Results In 2004-6, under-5 and under-1 mortality ratios were 65 and 46 per 1,000 live-births, respectively. Median pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospital were 193 min (inter-quartile range: 125-267) and 49 min (32-72); analogous values for vaccine clinics were 47 (25-73) and 26 min (13-40). Infant and under-5 mortality varied two-fold across geographic locations, ranging from 34.5 to 61.9 per 1000 child-years and 8.8 to 18.1 per 1000, respectively. However, distance to health facilities was not associated with mortality. Hazard Ratios (HR) were 0.99 (95% CI 0.95-1.04) per hour and 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.08) per half-hour of pedestrian and vehicular travel to hospital, respectively, and 1.00 (95% CI 0.99-1.04) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.92-1.05) per quarter-hour of pedestrian and vehicular travel to vaccine clinics in children <5 years of age. Conclusions Significant spatial variations in mortality were observed across the area, but were not correlated with distance to health facilities. We conclude that given the present density of health facilities in Kenya, geographic access to curative services does not influence population-level mortality. PMID:20236537

2010-01-01

352

Road map to scaling-up: translating operations research study's results into actions for expanding medical abortion services in rural health facilities in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background Identifying unsafe abortion among the major causes of maternal deaths and respecting the rights to health of women, in 2002, the Nepali parliament liberalized abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy on request. However, enhancing women’s awareness on and access to safe and legal abortion services, particularly in rural areas, remains a challenge in Nepal despite a decade of the initiation of safe abortion services. Methods Between January 2011 and December 2012, an operations research study was carried out using quasi-experimental design to determine the effectiveness of engaging female community health volunteers, auxiliary nurse midwives, and nurses to provide medical abortion services from outreach health facilities to increase the accessibility and acceptability of women to medical abortion. This paper describes key components of the operations research study, key research findings, and follow-up actions that contributed to create a conducive environment and evidence in scaling up medical abortion services in rural areas of Nepal. Results It was found that careful planning and implementation, continuous advocacy, and engagement of key stakeholders, including key government officials, from the planning stage of study is not only crucial for successful completion of the project but also instrumental for translating research results into action and policy change. While challenges remained at different levels, medical abortion services delivered by nurses and auxiliary nurse midwives working at rural outreach health facilities without oversight of physicians was perceived to be accessible, effective, and of good quality by the service providers and the women who received medical abortion services from these rural health facilities. Conclusions This research provided further evidence and a road-map for expanding medical abortion services to rural areas by mid-level service providers in minimum clinical settings without the oversight of physicians, thus reducing complications and deaths due to unsafe abortion. PMID:24886393

2014-01-01

353

Center for Public Health Sciences Master of Public Health  

E-print Network

1 Center for Public Health Sciences Master of Public Health STUDENT HANDBOOK June 2013 #12;Section Pages 1. Center for Public Health Sciences.....................................................................................................................................1 2. Center for Public Health Sciences Master of Public Health Program

Yates, Andrew

354

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

2007-10-01

355

75 FR 55574 - Joint Public Roundtable on Swap Execution Facilities and Security-Based Swap Execution Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission (``CFTC'') and Securities and Exchange Commission...swap execution facilities and security-based swap execution facilities...Interpretation & Guidance Web page at http://www.cftc...swap execution facilities and security-based swap execution...

2010-09-13

356

Table Of Contents Section: Page  

E-print Network

EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 2 SANITATION Table Of Contents Section: Page 02.A General-1 SECTION 2 SANITATION 02.A GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. Employers shall establish and maintain hygienic sanitation in the workplace. a. Periodic sanitation inspections of food preparation areas (kitchens and dining facilities

US Army Corps of Engineers

357

Health Tip: Minimize Jet Lag  

MedlinePLUS

... Kohnle Wednesday, September 17, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Page Traveler's Health (HealthDay News) -- It's difficult to eliminate jet lag ... HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Traveler's Health Recent Health News Page last updated on 18 ...

358

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...facility's physical plant (e.g., laboratory...of greenhouses or growth chambers where plants are grown for seed...scales, pH meters, distilled and sterile water, gas burners, an...require a greenhouse, growth chamber, or an...

2010-01-01

359

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...facility's physical plant (e.g., laboratory...of greenhouses or growth chambers where plants are grown for seed...scales, pH meters, distilled and sterile water, gas burners, an...require a greenhouse, growth chamber, or an...

2011-01-01

360

A feasible method to enhance and maintain the health of elderly living in long-term care facilities through long-term, simplified tai chi exercises.  

PubMed

Practicing Tai Chi offers the potential to enhance the physical and mental health of older adults. Identifying a feasible way to encourage regular Tai Chi practice is essential if Tai Chi is to be promoted as a long-term, daily activity for elderly care facility residents. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness and feasibility of using an audiovisual, simplified Tai Chi exercise module to enhance and maintain the health of long-term care facility residents. A quasi-experimental, one-group, time-series design was used. Data were collected six times (twice before the intervention; four times after intervention started) at three-month intervals. Fifty-one elderly male subjects were recruited by convenience sampling. A 50-minute Simplified Tai-Chi Exercise Program (STEP) was implemented in two small groups three times a week for 12 months. During the first six-month period, participants received guidance from an actual instructor. During the second six-month period, guidance was delivered via a video tape and displayed on a television screen. Results indicated that participants' physical health (cardio-respiratory function, lower body flexibility, and hand-gripping strength) and mental health (quality of sleep) had both improved significantly six months after intervention started, with improvements maintained throughout the end of the 12-month study (all p values < .05). Instructor-led STEP training followed by practice using appropriate audiovisual aids represents a feasible and effective method to implement a long-term activity program in long-term elderly care facilities. PMID:17551897

Chen, Kuei-Min; Li, Chun-Huw; Lin, Jong-Ni; Chen, Wen-Ting; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Wu, Hui-Chuan

2007-06-01

361

Care Everywhere Facility Listing (April 2012) Facility Name City State  

E-print Network

ALASKA Anchorage AK KODIAK COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER Kodiak AK INFIRMARY HEALTH SYSTEMS Mobile AL SISTERSCare Everywhere Facility Listing (April 2012) Facility Name City State PROVIDENCE HEALTH & SERVICES OF MERCY - FORT SMITH Fort Smith AR SISTERS OF MERCY - HOT SPRINGS Hot Springs AR BAPTIST HEALTH MEDICAL

Squire, Larry R.

362

Quotations Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sporting a new look and user interface, as well as five hundred new quotations (and a new URL, so check your bookmark file!), this site allows the user to search ten Internet quotation archives for keywords. A new advanced search page offers the choice to search by the text of quotations, author or subject, or all fields; users may search in more than one collection at a time on the advanced search page. The site also provides links to other quotation resources on the Internet, organized by topic. This site is not a replacement for a standard quotation reference source, but rather a constantly expanding selection of quotations available on the Internet. http://www.starlingtech.com/quotes/ Random quotation page: http://www.starlingtech.com/quotes/randquote.cgi

363

Contamination of the cold water distribution system of health care facilities by Legionella pneumophila: do we know the true dimension?  

