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Sample records for pain palliation philippines

  1. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care helps people with serious illnesses feel better. One of the problems a serious illness can cause ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Challenging pain problems. In: Walsh D, Caraceni AT, Fainsinger ...

  2. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  3. [Palliative pain therapy, cannabinoids].

    PubMed

    Radbruch, L; Elsner, F

    2005-10-01

    Cancer pain treatment should follow the recommendations of the World Health Organisation. Treatment should be with oral application, regular application times and following the analgesic step-ladder. Non-opioids such as dipyrone or non-steroids are used for slight to moderate pain, step-2 opioids such as tramadol or tilidine/naloxone for moderate pain and step-3 opioids such as morphine, oxycodone or hydromorphone for severe pain. Transdermal application of fentanyl or buprenorphine offer a non-invasive parenteral alternative for patients with stable pain syndromes. Cannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol offer a valuable add-on option for cancer patients with refractory pain, spasticity, nausea or appetite loss. PMID:15965665

  4. Integrated pain and palliative medicine model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Mayank

    2016-07-01

    Pain is one of the most common, distressing and feared symptom among cancer and other patients in need of palliative care. An estimated 25% of cancer patients and 25 million people die in pain each year. Effective pain and symptom management are the core elements of palliative care which aims at reducing suffering and improving quality of life (QOL) throughout the course of illness starting from diagnosis, in sync with curative treatments and at end of life. There is a prevailing shortage of manpower apt to deal with pain and providing cost-effective palliative care and with the rise of cancer, other chronic diseases and explosion of new life-prolonging therapeutic modalities, this 'Patient-pain and palliative physician' discrepancy is only going to increase, more so in developing countries. The need of the hour is to train all healthcare physicians and nurses especially those working in the field of chronic pain in principles of effective pain and symptom palliation, to integrate cancer pain and symptom management into existing pain management fellowships and to introduce a holistic pain and palliative care model at all levels of healthcare system. Simultaneously, of equal importance is to conduct research, evidence building and formulate policies and guidelines for meticulous symptom management among the diverse category of patients and diseases so as to have a personalized and individualistic approach to patient management. In this comprehensive review, we have pondered upon the need, advantages, barriers and recommendations to achieve ideal 'Integrated pain and palliative medicine' services, their equitable implementation and delivery to 'whomsoever in need of them'. PMID:27334349

  5. Pain Assessment in Noncommunicative Adult Palliative Care Patients.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Deborah B; Kaiser, Karen Snow; Haisfield-Wolfe, Mary Ellen; Iyamu, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Palliative care patients who have pain are often unable to self-report their pain, placing them at increased risk for underrecognized and undertreated pain. Use of appropriate pain assessment tools significantly enhances the likelihood of effective pain management and improved pain-related outcomes. This paper reviews selected tools and provides palliative care clinicians with a practical approach to selecting a pain assessment tool for noncommunicative adult patients. PMID:27497016

  6. Chronic pain in the outpatient palliative care clinic.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jessica S; Childers, Julie; Arnold, Robert M

    2013-03-01

    Chronic pain is common. Many patients with cancer and other life-limiting illnesses have chronic pain that is related to their disease, and some have comorbid chronic nonmalignant chronic pain. As palliative care continues to move upstream and outpatient palliative care programs develop, palliative care clinicians will be called upon to treat chronic pain. Chronic pain differs from acute pain in the setting of advanced disease and a short prognosis in terms of its etiology, comorbidities-especially psychiatric illness and substance abuse-and management. To successfully care for these patients, palliative care providers will need to learn new clinical competencies. This article will review chronic pain management core competencies for palliative care providers. PMID:22556285

  7. Using cannabinoids in pain and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Peat, Sue

    2010-10-01

    Interest in the use of cannabinoids in a clinical setting is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where more conventional treatments have failed. They have been reported as offering perceived benefits in a wide range of conditions, but the major interest at present is centred on their place in pain management and in the palliation of symptoms secondary to terminal cancer and neurological disease. The potential benefits include symptomatic relief for patients suffering from intractable neuropathic pain, anorexia, anxiety and muscle spasm. There is clear consensus that cannibinoids should not be used as a first-line monotherapy, but should be considered as valuable adjuvants to more commonly indicated therapeutic options in the management of palliative care patients. Scientific evidence documenting the benefits of the canibinoids nabilone and sativex is accumulating, but needs to be evaluated carefully in the light of the paucity of available data. Both drugs are usually used under the guidance of specialist units. Nabilone and Sativex are now controlled drugs, and are frequently used outside of their licensed indication (control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting) and hence particular care needs to be taken in evaluating the rational for their use. Sativex has been recently licenced for use in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:20972379

  8. Growing Pains: Palliative Care Making Gains

    Cancer.gov

    An article about the growth of palliative care, a medical subspecialty that has been shown to improve patient outcomes such as symptom management, quality of life, and patient and family satisfaction with care.

  9. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain. PMID:23329083

  10. [Hypnosis as an alternative treatment for pain in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Peintinger, Christa; Hartmann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Pain--which can have a variety of causes--constitutes a severe problem for patients in need of palliative care, because this pain usually dramatically impairs their quality of life. Thus, the more advanced a terminal illness has become, the more hospital staff should focus on holistic treatment, encompassing body, mind and soul of the patient. Apart from conventional medication-based pain therapy, there is also a variety of non-medicinal treatments for pain. One of these methods is hypnosis, an imaginative treatment that activates available resources; it is not only an effective way of alleviating pain, but it also can ease psychological problems at the same time. PMID:19165446

  11. When patients are stressed, in pain, suggest palliative care.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Case managers are in a good position to recognize patients who have serious medical problems that are causing them and their family members stress, and refer them for a palliative care consultation, experts say. The palliative care team coordinates with the team providing medical care and helps control pain and other physical symptoms, relieves depression and anxiety, and provides support and spiritual help for the patient and family. The core palliative care team typically includes a medical specialist, a nurse who also acts as a case manager, a social worker, and a spiritual counselor. Palliative care improves outcomes and patient satisfaction when patients have a consultation early in the stay or even in the emergency department. PMID:27323510

