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Sample records for pain complaints prevalence

  1. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Schopflocher, Donald; Taenzer, Paul; Jovey, Roman

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While chronic pain appears to be relatively common, published population prevalence estimates have been highly variable, partly due to differences in the definition of chronic pain and in survey methodologies. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of chronic pain in Canada using clear case definitions and a validated survey instrument. METHODS: A telephone survey was administered to a representative sample of adults from across Canada using the same screening questionnaire that had been used in a recent large, multicountry study conducted in Europe. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic pain prevalence for adults older than 18 years of age was 18.9%. This was comparable with the overall mean reported using identical survey questions and criteria for chronic pain used in the European study. Chronic pain prevalence was greater in older adults, and females had a higher prevalence at older ages compared with males. Approximately one-half of those with chronic pain reported suffering for more than 10 years. Approximately one-third of those reporting chronic pain rated the intensity in the very severe range. The lower back was the most common site of chronic pain, and arthritis was the most frequently named cause. CONCLUSIONS: A consensus is developing that there is a high prevalence of chronic pain within adult populations living in industrialized nations. Recent studies have formulated survey questions carefully and have used large samples. Unfortunately, a substantial proportion of Canadian adults continue to live with chronic pain that is longstanding and severe. PMID:22184555

  2. Pediatric Pain Screening Tool: rapid identification of risk in youth with pain complaints.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E; Smith, Allison; Ibagon, Camila; Coakley, Rachael; Logan, Deirdre E; Schechter, Neil; Borsook, David; Hill, Jonathan C

    2015-08-01

    Moderate to severe chronic pain is a problem for 1.7 million children, costing $19.5 billion dollars annually in the United States alone. Risk-stratified care is known to improve outcomes in adults with chronic pain. However, no tool exists to stratify youth who present with pain complaints to appropriate interventions. The Pediatric Pain Screening Tool (PPST) presented here assesses prognostic factors associated with adverse outcomes among youth and defines risk groups to inform efficient treatment decision making. Youth (n = 321, ages 8-18, 90.0% Caucasian, 74.8% female) presenting for multidisciplinary pain clinic evaluation at a tertiary care center participated. Of these, 195 (61.1%) participated at 4-month follow-up. Participants completed the 9-item PPST in addition to measures of functional disability, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Sensitivity and specificity for the PPST ranged from adequate to excellent, with regard to significant disability (78%, 68%) and high emotional distress (81%, 63%). Participants were classified into low- (11%), medium- (32%), and high- (57%) risk groups. Risk groups did not significantly differ by pain diagnosis, location, or duration. Only 2% to 7% of patients who met reference standard case status for disability and emotional distress at 4-month follow-up were classified as low risk at baseline, whereas 71% to 79% of patients who met reference standard case status at follow-up were classified as high risk at baseline. A 9-item screening tool identifying factors associated with adverse outcomes among youth who present with pain complaints seems valid and provides risk stratification that can potentially guide effective pain treatment recommendations in the clinic setting. PMID:25906349

  3. Prevalence of cold-related complaints, symptoms and injuries in the general population: the FINRISK 2002 cold substudy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

    2007-05-01

    The prevalence of cold-related complaints and symptoms in the general population has remained unknown. As part of the nationwide FINRISK 2002 health survey performed in Finland, 8,723 people aged 25 64 years filled in a questionnaire asking about the number of hours spent weekly in cold air, their sensations during cold exposure, cold-related complaints, symptoms of diseases, and degradation of performance. Cold thermal sensations at +5°C to -5°C were reported by 35% of men and 46% of women. Almost all subjects reported at least some cold-related complaints, most commonly musculoskeletal pain (men 30%, women 27%), followed by respiratory (25% / 29%), white finger (15% / 18%) and episodic peripheral circulation symptoms (12% / 15%). Decreased mental or physical performance in cold was reported by 75% of men and 70% of women, most commonly impairing manual dexterity and tactile sense. With declining temperature, the first symptom to emerge was pain in the elbow or the forearm (at -3°C), followed by increased excretion of mucus from the lungs (-5°C), while most other symptoms appeared only at lower temperatures of -15°C to -20°C. Most symptoms showed little or no association with the weekly duration of exposure, with the exception of cold-induced pain at most sites. Although, in general, Finns are well adapted to the cold climate, the high prevalence of cold-related complaints poses a challenge to the health care system in terms of decreased performance and the possibility that such symptoms predict more serious health effects, such as increased mortality.

  4. Bullying Victimization Prevalence and Its Effects on Psychosomatic Complaints: Can Sense of Coherence Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Moya, Irene; Suominen, Sakari; Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of bullying victimization and its impact on physical and psychological complaints in a representative sample of adolescents and to explore the role of sense of coherence (SOC) in victimization prevalence and consequences. Methods: A representative sample of Spanish adolescents (N =…

  5. Bullying Victimization Prevalence and Its Effects on Psychosomatic Complaints: Can Sense of Coherence Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garca-Moya, Irene; Suominen, Sakari; Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of bullying victimization and its impact on physical and psychological complaints in a representative sample of adolescents and to explore the role of sense of coherence (SOC) in victimization prevalence and consequences. Methods: A representative sample of Spanish adolescents (N =

  6. Optimizing deep hyperthermia treatments: are locations of patient pain complaints correlated with modelled SAR peak locations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canters, R. A. M.; Franckena, M.; van der Zee, J.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    During deep hyperthermia treatment, patient pain complaints due to heating are common when maximizing power. Hence, there exists a good rationale to investigate whether the locations of predicted SAR peaks by hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) are correlated with the locations of patient pain during treatment. A retrospective analysis was performed, using the treatment reports of 35 patients treated with deep hyperthermia controlled by extensive treatment planning. For various SAR indicators, the average distance from a SAR peak to a patient discomfort location was calculated, for each complaint. The investigated V0.1 closest (i.e. the part of the 0.1th SAR percentile closest to the patient complaint) performed the best, and leads to an average distance between the SAR peak and the complaint location of 3.9 cm. Other SAR indicators produced average distances that were all above 10 cm. Further, the predicted SAR peak location with V0.1 provides a 77% match with the region of complaint. The current study demonstrates that HTP is able to provide a global indication of the regions where hotspots during treatment will most likely occur. Further development of this technology is necessary in order to use HTP as a valuable toll for objective and advanced SAR steering. The latter is especially valid for applications that enable 3D SAR steering.

  7. Prevalence of chronic low back pain: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Meucci, Rodrigo Dalke; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Faria, Neice Muller Xavier

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate worldwide prevalence of chronic low back pain according to age and sex. METHODS We consulted Medline (PubMed), LILACS and EMBASE electronic databases. The search strategy used the following descriptors and combinations: back pain, prevalence, musculoskeletal diseases, chronic musculoskeletal pain, rheumatic, low back pain, musculoskeletal disorders and chronic low back pain. We selected cross-sectional population-based or cohort studies that assessed chronic low back pain as an outcome. We also assessed the quality of the selected studies as well as the chronic low back pain prevalence according to age and sex. RESULTS The review included 28 studies. Based on our qualitative evaluation, around one third of the studies had low scores, mainly due to high non-response rates. Chronic low back pain prevalence was 4.2% in individuals aged between 24 and 39 years old and 19.6% in those aged between 20 and 59. Of nine studies with individuals aged 18 and above, six reported chronic low back pain between 3.9% and 10.2% and three, prevalence between 13.1% and 20.3%. In the Brazilian older population, chronic low back pain prevalence was 25.4%. CONCLUSIONS Chronic low back pain prevalence increases linearly from the third decade of life on, until the 60 years of age, being more prevalent in women. Methodological approaches aiming to reduce high heterogeneity in case definitions of chronic low back pain are essential to consistency and comparative analysis between studies. A standard chronic low back pain definition should include the precise description of the anatomical area, pain duration and limitation level. PMID:26487293

  8. Cervical Spine pain as a presenting complaint in metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Emily; Buchtel, Lindsey

    2016-04-01

    A 48 year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a two-month history of neck pain with negative cervical spine x-rays. During that office visit, the patient was noted to be tachycardic with EKG revealing ST depressions, which led to hospital admission. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out, however, persistent neck pain warranted inpatient MRI of the cervical spine, which revealed a cervical spine lesion. Extensive investigation and biopsy ultimately confirmed stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the bone, liver, and likely lung. In the literature, the findings of a primary metastatic site being bone is rare with only a few case reports showing vertebral or sternal metastasis as the first clinical manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The uniqueness of this case lies in the only presenting complaint being cervical spine pain in the setting of extensive metastases to the liver, bone, and likely lung. PMID:26890294

  9. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Pain in Construction Workers in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence, characteristics, and distribution of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire about musculoskeletal pain in different parts of the body was completed by 165 construction workers from the construction industries in Dammam and Riyadh cities. The descriptive data were analyzed using chi-square test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Eighty (48.5%) of the responding workers had pain in neck, shoulders, lower back, hand, knee, or ankle. The majority of respondents had low back pain (50%) followed by knee pain (20%). The average intensity of pain at all sites during activity and rest was 6.65 and 3.59, respectively. Thirty-four (42.5%) respondents had dull aching pain and 24 (30%) had cramping pain. There was an association between years of experience, duration of break during work, and use of protective equipment with the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers (P < 0.05). Most of the workers complaining of pain got medical treatment (62.5%) and only 25% received physical therapy. It can be concluded from this study that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia is high. PMID:25811043

  10. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥4 or ≥7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥4 or ≥7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer patients. However, based on these positive findings, we can provide feedback to nurses, physicians, and pharmacists to empower them to be more committed to pain management. PMID:26735526

  11. Pressure ulcer related pain in community populations: a prevalence survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers are costly to the healthcare provider and can have a major impact on patient’s quality of life. One of the most distressing symptoms reported is pain. There is very little published data on the prevalence and details of pain experienced by patients with pressure ulcers, particularly in community populations. The study was conducted in two community NHS sites in the North of England. Methods The aim was to estimate the prevalence of pressure area related pain within a community population. We also explored the type and severity of the pain and its association with pressure ulcer classification. A cross-sectional survey was performed of community nurses caseloads to identify adult patients with pressure ulcers and associated pain. Consenting patients then had a full pain assessment and verification of pressure ulcer grade. Results A total of 287 patients were identified with pressure ulcers (0.51 per 1000 adult population). Of the 176 patients who were asked, 133 (75.6%) reported pain. 37 patients consented to a detailed pain assessment. Painful pressure ulcers of all grades and on nearly all body sites were identified. Pain intensity was not related to number or severity of pressure ulcer. Both inflammatory and neuropathic pain were reported at all body sites however the proportion of neuropathic pain was greater in pressure ulcers on lower limbs. Conclusions This study has identified the extent and type of pain suffered by community patients with pressure ulcers and indicates the need for systematic and regular pain assessment and treatment. PMID:25024642

  12. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sieberg, Christine B.; Simons, Laura E.; Edelstein, Mark R.; DeAngelis, Maria R.; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year8, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multi-centered registry examining post-surgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire- Version 30, which includes pain, activity, mental health, and self-image subscales, was administered to 190 patients prior to surgery and at 1 and 2 years post-surgery. A subset (n=77) completed 5-year post-surgery data. Pain prevalence at each time point and longitudinal trajectories of pain outcomes derived from SAS PROC TRAJ were examined using ANOVAs and post-hoc pairwise analyses across groups. Thirty-five percent of patients reported pain in the moderate-severe range prior to surgery. One year postoperative, 11% reported pain in this range while 15% reported pain at two years post-surgery. At five years post-surgery, 15% of patients reported pain in the moderate to severe range. Among the five empirically-derived pain trajectories, there were significant differences on self-image, mental health, and age. Identifying predictors of poor long-term outcomes in children with postsurgical pain may prevent the development of chronic pain into adulthood. PMID:24290449

  13. Ocular pain and discomfort after advanced surface ablation: an ignored complaint

    PubMed Central

    Sobas, Eva M; Videla, Sebastián; Maldonado, Miguel J; Pastor, Jose C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Laser vision correction is one of the most commonly performed elective surgical procedures in ophthalmology. Generally, discomfort besides pain (photophobia, burning sensation, tearing, and foreign body sensation) after these procedures is not taken into consideration in the clinical practice. The objective is to provide data on these symptoms and their relevance after advanced surface ablation (ASA). Methods Single-center survey study based on a structured questionnaire relative to the patients’ perceived symptoms after ASA. Inclusion criteria were: ≥18 years old, no ocular disease, with myopia (0.75 to 9 D) or hyperopia (0.25 to 5 D) with or without astigmatism, receiving ASA on at least one eye. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results Seventy-three consecutive patients (34 men and 39 women) were included in the study. The median (range) of age was 33 (19–64) years. Sixty-nine patients had surgery done on both eyes. Postoperative pain was the most frequent comorbidity (97% [95% confidence interval {CI}: 90–100]) with a median (range) of intensity (verbal numerical rating scale) score of 7 (2–10). Photophobia: 85% (95% CI: 75–92); burning sensation: 62% (95% CI: 50–73); tearing: 59% (95% CI: 47–70); and foreign body sensation: 48% (95% CI: 36–60) were also prevalent postoperative symptoms. Pain during ASA was reported for 44% (95% CI: 32–56) of patients. Conclusion Comorbidities such as pain, photophobia, burning sensation, tearing, and foreign body sensation are prevalent after ASA procedure. Postoperative pain should be taken into consideration due to its prevalence and intensity. A new and more efficient postoperative analgesic protocol should be established. PMID:26379419

  14. Prevalence and Characteristics of Musculoskeletal Pain in Korean Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Min, David; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E.; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of musculoskeletal pain (MSK) pain in Korean farmers using initial survey data of Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related MSK pain (FARM) study. Methods Farmers (534 females and 479 males; mean age 57.2±7.5 years) who owned or rented a farm and belonged to an agricultural cooperative unit were recruited. Presence of pain for each body part (neck, shoulder, arm/elbow, wrist/hand/finger, low back, leg/foot), and characteristics of MSK pain (prevalence, location, duration, severity, and frequency) during the last year was assessed. Additionally, demographic data such as farming duration, history of prior injury, and workload (low, moderate, somewhat hard, or hard) were collected using structured questionnaires. Results Almost all subjects (n=925; 91.3%) complained of pain in more than one body part. The frequency order was low back (63.8%), leg/foot (43.3%), shoulder (42.9%), wrist/hand/finger (26.6%), arm/elbow (25.3%), and neck (21.8%). Low back pain was more frequent in those with over 30 years of farming experience (odds ratio [OR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–1.81). MSK pain was related to history of prior injury (OR, 2.18–5.24; p<0.05) in all body parts except for leg/foot, and very hard workload was associated with low back, leg/foot, neck, shoulder, and wrist/hand/finger pain (OR, 2.88–10.83; p<0.05). Conclusion Most Korean farmers experience MSK pain; furthermore, there is a significant association between pain, history of prior injury, and workload, suggestive of the necessity of coping and preventive strategies to reduce injury or workload. PMID:26949663

  15. Prevalence of complaints of arm, neck and shoulder among computer office workers and psychometric evaluation of a risk factor questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Eltayeb, Shahla; Staal, J Bart; Kennes, Janneke; Lamberts, Petra HG; de Bie, Rob A

    2007-01-01

    Background Complaints of Arm Neck and Shoulder (CANS) represent a wide range of complaints, which can differ in severity from mild, periodic symptoms to severe, chronic and debilitating conditions. They are thought to be associated with both physical and psychosocial risk factors. The measurement and identification of the various risk factors for these complaints is an important step towards recognizing (a) high risk subgroups that are relevant in profiling CANS; and (b) also for developing targeted and effective intervention plans for treatment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of CANS in a Dutch population of computer workers and to develop a questionnaire aimed at measuring workplace physical and psychosocial risk factors for the presence of these complaints. Methods To examine potential workplace risk factors for the presence of CANS, the Maastricht Upper Extremity Questionnaire (MUEQ), a structured questionnaire, was developed and tested among 264 computer office workers of a branch office of the national social security institution in the Netherlands. The MUEQ holds 95 items covering demographic characteristics, in addition to seven main domains assessing potential risk factors with regard to (1) work station, (2) posture during work, (3) quality of break time, (4) job demands, (5) job control, and (6) social support. The MUEQ further contained some additional questions about the quality of the work environment and the presence of complaints in the neck, shoulder, upper and lower arm, elbow, hand and wrist. The prevalence rates of CANS in the past year were computed. Further, we investigated the psychometric properties of the MUEQ (i.e. factor structure and reliability). Results The one-year prevalence rate of CANS indicated that 54% of the respondents reported at least one complaint in the arm, neck and/or shoulder. The highest prevalence rates were found for neck and shoulder symptoms (33% and 31% respectively), followed by hand and upper arm complaints (11% to 12%) and elbow, lower arm and wrist complaints (6% to 7%). The psychometric properties of the MUEQ were assessed using exploratory factor analysis which resulted in the identification of 12 factors. The calculation of internal consistency and cross validation provided evidence of reliability and lack of redundancy of items. Conclusion Neck and shoulder complaints are more frequently reported among Dutch computer workers than arm, elbow and hand complaints. The results further indicate that the MUEQ has satisfactory reliability and internal consistency when used to document CANS among computer workers in the Netherlands. PMID:17629925

  16. Prevalence of Chronic Axial Pain, Inflammatory Back Pain, and Spondyloarthritis in Diagnosed Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Nicole; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Zhang, Xiao; Reveille, John; Weisman, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide prevalence estimates for inflammatory back pain (IBP) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) in those subjects with psoriasis using 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Methods In the NHANES 2009–2010 sample set, 6,684 persons ages 20–69 years were screened for participation, and 5,103 answered questions regarding onset of back pain, location of pain, and functional limitations. Data set assembly and statistical analysis were performed using SASTM and SUDAAN software. SEs were estimated by Taylor series linearization. The equality of the prevalence estimates for selected variables was tested (univariately) at an alpha level of 0.05 using 2-sided Student’s t-test with appropriate degrees of freedom. Results A total of 148 persons had self-reported medically diagnosed psoriasis. The psoriasis group versus the nonpsoriasis group had a significantly higher prevalence of axial pain using the 3-month duration criterion (31.1% versus 18.9%; P = 0.04) and alternating buttock pain (7.2% versus 2.4%; P = 0.03) and more frequently met IBP criteria from Berlin criteria 7b and 8a (P = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). The prevalence of SpA was significantly higher in the psoriasis group versus the nonpsoriasis group when using Amor or European Spondyloarthritis Study Group criteria (14.3% versus 1.5%; P < 0.001). Sudden onset of axial pain was significantly higher in the psoriasis group (23.3% versus 13.0%; P = 0.01). Conclusion There is a higher prevalence of lower axial pain, IBP, SpA, and alternating buttock pain associated with a prior diagnosis of psoriasis. These data may influence the way psoriasis patients are approached in primary care and specialty clinics. PMID:25469666

  17. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence

  18. Prevalence of Dementia and Cognitive Complaints in the Context of High Cognitive Reserve: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Perquin, Magali; Diederich, Nico; Pastore, Jessica; Lair, Marie-Lise; Stranges, Saverio; Vaillant, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to assess the prevalence of dementia and cognitive complaints in a cross-sectional sample of Luxembourg seniors, and to discuss the results in the societal context of high cognitive reserve resulting from multilingualism. Methods A population sample of 1,377 people representative of Luxembourg residents aged over 64 years was initially identified via the national social insurance register. There were three different levels of contribution: full participation in the study, partial participation, and non-participation. We examined the profiles of these three different samples so that we could infer the prevalence estimates in the Luxembourgish senior population as a whole using the prevalence estimates obtained in this study. Results After careful attention to the potential bias and of the possibility of underestimation, we considered the obtained prevalence estimates of 3.8% for dementia (with corresponding 95% confidence limits (CL) of 2.8% and 4.8%) and 26.1% for cognitive complaints (CL = [17.8–34.3]) as trustworthy. Conclusion Based on these findings, we postulate that high cognitive reserve may result in surprisingly low prevalence estimates of cognitive complaints and dementia in adults over the age of 64 years, which thereby corroborates the longer disability-free life expectancy observed in the Luxembourg population. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report such Luxembourgish public health data. PMID:26390288

  19. The Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Other Chronic Pain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Muhammad B.

    2012-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS). CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild. PMID:22191024

  20. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain in Radiotherapy Oncology Units

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, Ana; Monroy, Jose Luis; Ramos, Avelino Alia; Cano, Carmen; Lopez-Gomez, Vanessa; Masramon, Xavier; Perez, Maria

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Neuropathic pain (NP) in cancer patients severely impacts quality of life. Radiotherapy (RT) may cause NP, and at the same time, cancer patients visit RT units for pain relief. NP prevalence at these sites and current analgesic treatment should be assessed to improve management. Methods and Materials: This epidemiological, prospective, multicenter study was undertaken to assess NP prevalence, according to Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions questtionaire (DN4) test results, and analgesic management in cancer pain patients visiting RT oncologic units. Secondary analyses assessed NP etiology and pain intensity (using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form) and impact (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Medical Outcomes Study [MOS] for Sleep, and the Health Survey Short Form-12). Results: A total of 1,098 patients with any kind of pain were registered. NP prevalence was 31.1% (95% confidence interval, 28.4%--33.9%); 291 NP patients (mean age, 62.2 {+-}12.5 years and 57.7% men) were eligible for study; 49% of patients were overweight. The most frequent tumors were those of breast and lung, and stage IIIB was the most common cancer stage. The tumors caused 75% of NP cases. Anxiety, sleepiness, and depression were common. At 8 weeks, pain intensity and interference with daily activities decreased significantly for 50.8% of responders. Depression and anxiety (p < 0.0001) scores on the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary measures (p < 0.0001) and all MOS-Sleep subscales, except for snoring, improved significantly. The percentage of satisfied patients increased from 13.8% to 87.4% (p < 0.0001) with the current analgesic treatment, which meant a 1.2- and 6-fold increase (p < 0.0001) in narcotic analgesics and anticonvulsants, respectively, compared to previous treatment. Conclusions: NP is highly prevalent at RT oncology units, with sleepiness, anxiety, and depression as frequent comorbidities. There is a need to improve management of NP with increased use of more specific NP-targeting drugs.

  1. Prevalence of voice complaints, risk factors and impact of voice problems in female student teachers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; de Jong, Felix I C R S; Cremers, Cor W R J; Kooijman, Piet G C

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was done among 457 female student teachers and 144 females in the general population. The conclusions are based on the opinions of student teachers and the general population. The results of this study show that 39.6% of the student teachers and 32.6% of the general population reported voice complaints at the moment and/or over the past year (p=0.198). The association between various risk factors (vocal loading factors, physical factors, environmental factors and psycho-emotional factors) and voice complaints were examined. Vocal load was reported in both the student teachers and the general population (p=0.322). Among the subjects with voice complaints, the student teachers were significantly more of the opinion than the general population that environmental irritants in the classroom (p=0.001) and the composition of the group they communicate with (p=0.033) have a negative influence on their voice. In the groups with voice complaints, the student teachers reported significantly less than the general population that stress (p=0.004) and the deterioration of their general physical condition (p=0.003) have a negative influence on their voice. Remarkably, over a third of the student teachers and one fifth of the general population with voice complaints were of the opinion that decrease of hearing has a negative influence on their voices (p=0.113). There was no significant difference in Voice Handicap Index (VHI) scores (p=0.284) and impact of voice complaints among student teachers and the general population. Over 15% of the student teachers and the general population with voice complaints reported being or having been disabled due to the voice problem, probably reflecting the severity of the voice problem (p=0.838). The groups reporting voice complaints and disability in relation to their voice complaints have significantly higher VHI scores than those without voice complaints and disability, which indicates a higher psychosocial impact of voice complaints. Only around a third of the student teachers and the general population with voice complaints sought paramedical care (p=0.656)/treatment (p=0.361) for their voice complaint. Only a minority of student teachers (18.6%) and the general population (29.5%) with voice complaints were of the opinion that the number of people they communicate with has a negative influence on their voice (p=0.120). Only around a third of the student teachers and less than a tenth of the general population with voice complaints were of the view that they would develop a voice complaint due to their profession (p=0.003). Less than half of the student teachers and less than one fifth of the general population with voice complaints were aware of the potential risks of their profession on their voice (p=0.002). Voice complaints appear to have a multifactorial genesis. The student teachers are not sufficiently aware of the impact of the various risk factors on their voice. Furthermore, they are not aware of the potential risk that future teaching may have on their voice. This apparent lack of awareness in student teachers may be considered a risk factor for voice complaints. PMID:16479130

  2. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations.A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥4 or ≥7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥4 or ≥7 points) at each hospitalization.We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization.Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer patients. However, based on these positive findings, we can provide feedback to nurses, physicians, and pharmacists to empower them to be more committed to pain management. PMID:26735526

  3. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  4. Dating Violence Perpetration and Victimization among US Adolescents: Prevalence, Patterns, and Associations with Health Complaints and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Tilda; Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Wang, Jing; Barbieri, Brittney; Iannotti, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This research identified conceptually cohesive latent classes of youth dating violence (DV) and examined associations between covariates and classes by gender. Methods A nationally representative sample of 2,203 tenth-grade students completed assessments of physical and verbal DV victimization and perpetration, depressive symptoms, health complaints, and substance use. A Factor Mixture Model was used to identify patterns of DV. Gender differences among classes were examined for depressive symptoms, health complaints, and substance use. Results Prevalence of DV victimization was 35% and perpetration was 31%. A three-class model fit adequately and provided conceptual cohesion: Class 1) non-involved (65%); Class 2) victims/perpetrators of verbal DV (30%); and Class 3) victims/perpetrators of verbal and physical DV (5%). Compared to Class 1 adolescents, those in Classes 2 and 3 were more likely to report depressive symptoms, psychological complaints, and alcohol use. Females in Classes 2 and 3 were also more likely to report physical complaints, cigarette use, and marijuana use. Among females involved in DV, those in Class 3 compared to Class 2 reported more depressive symptoms, physical and psychological complaints, and cigarette and marijuana use. Conclusions The three-class model distinguished involvement in verbal acts from involvement in verbal and physical acts. Adolescents involved in DV had similar probabilities of reporting perpetration and victimization suggesting violence within relationships may be mutual. Involvement in DV was associated with more health issues and concurrent problem behaviors. For females in particular, the increased involvement in DV was associated with other health indicators. PMID:23664626

  5. Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (Prevalence of combinations for specimens containing MOR were as follows: DAM only 13 (0.59%), 6AM only 1140 (52.0%), 6AC only 24 (1.1%), DAM/6AM/6AC 710 (32.4%), 6AM/6AC 188 (8.6%), DAM/6AM 113 (5.2%), DAM/6AC 6 (0.27%). Importantly, the prevalence of combinations for specimens without MOR were as follows: DAM only 161 (23.8%), 6AM only 217 (32.1%), 6AC only 92 (13.6%), DAM/6AM/6AC 50 (7.4%), 6AM/6AC 7 (1.0%), DAM/6AM 145 (21.4%), DAM/6AC 5 (0.74%). Unexpected patterns of excretion were observed, such as the presence of DAM and 6AC in the absence of 6AM and MOR; therefore, multiple heroin markers may be useful to assess for heroin use. PMID:24858136

  6. The prevalence of pain at pressure areas and pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with pressure ulcers (PUs) report that pain is their most distressing symptom, but there are few PU pain prevalence studies. We sought to estimate the prevalence of unattributed pressure area related pain (UPAR pain) which was defined as pain, soreness or discomfort reported by patients, on an “at risk” or PU skin site, reported at a patient level. Methods We undertook pain prevalence surveys in 2 large UK teaching hospital NHS Trusts (6 hospitals) and a district general hospital NHS Trust (3 hospitals) during their routine annual PU prevalence audits. The hospitals provide secondary and tertiary care beds in acute and elective surgery, trauma and orthopaedics, burns, medicine, elderly medicine, oncology and rehabilitation. Anonymised individual patient data were recorded by the ward nurse and PU prevalence team. The analysis of this prevalence survey included data summaries; no inferential statistical testing was planned or undertaken. Percentages were calculated using the total number of patients from the relevant population as the denominator (i.e. including all patients with missing data for that variable). Results A total of 3,397 patients in 9 acute hospitals were included in routine PU prevalence audits and, of these, 2010 (59.2%) patients participated in the pain prevalence study. UPAR pain prevalence was 16.3% (327/2010). 1769 patients had no PUs and of these 223 patients reported UPAR pain, a prevalence of 12.6%. Of the 241 people with pressure ulcers, 104 patients reported pain, a UPAR pain prevalence of 43.2% (104/241). Conclusion One in six people in acute hospitals experience UPAR pain on ‘at risk’ or PU skin sites; one in every 8 people without PUs and, more than 2 out of every five people with PUs. The results provide a clear indication that all patients should be asked if they have pain at pressure areas even when they do not have a PU. PMID:23902583

  7. Subjective health complaints are more prevalent in Maasais than in Norwegians.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Ingvard; Mulindi, Sobbie; Sankok, David; Wilhelmsen, Ane B; Eriksen, Hege R; Ursin, Holger

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this observational, population-based study was to compare subjective health complaints (SHC) in Norwegians, living in a Western welfare society, and Maasai people, living in rural Kenya under primitive conditions. An interview-based version of SHC inventory was used. Data from 320 Maasais were compared to data from 1243 Norwegians. The Maasais had significantly higher score than the Norwegians on 23 of 28 items, involving musculoskeletal, "pseudo-neurological" and gastrointestinal complaints. The Maasais, living under primitive conditions, close to nature, seems to have more SHC than Norwegians, living in a modern, highly developed and industrialized country. PMID:17763124

  8. Prevalence and Pharmacologic Treatment of Patients with Low Back Pain Treated at Kosovo Energetic Corporation

    PubMed Central

    Ibraimi, Zana; Murtezani, Ardiana; Haxhiu, Bekim; Mustafa, Aziz; Martinaj, Merita

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint among the general population with a subgroup developing chronic and disabling symptoms generating large societal costs. Recurrences and functional limitations can be minimized with appropriate conservative management, including medications, physical therapy modalities, exercise and patient education. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of low back complaints in industrial workers, to investigate whether individual risk factors involved in the occurrence of LBP, and to determine the most frequent used drug in LBP treatment. Materials and Methods: Data for this study were provided from Kosovo Energetic Corporation. A cross-sectional study design was utilized. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed among 228 industrial workers. Patient with LBP underwent a comprehensive clinical, radiological and biochemical evaluation. Results: showed that LBP occurred in 63.5% of workers. Individual factors did not show significant associations with LBP. Age (OR=0.99/95% Cl 0.95-1.03), weight (OR=1.13/95% Cl 0.99-1.06), height (OR=0.97/95% Cl 0.91-1.02), and work experience (OR=1.01/95% Cl 0.97-1.05) increase odds for LBP but not significantly. The most frequently used drugs in patients included in this study are NSAIDs. In 33 (55.0%) patients for the treatment of LBP two types of drugs are administered. Conclusion: Increased physical activity, health promotion and reduced body weight can prevent morbidity from LBP. A continuous consultation with the Clinical Pharmacist demonstrates effective way of dosage and drug re-evaluation for the patients with LBP. PMID:25568510

  9. Back pain in the working population: prevalence rates in Dutch trades and professions.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, V H

    1995-06-01

    An analysis of three health surveys in the Dutch working population is described, aimed at the identification of Dutch trades and professions with relative high and low prevalence rates of back pain. The sample was representative of the working population in the Netherlands and consisted of 5840 men and 2908 women. The analysis included 33 trades and 34 professions, with at least 50 respondents for each. A total of 26.6% of the workers reported back pain quite often. Almost 2% reported absence from work in the last two months, and 4% considered their back pain to be a chronic disabling disease. There was a substantial variation in prevalence rate of low-back pain between trades and professions ranging from 12% to 41%. Trades with relatively high prevalence rates were found to be the building materials industry, the construction industry and road transportation, and the wholesale industry. Trades with relatively low prevalence rates were found to be banking, public administration and commercial services. Workers in the construction industry and supervisory production workers, plumbers, drivers and cleaners have a relatively high prevalence rate of back pain. Chemists, scientists, bookkeepers, secretaries and administrative professions have a relatively low prevalence rate of back pain. It is concluded that high prevalence rates of back pain are found in particular in non-sedentary professions. Priorities in prevention of back pain should be directed towards the group with relatively high prevalence rates identified above. PMID:7758450

  10. Education and the Prevalence of Pain. NBER Working Paper No. 14964

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlas, Steven J.; Skinner, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    Many Americans report chronic and disabling pain, even in the absence of identifiable clinical disorders. We first examine the prevalence of pain in the older U.S. population using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Among 50-59 year females, for example, pain rates ranged from 26 percent for college graduates to 55 percent for those without a

  11. Education and the Prevalence of Pain. NBER Working Paper No. 14964

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlas, Steven J.; Skinner, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    Many Americans report chronic and disabling pain, even in the absence of identifiable clinical disorders. We first examine the prevalence of pain in the older U.S. population using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Among 50-59 year females, for example, pain rates ranged from 26 percent for college graduates to 55 percent for those without a…

  12. Prevalence of Referred Pain with Pulpal Origin in the Head, Face and Neck Region

    PubMed Central

    Mardani, Siamak; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Baharvand, Maryam

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of referred pain with pulpal source in the head, face and neck region among patients referred to Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University MC, Tehran, Iran in 2004. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 100 patients (55 males and 45 females) referred to oral medicine department of Shahid Beheshti Dental School evaluated via clinical and radiographic examination to seek their pain sources and sites. Inclusion criteria were report of pain and a dental clinician accomplished detection of pain origin. Exclusion criteria were non-odontogenic painful diseases, advanced periodontal disease, and substantial carious lesions. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to score pain intensity; meanwhile the patients were asked to mark the painful sites on an illustrated head and neck mannequin. RESULTS: Sixty-five percent of patients reported pain in sites which diagnostically differed from the pain source. According to statistical analysis, duration (P<0.01), spontaneity (P<0.001) and quality (P<0.01) of pain influenced its referral nature, while sex and age of patients, kind of stimulus, throbbing and intensity of pain had no considerable effect on pain referral (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of referred pain with pulpal origin in the head, face and neck region is moderately high which requires precise diagnosis by dental practitioners. Some hallmarks of irreversible pulpitis (e.g. spontaneous and persistent pain after elimination of stimulus) are related to pain referral. PMID:24171013

  13. [Prevalence and evolution of sleep complaints recorded upon medical check-ups in healthcare centers in Bordeaux and Cenon, France, between 1988 and 1998].

    PubMed

    Cugy, D; Penide, D; Paty, J; Balan, J; Vinclair, J; Cugy, S; Lenain, J-L; Giordanella, J-P

    2004-01-01

    Primary healthcare checkups are regularly performed by French healthcare centers. We report analysis of sleep disorders complaint registered from 1988 to 1998 in Bordeaux-Cauderan and Cenon CPAM welfare centers. The prevalence of sleep disorders is estimated from a total of 205 347 checkups. The population is segmented by age (18-24: 19 332, 25-34:46 694, 35-44:51 072, 45-54:46 886, 55-64:32 658, 65 +:7 705), gender (male: 101 801; female: 103 546) and population category (general: 147 188, underprivileged: 22 785, prioritized: 35 374). Datas shows a relationship between sex and age. Surprisingly we found a relation between Buying Power for Net Wages and Prevalence of Sleep Complaint. There is a significant correlation (R(2)=0,718, p<0,0079). These data are in relationship with M. Ohayon findings relatively to low income and sleep complaint. PMID:15235520

  14. Self-Reported Facial Pain in UK Biobank Study: Prevalence and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Marcus; Macfarlane, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine the prevalence of facial pain and to examine the hypothesis that symptoms are associated with socio-demographic, dental, adverse psychological factors and pain elsewhere in the body. Material and Methods Cross-sectional population data were obtained from UK Biobank (www.ukbiobank.ac.uk/) study which was conducted in 2006 - 2010 and recruited over 500,000 people. Results The overall prevalence of facial pain (FP) was 1.9% (women 2.4%, men 1.2%) of which 48% was chronic. The highest prevalence was found in the 51 - 55 age group (2.2%) and the lowest in the 66 - 73 age group (1.4%). There was a difference in prevalence by ethnicity (0.8% and 2.7% in persons reporting themselves as Chinese and Mixed respectively). Prevalence of FP significantly associated with all measures of social class with the most deprived and on lowest income showing the highest prevalence (2.5% and 2.4% respectively). FP was more common in individuals who rated themselves as extremely unhappy, had history of depression and reported sleep problems. Smoking associated with increase in reporting FP while alcohol consumption had inverse association. FP associated with history of painful gums, toothache and all types of regional pain. Conclusions This is the largest ever study to provide estimates of facial pain prevalence. It demonstrates unique features (lower prevalence than previously reported) and common features (more common in women) and confirms multifactorial aetiology of facial pain. Significant association with psychological distress and a strong relationship to pain elsewhere in the body suggests that aetiology is not specific to this regional pain. PMID:25386229

  15. Preincisional paravertebral block reduces the prevalence of chronic pain after breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Kairaluoma, Pekka M; Bachmann, Martina S; Rosenberg, Per H; Pere, Pertti J

    2006-09-01

    We reported earlier that preincisional paravertebral block (PVB) provides significant immediate postoperative analgesia after breast cancer surgery. In the same patients (n = 60), a 1-yr follow-up was performed to find out whether PVB could also reduce the prevalence of postoperative chronic pain. The follow-up consisted of a 14-day symptom diary and telephone interviews 1, 6, and 12 mo after surgery. The 14-day consumption of analgesics was similar in the 30 PVB and the 30 control patients. However, 1 mo after surgery, the intensity of motion-related pain was lower (P = 0.005) in the PVB group. Six months after surgery, the prevalence of any pain symptoms (P = 0.029) was lower in the PVB group. Finally, at 12 mo after surgery, in addition to the prevalence of pain symptoms (P = 0.003) and the intensity of motion-related pain (P = 0.003), the intensity of pain at rest (P = 0.011) was lower in the PVB group. These findings were independent of whether or not axillary dissection had been performed. The incidence of neuropathic pain was low (two and three patients in the PVB and control groups, respectively). In addition to providing acute postoperative pain relief, preoperative PVB seems to reduce the prevalence of chronic pain 1 yr after breast cancer surgery. PMID:16931684

  16. Prevalence and Correlates of Pain and Pain Treatment in a Western Kenya Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Owino, Claudio; Gramelspacher, Gregory P.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Tabbey, Rebeka; Hagembe, Mildred; Strother, Robert M.; Njuguna, Festus; Vreeman, Rachel C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Pain is often inadequately evaluated and treated in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Objective We sought to assess pain levels and pain treatment in 400 hospitalized patients at a national referral hospital in western Kenya, and to identify factors associated with pain and pain treatment. Design Using face-validated Kiswahili versions of two single-item pain assessment tools, the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the Faces Pain ScaleRevised (FPS-R), we determined patients' pain levels. Additional data collected included patient demographics, prescribed analgesics, and administered analgesics. We calculated mean pain ratings and pain management index (PMI) scores. Results Averaged between the NRS and FPS-R, 80.5% of patients endorsed a nonzero level of pain and 30% of patients reported moderate to severe pain. Older patients, patients with HIV, and cancer patients had higher pain ratings. Sixty-six percent of patients had been prescribed analgesics at some point during their hospitalization, the majority of which were nonopioids. A majority of patients (66%) had undertreated pain (negative scores on the PMI). Conclusion This study shows that hospitalized patients in Kenya are experiencing pain and that this pain is often undertreated. PMID:24032753

  17. [Prevalence and characteristics of chronic pain with neuropathic component at Parakou in northern Benin in 2012].