PubMed

German water guidelines do not recommend routine assessment of cold water for Legionella in healthcare facilities, except if the water temperature at distal sites exceeds 25°C. This study evaluates Legionella contamination in cold and warm water supplies of healthcare facilities in Hesse, Germany, and analyses the relationship between cold water temperature and Legionella contamination. Samples were collected from four facilities, with cases of healthcare-associated Legionnaires' disease or notable contamination of their water supply. Fifty-nine samples were from central lines and 625 from distal sites, comprising 316 cold and 309 warm water samples. Legionella was isolated from central lines in two facilities and from distal sites in four facilities. 17% of all central and 32% of all distal samples were contaminated. At distal sites, cold water samples were more frequently contaminated with Legionella (40% vs 23%, p <0.001) and with higher concentrations of Legionella (?1,000 colony-forming unit/100 ml) (16% vs 6%, p<0.001) than warm water samples. There was no clear correlation between the cold water temperature at sampling time and the contamination rate. 35% of cold water samples under 20 °C at collection were contaminated. Our data highlight the importance of assessing the cold water supply of healthcare facilities for Legionella in the context of an intensified analysis. PMID:21527132

Arvand, M; Jungkind, K; Hack, A

2011-01-01

364

Mercury: Health Effects  

MedlinePLUS

... toxicological profile for mercury . Top of page Elemental mercury effects Elemental (metallic) mercury primarily causes health effects ... 0370.htm . Top of page Effects of other mercury compounds (inorganic and organic) High exposures to inorganic ...

365

The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST): an effectiveness study on improving newborn health and survival in rural Uganda through a community-based intervention linked to health facilities - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Reducing neonatal-related deaths is one of the major bottlenecks to achieving Millennium Development Goal 4. Studies in Asia and South America have shown that neonatal mortality can be reduced through community-based interventions, but these have not been adapted to scalable intervention packages for sub-Saharan Africa where the culture, health system and policy environment is different. In Uganda, health outcomes are poor for both mothers and newborn babies. Policy opportunities for neonatal health include the new national Health Sector Strategic Plan, which now prioritizes newborn health including use of a community model through Village Health Teams (VHT). The aim of the present study is to adapt, develop and cost an integrated maternal-newborn care package that links community and facility care, and to evaluate its effect on maternal and neonatal practices in order to inform policy and scale-up in Uganda. Methods/Design Through formative research around evidence-based practices, and dialogue with policy and technical advisers, we constructed a home-based neonatal care package implemented by the responsible VHT member, effectively a Community Health Worker (CHW). This CHW was trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits - two before and three just after birth - so that linkages will be made to facility care and targeted messages for home-care and care-seeking delivered. The project is improving care in health units to provide standardized care for the mother and the newborn in both intervention and comparison areas. The study is taking place in a new Demographic Surveillance Site in two rural districts, Iganga and Mayuge, in Uganda. It is a two-arm cluster randomized controlled design with 31 intervention and 32 control areas (villages). The comparison parishes receive the standard care already being provided by the district, but to the intervention villages are added a system for CHWs to visit the mother five times in her home during pregnancy and the neonatal period. Both areas benefit from a standardized strengthening of facility care for mothers and neonates. Discussion UNEST is designed to directly feed into the operationalization of maternal and newborn care in the national VHT strategy, thereby helping to inform scale-up in rural Uganda. The study is registered as a randomized controlled trial, number ISRCTN50321130. PMID:23153395

2012-01-01

366

Some Factors Influencing Effective Utilization of Drinking Water Facilities: Women, Income, and Health in Rural North Ghana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the examination of the implementation of rural drinking water facilities, not enough attention has been paid to analyzing the socioeconomic and political relationships that affect the effective utilization of the facilities, particularly as these relate to women in rural society. This paper suggests that much of the difficulty in instituting the utilization of safe water supply sources has to do with the rather low economic status of women—the main water collectors. Poverty consigns women to long periods of work in activities or jobs that bring little reward. This makes it difficult to effectively digest the messages delivered by program staff and limits the extent of usage of the safe water facilities.

Kendie, S. B.

1996-01-01

367

Assessment of quality of prescribing in patients of hypertension at primary and secondary health care facilities using the Prescription Quality Index (PQI) tool  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine the quality of prescribing in hypertension in primary and secondary health care settings using the Prescription Quality Index (PQI) tool and to assess the reliability of this tool. Materials and Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was carried out for 6 months in order to assess quality of prescribing of antihypertensive drugs using Prescription Quality Index (PQI) at four primary (PHC) and two secondary (SHC) health care facilities. Patients attending these facilities for at least 3 months were included. Complete medical history and prescriptions received were noted. Total and criteria wise PQI scores were derived for each prescription. Prescriptions were categorized as poor (score of ?31), medium (score 32-33) and high quality (score 34-43) based on PQI total score. Psychometric analysis using factor analysis was carried out to assess reliability and validity. Results: Total 73 hypertensive patients were included. Mean age was 61.2 ± 11 years with 35 (48%) patients above 65 years of age. Total PQI score was 26 ± 11. There was a significant difference in PQI score between PHC and SHC (P < 0.05) Out of 73 prescriptions, 43 (59%) were of poor quality with PQI score <31. The value of Cronbach's ? for the entire 22 criteria of PQI was 0.71 suggesting good reliability of PQI tool in our setting. Conclusions: Based on PQI scores, quality of prescribing in hypertensive patients was poor, somewhat better in primary as compared to secondary health care facility. PQI is reliable for measuring prescribing quality in hypertension in Indian set up. PMID:25298574

Suthar, Jalpa Vashishth; Patel, Varsha J.

2014-01-01

368

Learn about Health Literacy  

MedlinePLUS

... health literate [433 KB, 27 pages] How Can Organizations, Communities, and People Improve Health Literacy? The resources ... learn about health literacy and what you, your organization or community can do to improve it. The ...

369

Marriage and Heart Health  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... hand corner of the player. Marriage and Heart Health HealthDay November 25, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Family ... marital quality, underwent lab tests to assess cardiovascular health and provided medical information about heart attacks, strokes ...

370

Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

Environmental Health and Safety Approved by Document No. Version Date Replaces Page EHS EHS). 1. INTRODUCTION I was informed of McGill's Health & Safety Policies, including: Laboratory Responsibilities Health & Safety Internal Responsibility System Personal Protective Equipment Policy Accident

Shoubridge, Eric

371

INVOICE NO. 8 TO: Florida State University Page 1 of 1 Pages  

E-print Network

EXHIBIT 14 INVOICE NO. 8 TO: Florida State University Page 1 of 1 Pages Facilities Design & Construction 109 Mendenhall Project No. FS-200 Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4152 Project Name: Residence Hall 60,000 100 60,000 60,000 0 Design Development 90,000 100 90,000 90,000 0 50% Construction Documents

Sura, Philip

372

Increased vulnerability of rural children on antiretroviral therapy attending public health facilities in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  A large proportion of the 340,000 HIV-positive children in South Africa live in rural areas, yet there is little sub-Saharan\\u000a data comparing rural paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme outcomes with urban facilities. We compared clinical,\\u000a immunological and virological outcomes between children at seven rural and 37 urban facilities across four provinces in South\\u000a Africa.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We conducted a retrospective cohort study

Geoffrey Fatti; Peter Bock; Ashraf Grimwood; Brian Eley

2010-01-01

373

Health Facilities: New York State's Oversight of Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Report to the Honorable Bill Green, House of Representatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the request of Congressman William Green, the General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the validity of allegations about deficiencies in the New York State Department of Health's nursing home and hospital inspection processes for certification for participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health Care Financing Administration and…

General Accounting Office, New York, NY. Regional Office.