  12. Satisfaction with and Perception of Pain Management among Palliative Patients with Breakthrough Pain: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Pathmawathi, Subramanian; Beng, Tan Seng; Li, Lee Mei; Rosli, Roshaslina; Sharwend, Supermanian; Kavitha, Rasaiah R; Christopher, Boey Chiong Meng

    2015-08-01

    Breakthrough pain is a significant contributor to much suffering by patients. The experience of intense pain may interfere with, and affect, daily life functioning and has major consequences on patients' well-being if it is not well managed. The area of breakthrough pain has not been fully understood. This study thus aimed to explore the experiences of breakthrough pain among palliative patients. A qualitative study based on a series of open-ended interviews among 21 palliative patients suffering from pain at an urban tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted. Five themes were generated: (i) pain viewed as an unbearable experience causing misery in the lives of patients, (ii) deterioration of body function and no hope of recovery, (iii) receiving of inadequate pain management for pain, (iv) insensitivity of healthcare providers toward patients' pain experience, and (v) pain coping experiences of patients. The findings revealed that nonpharmacologic approaches such as psychosocial support should be introduced to the patients. Proper guidance and information should be given to healthcare providers to improve the quality of patient care. Healthcare providers should adopt a sensitive approach in caring for patients' needs. The aim is to meet the needs of the patients who want to be pain free or to attain adequate relief of their pain for breakthrough pain. PMID:26256219

  13. [High-dose buprenorphine for outpatient palliative pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Gastmeier, K; Freye, E

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 78-year-old patient with cancer-related pain and additionally mixed-pain syndrome is presented. Pain therapy with buprenorphine TTS 210 microg/h every 3 days was sufficient in the beginning, later the therapy was changed because of increasing problems of tape fixing during fever periods under chemotherapy to a continuous infusion of buprenorphine intravenously via an external medication pump. During the course of therapy it became necessary to increase the dose to 99.9 mg/day buprenorphine. Under this medication a sufficient pain reduction (median NRS 2-3) over a period of 135 days could be achieved. At the same time the patient was vigilant and cooperative without signs of intoxication until the end of life at home in the presence of his family.If no signs of intoxication occur under extreme opioid therapy and a sufficient pain therapy can be achieved, a rotation to another opioid is not necessary. However, outpatient palliative care requires a frequent adaptation to the individually varying opioid demand of the patient and time-consuming nursing care. PMID:19066981

  14. Palliation of bone pain with Sn-117m(4+)DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, L.F.; Mausner, L.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    Sn-117m(4+)DTPA prepared at Brookhaven National Laboratory has favorable physical and biological characteristics for use as a palliative agent to relieve pain from osseous metastases. The short range of the emitted conversion electrons permits large bone radiation doses without excessive radiation to the bone marrow. An accompanying 158.6 keV gamma is useful for monitoring the distribution. The T1/2 of 13.6 days provides an adequate shelf life. A previous study in humans has demonstrated favorable dosimetry with a bone surface dose of approximately 57.9 mGy/MBq and a bone surface to marrow ratio of 10:1. This study was instituted to find a dose level which was effective and to monitor effects on bone marrow. Sn-117m was administered to 14 patients. Administered activity ranged between 66 and 573 MBq or 1.2-5.8 MBq/kg body weight. At the lower dose levels (<3.1 MBq/kg, n=7), 1 obtained good relief of pain, 1 partial relief, and 1 no relief. The remaining 4 were not evaluated because of the need for further treatment of soft tissue disease or because of intervening death. The 7 patients treated at the higher dose level (4.8-5.8 MBq/kg) included patients with prostate (3), breast (3) and unknown (1) primary cancers. All patients experienced relief of pain, 5 excellent and 2 partial. No marrow suppression was observed as a result of Sn-117m therapy. Initial observations indicate that Sn-117m DTPA is effective in palliation of pain from osseous metastases without producing bone marrow suppression. Further studies at a higher dose level are planned.

  15. Elderly Patients With Painful Bone Metastases Should be Offered Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Sarah; Presutti, Roseanna; Zhang Liying; Salvo, Nadia; Hird, Amanda; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Danjoux, Cyril; Sahgal, Arjun; Mitera, Gunita; Sinclair, Emily; DeAngelis, Carlo; Nguyen, Janet; Napolskikh, Julie; Chow, Edward

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in relieving metastatic bone pain in elderly patients. Methods and Materials: The response to RT for palliation of metastatic bone pain was evaluated from a prospective database of 558 patients between 1999 and 2008. The pain scores and analgesic intake were used to calculate the response according to the International Bone Metastases Consensus Working Party palliative RT endpoints. Subgroup analyses for age and other demographic information were performed. Results: No significant difference was found in the response rate in patients aged >=65, >=70, and >=75 years compared with younger patients at 1, 2, or 3 months after RT. The response was found to be significantly related to the performance status. Conclusion: Age alone did not affect the response to palliative RT for bone metastases. Elderly patients should be referred for palliative RT for their painful bone metastases, regardless of age, because they receive equal benefit from the treatment.