    PubMed

    Adoukonou, T; Gnonlonfoun, D; Kpozehouen, A; Adjien, C; Tchaou, B; Tognon-Tchegnonsi, F; Adechina, H; Covi, R; Houinato, D

    2014-11-01

    The burden of chronic and neuropathic pain is high making it an important public health problem. The epidemiology is not well known in the general population in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic pain with a neuropathic component at Tititou in Parakou in northeastern Benin. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1st April to 31 May 2012 and included 2314 people in a door-to-door survey. Chronic pain was defined as pain occurring for more than three months. Neuropathic pain was assessed with the DN4 score. A neurological exam was performed by a young physician for all people with chronic pain. During the interview, sociodemographic data, past medical history, weight and height were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to analyze the main associated factors. Among the 2314 people included in this survey, 49.7% were male. The mean age was 32.3 ± 13.1 years. Nine hundred seven reported pain occurring for more than 3 months. The prevalence of chronic pain was 39.2% (CI95%: 29.3-34.7). It was more frequent in females, older people, among diabetics, people with a history of any surgery, stroke, brain trauma, and alcoholism. The prevalence of chronic pain with a neuropathic component was 6.3% (CI95%: 5.0-7.9). The main associated factors were age, matrimonial status, professional occupation, body mass index, diabetes, history of zoster, history of any surgery, brain trauma. People with neuropathic pain often reported pain with burning (87.6%), prickling (82.8%), numbness (66.9%), tingling (63.4%), and lightning pain (48.3%). The main locations were the lower limbs and low back pain. This study suggested the high frequency of chronic neuropathic pain in the general population in Parakou compared with rates reported in western countries. PMID:25444451

  18. Patellar maltracking is prevalent among patellofemoral pain subjects with patella alta: an upright, weightbearing MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Saikat; Besier, Thor F.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Fredericson, Michael; Delp, Scott L.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if patellar maltracking is more prevalent among patellofemoral (PF) pain subjects with patella alta compared to subjects with normal patella height. We imaged 37 PF pain and 15 pain free subjects in an open-configuration magnetic resonance imaging scanner while they stood in a weightbearing posture. We measured patella height using the Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, Insall-Salvati, Modified Insall-Salvati, and Patellotrochlear indices, and classified the subjects into patella alta and normal patella height groups. We measured patella tilt and bisect offset from oblique-axial plane images, and classified the subjects into maltracking and normal tracking groups. Patellar maltracking was more prevalent among PF pain subjects with patella alta compared to PF pain subjects with normal patella height (two-tailed Fisher’s exact test, p < 0.050). Using the Caton-Deschamps index, 67% (8/12) of PF pain subjects with patella alta were maltrackers, whereas only 16% (4/25) of PF pain subjects with normal patella height were maltrackers. Patellofemoral pain subjects classified as maltrackers displayed a greater patella height compared to the pain free and PF pain subjects classified as normal trackers (two-tailed unpaired t-tests with Bonferroni correction, p < 0.017). This study adds to our understanding of PF pain in two ways - 1) we demonstrate that patellar maltracking is more prevalent in PF pain subjects with patella alta compared to subjects with normal patella height; and 2) we show greater patella height in PF pain subjects compared to pain free subjects using four indices commonly used in clinics. PMID:23165335

  19. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Hongxing, L; Astrøm, A N; List, T; Nilsson, I-M; Johansson, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17 015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample. PMID:26538188

  20. Agreement between 2 pain visual analogue scales, by age and area of complaint in neck and low back pain subjects: the standard pen and paper VAS versus plastic mechanical sliderule VAS

    PubMed Central

    Hagino, Carol; Thompson, Marylee; Advent, Jolayne; Rivet, Lyne

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This study endeavoured to determine the agreement between the standard pencil and paper pain VAS (pVAS) and a relatively newly designed plastic mechanical (slide-rule) VAS (mVAS) in assessing cervical and lumbar pain intensity in cervical pain vs low back pain (LBP) patients stratified by age (< 65 years of age (yoa) and ≥ 65 yoa). Design Architecture: This was a concurrent validity study assessing the agreement between the gold standard pVAS and the experimental mVAS. Sample Size: A sample size estimate revealed that a minimum of 9 subjects for each of 4 age-complaint subgroups (< 65 yoa) neck pain, ≥ 65 yoa neck pain, <65 yoa low back pain, ≥ 65 yoa low back pain) would be necessary. Sample Profile: All adults (≥ 18 yrs of age) presenting to the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College’s Herbert K. Lee Outpatient Clinic with low back (LBP) pain or neck pain were considered eligible for the study. Three (3) essentially asymptomatic subjects were also recruited in order to provide a complete spectrum of pain severities. Outcome Measure: Pain intensity was measured in centimetres (to nearest one tenth) on the pVAS and in ten units on the mVAS (to the nearest one tenth unit). Method: The pVAS was administered by including it with either the standard intake forms which all new patients are required to complete, or by presenting it to patients visiting the Clinic for a subsequent treatment. The subject made a visual estimation of his/her pain intensity and marked it on the pVAS accordingly. The response was then measured in centimetres. One of the investigators presented the mVAS to the subject after arrival in the examination room. The mVAS instrument was presented to the subject with instructions as to how to indicate his/her level of present pain intensity. Every attempt was made to ensure that no less than five minutes and no more than 15 minutes elapsed between the completion of the two forms of Visual Analogue Scale. The data were categorized according to the subjects’ ages (≥ 65 years of age (yoa) or < 65 yoa) and their areas of complaint (neck pain or low back pain). Statistical Analysis Strategy: Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) analyses were performed to determine the index of agreement between the mVAS and pVAS for each of the age and complaint categories. 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) were calculated for each ICC value. A clinically acceptable level of agreement was judged by the investigators to be ICC ≥ 0.85; a 95% CI no wider than ± 0.25 was considered to provide statistical significance. Results: The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) analysis revealed an ICC of 0.86 with a 95% CI of ± 0.25 for the group under 65 yoa with neck pain, and an ICC of 0.87 with a 95% CI of ± 0.13 for the group under 65 yoa with low back pain. ICC’s (± 95 CI) of 0.60 (± 0.64) and 0.93 (± 0.2) were calculated for the ≥ 65 yoa neck pain group and ≥ 65 yoa LBP group, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that for the most part, there is statistically significant and clinically acceptable agreement between the pencil and paper VAS (pVAS) and a mechanical VAS (mVAS). The areas of complaint assessed (neck versus low back), did not appear to affect the level of agreement within each age category; only the older male neck pain and younger female LBP groups, however, yielded clinically unacceptable levels of agreement.

  1. The nature and prevalence of chronic pain in homeless persons: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Homeless people are known to suffer disproportionately with health problems that reduce physical functioning and quality of life, and shorten life expectancy. They suffer from a wide range of diseases that are known to be painful, but little information is available about the nature and prevalence of chronic pain in this vulnerable group. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of chronic pain among homeless people, and to examine its location, effect on activities of daily living, and relationship with alcohol and drugs. Methods: We conducted face-to-face interviews with users of homeless shelters in four major cities in the United Kingdom, in the winters of 2009-11. Participants completed the Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form McGill Pain questionnaire, Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs, and detailed their intake of prescribed and unprescribed medications and alcohol. We also recorded each participant’s reasons for homelessness, and whether they slept rough or in shelters. Findings: Of 168 shelter users approached, 150 (89.3%) participated: 93 participants (63%) reported experiencing pain lasting longer than three months; the mean duration of pain experienced was 82.2 months. The lower limbs were most frequently affected. Opioids appeared to afford a degree of analgesia for some, but whilst many reported symptoms suggestive of neuropathic pain, very few were taking anti-neuropathic drugs. Interpretation: The prevalence of chronic pain in the homeless appears to be substantially higher than the general population, is poorly controlled, and adversely affects general activity, walking and sleeping. It is hard to discern whether chronic pain is a cause or effect of homelessness, or both. Pain is a symptom, but in this challenging group it might not always be possible to treat the underlying cause. Exploring the diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain may offer a means of improving the quality of these vulnerable people’s lives. PMID:24555079

  2. Postmastectomy Pain: A Cross-sectional Study of Prevalence, Pain Characteristics, and Effects on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Ergönenç, Jalan Şerbetçigil; Ergönenç, Tolga; Sönmez, Özlem Uysal; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Altintoprak, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postmastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS) is defined as a chronic (continuing for 3 or more months) neuropathic pain affecting the axilla, medial arm, breast, and chest wall after breast cancer surgery. The prevalence of PMPS has been reported to range from 20% to 68%. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of PMPS among mastectomy patients, the severity of neuropathic pain in these patients, risk factors that contribute to pain becoming chronic, and the effect of PMPS on life quality. Methods: This cross-sectional study was approved by the Sakarya University, Medical Faculty Ethical Council and included 146 patients ranging in age from 18 to 85 years who visited the pain clinic, general surgery clinic, and oncology clinic and had breast surgery between 2012 and 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether they met PMPS criteria: pain at axilla, arm, shoulder, chest wall, scar tissue, or breast at least 3 months after breast surgery. All patients gave informed consent prior to entry into the study. Patient medical records were collected, and pain and quality of life were evaluated by the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, a short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), douleur neuropathique-4 (DN-4), and SF-36. Results: Patient mean age was 55.2 ± 11.8 years (33.0–83.0 years). PMPS prevalence was 36%. Mean scores on the VAS, SF-MPQ, and DN-4 in PMPS patients were 1.76 ± 2.38 (0–10), 1.73 ± 1.54 (0–5), and 1.64 ± 2.31 (0–8), respectively. Of these patients, 31 (23.7%) had neuropathic pain characteristics, and 12 (9.2%) had phantom pain according to the DN-4 survey. Patients who had modified radical mastectomy were significantly more likely to develop PMPS than patients who had breast-protective surgery (P = 0.028). Only 2 (2.4%) of PMPS patients had received proper treatment (anticonvulsants or opioids). Conclusions: PMPS seriously impacts patients’ emotional situation, daily activities, and social relationships and is a major economic burden for health systems. We conclude that the rate of PMPS among patients receiving breast cancer surgery in Turkey is 64.1% and that challenges to the proper treatment of these patients deserve further investigation. PMID:26712435

  3. Prevalence of low back pain and associated factors among farmers during the rice transplanting process

    PubMed Central

    Keawduangdee, Petcharat; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Swangnetr, Manida; Laohasiriwong, Wongsa; Settheetham, Dariwan; Yamauchi, Junichiro; Boucaut, Rose

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of low back pain and associated factors in Thai rice farmers during the rice transplanting process. [Subjects and Methods] Three hundred and forty-four farmers, aged 20–59 years old, were asked to answer a questionnaire modified from the Standard Nordic Questionnaire (Thai version). The questionnaire sought demographic, back-related, and psychosocial data. [Results] The results showed that the prevalence of low back pain was 83.1%. Farmers younger than 45 years old who worked in the field fewer than six days were more likely to experience low back pain than those who worked for at least six days. Farmers with high stress levels were more likely to have low back pain. [Conclusion] In the rice transplanting process, the low back pain experienced by the farmers was associated with the weekly work duration and stress. PMID:26311961

  4. Chronic Pain in the Japanese Community—Prevalence, Characteristics and Impact on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Fumio; Nishihara, Makoto; Arai, Young-Chang P.; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Kawai, Takashi; Inoue, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is recognized as a public health problem that affects the general population physically, psychologically, and socially. However, there is little knowledge about the associated factors of chronic pain, such as the influence of weather, family structure, daily exercise, and work status. Objectives This survey had three aims: 1) to estimate the prevalence of chronic pain in Japan, 2) to analyze these associated factors, and 3) to evaluate the social burden due to chronic pain. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional postal survey in a sample of 6000 adults aged ≥20 years. The response rate was 43.8%. Results The mean age of the respondents was 57.7 years (range 20–99 years); 39.3% met the criteria for chronic pain (lasting ≥3 months). Approximately a quarter of the respondents reported that their chronic pain was adversely influenced by bad weather and also oncoming bad weather. Risk factors for chronic pain, as determined by a logistic regression model, included being an older female, being unemployed, living alone, and no daily exercise. Individuals with chronic pain showed significantly lower quality of life and significantly higher psychological distress scores than those without chronic pain. The mean annual duration of absence from work of working-age respondents was 9.6 days (range 1–365 days). Conclusions Our findings revealed that high prevalence and severity of chronic pain, associated factors, and significant impact on quality of life in the adult Japanese population. A detailed understanding of factors associated with chronic pain is essential for establishing a management strategy for primary care. PMID:26076135

  5. Back pain prevalence in US industry and estimates of lost workdays.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, H R; Tanaka, S; Halperin, W E; Cameron, L L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Back pain is the most common reason for filing workers' compensation claims and often causes lost workdays. Data from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed to identify high-risk industries and to estimate the prevalence of work-related back pain and number of workdays lost. METHODS: Analyses included 30074 respondents who worked during the 12 months before the interview. A case patient was defined as a respondent who had back pain every day for a week or more during that period. RESULTS: The prevalence of lost-workday back pain was 4.6%, and individuals with work-related cases lost 101.8 million workdays owing to back pain. Male and female case patients lost about the same number of workdays. Industries in high-risk categories were also identified for future research and intervention, including those seldom studied. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides statistically reliable national estimates of the prevalence of back pain among workers and the enormous effect of this condition on American industry in terms of lost workdays. PMID:10394311

  6. Neck/shoulder pain and low back pain among school teachers in China, prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background School teachers represent an occupational group among which there appears to be a high prevalence of neck and/or shoulder pain (NSP) and low back pain (LBP). Epidemiological data on NSP and LBP in Chinese teachers are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for NSP and LBP among primary, secondary and high school teachers. Methods In a cross-sectional study of teachers from 7 schools, information on participant demographics, work characteristics, occupational factors and musculoskeletal symptoms and pain were collected. Results Among 893 teachers, the prevalence of NSP and LBP was 48.7% and 45.6% respectively. There was significant association between the level and prevalence of NSP and LBP among teachers in different schools. The prevalence of NSP among female teachers was much higher than that for males. Self-reported NSP was associated with physical exercise (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.86), prolonged standing (1.74, 1.03 to 2.95), sitting (1.76, 1.23 to 2.52) and static posture (2.25, 1.56 to 3.24), and uncomfortable back support (1.77, 1.23 to 2.55). LBP was more consistently associated with twisting posture (1.93, 1.30 to 2.87), uncomfortable back support (1.62, 1.13 to 2.32) and prolonged sitting (1.42, 1.00 to 2.02) and static posture (1.60, 1.11 to 2.31). Conclusions NSP and LBP are common among teachers. There were strong associations with different individual, ergonomic, and occupational factors. PMID:22978655

  7. Low Back Pain Prevalence and Associated Factors in Iranian Population: Findings from the National Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Biglarian, Akbar; Seifi, Behjat; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Mohammad, Kazem; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Karimlou, Masoud; Serahati, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Background. There are very few studies that had a sample size sufficient to explore the association between factors related to low back pain in a representative sample of the Iranian population. Objective. To examine the relationship between sociodemographic factors, smoking, obesity, and low back pain in Iranian people. Methods. We used Iranian adults respondents (n = 25307) from the National Health Survey. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by using logistic regression. Results. The prevalence of low back pain was found in 29.3% of the studied sample. High age, female sex, being married, obesity, low-economic index, being smoker, in a rural residence, and low educational attainment, all increased the odds of low back pain. Conclusions. Our findings add to the evidence on the importance of obesity in relation to low back pain. These results can be used as a basis to reinforce health programs to prevent obesity. PMID:23024861

  8. High prevalence of shoulder pain among elite Norwegian female handball players.

    PubMed

    Myklebust, G; Hasslan, L; Bahr, R; Steffen, K

    2013-06-01

    Clinical experience indicates that a substantial number of handball players may suffer from shoulder pain, but they continue to play despite having shoulder pain problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and consequences of shoulder pain problems among Norwegian female elite handball players. In the preseason of the 2007-2008 season, 179 players from all 12 teams of the Norwegian elite league went through the following tests: internal and external shoulder range of motion, apprehension, relocation test, and shooting velocity. All players completed the Fahlström questionnaire and, for players with current pain, the Western Ontario shoulder instability index questionnaire. Sixty-five (36%) players reported shoulder pain on the test day, and 40 (22%) players reported previous shoulder pain. Two thirds of the players with pain reported a gradual onset. For players with current or previous pain, 22 (36%) and 14 (36%) had missed match play, and 43 (68%) and 28 (76%) reported changing their training habits. A positive apprehension and relocation test was found among 51 (29%) of the players. In conclusion, a high proportion of female elite handball players experience shoulder pain and problems and have an unstable shoulder. PMID:22092886

  9. Hyperkyphosis and back pain are not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures in women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ribom, Eva L; Kindmark, Andreas; Ljunggren, Östen

    2015-03-01

    Vertebral fractures (VFs) are the clinical consequence of spinal osteoporosis and may be associated with back pain and aggravated kyphosis. However, the relative importance of VFs as an underlying cause of kyphosis and chronic back pain is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between prevalent VFs and the size of kyphosis, and back pain in osteoporotic women. Thirty-six women, aged 74.6 ± 8.3 years, were consecutively recruited from the osteoporosis unit at Uppsala University Hospital. The patients had 1-9 radiographic verified VFs. Tragus wall distance (TWD) and numeric rating scale were used to measure kyphosis and pain. All patients had a hyperkyphosis (TWD ≥ 10 cm). Notably, there were no associations between numbers or location of VFs versus size of kyphosis (ρ = 0.15, p = 0.4; ρ = -0.27, p = 0.12) or severity of back pain (ρ = -0.08, p = 0.66; ρ = 0.16, p = 0.35). Furthermore, no association was evident between kyphosis and back pain (ρ = -0.02, p = 0.89). There was, however, an association between size of kyphosis and age (R = 0.44, p = 0.008). In conclusion, these data suggest that prevalent VFs are not significantly associated with kyphosis or chronic back pain, in patients with manifest spinal osteoporosis. PMID:25495768

  10. Prevalence of and risk factors for low back pain among dentists

    PubMed Central

    Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; El-Gendy, Salwa; Karrouf, Gamal; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, symptoms of, and risk factors for low back pain among dentists as well as to discover the possible correlation of these factors with working posture and how to reduce their prevalence. [Subjects and Methods] The study was conducted among 60 dentists (28 male and 32 female) with a mean age of 25.7 years. Dentists were evaluated with the self-administered Nordic musculoskeletal evaluation chart, postural discomfort chart, and a self-prepared questionnaire. [Results] The data showed a 70% incidence of back pain among dentists, with low back pain predominating in 47.6% of cases. Most of the subjects (90.5%) had a mild-to-moderate level of severity, and only 9.5% had a severe level of low back pain. The majority of the dentists (57%) treated 1–3 patients per day. Only a few dentists (17%) exercised during their rest period even though 57% of them reported taking a break during their working hours. Although 63% of the dentists were aware of the advantages of assistive tools, only 40% of them used any kind of assistive devices. [Conclusion] Dental professionals demonstrate a high prevalence of low back pain. PMID:26504297

  11. Prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients treated years ago.

    PubMed

    Ramos, José Manuel; Alonso-Castañeda, Beatriz; Eshetu, Dejene; Lemma, Deriba; Reyes, Francisco; Belinchón, Isabel; Górgolas, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain, now recognized as another late complication of leprosy, and its characteristics among leprosy patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out of people treated for leprosy up to at least 5 years ago in a rural area of Ethiopia. Seventy-four patients were interviewed using the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) questionnaire. In total, 78.9% of the patients were female with a mean age of 42.9. The mean time from initial diagnosis to the time of the study was 28.0 years, and 73.0% of patients were diagnosed over 20 years ago. Fifty-two (70.3%) reported having symptoms suggestive of neuropathic pain and the majority described the pain as burning (88.5%), electric (80.8%), stabbing (76.9%), cutting (76.9%), tingling (65.4%), squeezing (57.7%), and/or pressure (53.8%). The pain caused a severe or moderate impact on daily life in 75% and 57.7% of cases, respectively, and 92.3% suffered from disrupted sleep. Eighty percent of patients with pain (42/52) took some medication for pain relief. Neuropathic pain is common in patients treated for leprosy and in more than half of them, it causes disruption in their daily life and sleep, limiting their quality of life even more. PMID:24892791

  12. Influence of work-related psychosocial factors on the prevalence of chronic pain and quality of life in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Keiko; Matsudaira, Ko; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Working is a common cause of chronic pain for workers. However, most of them need to continue working despite the pain in order to make a living unless they get a sick leave or retirement. We hypothesised that the therapeutic effect of vocational rehabilitation may depend on psychosocial factors related to the workplace. To test this hypothesis, we examined the association of work-related psychosocial factors with the prevalence of chronic pain or health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among workers with chronic pain. Methods We examined 1764 workers aged 20–59 years in the pain-associated cross-sectional epidemiological survey in Japan. The outcomes were (1) chronic pain prevalence among all workers and (2) low Euro QoL (EQ-5D <0.76; mean value of the current study) prevalence among workers with chronic pain according to the degree of workplace social support and job satisfaction. Workplace social support and job satisfaction were measured using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted ORs were calculated using a logistic regression model including age, sex, smoking, exercise, sleep time, work hours, body mass index, personal consumption expenditure, intensity of pain and the presence of severe depressive symptoms. Results Chronic pain prevalence was higher among males reporting job dissatisfaction compared with those reporting job satisfaction. No difference was observed among women. Chronic pain prevalence did not differ between workers of either sex reporting poor workplace social support compared with those reporting sufficient support. Among workers with chronic pain, low HRQoL was more frequent in those reporting job dissatisfaction. Similarly, low HRQoL was more frequent in patients with chronic pain reporting poor social support from supervisors or co-workers compared with patients reporting sufficient support. Conclusions Work-related psychosocial factors are critical for HRQoL in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27113235

  13. Prevalence of low back pain among handloom weavers in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Durlov, Santu; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Chatterjee, Arijit; Das, Tamal; Dev, Samrat; Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Haldar, Prasun; Maity, Santi Gopal; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Sahu, Subhashis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Handloom is one of the oldest industries in India, particularly in West Bengal, where a considerable number of rural people are engaged in weaving. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of low back pain among the handloom weavers in India. Methods: A modified Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorder Questionnaire and Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire along with a body part discomfort scale were administered to handloom weavers (n = 175). Working posture of the participants was assessed using the Ovako Working Posture Analysis System (OWAS). Results: Sixty eight per cent of the participants reported suffering from low back pain, making it the most prevalent disorder in our sample. Analysis of the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire data revealed that among those with low back pain (n = 119), 2% had severe disabilities, 46% had moderate disabilities, and 52% had minimal disabilities. Statistical analyses revealed a positive significant association between the intensity of pain in the lower back and an increased number of years of work experience (P<0.05). Conclusions: The study underlines the need for further research regarding the postural strain of weavers and also suggests the implementation of ergonomic design into weaver workstations to minimize the adverse effect of their current working postures. Improving upon the weaver’s work-posture could improve their quality of life. PMID:25224808

  14. Prevalence of Low Back Pain among Undergraduate Physiotherapy Students in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Vincent-Onabajo, Grace O.; Nweze, Ejiofor; Kachalla Gujba, Fatima; Ali Masta, Mamman; Usman Ali, Mohammad; Alhaji Modu, Ali; Umeonwuka, Chuka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of disability and the most common work-related musculoskeletal disorder among physiotherapists. This study examined the prevalence of low back pain among students undergoing training to become physiotherapists. Methods. Participants were 207 undergraduate clinical physiotherapy students at three universities in Nigeria. A modified version of a questionnaire used in a previous study was utilized to obtain demographic, educational activities, and LBP data. Prevalence of LBP was examined with descriptive statistics while factors associated with prevalence were explored using chi-square statistics. Results. More male students (53.1%) and those in the penultimate year of study (53.1%) participated in the study. Lifetime, 12-month, 1-month, and 7-day prevalence of LBP were 45.5%, 32.5%, 17.7%, and 11.5%, respectively. Prevalence of LBP was not significantly associated with any of the demographic variables. Educational activities, namely, “having techniques practiced on self for ≤10 hours” and “treating patients for ≥30 hours,” a month prior to the study were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with higher 1-month and 7-day LBP prevalence, respectively. Conclusions. Although the prevalence of LBP was comparatively low, its association with educational activities emphasizes the need to incorporate effective LBP preventive strategies in the training of physiotherapy students. PMID:26955486

  15. A Prevalence and Management Study of Acute Pain in Children Attending Emergency Departments by Ambulance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian; McCoy, Siobhan; O'Reilly, Kay; Fogarty, Eoin; Dietz, Jason; Crispino, Gloria; Wakai, Abel; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    Pain is the most common symptom in the emergency setting and remains one of the most challenging problems for emergency care providers, particularly in the pediatric population. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute pain in children attending emergency departments (EDs) in Ireland by ambulance. In addition, this study sought to describe the prehospital and initial ED management of pain in this population, with specific reference to etiology of pain, frequency of pain assessment, pain severity, and pharmacological analgesic interventions. A prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken over a 12-month period of all pediatric patients transported by emergency ambulance to four tertiary referral hospitals in Ireland. All children (<16 years) who had pain as a symptom (regardless of cause) at any stage during the prehospital phase of care were included in this study. Over the study period, 6,371 children attended the four EDs by emergency ambulance, of which 2,635 (41.4%, 95% confidence interval 40.2-42.3%) had pain as a documented symptom on the ambulance patient care report (PCR) form. Overall 32% (n = 856) of children who complained of pain were subject to a formal pain assessment during the prehospital phase of care. Younger age, short transfer time to the ED, and emergency calls between midnight and 6 am were independently associated with decreased likelihood of having a documented assessment of pain intensity during the prehospital phase of care. Of the 2,635 children who had documented pain on the ambulance PCR, 26% (n = 689) received some form of analgesic agent prior to ED arrival. Upon ED arrival 54% (n = 1,422) of children had a documented pain assessment and some form of analgesic agent was administered to 50% (n = 1,324). Approximately 41% of children who attend EDs in Ireland by ambulance have pain documented as their primary symptom. This study suggests that the management of acute pain in children transferred by ambulance to the ED in Ireland is currently poor, with documentary evidence of only 26% receiving prehospital analgesic agents. PMID:26024309

  16. The prevalence of back pain, hand discomfort, and dermatitis in the US working population.

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, V; Seligman, P; Cameron, L; Mathias, C G; Fine, L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of the study was to provide the health care and public health communities with national prevalence estimates of selected conditions in the US working population. METHODS. National prevalence estimates of self-reported conditions among working people were calculated from data collected for the 1988 Occupational Health Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey. RESULTS. The highest prevalence estimates were found among occupational groups. For example, the prevalence of back pain due to an injury at work among truck drivers was 6.7%; back pain due to repeated activities at work among mechanics and repairers of heavy equipment and machinery was 10.5%; hand discomfort among operators of machines that process metal, plastic, stone, and glass was 23.5%; and dermatitis due to contact with substances at work among physicians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, and dietitians was 5.6%. CONCLUSIONS. A substantial proportion of these conditions among occupational groups with the highest prevalence estimates are occupational in origin. These prevalence estimates identify occupations in which efforts are needed to prevent these conditions. PMID:7977917

  17. Prevalence and management of back pain in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Jean; Le May, Sylvie; Fortin, Carole; Labelle, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back pain (BP) has often been associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), which is a three-dimensional deviation of the vertebral column. In adolescents, chronic pain appears to be a predictor of health care utilization and has a negative impact on physical, psychological and family well-being. In this population, BP tends to be persistent and may be a predictor of BP in adulthood. OBJECTIVE: To document the prevalence and management of BP in AIS patients. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of AIS patients who were referred to Sainte-Justine University Teaching Hospital (Montreal, Quebec) from 2006 to 2011 was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 310 randomly selected charts were reviewed. Nearly one-half of the patients (47.3%) mentioned that they experienced BP, most commonly in the lumbar (19.7%) and thoracic regions (7.7%). The type of BP was documented in only 36% (n=112) of the charts. Pain intensity was specified in only 21% (n=65) of the charts. In approximately 80% (n=248) of the charts, no pain management treatment plan was documented. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of BP was moderately high among the present sample of adolescents with AIS. An improved system for documenting BP assessment, type, treatment plan and treatment effectiveness would improve pain management for these patients. PMID:25831076

  18. Gender differences in the incidence and prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boling, M.; Padua, D.; Marshall, S.; Guskiewicz, K.; Pyne, S.; Beutler, A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the association between gender and the prevalence and incidence of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). One thousand five hundred and twenty-five participants from the United States Naval Academy (USNA) were followed for up to 2.5 years for the development of PFPS. Physicians and certified athletic trainers documented the cases of PFPS. PFPS was defined as retropatellar pain during at least two of the following activities: ascending/descending stairs, hopping/jogging, prolonged sitting, kneeling, and squatting, negative findings on examination of knee ligament, menisci, bursa, and synovial plica, and pain on palpation of either the patellar facets or femoral condyles. Poisson and logistic regressions were performed to determine the association between gender and the incidence and prevalence of PFPS, respectively. The incidence rate for PFPS was 22/1000 person-years. Females were 2.23 times (95% CI: 1.19, 4.20) more likely to develop PFPS compared with males. While not statistically significant, the prevalence of PFPS at study enrollment tended to be higher in females (15%) than in males (12%) (P50.09). Females at the USNA are significantly more likely to develop PFPS than males. Additionally, at the time of admission to the academy, the prevalence of PFPS was not significantly different between genders. PMID:19765240

  19. A cross-sectional survey to investigate the prevalence of pain in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Mukai, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Shinji; Yasue, Ichiro; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Okochi, Tomo; Hirano, Shigeki; Kajio, Yusuke; Funahashi, Toshihiko; Akamatsu, Kaku; Ino, Kei; Okuda, Momoko; Tabuse, Hideaki; Iwata, Nakao

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of physical pain in Japanese major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ) patients as well as in healthy controls (HCs). We also examined the association between their psychopathology and characteristics of pain according to a face-to-face survey by an experienced psychiatrist and psychologist. We analyzed 233 HCs, 94 MDD patients, and 75 SZ patients using the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and SF-8 (all participants), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 21 items (MDD patients), and the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (SZ patients). Although MDD patients experienced more pain than HCs, there was no difference in the prevalence of pain between SZ patients and HCs. Moreover, HCs with pain did not have higher SF-8 total scores than those without pain, whereas both MDD and SZ patients with pain had higher SF-8 total scores than those without pain. The severity of psychopathology in MDD and SZ patients was also positively associated with both the prevalence of pain and MPQ scores. MPQ scores were also associated with positive symptoms in SZ patients. Considering these results, physicians need to query MDD patients about physical pain during examination if they are to ensure a favorable and quick response to treatment. The severity of positive symptoms (i.e., clinical status) in SZ patients might also be associated with pain sensitivity, and warrants further investigation. PMID:25724075

  20. Prevalence and type of pain during conventional and self-ligating orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; D'Attilio, Michele; Tetè, Stefano; Festa, Felice

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of pain experienced during orthodontic treatment in 30 subjects (12 males, 18 females, aged 12-18 years) with crowding. Fifteen patients were treated with conventional brackets (Victory Series) and 15 with self-ligating brackets (Damon SL II). The first archwire for all patients was a 0.014 inch nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwire with a force of approximately 100 g. Conventional brackets were ligated with elastomeric modules. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used daily to assess the intensity of pain; the use of pain medication was also reported in a specially designed daybook for a total period of 3 months. Pearson's chi-square was used to investigate the difference between groups in the frequency of pain experience, its nature, and the use of analgesia. Non-parametric statistics (Mann-Whitney U-test) were computed to compare pain intensity between the groups. To investigate reported pain assessments, Friedman's two-way analysis of variance was used and the differences were estimated using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. The results showed that pain was reported for a period of 9 days after archwire insertion. Patients treated with self-ligating brackets reported the highest pain intensity on the day following placement of the first archwire (VAS mean = 42.6), while those treated with conventional brackets experienced the greatest pain intensity at placement of the first archwire (VAS mean = 52) and after the second orthodontic appointment (VAS mean = 59.6). Analgesics were used by 16.5 per cent of patients treated with self-ligating brackets and by 10 per cent of those treated with conventional brackets, most often during the first 2 days after archwire placement. Patients treated with conventional brackets reported significantly more 'constant' pain than those treated with self-ligating brackets who complained of 'chewing/biting' pain. Pain appears to be common during orthodontic treatment but perhaps less intense when self-ligating brackets are used, although no difference was observed in the use of analgesics between those treated with self-ligating or conventional brackets. There were no reports of pain after 7-9 days in either group. PMID:19465738

  1. Pain, Work-related Characteristics, and Psychosocial Factors among Computer Workers at a University Center

    PubMed Central

    Mainenti, Míriam Raquel Meira; Felicio, Lilian Ramiro; Rodrigues, Érika de Carvalho; Ribeiro da Silva, Dalila Terrinha; Vigário dos Santos, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Complaint of pain is common in computer workers, encouraging the investigation of pain-related workplace factors. This study investigated the relationship among work-related characteristics, psychosocial factors, and pain among computer workers from a university center. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects (median age, 32.0 years; interquartile range, 26.8–34.5 years) were subjected to measurement of bioelectrical impedance; photogrammetry; workplace measurements; and pain complaint, quality of life, and motivation questionnaires. [Results] The low back was the most prevalent region of complaint (76.9%). The number of body regions for which subjects complained of pain was greater in the no rest breaks group, which also presented higher prevalences of neck (62.5%) and low back (100%) pain. There were also observed associations between neck complaint and quality of life; neck complaint and head protrusion; wrist complaint and shoulder angle; and use of a chair back and thoracic pain. [Conclusion] Complaint of pain was associated with no short rest breaks, no use of a chair back, poor quality of life, high head protrusion, and shoulder angle while using the mouse of a computer. PMID:24764635

  2. Assessment and Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain: Guidelines for the School Psychologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Colleen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Notes that somatic complaints without clear organic origin are also primary indicators for both anxiety and depression in childhood and adolescence. Review of literature provides school psychologists with basic information regarding prevalence, assessment, and treatment of one of most common types of somatic complaints: recurrent abdominal pain.

  3. Prevalence of low back pain and associated occupational factors among Chinese coal miners

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Very few studies have evaluated the association between occupational factors and low back pain (LBP) among miners. The epidemiological data on LBP in Chinese miners are limited. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of low back pain in Chinese coal miners and to investigate the role of occupational factors. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted to examine 1573 coal miners in northern China. The prevalence of LBP over a 12-month period was assessed using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. Odds ratios were calculated to examine the association between the prevalence of LBP over a 12-month period and occupational factors using logistic regression. Results Among the coal miners, 64.9% self-reported LBP in a 12-month period. Occupational factors associated with LBP were identified, including tasks with a high degree of repetitiveness (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.0-1.6), tasks characterized by a high level of physical demand (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8), posture requiring extreme bending (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-1.7) and insufficient recovery time (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.8). Conclusion Low back pain is common among Chinese miners. There were strong associations with occupational factors. PMID:22375934

  4. Back Pain Prevalence and Its Associated Factors in Brazilian Athletes from Public High Schools: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Noll, Matias; de Avelar, Ivan Silveira; Lehnen, Georgia Cristina; Vieira, Marcus Fraga

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on the prevalence of back pain have evaluated it in developed countries (Human Development Index-HDI > 0.808), and their conclusions may not hold for developing countries. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of back pain in representative Brazilian athletes from public high schools. This cross-sectional study was performed during the state phase of the 2015 Jogos dos Institutos Federais (JIF), or Federal Institutes Games, in Brazil (HDI = 0.744), and it enrolled 251 athletes, 173 males and 78 females (14-20 years old). The dependent variable was back pain, and the independent variables were demographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, hereditary, exercise-level, anthropometric, strength, behavioral, and postural factors. The prevalence ratio (PR) was calculated using multivariable analysis according to the Poisson regression model (α = 0.05). The prevalence of back pain in the three months prior to the study was 43.7% (n = 104), and 26% of the athletes reported feeling back pain only once. Multivariable analysis showed that back pain was associated with demographic (sex), psychosocial (loneliness and loss of sleep in the previous year), hereditary (ethnicity, parental back pain), strength (lumbar and hand forces), anthropometric (body mass index), behavioral (sleeping time per night, reading and studying in bed, smoking habits in the previous month), and postural (sitting posture while writing, while on a bench, and while using a computer) variables. Participants who recorded higher levels of lumbar and manual forces reported a lower prevalence of back pain (PR < 0.79), whereas feeling lonely in the previous year, obesity, and ethnicity exhibited the highest prevalence ratio (PR > 1.30). In conclusion, there is no association between exercise levels and back pain but there is an association between back pain and non-exercise related variables. PMID:26938456

  5. Back Pain Prevalence and Its Associated Factors in Brazilian Athletes from Public High Schools: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Matias; de Avelar, Ivan Silveira; Lehnen, Georgia Cristina; Vieira, Marcus Fraga

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on the prevalence of back pain have evaluated it in developed countries (Human Development Index—HDI > 0.808), and their conclusions may not hold for developing countries. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of back pain in representative Brazilian athletes from public high schools. This cross-sectional study was performed during the state phase of the 2015 Jogos dos Institutos Federais (JIF), or Federal Institutes Games, in Brazil (HDI = 0.744), and it enrolled 251 athletes, 173 males and 78 females (14–20 years old). The dependent variable was back pain, and the independent variables were demographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, hereditary, exercise-level, anthropometric, strength, behavioral, and postural factors. The prevalence ratio (PR) was calculated using multivariable analysis according to the Poisson regression model (α = 0.05). The prevalence of back pain in the three months prior to the study was 43.7% (n = 104), and 26% of the athletes reported feeling back pain only once. Multivariable analysis showed that back pain was associated with demographic (sex), psychosocial (loneliness and loss of sleep in the previous year), hereditary (ethnicity, parental back pain), strength (lumbar and hand forces), anthropometric (body mass index), behavioral (sleeping time per night, reading and studying in bed, smoking habits in the previous month), and postural (sitting posture while writing, while on a bench, and while using a computer) variables. Participants who recorded higher levels of lumbar and manual forces reported a lower prevalence of back pain (PR < 0.79), whereas feeling lonely in the previous year, obesity, and ethnicity exhibited the highest prevalence ratio (PR > 1.30). In conclusion, there is no association between exercise levels and back pain but there is an association between back pain and non-exercise related variables. PMID:26938456

  6. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Korean Children Presenting with Nonspecific Lower-Extremity Pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Jung; Lee, Juyeob; Lee, Jun Ku

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although interest in the role played by vitamin D in bone health is increasing, little is known about the role of this vitamin in musculoskeletal pain in children. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children presenting with nonspecific lower extremity pains. Materials and Methods From 2011 to 2012, 183 children underwent evaluation for nonspecific lower-extremity pains. Patients with valid causes, such as fractures or transient synovitis, were excluded, as were those with underlying medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy and metabolic disease. Ultimately, 140 patients met the inclusion criteria. Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25-(OH)D], the ideal indicator of vitamin D status, were measured in these children. Results Eighty-seven boys (62.1%) and 53 girls (37.9%) were included. The mean age at presentation was 5.2 years (range, 2-15). Serum 25-(OH)D levels were <10 ng/mL in 5.7% of patients, 10 to <20 ng/mL in 51.4%, 20 to <30 ng/mL in 37.9%, and ?30 ng/mL in only 5.0%. Most patients visited the hospital in the winter (41.4%) (summer, 12.9%), and serum 25-(OH)D levels were also lowest in the winter (17.25.5 ng/mL). Conclusion This study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in Korean children with nonspecific lower-extremity pains, indicating a positive association between vitamin D deficiency and growing pains. More attention should be directed toward vitamin D and its role in the optimization of bone health. PMID:26256984

  7. Feasibility of Applied Gaming During Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Patients With Complex Chronic Pain and Fatigue Complaints: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Joosen, Margot C W; van Bergen, Alfonsus H M M; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2016-01-01