374

A brief, standardized tool for measuring HIV-related stigma among health facility staff: results of field testing in China, Dominica, Egypt, Kenya, Puerto Rico and St. Christopher & Nevis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Within healthcare settings, HIV-related stigma is a recognized barrier to access of HIV prevention and treatment services and yet, few efforts have been made to scale-up stigma reduction programs in service delivery. This is in part due to the lack of a brief, simple, standardized tool for measuring stigma among all levels of health facility staff that works across diverse HIV prevalence, language and healthcare settings. In response, an international consortium led by the Health Policy Project, has developed and field tested a stigma measurement tool for use with health facility staff. Methods Experts participated in a content-development workshop to review an item pool of existing measures, identify gaps and prioritize questions. The resulting questionnaire was field tested in six diverse sites (China, Dominica, Egypt, Kenya, Puerto Rico and St. Christopher & Nevis). Respondents included clinical and non-clinical staff. Questionnaires were self- or interviewer-administered. Analysis of item performance across sites examined both psychometric properties and contextual issues. Results The key outcome of the process was a substantially reduced questionnaire. Eighteen core questions measure three programmatically actionable drivers of stigma within health facilities (worry about HIV transmission, attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLHIV), and health facility environment, including policies), and enacted stigma. The questionnaire also includes one short scale for attitudes towards PLHIV (5-item scale, ? = 0.78). Conclusions Stigma-reduction programmes in healthcare facilities are urgently needed to improve the quality of care provided, uphold the human right to healthcare, increase access to health services, and maximize investments in HIV prevention and treatment. This brief, standardized tool will facilitate inclusion of stigma measurement in research studies and in routine facility data collection, allowing for the monitoring of stigma within healthcare facilities and evaluation of stigma-reduction programmes. There is potential for wide use of the tool either as a stand-alone survey or integrated within other studies of health facility staff. PMID:24242266

Nyblade, Laura; Jain, Aparna; Benkirane, Manal; Li, Li; Lohiniva, Anna-Leena; McLean, Roger; Turan, Janet M; Varas-Diaz, Nelson; Cintron-Bou, Francheska; Guan, Jihui; Kwena, Zachary; Thomas, Wendell

2013-01-01

375

HIV/AIDS among inmates of and releasees from US correctional facilities, 2006: declining share of epidemic but persistent public health opportunity.  

PubMed

Because certain groups at high risk for HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) come together in correctional facilities, seroprevalence was high early in the epidemic. The share of the HIV/AIDS epidemic borne by inmates of and persons released from jails and prisons in the United States (US) in 1997 was estimated in a previous paper. While the number of inmates and releasees has risen, their HIV seroprevalence rates have fallen. We sought to determine if the share of HIV/AIDS borne by inmates and releasees in the US decreased between 1997 and 2006. We created a new model of population flow in and out of correctional facilities to estimate the number of persons released in 1997 and 2006. In 1997, approximately one in five of all HIV-infected Americans was among the 7.3 million who left a correctional facility that year. Nine years later, only one in seven (14%) of infected Americans was among the 9.1 million leaving, a 29.3% decline in the share. For black and Hispanic males, two demographic groups with heightened incarceration rates, recently released inmates comprise roughly one in five of those groups' total HIV-infected persons, a figure similar to the proportion borne by the correctional population as a whole in 1997. Decreasing HIV seroprevalence among those admitted to jails and prisons, prolonged survival and aging of the US population with HIV/AIDS beyond the crime-prone years, and success with discharge planning programs targeting HIV-infected prisoners could explain the declining concentration of the epidemic among correctional populations. Meanwhile, the number of persons with HIV/AIDS leaving correctional facilities remains virtually identical. Jails and prisons continue to be potent targets for public health interventions. The fluid nature of incarcerated populations ensures that effective interventions will be felt not only in correctional facilities but also in communities to which releasees return. PMID:19907649

Spaulding, Anne C; Seals, Ryan M; Page, Matthew J; Brzozowski, Amanda K; Rhodes, William; Hammett, Theodore M

2009-01-01

376

20/20 vision. To celebrate our 20th anniversary, Health Facilities Management explores emerging industry trends.  

PubMed

In the past 20 years, hospital design has evolved from institutional to evidence-based and patient-centered, medical and information technologies have advanced at unprecedented rates, infection control and security concerns have become more pronounced and environmental issues have broadened hospitals' healing mission to include the facility's impact on the community and the world at large. PMID:19024847

Eagle, Amy

2008-10-01

377

Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 01/10/2013 Page 1 of 2  

E-print Network

Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 01 authorities (primarily the Health and Safety Executive (HSE)) immediately under the requirements details are available on the Health and Safety Executive website at http

Schnaufer, Achim

378

Perception of quality of maternal healthcare services among women utilising antenatal services in selected primary health facilities in Anambra State, Southeast Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study aimed at assessing antenatal care service attendees’ perception of quality of maternal healthcare (MHC) services in Anambra State, southeast Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 310 pregnant women utilising antenatal care (ANC) services in three purposively selected primary health centres (PHCs) in rural communities in Anambra State were studied. Reponses were elicited from the participants selected consecutively over a 4-month period, using a pre-tested, semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, utilisation and perception of MHC services. Data collected were analysed using SPSS version 17. Results: Findings showed that utilisation of facility for both antenatal (97.0%; 95% CI, 94.4–98.4%) and natal services (92.7%; 95% CI 89.2–95.2%) were quite high. Generally, most of the women were satisfied with MHC services (89.7%). Most of them were satisfied with the staff attitude (85.1%), waiting time (84.1%) and cost of services (79.5%). Being ?30 years (X2 = 4.61, P = 0.032), married (X2 = 9.70, P = 0.008) and multiparous (X2 = 9.14, P = 0.028), as well as utilisation of formal health facility for antenatal (X2 = 26.94, P = 0.000) and natal (X2 = 33.42, P = 0.000) services were associated with satisfaction with maternal health services. Conclusions: The study showed high level of satisfaction with quality of maternal health services among antenatal attendees and highlights the need to strengthen interventions that increase uptake of formal MHC services. PMID:24791050

Emelumadu, Obiageli F.; Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu Uchenna; Ukegbu, Andrew Ugwunna; Ezeama, Nkiru N.; Ifeadike, Chigozie Ozoemena; Okezie, Obasi Kanu

2014-01-01

379

Implementation of Mental Health Service Has an Impact on Retention in HIV Care: A Nested Case-Control Study in a Japanese HIV Care Facility  

PubMed Central

Background Poor retention in the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with adverse patient outcomes such as antiretroviral therapy failure and death. Therefore, appropriate case management is required for better patient retention; however, which intervention in case management is important has not been fully investigated. Meanwhile, in Japan, each local government is required to organize mental health services for patients with HIV so that a case manager at an HIV care facility can utilize them, but little is known about the association between implementation of the services and loss to follow-up. Therefore, we investigated that by a nested case-control study. Methods The target population consisted of all patients with HIV who visited Osaka National Hospital, the largest HIV care facility in western Japan, between 2000 and 2010. Loss to follow-up was defined as not returning for follow-up care more than 1 year after the last visit. Independent variables included patient demographics, characteristics of the disease and treatment, and whether the patients have received mental health services. For each case, three controls were randomly selected and matched. Results Of the 1620 eligible patients, 88 loss to follow-up cases were identified and 264 controls were matched. Multivariate-adjusted conditional logistic regression revealed that loss to follow-up was less frequent among patients who had received mental health services implemented by their case managers (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.35 [0.16-0.76]). Loss to follow-up also occurred more frequently in patients who did not receive antiretroviral therapy (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 7.51 [3.34-16.9]), who were under 30 years old (2.74 [1.36-5.50]), or who were without jobs (3.38 [1.58-7.23]). Conclusion Mental health service implementation by case managers has a significant impact on patient retention. PMID:23922753

Tominari, Shinjiro; Nakakura, Takahiro; Yasuo, Toshihiko; Yamanaka, Kyoko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Shirasaka, Takuma; Nakayama, Takeo

2013-01-01

380

Get Affordable Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Get Affordable Health Care The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is ... and other care facilities to help people get health care they can afford. Health Centers Health centers provide ...