  16. Radionuclide therapy for palliation of pain due to osteoblastic metastases.

    PubMed

    Hellman, R S; Krasnow, A Z

    1998-01-01

    Beta-emitting, bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, administered systemically, represent a good alternative or adjuvant to external beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful osteoblastic bone metastases. The most frequently used radiopharmaceutical for this purpose is strontium 89, followed by samarium 153 ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate, and infrequently phosphorus 32 orthophosphate. Prior to consideration for radionuclide therapy, recent bone scans should be evaluated in order to determine if the patient has painful osteoblastic lesions likely to respond to therapy. Approximately 70% of patients with prostate and breast cancer will have a reduction in pain in response to radionuclide therapy, beginning within 2 to 4 weeks and lasting between 2 and 6 months. Patients who are expected to live 3 or more months are more likely to benefit than patients with shorter duration life expectancy. Hematosuppression is the chief side effect of radionuclide therapy, with leukopenia and thrombocytopenia more likely to be clinically significant than anemia. Relative contraindications for treatment include osteolytic lesions, pending spinal cord compression or pathologic fracture, preexisting severe myelosuppression, urinary incontinence, inability to follow radiation safety precautions, and severe renal insufficiency. PMID:15859838

  17. Psychiatric Morbidity, Pain Perception, and Functional Status of Chronic Pain Patients in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Context: Psychological factors, such as that exist when we experience pain, can profoundly alter the strength of pain perception. Aim: The study aims to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, and its association with perception of pain and functional status in chronic patients in palliative care. Materials and Methods: The sample was selected via simple randomisation and post consent were assessed using (1) a semi- structured questionnaire to elicit socio-demographic information and medical data (2) Brief Pain Inventory (3) ICD-10 Symptom Checklist (4) ICD-10-Diagnostic Criteria for Research (DCR) (5) Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) (6) Covi Anxiety Rating Scale (7) Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Data was analysed using independent sample t test and chi square test. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was 67% with depression and adjustment disorders being the major diagnosis. There was a significant association between psychiatric morbidity pain variables (P = 0.000). Psychiatric morbidity significantly impaired activity, mood, working, walk, sleep, relationship, and enjoyment. There was no association between aetiology of pain, type of cancer, treatment for primary condition and treatment for pain and psychiatric morbidity. The functional status of cancer patients was also poorer in patients with psychiatric morbidity (P = 0.008). Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of psychiatric illness in chronic pain patients of any aetiology. Psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased pain perception, impairment in activity and poor functional status. PMID:24347904

  18. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Atkins, Harold L.

    1998-12-29

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  19. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

    1998-12-29

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

  20. Mechanism-based Classification of Pain for Physical Therapy Management in Palliative care: A Clinical Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P; Saha, Sourov

    2011-01-01

    Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification–based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective) are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms. PMID:21633629

  1. Opioid availability and palliative care in Nepal: influence of an international pain policy fellowship.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Bishnu Dutta; Ryan, Karen M; Brown, Mary Skemp; Krakauer, Eric L; Rajagopal, M R; Maurer, Martha A; Cleary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Globally, cancer incidence and mortality are increasing, and most of the burden is shifting to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where patients often present with late-stage disease and severe pain. Unfortunately, LMICs also face a disproportionate lack of access to pain-relieving medicines such as morphine, despite the medical and scientific literature that shows morphine to be effective to treat moderate and severe cancer pain. In 2008, an oncologist from Nepal, one of the poorest countries in the world, was selected to participate in the International Pain Policy Fellowship, a program to assist LMICs, to improve patient access to pain medicines. Following the World Health Organization public health model for development of pain relief and palliative care, the Fellow, working with colleagues and mentors, has achieved initial successes: three forms of oral morphine (syrup, immediate-release tablets, and sustained-release tablets) are now manufactured in the country; health-care practitioners are receiving training in the use of opioids for pain relief; and a new national palliative care association has developed a palliative care training curriculum. However, long-term implementation efforts, funding, and technical assistance by governments, philanthropic organizations, and international partners are necessary to ensure that pain relief and palliative care become accessible by all in need in Nepal and other LMICs. PMID:24768596

  2. Sclerotic Vertebral Metastases: Pain Palliation Using Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Costa de Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Menezes, Marcos Roberto de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Cryoablative therapies have been proposed to palliate pain from soft-tissue or osteolytic bone tumors. A case of a patient with painful thoracic and sacral spine sclerotic metastases successfully treated by image-guided percutaneous cryoablation with the aid of insulation techniques and thermosensors is reported in this case report.

  3. Pain Management and Symptom-Oriented Drug Therapy in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Carsten; Lang, Ute; Bükki, Johannes; Sittl, Reinhard; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Summary Patients with advanced life-limiting disease often suffer from symptoms that considerably impair their quality of life and that of their families. Palliative care aims to alleviate these symptoms by a multidimensional approach. Pharmacotherapy is an essential component. The objective of this review is to give an overview of symptom-oriented drug therapy for the most important symptoms in palliative care. Leading symptoms that affect quality of life include pain, dyspnea, nausea and emesis, weakness and disorientation. Careful examination and history taking help to understand the individual mechanisms underlying these symptoms. Specific pharmacotherapy provides an efficient way to achieve symptom control in the context of palliative care. PMID:21547023

  4. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of pain from metastatic carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.C. Jr.; Hasan, S.M.; Jones, A.G.; Schlise, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy often is used for palliation of bone pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate but an objective evaluation of its efficacy in a large series of patients is unavailable. We report the results of external beam irradiation in 62 patients who had bone pain secondary to stage D carcinoma of the prostate. The variables used to judge pain before and after radiotherapy included subjective evaluation of pain, status of activity and quantitation of analgesic use. Complete relief of pain was achieved in 26 patients (42 per cent), partial relief in 22 (35 per cent) and no relief in 14 (23 per cent). On the basis of our experience external beam irradiation is useful palliative therapy for pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate.

  5. Cancer-related pain in older adults receiving palliative care: Patient and family caregiver perspectives on the experience of pain

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting. OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain perceptions and experiences of older adults with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used to describe and interpret data collected from semistructured interviews with 18 patients (≥65 years of age) with advanced cancer receiving palliative care at home and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The main category ‘Experiencing cancer pain’ incorporated three themes. The theme ‘Feeling cancer pain’ included the sensory aspects of the pain, its origin and meanings attributed to the pain. A second theme, ‘Reacting to cancer pain’, included patients’ and family caregivers’ behavioural, cognitive (ie, attitudes, beliefs and control) and emotional responses to the pain. A third theme, ‘Living with cancer pain’ incorporated individual and social-relational changes that resulted from living with cancer pain. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an awareness of cancer pain experienced by older patients and their family caregivers within the wider context of ongoing relationships, increased patient morbidity and other losses common in the aged. PMID:23957019

  6. [The nurse-healthcare assistant partnership in a mobile pain and palliative care team].