    Background Applied gaming holds potential as a convenient and engaging means for the delivery of behavioral interventions. For developing and evaluating feasible computer-based interventions, policy makers and designers rely on limited knowledge about what causes variation in usage. Objective In this study, we looked closely at why and by whom an applied game (LAKA) is demanded and whether it is feasible (with respect to acceptability, demand, practicality, implementation, and efficacy) and devised a complementary intervention during an interdisciplinary rehabilitation program (IRP) for patients with complex chronic pain and fatigue complaints. Methods A mixed-methods design was used. Quantitative process analyses and assessments of feasibility were carried out with patients of a Dutch rehabilitation center who received access to LAKA without professional support during a 16-week interdisciplinary outpatient program. The quantitative data included records of routinely collected baseline variables (t0), additional surveys to measure technology acceptance before (t1) and after 8 weeks of access to LAKA (t2), and automatic log files of usage behavior (frequency, length, and progress). Subsequently, semistructured interviews were held with purposively selected patients. Interview codes triangulated and illustrated explanations of usage and supplemented quantitative findings on other feasibility domains. Results Of the 410 eligible patients who started an IRP during the study period, 116 patients participated in additional data collections (108 with problematic fatigue and 47 with moderate or severe pain). Qualitative data verified that hedonic motivation was the most important factor for behavioral intentions to use LAKA (P<.001). Moreover, quotes illustrated a positive association between usage intentions (t1) and baseline level (t0) coping by active engagement (Spearman ρ=0.25; P=.008) and why patients who often respond by seeking social support were represented in a group of 71 patients who accessed the game (P=.034). The median behavioral intention to use LAKA was moderately positive and declined over time. Twenty patients played the game from start to finish. Behavioral change content was recognized and seen as potentially helpful by interview respondents who exposed themselves to the content of LAKA. Conclusions Variation in the demand for applied gaming is generally explained by perceived enjoyment and effort and by individual differences in coping resources. An applied game can be offered as a feasible complementary intervention for more patients with complex chronic pain or fatigue complaints by embedding and delivering in alignment with patient experiences. Feasibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness can be evaluated in a full-scale evaluation. New observations elicit areas of further research on the usage of computer-based interventions. PMID:27036094

  8. National Breakthrough Pain Study: prevalence, characteristics, and associations with health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Arvind; Katz, Nathaniel; Shillington, Alicia C; Stephenson, Judith J; Harshaw, Qing; Frye, Carla B; Portenoy, Russell K

    2015-02-01

    The National Breakthrough Pain Study is a large observational study that assessed breakthrough pain (BTP) in a population of commercially insured community-dwelling patients with opioid-treated chronic pain. Eligible patients were identified from an administrative claims database, and consenting patients were asked to complete a structured telephone interview and several validated questionnaires. Questionnaires assessed pain interference with function (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form), health status (Short Form 12 [SF-12] Health Survey), disability (Sheehan Disability Scale), work performance (World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire), and mood (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Screener [GAD-7] and Patient Health Questionnaire-2 [PHQ-2]). Of 2198 patients interviewed, 1278 patients had persistent pain controlled with opioid therapy; 1023 (80%) of these patients reported BTP. Patients had a median of 2.0 episodes of BTP per day (range, 1-50) and a median duration of BTP of 45 minutes (range, 1-720). Compared with patients without BTP, patients with BTP had more pain-related interference in function (Brief Pain Inventory, mean ± SD: 34.2 ± 15.6 vs 25.0 ± 15.7 [P < 0.001]), worse physical health (SF-12 physical component score: 29.9 ± 9.6 vs 35.1 ± 10.4 [P < 0.001]) and mental health (SF-12 mental component score: 47.4 ± 11.3 vs 49.3 ± 10.4 [P < 0.001]), more disability (Sheehan Disability Scale global impairment score: 15.1 ± 9.1 vs 10.6 ± 8.5; World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire absolute absenteeism: 12.4 ± 59.9 vs 7.7 ± 44.9 hours [both P < 0.001]), and worse mood (GAD-7 score: 7.4 ± 5.9 vs 5.9 ± 5.4; PHQ-2 anhedonia score: 1.2 ± 1.1 vs 0.9 ± 1.0 [both P < 0.001]). In this population of community-dwelling patients with opioid-treated chronic pain, BTP was highly prevalent and associated with negative outcomes. This burden of illness suggests the need for specific treatment plans. PMID:25599446

  9. Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Jaracz, Jan; Gattner, Karolina; Jaracz, Krystyna; Górna, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Patients with major depression often report pain. In this article, we review the current literature regarding the prevalence and consequences, as well as the pathophysiology, of unexplained painful physical symptoms (UPPS) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). UPPS are experienced by approximately two-thirds of depressed patients. The presence of UPPS makes a correct diagnosis of depression more difficult. Moreover, UPPS are a predictor of a poor response to treatment and a more chronic course of depression. Pain, in the course of depression, also has a negative impact on functioning and quality of life. Frequent comorbidity of depression and UPPS has inspired the formulation of an hypothesis regarding a shared neurobiological mechanism of both conditions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies has shown that frontal-limbic dysfunction in depression may explain abnormal pain processing, leading to the presence of UPPS. Increased levels of proinflamatory cytokines and substance P in patients with MDD may also clarify the pathophysiology of UPPS. Finally, dysfunction of the descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways that normally suppress ascending sensations has been proposed as a core mechanism of UPPS. Psychological factors such as catastrophizing also play a role in both depression and chronic pain. Therefore, pharmacological treatment and/or cognitive therapy are recommended in the treatment of depression with UPPS. Some data suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the alleviation of depression and UPPS. However, the pooled analysis of eight randomised clinical trials showed similar efficacy of duloxetine (an SNRI) and paroxetine (an SSRI) in reducing UPPS in depression. Further integrative studies examining genetic factors (e.g. polymorphisms of genes for interleukins, serotonin transporter and receptors), molecular factors (e.g. cytokines, substance P) and neuroimaging findings (e.g. functional studies during painful stimulation) might provide further explanation of the pathophysiology of UPPS in MDD and therefore facilitate the development of more effective methods of treatment. PMID:27048351

  10. Prevalence of chronic non-cancer pain in a UK prison environment

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is significant global health issue, accounting for a substantial increase in prescription analgesics worldwide, in recent decades. This clinical burden is evident in the UK prison population, where the prevalence of CNCP has never previously been determined. This study, conducted in June/July 2013, used prescribing data and a systematic review of clinical records from two UK prison establishments to derive a figure for point-prevalence of CNCP. Results showed that 20% of the total aggregated prisoner rolls (N = 1944) described CNCP and had been in receipt of treatment with daily analgesia, for a period of at least 3 months prior to observation date. This prevalence of CNCP was related to increasing age group (Spearman’s rank correlation 0.94). Of those on continuous analgesic therapy (CAT), 44% were taking continuous opioid therapy (COT) of any sort. Prisoners with a diagnosis of opioid-type drug dependence (OTDD) were more than twice as likely to complain of CNCP and be on continuous medication for it (odds ratio 2.3). The issues relating to CNCP in prisons are discussed. Further research is recommended, identifying factors influencing CNCP prevalence in prisons, and enabling comparisons to CNCP prevalence in the UK general population. PMID:26516564

  11. Work related complaints of neck, shoulder and arm among computer office workers: a cross-sectional evaluation of prevalence and risk factors in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Complaints of arms, neck and shoulders (CANS) is common among computer office workers. We evaluated an aetiological model with physical/psychosocial risk-factors. Methods We invited 2,500 computer office workers for the study. Data on prevalence and risk-factors of CANS were collected by validated Maastricht-Upper-extremity-Questionnaire. Workstations were evaluated by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Visual-Display-Terminal workstation-checklist. Participants' knowledge and awareness was evaluated by a set of expert-validated questions. A binary logistic regression analysis investigated relationships/correlations between risk-factors and symptoms. Results Sample size was 2,210. Mean age 30.8 ± 8.1 years, 50.8% were males. The 1-year prevalence of CANS was 56.9%, commonest region of complaint was forearm/hand (42.6%), followed by neck (36.7%) and shoulder/arm (32.0%). In those with CANS, 22.7% had taken treatment from a health care professional, only in 1.1% seeking medical advice an occupation-related injury had been suspected/diagnosed. In addition 9.3% reported CANS-related absenteeism from work, while 15.4% reported CANS causing disruption of normal activities. A majority of evaluated workstations in all participants (88.4%,) and in those with CANS (91.9%) had OSHA non-compliant workstations. In the binary logistic regression analyses female gender, daily computer usage, incorrect body posture, bad work-habits, work overload, poor social support and poor ergonomic knowledge were associated with CANS and its' severity In a multiple logistic regression analysis controlling for age, gender and duration of occupation, incorrect body posture, bad work-habits and daily computer usage were significant independent predictors of CANS Conclusions The prevalence of work-related CANS among computer office workers in Sri Lanka, a developing, South Asian country is high and comparable to prevalence in developed countries. Work-related physical factors, psychosocial factors and lack of awareness were all important associations of CANS and effective preventive strategies need to address all three areas. PMID:21816073

  12. Evaluating anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Hong, Engene; Kraft, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints account for about 20% to 30% of all primary care office visits; of these visits, discomfort in the knee, shoulder, and back are the most prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms. Having pain or dysfunction in the front part of the knee is a common presentation and reason for a patient to see a health care provider. There are a number of pathophysiological etiologies to anterior knee pain. This article describes some of the common and less common causes, and includes sections on diagnosis and treatment for each condition as well as key points. PMID:24994047

  13. [Visceral pain].

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, S; Häuser, W; Jänig, W

    2015-10-01

    Chronic visceral pain is an unresolved neurobiological, medical and socioeconomic challenge. Up to 20% of the adult population suffer from chronic visceral pain and abdominal complaints constitute a prevalent symptom also in children and adolescents. Existing treatment approaches are often unsuccessful and patients typically suffer from multiple somatic and psychological symptoms. This complex situation requires integrative treatment approaches. This review summarizes current basic and clinical research on acute and chronic visceral pain with a focus on research groups in Germany. Despite significant clinical and scientific advances, a number of questions remain open calling for more funding to support research to elucidate the complex pathophysiology of chronic visceral pain and to develop and test new treatment approaches. Research support should focus on interdisciplinary concepts and methodology using expertise from multiple disciplines. The field would also benefit from a broader integration of visceral pain into teaching curricula in medicine and psychology and should aim to motivate young clinicians and scientists to strive for a career within this important and highly fascinating area. PMID:26271911

  14. Radiating low back pain in general practice: Incidence, prevalence, diagnosis, and long-term clinical course of illness

    PubMed Central

    Groenhof, Feikje; Winters, Jan C.; van Wijhe, Marten; Groenier, Klaas H.; van der Meer, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and prevalence of radiating low back pain, to explore the long-term clinical course of radiating low back pain including the influence of radiculopathy (in a subsample of the study population) and non-radiating low back pain thereon, and to describe general practitioners’ (GPs’) treatment strategies for radiating low back pain. Design. A historic prospective cohort study. Setting. Dutch general practice. Subjects. Patients over 18 years of age with a first episode of radiating low back pain, registered by the ICPC code L86. Main outcome measures. Incidence and prevalence, clinical course of illness, initial diagnoses established by the GPs, and treatment strategies. Results. Mean incidence was 9.4 and mean prevalence was 17.2 per 1000 person years. In total, 390 patients had 1193 contacts with their GPs; 50% had only one contact with their GP. Consultation rates were higher in patients with a history of non-radiating low back pain and in patients with a diagnosis of radiculopathy in the first five years. In this study's subsample of 103 patients, L86 episodes represented radiculopathy in 50% of cases. Medication was prescribed to 64% of patients, mostly NSAIDs. Some 53% of patients were referred, mainly to physiotherapists and neurologists; 9% of patients underwent surgery. Conclusion. Watchful waiting seems to be sufficient general practice care in most cases of radiating low back pain. Further research should be focused on clarifying the relationship between radicular radiating low back pain, non-radicular radiating low back pain, and non-radiating low back pain. PMID:25693788

  15. Urine drug testing of chronic pain patients. II. Prevalence patterns of prescription opiates and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Heltsley, Rebecca; Zichterman, Anne; Black, David L; Cawthon, Beverly; Robert, Tim; Moser, Frank; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    This study of 20,089 urine specimens from chronic pain patients provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the prevalence of prescription opiates and metabolites, assess the usefulness of inclusion of normetabolites in the test panel, and compare opiate and oxycodone screening results to liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) results. All specimens were screened by an opiate [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 100 ng/mL] and oxycodone assay [ELISA, 100 ng/mL or enzyme immunoassay (EIA), 50 ng/mL] and simultaneously tested by LC-MS-MS [limit of quantitation (LOQ) = 50 ng/mL] for 10 opiate analytes (codeine, norcodeine, morphine, hydrocodone, dihydrocodeine, norhydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxycodone, noroxycodone, and oxymorphone). Approximately two-thirds of the specimens were positive for one or more opiate analytes. The number of analytes detected in each specimen varied from 1 to 8 with 3 (34.8%) being most prevalent. Hydrocodone and oxycodone (in combination with metabolites) were most prevalent followed by morphine. Norcodeine was only infrequently detected whereas the prevalence of norhydrocodone and noroxycodone was approximately equal to the prevalence of the parent drug. A substantial number of specimens were identified that contained norhydrocodone (n = 943) or noroxycodone (n = 702) but not the parent drug, thereby establishing their interpretative value as biomarkers of parent drug use. Comparison of the two oxycodone screening assays revealed that the oxycodone ELISA had broader cross-reactivity with opiate analytes, and the oxycodone EIA was more specific for oxycodone. Specimens containing only norhydrocodone were best detected with the opiate ELISA whereas noroxycodone (only) specimens were best detected by the oxycodone EIA. PMID:20109300

  16. Prevalence of restless legs syndrome in somatoform pain disorder and its effect on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Seshadri Sekhar; Mitra, Sayantanava; Guha, Prathama; Chakraborty, Kaustav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persistent somatoform pain disorder (SPD) is a condition in which the patient suffers from persistent, severe and distressing pain; and from associated physical and psychological distress. While presence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in SPD is understudied, their association might have an impact on general well-being and quality of life (QoL) in SPD. Aims and Objectives: Present study aimed at evaluating the prevalence of RLS in SPD patients attending outpatient department services at a tertiary care institute in eastern India. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty consecutive patients with SPD were screened initially and after applying appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, 192 subjects (male = 85, female = 107) were included in the study. Severity of RLS was assessed using a questionnaire of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group and QoL was measured on QoL Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (Q-LES-Q-SF). Results: Revealed a 28% prevalence of RLS is in patients with SPD, which is much higher than its estimated population prevalence. A larger proportion of those with RLS had continuous course of SPD, longer duration of SPD, and higher daytime sleepiness. They also had poorer scores on Q-LES-Q-SF, indicating a poorer QoL overall. Discussion and Conclusion: This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, on this aspect from India. While this association between RLS and SPD may have biological explanation based on abnormal monoaminergic neurotransmission system, the findings call for more vigilant approach to SPD patients in order to improve their QoL and add to their well-being. PMID:25883472

  17. Prevalence of self-reported skin complaints and avoidance of common daily life consumer products in selected European Regions.

    PubMed

    Naldi, Luigi; Cazzaniga, Simone; Gonçalo, Margarida; Diepgen, Thomas; Bruze, Magnus; Elsner, Peter; Coenraads, Peter J; Svensson, Åke; Bertuccio, Paola; Ofenloch, Robert

    2014-02-01

    IMPORTANCE Skin disorders are common in the general population, and they may be associated with significant disability. The use of daily skin products may affect the appearance and severity of skin conditions. OBJECTIVES To assess the prevalence of reported itchy rash lasting longer than 3 days among the general population and to evaluate lifetime avoidance of different types of consumer products because of skin problems. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The European Dermato-Epidemiology Network (EDEN) Fragrance Study comprised a large descriptive epidemiological survey of the general population conducted in 6 European regions from August 20, 2008, to October 10, 2011. Participants were a random sample of individuals aged 18 to 74 years, based on electoral precincts. The participants were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. EXPOSURES Lifetime exposure to products of common use was considered, including toiletry items that remained on the skin or were rinsed off and household and functional items. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The 1-month, 1-year, and lifetime age-standardized prevalence rates of itchy rash that lasted longer than 3 days. RESULTS In total, 12 377 individuals (53.9% female; median age, 43 years) were interviewed. The overall prevalences of itchy rash were 19.3% (95% CI, 18.6%-20.0%) during the month preceding the interview, 31.8% (95% CI, 31.0%-32.6%) during the preceding year, and 51.7% (95% CI, 50.8%-52.6%) over a lifetime. In addition, the percentage of individuals who reported avoidance of any product varied from 37.0% for products intended to be left on the skin to 17.7% for household or functional products. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings confirmed the magnitude of skin problems among the general population reported in other surveys. Although itchy rash is a nonspecific manifestation, it may be considered in epidemiological surveys to reflect a constellation of skin conditions and to summarize the burden of these conditions on general health. PMID:24369385

  18. Pain in Parkinson´s Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of Its Prevalence, Types, and Relationship to Depression and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Singliarova, Helena; Harsany, Jan; Hanakova, Marta; Martinkova, Jana; Benetin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an important and distressing symptom in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Our aim was to determine the prevalence of pain, its various types and characteristics, as well as its impact on depression and quality of life (QoL) in patients with PD. How pain differs in early- and advanced-stage PD and male and female PD patients was of special interest. One hundred PD patients on dopaminergic medications had a neurological examination and participated in a structured interview on pain characteristics and completed standardized questionnaires. A total of 76% of the patients had pain. The following types of pain were present: musculoskeletal pain accounted for 41% of the total pain, dystonic pain for 17%, central neuropathic pain for 22%, radicular pain for 27%, and other pains (non-radicular low back pain, arthritic, and visceral pain) made up 24%. One type of pain affected 29% of all the subjects, two types 35%, three types 10%, and four types of pain were reported by 2%. All types of pain were more prevalent in advanced-stage PD subjects than in early-stage PD subjects, except for arthritic pain (subclassified under”other pain”). The frequency and intensity of actual, average, and worst experienced pain were significantly more severe in advanced-stage subjects. PD subjects with general pain and in advanced stages were more depressed and had poorer QoL. Depression correlated with worst pain in the last 24 hours and with pain periodicity (the worst depression score in patients with constant pain). QoL correlated with average pain in the last 7 days. Pain is a frequent problem in PD patients, and it worsens during the course of the disease. PMID:26309254

  19. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of chronic widespread pain in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Kathryn E.; Sim, Julius; Jordan, Joanne L.; Jordan, Kelvin P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is common and associated with poor general health. There has been no attempt to derive a robust prevalence estimate of CWP or assess how this is influenced by sociodemographic factors. This study therefore aimed to determine, through a systematic review and meta-analysis, the prevalence of CWP in the adult general population and explore variation in prevalence by age, sex, geographical location, and criteria used to define CWP. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and AMED were searched using a search strategy combining key words and related database-specific subject terms to identify relevant cohort or cross-sectional studies published since 1990. Included articles were assessed for risk of bias. Prevalence figures for CWP (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were stratified according to geographical location, age, and sex. Potential sources of variation were investigated using subgroup analyses and meta-regression. Twenty-five articles met the eligibility criteria. Estimates for CWP prevalence ranged from 0% to 24%, with most estimates between 10% and 15%. The random-effects pooled prevalence was 10.6% (95% confidence intervals: 8.6-12.9). When only studies at low risk of bias were considered pooled, prevalence increased to 11.8% (95% confidence intervals: 10.3-13.3), with reduced but still high heterogeneity. Prevalence was higher in women and in those aged more than 40 years. There was some limited evidence of geographic variation and cultural differences. One in 10 adults in the general population report chronic widespread pain with possible sociocultural variation. The possibility of cultural differences in pain reporting should be considered in future research and the clinical assessment of painful conditions. PMID:26270591

  20. Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis and analysis of pain, rigidity, and functional incapacity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Montserrat; Nuñez, Esther; Sastre, Sergi; Del-Val, Jose-Luis; Segur, Josep-Maria; Macule, Francisco

    2008-08-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is one of the most prevalent health problems in our society. It accounts for 10% of all primary care visits in general medicine and 30% of outpatient appointments. The objectives of this cross-sectional descriptive study of 100 patients suffering from gonarthritis were to assess pain, functional capacity, and joint damage in patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis, as well as the possible repercussions for subsequent surgical treatment. Sociodemographic, clinical, and radiological data were collected, and pain and functional capacity were evaluated by using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The majority (71) of patients were women, mean age 71 years (SD=7.84), of low educational (66%) and financial (89%) status, with mean disease duration of 11.8 years. Of the total, 87% presented with comorbidity. Radiographs revealed a varus malalignment in 31% of patients and a valgus malalignment in 17%, with bone collapse in 39% of these. The factors that most affect surgery and subsequent rehabilitation are closely linked to social status, the general state of the patient, and the radiological severity of gonarthritis. Most of the patients were obese and suffered from comorbid conditions, and some presented with psychopathology. These factors may influence surgery, and thus improvements in primary care should be made as a way of offering a simpler and more effective treatment for gonarthritis. PMID:19292422

  1. Musculoskeletal pain and limitations in work ability in Swedish marines: a cross-sectional survey of prevalence and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Andreas; Larsson, Helena; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Äng, Björn O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of self-rated musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability in Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) marines, and to study factors potentially associated with pain limiting work ability for the most prevalent pain regions reported. Design Population-based, cross-sectional survey. Participants There were 272 SAF marines from the main marine battalion in Sweden included in the study. Outcomes Self-assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting the marines' work ability within a 6-month period, as obtained from structured questionnaires. The association of individual, health and work-related factors with musculoskeletal pain limiting work ability was systematically regressed with multiple logistic models, estimating OR and 95% CI. Results Musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability were most common in the back, at 46% and 20%, and lower extremities at 51% and 29%, respectively. Physical training ≤1 day/week (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.7 to 16.8); body height ≤1.80 m (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 15.1) and ≥1.86 m (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.1); computer work 1/4 of the working day (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.0) and ≥1/2 (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.1) of the working day were independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. None of the studied variables emerged significantly associated with such pain for the lower extremities. Conclusions Our findings show that musculoskeletal pain and resultant limitations in work ability are common in SAF marines. Low frequency of physical training emerged independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. This suggests that marines performing physical training 1 day per week or less are suitable candidates for further medical evaluation and secondary preventive actions. While also associated, body height and computer work need further exploration as underlying mechanisms for back pain limiting work ability. Further prospective studies are necessary to clarify the direction of causality. PMID:26443649

  2. Prevalence of low back pain in employees of a pharmaceutical company.

    PubMed

    Rotgoltz, J; Derazne, E; Froom, P; Grushecky, E; Ribak, J

    1992-01-01

    The association of low back pain (LBP) with mechanical factors at the workplace is uncertain. Most of the studies on this subject did not examine multiple levels of symptoms and did not take into account both the type of work and the primary activity during work. We studied the annual prevalence, severity and duration of attacks of LBP recorded on a physician-administered questionnaire in 208 workers in a pharmaceutical factory. Symptoms were then cross-tabulated with job type, location, work requirements, gender, and years at the factory. LBP was reported by 138 (66.3%) of the workers. Although over 75% of jobs in the packing department, laboratories and offices required prolonged sitting, LBP was most prevalent among workers in the packing department, where the chairs were found to be ergonomically unfit (odds ratio 3.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5-9.1, P = 0.003). Logistic regression demonstrated a highly significant and independent association between LBP and work in the packing or production department (odds ratio 2.03), sitting or lifting (odds ratio 1.97) and 6 years seniority (odds ratio 1.64). Gender was not a significant variable. We conclude that among these pharmaceutical company employees, prolonged sitting and work in the packing or production departments were independently associated with LBP. Prospective studies are warranted to substantiate our findings. PMID:1428819

  3. Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Diseases and Treatment Status in Noncardiac Chest Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hun; Choi, Ja Yeon; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives We evaluated the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD) in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients, risk factors for GERD, and status of prescriptions for GERD in Korean population. Subjects and Methods This was a retrospective non-interventional observational nation-wide 45-center study. Patients with a normal coronary angiogram (CAG) and upper gastroendoscopy within 2 years after CAG were enrolled. The prevalence of GERD was examined. Other gastrointestinal diseases including peptic ulcer diseases or gastritis were also examined. Risk factors for GERD were compared between the GERD group and non-GERD group. The ratio of patients medicated for gastrointestinal diseases (antacids or proton-pump inhibitor) was also examined. Results Nine hundred four patients were enrolled. Among the NCCP patients, GERD was present in 436 (48.2%), peptic ulcer disease in 154 patients (17.0%), and gastritis in 659 (72.9%). There was no difference in risk factors for GERD between the GERD and non-GERD patients. Medications for GERD and other gastrointestinal diseases were prescribed in 742 (82.1%) patients. Conclusion GERD was common (42.8%) in Korean NCCP patients and most (82.1%) received the prescription of gastrointestinal medications. No differences were evident in risk factors between GERD and non-GERD patients. PMID:26617648

  4. A School-Based Survey of Recurrent Non-Specific Low-Back Pain Prevalence and Consequences in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. A.; Stratton, G.; Reilly, T.; Unnithan, V. B.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to provide evidence of the prevalence and consequences of recurrent low-back pain in children from Northwest England. A cross-sectional survey was conducted involving a standardized questionnaire with established reliability and validity. A cross-sectional sample of 500 boys (n = 249) and girls (n = 251) aged…

  5. A School-Based Survey of Recurrent Non-Specific Low-Back Pain Prevalence and Consequences in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. A.; Stratton, G.; Reilly, T.; Unnithan, V. B.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to provide evidence of the prevalence and consequences of recurrent low-back pain in children from Northwest England. A cross-sectional survey was conducted involving a standardized questionnaire with established reliability and validity. A cross-sectional sample of 500 boys (n = 249) and girls (n = 251) aged

  6. Ethnic differences in pain and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Considerable evidence demonstrates substantial ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, progression and outcomes of pain-related conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying these group differences is of crucial importance in reducing and eliminating disparities in the pain experience. Over recent years, accumulating evidence has identified a variety of processes, from neurophysiological factors to structural elements of the healthcare system, that may contribute to shaping individual differences in pain. For example, the experience of pain differentially activates stress-related physiological responses across various ethnic groups, members of different ethnic groups appear to use differing coping strategies in managing pain complaints, providers’ treatment decisions vary as a function of patient ethnicity and pharmacies in predominantly minority neighborhoods are far less likely to stock potent analgesics. These diverse factors, and others may all play a role in facilitating elevated levels of pain-related suffering among individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds. Here, we present a brief, nonexhaustive review of the recent literature and potential physiological and sociocultural mechanisms underlying these ethnic group disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:23687518

  7. Prevalence and diagnostic distribution of medically unexplained painful somatic symptoms across 571 major depressed outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Maremmani, Icro; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Carbonatto, Paolo; Mencacci, Claudio; Muscettola, Giovanni; Pani, Luca; Torta, Riccardo; Vampini, Claudio; Parazzini, Fabio; Dumitriu, Arina; Perugi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence and distribution of medically unexplained painful somatic symptoms (PSSs) versus nonpainful somatic symptoms (NPSSs) in patients diagnosed with major depressive episode (MDE). Method: A total of 571 outpatients diagnosed with MDE according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were consecutively enrolled into a cross-sectional, multicentric, observational study over a period of 7 months. Subjects were evaluated by means of the ad hoc validated 30-item Somatic Symptoms Checklist (SSCL-30) and Zung’s questionnaires for depression and anxiety. The 32-item Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32) was also administered in order to explore any eventual association of PSSs or NPSSs with sub-threshold (DSM-IV-TR [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision] not recognized) bipolar disorder (BD). Results: In our sample, just 183 patients (32%) did not report painful somatic symptoms (NPSSs). Of these, 90 patients (15.76%) had no somatic symptoms at all. The remaining 388 (68%) had at least one PSS being subdivided as follows: 248 (43%) had one or two PSSs, while 140 (25%) experienced two or more. Patients with at least one PSS also reported a greater number of nonpainful somatic symptoms than NPSS. Bipolar patients (associated with higher HCL-32 scores) were less represented across PSS cases than NPSS subjects. Conversely, females were more prone to having a higher number of total somatic symptoms (and bipolar features). Conclusion: PSSs are common in patients with MDE, especially among those patients reporting fewer somatic symptoms in general as opposed to those patients who exhibit more somatic symptoms (both PSSs and NPSSs) with lower relative number of PSSs. A major therapeutic implication is that antidepressant monotherapy could be used with more confidence in unexplained PSS patients than in NPSS patients because of the latter group’s lower frequency of (sub)-threshold bipolar features. PMID:21573083

  8. Pain among nursing home patients in the Netherlands: prevalence, course, clinical correlates, recognition and analgesic treatment – an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Smalbrugge, Martin; Jongenelis, Lineke K; Pot, Anne Margriet; Beekman, Aartjan TF; Eefsting, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    Background Pain is highly prevalent in nursing homes (NH) in several countries. Data about pain in Dutch NH's, where medical care is delivered by specifically trained NH-physicians, are not available. The aim of the present study is to determine prevalence, course, correlates, recognition and treatment of pain among Dutch NH-patients and to make a comparison with international data. Methods The study-population consisted of 350 elderly NH-patients from 14 Dutch NH's. Pain (pain-subscale Nottingham Health Profile) and clinical characteristics (gender, age, cognition, depression, anxiety, sleeping problems, morbidity and functional status) were measured at baseline and at six months. Association of pain (baseline and six months) with clinical characteristics was assessed with chi-square and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results Pain-prevalence was 68.0% (40.5% mild pain symptoms, 27.5% serious pain symptoms). 80% of the patients with pain at baseline still experienced pain at six months. Serious pain at baseline was significantly associated with depression (OR: 2.56; 95% CI: 1.34-4.89) and anxiety (OR 2.47; 95% CI: 1.22-4.99). Serious pain at six months was associated with pain at baseline (OR 18.55; 95% CI: 5.19-66.31) and depression at baseline (OR: 2.63; 95% CI:1.10-6.29). Recognition of pain by NH-physicians varied (35% to 69.7%) depending on measurement instrument and severity of pain. Analgesics were received by 64.5% (paracetamol (acetaminophen), NSAIDs, opioids). Paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids frequently were prescribed below daily defined doses. Conclusion Pain occurred frequently also among Dutch NH-patients and was associated with depression and anxiety. Recognition and treatment by NH-physicians proved sub-optimal. Future studies should focus on interventions to improve recognition and treatment of pain. PMID:17300724

  9. Association between Hypertension and the Prevalence of Low Back Pain and Osteoarthritis in Koreans: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-riong; Park, Ki Byung; Cho, Jae-Heung; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension and musculoskeletal disorders are highly prevalent in adult populations. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between hypertension and prevalence of low back pain (LBP) and osteoarthritis in Koreans. Methods A total 17,128 participants (age ≥20 years) who answered low back pain and osteoarthritis items in the 4th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2009) were analyzed. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression and were adjusted for age, sex, income level, education, occupation, BMI, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Results Lifetime prevalence of LBP in hypertensive subjects was 34.4%, and that of osteoarthritis 26.2%. LBP prevalence was significantly lower in hypertensives (fully adjusted OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.70–0.90), and both LBP and osteoarthritis prevalence was significantly lower in participants with systolic blood pressure ≥140mmHg than those with <120mmHg (fully adjusted OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.70–0.94, and 0.81; 95% CI 0.68–0.96, respectively). Prevalence of LBP in subjects with diastolic blood pressure ≥90mmHg was also significantly lower than those with <80mmHg (fully adjusted OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.63–0.85). LBP and osteoarthritis prevalence did not differ by systolic or diastolic blood pressure interval in respondents taking antihypertensive medication. LBP and osteoarthritis prevalence increased with longer hypertension duration (fully adjusted p for trend 0.028, and 0.0008, respectively). Conclusions Hypertension showed an inverse relationship with LBP and osteoarthritis prevalence, which may be ascribed to hypertension-associated hypalgesia, and antihypertensive medication intake and longer hypertension duration attenuated this association. PMID:26393797

  10. Prevalence and individual risk factors associated with clinical lumbar instability in rice farmers with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Yodchaisarn, Wantanee; Emasithi, Alongkot; Keawduangdee, Petcharat; Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical lumbar instability (CLI) is one of the subgroups of chronic non-specific low back pain. Thai rice farmers often have poor sustained postures during a rice planting process and start their farming at an early age. However, individual associated factors of CLI are not known and have rarely been diagnosed in low back pain. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and individual associated factors of CLI in Thai rice farmers. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 323 Thai rice farmers in a rural area of Khon Kaen province, Thailand. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using the 13-item Delphi criteria questionnaire, after which an objective examination was performed using aberrant movement sign, painful catch sign, and prone instability test to obtain information. Individual factors such as sex, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, smoking, and number of years of farming experience, were recorded during the face-to-face interview. Results The prevalence of CLI in Thai rice farmers calculated by the method described in this study was 13% (age 44±10 years). Number of years of farming experience was found to be significantly correlated with the prevalence of CLI (adjusted odds ratio =2.02, 95% confidence interval =1.03–3.98, P<0.05). Conclusion This study provides prevalence of CLI in Thai rice farmers. Those with long-term farming experience of at least 30 years have a greater risk of CLI. PMID:25565778

  11. Prevalence and conditions associated with chronic pelvic pain in women from São Luís, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, L.S.C.; Brito, L.M.O.; Chein, M.B.C.; Mascarenhas, T.S.; Costa, J.P.L.; Nogueira, A.A.; Poli-Neto, O.B.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in the community of São Luís, capital of the State of Maranhão, Northeastern Brazil, and to identify independent conditions associated with it. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including a sample of 1470 women older than 14 years predominantly served by the public health system. The interviews were held in the subject's home by trained interviewers not affiliated with the public health services of the municipality. The homes were visited at random according to the city map and the prevalence of the condition was estimated. To identify the associated conditions, the significant variables (P=0.10) were selected and entered in a multivariate analysis model. Data are reported as odds ratio and 95% confidence interval, with the level of significance set at 0.05. The prevalence of chronic pelvic pain was 19.0%. The independent conditions associated with this diagnosis were: dyspareunia (OR=3.94), premenopausal status (OR=2.95), depressive symptoms (OR=2.33), dysmenorrhea (OR=1.77), smoking (OR=1.72), irregular menstrual flow (OR=1.62), and irritative bladder symptoms (OR=1.90). The prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in Sao Luís is high and is associated with the conditions cited above. Guidelines based on prevention and/or early identification of risk factors may reduce the prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in São Luís, Brazil. PMID:25075577

  12. Lower Urinary Tract Pain and Anterior Urethral Stricture Disease: Prevalence and Effects of Urethral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Laura A.; Warren, Gareth J.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Elliott, Sean P.; Myers, Jeremy B.; McClung, Christopher D.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Erickson, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anterior urethral stricture disease most commonly presents as urinary obstruction. Lower urinary tract pain is not commonly reported as a presenting symptom. We prospectively characterized lower urinary tract pain in association with urethral stricture disease and assessed the effects of urethroplasty on this pain. Materials and Methods Men (18 years old or older) with anterior urethral stricture disease were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal, multi-institutional, urethral reconstruction outcomes study from June 2010 to January 2013 as part of TURNS (Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons). Preoperative and postoperative lower urinary tract pain was assessed by the validated CLSS. Voiding and sexual function was assessed using validated patient-reported measures, including I-PSS. Results Preoperatively 118 of 167 men (71%) reported urethral pain and 68 (41%) reported bladder pain. Age was the only predictor of urethral pain with men 40 years or younger reporting more pain than those 60 years old or older (81% vs 58%, p = 0.0104). Lower urinary tract pain was associated with worse quality of life and overall voiding symptoms on CLSS and I-PSS (each p <0.01). Postoperatively lower urinary tract pain completely resolved in 64% of men with urethral pain and in 73.5% with bladder pain. There were no predictive factors for changes in lower urinary tract pain after urethral reconstruction. Conclusions Lower urinary tract pain is common in urethral stricture disease, especially in younger men. It is associated with worse quality of life and voiding function. In most men lower urinary tract pain resolves after urethral reconstruction. PMID:25046621

  13. Prevalence and intensity of chronic pain and self-perceived health among elderly people: a population-based study1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lilian Varanda; de Vasconcelos, Patrícia Pereira; Souza, Layz Alves Ferreira; Pereira, Gilberto de Araújo; Nakatani, Adélia Yaeko Kyosen; Bachion, Maria Márcia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the prevalence and intensity of chronic pain among elderly people of the community and to analyze associations with the self-perceived health status. METHOD: cross-sectional study with a populational sample (n=934), conducted through household interviews in the city of Goiânia, Brazil. The intensity of chronic pain (existing for 6 months or more) was measured using a numerical scale (0-10) and the self-perceived health through a verbal scale (very good, good, fair, poor, very poor). For the statistical analysis, the absolute frequency and percentage, CI (95%), Chi-square test, Odds ratio, and regression analysis were used. Significance of 5%. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic pain was 52.8% [CI (95%):49.4-56.1]; most frequently located in the lower limbs (34.5%) and lumbar region (29.5%); with high or the worst possible intensity for 54.6% of the elderly people. The occurrence of chronic pain was associated with (p<0.0001) a worse self-perception of health (OR=4.2:2.5-7.0), a greater number of chronic diseases (OR=1.8:1.2-2.7), joint disease (OR=3.5:2.4-5.1) and the female gender (OR=2.3:1.7-3.0). A lower intensity of chronic pain was associated with a better self-perception of health (p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: the majority of the elderly people of the community reported chronic pain, of a severe intensity, and located in areas related to movement activities, thus influencing the morbidity and mortality of this population. PMID:25296151

  14. Prevalence of pain-free weeks in chiropractic subjects with low back pain - a longitudinal study using data gathered with text messages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of automated text messages has made it possible to identify different courses of low back pain (LBP), and it has been observed that pain often fluctuates and that absolute recovery is rather rare. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of pain-free weeks and pain-free periods in subjects with non-specific LBP treated by chiropractors, and to compare subjects from two different countries in these aspects. Methods Data were obtained from two practice-based multicentre prospective outcome studies, one Danish and one Swedish, involving subjects being treated by chiropractors for non-specific LBP. Over 18 weeks, subjects answered a weekly automated text message question on the number of days in the past week that they had experienced bothersome LBP, i.e. a number between 0 and 7. The number of weeks in a row without any LBP at all ("zero weeks") as well as the maximum number of zero weeks in a row was determined for each individual. Comparisons were made between the two study samples. Estimates are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals. Results In the Danish and the Swedish populations respectively, 93/110 (85%) and 233/262 (89%) of the subjects were eligible for analysis. In both groups, zero weeks were rather rare and were most commonly (in 40% of the zero weeks) reported as a single isolated week. The prevalence of pain free periods, i.e. reporting a maximum of 0, 1 or 2, or 3-6 zero weeks in a row, were similar in the two populations (20-31%). Smaller percentages were reported for ? 7 zero weeks in a row. There were no significant differences between the two study groups. Conclusion It was uncommon that chiropractic subjects treated for non-specific LBP experienced an entire week without any LBP at all over 18 weeks. When this occurred, it was most commonly reported for brief periods only. Hence, recovery in the sense that patients become absolutely pain free is rare, even in a primary care population. PMID:22168838

  15. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Message Strategic Plans & Reports Budget & Legislation Advisory Council Job Opportunities All About NCCIH Health Topics A-Z # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pain Share: Pain is the most common reason for seeking medical care. It is also a common reason ...