381

Page 2 of 52 National Tracking Network  

E-print Network

#12;TNIP 2010 Page 2 of 52 National Tracking Network Implementation Plan 2010 Environmental Public Health Tracking Network TNIP 2010 #12;TNIP 2010 Page 3 of 52 CONTENTS 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................................4 1.1. Overview of the Technical Infrastructure of the Tracking Network and State/local Tracking

382

Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Created on 01/10/2013 Page 1 of 8  

E-print Network

, with registration number SC005336 Section A Date, time and place of accident, dangerous occurrence or incident. Date to Complete an Online Accident / Incident Report Introduction The online form should be used to report any/health-safety/occupational-health/ill-health-accident-reporting/ill- health-reporting Completing the form: The online form can either be completed by the injured person

Schnaufer, Achim

383

MedlinePlus - Health Information from the National Library of Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Women's Health Checkup Allergy Asthma in Children Bullying Child Safety Childhood Immunization Children's Health Children's Page ... Women's Health Checkup Children Allergy Asthma in Children Bullying Child Safety Childhood Immunization Children's Health Children's Page ...

384

Page 1 of 101 SEATTLE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

98122-1090 Phone: (206) 296-5660 Email: nurse@seattleu.edu Website: www.seattleu.edu/nurs #12;Page 2 Nurse Practitioner with Addictions Focus Advanced Community Public Health Nursing: Advanced Practice

Carter, John

385

Energy management system optimization for on-site facility staff - a case history of the New York State Office of Mental Health  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Novus Engineering and EME Group began a project for the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) to maximize the use and benefit of energy management systems (EMS) installed at various large psychiatric hospitals throughout New York State. The project, which was funded and managed by the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY), had three major objectives: (1) Maximize Energy Savings - Novus staff quickly learned that EMS systems as set up by contractors are far from optimal for generating energy savings. This part of the program revealed numerous opportunities for increased energy savings, such as: fine tuning proportional/integral/derivative (PID) loops to eliminate valve and damper hunting; adjusting temperature reset schedules to reduce energy consumption and provide more uniform temperature conditions throughout the facilities; and modifying equipment schedules. (2) Develop Monitoring Protocols - Large EMS systems are so complex that they require a systematic approach to daily, monthly and seasonal monitoring of building system conditions in order to locate system problems before they turn into trouble calls or equipment failures. In order to assist local facility staff in their monitoring efforts, Novus prepared user-friendly handbooks on each EMS. These included monitoring protocols tailored to each facility. (3) Provide Staff Training - When a new EMS is installed at a facility, it is frequently the maintenance staffs first exposure to a complex computerized system. Without proper training in what to look for, staff use of the EMS is generally very limited. With proper training, staff can be taught to take a pro-active approach to identify and solve problems before they get out of hand. The staff then realize that the EMS is a powerful preventative maintenance tool that can be used to make their work more effective and efficient. Case histories are presented.

Bagdon, M.J.; Martin, P.J.

1997-06-01

386

Educational Programming in Mental Health/Retardation Facilities. Report of the Mental Health and Retardation to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. Senate Document No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents data on three studies requested by Virginia State Senate Joint Resolution No. 148 and carried out by the Virginia Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation in cooperation with other agencies. The three studies included in the report are: (1) an assessment of the appropriateness of housing young adults (ages 18-22)…

Virginia State General Assembly, Richmond. Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission.

387

[Fulfillment of personnel staffing requirements in health facilities in Bohemia and individual regions as of September 30 1988].  

PubMed

In the CSR an investigation was made to test the implementation of personnel norms in health institutions to the date of September 30, 1988. It was revealed that the norms were not implemented: there was a shortage of 12,106.38 medical posts, i.e. 27.7%, 1,425.88 working posts of pharmacists, i.e. 29.0%; as regards other university graduates, 3,422.51 posts were vacant, i.e. 55.5%, and as regards nursing staff there were 53,161.34 vacant working posts. There was a shortage of a total of 70,116.11 specialized health workers, the norm was met by 68.1%. This is the overall position but there are differences in particular groups and interregional differences too. The authors analyze in detail the position in the CSR by categories of workers and by regions in different health institutions. PMID:2331757

Chudobová, M

1990-01-01

388

Supply-Side Effect of Health Care Facilities on Productivity Amongst the Female Workers in the Readymade Garment Sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted in 4 selected garment factories within Dhaka city. The objectives of this study were to find out health care access (Supply-side effect) in the garments factory for the women workers and their relation to the productivity. A total of 300 women garment workers were included in this study. Most (60.0%) of the respondents were adolescents, unmarried

Housne Ara Begum; Homayra Fahmida

2009-01-01

389

Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

2010-01-01

390

Specifying and Testing a Multi-Dimensional Model of Publicness: An Analysis of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities  

E-print Network

, 1987), as well as its level of: social equity; engagement with external enterprises that compel "morally governed behavior" (e.g., accreditation agencies); and openness. Data on public and private (for-profit and non-profit) mental health and substance...

Merritt, Cullen

2014-05-31

391

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

41581 Health Psychology (3) or SOC 42563 Sociology in Health and Health Care (3) 3 Health ScienceRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies - Health Sciences ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSC] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last

Sheridan, Scott

392

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

41581 Health Psychology (3) or SOC 42563 Sociology in Health and Health Care (3) 3 Health ScienceRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies - Health Sciences ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSC] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last

Sheridan, Scott

393

Recent changes in human resources for health and health facilities at the district level in Indonesia: evidence from 3 districts in Java  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  There is continuing discussion in Indonesia about the need for improved information on human resources for health at the district\\u000a level where programs are actually delivered. This is particularly the case after a central government decision to offer doctors,\\u000a nurses and midwives on contract the chance to convert to permanent civil service status. Our objective here is to report changes

Peter Heywood; Nida P Harahap; Siska Aryani

2011-01-01

394

Please cite this article in press as: Y. Zhang, et al., The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.013  

E-print Network

health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case study, Int. J. Med. Inform. (2012.ijmijournal.com The benefits of introducing electronic health records in residential aged care facilities: A multiple case Electronic health records (EHR) Electronic nursing documentation Interview Nursing home Residential aged care

Yu, Ping

395

National Environmental Public Health Performance Standards  

E-print Network

#12;CDC's Strategy and Goals Health Impact Investments People Strategy Goals Performance Health Protection Global Health Customer Focus Research Health System Leadership Accountability Communication Health Performance Standards Page 2 #12;Goal: Continuous Assessment PLANNING IMPLEMENTREVIEW GUIDANCE

396

Effect of health insurance and facility quality improvement on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in Nigeria: a population-based study.  