    PubMed

    Chevaucherie, Isabelle; Fernandes, Martine; Lariche, Stéphanie; Mussault, Pascale

    2015-02-01

    The mission of the mobile pain and palliative care team is to improve the quality of care and comfort of patients. At Longjumeau general hospital the nurse-healthcare assistant partnership within this team enables the patient to benefit from the caregivers' two-way perspective, while allowing the professionals to share knowledge and to be stronger in the face of suffering. PMID:26144825

  7. Philippines.

    PubMed

    1983-09-01

    This discussion of the Philippines focuses on the following: the people; geography; history; government; political conditions; economy (agriculture, mining, industry, and foreign trade); defense; foreign relations; and relations between the US and the Philippines. In 1982 the population was estimated at 51.6 million with an annual growth rate of 2.4%. The infant mortality rate was 59/1000 (1982), and life expectancy was 64 years (1981). The Philippine people are mostly of Malay stock, descended from the Indonesians and Malays who migrated to the islands long before the Christian era. The most significant ethnic minority group is the Chinese, who have played an important role in commerce since the 9th century, when they first came to the islands to trade. About 90% of the people are Christian. The Philippine Archipelago extends about 1770 kilometers north to south along the southeastern rim of Asia, forming a land chain between the Pacific Ocean on the east and the South China Sea on the west. The archipelago consists of some 7100 islands and islets. The history of the Philippines may be broken down into 4 distinct phases: the pre Spanish period, the Spanish period (1521-1898); the American period (1898-1946); and the years since independence (1946-present). A new constitution, to replace that of 1935, was completed by a constitutional convention in November 1972 and was proclaimed in effect in January 1973. The 1973 constitution provided for a parliamentary system, initially with extensive powers vested in a prime minister. Major amendments adopted in 1981 revised the system to make the president head of government. From independence of 1972, the Philippines practiced relatively traditional constiutional democracy. In addition to more moderate, legitimate opposition, the government has been opposed by 2 insurgencies, whose roots predated martial law, and by some urban terrorism. The Philippine economy grew rapidly during the period of rehabilitation and expansion

  8. Cancer Pain: A Critical Review of Mechanism-based Classification and Physical Therapy Management in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient's symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms – central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective – operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient's findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain. PMID:21976851

  9. Philippines.

    PubMed

    1986-08-01

    The Philippines is an archipelago of 7100 islands and islets, 11 of which compose about 95% of the total area and population. The majority of the Filipinos are descendants of Indonesians and Malays. Approximately 90% of the population are Christian with the majority of the remaining 10% being Moslems. In the 1960s, the annual population growth rate was roughly 3%, but it fell to 2.4% in the late 1970s and was still 2.4% in 1985. In 1970, President Marcos implemented an official family planning policy to reduce the high growth rate and thereby stimulate economic development. A population commission coordinates family planning efforts. Both the Spanish (1521-1898) and the United States (1898-1946) have ruled the Philippines with a brief occupation by the Japanese (1942-1945). The US assisted in the reconstruction of the economy following World War II and continues to maintain and operate military bases. Further, from 1946-1986, the Philippines has received $3.7 billion in economic and military assistance from the US. The government operated under a constitutional democracy from 1946-1972, but in 1972 President Marcos declared martial law. In 1981, martial law ended and Marcos called for a presidential election. After winning the election, he called for an amendment of the 1972 constitution making him, rather than the prime minister, the head of government. Even though martial law ended in 1981, the Marcos government retained its wide powers to arrest and detain anyone. In February 1986, popular support backed by a peaceful civilian-military uprising brought Corazon Aquino to the Presidency. In the mid 1980s a severe economic recession hit the Philippines with the real GNP growth rate ranging from -5.3%-0%. The Philippines have diplomatic relations with the south east Asian nations, many East Bloc nations, the US, China, Cuba, and the Soviet Union. PMID:12178014

  10. Pharmacovigilance in hospice/palliative care: net effect of gabapentin for neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Christine; Quinn, Stephen J; Agar, Meera; Chye, Richard; Clark, Katherine; Doogue, Matthew; Fazekas, Belinda; Lee, Jessica; Lovell, Melanie R; Rowett, Debra; Spruyt, Odette; Currow, David C

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospice/palliative care patients may differ from better studied populations, and data from other populations cannot necessarily be extrapolated into hospice/palliative care clinical practice. Pharmacovigilance studies provide opportunities to understand the harms and benefits of medications in routine practice. Gabapentin, a γ-amino butyric acid analogue antiepileptic drug, is commonly prescribed for neuropathic pain in hospice/palliative care. Most of the evidence however relates to non-malignant, chronic pain syndromes (diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, central pain syndromes, fibromyalgia). The aim of this study was to quantify the immediate and short-term clinical benefits and harms of gabapentin in routine hospice/palliative care practice. Design Multisite, prospective, consecutive cohort. Population 127 patients, 114 of whom had cancer, who started gabapentin for neuropathic pain as part of routine clinical care. Settings 42 centres from seven countries. Data were collected at three time points—at baseline, at day 7 (and at any time; immediate and short-term harms) and at day 21 (clinical benefits). Results At day 21, the average dose of gabapentin for those still using it (n=68) was 653 mg/24 h (range 0–1800 mg) and 54 (42%) reported benefits, of whom 7 (6%) experienced complete pain resolution. Harms were reported in 39/127 (30%) patients at day 7, the most frequent of which were cognitive disturbance, somnolence, nausea and dizziness. Ten patients had their medication ceased due to harms. The presence of significant comorbidities, higher dose and increasing age increased the likelihood of harm. Conclusions Overall, 42% of people experienced benefit at a level that resulted in continued use at 21 days. PMID:25324335

  11. Pain Palliation by Percutaneous Acetabular Osteoplasty for Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hokotate, Hirofumi; Baba, Yasutaka; Churei, Hisahiko; Nakajo, Masayuki; Ohkubo, Kouichi; Hamada, Kenji

    2001-09-15

    A 68-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma and known skeletal metastasis developed right hip pain and gait disturbance due to an osteolytic metastasis in the right acetabulum. This was treated initially with chemoembolization and radiation therapy. When these procedures proved unsuccessful percutaneous injection of acrylic bone cement into the acetabulum was undertaken. Immediately after this procedure, he obtained sufficient pain relief and improved walking ability, which continued for 3 months until he died of hepatic insufficiency.