  16. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. Methods In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2–6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6–11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Conclusion Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered. PMID:26106512

  17. Self-Reported Hindering Health Complaints of Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    van Blijswijk, Sophie C. E.; Chan, On Ying A.; van Houwelingen, Anne H.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Blom, Jeanet W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Proactive care for community-dwelling older persons targeting self-reported hindering health complaints might prevent a decline in function. We investigated the spectrum of self-reported hindering complaints of community-dwelling older persons, the association with functional outcomes, and help-seeking behavior for these complaints. Methods Within the ISCOPE trial, participants (aged ≥75 years) received the ISCOPE screening questionnaire, including the open-ended question “At the moment, which health complaints limit you the most in your day-to-day life?”. After coding the answers with the ICPC-1-NL, we examined the prevalence and the association between the number and type of complaints and functional outcomes (Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, quality of life measured on Cantril’s Ladder, Mini-Mental State Examination, Geriatric Depression Scale-15, and De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale). Electronic patient registers were searched for the most reported complaints. Results 7285 participants (median age: 81.0 years [IQR 77.8–85.3], 38.6% males) reported 13,524 hindering complaints (median 1, range 0–18); 32.7% reported no complaints. Participants mostly reported problems with walking/standing (22.1%), pain (20.8%) or weakness/tiredness (8.5%). These complaints were mentioned in the electronic patient registers in 28.3%, 91.3% and 55.5%, respectively. Higher numbers of hindering complaints were related to poorer scores on the number of domains with problems, Cantril’s Ladder for quality of life, Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale, and De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale. Self-reported weakness, problems with walking/standing, visual limitations, cognitive problems, dyspnea and back complaints were associated with poorer scores on the number of domains with problems, Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, MMSE or Geriatric Depression Scale. Conclusion One third of the participants reported no hindering complaints. Problems with walking/standing, pain, and weakness/tiredness were most reported, but not always found in electronic patient registers. A higher number of, and specific self-reported hindering complaints, were associated with poorer scores on functional outcomes. It may be helpful for general practitioners to ask about these complaints and their influence on daily life. PMID:26571233

  18. Spinal pain in adolescents: prevalence, incidence, and course: a school-based two-year prospective cohort study in 1,300 Danes aged 11–13

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). Methods This study was a school-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11–13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N = 1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time. Results The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain was 86% and 89% at baseline and follow-up, respectively. A group of 13.6% (95% CI: 11.8, 15.6) at baseline and 19.5% (95% CI: 17.1, 22.0) at follow-up reported that they had pain frequently. The frequency of pain was strongly associated with the intensity of pain, i.e., the majority of the participants reported their pain as relatively infrequent and of low intensity, whereas the participants with frequent pain also experienced pain of higher intensity. The two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations. Progression of pain from one to more locations and from infrequent to more frequent was common over the two-year period. Conclusions Spinal pain is common at the age of 11–15 years, but some have more pain than others. The pain is likely to progress, i.e., to more locations, higher frequency, and higher pain intensity over a two-year period. PMID:24885549

  19. A closer look at hand and wrist complaints.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2013-03-10

    Hand or wrist pain is a common complaint in primary care. This pain can be very disabling and can significantly impair a person's quality of life. With the appropriate clinical knowledge and skills, nurse practitioners can effectively evaluate, diagnose, and treat many of the common hand and wrist complaints seen in primary care. PMID:23416341

  20. Characteristics of visual disturbances reported by subjects with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Visual symptoms are often reported by patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to report on the prevalence and most troublesome visual disturbances in subjects with neck pain. Seventy subjects with neck pain and seventy healthy control subjects answered questions about the presence and magnitude (/12) - product of frequency (0-4) and intensity (0-3) of each of 16 visual symptoms noted to be associated with neck pain and other possible causes. A visual complaint index (VCI) (/168) was generated from the sum of the magnitude rating of 14 significant symptoms. The neck pain group had significantly (P > 0.05) greater prevalence and magnitude of 14/16 visual complaints and VCI (mean 27.4) compared to control subjects (mean 6.2). The most prevalent symptoms were 'need to concentrate to read' (70%) and 'sensitivity to light' (58.6%). The least prevalent were 'double vision' (28.6%) and 'dizzy reading' (38.6%). The most troublesome symptoms (greatest magnitude) were 'need to concentrate to read' (3.4/12), 'visual fatigue' (3/12), 'difficulty judging distances' (2.1/12) and 'sensitivity to light' (2.1/12) while the least troublesome complaints were 'double vision' (0.5/12), 'red eyes' (1/12) and 'spots and words moving' (1/12). The characteristics of the visual symptoms were mostly consistent for those previously associated with neck pain. Subjects with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher VCI compared to those with idiopathic neck pain. The results could help with differential diagnosis. The visual symptoms might be related to eye movement control disturbances in neck pain, however further research is required. PMID:24521926

  1. Increased low back pain prevalence in females than in males after menopause age: evidences based on synthetic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wáng, Jùn-Qīng; Káplár, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Female sex hormones play an important role in the etiology and pathophysiology of a variety of musculoskeletal degenerative diseases. Postmenopausal women show accelerated disc degeneration due to relative estrogen deficiency. This literature review aims to validate or falsify this hypothesis, i.e., while overall females have higher prevalence of low back pain (LBP) across all age groups, this male vs. female difference in LBP prevalence further increases after female menopause age. The literature search was performed on PubMed on January 2, 2016. The search word combination was (low back pain) AND prevalence AND [(males OR men) AND (females OR women)]. The following criteria were taken to include the papers for synthetic analysis: (I) only English primary literatures on nonspecific pain; (II) only prospective studies on general population, but not population with occupational LBP causes, of both males and female subjects studied using the same LBP criterion, ages-specific information available, and males and female subjects were age-matched; (III) studies without major quality flaws. In total 98 studies with 772,927 subjects were analyzed. According to the information in the literature, participant subjects were divided into four age groups: (I) school age children group: 6–19 years; (II) young and middle aged group: 20–50 years; (III) mixed age group: data from studies did not differentiate age groups; (IV) elderly group: ≥50 years old. When individual studies were not weighted by participant number and each individual study is represented as one entry regardless of their sample size, the median LBP prevalence ratio of female vs. males was 1.310, 1.140, 1.220, and 1.270 respectively for the four age groups. When individual studies were weighted by participant number, the LBP prevalence ratio of female vs. males was 1.360, 1.127, 1.185, and 1.280 respectively for the four groups. The higher LBP prevalence in school age girls than in school age boys is likely due to psychological factors, female hormone fluctuation, and menstruation. Compared with young and middle aged subjects, a further increased LBP prevalence in females than in males was noted after menopause age. PMID:27190772

  2. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially if you drink a lot of alcohol. Opioids Opioids (OH-pee-oids), or narcotics, are the most ... and oxycodone (OKS-ih-KOH-duhn). Pain 353 Opioid side effects include: l nausea l vomiting l ...

  3. Prevalence of occupation-related pain among baristas and an examination of low back and shoulder demand during the preparation of espresso-based beverages.

    PubMed

    Dainty, R Scott; Alcorn, Eric; Ferguson, Chantelle A; Gregory, Diane E

    2014-01-01

    Many baristas complain of low back pain (LBP) and upper extremity discomfort while at work. This study documented the prevalence of LBP and shoulder pain, via questionnaire, among a population of baristas to determine whether cumulative low back loads and shoulder moments are associated with pain reporting. Fifty-nine baristas completed the questionnaire; ten were also video-recorded for biomechanical analysis while making espresso beverages and cumulative and peak low back loads and shoulder moments were calculated. Seventy-three percent of those who completed the questionnaire reported having experienced LBP, and half attributed this pain to their job as a barista. Furthermore, 68% reported having experienced shoulder pain and half also attributed this pain to their job. Those who suffered from LBP had higher peak low back compression and those with shoulder pain had, in general, higher moments about their dominant shoulder. PMID:24837283

  4. Pain.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Invasive stimulation of the motor (precentral) cortex using surgically implanted epidural electrodes is indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain that is refractory to medical treatment. Controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS), but MCS outcome remains variable and validated criteria for selecting good candidates for implantation are lacking. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive approach that could be used as a preoperative tool to predict MCS outcome and also could serve as a therapeutic procedure in itself to treat pain disorders. This requires repeated rTMS sessions and a maintenance protocol. Other studies have also demonstrated the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in relieving chronic pain syndromes. The most studied target is the precentral cortex, but other targets, such as the prefrontal and parietal cortices, could be of interest. The analgesic effects of cortical stimulation relate to the activation of various circuits modulating neural activities in remote structures, such as the thalamus, limbic cortex, insula, or descending inhibitory controls. In addition to the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain by epidural MCS, new developments of this type of strategy are ongoing, for other types of pain syndrome and stimulation techniques. PMID:24112914

  5. The impact of pain on quality of life and the unmet needs of pain management: results from pain sufferers and physicians participating in an Internet survey.

    PubMed

    McCarberg, Bill H; Nicholson, Bruce D; Todd, Knox H; Palmer, Trish; Penles, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Pain is one of the most common medical complaints, but despite its prevalence, many individuals still suffer with unrelieved or undertreated pain. This marketing research survey was designed to determine the physical, psychological, and economic impact pain has on the lives of individuals suffering with pain and to identify the unmet needs of patients who have taken opioid medications to treat their pain. In addition, the survey sought to address the challenges physicians face when treating patients with pain. Pain sufferers were recruited through e-mail invitation to an Internet survey; 173,854 invitations were sent out, 22,018 people responded (12.7%), and 606 met the criteria for inclusion in the survey as pain sufferers. Of these, 359 people had moderate to moderately severe chronic pain and 247 people had moderate to moderately severe acute pain. Additionally, physicians currently treating pain were recruited through e-mail and postal mail invitations and 492 met eligibility criteria: 241 specialists (orthopedic or general surgeons, pain specialists or anesthesiologists), 125 primary care, and 126 emergency medicine physicians. Results of this survey supported what many physicians observe in their practice and hear from their patients, that pain has a negative impact on daily activities in the majority of pain sufferers. Many chronic pain sufferers reported that pain had deleterious effects on their mental health, employment status, sleep, and personal relationships. The impact of pain on patient quality of life and the unmet needs in pain management were recognized by the majority of physicians surveyed, with inadequate pain control, end-of-dose pain, and side effects associated with increased dosing reported as negative factors influencing their choice of pain medication. In conclusion, effective communication between physicians and patients is encouraged to not only improve overall pain management but also to establish shared treatment goals with functional outcomes. PMID:18645331

  6. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Gertrud; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Buhmann, Sonja; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Lenz, Miriam; Vogel, Tobias; Kichhoff, Rainer Maria

    2006-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain. PMID:16800878

  7. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of low back pain among undergraduate students of a sports and physical education institute in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Triki, Moez; Koubaa, Abdessalem; Masmoudi, Liwa; Fellmann, Nicole; Tabka, Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    Introduction For obvious reasons, athletes are at greater risk of sustaining a lumber (lower) spine injury due to physical activity. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in a Tunisian sports and physical education institute. Aim To assess the prevalence of LBP in different sports among students studying in a sports and physical education institute in Tunisia, to determine the causes of the injuries, and to propose solutions. Methods A total of 3,379 boys and 2,579 girls were studied. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted on a group of students aged 18.5–24.5 years at the Higher Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax to estimate the prevalence of LBP and its relation to the type of sports. Data on age, weight, height, smoking, and the sport in which the student was injured in the low back were collected from the institute health service records from 2005 until 2013. Results LBP was reported by 879 of the 5,958 study participants (14.8%). The prevalence of LBP was significantly higher (p<0.001) in females (17.6%) than in males (12.5%). LBP prevalence did not differ by body mass index or smoking habit (p>0.05). The sports associated with the higher rates of LBP were gymnastics, judo, handball, and volleyball, followed by basketball and athletics. Conclusion LBP is frequent among undergraduate students of a sports and physical education institute in Tunisia. It is strongly associated with fatigue after the long periods of training in different sports. Gymnastics, judo, handball, and volleyball were identified as high-risk sports for causing LBP. PMID:25758252

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of low back pain among undergraduate students of a sports and physical education institute in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Triki, Moez; Koubaa, Abdessalem; Masmoudi, Liwa; Fellmann, Nicole; Tabka, Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : For obvious reasons, athletes are at greater risk of sustaining a lumber (lower) spine injury due to physical activity. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in a Tunisian sports and physical education institute. Aim : To assess the prevalence of LBP in different sports among students studying in a sports and physical education institute in Tunisia, to determine the causes of the injuries, and to propose solutions. Methods : A total of 3,379 boys and 2,579 girls were studied. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted on a group of students aged 18.5-24.5 years at the Higher Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax to estimate the prevalence of LBP and its relation to the type of sports. Data on age, weight, height, smoking, and the sport in which the student was injured in the low back were collected from the institute health service records from 2005 until 2013. Results : LBP was reported by 879 of the 5,958 study participants (14.8%). The prevalence of LBP was significantly higher (p<0.001) in females (17.6%) than in males (12.5%). LBP prevalence did not differ by body mass index or smoking habit (p>0.05). The sports associated with the higher rates of LBP were gymnastics, judo, handball, and volleyball, followed by basketball and athletics. Conclusion : LBP is frequent among undergraduate students of a sports and physical education institute in Tunisia. It is strongly associated with fatigue after the long periods of training in different sports. Gymnastics, judo, handball, and volleyball were identified as high-risk sports for causing LBP. PMID:25758252

  10. Growing pains: contemporary knowledge and recommended practice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Angela M

    2008-01-01

    Background Leg pain in children, described as growing pains, is a frequent clinical presentation seen by an array of health care professionals. Described since 1823, growing pains continues to puzzle practitioners, yet diagnostic criteria and evidence based treatment is available. Methods The medical literature has been searched exhaustively to access all articles (English language) pertaining to leg pains in children which are ascribed to being 'growing pains'. Results The literature, whilst plentiful in quantity and spanning two centuries, is generally replete with reiterated opinion and anecdote and lacking in scientific rigour. The author searched 45 articles for relevance, determined according to title, abstract and full text, resulting in a yield of 22 original studies and 23 review articles. From the original studies, one small (non-blinded) randomised controlled trial that focused on GP treatment with leg muscle stretching was found. Nine prevalence studies were found revealing disparate estimates. Ten cohort (some case-controlled) studies, which investigated pain attribute differences in affected versus unaffected groups, were found. One series of single case experiment designs and one animal model study were found. Conclusion Growing pains is prevalent in young children, presents frequently in the health care setting where it is poorly managed and is continuing to be researched. A common childhood complaint, growing pains needs to be acknowledged and better managed in the contemporary medical setting. PMID:18822152

  11. Prevalence of illicit drug use in patients without controlled substance abuse in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D; Barnhill, Renee C

    2003-04-01

    Drug abuse with illicit drugs and licit drugs has been increasing steadily over the past decade. A recent National Household Survey on Drug Abuse found statistically significant increases between 2000 and 2001 in the use of multiple drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, and non-medical use of pain relievers and tranquilizers. Prescription controlled substance abuse is a major issue in chronic pain management. Various means suggested to avoid or monitor abuse in patients in treatment include urine/serum drug screening whenever requested, along with other precautions including one prescribing physician and one designated pharmacy, etc. Based on the present evidence, physicians assume that patients adhering to controlled substance agreements and without obvious dependency behavior do not abuse either illicit or licit drugs. Thus, it is accepted that there is no necessity to perform routine urine/drug testing in this specific group of the patient population. One hundred patients undergoing interventional pain management and receiving controlled substances were randomly selected for evaluation of illicit drug abuse by urine drug testing. They were selected from a total of 250 patients who were identified as non-abusers of prescription drugs. Results showed that illicit drug abuse in patients without history of controlled substance abuse was seen in 16 patients. Thirteen of the 16 patients tested positive for marijuana and 3 patients tested positive for cocaine. Only one patient tested positive for a combined use of both marijuana and cocaine. This study showed that, in an interventional pain management setting, there is significant use of illicit drugs (16%) with 13% use of marijuana and 3% use of cocaine in patients who are considered as non-abusers of prescription controlled substances and those who are adherent to controlled substance agreements. However, if cocaine is considered as a hardcore drug in contrast to marijuana, abuse of hardcore illicit drugs is only 3%. PMID:16883377

  12. Prevalence and social burden of active chronic low back pain in the adult Portuguese population: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Eusébio, Mónica; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime C

    2016-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of active chronic low back pain (CLBP) in the adult Portuguese population; to compare the active CLBP population with the population without CLBP; and to explore factors associated with active CLBP. The present study was conducted under the scope of EpiReumaPt a population-based study. Active CLBP was self-reported and considered if present on the day of the interview and for ≥90 days. Prevalence estimates were calculated. Association of active CLBP with quality of life, functional ability and healthcare consumption were evaluated. Factors associated with active CLBP were identified through logistic regression. Among 10.661 EpiReumaPt subjects, 1487 self-reported active CLBP. The prevalence of active CLBP was 10.4 % (95 % CI 9.6; 11.9 %). After adjustment, active CLBP subjects had a higher likelihood for anxiety symptoms (OR 2.77), early retirement due to disease (OR 1.88) and more physician visits (β = 2.65). Factors significantly and independently associated with the presence of active CLBP were: female gender (OR 1.34), overweight/obesity (OR 1.27), presence of self-reported rheumatic musculoskeletal disease (RMD) (OR 2.93), anxiety symptoms (OR 2.67), age (OR 1.02) and higher number of self-reported comorbidities (OR 1.12). Active CLBP is highly prevalent in the Portuguese population and is associated with disability and with a high consumption of healthcare resources. Female gender, older age, anxiety symptoms, overweight/obesity, the presence of other RMD and the number of comorbidities were independently associated with the presence of active CLBP. These factors should be taken into account when new cohort prospective studies will be developed. PMID:26661091

  13. Restless legs syndrome and pain disorders: what's in common?

    PubMed

    Goulart, Leonardo Ierardi; Delgado Rodrigues, Raimundo Nonato; Prieto Peres, Mario Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Between 10 % and 30 % of the population report chronic pain. More than half of these also have sleep complaints. From considering these data, it can be inferred there is a significant overlapping between these conditions. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease (RLS/WED) is characterized by complaints of an "urge to move" frequently associated with dysesthesias. From that perspective, these sensations can also have painful characteristics. By the same token, the presence of comorbid diseases as predicted by a higher prevalence RLS/WED, have many of them with pain as an important complaint. Pain is a multidimensional response involving several levels of expression ranging from somatosensory to emotional. The potential shared mechanisms between RLS/WED and pain may involve sleep deprivation/fragmentation effect, inducing an increase in markers of inflammation and reduction in pain thresholds. These are modulated by several different settings of neurotransmitters with a huge participation of monoaminergic dysfunctional circuits. A thorough comprehension of these mechanisms is of utmost importance for the correct approach and treatment choices. PMID:25249423

  14. Musculoskeletal pain and the reproductive life stage in women: is there a relationship?

    PubMed

    Frange, C; Hirotsu, C; Hachul, H; Pires, J S; Bittencourt, L; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between reproductive life stage, pain perception and musculoskeletal pain complaint in a representative sample of women from São Paulo, Brazil. Methods A population-based survey was carried out with 574 women who were classified as being in the premenopausal or postmenopausal stage. They answered questions about pain perception and musculoskeletal pain. Follicle stimulating hormone was collected to confirm menopausal condition along with clinical evaluation. Results In the whole sample, we found a prevalence of 56% for pain perception and 20.2% for complaints of musculoskeletal pain. Regarding the topography of musculoskeletal pain, the distributions were similar among the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. No significant association was found between reproductive life stage and pain perception, as 58.1% of the premenopausal group and 52.0% of the postmenopausal group reported pain. Similarly, there was no significant association between menopausal stage and musculoskeletal pain, as 19.5% and 21.6% of the premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively, complained of musculoskeletal pain. There was no significant association of postmenopausal stage (early or late) with pain perception or musculoskeletal pain. The use of analgesics was significantly higher in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal women (p < 0.001). Conclusion A high prevalence of pain was found in women from the city of São Paulo. However, neither the presence of musculoskeletal pain nor pain perception were associated with the reproductive life stage, showing that both parameters was independent from the menopausal status in the studied women. PMID:27095066

  15. Prevalence of and risk factors for low back pain among staffs in schools for physically and mentally handicapped children.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shigeki; Muto, Takashi; Seo, Akihiko; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Taoda, Kazushi; Watanabe, Misuzu

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the prevalence of and risk factors for low back pain (LBP) in schools for physically and mentally handicapped children. This study design is a cross-sectional study. The subjects included were 1,869 staff members from 19 prefectural schools for children in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, which included schools for the blind, deaf-mutes, physically handicapped, and mentally retarded children. A total of 975 subjects completed two postal questionnaires which included morbidity, demographic factors, nursing activity, and psychosocial factors. The answer rate was 52%. The one-month prevalence of LBP was 45%. According to the classification of nursing activity, assistance in movement 1.67 (95% CI 1.27-2.14), excretory function 1.45 (1.11-1.88), and feeding 1.44 (1.10-1.90) showed significant increases in the odds ratio. The adjusted odds ratio significantly increased by 2.35 (1.78-3.11) in the group with depression symptoms as well as in the group with job stressors such as quantitative, qualitative, and physical work loads, job control, utilization of technique, interpersonal conflicts, and degree of satisfaction with their work/home life. PMID:16610547

  16. Prevalence of shoulder pain in Swedish flatwater kayakers and its relation to range of motion and scapula stability of the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anette; Svantesson, Ulla; Tannerstedt, Jörgen; Alricsson, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have investigated the incidence of injuries in kayakers. The aim was to study the prevalence of shoulder pain in competitive flatwater kayakers and to evaluate any differences in range of motion or scapula stability of the shoulder joint among kayakers with or without the history of shoulder pain. Thirty-one kayakers were participated in the study, and a questionnaire including background data was used. Shoulder range of motion was measured with a goniometer, and the participants were observed for scapula dyskinesis in flexion and abduction. Of the participating kayakers, 54.8% (n = 17) had experienced shoulder pain. Kayakers who had experienced shoulder pain showed a significantly lower degree of internal rotational range of motion versus kayakers with no reported shoulder pain, with a mean degree of internal rotation in the right shoulder 49.3 vs 60.0 (P = 0.017) and the left shoulder 51.9 vs 66.0 (P = 0.000). Kayakers who had experienced shoulder pain were also observed with a scapular dyskinesis (n = 15 of 17 kayakers) to a significantly higher degree (P = 0.001) than kayakers with no reported shoulder pain. Findings suggest that screening for scapular dyskinesis and testing for rotational range of motion in the shoulder joint is essential in order to treat and maybe prevent shoulder pain in kayakers. PMID:26301322

  17. Determining zolpidem compliance: urinary metabolite detection and prevalence in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Schwope, David M; DePriest, Anne; Black, David L; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J; Heltsley, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Zolpidem (Ambien(®)) is the most prescribed insomnia treatment in the USA; however, little is known about zolpidem metabolite excretion in chronic pain patients. As zolpidem is extensively metabolized in vivo to zolpidem 4-phenyl carboxylic acid (ZCA), metabolite detection may provide improved accuracy for compliance determinations, thereby improving clinical decisions. Zolpidem and ZCA were extracted from 1 mL human urine by mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. Samples were analyzed by LC-MS-MS using positive electrospray ionization with multiple reaction monitoring mode employed for detection and quantification. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved with a reversed-phase column in a rapid 1.8 min analysis. The assay was linear from 4 to 1,000 µg/L for zolpidem and 4 to 10,000 µg/L for ZCA. Interday recovery (bias) and imprecision (n = 20) were 100-107% of target and 2.4-3.7% relative standard deviation, respectively. Extraction efficiencies were 78-90%. Pain compliance samples (n = 3,142) were de-identified and analyzed for zolpidem and ZCA. Zolpidem was detected greater than limit of quantification in 720 specimens (22.9%), while ZCA was detected in 1,579 specimens (50.3%). Only five specimens contained zolpidem alone. ZCA was observed without parent zolpidem in 864 specimens, thereby increasing population detection rates by 27.5%. Addition of a zolpidem metabolite to compliance determinations substantially improved detection for zolpidem intake and also should prove useful in clinical and forensic settings. PMID:25217539

  18. Prevalence and use of complementary health approaches among women with chronic pelvic pain in a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Maria T.; Abercrombie, Priscilla D.; Nakagawa, Sanae; Gregorich, Steven E.; Learman, Lee A.; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of and factors associated with use of complementary health approaches among women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Design We analyzed data from the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives (SOPHIA), a prospective cohort study of women seeking care for noncancerous pelvic problems with intact uteri at enrollment. Among a subset of 699 participants who reported having CPP, we analyzed the prevalence of complementary health approaches used and associated patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, health-related quality of life, attitudes and beliefs, and conventional health care practices. Results At baseline, slightly over one-half (51%) of women with CPP used at least one complementary health approach in the past year, including acupuncture (8%), special foods or diets (22%), herbs (27%), and vitamins and minerals (29%). During follow-up surveys conducted annually for four years, a substantial proportion of women (44.8%) used complementary health approaches at more than half of the assessments. Users of complementary health approaches were more likely to undergo a hysterectomy or oophorectomy or to use gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists or opioids during the study compared with non-users. Women with CPP who used complementary health approaches also had more optimal health-related quality of life measured by the Pelvic Problem Impact Questionnaire (31.6 vs. 25.6, p<0.001). Conclusion(s) Many women with CPP consistently use complementary health approaches. The substantial interest in and high prevalence of complementary health approaches used alongside conventional medical approaches highlights the need for better understanding of multimodal approaches to address the complex condition of CPP. PMID:25279935

  19. The role of ergonomic training interventions on decreasing neck and shoulders pain among workers of an Iranian automobile factory: a randomized trial study

    PubMed Central

    Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Kabir-Mokamelkhah, Elahe; Labbafinejad, Yasser; Bahrami-Ahmadi, Amir; Hosseini, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ergonomic training had been implemented for prevention or reduction of neck and shoulder complaints among workers. The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of ergonomic training intervention on decreasing the prevalence of neck and shoulder complaints among workers of an automobile factory. Methods: Within the present randomized clinical trial, the role of three ergonomic training methods on the prevalence of neck and shoulders pain among 503 workers of an automobile factory (Response rate: 94.23%) was assessed. The eligible workers were randomly allocated into the following three interventional (pamphlet, lecture, workshop) groups and one control group. The Nordic questionnaire was used to assess the prevalence of neck and shoulder complaints. We followed and assessed the prevalence of neck and shoulders complaints among the study employees before and one year after the intervention. We used chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests to compare the prevalence of neck and shoulder complaints between the trial and control groups. A two-tailed P-value less than or equal to 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The prevalence of neck and shoulders complaints among the study employees at the recent week (p= 0.002) and year (p= 0.02) had been significantly decreased in the study employees after participating in the study workshop. The prevalence of neck and shoulders complaints at the recent week and year did not significantly changed in the study employees after receiving the pamphlet and lecture as ergonomic trainings. Conclusion: Workshop as an ergonomic training method had an effective and powerful role on decreasing the prevalence of neck and shoulders complaints among workers. PMID:26034743

  20. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN AND ASSOCIATED DISABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Coggon, David

    2015-01-01

    Although much attention has been given to the physical determinants of common musculoskeletal complaints such as back and arm pain, research points to a stronger influence of psychological factors. Multiple studies have implicated poor mental health and somatisation (a tendency to worry about common somatic symptoms) in the incidence and chronicity of musculoskeletal pain and associated disability. Also important are adverse beliefs about the prognosis of such disorders, and about the role of physical activity in their development and persistence. Differences in societal beliefs may have contributed to major variation in the prevalence of disabling musculoskeletal pain that has been observed between countries and in the same countries over time. Psychosocial aspects of work have also been linked with musculoskeletal pain, although relative risks have generally been smaller. There is a need to take account of psychological factors in the clinical management of patients with back, neck and arm pain. PMID:26612236

  1. Prevalence of the Fibromyalgia Phenotype in Spine Pain Patients Presenting to a Tertiary Care Pain Clinic and the Potential Treatment Implications

    PubMed Central

    Brummett, Chad M.; Goesling, Jenna; Tsodikov, Alex; Meraj, Taha S.; Wasserman, Ronald A.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Hassett, Afton L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Injections for spinal pain have high failure rates, emphasizing the importance of patient selection. It is possible that detecting the presence of a fibromyalgia-like phenotype could aid in prediction, because in these individuals a peripheral injection would not address pain due to alterations in central neurotransmission. We hypothesized that spine pain patients meeting survey criteria for fibromyalgia would be phenotypically distinct from those who do not meet criteria. Methods 548 patients with a primary spine pain diagnosis were studied. All patients completed validated self-report questionnaires, including the Brief Pain Inventory, PainDETECT, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, measures of physical function, and the American College of Rheumatology survey criteria for fibromyalgia. Results 42% met survey criteria for fibromyalgia (FM+). When compared with criteria negative patients, FM+ patients were more likely to be younger, unemployed, receiving compensation, have greater pain intensity, pain interference and neuropathic pain descriptors, as well as higher levels of depression and anxiety, and lower level of physical function (p < 0.0001 for each comparison). Gender, neuropathic pain, pain interference, physical function, and anxiety were independently predictive of fibromyalgia status in a multivariate analysis (p < 0.01, all variables). ROC analysis showed the strength of association of 0.81 as measured by the cross-validated C-statistic. Conclusion Using the survey criteria for fibromyalgia, we demonstrated profound phenotypic differences in a spine pain population. Although centralized pain cannot be confirmed with a survey alone, the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia may help explain a portion of the variability of responses to spine interventions. PMID:24022710

  2. Spinal alignment, mobility of the hip and thoracic spine and prevalence of low back pain in young elite cross-country skiers

    PubMed Central

    Alricsson, Marie; Björklund, Glenn; Cronholm, Martin; Olsson, Oscar; Viklund, Peter; Svantesson, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between spinal alignment, mobility of the hips and the thoracic spine and low back pain in adolescent cross-country skiers. Cohort of 51 elite cross-country skiers from a cross-country skiing high school in Sweden participated in the study. Sagittal spinal alignment, active range of motion in flexion, extension and rotation of the thoracic spine as well as passive and active extension of the hips were measured. The participants also completed a questionnaire regarding training, competition, skiing technique and occurrence of low back pain. A simple linear regression was calculated to predict pain score based on thoraco-lumbar relation, with a significant (P<0.05) regression equation of y=−0.069x+2.280 (standard error of estimate, 0.034). Participants with greater lordosis than kyphosis were more likely to suffer from low back pain than subjects without this offset. Thoracic mobility and passive or active hip extension showed no correlation with low back pain. Sagittal spinal alignment seems to be related with low back pain among young elite cross-country skiers. This study shows that range of motion of the thoracic spine and hips do not have an effect on the prevalence of low back pain in this population. PMID:26933656

  3. Spinal alignment, mobility of the hip and thoracic spine and prevalence of low back pain in young elite cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Alricsson, Marie; Björklund, Glenn; Cronholm, Martin; Olsson, Oscar; Viklund, Peter; Svantesson, Ulla

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the association between spinal alignment, mobility of the hips and the thoracic spine and low back pain in adolescent cross-country skiers. Cohort of 51 elite cross-country skiers from a cross-country skiing high school in Sweden participated in the study. Sagittal spinal alignment, active range of motion in flexion, extension and rotation of the thoracic spine as well as passive and active extension of the hips were measured. The participants also completed a questionnaire regarding training, competition, skiing technique and occurrence of low back pain. A simple linear regression was calculated to predict pain score based on thoraco-lumbar relation, with a significant (P<0.05) regression equation of y=-0.069x+2.280 (standard error of estimate, 0.034). Participants with greater lordosis than kyphosis were more likely to suffer from low back pain than subjects without this offset. Thoracic mobility and passive or active hip extension showed no correlation with low back pain. Sagittal spinal alignment seems to be related with low back pain among young elite cross-country skiers. This study shows that range of motion of the thoracic spine and hips do not have an effect on the prevalence of low back pain in this population. PMID:26933656

  4. Exploring the prevalence of and factors associated with pain: a cross-sectional study of community-dwelling people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Barry, Heather E; Parsons, Carole; Passmore, A Peter; Hughes, Carmel M

    2016-05-01

    Few pain studies have made community-dwelling people with dementia (PWD) their focus. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of pain among this patient population and to explore medication use. Moreover, we sought to investigate patient and caregiver variables associated with the presence of pain. Community-dwelling PWD and their caregivers were recruited between May 2009 and July 2012 from outpatient memory clinics in Northern Ireland to take part in a face-to-face structured interview with a researcher. Patients' cognitive status and presence of depression were established. A full medication history was taken. Both patients and caregivers were asked to rate patients' pain, at the time of the interview and on an average day, using a 7-point verbal descriptor scale. From the 206 patients who were eligible to take part, 75 patient-caregiver dyads participated in the study (participation rate = 36.4%). The majority of patients (92.0%) had dementia classed as mild or moderate. Pain was commonly reported among the sample, with 57.3% of patients and 70.7% of caregivers reporting patient pain on an average day. Significant differences were found between patients' and caregivers' reports of pain. Two-fifths of patients (40.0%) were prescribed analgesia. Antipsychotic, hypnotic and anxiolytic drug use was low, whereas antidepressant drugs were prescribed more commonly. Presence of pain was unaffected by dementia severity; however, the use of prescribed analgesic medication was a significant predictor of the presence of pain in these patients, whether reported by the patient or their caregiver 'right now' or 'on an average day' (P < 0.001). Patient and caregiver recruitment was challenging, and remains a barrier to research in this area in the future. PMID:25708056

  5. Prevalence of nonspecific lumbar pain and associated factors among adolescents in Uruguaiana, state of Rio Grande do Sul☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Graup, Susane; de Araújo Bergmann, Mauren Lúcia; Bergmann, Gabriel Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the prevalence of nonspecific lumbar pain and associated factors among adolescents in Uruguaiana, state of Rio Grande do Sul. Methods This was a cross-sectional school-based study conducted among adolescents aged 10–17 years who were enrolled in the day shift of the municipal and state educational systems of Uruguaiana. This study evaluated 1455 adolescents. The data-gathering procedures involved two stages. Firstly, a questionnaire on sociodemographic indicators, behavioral patterns and habits of the daily routine and history of nonspecific lumbar pain was applied. Subsequently, height, body mass, flexibility and abdominal strength/resistance measurements were evaluated. To analyze the data, univariate, bivariate and multivariable methods were used and the significance level was taken to be 5% for all the tests. Results The prevalence of lumbar pain among the adolescents evaluated was 16.1%. Grouped according to sex, the prevalence among males was 10.5% and among females, 21.6%. The variables of sex, body mass index, abdominal strength/resistance and physical activity level presented statistically significant associations with nonspecific lumbar pain. In the adjusted analysis, sex (OR = 2.36; p < 0.001), age (OR = 1.14; p < 0.001) and body mass index (OR = 1.44; p = 0.029) maintained significance in the final model. Conclusions Female adolescents of older age and who presented overweight or obesity had higher chances of developing nonspecific lumbar pain. PMID:26229878

  6. Chronic Pain Without Clear Etiology in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Tracy; Thomas, Sarah; Stabile, Victoria; Han, Xue; Shotwell, Matthew; McQueen, K A Kelly

    2016-06-01

    Globally, 8 of the top 12 disabling conditions are related either to chronic pain or to the psychological conditions strongly associated with persistent pain. In this narrative review, we explore the demographic and psychosocial associations with chronic pain exclusively from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and compare them with current global data. One hundred nineteen publications in 28 LMICs were identified for review; associations with depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress, insomnia, disability, gender, age, rural/urban location, education level, income, and additional sites of pain were analyzed for each type of chronic pain without clear etiology. Of the 119 publications reviewed, pain was described in association with disability in 50 publications, female gender in 40 publications, older age in 34 publications, depression in 36 publications, anxiety in 19 publications, and multiple somatic complaints in 13 publications. Women, elderly patients, and workers, especially in low-income and low-education subgroups, were more likely to have pain in multiple sites, mood disorders, and disabilities. In high-income countries, multisite pain without etiology, female gender, and association with mood disturbance and disability may be suggestive of a central sensitization syndrome (CSS). Because each type of prevalent chronic pain without known etiology reviewed had similar associations in LMICs, strategies for assessment and treatment of chronic pain worldwide should consider the possibility of prevalent CSS. Recognition is especially critical in resource-poor areas, because treatment of CSS is vastly different than localized chronic pain. PMID:27195643

  7. Persistent of Neck/Shoulder Pain among Computer Office Workers with Specific Attention to Pain Expectation, Somatization Tendency, and Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Farideh; Raei, Mehdi; Amiri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neck and shoulder pains are the prevalent complaints among computer office workers. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of somatization tendency, expectation of pain, mental health and beliefs about causation of pain with persistence of neck/shoulder pains among computer office workers. Methods: This research is a kind of prospective cohort study with 1-year follow-up. It has done among all eligible computer office workers of Shahroud universities (n = 182) in 2008-2009 and 1-year later. Data were collected using the Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data through SPSS (P < 0.05). Results: At the baseline 100 (54.9%) of participants reported neck/shoulder pains and at follow-up 34.3% of them reported persistence pains. Significant relationships were found between persistence of neck/shoulder pains and negative expectation about pain in next 1-year P = 0.002, (odds ratio [OR] =8.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.1-32.9) and somatization tendency P = 0.01, (OR = 6.5, 95% CI: 1.6-27.4). Conclusions: Pain expectation and somatization tendency recognized as associated risk factors of persistent neck/shoulder pain among computer operators. This confirmed some other similar studies on work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Europe countries in recent years. PMID:25317301

  8. Prevalence, Distribution, and Significance of Incidental Thoracic Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum in Korean Patients with Back or Leg Pain : MR-Based Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Bong Ju; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Sungjun; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a relatively rare disease. Because of ambiguous clinical symptom, it is difficult for early diagnosis of OLF and subsequent treatment can be delayed or missed. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to comprehensively assess the prevalence and distribution of thoracic OLF by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and coexisting spinal disease in Korean patients with back pain or leg pain. Methods The sample included 2134 Korean patients who underwent MRI evaluation for back pain. The prevalence and distribution of thoracic OLF were assessed using lumbar MRI with whole spine sagittal images. Additionally, we examined the presence of coexisting lumbar and cervical diseases. The presence of thoracic OLF as well as clinical parameters such as age, sex, and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Results The prevalence of thoracic OLF in total patients was 16.9% (360/2134). The prevalence tended to increase with aging and was higher in women than in men. The lower thoracic segment of T10-11 was the most frequently affected segment. Of the 360 patients with OLF, 31.9% had coexisting herniated thoracic discs at the same level. Approximately 74% of the patients with OLF had coexisting lumbar and cervical disease. Nine (2.5%) of 360 OLF patients underwent surgery for thoracic lesion. Conclusion The prevalenceof thoracic OLF was relatively higher than those of previous reports. And coexisting lumbar and cervical disease were very frequent. Therefore, we should check coexisting spinal diseases and the exact diagnostic localization of ossification besides lumbar disease. PMID:26361526

  9. Pain-related and Psychological Symptoms in Adolescents With Musculoskeletal and Sleep Problems

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sue; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Two-thirds of adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain report a concurrent sleep problem. Both musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems can have deleterious effects on physiological and psychological well-being. We explored the prevalence of sleep problems and musculoskeletal pain, using data on 3568 adolescents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Children. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive battery of questionnaires was administered to derive clinical phenotypes of musculoskeletal pain. Adolescents with single symptoms were compared with those reporting both musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to compare groups on pain-related variables and psychological complaints. The association between sociodemographic variables and comorbid musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Over half the sample was female (n=2076, 58.2%) and the majority of European ancestry (n=3174, 97.7%). Only 5.5% (n=196) of participants were identified as having a pain condition, while 21.2% (n=749) reported a significant sleep problem, and 2.8% (n=99) reported comorbid musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems. Adolescents with comorbid problems experienced greater pain intensity and pain-related anxiety. Other psychological complaints were also higher in those who experienced concurrent problems, including depression, fatigue, concentration, and overall severity of psychological symptoms. Discussion: Comorbid sleep and pain problems were associated with a higher incidence of pain-related and psychological symptoms. Sleep problems may therefore be an important modifiable risk factor for alleviating distress in adolescents with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:25974623

  10. Scrotal pain: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Gordhan, Chirag G

    2015-01-01

    Scrotal pain is a common complaint in a urological practice. Its diagnosis can prove challenging in both acute and chronic forms and requires a thorough and complete history and physical examination. This article discusses the evaluation and management of several entities of scrotal pain, including testicular torsion, epididymitis, postvasectomy pain, varicocele, and chronic orchialgia. PMID:25598931

  11. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    An, Howard S; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo; Suh, Seung Woo; Chen, Ding; Jeon, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain (NP) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to subgroup analysis of symptoms. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled subjects with LSS (n=86) who were scheduled to undergo spinal surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to a chief complaint of radicular pain or neurogenic claudication. We measured patient's pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Leads Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS). According to LANSS value, the prevalence of NP component pain in patients with LSS was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to find the relationship between LANSS scores and the other scores. Results From our sample of 86 patients, 31 (36.0%) had a NP component, with 24 (63.4%) in the radicular pain group having NP. However, only seven patients (15.6%) in the neurogenic claudication group had NP. The LANSS pain score was not significantly correlated with VAS scores for back pain, but did correlate with VAS scores for leg pain (R=0.73, p<0.001) and with ODI back pain scores (R=0.54, p<0.01). Conclusion One-third of the patients with LSS had a NP component. The presence of radicular pain correlated strongly with NP. The severity of leg pain and ODI score were also closely related to a NP component. This data may prove useful to understanding the pain characteristics of LSS and in better designing clinical trials for NP treatment in patients with LSS. PMID:26069129