PubMed

IMPORTANCE Hypertension is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, but the lack of affordable treatment and the poor quality of health care compromise antihypertensive treatment coverage and outcomes. OBJECTIVE To report the effect of a community-based health insurance (CBHI) program on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in rural Nigeria. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We compared changes in outcomes from baseline (2009) between the CBHI program area and a control area in 2011 through consecutive household surveys. Households were selected from a stratified random sample of geographic areas. Among 3023 community-dwelling adults, all nonpregnant adults (aged ?18 years) with hypertension at baseline were eligible for this study. INTERVENTION Voluntary CBHI covering primary and secondary health care and quality improvement of health care facilities. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The difference in change in blood pressure from baseline between the program and the control areas in 2011, which was estimated using difference-in-differences regression analysis. RESULTS Of 1500 eligible households, 1450 (96.7%) participated, including 564 adults with hypertension at baseline (313 in the program area and 251 in the control area). Longitudinal data were available for 413 adults (73.2%) (237 in the program area and 176 in the control area). Baseline blood pressure in respondents with hypertension who had incomplete data did not differ between areas. Insurance coverage in the hypertensive population increased from 0% to 40.1% in the program area (n?=?237) and remained less than 1% in the control area (n?=?176) from 2009 to 2011. Systolic blood pressure decreased by 10.41 (95% CI, -13.28 to -7.54) mm Hg in the program area, constituting a 5.24 (-9.46 to -1.02)-mm Hg greater reduction compared with the control area (P?=?.02), where systolic blood pressure decreased by 5.17 (-8.29 to -2.05) mm Hg. Diastolic blood pressure decreased by 4.27 (95% CI, -5.74 to -2.80) mm Hg in the program area, a 2.16 (-4.27 to -0.05)-mm Hg greater reduction compared with the control area, where diastolic blood pressure decreased by 2.11 (-3.80 to -0.42) mm Hg (P?=?.04). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Increased access to and improved quality of health care through a CBHI program was associated with a significant decrease in blood pressure in a hypertensive population in rural Nigeria. Community-based health insurance programs should be included in strategies to combat cardiovascular disease in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24534947

Hendriks, Marleen E; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Akande, Tanimola M; Kramer, Berber; Osagbemi, Gordon K; Tanovic, Zlata; Gustafsson-Wright, Emily; Brewster, Lizzy M; Lange, Joep M A; Schultsz, Constance

2014-04-01

397

Optical Technology Division: Low Background Infrared Calibration Facility Quality Manual  

E-print Network

Technology Division: Low Background Infrared Calibration Facility Quality Manual Version Date Author ApprovalOptical Technology Division: Low Background Infrared Calibration Facility Quality Manual LBIR Project Leader Review: Date: Technical Manager Approval: Date: Version Date Author Approval Pages Filename

398

Technological trends in health care: electronic health record.  

PubMed

The most relevant technological trend affecting health care organizations and physician services is the electronic health record (EHR). Billions of dollars from the federal government stimulus bill are available for investment toward EHR. Based on the government directives, it is evident EHR has to be a high-priority technological intervention in health care organizations. Addressed in the following pages are the effects of the EHR trend on financial and human resources; analysis of advantages and disadvantages of EHR; action steps involved in implementing EHR, and a timeline for implementation. Medical facilities that do not meet the timetable for using EHR will likely experience reduction of Medicare payments. This article also identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the EHR and steps to be taken by hospitals and physician medical groups to receive stimulus payment. PMID:21045583

Abraham, Sam

2010-01-01

399

Implementing routine provider-initiated HIV testing in public health care facilities in Kenya: a qualitative descriptive study of nurses' experiences.  

PubMed

Routine "provider-initiated testing and counselling" (PITC) for HIV has been implemented amidst concern over how consent, confidentiality and counselling (the 3Cs) can be maintained in under-resourced health care settings. In Kenya, PITC has been rolled out since 2005, HIV prevalence is 7.1% and more than 86% of adults have not been tested. Kenyan nurses are the main cadre implementing PITC, but little is known about their experiences of incorporating HIV testing into everyday practice and the challenges faced in maintaining the 3Cs within their work environments. This study aimed to explore these issues and adopted a qualitative multi-method design using a convenience sampling approach. Two focus group discussions (total n=12) and 13 in-depth individual interviews were undertaken with nurses from 11 different public health care facilities in Nairobi and its surrounding areas (including in-patient and outpatient settings). Data were analysed thematically. Nurses identified a range of personal, client and health system challenges in the everyday application of PITC. These included (i) the contradictions of normalising a highly stigmatised disease and the difficulty in providing client-centred care within a routinised and target-oriented work culture; (ii) the challenge of dealing with ethically complex client situations in which the principles of the 3Cs could be difficult to uphold; and (iii) lack of time, resources, space and recognition within workplace environments (especially in-patient settings) that, likewise, led to problems with maintaining the 3Cs. In-patient nurses in particular identified problems associated with testing in a multi-disciplinary context, suggesting that other health professionals appeared to routinely flout the PITC guidelines. In conclusion, this study shows that the process of translating policy into practice is invariably complex and that more research is needed to explore PITC practices, particularly in in-patient settings. Nurses require supervision and support to negotiate the challenges and to fulfil their roles effectively. PMID:21939406

Evans, Catrin; Ndirangu, Eunice

2011-10-01

400

Reproductive rights and options available to women infected with HIV in Ghana: perspectives of service providers from three Ghanaian health facilities  

PubMed Central

Background Owing to improved management of HIV and its associated opportunistic infections, many HIV-positive persons of reproductive age are choosing to exercise their right of parenthood. This study explored the knowledge of health workers from two Ghanaian districts on the reproductive rights and options available to HIV-positive women who wish to conceive. Methods Facility-based cross-sectional in design, the study involved the entire population of nurse counselors (32) and medical officers (3) who provide counseling and testing services to clients infected with HIV. Both structured and in-depth interviews were conducted after informed consent. Results Two main perspectives were revealed. There was an overwhelmingly high level of approbation by the providers on HIV-positive women’s right to reproduction (94.3%). At the same time, the providers demonstrated a lack of knowledge regarding the various reproductive options available to women infected with HIV. Site of facility, and being younger were associated with practices that violated client’s right to contraceptive counseling (p?health issues of HIV-persons into the existing guidelines. PMID:23496943

2013-01-01

401

Comparison of activities of daily living after osteoporotic hip fracture surgery in patients admitted from home and from geriatric health service facilities  

PubMed Central

With the population and proportion of the elderly increasing each year, difficulties with postoperative treatment outcomes after osteoporotic hip fracture are increasing. This study focused on activities of daily living (ADL) in patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture through an investigation of living arrangements, the presence of dementia, and other complications of aging. Information from 99 patients who lived either at home or in geriatric health service facilities was collected for this trial. Most patients were over 65 years of age and female, and about half of them had dementia. The postoperative ADL score (focusing on patients’ walking ability) was significant for those living at home than for those living in facilities. In addition, patients with dementia were divided into the following two categories: an early-rising group, comprising patients who were able to use a wheelchair within 48 hours of their operation; and a late-rising group, who did not start using a wheelchair until more than 48 hours after surgery. The ADL scores for the two groups were compared. Although the preoperative ADL scores were not significantly different between the two groups, postoperative ADL scores were significantly higher in the early-rising group than in the late-rising group, especially in patients who had undergone hemiarthroplasty. These data suggest that ADL in dementia patients following hip fracture depends on the surgical procedure performed and whether they are late or early risers after surgery. PMID:25378917

Horikawa, Akira; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi; Kodama, Hiroyuki

2014-01-01

402

ENSO Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ENSO PAGE, provided by the National Weather Service in the San Francisco Bay Area, is a collection of links dealing with a variety of ENSO (El Nino/Southern Oscillation) related topics such as impacts, sea surface temperature charts, indices and analyses, and background information. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration (NOAA), El Nino is "a disruption of the ocean-atmosphere system in the tropical Pacific having important consequences for weather around the globe." It is caused by a change in trade wind patterns in the central and western Pacific ocean, and causes a large volume of ocean to be warmed (typically about 20 degrees of latitude by 90 degrees of longitude). It happens at irregular intervals and has global climatic consequences (regional flooding and droughts, in particular).

1998-01-01

403

1/10/2014, 12:22 PMCan reading a novel change your brain? A study of brain scans suggest yes. -The Washington Post Page 1 of 2http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/can-reading-...st-yes/2014/01/06/171d9e6e-7163-11e3-8b3f-b1666705ca3b_print  

E-print Network

1/10/2014, 12:22 PMCan reading a novel change your brain? A study of brain scans suggest yes. - The Washington Post Page 1 of 2http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/can-reading-...st-yes/2014 to previous page Can reading a novel change your brain? A study of brain scans suggests yes. By Emory

Reid, Nancy

404

Older Women with Asthma Face Worse Health Outcomes  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Older Women With Asthma Face Worse Health Outcomes Making breathing issues a ... Dallas Friday, August 1, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Asthma Seniors' Health Women's Health FRIDAY, Aug. 1, 2014 ( ...