  12. Evaluating palliative care: bereaved family members' evaluations of patients' pain, anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Christine J; Addington-Hall, Julia M

    2004-08-01

    Palliative care surveys often rely on bereaved family members to act as proxies to provide information on patient care at the end of life, after the patient's death. However, when comparing bereaved family members' assessments with those of the patients, agreement is found to be better for symptoms that are more concrete and observable than subjective aspects such as psychological symptoms and pain. To date, little is known about how proxies actually evaluate these types of symptoms. The present study used retrospective verbal protocol analysis to elucidate the thought processes of 30 bereaved relatives during their evaluations of patients' pain, anxiety and depression. The qualitative analysis raised awareness of the difficulties experienced by proxies when discerning the presence of symptoms. It also provided insights into the cues and strategies used when making decisions, contributing to a fuller understanding of how proxies distinguish symptoms. Recommendations are made to improve the design of retrospective palliative care surveys. PMID:15276191

  13. The Pain Relief Promotion Act of 1999: a serious threat to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Orentlicher, D; Caplan, A

    2000-01-12

    Recent educational efforts in the US medical community have begun to address the critical issue of palliative care for terminally ill patients. However, a newly introduced bill in Congress, the Pain Relief Promotion Act of 1999 (PRPA), could dramatically hinder these efforts if enacted. The act criminally punishes the use of controlled substances to cause-or assist in causing-a patient's death. The primary purposes of PRPA are to override the physician-assisted suicide law currently in effect in Oregon and prohibit other states from enacting similar laws. The act also includes valuable provisions for better research and education in palliative care, but the benefits of those provisions are outweighed by the punitive sections of the act. Under PRPA, the quality of palliative care in the United States could be compromised when physicians, fearing criminal prosecution, err on the side of caution rather than risk their patients' deaths by using highly aggressive pain treatments. Furthermore, PRPA would put Drug Enforcement Administration officials, who have no medical expertise, in the position of regulating medical decisions. The act also would interfere with individual states' long-standing authority over medical practice. Finally, PRPA would discourage physicians from engaging in experimentation and innovation in palliative care, again out of concern for crossing the line between relief of suffering and physician-assisted suicide. Other bills have been introduced that go much further than PRPA to encourage palliative care, without its problematic provisions. Regardless of the controversy surrounding physician-assisted suicide in the United States, the need for quality end-of-life care will be far better served if Congress enacts one of these bills rather than PRPA. PMID:10634344

  14. Evidence-based review of interventions to improve palliation of pain, dyspnea, depression.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Fatima; Cervo, Frank; Fields, Suzanne

    2009-08-01

    This review of the guideline developed by the Clinical Efficacy Subcommittee of the American College of Physicians and the accompanying systematic review offers clinicians evidence-based recommendations for palliative care. Seriously ill patients should be assessed for pain, dyspnea, and depression. Clinicians should use therapies of proven effectiveness to manage pain, depression, and dyspnea, including opioids in patients with unrelieved dyspnea and oxygen for short-term relief of hypoxemia. Clinicians should ensure that advance care planning, including completion of advance directives, occurs. PMID:20722311

  15. Palliative Sedation and What Constitutes Active Dying: A Case of Severe Progressive Dystonia and Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Feely, Molly A; Kramer, Neha M; Moeschler, Susan M; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome who developed progressive generalized dystonia of unclear etiology, resulting in intractable pain despite aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Ultimately, palliative sedation was required to relieve suffering. Herein, we describe ethical considerations including defining sedation, determining prognosis in the setting of an undefined neurodegenerative condition, and use of treatments that concurrently might prolong or alter end-of-life trajectory. We highlight pertinent literature and how it may be applied in challenging and unique clinical situations. Finally, we discuss the need for expert multidisciplinary involvement when implementing palliative sedation and illustrate that procedures and rules need to be interpreted to deliver optimal patient-centered plan of care. PMID:25487783

  16. Tin-117m(4+)-DTPA for palliation of pain from osseous metastases: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C. ||

    1995-05-01

    The physical and biological attributes of {sup 117m}Sn(4+)-DTPA indicate that it should be an effective agent for palliative therapy of painful bony metastatic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not this agent could effectively reduce pain while sparing the hemopoietic marrow from adverse effects. Fifteen patients (10 males and 5 females) with painful bony metastases from various primary cancers were included in the study. Seven patients received 1.22 to 3.11 MBq/kg of {sub 117m}Sn intravenously (Group 1) and eight patients received 4.85 to 5.77 MBq/kg (Group 2). All but one were treated as outpatients and followed for a minimum of 2 mo. In the first group, pain relief was nonassessable in four patients because of death or additional treatment of soft-tissue disease by another modality. One patient had no relief of pain, one had complete relief of pain and one had transient relief of pain. No myelotoxicity was observed. For Group 2, three patients achieved complete relief of pain, two good relief, two partial relief and one began to experience pain relief when he suffered a pathological fracture 2 mo most-treatment. None of these patients had myelotoxicity. Tin-117m(4+)-DTPA can reduce pain from metastatic disease to bone without inducing adverse reactions related to bone marrow. Further studies are needed to assess tolerance levels for the bone marrow and to evaluate response rates and duration of effect. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Bone Metastases Pain Palliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Nanba, Hirofumi; Kato, Tomonari; Tani, Toshikazu; Ushida, Takahiro