  12. Prevalence of hyperactive digastric muscles during swallowing as measured by electromyography in patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, L B; Last, F C; Salerno, V M

    1997-01-01

    One purpose of this clinical study is to establish a relationship between the hyper activity of the digastric muscles and predisposition of an individual to MPDS (myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome). If a population predisposed to MPD could be identified by an early diagnosis, intervention and treatment could eliminate potential pain in adulthood. Secondly, can the employment of electromyography to aid in the diagnosis of patients with MPD be helpful in establishing a program of prevention and treatment? Thirty-one patients, male and female, were randomly selected from among those routinely diagnosed as having myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome by the dental staff at the Long Island Center for Craniofacial Pain. Eighteen patients who did not experience any symptoms of facial pain comprised the control group in the study. This study demonstrated that the average trace readings which indicate the activity of the digastric muscles, as measured by the electromyogram from patients experiencing facial pain were significantly higher than those from patients without pain symptoms. In every instance, the correlation between facial pain and abnormal swallow patterns which are a cause of hyperactivity of the digastrics was confirmed. PMID:9610292

  13. Prevalence and correlates of pain interference in older adults: why treating the whole body and mind is necessary.

    PubMed

    Przekop, Peter; Haviland, Mark G; Oda, Keiji; Morton, Kelly R

    2015-04-01

    Our study presents pain-related interference rates in a sample of community-dwelling, older adults and determines factors associated with these restrictions. Participants were 9506 respondents to the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (66.8% female and 33.2% male; average age = 62.3 years). In this sample, 48.2% reported no pain-related interference, whereas 37.7% reported moderate and 14.1% reported severe interference. As hypothesized, older age, female gender, lower education, financial strain, traumatic experiences, worse health, increased body mass index, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms all were associated with higher pain interference ratings (ordered logistic regression/three-level pain criterion; odds ratios p < 0.05). Our findings are similar to those from younger adults, and they suggest enduring effects of trauma on health and reveal the complexity of chronic pain in community-dwelling, older adults. PMID:25892375

  14. Are subjective health complaints a result of modern civilization?

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Hege R; Hellesnes, Brit; Staff, Peer; Ursin, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Subjective health complaints without or with minimal somatic findings (pain, fatigue) are common and frequent reasons for encounter with the general practitioner and for long-term sickness leave and disability. The complaints are often attributed to the stressors of modern life. Is this true? We interviewed 120 Aborigine Mangyans (native population, M age = 33.5 years, 72.5% women) living under primitive conditions in the jungle of Mindoro, an island in the Philippines, and 101 persons living in a small coastal town on the same island (coastal population, M age = 33.8 years, 60.4% women). Both groups had more musculoskeletal complaints, fatigue, mood changes, and gastrointestinal complaints than a representative sample from the Norwegian population (N = 1,243). Our common subjective health complaints, therefore, are not specific for industrialized societies. PMID:15456682

  15. Relationship between complaints presented by emergency patients and the final outcome 1

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Helisamara Mota; Souza, Kesia Meiriele; Lima, Patrcia de Oliveira; Martins, Jos Carlos Amado; Chianca, Tnia Couto Machado

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to relate complaints presented by emergency room patients, classified using the Manchester Triage System, with the final outcome (discharge/death/transfer). Methods: prospective cohort study, involving 509 patients who were admitted to the emergency room and remained there for more than 24 hours after admission, being monitored to the final outcome. Data were analyzed with a statistical program using descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: the mean age of the patients was 59.1 years and 59.3% were male. The main complaints were unwell adult (130 - 22.5%), shortness of breath in adults (81 - 14.0%), abdominal pain in adults (58 - 10.0%) and behaving strangely (34 - 5.9%), with 87% of the patients being discharged. More deaths were found in the patients classified in the severe colors, with 42.8% classified as red, 17.0% as orange and 8.9% as yellow. Among the patients classified as green, 9.6% died. Conclusion: in the various colors of the Manchester Triage System, death prevailed in patients that presented the complaints of unwell adult, shortness of breath, head injury, major trauma, diarrhea and vomiting. The higher the clinical priority the greater the prevalence of death. PMID:26444159

  16. Complaints against Nursing Homes: Comparing Two Sources of Complaint Information and Predictors of Complaints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Sause, Wendy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Two consumer-derived measures of nursing home quality that have been underutilized by researchers are consumer complaints to the state certification agency between inspections and complaints to the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. This article describes these complaints, considers facility-level predictors of complaints, and

  17. Complaints against Nursing Homes: Comparing Two Sources of Complaint Information and Predictors of Complaints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Sause, Wendy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Two consumer-derived measures of nursing home quality that have been underutilized by researchers are consumer complaints to the state certification agency between inspections and complaints to the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. This article describes these complaints, considers facility-level predictors of complaints, and…

  18. Epidemiology of Back Pain in Children and Youth Aged 10–19 from the Area of the Southeast of Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kędra, Agnieszka; Czaprowski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work was to define the prevalence of back pain in children and youth aged 10–19 from the southeast of Poland. Material and Methods. The cross-sectional study included 1089 students (547 girls and 542 boys) aged 10–19. The prevalence of back pain, its intensity, location, and situations in which it occurred were assessed with a questionnaire. Results. Among 1089 respondents, 830 (76.2%) admitted that they had experienced back pain at various frequencies within the year preceding the study. Back pain was located mainly in the lumbar segment (74.8%). Mild pains were dominant, which was declared by 44.7% of the respondents. Girls experienced back pain significantly more frequently than boys (52.2% versus 47.8%, P < 0.05). Conclusions. The research revealed that back pain is a common phenomenon. The prevalence of back pain in children and youth living in southeast Poland is similar to the frequency of occurrence of such complaints occurring in peers in other countries. It seems significant to monitor the remaining regions of Poland in order to define the scale of the problem and to look for the risk factors of back pain in children and youth to undertake efficient prophylactic actions. PMID:23984375

  19. High Prevalence of Falls, Fear of Falling, and Impaired Balance among Older Adults with Pain in the U.S.: Findings from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Lamb, Sarah E.; Missikpode, Celestin; Wallace, Robert B.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Turk, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives The role of chronic pain in the occurrence of falls and as a target for falls prevention has received limited attention. We sought to determine the prevalence of clinically relevant falls-related outcomes according to pain status in the older population of the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study, a sample of Medicare enrollees aged ≥65 years (response rate= 71.0%). Setting In-person assessments were conducted in the home or residential care facility of the sampled study participant. Participants 7,601 participants representing 35.3 million Medicare beneficiaries. Measurements Participants were asked whether they had been “bothered by pain” and the location of pain as well as questions about balance/coordination, fear of falls, and falls. Results Bothersome pain was reported by 52.9% of the population. Comparing participants with pain to those without pain, the prevalence of recurrent falls (≥2 falls) in the past year was 19.5% and 7.4%, respectively [age- and sex-adjusted prevalence ratio (PR)=2.63; 95% confidence interval (CI):2.28-3.05]. For fear of falls that limits activity, prevalence was 18.0% and 4.4% in those with and without pain, respectively (adjusted PR=3.98; 95% CI:3.24-4.87). Prevalence of balance and falls outcomes increased with number of pain sites. For example, prevalence of problems with balance/coordination that limited activity among participants with 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥4 sites of pain was 6.6%, 11.6%, 17.7%, 25.0%, and 41.4%, respectively (P<0.001 for trend). Associations were robust to adjustment for several potential confounders, including cognitive and physical performance. Conclusion Falls-related outcomes were substantially more common among older adults with pain than in those without pain. Accordingly, pain management strategies should be developed and evaluated for falls prevention. PMID:25283473

  20. Correlates of pain symptoms among Iraq and Afghanistan military personnel following combat-related blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelcey J; Hawn, Sage E; Amstadter, Ananda B; Cifu, David X; Walker, William C

    2014-01-01

    Pain complaints are highly prevalent among military servicemembers and Veterans of the recent combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The high comorbidity of pain with conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) underscores the importance of a greater understanding of factors associated with complex polytraumatic injuries among military personnel. The present study aimed to identify correlates of current pain among 201 U.S. military personnel who reported at least one blast experience during combat deployment (age [mean +/– standard deviation]: 27.20 +/– 7.58 yr). Theoretically derived subsets of variables were analyzed in successive hierarchical regression models to determine correlates of self-reported pain symptoms. Preliminary models evaluated demographic features, medical and injury characteristics (e.g., TBI classification), psychosocial history (e.g., trauma exposure), and psychiatric variables. A final model was then derived, in which older age, possible or probable mild TBI, depression symptoms, and PTSD re-experiencing symptoms emerged as significant correlates of pain. The findings further the understanding of polytrauma symptoms among military personnel by identifying specific patient characteristics and comorbidity patterns related to pain complaints. Increased awareness of demographic, psychiatric, or medical factors implicated in pain will enhance comprehensive clinical assessment and intervention efforts. PMID:25789376

  1. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain Pain Assessment Pain Treatments Integrative Pain Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References May 31, 2016 Pain Assessment Effective pain management begins with a comprehensive assessment. This assessment allows ...

  2. Sleep complaints in the Brazilian population: Impact of socioeconomic factors

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Camila; Bittencourt, Lia; Garbuio, Silverio; Andersen, Monica Levy; Tufik, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    National surveys are relevant for the study of sleep epidemiology since they can provide specific data about sleep in large dimension with important implications for the health system. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sleep complaints among the Brazilian population using a randomized cluster sample according to region and socioeconomic class. For this, a 3-stage sampling technique was used to randomly select Brazilian subjects of both genders older than 16 years. A total of 2017 subjects, from 132 different cities, were selected to estimate prevalence in the Brazilian population with a sampling error of ±2%. Questions about sleep complaints were administered face-to-face by Instituto Datafolha interviewers on April 10 and 16, 2012. Data were expanded using a weighted variable. The results showed that 76% of the study population suffers from at least 1 sleep complaint, indicating that approximately 108 million Brazilians may be affected by sleep disorders. On average, each subject had 1.9 sleep problems with the most common complaints being light and insufficient sleep, snoring, moving a lot during sleep, and insomnia, which usually occurred more than 3 times per week. Low income was associated with higher number of sleep complaints only in Northeast and Southeast regions. In conclusion, this study showed a high prevalence of sleep complaints in a sample of the Brazilian population, suggesting that sleep disorders may be markedly frequent in the Brazilian population with a possible correlation with the socioeconomic situation of the interviewed subjects. PMID:26483918

  3. Prevalence of the different Axis I clinical subtypes in a sample of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders in the Andalusian Healthcare Service

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Torronteras, Alejandro; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background The main objective of this paper is to analyze the prevalence of each of the different clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a sample of patients with this pathology. In addition, a second objective was to analyze their distribution according to gender. Material and Methods To this end, the results of 1603 patients who went to the Unit of Temporomandibular Disorders in the Córdoba Healthcare District because they suffered from this pathology were analyzed. In order to diagnose them, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were applied, analyzing the different Axis I subtypes (myopathy, discopathy and arthropathy) and obtaining the combined Axis I for each patient and the relation of all these variables according to gender. The null-hypothesis test confirmed the lack of connection between the gender variable and the different subtypes in the clinical analysis, and between the former and the combined Axis I of the RDC/TMD. Results The prevalence was high for the muscle disorders subtype in general, showing an 88.7% prevalence, while the presence of discopathies or arthropathies was much lower. Among discopathies, the most frequent ones were disc displacements with reduction, with 39.7% and 42.8% for the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJ), respectively, while the prevalence of arthropathies was 26.3% for the right TMJ and 32.9% for the left TMJ. The bivariate analysis on the connection with gender reveals a p≥ 0.05 value for the muscle and arthralgia subtypes. Conclusions The patients seen at the TMD Unit where mostly middle-aged women whose main clinical axis subtype was the muscle disorder subtype. For their part, both discopathies and arthropathies, although present, are much less prevalent. Key words:RDCTMD, axis I, orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, gender. PMID:26615508

  4. A Retrospective Study of Chronic Post-Surgical Pain following Thoracic Surgery: Prevalence, Risk Factors, Incidence of Neuropathic Component, and Impact on Qualify of Life

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhiyou; Li, Huiling; Zhang, Chong; Qian, Xiang; Feng, Zhiying; Zhu, Shengmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgeries including thoracotomy and VATS are some of the highest risk procedures that often lead to CPSP, with or without a neuropathic component. This retrospective study aims to determine retrospectively the prevalence of CPSP following thoracic surgery, its predicting risk factors, the incidence of neuropathic component, and its impact on quality of life. Methods Patients who underwent thoracic surgeries including thoracotomy and VATS between 01/2010 and 12/2011 at the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University were first contacted and screened for CPSP following thoracic surgery via phone interview. Patients who developed CPSP were then mailed with a battery of questionnaires, including a questionnaire referenced to Maguire's research, a validated Chinese version of the ID pain questionnaire, and a SF-36 Health Survey. Logistic regression analyses were subsequently performed to identify risk factors for CPSP following thoracic surgery and its neuropathic component. Results The point prevalence of CPSP following thoracic surgery was 24.9% (320/1284 patients), and the point prevalence of neuropathic component of CPSP was 32.5% (86/265 patients). CPSP following thoracic surgery did not improve significantly with time. Multiple predictive factors were identified for CPSP following thoracic surgery, including age<60 years old, female gender, prolonged duration of post-operative chest tube drainage (≥4 days), options of post-operative pain management, and pre-existing hypertension. Furthermore, patients who experienced CPSP following thoracic surgery were found to have significantly decreased physical function and worse quality of life, especially those with neuropathic component. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that nearly 1 out of 4 patients underwent thoracic surgery might develop CPSP, and one third of them accompanied with a neuropathic component. Early prevention as well as aggressive treatment is important for patients with CPSP following thoracic surgery to achieve a high quality of life. PMID:24587187

  5. [Subjective memory complaints (SMC)].

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Toji; Iwata, Atushi

    2016-03-01

    Subjective memory complaints without objective cognitive impairments are common in elderly people. Recent evidence indicates subjective memory complaints is not merely a sign of a depressive state or an aging phenomenon, but an important risk factor for proceeding to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in the future. Even when cognitively intact through the life, people with SMC tend to have more Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain, which recently been defined as preclinical AD. Though not having the same clinical significance compared to MCI, we should keep in mind that elderly people with SMC are at risk for future cognitive decline and try to find out what specific biological backgrounds or clinical characters increase this cognitive risk. PMID:27025085

  6. Effects of bariatric surgery for knee complaints in (morbidly) obese adult patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Groen, V A; van de Graaf, V A; Scholtes, V A B; Sprague, S; van Wagensveld, B A; Poolman, R W

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis, and over the past 30 years the prevalence of obesity has more than doubled. In an advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis is treated with total knee arthroplasty, and the demand for primary total knee arthroplasties is expected to grow exponentially. However, total knee arthroplasty in obese patients is associated with more complications, longer hospital stay and higher costs. We aimed to determine the effects of bariatric surgery on knee complaints in (morbidly) obese (body mass index >30?kg?m(-2) ) adult patients. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, TRIP, BIOSIS-Previews and reference lists of retrieved publications were systematically searched from earliest available up to 20 April?2014 for any English, German, French and Dutch studies. There was no restriction on study design. We included studies on the effect of surgically induced weight reduction on knee complaints in (morbidly) obese adult patients, with a minimal follow-up of 3 months. Studies on the effects of lipectomy or liposuction and studies in which patients had already received a total knee arthroplasty were excluded. Thirteen studies were included in this systematic review with a total of 3,837 patients. Although different assessment tools were used, an overall significant improvement in knee pain was seen in 73% out of the used assessments. All studies measuring intensity of knee pain, knee physical function and knee stiffness showed a significant improvement after bariatric surgery. The quality of evidence was very low or too low for most of the included studies and moderate for one study. Bariatric surgery with subsequent marked weight loss is likely to improve knee pain, physical function and stiffness in (morbidly) obese adult patients. However, with the current available evidence, there is need for high-quality studies. PMID:25487972

  7. Salivary and microbial conditions in patients with orofacial discomfort complaints.

    PubMed

    Yontchev, E; Emilson, C G

    1986-08-01

    Secretion rate, pH, and buffer capacity of paraffin-stimulated saliva and the prevalence of salivary Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli were examined in 98 consecutive patients (22 men, 76 women) referred for orofacial discomfort complaints related to 'oral galvanism'. The results of this investigation were compared with those of a group of 100 patients without symptoms and complaints. The patients with orofacial symptoms and complaints had significantly fewer teeth with amalgam fillings than patients without, despite equal mean number of teeth in the two groups. Most patients had normal secretion rate and pH of saliva but somewhat low values of salivary buffer capacity. Determination of saliva conductivity showed values within a normal reference interval but lower than those from a group of subjects without orofacial symptoms and complaints. The salivary levels of cariogenic bacteria were low. PMID:3465193

  8. [Labor of freight-container tractor drivers and low-back pain. Characteristics of the low-back pain through clinical findings].

    PubMed

    Nakata, M

    1987-07-01

    In order to clarify the characteristics of the low-back pain which is prevalent among freight-container tractor drivers, a medical examination, composed of orthopedic tests and questions about health conditions, was carried out on 231 tractor drivers. Prevailing complaints were: dullness or stiffness of the shoulder (71%); dullness of the neck (69%); dullness of the low back (62%); low-back pain (42%); dullness of the lower limbs (39%) and dullness of the back (36%). The rates of complaints of dullness or pain of the neck, shoulder, upper limbs, back or lower limbs, and disturbance of daily activity were associated with the grade of low-back pain evaluated from the subjective symptoms. Orthopedic examination revealed fatigue signs of muscles i.e. tenderness of the body trunk and limbs, tenderness or percussion pain on the spinous processes, and poor results in some tests on muscle strength. These findings were seen more frequently in the group with subjective symptoms, but even among the group without symptoms, they were evident to some degree. These findings were considered to originate from the fact that the freight-container tractors had many ergonomic problems and the daily driving hours of many drivers were estimated to exceed the allowable vibration exposure time of the ISO. PMID:2960839

  9. Determinants of the clinical course of musculoskeletal complaints in general practice: design of a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    van der Waal, Johanna M; Bot, Sandra DM; Terwee, Caroline B; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Bouter, Lex M; Dekker, Joost

    2003-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal complaints are frequent and have large consequences for public health. Information about the prognosis after presentation in general practice is far from complete. Knowledge about determinants of the clinical course of musculoskeletal complaints is essential for management decisions and to inform patients about their prognosis. The purpose of this study is to provide information about the prognosis of musculoskeletal complaints other than low back pain by studying the course of these complaints in general practice and to identify determinants of this course. Methods Patients of 18 years and older, who present in general practice with a new episode of a musculoskeletal complaint of the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, arm, hip, knee, ankle or foot, are recruited by their general practitioner (GP). Participants will receive complaint-specific questionnaires by mail at baseline and after 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. The following putative determinants of the course of the complaints will be investigated: sociodemographic characteristics, characteristics of the complaint, psychosocial job characteristics, physical workload, physical activity during leisure time, pain coping, mood, kinesiophobia, social support, optimism. The primary outcomes are perceived recovery, pain, functional status, sick leave and overall quality of life. PMID:12600275

  10. Use of analgesics for exercise-associated pain: prevalence and predictors of use in recreationally trained college-aged students.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Christi B; Bentley, John P; Hallam, Jeffrey S; Woodyard, Catherine D; Waddell, Dwight E

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the use of the analgesics for the relief of exercise-associated pain (EAP) and to examine personal and/or exercise characteristics that might potentially predict such use in recreationally trained college-aged individuals. Recreationally trained college-aged students (N = 263) were invited to complete a self-administered 16-item questionnaire concerning personal exercise habits and analgesic use for EAP. The primary dependent variable was analgesic use for EAP, and additional items sought to characterize patterns and behaviors related to the use. Descriptive statistics and frequencies were calculated for all items, and logistic regression was used to evaluate the ability of 4 variables to predict analgesic use for EAP: gender, length of time performing regular exercise, weekly frequency of aerobic exercise, and weekly frequency of resistance exercise. Approximately 36% of respondents reported analgesic use for EAP, with data indicating acute use for what is generally acute pain. With predictors considered individually, gender was a significant predictor, with female respondents being more likely to use analgesics for EAP (p = 0.04). With all predictors considered concurrently, the model did not significantly contribute to the prediction of use in this sample. Potential for misuse was highlighted by a large percentage of users who described themselves as very unlikely to follow label directions and more likely to take a dose exceeding recommendations. In light of research that reports a potential detriment to muscular regeneration when analgesics are consumed with exercise, it is important to be cognizant of the use of these drugs in individuals striving to improve muscular fitness. Coaches and trainers should educate athletes about the associated risks and caution those who may unnecessarily take analgesics. PMID:23542880

  11. Changes in functional connectivity of pain modulatory systems in women with primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shyh-Yuh; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Tu, Cheng-Hao; Li, Wei-Chi; Low, Intan; Chuang, Chih-Ying; Chen, Li-Fen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Menstrual pain is the most prevalent gynecological complaint, and is usually without organic cause (termed primary dysmenorrhea, PDM). The high comorbidity in the later life of PDM with many functional pain disorders (associated with central dysfunction of pain inhibition, eg, fibromyalgia) suggests possible maladaptive functionality of pain modulatory systems already occurred in young PDM women, making them vulnerable to functional pain disorders. Periaqueductal gray (PAG) matter functions as a critical hub in the neuraxis of pain modulatory systems; therefore, we investigated the functional connectivity of PAG in PDM. Forty-six PDM subjects and 49 controls received resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging during menstruation and periovulatory phases. The PAG of PDM subjects exhibited adaptive/reactive hyperconnectivity with the sensorimotor cortex during painful menstruation, whereas it exhibited maladaptive hypoconnectivity with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and default mode network (involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, or posterior parietal cortex) during menstruation or periovulatory phase. We propose that the maladaptive descending pain modulatory systems in PDM may underpin the central susceptibility to subsequent development of various functional disorders later in life. This hypothesis is corroborated by the growing body of evidence that hypoconnectivity between PAG and default mode network is a coterminal to many functional pain disorders. PMID:26307856

  12. Prevalence of Neck Pain and Associated Factors with Personal Characteristics, Physical Workloads and Psychosocial among Male Rubber Workers in FELDA Settlement Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Chow Li; Adon, Mohd Yusoff Bin; Rahman, Anita Binti Abd; Hassan, Syed Tajuddin Syed; Ismail, Kamal Bin

    2012-01-01

    Rubber tapping processes posed potential risk of various health problems among rubber workers. It ranges from simple musculoskeletal aches to more serious and complicated structural damage to bone, muscles, tendons and nerves of musculoskeletal system. These health problems might be linked directly to the arduous demands of farm labor. Objectives: A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of neck pain (NP) and musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) and its association with personal characteristics, physical workloads and psychosocial factors among rubber workers. Methods: Stratified random sampling method was adopted and a total of 419 rubber workers in FELDA’s scheme Malaysia participated in this study. Data was collected through face to face interview using modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire (SNQ) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Results: The results revealed the prevalence of NP was 59.9% and weak correlation with age (ρ= -0.184, p= 0.001) and a positive weak correlation with working hours per day (ρ= 0.099, p= 0.043) significantly. All physical workloads (neck flexion or rotation, awkward postures, repetitive motion and static postures) had significant weak to moderate positive correlation with NP (p<0.05). Job insecurity was found to have weak and positive correlation with NP (p<0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed risk factors for NP were decreased with age (OR= 3.92, 95% CI 1.61 – 9.58, p=0.003), increase in neck flexion or rotation (OR= 9.52, 95% CI 5.55 – 16.32, p= 0.001), awkward postures (OR=2.23, 95% CI 1.29 – 3.86, p= 0.004) and static postures (OR= 1.86, 95% CI 1.10 – 3.14, p= 0.021). Conclusion: This study showed that high prevalence of NP was associated with neck flexion or rotation, awkward and static postures. PMID:22980103

  13. Work–Family Conflict, Task Interruptions, and Influence at Work Predict Musculoskeletal Pain in Operating Room Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Nützi, Marina; Koch, Patricia; Baur, Heiner; Elfering, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints in Swiss operating room (OR) nurses, and to investigate how work–family conflict, work interruptions, and influence at work are related to lumbar and cervical back pain. Methods Participants in this correlational questionnaire study included 116 OR nurses from eight different hospitals in Switzerland. Results We found that 66% of the OR staff suffered from musculoskeletal problems. The most prevalent musculoskeletal complaints were lumbar (52.7%) and cervical pain (38.4%). Furthermore, 20.5% reported pain in the mid spine region, 20.5% in the knees and legs, and 9.8% in the hands and feet. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that work–family conflict (p < 0.05) and interruptions (p < 0.05) significantly predicted lumbar and cervical pain in OR nurses, while influence at work (p < 0.05) only predicted lumbar pain. Conclusion These results suggest that reducing the work–family conflict and interruptions at work, as well as offering opportunities to influence one's workplace, help to promote OR nurses' health. PMID:26929846

  14. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers. PMID:10230572

  15. The application of a classification-tree model for predicting low back pain prevalence among hospital staff.

    PubMed

    Mendelek, Fady; Caby, Isabelle; Pelayo, Patrick; Kheir, Rania Bou

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a widespread musculoskeletal condition that frequently occurs in the working-age population (including hospital staff). This study proposes a classification-tree model to predict LBP risk levels in Sacré-Cœur Hospital, Lebanon (as a case study-236 chosen staffs) using various predictor individual and occupational factors. The developed tree model explained 80% of variance in LBP risk levels using standing hours/day (90% in relative importance), job status/sitting hours per day (80% each), body mass index (71%), working days/week (63%), domestic activity hours/week (36%), weight (35%), job dissatisfaction/sitting on ergonomic chairs (30% each), height (28%), gender (27%), sufficient break time (26%), using handling techniques/age (25% each), job stress (24%), marital status/wearing orthopedic insoles/extra professional activity (22% each), practicing prevention measures (20%), children care hours/week (16%), and type of sport activity/sports hours per week, car sitting, and fear of changing work due to LBP (15% each). The overall accuracy of this predictive tree once compared with actual subjects was estimated to be 77%. The proposed tree model can be used by expert physicians in their decision-making for LBP diagnosis among hospital staff. PMID:23566320

  16. Depression, Health, and Somatic Complaints in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahurin, Kathleen A.; Gatz, Margaret

    Although depression is considered to be common in the elderly, reliable rates of prevalence are lacking. Studies have shown that age differences on measures of depressive symptomatology can be attributed to higher levels of somatic complaints. In order to examine whether the association between somatic and depressive symptoms varies as a function…

  17. [Pathophysiology of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele

    2011-08-01

    Abdominal pain can be induced by stimulation of visceral nociceptors. Activation of nociceptors usually requires previous sensitization by pathological events, such as inflammation, ischemia or acidosis. Although abdominal pain can obviously be caused by pathology of a visceral structure, clinicians frequently observe that such a pathology explains only part of the pain complaints. Occasionally, there is lack of objective signs of visceral lesions. There is clear evidence that pain states are associated with profound changes of the central processing of the sensory input. The main consequences of such alterations for patients are twofold: 1) a central sensitization, i.e. an increased excitability of the central nervous system; 2) an alteration of the endogenous pain modulation, which under normal conditions inhibits the processing of nociceptive signals in the central nervous system. Both phenomena lead to a spread of pain to other body regions and an amplification of the pain perception. The interactions between visceral pathology and alterations of the central pain processes represent an at least partial explanation for the discrepancy between objective signs of peripheral lesions and severity of the symptoms. Today, both central hypersensitivity and alteration in endogenous pain modulation can be measured in clinical practice. This information can be used to provide the patients with an explanatory model for their pain. Furthermore, first data suggest that alterations in central pain processing may represent negative prognostic factors. A better understanding of the individual pathophysiology may allow in the future the development of individual therapeutic strategies. PMID:21796591

  18. Is Chronic Low Back Pain Associated with the Prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease when Genetic Susceptibility Is Considered? A Co-Twin Control Study of Spanish Twins

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Matt; Ordoñana, Juan R.; Hartvigsen, Jan; Ferreira, Manuela L.; Refshauge, Kathryn M.; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F.; Pinheiro, Marina B.; Simpson, Stephen J.; Hopper, John L.; Ferreira, Paulo H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the chronic low back pain and coronary heart disease relationship, after adjusting for relevant confounders, including genetics. Methods In a cross-sectional design, 2148 twins were recruited from the Murcia Twin Registry, Spain. The exposure was chronic LBP and the outcomes were myocardial infarction and other coronary heart diseases—lifetime and in the last 2 years–based on standardized health-related questionnaires. First, logistic regression analysis investigated associations of the total sample followed by a matched co-twin control analyses, with all complete twin pairs discordant for chronic LBP utilised, separated for zygosity—dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) pairs, which adjusted for shared familial factors, including genetics. Results Chronic LBP pain is associated with lifetime myocardial infarction [odds ratio (OR) = 2.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.35–5.36], other coronary heart diseases over a lifetime (OR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.69–3.93) and in the last two years (OR = 2.19, 95% CI: 1.33–3.60), while there was a borderline association with myocardial infarction in the last 2 years (OR = 2.64, 95% CI: 0.98–7.12). Although the magnitude of the association remained or increased in the co-twin control analyses, none reached statistical significance. Conclusion Chronic LBP is associated with a higher prevalence of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease. It is possible that this association remains even when controlling for genetics and early shared environment, although this should be investigated with larger samples of twins discordant for LBP. PMID:27171210

  19. Complaints against an EMS system.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Christopher B; Pons, Peter T; Pi, Randy

    2003-11-01

    Complaints against Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies represent a concerning and potentially time-consuming problem for all involved in the delivery of prehospital emergency medical care. The objective of this study was to identify the source of complaints against an EMS system to help focus quality and performance improvement and customer service efforts. We conducted a retrospective review of complaints filed against a busy urban EMS agency over a 6-year period. All complaints were included, totaled by season and by year, and categorized by originator and nature of the complaint. A total of 286 complaints were registered during the 6-year period, with an average of 48 per year and 9.3 per 10,000 responses. The most common originators of complaints were patients (53%) followed by medical personnel (19%) and family members or friends (12%). Rude behavior accounted for 23% of the complaints registered, followed by technical skills (20%), transport problems (18%), and loss of belongings (13%). The identification of areas of dissatisfaction will allow focused quality and performance improvement programs directed at customer service and risk management. PMID:14654181

  20. Use of Airport Noise Complaint Files to Improve Understanding of Community Response to Aircraft Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Howe, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of using complaint information archived by modem airport monitoring systems to conduct quantitative analyses of the causes of aircraft noise complaints and their relationship to noise- induced annoyance. It was found that all computer-based airport monitoring systems provide at least rudimentary tools for performing data base searches by complainant name, address, date, time of day, and types of aircraft and complaints. Analyses of such information can provide useful information about longstanding concerns, such as the extent to which complaint rates are driven by objectively measurable aspects of aircraft operations; the degree to which changes in complaint rates can be predicted prior to implementation of noise mitigation measures; and the degree to which aircraft complaint information can be used to simplify and otherwise improve prediction of the prevalence of noise-induced annoyance in communities.

  1. 48 CFR 422.1308 - Complaint procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Vietnam Era, and Other Eligible Veterans 422.1308 Complaint procedures. The contracting officer shall forward complaints received about the administration of the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment...

  2. Cross-cultural conceptions of pain and pain control

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Pain is a ubiquitous feature of the human experience. This paper presents an anthropology of pain. Anthropology is defined as the cross-cultural and comparative study of human behavior. Pain can be acute and episodic, and pain can be constant and uninterrupted. Acute pain, lasting for minutes or hours, is reported at some time by virtually all adults and by most juveniles and is indicated by the cries and facial expressions of toddlers and infants. This universality of pain as a part of the human condition has been established by the research of many biological, physical, and social scientists. Ethnographers, physicians, and public health experts describe pain complaints for a variety of modern, industrial societies and traditional, undeveloped societies. Pain is the most frequent complaint brought to the offices of physicians in North America, and it is a focus of attention in the literate medical traditions of China, India, and Islamic cultures. Hence, the study of pain and the cultural perceptions of pain are prominent foci of anthropologists. Given that the goal of medicine is to offer medical care to all people who seek it, the practice of modern medicine may be assisted by an exploration of the possibility of cultural differences in medical beliefs and practices in the multiethnic and racially diverse patient populations today. PMID:16333427

  3. Overtreating chronic back pain: time to back off?

    PubMed

    Deyo, Richard A; Mirza, Sohail K; Turner, Judith A; Martin, Brook I

    2009-01-01

    Chronic back pain is among the most common patient complaints. Its prevalence and impact have spawned a rapidly expanding range of tests and treatments. Some of these have become widely used for indications that are not well validated, leading to uncertainty about efficacy and safety, increasing complication rates, and marketing abuses. Recent studies document a 629% increase in Medicare expenditures for epidural steroid injections; a 423% increase in expenditures for opioids for back pain; a 307% increase in the number of lumbar magnetic resonance images among Medicare beneficiaries; and a 220% increase in spinal fusion surgery rates. The limited studies available suggest that these increases have not been accompanied by population-level improvements in patient outcomes or disability rates. We suggest a need for a better understanding of the basic science of pain mechanisms, more rigorous and independent trials of many treatments, a stronger regulatory stance toward approval and post-marketing surveillance of new drugs and devices for chronic pain, and a chronic disease model for managing chronic back pain. PMID:19124635

  4. Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, and Vitamin D: Major Determinants of Chronic Pain in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Haggiag, Isabelle; Os, Pnina; Bernheim, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Pain is a frequent complaint of hemodialysis (HD) patients, yet information regarding its causes and frequency is relatively scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and possible causes of chronic pain in patients who are on long-term HD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We prospectively enrolled 100 patients who were undergoing maintenance HD for at least 3 mo. Pain was evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory. Data collected on each participant included age, gender, ethnic origin, body mass index, smoking habits, time on dialysis, type of blood access, comorbidities, and biochemical and hematologic parameters. Results: The average age was 64.5 yr; the average time on dialysis 40.4 mo. Forty-five patients were male. Thirty-one participants were of Arabic origin. Fifty-three patients had diabetes, 36 of whom had diabetic retinopathy. Although 51 patients experienced chronic pain, only 19.6% described the pain as severe. Musculoskeletal pain, neuropathic pain, and headache were the most prevalent forms of pain. The presence of diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy (but not diabetes per se) and levels of intact parathyroid hormone, calcium, and calcitriol (but not 25-hydroxyvitamin D3) differed significantly between those who experienced chronic pain and those who did not. On a logistic regression model, higher serum calcium levels and intact parathyroid hormone levels >250 pg/ml were independently associated with chronic pain, as well as the presence of diabetic retinopathy. Calcitriol had a marginal effect. Conclusions: Disturbed mineral metabolism is strongly associated with chronic pain in long-term HD patients, along with microangiopathy. PMID:19578003

  5. Prevalence and determinants of cannabinoid prescription for the management of chronic noncancer pain: a postal survey of physicians in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec

    PubMed Central

    St-Amant, Huguette; Ware, Mark A.; Julien, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have been conducted to explore physicians’ prescription practices and attitudes toward the use of cannabinoids in Canada.We measured the prevalence and identified determinants of cannabinoid prescription for the management of chronic noncancer pain among physicians in southwestern Quebec. Methods In February 2013, we conducted a postal survey using a modified Dillman method that involved physicians practising in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec. We used multivariate logistic regression models to identify determinants of cannabinoid prescription. Results A total of 166 physicians of 318 practising in the region participated in the survey (response rate 52.2%). The prevalence of cannabinoid prescription was 27.3% (45/165) for any indication and 23.0% (38/165) for the management of chronic noncancer pain; 91.1% (41/45) of the physicians prescribed cannabinoids to 5 or fewer patients. Of the 38 physicians who prescribed cannabinoids for chronic noncancer pain, 35 (92.1%) prescribed nabilone, 7 (18.4%) medical marijuana and 2 (5.3%) nabiximols. The principal determinant of cannabinoid prescription was the physician’s level of comfort with prescribing cannabinoids (adjusted odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.55, per 1-point increase in comfort level measured on 10-point scale). Respondents reported that continuing medical education (CME) activities could increase their comfort level. They also indicated a need for guidelines or algorithms that included cannabinoid use as well as more studies about the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids for the management of chronic noncancer pain. Interpretation We found that cannabinoids were not often prescribed for the management of chronic noncancer pain and that survey respondents were not comfortable with prescribing this drug class. This degree of discomfort could be addressed by CME activities, more effective dissemination of guidelines and more evidence regarding cannabinoid use for the management of chronic noncancer pain. PMID:26389104

  6. The Complaint Letter and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an assignment in which students write a letter of complaint, and discusses how this assignment aids students in seeing the importance of effective written communication to their daily lives. (SR)

  7. Chronic Low Back Pain in Young Korean Urban Males: The Life-Time Prevalence and Its Impact on Health Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Young; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Doh, Jae-Won; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed the life-time prevalence (LTP) of chronic low back pain (LBP) in young Korean males. We also evaluated the relationship between lumbar spinal lesions and their health related quality-of-life (HRQOL). Methods A cross-sectional, self-reported survey was conducted in Korean males (aged 19-year-old) who underwent physical examinations for the conscript. We examined 3331 examinees in November 2014. We included 2411 subjects, who accepted to participate this study without any comorbidities. We interviewed using simple binary questions for their LBP experience and chronicity. HRQOL was assessed by Short-Form Health-Survey-36 (SF-36) in chronic LBP and healthy control groups. Radiological assessment was performed in chronic LBP group to determine whether there were any pathological causes of their symptoms. Results The LTP of chronic LBP was 13.4%. Most (71.7%) of them didn't have any lumbar spinal lesions (i.e., non-specific chronic LBP). The SF-36 subscale and summary scores were significantly lower in subjects with chronic LBP. Between specific and non-specific chronic LBP group, all physical and mental subscale scores were significantly lower in specific chronic LBP group, except mental health (MH) subscale score. In MH subscale and mental component summary score, statistical significant differences didn't appear between two groups (p=0.154, 0.126). Conclusion In Korean males 19 years of age, the LTP of chronic LBP was 13.4%, and more than two-thirds were non-specific chronic LBP. Chronic LBP had a significant impact on HRQOL. The presence of lumbar spinal pathoanatomical lesions affected mainly on the physical aspect of HRQOL. It influenced little on the mental health. PMID:25628807

  8. Development and evaluation of a behavioral pain management treatment program in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelcey J; Bender, Mark C; Cameron, Jennifer J; Pickett, Treven C

    2015-03-01

    Chronic pain complaints are highly prevalent among Veterans seeking Veterans Affairs health care, and the implementation of effective behavioral health interventions is vital to meet patient needs. Research supports the use of cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of chronic pain; however, varying guidelines regarding length of treatment and modality (i.e., group vs. individual) complicate clinical planning and program development. This study aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and equivalence of 3 variations (12, 10, and 6 weeks of group treatment) of cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic pain using clinical program data collected from Veterans enrolled in Veterans Affairs health services in a large tertiary care setting. Across groups, Veterans showed improvements in negative pain-related thinking and decreases in pain-related disability and distress. In general, patient outcomes regarding pain-related distress and disability for the 6-week group were equivalent or better than the 12- and 10-week groups. Preliminary results support the effectiveness of brief behavioral interventions for chronic pain. The findings have important practical implications, as briefer treatments may offer comparable therapeutic impact as longer, more time-intensive treatment protocols. This study offers a unique examination of treatment development and evaluation processes informed by real-world clinical needs and patient feedback. PMID:25735015

  9. 45 CFR 98.93 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaints. 98.93 Section 98.93 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Monitoring, Non-compliance and Complaints § 98.93 Complaints. (a) This section applies to any complaint...

  10. 45 CFR 98.93 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Complaints. 98.93 Section 98.93 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Monitoring, Non-compliance and Complaints § 98.93 Complaints. (a) This section applies to any complaint...