405

"Sex Health" Deaf Health Talks,  

E-print Network

;Sexual Dysfunction- Males Types of Erectile Dysfunction (unable to get erect or stay "up" for sex dysfunction? What are common types of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)? How can we protect our sexual-surprising-health-benefits-of-sex?page=3 #12;Sexual Health Issues Sexual dysfunction Male and female Common

Goldman, Steven A.

406

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

SciTech Connect

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17

407

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Not Available

1992-09-01

408

Health Data Interactive  

MedlinePLUS

... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Data Access Data Access Interactive Tables and Databases NCHS ... Statistics Online Research Data Center NCHS Home Health Data Interactive Welcome! Health Data Interactive presents tables with ...

409

BioMed Central Page 1 of 11  

E-print Network

BioMed Central Page 1 of 11 (page number not for citation purposes) Health and Quality of Life and implementing on the impact of cancer on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by the way of a mean comparison study was used to determine the impact on HRQoL of newly diagnosed cancer: 84 patients with cancer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

BioMed Central Page 1 of 12  

E-print Network

Hospital, Arusha, Tanzania, 4University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Public Health, ChapelBioMed Central Page 1 of 12 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Public Health Open Access Thielman6 Address: 1School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2

Chen, Yiling

411

Distribution and health risk assessment of some organic and inorganic substances in a petroleum facility in central Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An oil distribution and storage station was subjected to an Environmental Auditory and results showed soil contamination in part of the surface. An assessment of the site was required in order to fulfill a complete characterization of the contaminants present in soil and groundwater, as well as to establish the probable sources of contamination. Besides, a health risk assessment was performed to set remediation goals. The aim of this work is to show how the entire characterization and risk assessment process performed in this storage station from central Mexico, regarding to subsoil and groundwater. Thirty sample points were examined. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations in soil were in a very low range (20-268 mg/kg). Ethylbenzene, methyl tert-butyl ether, tert-amyl methyl ether, and lead were identified in one sampling point. Iron and zinc were found in all soil samples. There was no correlation between total petroleum hydrocarbons and any of the metals or between both metals. Only two out of four monitoring wells showed total petroleum hydrocarbons levels (1.4 and 66 mg/L, respectively). Regarding lead, all four monitored wells showed lead concentrations (0.043-0.15 mg/L). Results suggested that metal concentrations were not associated to petroleum contamination, but to iron scrap deposits placed over the soil; nevertheless more data is needed to make a clear conclusion. Health risk assessment showed that none of the evaluated contaminants represented a risk either for the on-site or the off-site receptors, since the hazardous quotients estimated did not exceed the acceptable values.

Flores-Serrano, R. M.; Torres, L. G.; Flores, C.; Castro, A.; Iturbe, R.

412

Attributes and perspectives of public providers related to provision of medical abortion at public health facilities in Vietnam: a cross-sectional study in three provinces  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to investigate attributes of public service providers associated with the provision of medical abortion in Vietnam. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study via interviewer-administered questionnaire among abortion providers from public health facilities in Hanoi, Khanh Hoa, and Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam between August 2011 and January 2012. We recruited abortion providers at all levels of Vietnam’s public health service delivery system. Participants were questioned about their medical abortion provision practices and perspectives regarding abortion methods. Results A total of 905 providers from 62 health facilities were included, comprising 525 (58.0%) from Hanoi, 122 (13.5%) from Khanh Hoa, and 258 (28.5%) from Ho Chi Minh City. The majority of providers were female (96.7%), aged ?25 years (94%), married (84.4%), and had at least one child (89%); 68.9% of providers offered only manual vacuum aspiration and 31.1% performed both medical abortion and manual vacuum aspiration. Those performing both methods included physicians (74.5%), midwives (21.7%), and nurses (3.9%). Unadjusted analyses showed that female providers (odds ratio 0.1; 95% confidence interval 0.01–0.30) and providers in rural settings (odds ratio 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.08–0.79) were less likely to provide medical abortion than their counterparts. Obstetricians and gynecologists were more likely to provide medical abortion than providers with nursing/midwifery training (odds ratio 22.2; 95% confidence interval 3.81–129.41). The most frequently cited advantages of medical abortion for providers were that no surgical skills are required (61.7%) and client satisfaction is better (61.0%). Conclusion Provision of medical abortion in Vietnam is lower than provision of manual vacuum aspiration. While the majority of abortion providers are female midwives in Vietnam, medical abortion provision is concentrated in urban settings among physicians. Individuals providing medical abortion found that the method yields high client satisfaction. PMID:25152635

Ngo, Thoai D; Free, Caroline; Le, Hoan T; Edwards, Phil; Pham, Kiet HT; Nguyen, Yen BT; Nguyen, Thang H

2014-01-01

413

Anti-malarial prescription practices among outpatients with laboratory-confirmed malaria in the setting of a health facility-based sentinel site surveillance system in Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Most African countries have adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. The World Health Organization now recommends limiting anti-malarial treatment to those with a positive malaria test result. Limited data exist on how these policies have affected ACT prescription practices. Methods Data were collected from all outpatients presenting to six public health facilities in Uganda as part of a sentinel site malaria surveillance programme. Training in case management, encouragement of laboratory-based diagnosis of malaria, and regular feedback were provided. Data for this report include patients with laboratory confirmed malaria who were prescribed anti-malarial therapy over a two-year period. Patient visits were analysed in two groups: those considered ACT candidates (defined as uncomplicated malaria with no referral for admission in patients???4 months of age and???5 kg in weight) and those who may not have been ACT candidates. Associations between variables of interest and failure to prescribe ACT to patients who were ACT candidates were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results A total of 51,355 patient visits were included in the analysis and 46,265 (90.1%) were classified as ACT candidates. In the ACT candidate group, 94.5% were correctly prescribed ACT. Artemether-lumefantrine made up 97.3% of ACT prescribed. There were significant differences across the sites in the proportion of patients for whom there was a failure to prescribe ACT, ranging from 3.0-9.3%. Young children and woman of childbearing age had higher odds of failure to receive an ACT prescription. Among patients who may not have been ACT candidates, the proportion prescribed quinine versus ACT differed based on if the patient had severe malaria or was referred for admission (93.4% vs 6.5%) or was below age or weight cutoffs for ACT (41.4% vs 57.2%). Conclusions High rates of compliance with recommended ACT use can be achieved in resource-limited settings. The unique health facility-based malaria surveillance system operating at these clinical sites may provide a framework for improving appropriate ACT use at other sites in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23870515

2013-01-01

414

environmental, health and safety  

E-print Network

directors and officers, environmental supervisors, union representatives, health and safety technicians, occupational health specialists and nurses, risk managers, compliance managers, plant or facilities managers

California at Davis, University of

415

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-print Network

directors and officers, environmental supervisors, union representatives, health and safety technicians, occupational health specialists and nurses, risk managers, compliance managers, plant or facilities managers

California at Davis, University of

416

Director's Page  

Cancer.gov

Harold Varmus, M.D., co-recipient of a Nobel Prize for studies of the genetic basis of cancer, began his tenure as NCI Director on July 12, 2010. He previously served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and as Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