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a novel treatment method that achieves non-invasive thermal ablation by focusing many ultrasound waves on a target tissue with real-time monitoring of the location and temperature of the target during the procedure. We investigated the palliative effect on pain and safety of MRgFUS in painful bone metastases. Six patients (mean age, 65.8 years) who met eligibility criteria for the clinical study approved by our Institutional Ethics Committee based on the cooperative protocol were treated with MRgFUS. Targeted sites included the sacrum (n = 1), ilium (n = 2), scapula (n = 2), and femur (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 9.2 months. All procedures were performed as a single-session treatment using the treatment system that is integrated into the patient table of a magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanner. Endpoints were change in the intensity of pain due to bone metastases from before to after the treatment, as measured on a numerical rating scale, pain interference with daily activities as determined by the Brief pain inventory (BPI), change in images, and safety. Pain relief was obtained in all patients early after treatment, with a reduction in the mean pain score from 6.0±1.3 at baseline to 1.2±1.0 at the end of follow-up as well as in pain interference with daily activities. The mean time required for a single-session treatment was 83.7±37.0 min, with a mean number of sonications required of 13.3±3.7 and mean energy applied of 846.4±273.5 J. No significant growth of tumors was observed, nor were there treatment-related adverse events. These results suggest that MRgFUS has a non-invasive palliative effect on the localized pain in patients with bone metastasis. MRgFUS could become an option in treatment strategies for painful bone metastases in the future.

  18. Refractory pain, existential suffering, and palliative care: releasing an unbearable lightness of being.

    PubMed

    Smith, George P

    2011-01-01

    Since the beginning of the hospice movement in 1967, "total pain management" has been the declared goal of hospice care. Palliating the whole person's physical, psychosocial, and spiritual states or conditions is central to managing the pain that induces suffering. At the end-stage of life, an inextricable component of the ethics of adjusted care requires recognition of a fundamental right to avoid cruel and unusual suffering from terminal illness. This Article urges wider consideration and use of terminal sedation, or sedation until death, as an efficacious palliative treatment and as a reasonable medical procedure in order to safeguard the "right" to a dignified death. Once the state establishes a human right to avoid refractory pain of whatever nature in end-stage illness, a coordinate responsibility must be assumed by health care providers to make medical judgments consistent with preserving the best interests of a patient's quality of life by alleviating suffering. The principle of medical futility is the preferred construct for implementing this professional responsibility. Rather than continue to be mired in the vexatious quagmire of the doctrine of double effect--all in an effort to "test" whether end-stage decisions by health care providers are licit or illicit--a relatively simple test of proportionality, or cost-benefit analysis, is proffered. Imbedded, necessarily, in this equation is the humane virtue of compassion, charity, mercy or agape. Assertions of state interest in safeguarding public morality by restricting intimate associational freedoms to accelerate death in a terminal illness are suspicious, if, indeed, not invalid. No terminally ill individual suffering from either intractable somatic or non-somatic pain, or both, should be forced to continue living. PMID:25330560

  19. International Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Evidence-Based Practice?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Alysa; Barnes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Sunita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William; Holt, Tanya; Wu, Jackson; Janjan, Nora; Chow, Edward

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. Methods and Materials: The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. Results: A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Conclusion: Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of

  20. Hemi body irradiation: An economical way of palliation of pain in bone metastasis in advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Santanu; Dutta, Samrat; Adhikary, Shyam Sundar; Bhattacharya, Biswamit; Ghosh, Balaram; Patra, Niladri B.

    2014-01-01

    Test (P < 0.05) was significant in VAS score changes, VRS score changes, PPR score changes, and GPS score changes. Along with the decrease in morphine tablets, the Linear Correlation of various scales for pain reduction like VAS, VRS, PPR, and GPS were significant. As such, the quality of life was better due to decreased pain and also, a decrease in the dose of analgesics. Grade 1 and 2 hematological toxicity and grade 1 diarrhea were observed as common side-effects. The average total cost of treatment including hospital stay, medicines, and radiation charges was around INR 400.00. Conclusion: This study shows that hemibody irradiation is not only an effective modality for palliation of severe bone pain in advanced cancer cases but also economical, involves short hospital stay, with acceptable side-effects, utilizes the simple Telecobalt machine, and is less cumbersome in comparison to other currently available pain palliation methods like oral morphine and radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:24665443

  1. Stereotactic mesencephalotomy for palliative care pain control: A case report, literature review and plea to rediscover this operation.

    PubMed

    Ivanishvili, Zurab; Pujara, Shyam; Honey, C Michael; Chang, Stephano; Honey, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Introduction Stereotactic mesencephalotomy is an ablative procedure which lesions the pain pathways (spinothalamic and trigeminothalamic tracts) at the midbrain level to treat medically refractory, nociceptive, contralateral pain. Sparsely reported in contemporary English language literature, this operation is at risk of being lost from the modern-day neurosurgical practice. Methods We present a case report and brief review of the literature on stereotactic mesencephalotomy. A 17-year-old girl with cervical cord glioblastoma and medically refractory unilateral head and neck pain was treated with contralateral stereotactic mesencephalotomy. The lesion was placed at the level of the inferior colliculus, half way between the lateral edge of the aqueduct and lateral border of the midbrain. Results The patient had no head and neck pain immediately after the procedure and remained pain-free for the remainder of her life (five months). She was weaned off her pre-operative narcotics and was able to leave hospital, meeting her palliative care goals. Conclusions Cancer-related unilateral head and neck nociceptive pain in the palliative care setting can be successfully treated with stereotactic mesencephalotomy. We believe that stereotactic mesencephalotomy is the treatment of choice for a small number of patients typified by our case. The authors make a plea to the palliative care and neurosurgical communities to rediscover this operation. PMID:26760110