  11. 39 CFR 3030.10 - Complaint contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaint contents. 3030.10 Section 3030.10 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES FOR COMPLAINTS Form and Manner Requirements of Initial Pleadings § 3030.10 Complaint contents. (a) A complaint must: (1) Set forth the facts...

  12. 39 CFR 3030.10 - Complaint contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Complaint contents. 3030.10 Section 3030.10 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES FOR COMPLAINTS Form and Manner Requirements of Initial Pleadings § 3030.10 Complaint contents. (a) A complaint must: (1) Set forth the facts...

  13. 39 CFR 3030.10 - Complaint contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complaint contents. 3030.10 Section 3030.10 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES FOR COMPLAINTS Form and Manner Requirements of Initial Pleadings § 3030.10 Complaint contents. (a) A complaint must: (1) Set forth the facts...

  14. 47 CFR 1.1404 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Complaint. 1.1404 Section 1.1404 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1404 Complaint. (a) The complaint shall contain the name and address...

  15. 25 CFR 11.300 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complaints. 11.300 Section 11.300 Indians BUREAU OF... Criminal Procedure § 11.300 Complaints. (a) A complaint is a written statement of the essential facts.... (c) Complaints must be submitted without unnecessary delay by a law enforcement officer to...

  16. 39 CFR 3030.10 - Complaint contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Complaint contents. 3030.10 Section 3030.10 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES FOR COMPLAINTS Form and Manner Requirements of Initial Pleadings § 3030.10 Complaint contents. (a) A complaint must: (1) Set forth the facts...

  17. 39 CFR 3030.10 - Complaint contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Complaint contents. 3030.10 Section 3030.10 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES FOR COMPLAINTS Form and Manner Requirements of Initial Pleadings § 3030.10 Complaint contents. (a) A complaint must: (1) Set forth the facts...

  18. 24 CFR 146.33 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., individually or as a member of a class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with HUD alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act. A complainant shall file a complaint within 180 days from the date the... this time limit. The filing date for a complaint will be the date upon which the complaint is...

  19. 47 CFR 1.1404 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Complaint. 1.1404 Section 1.1404 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1404 Complaint. (a) The complaint shall contain the name and address of the complainant,...

  20. 24 CFR 146.33 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., individually or as a member of a class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with HUD alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act. A complainant shall file a complaint within 180 days from the date the... this time limit. The filing date for a complaint will be the date upon which the complaint is...

  1. 24 CFR 146.33 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., individually or as a member of a class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with HUD alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act. A complainant shall file a complaint within 180 days from the date the... this time limit. The filing date for a complaint will be the date upon which the complaint is...

  2. 47 CFR 1.1404 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Complaint. 1.1404 Section 1.1404... Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1404 Complaint. (a) The complaint shall contain the name and address of... complainant's direct interest in the matter complained of. Counsel for the complainant may sign the...

  3. 47 CFR 1.1404 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaint. 1.1404 Section 1.1404 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1404 Complaint. (a) The complaint shall contain the name and address of the complainant,...

  4. 24 CFR 146.33 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., individually or as a member of a class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with HUD alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act. A complainant shall file a complaint within 180 days from the date the... this time limit. The filing date for a complaint will be the date upon which the complaint is...

  5. 24 CFR 146.33 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., individually or as a member of a class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with HUD alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act. A complainant shall file a complaint within 180 days from the date the... this time limit. The filing date for a complaint will be the date upon which the complaint is...

  6. [Greater trochanteric pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, H; Opitz, G; Gerdesmeyer, L; Hauschild, M

    2014-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain is one of the common complaints in orthopedics. Frequent diagnoses include myofascial pain, trochanteric bursitis, tendinosis and rupture of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon, and external snapping hip. Furthermore, nerve entrapment like the piriformis syndrome must be considered in the differential diagnosis. This article summarizes essential diagnostic and therapeutic steps in greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Careful clinical evaluation, complemented with specific imaging studies and diagnostic infiltrations allows determination of the underlying pathology in most cases. Thereafter, specific nonsurgical treatment is indicated, with success rates of more than 90 %. Resistant cases and tendon ruptures may require surgical intervention, which can provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in most cases. PMID:24414233

  7. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  8. Rapid EEG activity during sleep dominates in mild traumatic brain injury patients with acute pain.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Samar; Chouchou, Florian; Amzica, Florin; Giguère, Jean-François; Denis, Ronald; Rouleau, Guy A; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2013-04-15

    Chronic pain is a highly prevalent post-concussion symptom occurring in a majority of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). About half of patients with mTBI report sleep-wake disturbances. It is known that pain can alter sleep quality in this population, but the interaction between pain and sleep is not fully understood. This study aimed to identify how pain affects subjective sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), sleep architecture, and quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) brain activity after mTBI. Twenty-four mTBI patients complaining of sleep-wake disturbances, with and without pain (8 and 16, respectively), were recruited 45 (±22.7) days post-trauma on average. Data were compared with those of 18 healthy controls (no sleep or pain complaints). The PSQI, sleep architecture, and qEEG activity were analyzed. Pain was assessed using questionnaires and a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Patients with mTBI reported three times poorer sleep quality than controls on the PSQI. Sleep architecture significantly differed between patients with mTBI and controls but was within normal range. Global qEEG showed lower delta (deep sleep) and higher beta and gamma power (arousal) at certain EEG derivations in patients with mTBI compared with controls (p<0.04). Patients with mTBI with pain, however, showed greater increase in rapid EEG frequency bands, mostly during REM sleep, and beta bands in non-REM sleep compared with patients with mTBI without pain and controls (p<0.001). Pain in patients with mTBI was associated with more rapid qEEG activity, mostly during REM sleep, suggesting that pain is associated with poor sleep and is a critical factor in managing post-concussion symptoms. PMID:23510169

  9. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  10. Chronic Pain in Adolescence: Parental Responses, Adolescent Coping, and their Impact on Adolescent's Pain Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Claar, Robyn Lewis; Logan, Deirdre L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine relations among parental responses, adolescent pain coping, and pain behaviors in adolescents with chronic pain. Methods This study included 217 adolescents (12–17 years) evaluated at a multidisciplinary pain clinic and their parents. Adolescents completed measures assessing their pain, pain coping responses, functional disability, and somatic symptoms. Parents reported on their responses to their adolescent's pain. Results Passive and active coping interacted with parental protective behavior to predict adolescents’ pain behaviors. Contrary to expectations, among adolescents who reported infrequent use of passive or active coping strategies, higher levels of parental protective behavior were associated with higher levels of disability and somatic symptoms. Discussion Among adolescents who report infrequent use of passive and active coping responses, parental protective responses to pain may inadvertently promote greater disability and symptom complaints. Parental responses to pain may be an important target to treat adolescent chronic pain. PMID:18375447

  11. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  12. Hypochondriacal complaints among Hong Kong children: a mental health hazard?

    PubMed

    Wong, S W

    1979-07-01

    The incidence of hypochondriacal complaints among clinic attenders at a general outpatients clinic is in the region of 51/thousand (51 per 1,000). A series of 33 children were studied in detail. It was found that their age range from 1 1/2-14 with a mode of 8-10 years, females having a slight predominance (1.33:1). They usually came from lower social-economic backgrounds but a substantial portion also came from social class 2. Among his latter group, psychological complaints predominate. Pain remained the most frequent complaint. There was also a predominance of complaints confined to the respiratory tract, a tendency which could be explained on a cultural and public-health basis. It was also found that only very few of the children in the study had previous hypochondriacal traits, a fact which contrasted sharply to those of their parents in whom hypochondriacal traits predominate. Hypochondriacal children, when treated, had good prognostic outcomes. Two areas of special significance in future researches are: 1. The importance of parental influence on the health attitudes of children. 2. Whether hypochondriacal children contribute significantly towards adult jupochondriasis (Primary or Secondary). PMID:547867

  13. Botlhoko, botlhoko! How people talk about their musculoskeletal complaints in rural Botswana: a focused ethnography

    PubMed Central

    Hondras, Maria; Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Johannessen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting interpretations about the structure and function of the body contribute to discordance in communication between healthcare professionals and lay people. Understanding musculoskeletal (MSK) complaints presents additional complexities when discussed in more than one language or in cross-cultural settings. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), few healthcare professionals have specialist MSK training and not all practitioners speak the primary language of patients. Objective Our goal was to understand how people in rural Botswana perceive and express MSK complaints. Design Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months in the Botswana Central District included participant observations and interviews with 34 community members with MSK complaints. Audio-recorded interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter, transcribed verbatim, and contextually translated into English. Abductive qualitative analysis was used as the interpretive methodology. Results Whereas initial responses about MSK troubles yielded the exclamation botlhoko, botlhoko! combined with animated non-verbal gestures and facial expressions indicating widespread body pains, in-depth interviews revealed the complexities of pain expression among respondents. MSK pains were described as ‘bursting, exploding, aching, numbness, hot, pricking, stabbing, swollen, and pain in the heart’. Language subtleties manifested during interviews, where ‘meat’ or ‘flesh’ implied soft tissue pains; waist pains were voiced yet portrayed as low back or sacroiliac pain; and ‘veins’ variously referred to structural and functional types of pain. Psychological and social stressors accompanied many accounts of MSK troubles. Conclusions Respondents offered diverse MSK symptom descriptions consistent with biopsychosocial illness models, yet few communicated complaints using the biomedical language of healthcare providers. Although research interview and transcription processes may not be practical for clinicians, working with interpreters who communicate detailed patient accounts for MSK troubles will complement patient–provider encounters. Community member perceptions of their MSK pain and associated conditions should be explored and incorporated into healthcare interventions and innovations for rural communities in LMICs. PMID:26689457

  14. Spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Saulino, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pain associated with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) can be quite challenging to the physiatrist. This highly prevalent condition within the SCI population requires an appropriate evaluative approach including a thorough history, a targeted physical examination, and appropriate use of diagnostic testing. The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Classification allows for a reasonable categorization of the various pain syndromes and may assist in selecting a reasoned treatment strategy. A multitude of management approaches exist including nonpharmacologic, pharmacologic, and interventional approaches. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, classification, evaluation, and management of SCI-associated pain. PMID:24787340

  15. 14 CFR 16.27 - Incomplete complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dismiss the complaint within 20 days after receiving it. Dismissal will be without prejudice to the refiling of the complaint after amendment to correct the deficiency. The Director's dismissal will include the reasons for the dismissal....

  16. 14 CFR 13.208 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.208 Complaint. (a... documents in the civil penalty action. (c) Contents. A complaint shall set forth the facts alleged,...

  17. 14 CFR 13.208 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.208 Complaint. (a... documents in the civil penalty action. (c) Contents. A complaint shall set forth the facts alleged,...

  18. 7 CFR 47.6 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Formal complaints. (a) Filing; contents; number of copies. (1) If the procedure provided in § 47.3(b) fails to effect an amicable or informal settlement, the person who filed the informal complaint may,...

  19. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... bad abdominal pain if you have gas or stomach cramps due to viral gastroenteritis . However, life-threatening ...

  20. Public Complaints and Complaint Responses in Calls to a Jordanian Radio Phone-In Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migdadi, Fathi; Badarneh, Muhammad A.; Momani, Kawakib

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates complaints and complaint responses in interactions between local citizens and the hosts of a live two-hour radio phone-in in Jordan devoted to receiving and handling complaints of a public nature. Using Brown and Levinson's (1987) politeness model, the study examines the functions and patterns of complaints and the types of

  1. Public Complaints and Complaint Responses in Calls to a Jordanian Radio Phone-In Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migdadi, Fathi; Badarneh, Muhammad A.; Momani, Kawakib

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates complaints and complaint responses in interactions between local citizens and the hosts of a live two-hour radio phone-in in Jordan devoted to receiving and handling complaints of a public nature. Using Brown and Levinson's (1987) politeness model, the study examines the functions and patterns of complaints and the types of…

  2. 46 CFR 502.64 - Answer to complaint; counter-complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Answer to complaint; counter-complaint. 502.64 Section 502.64 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Proceedings; Pleadings; Motions; Replies § 502.64 Answer to complaint; counter-complaint. (a) Respondent shall file with the...

  3. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Formal Complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal Complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  4. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Formal complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  5. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Formal complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  6. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Formal complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  7. 10 CFR 13.7 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Complaint. 13.7 Section 13.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.7 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the Department of Justice approves the issuance of a complaint in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3803(b)(1), the reviewing official...

  8. 7 CFR 1.163 - The complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The complaint. 1.163 Section 1.163 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing Cease and Desist Proceedings Under Section 2 of the Capper-Volstead Act § 1.163 The complaint. The complaint...

  9. 7 CFR 1.163 - The complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The complaint. 1.163 Section 1.163 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing Cease and Desist Proceedings Under Section 2 of the Capper-Volstead Act § 1.163 The complaint. The complaint...

  10. 7 CFR 1.163 - The complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The complaint. 1.163 Section 1.163 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing Cease and Desist Proceedings Under Section 2 of the Capper-Volstead Act § 1.163 The complaint. The complaint...

  11. 7 CFR 1.163 - The complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The complaint. 1.163 Section 1.163 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing Cease and Desist Proceedings Under Section 2 of the Capper-Volstead Act § 1.163 The complaint. The complaint...

  12. 19 CFR 210.12 - The complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The complaint. 210.12 Section 210.12 Customs... appearance and agreement to be bound by the terms of the protective order; and (j) Duty to supplement complaint. Complainant shall supplement the complaint prior to institution of an investigation...

  13. 19 CFR 210.12 - The complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The complaint. 210.12 Section 210.12 Customs... appearance and agreement to be bound by the terms of the protective order; and (j) Duty to supplement complaint. Complainant shall supplement the complaint prior to institution of an investigation...

  14. 22 CFR 911.2 - Filing complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Filing complaint. 911.2 Section 911.2 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.2 Filing complaint. If the dispute is not satisfactorily resolved at the agency level, the moving party may file a complaint within...

  15. 22 CFR 911.2 - Filing complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Filing complaint. 911.2 Section 911.2 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.2 Filing complaint. If the dispute is not satisfactorily resolved at the agency level, the moving party may file a complaint within...

  16. 22 CFR 911.2 - Filing complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Filing complaint. 911.2 Section 911.2 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.2 Filing complaint. If the dispute is not satisfactorily resolved at the agency level, the moving party may file a complaint within...

  17. 22 CFR 911.2 - Filing complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Filing complaint. 911.2 Section 911.2 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.2 Filing complaint. If the dispute is not satisfactorily resolved at the agency level, the moving party may file a complaint within...

  18. 22 CFR 911.2 - Filing complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Filing complaint. 911.2 Section 911.2 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.2 Filing complaint. If the dispute is not satisfactorily resolved at the agency level, the moving party may file a complaint within...

  19. 48 CFR 408.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality complaints. 408... People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled 408.711 Quality complaints. Prior to attempting to resolve a complaint regarding the quality of goods or services provided by participating nonprofit agency with...

  20. 21 CFR 225.115 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complaint files. 225.115 Section 225.115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records and Reports § 225.115 Complaint files. (a) Complaints and reports of experiences...

  1. 24 CFR 30.85 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 26, subpart B, shall be included with the complaint. (d) Service of the complaint. The... 30.50 for violation of 12 U.S.C. 1723i(b)(1)(G) or (I), the Secretary shall inform the Attorney... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complaint. 30.85 Section...

  2. 24 CFR 30.85 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 26, subpart B, shall be included with the complaint. (d) Service of the complaint. The... 30.50 for violation of 12 U.S.C. 1723i(b)(1)(G) or (I), the Secretary shall inform the Attorney... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complaint. 30.85 Section...

  3. 45 CFR 1618.3 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Complaints. 1618.3 Section 1618.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES § 1618.3 Complaints. A complaint of a violation by a recipient or an employee of a recipient may be made to...

  4. 45 CFR 1618.3 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Complaints. 1618.3 Section 1618.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES § 1618.3 Complaints. A complaint of a violation of the Act by a recipient or an employee may be made to the...

  5. 45 CFR 1618.3 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaints. 1618.3 Section 1618.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES § 1618.3 Complaints. A complaint of a violation of the Act by a recipient or an employee may be made to the...

  6. 45 CFR 1618.3 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Complaints. 1618.3 Section 1618.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES § 1618.3 Complaints. A complaint of a violation by a recipient or an employee of a recipient may be made to...

  7. 21 CFR 211.198 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complaint files. 211.198 Section 211.198 Food and... files. (a) Written procedures describing the handling of all written and oral complaints regarding a...) A written record of each complaint shall be maintained in a file designated for drug...

  8. 21 CFR 820.198 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complaint files. 820.198 Section 820.198 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Records § 820.198 Complaint files. (a) Each manufacturer shall maintain complaint files. Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures for receiving, reviewing,...

  9. 37 CFR 4.3 - Submitting complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL COMPLAINTS REGARDING INVENTION PROMOTERS § 4.3 Submitting complaints. (a) A person may... returned. If complainant's address is not provided, the complaint will be destroyed. (e) No originals of... promoter; (3) The name of the customer; (4) The invention promotion services offered or performed by...

  10. 37 CFR 4.3 - Submitting complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL COMPLAINTS REGARDING INVENTION PROMOTERS § 4.3 Submitting complaints. (a) A person may... returned. If complainant's address is not provided, the complaint will be destroyed. (e) No originals of... promoter; (3) The name of the customer; (4) The invention promotion services offered or performed by...

  11. 37 CFR 4.3 - Submitting complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL COMPLAINTS REGARDING INVENTION PROMOTERS § 4.3 Submitting complaints. (a) A person may... returned. If complainant's address is not provided, the complaint will be destroyed. (e) No originals of... promoter; (3) The name of the customer; (4) The invention promotion services offered or performed by...

  12. 37 CFR 4.3 - Submitting complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL COMPLAINTS REGARDING INVENTION PROMOTERS § 4.3 Submitting complaints. (a) A person may... returned. If complainant's address is not provided, the complaint will be destroyed. (e) No originals of... promoter; (3) The name of the customer; (4) The invention promotion services offered or performed by...

  13. 37 CFR 4.3 - Submitting complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL COMPLAINTS REGARDING INVENTION PROMOTERS § 4.3 Submitting complaints. (a) A person may... returned. If complainant's address is not provided, the complaint will be destroyed. (e) No originals of... promoter; (3) The name of the customer; (4) The invention promotion services offered or performed by...

  14. 49 CFR 604.30 - Filing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filing complaints. 604.30 Section 604.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Complaints § 604.30 Filing complaints. (a) Filing address..., DC 20590. (b) Date and method of filing. Filing of any document shall be by personal delivery,...

  15. 20 CFR 658.412 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complaint resolution. 658.412 Section 658.412 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS... Complaint resolution. (a) A JS-related complaint is resolved when: (1) The complainant...

  16. 20 CFR 658.412 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complaint resolution. 658.412 Section 658.412 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADMINISTRATIVE... 658.412 Complaint resolution. (a) A JS-related complaint is resolved when: (1) The...

  17. 20 CFR 658.412 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complaint resolution. 658.412 Section 658.412 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADMINISTRATIVE... 658.412 Complaint resolution. (a) A JS-related complaint is resolved when: (1) The...

  18. 48 CFR 408.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality complaints. 408... People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled 408.711 Quality complaints. Prior to attempting to resolve a complaint regarding the quality of goods or services provided by participating nonprofit agency with...

  19. 12 CFR 268.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 12 CFR 268.108(a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and... disability. (2) Class complaint is a written complaint of discrimination filed on behalf of a class by the agent of the class alleging that: (i) The class is so numerous that a consolidated complaint of...

  20. 12 CFR 268.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 12 CFR 268.108(a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and... disability. (2) Class complaint is a written complaint of discrimination filed on behalf of a class by the agent of the class alleging that: (i) The class is so numerous that a consolidated complaint of...

  1. 29 CFR 1614.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 29 CFR 1614.109 (a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and..., age, disability, or genetic information. (2) A class complaint is a written complaint of... that a consolidated complaint of the members of the class is impractical; (ii) There are questions...

  2. 29 CFR 35.31 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with CRC alleging discrimination in violation of the Act or these... complaint is considered to be complete on the date CRC receives all the information necessary to process it, as provided in paragraph (c)(1) of this section. CRC will: (1) Accept as a complete complaint...

  3. 29 CFR 35.31 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with CRC alleging discrimination in violation of the Act or these... complaint is considered to be complete on the date CRC receives all the information necessary to process it, as provided in paragraph (c)(1) of this section. CRC will: (1) Accept as a complete complaint...

  4. 38 CFR 18.542 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with VA alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act or these regulations based on an action occurring on or after July 1, 1979. A complainant shall file a complaint within... taking the following measures: (1) Acknowledging receipt and acceptance of a complaint in writing....

  5. 29 CFR 30.11 - Complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Complaint procedure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING § 30.11 Complaint... authorized representative, file a complaint with the Department, or, at the apprentice's or...

  6. 21 CFR 17.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complaint. 17.5 Section 17.5 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.5 Complaint. (a) The Center with principal jurisdiction over the matter involved shall begin all administrative civil money penalty actions by serving on the respondent(s) a complaint signed...

  7. 21 CFR 17.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complaint. 17.5 Section 17.5 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.5 Complaint. (a) The Center with principal jurisdiction over the matter involved shall begin all administrative civil money penalty actions by serving on the respondent(s) a complaint signed...

  8. 41 CFR 50-205.6 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Complaints. 50-205.6 Section 50-205.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... AND EMPLOYEES § 50-205.6 Complaints. When a complaint of alleged safety and health violations by...

  9. 41 CFR 50-205.6 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaints. 50-205.6 Section 50-205.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... AND EMPLOYEES § 50-205.6 Complaints. When a complaint of alleged safety and health violations by...

  10. 29 CFR 30.11 - Complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Complaint procedure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING § 30.11 Complaint procedure... representative, file a complaint with the Department, or, at the apprentice's or applicant's election, with...

  11. 41 CFR 50-205.6 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Complaints. 50-205.6 Section 50-205.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... AND EMPLOYEES § 50-205.6 Complaints. When a complaint of alleged safety and health violations by...

  12. 29 CFR 30.11 - Complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Complaint procedure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING § 30.11 Complaint procedure... representative, file a complaint with the Department, or, at the apprentice's or applicant's election, with...

  13. 41 CFR 50-205.6 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Complaints. 50-205.6 Section 50-205.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... AND EMPLOYEES § 50-205.6 Complaints. When a complaint of alleged safety and health violations by...

  14. 21 CFR 17.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complaint. 17.5 Section 17.5 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.5 Complaint. (a) The Center with principal jurisdiction over the matter involved shall begin all administrative civil money penalty actions by serving on the respondent(s) a complaint signed...

  15. 41 CFR 50-205.6 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complaints. 50-205.6 Section 50-205.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... AND EMPLOYEES § 50-205.6 Complaints. When a complaint of alleged safety and health violations by...

  16. 38 CFR 18.542 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with VA alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act or these regulations based on an action occurring on or after July 1, 1979. A complainant shall file a complaint within... taking the following measures: (1) Acknowledging receipt and acceptance of a complaint in writing....

  17. 38 CFR 18.542 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with VA alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act or these regulations based on an action occurring on or after July 1, 1979. A complainant shall file a complaint within... taking the following measures: (1) Acknowledging receipt and acceptance of a complaint in writing....

  18. 38 CFR 18.542 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with VA alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act or these regulations based on an action occurring on or after July 1, 1979. A complainant shall file a complaint within... taking the following measures: (1) Acknowledging receipt and acceptance of a complaint in writing....

  19. 21 CFR 17.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complaint. 17.5 Section 17.5 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.5 Complaint. (a) The Center with principal jurisdiction over the matter involved shall begin all administrative civil money penalty actions by serving on the respondent(s) a complaint signed...

  20. 29 CFR 30.11 - Complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Complaint procedure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING § 30.11 Complaint... authorized representative, file a complaint with the Department, or, at the apprentice's or...

  1. 29 CFR 30.11 - Complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaint procedure. 30.11 Section 30.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING § 30.11 Complaint... authorized representative, file a complaint with the Department, or, at the apprentice's or...

  2. 38 CFR 18.542 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... behalf of others, may file a complaint with VA alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act or these regulations based on an action occurring on or after July 1, 1979. A complainant shall file a complaint within... taking the following measures: (1) Acknowledging receipt and acceptance of a complaint in writing....

  3. 21 CFR 17.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complaint. 17.5 Section 17.5 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.5 Complaint. (a) The Center with principal jurisdiction over the matter involved shall begin all administrative civil money penalty actions by serving on the respondent(s) a complaint signed...

  4. 20 CFR 658.412 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complaint resolution. 658.412 Section 658.412 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS... Complaint resolution. (a) A JS-related complaint is resolved when: (1) The complainant...

  5. 48 CFR 408.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality complaints. 408... People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled 408.711 Quality complaints. Prior to attempting to resolve a complaint regarding the quality of goods or services provided by participating nonprofit agency with...

  6. 48 CFR 408.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality complaints. 408... People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled 408.711 Quality complaints. Prior to attempting to resolve a complaint regarding the quality of goods or services provided by participating nonprofit agency with...

  7. 48 CFR 408.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality complaints. 408... People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled 408.711 Quality complaints. Prior to attempting to resolve a complaint regarding the quality of goods or services provided by participating nonprofit agency with...

  8. 45 CFR 1618.3 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Complaints. 1618.3 Section 1618.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES § 1618.3 Complaints. A complaint of a violation of the Act by a recipient or an employee may be made to the...

  9. Dyadic analysis of child and parent trait and state pain catastrophizing in the process of children's pain communication.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Chambers, Christine T; Chorney, Jill; Fernandez, Conrad V; McGrath, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    When explored separately, child and parent catastrophic thoughts about child pain show robust negative relations with child pain. The objective of this study was to conduct a dyadic analysis to elucidate intrapersonal and interpersonal influences of child and parent pain catastrophizing on aspects of pain communication, including observed behaviours and perceptions of child pain. A community sample of 171 dyads including children aged 8 to 12 years (89 girls) and parents (135 mothers) rated pain catastrophizing (trait and state versions) and child pain intensity and unpleasantness following a cold pressor task. Child pain tolerance was also assessed. Parent-child interactions during the cold pressor task were coded for parent attending, nonattending, and other talk, and child symptom complaints and other talk. Data were analyzed using the actor-partner interdependence model and hierarchical multiple regressions. Children reporting higher state pain catastrophizing had greater symptom complaints regardless of level of parent state pain catastrophizing. Children reporting low state pain catastrophizing had similar high levels of symptom complaints, but only when parents reported high state pain catastrophizing. Higher child and parent state and/or trait pain catastrophizing predicted their own ratings of higher child pain intensity and unpleasantness, with child state pain catastrophizing additionally predicting parent ratings. Higher pain tolerance was predicted by older child age and lower child state pain catastrophizing. These newly identified interpersonal effects highlight the relevance of the social context to children's pain expressions and parent perceptions of child pain. Both child and parent pain catastrophizing warrant consideration when managing child pain. PMID:26713422

  10. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  11. 29 CFR 1984.103 - Filing of retaliation complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Complaints, Investigations, Findings and Preliminary Orders § 1984.103 Filing... complaint is required. A complaint may be filed orally or in writing. Oral complaints will be reduced...

  12. 29 CFR 1984.103 - Filing of retaliation complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Complaints, Investigations, Findings and Preliminary Orders § 1984.103 Filing... complaint is required. A complaint may be filed orally or in writing. Oral complaints will be reduced...

  13. Low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Violante, Francesco S; Mattioli, Stefano; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is one of the most common painful conditions experienced by humans throughout their life. Some occupational risk factors (namely, heavy manual material handling) may also contribute to the development of low-back pain: due to the high prevalence of both low-back pain and manual material handling in the adult working population, it has been estimated that low-back pain is probably the most common occupational disorder worldwide. Lifetime prevalence of low-back pain has been reported to be as high as 84%, depending on the case definition used, and no age group is spared, even children. Although low-back pain is not a lethal condition, it was estimated at the third rank among all diseases by disability-adjusted life-years in 2010 in the USA, after ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and at the first rank by years lived with disability. It also ranked high (13th) globally for the same year, in disability-adjusted life-years. Low-back pain is currently classified as nonspecific/specific as to putative cause and as acute (lasting less than 6 weeks), subacute (6-12 weeks), or chronic (more than 12 weeks) according to duration of symptoms. The distinction between nonspecific/specific and acute/subacute/chronic low-back pain is useful not only for epidemiologic studies, but also (mainly) for choosing the appropriate strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Workplace risk factors for low-back pain include manual lifting and whole-body vibration exposure. This chapter will provide an overview of modern concepts of low-back pain (in general) and will then outline some distinctive features of work-related low-back pain. PMID:26563799

  14. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  15. Prevalence of post-treatment pain after cleaning and shaping of the root canal system using manual step-back versus rotary nickel titanium.

    PubMed

    Aqrabawi, J; Jamani, K

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of ProTaper rotary NiTi instrumentation technique on post-treatment pain at different time periods when compared with step-back technique, one hundred forty-six patients with 160 teeth participated in this study. All treated teeth (160) are having vital pulps and divided into two groups according to the canal instrumentation technique. Group (1) consisted of 80 teeth, cleaned and shaped with manual step-back technique using K-Flexo hand files. Group (2) was 80 teeth cleaned and shaped using ProTaper (NiTi) rotary files. Patients assessed post-treatment pain at 8 h, 24 h, and 48 h as none, mild, moderate, or severe. Evaluation of the two groups, according to the three post-treatment time period, was tabled as to the number of responses at each pain level at each interval. Comparisons were made by subjecting the collected data to a multiple- regression test. The results demonstrated that there were no statistically significant difference in post-treatment pain between the two groups at any time period P > 0.05. PMID:16704020

  16. Myofascial pain syndrome: a treatment review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigger points and muscle pain. Through a critical evidence-based review of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, the authors aim to provide clinicians with a more comprehensive knowledge of the interventions for myofascial pain. PMID:25135034

  17. Prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Bartelink, M L; Wollersheim, H; van de Lisdonk, E; Spruijt, R; van Weel, C

    1992-10-01

    Studies that present prevalence rates for Raynaud's phenomenon show great variation. Figures range from a few to more than 20%. In this study, 508 patients who attended their general practitioner filled in a questionnaire dealing with symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon. When strict criteria (cold digits, numbness and at least a biphasic discolouration) were applied, prevalence was 0.5% in males and 2.9% in females. When a monophasic white discolouration was included, prevalence rates increased by 5.4% in males and by 7.5% in females. The respective percentages became 10.4% and 21.2% when subjects with cold digits and at least a monophasic white or blue discolouration were included. Complaints of cold digits were present in 22.7% of the males and in 35% of the females. We conclude that a great deal of the variation in prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon can be explained by differences in its definition. PMID:1470286

  18. Recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stickler, G B; Murphy, D B

    1979-05-01

    A long-term follow-up study (minimum of five years) of 161 children with recurrent abdominal pain disclosed that three had organic disease and that was missed--inflammatory bowel disease. Anorexia nervosa developed in one patient. Three fourths of the patients recovered from the initial symptom; most recovered within a few weeks; but some patients continued to have complaints for a number of years. Approximately 20% of patients underwent additional surgical or medical treatments of doubtful necessity. In 18% of patients, other psychosomatic symptoms developed. PMID:433872

  19. Exertional Leg Pain.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-02-01

    Exertional leg pain is a common condition seen in runners and the general population. Given the broad differential diagnosis of this complaint, this article focuses on the incidence, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of common causes that include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial bone stress injury, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, arterial endofibrosis, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, and entrapment of the common peroneal, superficial peroneal, and saphenous nerves. Successful diagnosis of these conditions hinges on performing a thorough history and physical examination followed by proper diagnostic testing and appropriate management. PMID:26616179

  20. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Moscow.

    PubMed

    Bor, S; Lazebnik, L B; Kitapcioglu, G; Manannikof, I; Vasiliev, Y

    2016-02-01

    Limited data exist to determine the prevalence and clinical spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the Russian population, which might be different from those in Western countries. This study was performed in Moscow on randomized 1065 adults aged ≥15 years. A validated reflux questionnaire comprising 72 questions and an additional 29 sub-questions were used. The questions assessed (heartburn and regurgitation) and related (dyspepsia, dysphagia, odynophagia and chest pain) symptoms, the triggering factors of these symptoms, family history and data on demographic and socioeconomic features. GERD was defined as heartburn and/or regurgitation once a week or common. Of the 1065 participants, 42.1% were male and 57.9% were female. The prevalences of frequent and occasional symptoms were 17.6 and 22.1% for heartburn and 17.5 and 21.8% for regurgitation, respectively, over the last 12 months. The prevalence of GERD was found to be 23.6%. The rate of GERD was significantly higher in females than in males (15.4 vs. 29.5%, P < 0.001) and significantly increased as the age of the participants increased (P = 0.011). GERD was present in 20.4% of smokers, 24.2% of coffee drinkers, 21.5% of alcohol consumers and 45.9% of stressed participants. Although the rate of alcohol consumers was lower in those with GERD compared with those without GERD, the rate of coffee drinkers and stressed participants was higher among those with GERD. The rate of additional symptoms was higher even in participants complaining of regurgitation/heartburn rarely, compared with those without complaints. Using the same questionnaire, which makes it possible to compare the present results with those from different countries, we found the prevalence of GERD in Moscow to be 23.6%, one of highest in the Western populations. The rates of heartburn and regurgitation were found to be similar, which constitutes a different result than has been found in similar studies. Additional symptoms should be assessed, in all GERD patients even in the presence of rare complaints of regurgitation/heartburn. PMID:25604401

  1. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Glare, Paul A; Davies, Pamela S; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Paice, Judith A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Syrjala, Karen L

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  2. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  3. The network organisation of consumer complaints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. E. C.; Holme, P.

    2010-07-01

    Interaction between consumers and companies can create conflict. When a consensus is unreachable there are legal authorities to resolve the case. This letter is a study of data from the Brazilian Department of Justice from which we build a bipartite network of categories of complaints linked to the companies receiving those complaints. We find the complaint categories organised in an hierarchical way where companies only get complaints of lower degree if they already got complaints of higher degree. The fraction of resolved complaints for a company appears to be nearly independent of the equity of the company but is positively correlated with the total number of complaints received. We construct feature vectors based on the edge-weight —the weight of an edge represents the times complaints of a category have been filed against that company— and use these vectors to study the similarity between the categories of complaints. From this analysis, we obtain trees mapping the hierarchical organisation of the complaints. We also apply principal component analysis to the set of feature vectors concluding that a reduction of the dimensionality of these from 8827 to 27 gives an optimal hierarchical representation.

  4. Duloxetine in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Howard S; Smith, Eric J; Smith, Benjamin R

    2012-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is among the most frequent painful complaints that healthcare providers address. The bulk of these complaints are chronic low back pain and chronic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United States. It is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by a loss of cartilage, and occurs most often in older persons. The management of osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain may involve both nonpharmacologic (eg, weight loss, resistive and aerobic exercise, patient education, cognitive behavioral therapy) and pharmacologic approaches. Older adults with severe osteoarthritis pain are more likely to take analgesics than those with less severe pain. The pharmacologic approaches to painful osteoarthritis remain controversial, but may include topical as well as oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, duloxetine, and opioids. The role of duloxetine for musculoskeletal conditions is still evolving. PMID:22767991

  5. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24864393

  6. Biomechanical and organizational risk and prevalence of low back pain in the old adults caregivers of a nursing home in Joao Pessoa/PB.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sânzia Bezerra; Cárdia, Maria Claudia Gatto; Almeida, Lais Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The objective present study was to investigate the presence of low back pain in caregivers of a nursing home, related with the labored activities executed by these workers. 16 subjects were investigated, 15 female and one male, with 40,8 age average all being caregivers as their profession. It consisted of three phases, where the first concerns the analysis of the collective work, assessed in a perspective of caregivers, Second, a postural assessment to verify the retractions in such workers and the third stage was used Diagram of Corllet to identify the presence of signs and symptoms in caregivers. The study demonstrated that organizational and biomechanical factors are responsible for the high level of physical fatigue and presence of pain in 93,75% of the caregivers in some region of the body. 50% referred pain in the lumbar region. The results of the postural evaluation confirmed that the caregivers had alterations in the postural alignment, presenting retractions of the anterior and posterior chain. The suggestions are to minimize the risk factors of this productive process and the symptoms and signals presented from these workers by adoption ergonomic measures and the realization of a physical program with stretching and muscular strengthening of the muscles of the anterior and posterior body chain based on the method of Reorganization Postural Sensoperceptive. PMID:22316998

  7. Work activities and musculoskeletal complaints among preschool workers.

    PubMed

    Grant, K A; Habes, D J; Tepper, A L

    1995-12-01

    The potential for musculoskeletal trauma among preschool workers has been largely unexplored in the United States. This case report describes an investigation conducted to identify and evaluate possible causes of back and lower extremity pain among 22 workers at a Montessori day care facility. Investigators met with and distributed a questionnaire to school employees, and made measurements of workstation and furniture dimensions. Investigators also recorded the normal work activities of school employees on videotape, and performed a work sampling study to estimate the percentage of time employees spend performing various tasks and in certain postures. Questionnaire results from 18 employees indicated that back pain/discomfort was a common musculoskeletal complaint, reported by 61% of respondents. Neck/shoulder pain, lower extremity pain and hand/wrist pain were reported by 33, 33 and 11% of respondents, respectively. Observation and analysis of work activities indicated that employees spend significant periods of time kneeling, sitting on the floor, squatting, or bending at the waist. Furthermore, staff members who work with smaller children (i.e. six weeks to 18 months of age) performed more lifts and assumed more awkward lower extremity postures than employees who work with older children (3-4 years of age). Analysis of two lifting tasks using the revised NIOSH lifting equation indicated that employees who handle small children may be at increased risk of lifting-related low back pain. Investigators concluded that day care employees at this facility are at increased risk of low back pain and lower extremity (i.e. knee) injury due to work activities that require awkward or heavy lifts, and static working postures. Recommendations for reducing or eliminating these risks by modifying the workplace and changing the organization and methods of work are presented. PMID:15677041

  8. [Repetitive work and psychosomatic complaints].

    PubMed

    Liebrich, J; Geiger, L; Rupp, M

    1978-08-01

    200 workers of the Swiss watch industry were examined in an interdisciplinary study on the effect of repetitive work on the wellbeing of the worker. Women doing repetitive work with little autonomy complained more often about psychosomatic problems than the male workers doing non-repetitive work. This difference is interpreted as a difference of sexe rather than one of the work situation. However, there is a significant difference in the complaint about nervosity between women being paid monthly and women who were paid by piece or by hour with a premium. PMID:706840

  9. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Chronic Pain Information Page Synonym(s): Pain - Chronic Condensed from Pain: ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Chronic Pain? While acute pain is a normal sensation triggered ...