417

Knowledge of tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and perception about provider initiated HIV testing and counselling among TB patients attending health facilities in Harar town, Eastern Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) co-infection is one of the major health problems in Ethiopia. The national TB and HIV control guideline in Ethiopia recommends provider initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) as a routine care for TB patients. However, the impact of this approach on the treatment seeking of TB patients has not been well studied. In this study, we assessed knowledge of TB and HIV, and perception about PITC among TB patients attending health facilities in Harar town, Eastern Ethiopia. Methods In a health facilities based cross-sectional study, a total of 415 study participants were interviewed about knowledge of TB and HIV as well as the impact of HIV testing on their treatment seeking behavior using a semi-structured questionnaires. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed the association of distance > 10 km from health facility [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.48, 95% CI: 0.24 - 0.97, P=0.042] with low knowledge of TB. Distance > 10 km from health facility (AOR= 0.12, 95% CI: 0.06 -0.23, P < 0.001) was also associated with low knowledge of HIV testing. Delay in treatment seeking was associated with female participants (AOR = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.05-0.25, <0.001), single marital status (AOR =0.001, 95% CI: 0.00 - 0.01, P< 0.001) and distance > 10 km from health facility (AOR =0.46, 95% CI: 0.28 - 0.75, P=0.002). Most of the study participants (70%) believed that there is no association between TB and HIV/AIDS. On the other hand, two thirds (66.5%) of the participants thought that HIV testing has importance for TB patients. However, the majority (81.6%) of the study participants in the age category less than 21 years believed that fear of PITC could cause delay in treatment seeking. Conclusion The study showed the association of low knowledge of the study participants about TB and HIV testing with distance > 10 km from health facility. Study participants in the age category less than 21 years thought that fear of PITC could cause treatment delay of TB patients. Hence, emphasis should be given to improve knowledge of TB and HIV among residents far away from health facility, and attention also needs to be given to improve the perception of individuals in the age group less than 21 years about PITC in the present study area. PMID:23394172

2013-01-01

418

A guide to population-related home pages on the World Wide Web.  

PubMed

The number of home pages on the World Wide Web is increasing, and the information they contain is constantly being updated. The Australian National University's Demography and Population Studies World-Wide Web Virtual Library (http://coombs.anu.edu.au/ResFacilities DemographyPage.html) has links to 155 pertinent sites. Some of the outstanding home pages containing population information pertaining to the US or generated by US agencies include that of 1) the US Census Bureau, 2) the US state census data centers, 3) the National Center for Health Statistics, 4) the National Institute on Aging, 5) American Demographics, Inc., 6) the UN Population Information Network, 7) the Demographic and Health Surveys, 8) the Population Reference Bureau, 9) the Population Index, 10) the US Census Bureau's International Programs Center, and 11) POPLINE. International development information can be found by visiting the web sites of 1) the International Institute for Sustainable Development, 2) USAID, 3) the UN Development Programme, and 4) the World Bank. Population Associations which have web sites include 1) the Population Association of America, 2) the Association of Population Libraries and Information Centers-International, and 3) the Association of Population Centers. Collections of population web sites can be found at Internet Resources for Demographers and Population and Reproductive Health. Finally, a directory of population organizations is also available. PMID:12320450

Malsawma, Z

1996-10-01

419

RFP v1 Page 1 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)  

E-print Network

RFP v1 Page 1 2012/09/05 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP) for REPORT ON INVESTIGATION INTO OUTSOURCED Services and Facilities Building, West Campus #12;University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 1. RFP v1.1. RFP COORDINATOR

420

Facility Manager Primary Purpose  

E-print Network

and working environment for our students, employees and others associated with the STM community. Nature. The Facility Manager is responsible for the work of supervising others, recruiting, providing training health and safety requirements; d. ensuring that employees receive training in occupational health

Saskatchewan, University of

421

Updated: May 2008 Page 1 of 3 Spingold Theater Center  

E-print Network

Updated: May 2008 Page 1 of 3 Spingold Theater Center Facility and Theater Specifications General. (Same level as Theater Lot) Dock height: 3'- 6" Depth of dock edge to door: 8' - 0" Door opening: 8' - 6 Page 2 of 3 Mainstage Theater Type of Theater: Traditional Proscenium Color of Main Drape: Red Travel

Fraden, Seth

422

Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy  

E-print Network

;Parking and Transport Policy Page 2 Pay-As-You-Go parking Parking provided in designated parking areas where a fee is payable based on the use of the parking. These areas are available to staff, studentsParking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life

423

Efficacy of Hospital Germicides against Adenovirus 8, a Common Cause of Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Health Care Facilities  

PubMed Central

The inactivation of virus-contaminated nonporous inanimate surfaces was investigated using adenovirus type 8, a common cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. A 10-?l inoculum of adenovirus was placed onto each stainless steel disk (1-cm diameter), and the inoculum was allowed to air dry for 40 min. Twenty-one different germicides (including disinfectants and antiseptics) were selected for this study based on their current uses in health care. After a 1- or 5-minute exposure to 50 ?l of the germicide, the virus-germicide test mixture was neutralized and assayed for infectivity. Using an efficacy criterion of a 3-log10 reduction in the titer of virus infectivity and regardless of the virus suspending medium (i.e., hard water, sterile water, and hard water with 5% fetal calf serum), only five disinfectants proved to be effective against the test virus at 1 min: 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde, 2.4% glutaraldehyde, 2.65% glutaraldehyde, ?6,000 ppm chlorine, and ?1,900 ppm chlorine. Four other disinfectants showed effectiveness under four of the five testing conditions: 70% ethanol, 65% ethanol with 0.63% quaternary ammonium compound, 79.6% ethanol with 0.1% quaternary ammonium compound, and 0.2% peracetic acid. Of the germicides suitable for use as an antiseptic, 70% ethanol achieved a 3-log10 reduction under four of the five test conditions. These results emphasize the need for proper selection of germicides for use in disinfecting noncritical surfaces and semicritical medical devices, such as applanation tonometers, in order to prevent outbreaks of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:16569860

Rutala, William A.; Peacock, Jeffrey E.; Gergen, Maria F.; Sobsey, Mark D.; Weber, David J.

2006-01-01

424

Table of Contents for Entomology IIPP, Page i of iii DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY  

E-print Network

Table of Contents for Entomology IIPP, Page i of iii DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY INJURY & ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAM TABLE OF CONTENTS [ Revised 10/02 ] Page I. UC DAVIS/ENTOMOLOGY'S COMMITMENT TO HEALTH;Table of Contents for Entomology IIPP, Page ii of iii 2. Newly Discovered Health and Safety Concerns 4 3

Ferrara, Katherine W.

425

Prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV in a tertiary health facility in south-south Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Adherence to Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a major predictor of the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Good adherence to HAART is necessary to achieve the best virologic response, lower the risk of drug resistance and reduce morbidity and mortality. This study therefore aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV accessing treatment in a tertiary location in Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients on HAART attending the Presidential Emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital between October–December 2011. A total of 411 PLHIV visiting the study site during the study period were interviewed. PLHIV who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively recruited into the study till the desired sample size was attained. Information was obtained from participants using a semi-structured, pretested, interviewer administered questionnaire. Adherence was measured via patients self report and were termed adherent if they took at least 95% of prescribed medication in the previous week prior to the study. Data were summarized using proportions, and ?2 test was used to explore associations between categorical variables. Predictors of adherence to HAART were determined by binary logistic regression. Level of significance was set at p?health status [OR 3.11; CI: 1.58-6.11], reduced pill load [OR 1.25; 95% CI: 0.46-2.72] and non-use of herbal remedies [OR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.22-2.72] were the major predictors for adherence to HAART. However, payment for ART services significantly decreased the likelihood of adherence to HAART. [OR 0.46; 95% CI: 0.25-0.87.]. Conclusions The adherence rate reported in this study was quite low. Appropriate adherence enhancing intervention strategies targeted at reducing pill load and ensuring an uninterrupted access to free services regimen is strongly recommended. PMID:24229404