  2. Relationship between pain and chronic illness among seriously ill older adults: expanding role for palliative social work.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Mary Beth; Viola, Deborah; Shi, Qiuhu

    2014-01-01

    Confronting the issue of pain among chronically ill older adults merits serious attention in light of mounting evidence that pain in this population is often undertreated or not treated at all (Institute of Medicine, 2011 ). The relationship between pain and chronic illness among adults age 50 and over was examined in this study through the use of longitudinal data from the University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study, sponsored by the National Institute on Aging and the Social Security Administration. Findings suggested positive associations between pain and chronic disease, pain and multimorbidity, as well as an inverse association between pain and education. Policy implications for workforce development and public health are many, and amplification of palliative social work roles to relieve pain and suffering among seriously ill older adults at all stages of the chronic illness trajectory is needed. PMID:24628140

  3. Palliative Surgery in Treating Painful Metastases of the Upper Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Ye, Zhewei; Pu, Feifei; Chen, Songfeng; Wang, Baichuan; Zhang, Zhicai; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased incidence of upper cervical metastases and higher life expectancy resulted in higher operative rates in patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the methods and the clinical outcomes of palliative surgery for cervical spinal metastases. A systematic review of a 15-case series of upper cervical metastases treated with palliative surgery was performed. All cases underwent palliative surgery, including anterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 3 cases, posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 10 cases, and combined anterior and posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 2 cases. Patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically after the operation, and visual analog scale (VAS) and activities of daily living scores were calculated. In addition, a literature review was performed and patients with upper cervical spine metastases were analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months (range, 3–26 months) in this consecutive case series. The pain was substantially relieved in 93.3% (14/15) of the patients after the operation. The VAS and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores showed improved clinical outcomes, from 7.86 ± 1.72 and 11.13 ± 2.19 preoperatively to 2.13 ± 1.40 and 14.26 ± 3.03 postoperatively, respectively. The mean survival time was 9.5 months (range, 5–26 months). Dural tear occurred in 1 patient. Wound infections, instrumentation failure, and postoperative death were not observed. Among our cases and other cases reported in the literature, 72% of the patients were treated with simple anterior or posterior operation, and only 12% of the patients (3/25) underwent complex combined anterior and posterior operation. Metastatic upper cervical spine disease is not a rare occurrence. Balancing the perspective of patients on palliative surgery concerning the clinical benefits of operation versus its operative risks can assist the decision for surgery. PMID:27149472

  4. Integrating palliative care in public health: the Colombian experience following an international pain policy fellowship.

    PubMed

    Leon, Marta; Florez, Sandra; De Lima, Liliana; Ryan, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Access to palliative care is insufficient in many countries around the world. In an effort to improve access to palliative care services and treatments, a public health approach as suggested by the World Health Organization was implemented in Colombia to improve opioid availability, increase awareness and competences about palliative care for healthcare workers, and to include palliative care as a component of care in legislation. As a result, opioid availability has improved, a mandatory palliative care course for medical undergraduate students has been implemented and a palliative care law is being discussed in the Senate. This article describes the strategy, main achievements and suggestions for implementing similar initiatives in developing countries. PMID:21228093

  5. Metastatic Bone Pain Palliation using 177Lu-Ethylenediaminetetramethylene Phosphonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Mehrosadat; Omidvari, Shapour; Mehdizadeh, Alireza; Jalilian, Amir R.; Bahrami-Samani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    177Lu-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) is presently suggested as an excellent bone seeking radionuclide for developing metastatic bone pain (MBP) palliation agent owing to its suitable nuclear decay characteristics. To find the exact dosage and its efficiency, this clinical study was performed on the human being, using 177Lu-EDTMP for MBP palliation. 177Lu-EDTMP was prepared by Iran, atomic energy organization. Thirty consecutive patients with determined tumors, incontrollable MBP, and positive bone scan at 4 weeks before the beginning of the study participated in this study in the nuclear medicine ward. 177Lu-EDTMP in the form of sterile slow IV injection was administered with a dose of 29.6 MBq/kg. Short form of brief pain inventory questionnaire was used to evaluate the efficiency of the intervention. Questionnaires were filled out by an expert nuclear physician every 2 weeks while the cell blood count was also checked every 2 weeks up to 12 weeks for evaluation of bone marrow suppression and hematological toxicity. Furthermore, whole body scan was done at days 1, 3, and 7. Twenty-five patients showed a significant pain relief since 2 weeks after the injection, and continued until the end of the follow up period (12 weeks). There were no significant early complications such as bone marrow suppression, hematological toxicity, and no systemic adverse effects. No complication was observed in renal function. Twenty one patients showed flare phenomenon that was started after the 12.2 ± 1.78 h lasting for 38.4 ± 23.08. Sixteen patients (53%) were completely treated; nine patients (30%) showed a partial response, and five patients (17%) had no response to treatment. Total response to treatment was achieved in 25 patients (83%). At the end of the evaluation, no bone marrow suppression or hematologic toxicity was observed. 177Lu-EDTMP has shown suitable physical and biological properties with good results in long term bone pain relief for patients