  10. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  11. Relationship between performance validity testing, disability status, and somatic complaints in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Greene, Doug; Brooks, Lawrence; Ference, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain-related disorder that typically includes cognitive complaints as well as non-specific somatic complaints, such as fatigue and sleep disturbance (Wolfe et al., 2010). Fibromyalgia has also been shown to be associated with a high rate of failure on performance validity testing (PVT), which has not been examined with respect to other self-reported symptoms that are now part of the diagnostic criteria for the disorder. We evaluated 85 patients with fibromyalgia who completed objective measures of pain, sleep, and fatigue along with symptom validity measures (Word Memory Test or Test of Memory Malingering and Reliable Digit Span). Three groups were formed based on effort testing: Two PVTs Failed, One PVT Failed, and No PVTs Failed. We also formed three groups based on disability status: On Disability, Applying for Disability, and Not on Disability. A total of 37% of the patients failed one or both PVTs. PVT group analyses were significant for daily pain, weekly pain, and sleep, but not fatigue. Disability status analyses were significant for daily pain, weekly pain, and fatigue, but not sleep. The implication of this study is that PVT performance and disability status are associated with exaggeration of non-cognitive symptoms such as pain, sleep, and fatigue in persons with fibromyalgia. This study reinforces the importance of effort testing when working with medical populations. PMID:23121595

  12. Postprandial Vomiting and Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Halper; MacKenzie

    1996-10-01

    A 14-year-old Asian female presented with complaints of abdominal pain that was intermittent, crampy, periumbilical, without radiation, and aggravated by eating. She had been vomiting "green-colored" material 4 days earlier, after meals, associated with abdominal pain. On hospital day 3, after no improvement was noted, an upper GI series demonstrated an obstruction at the third portion of the duodenum. She was evaluated for an eating disorder, but further history failed to elicit diagnostic criteria. She responded favorably to total parenteral nutrition and symptoms were relieved with changes in position. Her symptoms and diagnostic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. PMID:10359987

  13. Patellofemoral pain: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rothermich, Marcus A; Glaviano, Neal R; Li, Jiacheng; Hart, Joe M

    2015-04-01

    Patients with anterior knee pain present a complex and common problem to health care providers. The diagnosis and treatment of these patients often involve a comprehensive evaluation that includes assessing the chronicity of the pain, the specific location of the complaint, and the previous treatment modalities attempted by the patient. This common diagnosis includes a wide variety of different pathologic abnormalities that can be present independently or concomitantly and cause a spectrum of disabilities for the patient. PMID:25818716

  14. Management of chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Benjamin-Pratt, A R; Howard, F M

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a common complaint of women presenting for gynecologic and primary care. Evaluation of CPP requires obtaining a careful history including not only obstetrical and gynecologic information but also screening for gastrointestinal, urologic, musculoskeletal, and neurological disorders. A detailed physical examination is also necessary. Management of CPP depends largely on the cause. Gynecologic causes include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, adhesive disease, pelvic congestion syndrome, ovarian retention syndrome, ovarian remnant syndrome, adenomyosis, and leiomyomas. Some non-gynecologic causes are interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, pelvic floor tension myalgia, and abdominal myofascial pain syndrome. Treatments may be directed toward specific causes or may be targeted to general pain management. The most effective therapy may involve using both approaches. The diagnosis and treatment of each of the above disorders, and the management of CPP itself, is discussed. PMID:20938429

  15. Postoperative pain outcomes after transvaginal mesh revision

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, David J.; Reynolds, W. Stuart; Biller, Daniel H.; Dmochowski, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Although the current literature discusses mesh complications including pain, as well as suggesting different techniques for removing mesh, there is little literature regarding pain outcomes after surgical removal or revision. The purpose of this study is to determine if surgical removal or revision of vaginal mesh improves patient’s subjective complaints of pelvic pain associated with original placement of mesh. Methods After obtaining approval from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Institutional Review Board, a retrospective review of female patients with pain secondary to previous mesh placement who underwent excision or revision of vaginal mesh from January 2000 to August 2012 was performed. Patient age, relevant medical history including menopause status, previous hysterectomy, smoking status, and presence of diabetes, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, and chronic pelvic pain, was obtained. Patients’ postoperative pain complaints were assessed. Results Of the 481 patients who underwent surgery for mesh revision, removal or urethrolysis, 233 patients met our inclusion criteria. One hundred and sixty-nine patients (73 %) reported that their pain improved, 19 (8 %) reported that their pain worsened, and 45 (19 %) reported that their pain remained unchanged after surgery. Prior history of chronic pelvic pain was associated with increased risk of failure of the procedure to relieve pain (OR 0.28, 95 % CI 0.12–0.64, p=0.003). Conclusions Excision or revision of vaginal mesh appears to be effective in improving patients’ pain symptoms most of the time. Patients with a history of chronic pelvic pain are at an increased risk of no improvement or of worsening pain. PMID:25011703

  16. 34 CFR 300.140 - Due process complaints and State complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... complaint regarding the child find requirements (as described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section) must be...) State complaints. (1) Any complaint that an SEA or LEA has failed to meet the requirements in §§ 300.132... §§ 300.151 through 300.153. (2) A complaint filed by a private school official under § 300.136(a) must...

  17. 34 CFR 300.140 - Due process complaints and State complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... complaint regarding the child find requirements (as described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section) must be...) State complaints. (1) Any complaint that an SEA or LEA has failed to meet the requirements in §§ 300.132... §§ 300.151 through 300.153. (2) A complaint filed by a private school official under § 300.136(a) must...

  18. 34 CFR 300.140 - Due process complaints and State complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complaint regarding the child find requirements (as described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section) must be...) State complaints. (1) Any complaint that an SEA or LEA has failed to meet the requirements in §§ 300.132... §§ 300.151 through 300.153. (2) A complaint filed by a private school official under § 300.136(a) must...

  19. 34 CFR 300.140 - Due process complaints and State complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... complaint regarding the child find requirements (as described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section) must be...) State complaints. (1) Any complaint that an SEA or LEA has failed to meet the requirements in §§ 300.132... §§ 300.151 through 300.153. (2) A complaint filed by a private school official under § 300.136(a) must...

  20. 34 CFR 300.140 - Due process complaints and State complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... complaint regarding the child find requirements (as described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section) must be...) State complaints. (1) Any complaint that an SEA or LEA has failed to meet the requirements in §§ 300.132... §§ 300.151 through 300.153. (2) A complaint filed by a private school official under § 300.136(a) must...

  1. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult. PMID:20356798

  2. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  3. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  4. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  5. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... other sports activity The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout : Common in the big toe, ...

  6. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  7. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  8. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  9. Failure of physician documentation of sleep complaints in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, H H; Riemer, A; Santiago, S M; Stein, M; Goldman, M D; Williams, A J

    1998-01-01

    Sleep disorders are acknowledged to be common but remain underrecognized by the medical community, often attributed to the failure to question patients about their sleep quality. We examined the prevalence of sleep complaints (insomnia or excessive daytime sleepiness) in a group of general medical patients by administering a questionnaire to hospitalized patients in a Veterans Affairs tertiary care medical center. A total of 222 consecutive adults (215 men, 60 +/- 14 years; body mass index, 24.8 +/- 5.6) completed the questionnaire. Of these, 105 patients (47%) had either insomnia, excessive daytime somnolence, or both; 63 (28%) had excessive daytime somnolence, which was severe in 27 (12%). Of 75 patients (34%) who had insomnia, a third were taking hypnotic medication. Forty patients (18%) had snoring, which was associated with excessive daytime somnolence in 36, whereas 46 patients (21%) had either restless legs or a combination of leg jerks and leg kicking or twitching during sleep, associated with a sleep complaint (insomnia in 32). The medical records were subsequently reviewed to assess the admitting physicians' recognition of these symptoms. No record included mention of any patient symptom related to sleep. We conclude that symptoms related to sleep, some of which may be clinically important, are common, and that none of these complaints appear to be recognized by the physicians of record. PMID:9771152

  10. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  11. 8 CFR 1003.104 - Filing of complaints; preliminary inquiries; resolutions; referral of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Immigration Courts shall be filed with the EOIR disciplinary counsel. Disciplinary complaints must be... a complaint with the EOIR disciplinary counsel using the Form EOIR-44. The EOIR disciplinary counsel... inquiry. Upon receipt of a disciplinary complaint or on its own initiative, the EOIR disciplinary...

  12. 8 CFR 1003.104 - Filing of complaints; preliminary inquiries; resolutions; referral of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Immigration Courts shall be filed with the EOIR disciplinary counsel. Disciplinary complaints must be... a complaint with the EOIR disciplinary counsel using the Form EOIR-44. The EOIR disciplinary counsel... inquiry. Upon receipt of a disciplinary complaint or on its own initiative, the EOIR disciplinary...

  13. 8 CFR 1003.104 - Filing of complaints; preliminary inquiries; resolutions; referral of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Immigration Courts shall be filed with the EOIR disciplinary counsel. Disciplinary complaints must be... a complaint with the EOIR disciplinary counsel using the Form EOIR-44. The EOIR disciplinary counsel... inquiry. Upon receipt of a disciplinary complaint or on its own initiative, the EOIR disciplinary...

  14. 8 CFR 1003.104 - Filing of complaints; preliminary inquiries; resolutions; referral of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Immigration Courts shall be filed with the EOIR disciplinary counsel. Disciplinary complaints must be... a complaint with the EOIR disciplinary counsel using the Form EOIR-44. The EOIR disciplinary counsel... inquiry. Upon receipt of a disciplinary complaint or on its own initiative, the EOIR disciplinary...

  15. 47 CFR 7.22 - Formal complaints based on unsatisfied informal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Formal complaints based on unsatisfied informal complaints. 7.22 Section 7.22 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO VOICEMAIL AND INTERACTIVE MENU SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Enforcement § 7.22 Formal complaints based on unsatisfied...

  16. 20 CFR 658.401 - Types of complaints handled by the JS complaint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... The State agency shall handle such complaints under the Department's regulations at 41 CFR part 60-250... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Types of complaints handled by the JS complaint system. 658.401 Section 658.401 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING...

  17. Childhood adversities and laboratory pain perception

    PubMed Central

    Pieritz, Karoline; Rief, Winfried; Euteneuer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Childhood adversity has frequently been related to a wide range of psychosomatic complaints in adulthood. The present study examined the relationship between different forms of childhood adversity and laboratory measures of pain. Heat pain tolerance and perceived heat pain intensity were measured in a community-based sample of 62 women (aged 20–64 years). Participants completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), which assesses five forms of childhood adversity: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, and emotional neglect. Somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and pain catastrophizing were assessed as potential mediators. Bivariate analyses indicated that emotional abuse but no other forms of childhood adversity were significantly related to decreased heat pain tolerance (r=−0.27; P<0.05). Accordingly, multiple regression analyses revealed that only emotional abuse was a significant predictor of heat pain tolerance (β=−0.62; P=0.034) when entering all CTQ subscales simultaneously. Although emotional abuse was also related to somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and pain catastrophizing, none of these variables mediated the relationship between childhood adversity and laboratory pain (P>0.1). No significant associations were found between any forms of childhood adversity and heat pain intensity. Our findings indicate that the severity of emotional childhood abuse is associated with decreased pain tolerance, an affective component of pain, but not with heat pain intensity, which has been described as a sensory component of pain. PMID:26316757

  18. Bilateral painful idiopathic ophthalmoplegia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Andrea; Bazan, Rodrigo; Almeida, Leila; Rocha, Fernando C; Raffin, César N; Bigal, Marcelo E; Schelp, Arthur O

    2007-06-01

    Around 3% of the individuals with painful ophthalmoplegia have bilateral complaints. In the vast majority of these cases, appropriate investigation demonstrates a secondary etiology, and we are not aware of idiopathic cases reported. Herein we report a case of bilateral ophthalmoplegia where extensive investigation did not suggest a secondary cause. PMID:17578533

  19. Inguinoscrotal pain resistant to conventional treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Agarwal, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Inguinoscrotal pain (ISP) is a common complaint that affects almost all age groups. The etiology may be vascular, neurogenic, visceral, muscular or psychological. Most causes of ISP are benign, but Pott's spine as a cause of ISP, when missed, may lead to serious outcomes. PMID:25624580

  20. Patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; Linschoten, Robbart van

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged <40 years, it also affects people of all activity levels and ages.(1 2) Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  1. 28 CFR 76.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR... serve a copy of the complaint on the respondent as provided in 28 CFR 76.6(b). (b) The complaint shall... to be in violation of law, the approximate date, place and location of the alleged...

  2. 28 CFR 76.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR... serve a copy of the complaint on the respondent as provided in 28 CFR 76.6(b). (b) The complaint shall... to be in violation of law, the approximate date, place and location of the alleged...

  3. 28 CFR 76.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR... serve a copy of the complaint on the respondent as provided in 28 CFR 76.6(b). (b) The complaint shall... to be in violation of law, the approximate date, place and location of the alleged...

  4. 28 CFR 76.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR... serve a copy of the complaint on the respondent as provided in 28 CFR 76.6(b). (b) The complaint shall... to be in violation of law, the approximate date, place and location of the alleged...

  5. 28 CFR 76.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR... serve a copy of the complaint on the respondent as provided in 28 CFR 76.6(b). (b) The complaint shall... to be in violation of law, the approximate date, place and location of the alleged...

  6. Complaints Soar over Student-Loan Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Over the past five years, the number of complaints filed against agencies collecting on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education has grown by 45 percent. The Federal Trade Commission, which oversees the entire industry, received 142,743 complaints involving debt-collection companies last year, though only some involved student loans. Consumer…

  7. 43 CFR 17.331 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with DOI, alleging discrimination prohibited by the Act... good cause shown, however, DOI may extend this time limit. (b) DOI will consider the date a complaint... described in paragraphs (a) and (c)(1) of this section. (c) DOI will attempt to facilitate the filing...

  8. 48 CFR 8.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality complaints. 8.711... Blind or Severely Disabled 8.711 Quality complaints. (a) When the quality of supplies or services... the appropriate central nonprofit agency. (b) When quality problems cannot be resolved by the...

  9. 12 CFR 308.506 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Complaint. 308.506 Section 308.506 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.506 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the...

  10. 12 CFR 308.506 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complaint. 308.506 Section 308.506 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.506 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the...

  11. 10 CFR 590.317 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Complaints. 590.317 Section 590.317 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.317 Complaints. (a) Any person may file...

  12. 21 CFR 225.115 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records and Reports § 225.115 Complaint files. (a... current good manufacturing practices. These complaints and experiences may reveal the existence of manufacturing problems not otherwise detected through the normal quality control procedures. Timely...

  13. 21 CFR 225.115 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records and Reports § 225.115 Complaint files. (a... current good manufacturing practices. These complaints and experiences may reveal the existence of manufacturing problems not otherwise detected through the normal quality control procedures. Timely...

  14. 21 CFR 225.115 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records and Reports § 225.115 Complaint files. (a... current good manufacturing practices. These complaints and experiences may reveal the existence of manufacturing problems not otherwise detected through the normal quality control procedures. Timely...

  15. 14 CFR 302.721 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complaints. 302.721 Section 302.721 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL... Analysis, X-50, Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590, a complaint with respect to...

  16. 14 CFR 302.721 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Complaints. 302.721 Section 302.721 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL... Analysis, X-50, Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590, a complaint with respect to...

  17. 21 CFR 225.115 - Complaint files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complaint files. 225.115 Section 225.115 Food and... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records and Reports § 225.115 Complaint files. (a... feed manufacturer shall maintain on the premises a file which contains the following information:...

  18. 39 CFR 952.5 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaints. 952.5 Section 952.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.5 Complaints. When the Chief Postal Inspector or his or her...

  19. 39 CFR 952.5 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Complaints. 952.5 Section 952.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.5 Complaints. When the the Chief Postal Inspector or his or her...

  20. 39 CFR 952.5 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complaints. 952.5 Section 952.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.5 Complaints. When the Chief Postal Inspector or his or her...

  1. 39 CFR 952.5 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Complaints. 952.5 Section 952.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.5 Complaints. When the Chief Postal Inspector or his or her...

  2. 39 CFR 952.5 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Complaints. 952.5 Section 952.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS (EFF. UNTIL 7-22-2011) § 952.5 Complaints. When the the Chief Postal Inspector...

  3. 47 CFR 76.1713 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Complaint resolution. 76.1713 Section 76.1713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection 76.1713 Complaint resolution....

  4. 47 CFR 76.1713 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Complaint resolution. 76.1713 Section 76.1713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection 76.1713 Complaint resolution....

  5. 47 CFR 76.1713 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Complaint resolution. 76.1713 Section 76.1713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection 76.1713 Complaint resolution....

  6. 47 CFR 76.1713 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Complaint resolution. 76.1713 Section 76.1713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection 76.1713 Complaint resolution....

  7. 7 CFR 271.6 - Complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Complaint procedure. 271.6 Section 271.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM GENERAL INFORMATION AND DEFINITIONS § 271.6 Complaint procedure. (a) State agency...

  8. 48 CFR 8.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality complaints. 8.711... Blind or Severely Disabled 8.711 Quality complaints. (a) When the quality of supplies or services... the appropriate central nonprofit agency. (b) When quality problems cannot be resolved by the...

  9. 14 CFR 13.208 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Complaint. 13.208 Section 13.208 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions 13.208 Complaint....

  10. 14 CFR 13.208 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Complaint. 13.208 Section 13.208 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions 13.208 Complaint....

  11. 14 CFR 13.208 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Complaint. 13.208 Section 13.208 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions 13.208 Complaint....

  12. 10 CFR 590.317 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Complaints. 590.317 Section 590.317 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.317 Complaints. (a) Any person may file...

  13. 29 CFR 1614.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 29 CFR 1614.109 (a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION FEDERAL SECTOR EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Provisions Applicable to Particular Complaints § 1614.204 Class complaints....

  14. 12 CFR 268.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accordance with 12 CFR 268.108(a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and recommendations. (1) The... employment who, it is alleged, have been or are being adversely affected by a Board personnel management..., national origin, age or disability. (2) Class complaint is a written complaint of discrimination filed...

  15. 5 CFR 185.107 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complaint. 185.107 Section 185.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.107 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the Department of Justice approves the issuance of...

  16. 5 CFR 185.107 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Complaint. 185.107 Section 185.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.107 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the Department of Justice approves the issuance of...

  17. 29 CFR 458.60 - Actionable complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Actionable complaint. 458.60 Section 458.60 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STANDARDS OF CONDUCT... Prohibited Discipline § 458.60 Actionable complaint. If it appears to the District Director that there is...

  18. 41 CFR 105-70.007 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complaint. 105-70.007 Section 105-70.007 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.007 Complaint. (a) On or after the...

  19. 29 CFR 458.60 - Actionable complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actionable complaint. 458.60 Section 458.60 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STANDARDS OF CONDUCT... Prohibited Discipline § 458.60 Actionable complaint. If it appears to the District Director that there is...

  20. 30 CFR 570.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Complaint. 570.5 Section 570.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 570.5 Complaint. (a) Whenever any person believes that he or she has...

  1. 5 CFR 185.107 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Complaint. 185.107 Section 185.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.107 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the Department of Justice approves the issuance of...

  2. 44 CFR 7.941 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Complaints. 7.941 Section 7.941 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with FEMA, alleging discrimination prohibited by...

  3. 12 CFR 268.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with 12 CFR 268.108(a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and recommendations. (1) The... employment who, it is alleged, have been or are being adversely affected by a Board personnel management..., national origin, age or disability. (2) Class complaint is a written complaint of discrimination filed...

  4. 30 CFR 570.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complaint. 570.5 Section 570.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 570.5 Complaint. (a) Whenever any person believes that he or she has...

  5. 41 CFR 105-70.007 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaint. 105-70.007 Section 105-70.007 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.007 Complaint. (a) On or after the...

  6. 41 CFR 105-70.007 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Complaint. 105-70.007 Section 105-70.007 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.007 Complaint. (a) On or after the...

  7. 30 CFR 570.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaint. 570.5 Section 570.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 570.5 Complaint. (a) Whenever any person believes that he or she has...

  8. 29 CFR 1614.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 29 CFR 1614.109 (a) through (f). (i) Decisions: The... alleged, have been or are being adversely affected by an agency personnel management policy or practice..., age, disability, or genetic information. (2) A class complaint is a written complaint...

  9. 41 CFR 105-70.007 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Complaint. 105-70.007 Section 105-70.007 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.007 Complaint. (a) On or after the...

  10. 29 CFR 458.60 - Actionable complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actionable complaint. 458.60 Section 458.60 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STANDARDS OF CONDUCT... Prohibited Discipline § 458.60 Actionable complaint. If it appears to the District Director that there is...

  11. 29 CFR 1614.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 29 CFR 1614.109 (a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and... alleged, have been or are being adversely affected by an agency personnel management policy or practice..., age, disability, or genetic information. (2) A class complaint is a written complaint...

  12. 41 CFR 105-70.007 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Complaint. 105-70.007 Section 105-70.007 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.007 Complaint. (a) On or after the...

  13. 5 CFR 185.107 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Complaint. 185.107 Section 185.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.107 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the Department of Justice approves the issuance of...

  14. 41 CFR 50-201.1202 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complaints. 50-201.1202 Section 50-201.1202 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... receives any complaint with respect to, a breach or violation of the stipulations required under §...

  15. 12 CFR 268.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accordance with 12 CFR 268.108(a) through (f). (i) Report of findings and recommendations. (1) The... employment who, it is alleged, have been or are being adversely affected by a Board personnel management..., national origin, age or disability. (2) Class complaint is a written complaint of discrimination filed...

  16. 44 CFR 7.941 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Complaints. 7.941 Section 7.941 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with FEMA, alleging discrimination prohibited by...

  17. 5 CFR 185.107 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Complaint. 185.107 Section 185.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.107 Complaint. (a) On or after the date the Department of Justice approves the issuance of...

  18. 41 CFR 50-201.1202 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaints. 50-201.1202 Section 50-201.1202 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... receives any complaint with respect to, a breach or violation of the stipulations required under §...

  19. 44 CFR 7.941 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Complaints. 7.941 Section 7.941 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with FEMA, alleging discrimination prohibited by...

  20. 29 CFR 458.60 - Actionable complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actionable complaint. 458.60 Section 458.60 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STANDARDS OF CONDUCT... Prohibited Discipline § 458.60 Actionable complaint. If it appears to the District Director that there is...

  1. 30 CFR 270.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Complaint. 270.5 Section 270.5 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 270.5 Complaint. (a) Whenever any person believes that he or she has been denied...

  2. 44 CFR 7.941 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Complaints. 7.941 Section 7.941 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with FEMA, alleging discrimination prohibited by...

  3. 44 CFR 7.941 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaints. 7.941 Section 7.941 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... class or on behalf of others, may file a complaint with FEMA, alleging discrimination prohibited by...

  4. 41 CFR 50-201.1202 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Complaints. 50-201.1202 Section 50-201.1202 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... receives any complaint with respect to, a breach or violation of the stipulations required under §...

  5. 41 CFR 50-201.1202 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Complaints. 50-201.1202 Section 50-201.1202 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... receives any complaint with respect to, a breach or violation of the stipulations required under §...

  6. 29 CFR 1614.204 - Class complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hearing shall be conducted in accordance with 29 CFR 1614.109 (a) through (f). (i) Decisions: The... alleged, have been or are being adversely affected by an agency personnel management policy or practice..., age, disability, or genetic information. (2) A class complaint is a written complaint...

  7. 30 CFR 270.5 - Complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Complaint. 270.5 Section 270.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE NONDISCRIMINATION IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 270.5 Complaint. (a) Whenever any...

  8. 77 FR 47823 - Zen Magnets, LLC; Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ...Under provisions of its Rules of Practice for Adjudicative Proceeding (16 CFR part 1025), the Consumer Product Safety Commission must publish in the Federal Register Complaints which it issues. Published below is a Complaint: In the Matter of Zen Magnets, LLC.\\1\\...

  9. 47 CFR 76.1713 - Complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaint resolution. 76.1713 Section 76.1713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1713 Complaint resolution....

  10. 10 CFR 590.317 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Complaints. 590.317 Section 590.317 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.317 Complaints. (a) Any person may file...

  11. 48 CFR 8.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality complaints. 8.711... Blind or Severely Disabled 8.711 Quality complaints. (a) When the quality of supplies or services... the appropriate central nonprofit agency. (b) When quality problems cannot be resolved by the...

  12. 48 CFR 8.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality complaints. 8.711... Blind or Severely Disabled 8.711 Quality complaints. (a) When the quality of supplies or services... the appropriate central nonprofit agency. (b) When quality problems cannot be resolved by the...

  13. 48 CFR 8.711 - Quality complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality complaints. 8.711... Blind or Severely Disabled 8.711 Quality complaints. (a) When the quality of supplies or services... the appropriate central nonprofit agency. (b) When quality problems cannot be resolved by the...

  14. Cervicobrachial pain - How Often is it Neurogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, N. Sreekumaran; Bhat, Anil K; Solomon, John M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neck pain associated with pain in the arm (cervicobrachial pain) is a common complaint in patients seeking physiotherapy management. The source of symptoms for this complaint is commonly presumed to be neural. However, this pain pattern could also result from various other innervated tissue structures of the upper quarter. Knowledge about frequency of neural structures being a predominant source of symptoms would help in implementing appropriate therapeutic strategies such as neural tissue mobilization along with other complimentary therapies for optimal outcomes. Aim To determine the frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic. Materials and Methods Participants (n=361) aged between 20-65 years, reporting cervicobrachial pain were screened for neurogenic nature of symptoms. These physical signs included: active and passive movement dysfunction, adverse responses to neural tissue provocation tests, tenderness on palpating nerve trunks and related cutaneous tissues and evidence of a related local area of pathology (Clinical/radiological). The consistency of all these signs was checked to identify a significant neural involvement. Results Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Of 361 participants, 206 were males (44.6 ±10.8 years) and 155 were females (41.8 ± 11.2 years). The frequency of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain was determined to be 19.9% (n=72) and the non-neurogenic sources for symptoms were attributed to 80.1% (n=289) of screened participants. Conclusion Lower frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic indicates thorough screening for appropriate therapeutic interventions to be successful. PMID:27134988

  15. The relation of pain to depression among institutionalized aged.

    PubMed

    Parmelee, P A; Katz, I R; Lawton, M P

    1991-01-01

    Nursing home and congregate apartment residents (N = 598) were classified on the basis of a DSM-IIIR symptom checklist as suffering possible major, minor, or no depression; they also completed the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Possible major depressives reported more intense pain and a greater number of localized pain complaints than did minor depressives; nondepressed individuals reported the least intense pain and fewest localized complaints. The effect remained strong even when functional disability and health status were controlled statistically. Both pain intensity and number of localized complaints were correlated with GDS and POMS factor scores, but strength and direction of associations varied with level of depression. Item-by-item examination of localized complaints again indicated that more depressed individuals were more likely to report pain, particularly where physicians had identified a physical problem that might account for the pain. Results are compared with previous research on pain among younger individuals. Implications for treatment of depressed elderly are discussed. PMID:1986040

  16. Predictors of Genital Pain in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of genital pain in healthy young adult women, limited research has addressed genital pain during intercourse using contemporary models of multidimensional sexual function. The objectives of this study were threefold: (1) to identify differences in sexual functioning in women who experience genital pain compared to pain free women; (2) to identify predictors of sexual functioning in women with and without genital pain; and (3) to identify predictors of sexual satisfaction in women with and without genital pain. Sexually active female undergraduates (n = 651) were administered the Female Sexual Function Index and the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory. We evaluated the sexual factors that impact the sexual function of women with any pain (including high and low pain groups) versus women with no history of pain. Women with genital pain reported greater rates of sexual dysfunction as compared to pain-free women; however, sexual functioning in the high versus low pain groups was distinguished primarily by vaginal lubrication. Women in the high pain group showed negative correlations between domains of sexual satisfaction and genital pain frequency and intensity that were not found in the low pain group. For pain-free women, intercourse played a strong role in sexual satisfaction, whereas non-intercourse sexual behavior was central to sexual satisfaction in women who reported pain. The evaluation of levels of genital pain may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the impairment of sexual function, sexual behavior, and sexual satisfaction. PMID:17674182

  17. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  18. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  19. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians: a systematic review of incidence and prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Zaza, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders cause pain, disability and loss of employment for many workers, including musicians. Although performing arts medicine is a growing field, the health problems of musicians remain under-recognized and under-researched. Therefore, the author undertook a systematic review of published information on the incidence and prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) in classical musicians. METHODS: Seven databases were searched for the period 1980 to 1996. The main textbook and performing arts medicine journals were searched manually, as were reference lists of all relevant papers. The author also contacted individuals familiar with the literature of performing arts medicine. Studies were included for review if they reported PRMD incidence or prevalence in classical musicians. Of the 24 studies identified, 18 cross-sectional surveys and cohort studies were reviewed. The author subjectively assessed the studies using criteria modified from an existing evaluation scale and used 4 criteria for data combination. On the basis of prevalence values from the eligible studies, chi 2 tests for heterogeneity were performed. RESULTS: Only one study estimated PRMD incidence. Ten of the 17 prevalence studies were ineligible for data combination, because of low response rates and other methodological problems. In the 7 eligible studies, PRMD point prevalence ranged from 39% to 87% in adult musicians and from 34% to 62% in secondary school music students. The best estimates of PRMD prevalence were derived from the 3 studies that excluded mild complaints; these studies indicated that PRMD prevalence was 39% and 47% in adults and 17% in secondary school music students respectively. Statistical combination of data across studies within each demographic category was not possible. INTERPRETATION: Available data indicate that the prevalence of PRMD in adult classical musicians is comparable to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders reported for other occupational groups. Several recommendations for future research are outlined. PMID:9580730

  20. Changes in prevalence of subjective fatigue during 14-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayanagi, Kaname; Natsuno, Toyoki; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Nobuhisa; Watanabe, Yoriko; Suzuki, Satomi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Yajima, Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    The present study examines the prevalence of subjective fatigue in young healthy males during 14 days of 6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) by using a multidimensional questionnaire. Forty-one subjects completed the Subjective Fatigue Scale questionnaire to assess the fatigue-related complaints and symptoms. The questionnaire is composed of three sections, with 10 items each. The sections measured drowsiness and dullness (Section 1), difficulty in concentration (Section 2), and the projection of physical disintegration (Section 3). The subjects answered simple questions between 1400 and 1700 on 6 measurement days before and during the HDBR period. The prevalence rate of low back pain was markedly high (80.5%) on the second day and more than 50% in the first half of the HDBR period, and any complaints related to either a lack of sleep or a deterioration in the quality of sleep continued until the end of the HDBR period. Our findings may be useful in developing preventive strategies against physical and mental fatigue associated with prolonged HDBR, horizontal bed rest, and microgravity environments.

  1. Vicarious pain while observing another in pain: an experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, S.; Crombez, G.; Van Ryckeghem, D. M. L.; Brass, M.; Van Damme, S.; Goubert, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at developing an experimental paradigm to assess vicarious pain experiences. We further explored the putative moderating role of observer's characteristics such as hypervigilance for pain and dispositional empathy. Methods: Two experiments are reported using a similar procedure. Undergraduate students were selected based upon whether they reported vicarious pain in daily life, and categorized into a pain responder group or a comparison group. Participants were presented a series of videos showing hands being pricked whilst receiving occasionally pricking (electrocutaneous) stimuli themselves. In congruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were applied to the same spatial location. In incongruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were in the opposite spatial location. Participants were required to report on which location they felt a pricking sensation. Of primary interest was the effect of viewing another in pain upon vicarious pain errors, i.e., the number of trials in which an illusionary sensation was reported. Furthermore, we explored the effect of individual differences in hypervigilance to pain, dispositional empathy and the rubber hand illusion (RHI) upon vicarious pain errors. Results: Results of both experiments indicated that the number of vicarious pain errors was overall low. In line with expectations, the number of vicarious pain errors was higher in the pain responder group than in the comparison group. Self-reported hypervigilance for pain lowered the probability of reporting vicarious pain errors in the pain responder group, but dispositional empathy and the RHI did not. Conclusion: Our paradigm allows measuring vicarious pain experiences in students. However, the prevalence of vicarious experiences of pain is low, and only a small percentage of participants display the phenomenon. It remains however unknown which variables affect its occurrence. PMID:23781187

  2. Acute abdominal pain in the emergency department of a university hospital in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Caporale, Nicolò; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Nardi, Elena; Cogliandro, Rosanna; Cavazza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute abdominal pain (AAP) is one of the most common causes of referral to an emergency department (ED), but information about its impact is limited. Objectives The objectives of this article are to define the prevalence of AAP among ED visits in a large university hospital and analyze its main clinical features. Methods All patients admitted at the Sant’Orsola, Malpighi University Hospital of Bologna ED on 12 a priori selected sample days in 2013 were included. General data were recorded for each patient. A total of 192 clinical variables were recorded for each patient with abdominal pain. Results During the observation period the ED assisted 2623 patients with a daily admission rate of 219 ± 20 (mean ± SD). Of these, 239 patients complained of AAP as their chief complaint at entry (prevalence = 9.1%). AAP prevalence was significantly higher in females than in males (10.4% vs. 7.8%; OR = 1.37; p = 0.021) as well as in foreign over Italian patients (13.2% vs. 8.5%; OR = 1.64; p = 0.007). The most frequent ED operative diagnoses were non-specific abdominal pain (n = 86, 36.0%) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract-related pain (n = 79, 33.1%; n = 19 upper GI, n = 60 lower GI). Conclusions AAP is a common cause of referral at EDs. Despite technological advances, non-specific abdominal pain is still the main operative diagnosis. PMID:27087960

  3. Painful heel: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Ortega, R; Aguilera, C; Sánchez, A; Andía, E

    2000-01-01

    Heel pain is a common and frequently disabling clinical complaint that may be caused by a broad spectrum of osseous or soft-tissue disorders. These disorders are classified on the basis of anatomic origin and predominant location of heel pain to foster a better understanding of this complaint. The disorders include plantar fascial lesions (fasciitis, rupture, fibromatosis, xanthoma), tendinous lesions (tendinitis, tenosynovitis), osseous lesions (fractures, bone bruises, osteomyelitis, tumors), bursal lesions (retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilleal bursitis), tarsal tunnel syndrome, and heel plantar fat pad abnormalities. With its superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar capability, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help determine the cause of heel pain and help assess the extent and severity of the disease in ambiguous or clinically equivocal cases. Careful analysis of MR imaging findings and correlation of these findings with patient history and findings at physical examination can suggest a specific diagnosis in most cases. The majority of patients with heel pain can be successfully treated conservatively, but in cases requiring surgery (eg, plantar fascia rupture in competitive athletes, deeply infiltrating plantar fibromatosis, masses causing tarsal tunnel syndrome), MR imaging is especially useful in planning surgical treatment by showing the exact location and extent of the lesion. PMID:10715335

  4. [Pain Management in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Eiche, Jürgen; Schache, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Pains belong to the most frequent reasons for a doctor's visit. In elderly people, it is the result of progressive degenerative processes (e. g. , arthrosis, Osteoarthritis, degenerative spinal changes) and a higher prevalence of cancer disease to a further increase of the patients who suffer unnecessarily from pains. By the increasing polymorbidity (e.g. diabetes mellitus, vascular disease) and a declining immune competence, the prevalence of polyneuropathy and post-herpetic neuralgia rises. Insufficiently treated chronic or periodically returning pain can lead to serious interferences of the physical, cognitive and social everyday competence and therefore to a limited quality of life. These facts shows the relevance of a sufficient pain therapy in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, on account of existing comorbidity, polypharmacy as well as of impaired organ function, the pharmacological pain therapy in old patients also poses a potential hazard. Although pain prevalence is higher with geriatric than with younger patients, significantly less analgesics are prescribed in the elderly population. This results from existing uncertainties at the treating doctors as well as the complicated pain capture, in particular with cognitive affected patients. The present article should indicate options of treatment for geriatric pain patients. PMID:27123730

  5. Interventional Treatments of Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Sindt, Jill E; Brogan, Shane E

    2016-06-01

    Pain is a significant burden for patients with cancer and is particularly prevalent among those with advanced cancer. Appropriate interventional cancer pain therapies complement conventional pain management by reducing the need for systemic opioid therapy and its associated toxicity; however, these therapies are often underutilized. This article reviews techniques, indications, complications, and outcomes of the most common interventional approaches for the management of cancer-related pain. These approaches include intrathecal drug delivery, vertebral augmentation, neurolysis of the celiac, superior hypogastric and ganglion impar plexus', image-guided tumor ablation, and other less commonly performed but potentially beneficial interventions. PMID:27208713

  6. Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a disabling, multifaceted symptom that is highly prevalent and stubbornly persistent. Although fatigue is a frequent complaint among patients with fibromyalgia, it has not received the same attention as pain. Reasons for this include lack of standardized nomenclature to communicate about fatigue, lack of evidence-based guidelines for fatigue assessment, and a deficiency in effective treatment strategies. Fatigue does not occur in isolation; rather, it is present concurrently in varying severity with other fibromyalgia symptoms such as chronic widespread pain, unrefreshing sleep, anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, and so on. Survey-based and preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that multiple symptoms feed into fatigue and it may be associated with a variety of physiological mechanisms. Therefore, fatigue assessment in clinical and research settings must consider this multi-dimensionality. While no clinical trial to date has specifically targeted fatigue, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indicate that treatment modalities studied in the context of other fibromyalgia symptoms could also improve fatigue. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Working Group and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) have been instrumental in propelling the study of fatigue in fibromyalgia to the forefront. The ongoing efforts by PROMIS to develop a brief fibromyalgia-specific fatigue measure for use in clinical and research settings will help define fatigue, allow for better assessment, and advance our understanding of fatigue. PMID:24289848

  7. [Complaint analysis derived from surgical practice].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Dolci, Germn; Rodrguez-Surez, Francisco Javier; Campos-Castolo, Esther Mahuina; Carrillo-Jaimes, Arturo; Zavala-Surez, Etelvina; Aguirre-Gas, Hctor Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the analysis of medical complaints presented to the National Commission on Medical Arbitration (Comisin Nacional de Arbitraje Mdico, CONAMED) between June 1996 and December 2007 to determine its magnitude and to identify the causes of safety problems in medical care. Out of 182,407 complaints presented to CONAMED, 87% were resolved by the Office of Orientation and Management. The remaining 18,443 complaints were presented to the Council Directorate. Of those cases, 48% were resolved by an agreement between the complainants and the physicians, 31% were not resolved by this method, and 3% were irresolute complaints. The highest frequency of complaints was registered in the Federal District (Distrito Federal) and the State of Mxico (Estado de Mxico), mainly corresponding to social security institutions and private hospitals. Among the nine most frequently involved specialties, six were surgical specialties. Malpractice was identified in 25% of all cases. The principal demands of those making complaints were the refunding of expenses in patient medical care (51%) and indemnification (40%) and, in those, the average amount of payments was 4.6 times greater. Due to the incidence of medical complaints, it was reasonable to investigate the causes and to take preventive and corrective actions required for its decrease. It was proposed to the Mexican Academy of Surgery that this organization should use their educational leadership and assume the vanguard in the dissemination and promotion of the WHO plan "Safe Surgery Saves Lives" and the implementation in Mexico of the "Surgical Safety Checklist." PMID:19671273

  8. Cognitive and emotional control of pain and its disruption in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, M. Catherine; Čeko, Marta; Low, Lucie A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent health problems in our modern world, with millions of people debilitated by conditions such as back pain, headache and arthritis. To address this growing problem, many people are turning to mind–body therapies, including meditation, yoga and cognitive behavioural therapy. This article will review the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain by cognitive and emotional states — important components of mind–body therapies. It will also examine the accumulating evidence that chronic pain itself alters brain circuitry, including that involved in endogenous pain control, suggesting that controlling pain becomes increasingly difficult as pain becomes chronic. PMID:23719569

  9. Cognitive and emotional control of pain and its disruption in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, M Catherine; Ceko, Marta; Low, Lucie A

    2013-07-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent health problems in our modern world, with millions of people debilitated by conditions such as back pain, headache and arthritis. To address this growing problem, many people are turning to mind-body therapies, including meditation, yoga and cognitive behavioural therapy. This article will review the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain by cognitive and emotional states - important components of mind-body therapies. It will also examine the accumulating evidence that chronic pain itself alters brain circuitry, including that involved in endogenous pain control, suggesting that controlling pain becomes increasingly difficult as pain becomes chronic. PMID:23719569

  10. Somatic Complaints in Anxious Youth

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, Sarah A.; Caporino, Nicole E.; Birmaher, Boris; Ginsburg, Golda; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Sakolsky, Dara; Compton, Scott N.; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined (a) demographic and clinical characteristics associated with physical symptoms in anxiety-disordered youth and (b) the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (Coping Cat), medication (sertraline), their combination, and pill placebo on physical symptoms. Youth (N = 488, ages 7–17 years) with a principal diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia participated as part of a multi-site, randomized controlled trial and received treatment delivered over 12 weeks. Diagnostic status, symptom severity, and impairment were assessed at baseline and week 12. The total number and severity of physical symptoms was associated with age, principal diagnosis, anxiety severity, impairment, and the presence of comorbid internalizing disorders. Common somatic complaints were headaches, stomachaches, head cold or sniffles, sleeplessness, and feeling drowsy or too sleepy. Physical symptoms decreased over the course of treatment, and were unrelated to treatment condition. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00052078) PMID:24129543