2013-01-01

426

page 22 page 30page 28 Winter 2013  

E-print Network

Lincoln's dream in Idaho now 8 What does 150 years of the Morrill Act mean to us? roadtrip, research, kidspage 22 page 30page 28 Winter 2013 one hundred fifty years MORRILL ACT 1862 Revisiting Abe Lincoln's Dream in Idaho the people's university of idaho #12;LETTEr FrOM ThE EDITOr I must confess that when I

O'Laughlin, Jay

427

This page intentionally blank. ON THE COVER  

E-print Network

of very cold neutrons, N. Verdal, et al. (CHRNS) 51 Uniformity of a large cross section neutron spin analyzer for SANS polarization analysis, W.C. Chen, et al. (CHRNS) 52 NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONS 53 FACILITY#12;This page intentionally blank. #12;ON THE COVER Doug Ogg pre-aligns new neutron guides

428

Disclosure to sexual partner and condom use among HIV positive clients attending ART clinic at a tertiary health facility in South West Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Introduction Condom use and disclosure of HIV status increase the safety of sexual activity. Its extent will determine the need for appropriate interventions. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of condom use and disclosure to sexual partners among individuals receiving Antiretroviral Therapy at a tertiary health facility in South West Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional study of 578 clients enrolled in the ART program of Federal Medical Centre Owo, Ondo State Nigeria, was conducted. Results The mean age of respondents was 38.6+9.6 years, more than half (66.6%) were females and 7% were currently married. Three-quarter were sexually active out of which 324(75.9%) used condom consistently and correctly and 323(75.6%) disclosed their status to their sexual partner. Use of condom was by 81% of those with tertiary education (p=0.002), and 84.5% of singles utilized condom (p<0.001). Determinant of condom use wwere, male (OR: 2; CI: 1.1- 3.3; p=0.013), secondary and tertiary education (OR: 3.69; CI: 1.48 - 9.19; p=0.005) and (OR: 4.79; CI: 1.84 - 12.44; p=0.001) respectively. Determinant of disclosure was being married (OR: 11.8; CI- 5.5-25.7; p<0.001). No significant association exist between disclosure and condom use. Conclusion Most of the people living with HIV accessing ART were sexually active. A good proportion of them used condom consistently and correctly. Disclosure did not have significant effect on condom use. More health education intervention to increase disclosure rate and safe sexual behaviour among HIV positive clients is needed.

Adebayo, Ayodeji Matthew; Ilesanmi, Olayinka Stephen; Omotoso, Bridget Ama; Ayodeji, Oladele Olufemi; Kareem, Adesola Olawumi; Alele, Faith Osaretin

2014-01-01

429

How People Recognize Previously Seen Web Pages from Titles, URLs and Thumbnails  

Microsoft Academic Search

The selectable lists of pages offered by web browsers' history and bookmark facilities ostensibly make it easier for people to return to previously visited pages. These lists show the pages as abstractions, typically as truncated titles and URLs, and more rarely as small thumbnail images. Yet we have little knowledge of how recognizable these representations really are. Consequently, we carried

Shaun Kaasten; Saul Greenberg; Christopher Edwards

2001-01-01

430

How People Recognize Previously Seen Web Pages from Titles, URLs and Thumbnails  

Microsoft Academic Search

The selectable lists of pages offered by web browsers' history and bookmark facilities ostensibly make it easier for people to return to previously visited pages. These lists show the pages as abstractions, typically as truncated titles and URLs, and more rarely as small thumbnail images. Yet we have little knowledge of how recognizable these representations really are. Consequently, we carried

Shaun Kaasten; Saul Greenberg

431

Molecular Epidemiology of Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamases among Escherichia coli Isolates Collected in a Swedish Hospital and Its Associated Health Care Facilities from 2001 to 2006?  

PubMed Central

The genetic characteristics and molecular epidemiology of extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs) among Escherichia coli isolates were investigated at a general hospital and its associated health care facilities in Stockholm, Sweden, during the period from 2001 to 2006. Of 87 consecutive nonduplicate ESBL-positive isolates, 80 isolates encoded CTX-M-type ESBLs, 64 of which were group 1 enzymes. TEM-type and OXA-type ?-lactamases were encoded in 63 and 59% of the ESBL isolates, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed 40 different pulsotypes, consisting of 11 clones accounting for 66% of all isolates, and 29 unique patterns. Moreover, of the 11 clones, clones 1 and 4 comprised half of the clonally related isolates (28 of 57). Clone 1 was a persistent endemic clone in the area throughout the years, and clone 4 emerged in 2003. However, in recent years, clone 1 isolates were no longer predominant and were gradually replaced by new emerging strains. Concerning ?-lactamase gene profiles in relation to PFGE pulsotypes, clone-related bla profiles were observed in certain clones, while in most cases different bla profiles could be observed in the same clone, and the same bla profile could be present in different clones. The molecular epidemiology of ESBL-positive E. coli in the area shows shifts in predominant strains and increased clonal diversity over time. The study also indicated that both clonal spread of epidemic strains and transfer of transposable genetic elements might contribute to the proliferation of ESBLs. PMID:18094139

Fang, Hong; Ataker, Ferda; Hedin, Goran; Dornbusch, Kathrine

2008-01-01

432

APPLICATION TO THE BIOHAZARDS COMMITTEE August 2009 Page 1 of 6  

E-print Network

.g., potential hazard to human/animal health or the environment). #12;August 2009 Page 3 of 6 IDENTIFY POTENTIAL or vaccination required?) #12;August 2009 Page 4 of 6 EXPLAIN HOW THE HAZARDOUS MATERIAL WILL BE TRANSPORTED

Carleton University

433

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP  

E-print Network

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP REQUESTED TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP: $________________ Insurance: $________________ Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology #12;(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 2 All students

Bhatia, Sangeeta

434

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP (MD Students)  

E-print Network

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP (MD Students) REQUESTED RESEARCH-MIT Health Sciences & Technology #12;(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 2 (Continued) The following must be completed before

Bhatia, Sangeeta

435

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP (PhD/SM Students)  

E-print Network

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP (PhD/SM Students) REQUESTED RESEARCH: __________________ __________________________________________________________ E-Mail: __________________ Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology #12;(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 2

Bhatia, Sangeeta

436

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR FELLOWSHIP SUPPORT  

E-print Network

(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 1 APPLICATION FOR FELLOWSHIP SUPPORT REQUESTED FELLOWSHIP APPOINTMENT TERMS-Mail: ________________ _____________________________________________________________________ (Continued) Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology #12;(Rev. 3/20/14) Page 2 The following must

Bhatia, Sangeeta

437

Health.  

PubMed Central

Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment is then suggested, and used to shed light on some problems about mental illness and to compare and contrast it with physical illness and with political and other deviancies which are not illnesses. PMID:3806628

Hare, R M

1986-01-01

438

Career Minors Page 81Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog either of two significant dimensions of health care: technical and mana-  

E-print Network

Career Minor in Arts Management Career Minor in Health Systems Organizations Career Minor in Women of study. Career Minor in Arts Management The career minor in arts management provides students in arts management may also be combined with any other major, provided that the student also completes

Ravikumar, B.

439

Nuclear Energy Page 570Page 570  

E-print Network

Nuclear Energy Page 570Page 570 #12;Energy Supply and Conservation/ Nuclear Energy FY 2007;Energy Supply and Conservation/Nuclear Energy/ Overview FY 2007 Congressional Budget Energy Supply and Conservation Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Overview Appropriation Summary by Program

440