  11. Somatic complaints in anxious youth.

    PubMed

    Crawley, Sarah A; Caporino, Nicole E; Birmaher, Boris; Ginsburg, Golda; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Sakolsky, Dara; Compton, Scott N; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T; Kendall, Philip C

    2014-08-01

    This study examined (a) demographic and clinical characteristics associated with physical symptoms in anxiety-disordered youth and (b) the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (Coping Cat), medication (sertraline), their combination, and pill placebo on physical symptoms. Youth (N = 488, ages 7-17 years) with a principal diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia participated as part of a multi-site, randomized controlled trial and received treatment delivered over 12 weeks. Diagnostic status, symptom severity, and impairment were assessed at baseline and week 12. The total number and severity of physical symptoms was associated with age, principal diagnosis, anxiety severity, impairment, and the presence of comorbid internalizing disorders. Common somatic complaints were headaches, stomachaches, head cold or sniffles, sleeplessness, and feeling drowsy or too sleepy. Physical symptoms decreased over the course of treatment, and were unrelated to treatment condition. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00052078). PMID:24129543

  12. Assessment of spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X; Regel, A; Kiltz, U

    2014-12-01

    Spinal pain or back pain is a very common symptom that can have many reasons. The most studied location is low back pain, and it is considered to be nonspecific in the majority of cases. Only a small proportion of patients have axial inflammation as the major cause of their back complaints with chronic inflammatory back pain (IBP) as the most prominent clinical feature of spondyloarthritis (SpA). The recognition of IBP and patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is challenging in primary care, and it is important to further facilitate the early diagnosis of SpA. Proposals for improving the referral of patients with a possible diagnosis of axSpA include clinical parameters, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27, and imaging parameters. Imaging is crucial for the visualization, objective validation, and understanding of back pain. Numerous diseases such as degenerative disk disease, degenerative changes in the intervertebral (facet) joints and the associated ligaments, spinal instability, herniation of the intervertebral disk, and spinal stenosis have to be differentiated in interpreting imaging of the spine. The sacroiliac joints and the spine are of major importance for the diagnosis and classification of axSpA. Conventional radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most important imaging technologies for visualization of structural changes such as syndesmophytes and axial inflammation such as sacroiliitis and spondylitis. The pathogenesis of axSpA is largely genetically determined. HLA B27 has the strongest contribution to the total genetic burden, but other major contributors such as endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-23R have also been identified. PMID:26096091

  13. Clinical Complaints amongst Patients in a Guyanese Prison

    PubMed Central

    Deonandan, Raywat; Lockhart, Jessica Wynn; Mahony, Brenna; Mindlin, Glenda; Laine-Gossin, Joanne; Audam, Nazmoon; Nel, Louis; Sissons, Melissa; Vineberg, Bekkie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated populations are at particular risk for developing specific health conditions. Prior studies of prisons in developing countries have focused on the threat of communicable diseases, though anecdotal evidence suggests that chronic conditions are of particular concern. This study constitutes the first published investigation of health complaints offered by residents of a prison in the South American nation of Guyana. Method: In 2010, a medical team sent by the Toronto non-governmental organization Ve’ahavta visited the Mazaruni prison in the interior of Guyana. Data on patient encounters was collected as part of the triage activity. Results: Care was given to 108 patients, staff and family members. Contrary to literature expectations, 50% of complaints concerned musculoskeletal issues, while only 11% were genitor-reproductive. Upon examination, 30.6% of patients were experiencing musculoskeletal problems, most commonly back pain. Conclusion: Future medical interventions to this and comparable low- and middle-income country prisons should more vigorously consider physiotherapeutic interventions, in addition to the expected addressing of infectious diseases. PMID:23121742

  14. Complaints related to mandibular function impairment after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Niezen, E T; Bos, R R M; de Bont, L G M; Stegenga, B; Dijkstra, P U

    2010-07-01

    This study analysed the relationship between complaints and mandibular function after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle in a prospective study. In a 1-year follow-up, complaints were assessed during physical examination and function was assessed using the mandibular function impairment questionnaire (MFIQ), scoring range 0-68. Data from 114 patients (41 women, 73 men), mean age 28.1 years (SD 13.3), were available. On average the MFIQ scores were low 3.4 (SD 7.3). Ten patients (9%) experienced pain and 45 (39%) patients had a MFIQ score > 0. Mean mouth opening was 51.9 mm (SD 8.4). Occlusion was perceived as moderate or poor by 24% of the patients. In the logistic regression analysis mandibular function impairment (MFIQ score > 0) was entered as a dependent variable. Risk factors for mandibular function impairment were: pain, perceived occlusion (moderate or poor), absolute difference between left and right horizontal movements and age. A protective factor was mouth opening. The results of this study show that complaints (i.e. pain, perceived occlusion, reduced mouth opening, difference between left and right lateral movements and increased age) are predictors of mandibular function impairment after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle. PMID:20430584

  15. Rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids pertaining to the management of rheumatic complaints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritis pain is reported as one of the most common reasons for persons using medical herbal cannabis in North America. “Severe arthritis” is the condition justifying legal use of cannabis in over half of all authorizations in Canada, where cannabis remains a controlled substance. As champions for the care of persons with arthritis, rheumatologists must be knowledgeable of treatment modalities both traditional and non-traditional, used by their patients. As study of cannabinoid molecules in medicine is recent, we have examined the confidence in the knowledge of cannabinoids expressed by Canadian rheumatologists. Methods The confidence of rheumatologists in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules and mechanisms relevant to rheumatology, and their ability to advise patients about cannabinoid treatments was recorded by an online questionnaire circulated via email to the entire Canadian Rheumatology Association membership. Results Over three quarters of the 128 respondents lacked confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules. While 45% of respondents believed there was no current role for cannabinoids in rheumatology patient care, only 25% supported any use of herbal cannabis. With 70% never having previously prescribed or recommended any cannabinoid treatment, uncertainty regarding good prescribing practices was prevalent. Concerns about risks of cannabis use were in line with the current literature. Conclusions Rheumatologists lacked confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules in general and in their competence to prescribe any cannabinoid for rheumatic complaints. In line with this uncertainty, there is reticence to prescribe cannabinoid preparations for rheumatology patients. Guidance is required to inform rheumatologists on the evidence regarding cannabinoids. PMID:25080153

  16. The effect of depressive symptoms on the association between radiographic osteoarthritis and knee pain: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The progressive nature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) leads to not only to physical but also to psychosocial decline; this aspect can influence knee pain experience, manifestations and inevitably diagnostic accuracy. To analyze the role of depressive symptoms on the association between radiographic OA and knee pain, understanding the ability of knee pain symptoms to find out individuals with radiographic OA. Methods Data on 663 subjects was obtained by interview using a structured questionnaire on social, demographic, behavioural and clinical data. Painful knee was assessed regarding having pain: ever, in the last year, in the last 6 months and in the last month. Using factor analysis, participants were graded using a knee pain score, with higher scores representing more symptomatology. Depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI), and radiographic knee OA was classified using the Kellgren Lawrence (KL) scale; those with KL ≥ 2 were considered as having radiographic OA. Results Knee pain was reported by 53.2% of those with radiographic KL ≥ 2 and by 33.2% of those with radiographic KL < 2. The prevalence of depressive symptoms (BDI > 14) was 19.9% among participants with radiographic KL ≥ 2 and 12.6% among those with radiographic KL < 2 (p = 0.01). The association of knee pain with radiographic knee OA was higher in higher pain scores and in participants without depressive symptoms. Among participants with BDI ≤ 14 the likelihood ratio to identify patients with radiographic knee OA increased with increased pain scores: 1.02 for score 1; 2.19 for score 2 and 7.34 when participants responded positively to all pain questions (score 3). Among participants with depressive symptoms (BDI > 14) likelihood ratios were 0.51, 1.92, 1.82, respectively. The results were similar for both genders. Conclusions Knee pain scores increased ability to identify participants with radiographic KL ≥ 2 in both sexes. However, the presence of depressive symptoms impairs the ability of knee pain complaints to identify patients with radiographic OA. PMID:23875806

  17. A cross-sectional study of elite adult Irish dancers: biopsychosocial traits, pain, and injury.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Roisin; Purtill, Helen; O'Sullivan, Peter; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2015-03-01

    Despite its growing popularity, scant research exists concerning musculoskeletal pain and injury in Irish dancing (ID). This study aimed to record the biopsychosocial characteristics of elite adult Irish dancers and to investigate potential relationships between these characteristics and musculoskeletal pain and injury. One hundred and four professional Irish dancers, elite competitive Irish dancers, and dancers in full time education studying ID completed a questionnaire providing data on dance and activity levels, physical and psychological health, and pain and injury history. Of these subjects, 84 underwent 1. a physical screening of lower limb flexibility, which involved balance and endurance; 2. a number of functional tests; and 3. anthropometric, biomechanical, and anatomical assessments. Subjects were divided into "significantly injured (SI)" and "not significantly injured (NSI)" categories based on the severity and impact of self-reported pain and injury. Thirty-three (31.7%) subjects were classified as SI and 71 (68.3%) as NSI. The factors significantly associated with being SI were female sex (p = 0.036), higher number of subjective general health (p = 0.001) and psychological (p = 0.036) complaints, low mood (p = 0.01), heightened catastrophizing (p = 0.047), and failure always to complete a warm-up (p = 0.006). A self-reported injury rate of 76.9% over the previous 5 years was reported. The mean number of injuries sustained to all body parts over the previous 5 years was 1.49, with a mean of 126.1 days lost annually to injury. Foot and ankle injuries were most prevalent. It was concluded that there is a significant level of musculoskeletal pain and injury in elite adult ID. A complex combination of biopsychosocial factors appears to be associated with pain and injury. PMID:25741782

  18. 32 CFR 724.815 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... it is alleged that a decisional document issued by the NDRB or the SRA contains a specifically indentified violation of 32 CFR part 70 or any references thereto. Complaints will be reviewed pursuant to 32 CFR part 70....

  19. 32 CFR 724.815 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... it is alleged that a decisional document issued by the NDRB or the SRA contains a specifically indentified violation of 32 CFR part 70 or any references thereto. Complaints will be reviewed pursuant to 32 CFR part 70....

  20. 32 CFR 724.815 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... it is alleged that a decisional document issued by the NDRB or the SRA contains a specifically indentified violation of 32 CFR part 70 or any references thereto. Complaints will be reviewed pursuant to 32 CFR part 70....

  1. 32 CFR 724.815 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... it is alleged that a decisional document issued by the NDRB or the SRA contains a specifically indentified violation of 32 CFR part 70 or any references thereto. Complaints will be reviewed pursuant to 32 CFR part 70....

  2. 32 CFR 724.815 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... it is alleged that a decisional document issued by the NDRB or the SRA contains a specifically indentified violation of 32 CFR part 70 or any references thereto. Complaints will be reviewed pursuant to 32 CFR part 70....

  3. 49 CFR 604.29 - Incomplete complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Chief Counsel may dismiss the complaint within 20 days after receiving it. Dismissal shall... Chief Counsel's dismissal shall include the reasons for the dismissal without prejudice....

  4. 49 CFR 1503.801 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide the reason for the dismissal, in writing, to the person who filed the complaint and the person(s... CFR part 7. Portions of the record may be exempt from disclosure pursuant to FOIA. (2) Docket files...

  5. 49 CFR 604.30 - Filing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Room E55-302, Washington, DC 20590 and file it electronically in the Charter... sending the complaint to 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140,...

  6. 12 CFR 626.6030 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration, McLean, Virginia 22102-5090. (b) Complaints... shall be referred to the Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration,...

  7. 28 CFR 42.731 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Compliance Procedures § 42.731 Complaints. (a) General....

  8. 28 CFR 42.731 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Federally Assisted Programs or Activities; Implementation of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 Compliance Procedures § 42.731 Complaints. (a) General....

  9. 14 CFR 302.404 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... violation of the economic regulatory provisions of the Statute or of the Department's rules, regulations... complaints, complainants, or respondents will not be conducive to the proper dispatch of the...

  10. 14 CFR 302.404 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... violation of the economic regulatory provisions of the Statute or of the Department's rules, regulations... complaints, complainants, or respondents will not be conducive to the proper dispatch of the...

  11. 12 CFR 626.6030 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration, McLean, Virginia 22102-5090. (b) Complaints... shall be referred to the Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration,...

  12. 12 CFR 626.6030 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration, McLean, Virginia 22102-5090. (b) Complaints... shall be referred to the Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration,...

  13. 12 CFR 626.6030 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration, McLean, Virginia 22102-5090. (b) Complaints... shall be referred to the Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration,...

  14. 12 CFR 626.6030 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration, McLean, Virginia 22102-5090. (b) Complaints... shall be referred to the Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit Administration,...

  15. Anorectal Complaints in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Christina Lynn; Pham, Thuy Van

    2016-05-01

    Patients commonly present to the emergency department with anorectal complaints. Most of these complaints are benign and can be managed conservatively; however, there are a few anorectal emergencies that clinicians must be aware of in order to prevent further complications. The history and physical examination are especially important so that critical disorders can be recognized and specific treatment plans can be determined. It is important to maintain a broad differential diagnosis of anorectal disease and to distinguish benign from serious processes. PMID:27133243

  16. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  17. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  18. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  19. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Collapse of the lung ( pneumothorax ) Pneumonia causes a sharp chest pain that often gets worse when you ... pleurisy ) can cause chest pain that usually feels sharp, and often gets worse when you take a ...

  20. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  1. Cognitive complaints in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vaessen, Tim J A; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with impairments in cognitive functioning. Although cognitive complaints are related to quality of life, work productivity and health care expenditures, most research and all reviews have focused exclusively on objective cognitive functioning so far. In this systematic review, we assessed the available literature on subjective measures of cognition in adult OSA patients. Concentration complaints were consistently found to be more severe in untreated OSA patients as compared to primary snorers and healthy controls. The same seems to be true for memory and executive function problems, but firm conclusions cannot be made as of yet, due to methodological limitations of the available studies. Cognitive complaints appear to be at least partially related to subjective sleepiness. Importantly, they are not necessarily a sign of objective cognitive impairment. Additional research is needed to explore the relation between cognitive complaints, sleepiness and mood problems using validated and norm-referenced questionnaires for cognitive complaints. In addition, the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on cognitive complaints in OSA warrants further study. PMID:24846772

  2. 14 CFR 16.21 - Pre-complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Complaints § 16.21 Pre-complaint resolution. (a) Except for those persons filing under 49 CFR 26... request to assist the parties with informal resolution. (b) Except for complaints filed under 49 CFR 26... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-complaint resolution. 16.21 Section...

  3. 14 CFR 16.21 - Pre-complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pre-complaint resolution. 16.21 Section 16.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL... to Complaints § 16.21 Pre-complaint resolution. (a) Prior to filing a complaint under this part,...

  4. 14 CFR 16.21 - Pre-complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-complaint resolution. 16.21 Section 16.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL... to Complaints § 16.21 Pre-complaint resolution. (a) Prior to filing a complaint under this part,...

  5. 12 CFR 227.2 - Consumer complaint procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consumer complaint procedure. 227.2 Section 227... SYSTEM UNFAIR OR DECEPTIVE ACTS OR PRACTICES (REGULATION AA) General Provisions § 227.2 Consumer complaint procedure. (a) Submission of complaints. (1) Any consumer having a complaint regarding a...

  6. 29 CFR 2700.36 - Contents of complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Contents of complaint. 2700.36 Section 2700.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Complaints for Compensation § 2700.36 Contents of complaint. A complaint for compensation shall include:...

  7. 47 CFR 1.1406 - Dismissal of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dismissal of complaints. 1.1406 Section 1.1406 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1406 Dismissal of complaints. (a) The complaint shall be dismissed...

  8. 47 CFR 1.1406 - Dismissal of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dismissal of complaints. 1.1406 Section 1.1406 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1406 Dismissal of complaints. (a) The complaint shall be dismissed...

  9. 18 CFR 385.206 - Complaints (Rule 206).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., contracts and affidavits; (9) State (i) Whether the Enforcement Hotline, Dispute Resolution Service, tariff... resolving the complaint. (c) Service. Any person filing a complaint must serve a copy of the complaint on... expected to be affected by the complaint. Service must be simultaneous with filing at the Commission...

  10. 14 CFR 16.21 - Pre-complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-complaint resolution. 16.21 Section 16... to Complaints 16.21 Pre-complaint resolution. (a) Prior to filing a complaint under this part, a... responsible for the noncompliance. These efforts at informal resolution may include, without limitation,...

  11. 29 CFR 2700.36 - Contents of complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contents of complaint. 2700.36 Section 2700.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Complaints for Compensation § 2700.36 Contents of complaint. A complaint for compensation shall include:...

  12. Managing patient complaints in China: a qualitative study in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yishi; Ying, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Sirui Rae; Kane, Sumit; Mukhopadhyay, Maitrayee; Qian, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the handling system for patient complaints and to identify existing barriers that are associated with effective management of patient complaints in China. Setting Key stakeholders of the handling system for patient complaints at the national, Shanghai municipal and hospital levels in China. Participants 35 key informants including policymakers, hospital managers, healthcare providers, users and other stakeholders in Shanghai. Primary and secondary outcome measures Semistructured interviews were conducted to understand the process of handling patient complaints and factors affecting the process and outcomes of patient complaint management. Results The Chinese handling system for patient complaints was established in the past decade. Hospitals shoulder the most responsibility of patient complaint handling. Barriers to effective management of patient complaints included service users’ low awareness of the systems in the initial stage of the process; poor capacity and skills of healthcare providers, incompetence and powerlessness of complaint handlers and non-transparent exchange of information during the process of complaint handling; conflicts between relevant actors and regulations and unjustifiable complaints by patients during solution settlements; and weak enforcement of regulations, deficient information for managing patient complaints and unwillingness of the hospitals to effectively handle complaints in the postcomplaint stage. Conclusions Barriers to the effective management of patient complaints vary at the different stages of complaint handling and perspectives on these barriers differ between the service users and providers. Information, procedure design, human resources, system arrangement, unified legal system and regulations and factors shaping the social context all play important roles in effective patient complaint management. PMID:25146715

  13. 29 CFR 2700.36 - Contents of complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contents of complaint. 2700.36 Section 2700.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Complaints for Compensation § 2700.36 Contents of complaint. A complaint for compensation shall include:...

  14. 29 CFR 2700.36 - Contents of complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contents of complaint. 2700.36 Section 2700.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Complaints for Compensation § 2700.36 Contents of complaint. A complaint for compensation shall include:...

  15. 47 CFR 1.721 - Format and content of complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Format and content of complaints. 1.721 Section 1.721 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Complaints, Applications, Tariffs, and Reports Involving Common Carriers Formal Complaints § 1.721 Format and content of complaints. (a) Subject to paragraph...

  16. 34 CFR 300.152 - Minimum State complaint procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Minimum State complaint procedures. 300.152 Section 300... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.152 Minimum State complaint procedures. (a) Time limit; minimum procedures. Each SEA must include in its complaint procedures a...

  17. 34 CFR 300.152 - Minimum State complaint procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum State complaint procedures. 300.152 Section 300... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.152 Minimum State complaint procedures. (a) Time limit; minimum procedures. Each SEA must include in its complaint procedures a...

  18. 5 CFR 2423.25 - Post complaint, prehearing settlements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post complaint, prehearing settlements... Post Complaint, Prehearing Procedures § 2423.25 Post complaint, prehearing settlements. (a) Informal and formal settlements. Post complaint settlements may be either informal or formal. (1)...

  19. 5 CFR 2423.25 - Post complaint, prehearing settlements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Post complaint, prehearing settlements... Post Complaint, Prehearing Procedures § 2423.25 Post complaint, prehearing settlements. (a) Informal and formal settlements. Post complaint settlements may be either informal or formal. (1)...

  20. 24 CFR 135.76 - Filing and processing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOW- AND VERY LOW-INCOME PERSONS Complaint and Compliance Review § 135.76 Filing and processing complaints. (a) Who may file a complaint. The following... Assistant Secretary a complaint alleging noncompliance with section 3: (1) Any section 3 resident on...

  1. 34 CFR 300.153 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Filing a complaint. 300.153 Section 300.153 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.153 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 300.151 through...

  2. 34 CFR 303.434 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Filing a complaint. 303.434 Section 303.434 Education... DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards State Complaint Procedures § 303.434 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 303.432...

  3. 34 CFR 300.152 - Minimum State complaint procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Minimum State complaint procedures. 300.152 Section 300... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.152 Minimum State complaint procedures. (a) Time limit; minimum procedures. Each SEA must include in its complaint procedures a...

  4. 34 CFR 303.434 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Filing a complaint. 303.434 Section 303.434 Education... DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards State Complaint Procedures § 303.434 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 303.432...

  5. 34 CFR 300.153 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Filing a complaint. 300.153 Section 300.153 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.153 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 300.151 through...

  6. 5 CFR 2423.25 - Post complaint, prehearing settlements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Post complaint, prehearing settlements... Post Complaint, Prehearing Procedures § 2423.25 Post complaint, prehearing settlements. (a) Informal and formal settlements. Post complaint settlements may be either informal or formal. (1)...

  7. 24 CFR 135.76 - Filing and processing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOW- AND VERY LOW-INCOME PERSONS Complaint and Compliance Review § 135.76 Filing and processing complaints. (a) Who may file a complaint. The following... Assistant Secretary a complaint alleging noncompliance with section 3: (1) Any section 3 resident on...

  8. 24 CFR 135.76 - Filing and processing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOW- AND VERY LOW-INCOME PERSONS Complaint and Compliance Review § 135.76 Filing and processing complaints. (a) Who may file a complaint. The following... Assistant Secretary a complaint alleging noncompliance with section 3: (1) Any section 3 resident on...

  9. 24 CFR 135.76 - Filing and processing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOW- AND VERY LOW-INCOME PERSONS Complaint and Compliance Review § 135.76 Filing and processing complaints. (a) Who may file a complaint. The following... Assistant Secretary a complaint alleging noncompliance with section 3: (1) Any section 3 resident on...

  10. 5 CFR 2423.25 - Post complaint, prehearing settlements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Post complaint, prehearing settlements... Post Complaint, Prehearing Procedures § 2423.25 Post complaint, prehearing settlements. (a) Informal and formal settlements. Post complaint settlements may be either informal or formal. (1)...

  11. 34 CFR 300.153 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Filing a complaint. 300.153 Section 300.153 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.153 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 300.151 through...

  12. 34 CFR 300.153 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Filing a complaint. 300.153 Section 300.153 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.153 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 300.151 through...

  13. 5 CFR 2423.25 - Post complaint, prehearing settlements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Post complaint, prehearing settlements... Post Complaint, Prehearing Procedures § 2423.25 Post complaint, prehearing settlements. (a) Informal and formal settlements. Post complaint settlements may be either informal or formal. (1)...

  14. 34 CFR 300.152 - Minimum State complaint procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum State complaint procedures. 300.152 Section 300... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.152 Minimum State complaint procedures. (a) Time limit; minimum procedures. Each SEA must include in its complaint procedures a...

  15. 24 CFR 135.76 - Filing and processing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOW- AND VERY LOW-INCOME PERSONS Complaint and Compliance Review § 135.76 Filing and processing complaints. (a) Who may file a complaint. The following... Assistant Secretary a complaint alleging noncompliance with section 3: (1) Any section 3 resident on...

  16. 34 CFR 303.434 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Filing a complaint. 303.434 Section 303.434 Education... DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards State Complaint Procedures § 303.434 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 303.432...

  17. 34 CFR 300.153 - Filing a complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing a complaint. 300.153 Section 300.153 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.153 Filing a complaint. (a) An organization or individual may file a signed written complaint under the procedures described in §§ 300.151 through...

  18. 34 CFR 300.152 - Minimum State complaint procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum State complaint procedures. 300.152 Section 300... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility State Complaint Procedures § 300.152 Minimum State complaint procedures. (a) Time limit; minimum procedures. Each SEA must include in its complaint procedures a...

  19. 14 CFR 16.21 - Pre-complaint resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-complaint resolution. 16.21 Section 16... to Complaints § 16.21 Pre-complaint resolution. (a) Prior to filing a complaint under this part, a... responsible for the noncompliance. These efforts at informal resolution may include, without limitation,...

  20. Pain as a Comorbidity of Pediatric Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hainsworth, Keri R.; Miller, Lawrence A.; Stolzman, Stacy C.; Fidlin, Brian M.; Davies, W. Hobart; Weisman, Steven J.; Skelton, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the prevalence and characteristics of physical pain in a sample of severely obese children and adolescents. In this retrospective chart review, primary measures included current and past pain, pain intensity, and pain characteristics during a 5-minute walk test. Pain assessments for 74 patients (mean age 11.7 years; 53% female; 41% African American) were conducted by a physical therapist. Past pain was reported by 73% of the sample, with 47% reporting pain on the day of program enrollment. Although average pain intensity was moderate (M = 5.5/10), alarmingly, 42% of those with current pain reported severe pain (6/10 to 10/10). Overall, pain occurred primarily in the lower extremities and with physical activity. Patients reporting current pain had a significantly higher body mass index than those reporting no pain. These findings suggest that pain is common in severely obese youth, and furthermore, that pain should be recognized as a comorbidity of pediatric obesity. Routinely screening severely obese children and adolescents for pain presence and intensity is recommended. PMID:24723992

  1. Musculoskeletal Pain as a Marker of Health Quality. Findings from the Epidemiological Sleep Study among the Adult Population of São Paulo City

    PubMed Central

    Palombini, Luciana; Godoy, Luciana M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We are witnessing the growth of urban populations, particularly in the developing world. São Paulo, the largest city in South America, continues to grow, and this growth is dramatically effecting the environment and human health. The aim of this study was to estimate the point prevalence of chronic pain in São Paulo city dwellers and to explore the influence of aspects related to urbanicity. Methods A two-stage cluster randomized sample included 1100 individuals of the city of Sao Paulo, representing the population proportionally in terms of gender, age and social classes in 2007. For this observational cross-sectional study, the household sample was interviewed using validated questionnaires for sociodemographic aspects, the Beck inventories for anxiety and depression, the WHOQoL-REF for quality of life, the Chalder Fatigue Scale. Musculoskeletal pain was defined as diffuse pain or pain located in the back, joints or limbs. Data regarding sleep complaints and polysomnography were obtained from the Epidemiologic Sleep Study conducted in São Paulo city in 2007. Results The prevalence estimate of chronic musculoskeletal pain was approximately 27%, with a female/male ratio of approximately 2.6/1. The predictors were being in the age-range of 30–39 years, low socioeconomic and schooling levels, obesity, sedentarism, fatigue, non-restorative sleep, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep quality, poor life quality, anxiety and depression symptoms. Psychological wellbeing was the main discriminator between responders with chronic musculoskeletal pain and the controls, followed by depression for the participants with poor psychological wellbeing, and fatigue, for the remaining ones. Insomnia syndrome was the third-level discriminator for those with fatigue, whereas sleep quality for those without fatigue. Conclusions Musculoskeletal pain was frequently reported by São Paulo city dwellers and its correlates with psychological and sleep aspects are suggestive of a response to urbanicity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00596713 PMID:26600201

  2. Abdominal Pain following Gastric Bypass: Suspects & Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Alexander J.; O’Rourke, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Gastric bypass remains the mainstay of surgical therapy for obesity. Abdominal pain after gastric bypass is common, and accounts for up to half of all postoperative complaints and emergency room visits. This manuscript reviews the most important causes of abdominal pain specific to gastric bypass and discusses management considerations. Data Sources The current surgical literature was reviewed using PubMed, with a focus on abdominal pain after gastric bypass and the known pathologies that underlie its pathogenesis. Conclusions The differential diagnosis for abdominal pain after gastric bypass is large and includes benign and life-threatening entities. Its diverse causes require a broad evaluation that should be directed by history and clinical presentation. In the absence of a clear diagnosis, the threshold for surgical exploration in patients with abdominal pain after gastric bypass should be low. PMID:21333269

  3. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    Face pain may be dull and throbbing or an intense, stabbing discomfort in the face or forehead. It can occur in one or ... Pain that starts in the face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in the body. ...

  4. Chronic Pain Associated with Upper-Limb Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Marisol A.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Jensen, Mark; Czerniecki, Joseph; Smith, Douglas G.; Robinson, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence, intensity, and functional impact of the following types of pain associated with upper-limb loss: phantom limb, residual limb, back, neck, and nonamputated-limb pain. Design Cross-sectional survey; 104 respondents with upper-limb loss at least 6 months postamputation completed measures of pain intensity, interference, disability, and health-related quality-of-life. Results Nearly all (90%) of the respondents reported pain, with 76% reporting more than one pain type. Phantom-limb pain and residual-limb pain were the most prevalent (79% and 71%, respectively), followed by back (52%), neck (43%), and nonamputated-limb pain (33%). Although nonamputated-limb pain was least prevalent, it was reported to cause the highest levels of interference and pain-related disability days. Self-reported quality-of-life was significantly lower for individuals with each type of pain compared with those without any pain. Age, time since amputation, and cause of amputation were not associated with pain. Conclusions In addition to pain in the phantom and residual limb, back, neck, and nonamputated-limb pain are also common after upper-limb loss. All of these pain types are associated with significant disability and activity interference for some individuals, suggesting that assessment of multiple pain types in persons with upper-limb amputation may be important. PMID:19692791

  5. The association between chronic pain and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Okifuji, Akiko; Hare, Bradford D

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and pain present serious public health concerns in our society. Evidence strongly suggests that comorbid obesity is common in chronic pain conditions, and pain complaints are common in obese individuals. In this paper, we review the association between obesity and pain in the general population as well as chronic pain patients. We also review the relationship between obesity and pain response to noxious stimulation in animals and humans. Based upon the existing research, we present several potential mechanisms that may link the two phenomena, including mechanical/structural factors, chemical mediators, depression, sleep, and lifestyle. We discuss the clinical implications of obesity and pain, focusing on the effect of weight loss, both surgical and noninvasive, on pain. The literature suggests that the two conditions are significant comorbidities, adversely impacting each other. The nature of the relationship however is not likely to be direct, but many interacting factors appear to contribute. Weight loss for obese pain patients appears to be an important aspect of overall pain rehabilitation, although more efforts are needed to determine strategies to maintain long-term benefit. PMID:26203274

  6. 5 CFR 2423.20 - Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. 2423.20 Section 2423.20... § 2423.20 Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. (a) Complaint. Whenever formal proceedings are deemed necessary, the Regional...

  7. 5 CFR 2423.20 - Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. 2423.20 Section 2423.20... § 2423.20 Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. (a) Complaint. Whenever formal proceedings are deemed necessary, the Regional...

  8. 5 CFR 2423.20 - Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. 2423.20 Section 2423.20... § 2423.20 Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. (a) Complaint. Whenever formal proceedings are deemed necessary, the Regional...

  9. 5 CFR 2423.20 - Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. 2423.20 Section 2423.20... § 2423.20 Issuance and contents of the complaint; answer to the complaint; amendments; role of Office of Administrative Law Judges. (a) Complaint. Whenever formal proceedings are deemed necessary, the Regional...

  10. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. PMID:24591846

  11. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. PMID:24591846

  12. Painful diabetic neuropathy: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Didangelos, Triantafyllos; Doupis, John; Veves, Aristidis

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of several clinical syndromes in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and presents a major challenge for optimal management. The epidemiology of PDN has not been extensively studied. On the basis of available data, the prevalence of pain ranges from 10% to 20% in patients with diabetes and from 40% to 50% in those with diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathic pain can be disabling and devastating, with a significant impact on the patient's quality of life and associated healthcare cost. Pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying PDN are similar to other neuropathic pain disorders and broadly invoke peripheral and central sensitization. The natural course of PDN is variable, with the majority of patients experiencing spontaneous improvement and resolution of pain. Quantifying neuropathic pain is difficult, especially in clinical practice, but has improved recently in clinical trials with the development of neuropathic pain-specific tools, such as the Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire and the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. Hyperglycemia-induced pathways result in nerve dysfunction and damage, which lead to hyperexcitable peripheral and central pathways of pain. Glycemic control may prevent or partially reverse DPN and modulate PDN. PMID:25410214

  13. Complaints of Sleep Disturbances Are Associated with Cardiovascular Disease: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Matthias; Wiltink, Jörg; Kirschner, Yvonne; Schneider, Astrid; Wild, Philipp S.; Münzel, Thomas; Blettner, Maria; Schulz, Andreas; Lackner, Karl; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tschan, Regine; Tuin, Inka; Beutel, Manfred E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their high prevalence, sleep disorders often remain unrecognized and untreated because of barriers to assessment and management. The aims of the present study were to examine associations of complaints of sleep disturbances with cardiovascular disease, related risk factors, and inflammation in the community and to determine the contribution of sleep disturbances to self-perceived physical health. Method The sample consists of n = 10.000 participants, aged 35 to 74 years of a population based community sample in Germany. Cross-sectional associations of complaints of sleep disturbances with cardiovascular risk factors and disease, biomarkers of inflammation, depression, anxiety, and physical health status were analyzed. Results 19% of our sample endorsed clinically significant sleep disturbances. In the unadjusted analyses severity of sleep disturbances increased with female sex, low socioeconomic status, living without a partnership, cardiovascular disease, depression, anxiety, poor physical health, increased levels of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. After multivariate adjustment robust associations with coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction and dyslipidemia remained. Complaints of sleep disturbances were strong and independent contributors to self-perceived poor physical health beyond depression, anxiety and medical disease burden. Conclusions Given the high prevalence of complaints of sleep disturbances and their strong impact on health status, increased efforts should be undertaken for their identification and treatment. PMID:25093413

  14. SLEEP COMPLAINTS IN COMMUNITY-LIVING OLDER PERSONS: A MULTIFACTORIAL GERIATRIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Among older persons, sleep complaints in the form of insomnia and daytime drowsiness are highly prevalent and associated with adverse outcomes. The underlying mechanisms are linked to age-related declines in physiology, i.e., normal aging, and age-related increases in disease prevalence, i.e., usual aging. In this monograph, we describe how normal aging leads to less restorative sleep, characterized by reductions in homeostatic and circadian sleep, and to phase advancement of the sleep-wake cycle, characterized by older persons being more alert in the early morning but drowsier in the early evening. We also describe how usual aging leads to sleep complaints through reductions in health status, loss of physical function, and primary sleep disorders. Psychosocial influences are likewise described and their relevance to sleep complaints is discussed. We subsequently incorporate these aging-related changes into a conceptual model that describes sleep complaints as a consequence of multiple and interdependent predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factors, akin to a geriatric syndrome. We conclude our discussion by applying our conceptual model to the sleep-related care of an older person with insomnia and daytime drowsiness, and suggest that the diagnostic assessment consider, in addition to primary sleep disorders, multiple domains including medical, physical, cognitive, psychological, and social issues with the intent of developing an overall therapeutic plan and establishing long-term follow-up. PMID:17916123

  15. Bladder and Bowel Symptoms Among Adults Presenting With Low Back Pain to an Academic Chiropractic Clinic: Results of a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Walden, Anna L.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Reed, William R.; Lawrence, Dana J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to estimate the 1-month point prevalence of bowel and bladder symptoms (BBS) among adult chiropractic patients and to evaluate associations between these symptoms and low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients 18 years or older presenting to a chiropractic college academic health clinic between March 25 and April 25, 2013, were asked to complete a symptom screening questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, Fisher exact test, and P values were calculated from the sample. Results The sample included 140 of 1300 patients who visited the clinic during the survey period (11%). Mean age was 47.5 (range 18-79) years. LBP was the primary chief complaint in 42%. The 1-month point prevalence of any bladder symptoms was 75%, while the rate for bowel symptoms was 62%; 55% reported both BBS. Binary logistic regression analyses showed no statistically significant association between a chief complaint of LBP and combined BBS (OR = 1.67, P = .164). Conclusion The prevalence of bowel and bladder symptoms in chiropractic patients was high. There was no statistically significant association between these symptoms and LBP in this group of patients seeking care for LBP. PMID:25225466

  16. The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease among hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Ercelep, O B; Caglar, E; Dobrucali, A

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative estimate of the actual prevalence of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is difficult to obtain because most of the patients with heartburn have intermittent symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of typical and atypical symptoms suggesting GERD to investigate the association of habits and social conditions reported to lead to reflux in the employees of hospital. A total of 2037 collected forms were assessed. The prevalence of GERD was found to be 21.7% (442). The prevalence of symptoms other than heartburn in employees with and without GERD symptoms were 6.6% versus 3.4% (P < 0.05) for asthma, 27.6% versus 8.3% (P < 0.001) for night cough, 50% versus 19.5% (P < 0.001) for noncardiac chest pain. Dyspeptic complaints were found to be significantly higher among GERD patients (P < 0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, female gender (odds ratio [OR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.60, P = 0.027), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug medication (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.60, P = 0.021) and body mass index over 30 (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.60-3.18, P < 0.001) were independent risk factors associated with GERD symptoms. GERD is a common health problem in Turkey, and its prevalence is similar to that of Western populations with different symptom profiles. Female gender, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and body mass index >30 kg/m(2) were independent risk factors associated with GERD symptoms. Age, alcohol, coffee, tea, and tobacco smoking do not seem to be risk factors for reflux. PMID:23020266

  17. Low Back Pain in Port Machinery Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BOVENZI, M.; PINTO, I.; STACCHINI, N.

    2002-05-01

    The occurrence of several types of low back pain (LBP) was investigated by a standardized questionnaire in a group of 219 port machinery operators exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) and postural load and in a control group of 85 maintenance workers employed at the same transport company. The group of port machinery operators included 85 straddle carrier drivers, 88 fork-lift truck drivers, and 46 crane operators. The vector sum of the frequency-weighted r.m.s. acceleration of vibration measured on the seatpan of port vehicles and machines averaged 0·90 m/s2 for fork-lift trucks, 0·48 m/s2 for straddle carriers, 0·53 m/s2 for mobile cranes, and 0·22 m/s2 for overhead cranes. The 12-month prevalence of low back symptoms (LBP, sciatic pain, treated LBP, sick leave due to LBP) was significantly greater in the fork-lift truck drivers than in the controls and the other two groups of port machinery operators. After adjusting for potential confounders, the prevalence of low back symptoms was found to increase with the increase of WBV exposure expressed as duration of exposure (driving years), equivalent vibration magnitude (m/s2), or cumulative vibration exposure (yr m2/s4). An excess risk for lumbar disc herniation was observed in the port machinery operators with prolonged driving experience. In both the controls and the port machinery operators, low back complaints were strongly associated with perceived postural load assessed in terms of frequency and/or duration of awkward postures at work. Multivariate analysis showed that vibration exposure and postural load were independent predictors of LBP. Even though the cross-sectional design of the present study does not permit firm conclusions on the relationship between WBV exposure and low back disorders, the findings of this investigation provide additional epidemiological evidence that seated WBV exposure combined with non-neutral trunk postures, as while driving, is associated with an increased risk of long-term adverse health effects on the lower back.

  18. 20 CFR 658.401 - Types of complaints handled by the JS complaint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... agency shall handle such complaints under the Department's regulations at 41 CFR part 60-250. (c... in writing by the State agency and the ETA regional office and referred to ESA or OSHA pursuant to... subagencies other than JS (non-JS related complaints) shall be logged by the State agency and the ETA...

  19. 20 CFR 658.401 - Types of complaints handled by the JS complaint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... agency shall handle such complaints under the Department's regulations at 41 CFR part 60-250. (c... in writing by the State agency and the ETA regional office and referred to ESA or OSHA pursuant to... subagencies other than JS (non-JS related complaints) shall be logged by the State agency and the ETA...

  20. 47 CFR 6.22 - Formal complaints based on unsatisfied informal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Formal complaints based on unsatisfied informal complaints. 6.22 Section 6.22 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICE, TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND CUSTOMER PREMISES EQUIPMENT BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Enforcement § 6.22...