  6. Solitary Painful Osseous Metastases: Correlation of Imaging Features with Pain Palliation after Radiofrequency Ablation—A Multicenter American College of Radiology Imaging Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Guenette, Jeffrey P.; Lopez, Michael J.; Kim, Eunhee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the correlation of pre- and postablation imaging features with pain relief, pain intensity, and patient mood after radiofrequency (RF) ablation of solitary painful osseous metastases. Materials and Methods: This prospective, multicenter group trial was approved by each institutional review board. Participants were enrolled between November 1, 2001, and April 6, 2006. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects, and patient confidentiality protocols were followed in compliance with HIPAA. Computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation and contrast material–enhanced 1-month follow-up CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging were performed in 49 subjects (24 men, 25 women; age range, 34–83 years) with a confirmed malignant solitary bone lesion of maximum dimension of 8 cm or smaller that was causing intractable pain. Pain intensity and patient mood were measured before and after RF ablation. Tumor imaging features were recorded. Unadjusted and adjusted linear mixed-effects models, with a random intercept for each subject, were used to model patient mood, pain relief, and pain intensity scores at three times after ablation as a function of each tumor characteristic. Results: Decreased postablation tumor pain correlated with preablation tumor volume (P = .02) and pathologic fracture (P = .01), while pain relief correlated with pathologic fracture (P = .03) and percentage of bone-tumor interface (BTI) ablated (P = .02). Conversely, presence of an irregular rim after ablation (P = .02) and rim thickness (P = .01) correlated with increased pain. There was no evidence in this study that RF ablation of larger tumor percentage or larger volume leads to better pain relief or decreased pain (P > .05). Conclusion: Existing pathologic fracture and smaller tumor size appear to be predictive parameters of success when selecting patients for palliative RF ablation of painful solitary osseous metastases. Successful palliation also appears to be related

  7. Pain medicine and palliative care as an alternative to euthanasia in end-of-life cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Erdek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There exists support for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in cases of terminal cancer. One of the premises for this approach is the goal of the alleviation of suffering. Do current means of pain control in the greater overall setting of palliative care serve as a desirable alternative? A contrast comparison may be drawn between the above approaches using both theological and medical sources to show that the enlightened use of both interventional and non-interventional pain medicine approaches in an integrated palliative care setting are a theologically grounded and medically feasible alternative to euthanasia or PAS in this population. Lay summary: Patients suffering from terminal cancer often have pain. Some have advocated euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide as a potential way of alleviating this suffering. Further examination of this topic, however, shows this approach may be essentially utilitarian and fail to consider the inherent value of human life. There has been significant development in recent years in the fields of pain medicine and palliative care, which afford alternate means of addressing suffering in this patient population. PMID:25999611

  8. Pain medicine and palliative care as an alternative to euthanasia in end-of-life cancer care.

    PubMed

    Erdek, Michael

    2015-05-01

    There exists support for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in cases of terminal cancer. One of the premises for this approach is the goal of the alleviation of suffering. Do current means of pain control in the greater overall setting of palliative care serve as a desirable alternative? A contrast comparison may be drawn between the above approaches using both theological and medical sources to show that the enlightened use of both interventional and non-interventional pain medicine approaches in an integrated palliative care setting are a theologically grounded and medically feasible alternative to euthanasia or PAS in this population. Lay summary: Patients suffering from terminal cancer often have pain. Some have advocated euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide as a potential way of alleviating this suffering. Further examination of this topic, however, shows this approach may be essentially utilitarian and fail to consider the inherent value of human life. There has been significant development in recent years in the fields of pain medicine and palliative care, which afford alternate means of addressing suffering in this patient population. PMID:25999611

  9. Palliative therapy with I-131 labeled bezylidenediphosphonic acid: In vivo kinetics and response to pain induced by bone metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhut, M.; Berberich, R.; Kimmig, B.; Oberhausen, E.; Georgi, P.; Zum Winkel, K.

    1985-05-01

    I-131 labeled ..cap alpha..-amino-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)diphosphonic acid (BDP3) was recently suggested as a palliative acting radiopharmaceutical against pain syndromes associated with disseminated bone metastases. Such an application was supported by the in vivo kinetics of I-131-BDP3 in rats. The authors investigated the palliative effectiveness of I-131-BDP3 in 18 patients with typical pain symptoms induced by bone metastases of various primary carcinoma. The blood clearance was rapid. More than 90% disappeared from the blood pool at 4 hr after injection. The excretion of the activity occured solely through the kidneys and the median total body retention at 48 hr was 51% (range 30-64%). The thyroid activity decreased during therapy indicating no cleavage reactions as long as I-131-BDP3 is bound to the bone tissue. The binding of I-131-BDP3 to bone is very long since the effective half life was in the order of magnitude of the physical half life. Additionally the effective half lifes in the metastatic ares (median 182 hr; range 177-205 hr) proved to be longer than in unaffected areas (145 hr; 140-165 hr). The palliative therapies were performed with doses of 6 - 48 mCi. The response amounted to 44% complete pain relief, 6% substantial pain relief, 22% minimal improvement and 28% no change. The duration of response ranged between 1 and 8 weeks.

  10. Transmucosal Immediate-Release Fentanyl for Breakthrough Cancer Pain: Opportunities and Challenges for Use in Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andrew; Roeland, Eric J; Atayee, Rabia S; Revta, Carolyn; Ma, Joseph D

    2015-09-01

    Opioids are used to treat breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) and can be classified by relative duration and onset of action. Regulatory approvals of numerous transmucosal immediate-release fentanyl (TIRF) formulations provide alternative options to palliative care-trained providers in the management of BTCP. TIRFs have been formulated as a sublingual tablet, sublingual spray, intranasal spray, pectin-based nasal spray, buccal tablet, and buccal soluble film. Differences exist between TIRFs regarding formulation design and dosing to treat BTCP. Opportunities for use include palliation of BTCP in head and neck cancer and/or radiation-induced mucositis. The purpose of this review is to discuss TIRF formulation and dosing, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, patient acceptability, and safety/tolerability. In addition, barriers to TIRF utilization will be discussed. PMID:26368648

  11. Rhemium-186-monoaminemonoamidedithiol-conjugated bisphosphonate derivatives for bone pain palliation.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mukai, Takahiro; Arano, Yasushi; Otaka, Akira; Ueda, Masashi; Uehara, Tomoya; Magata, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saji, Hideo

    2006-05-01

    To develop a radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of painful bone metastases based on the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals, we synthesized a bisphosphonate derivative labeled with rhenium-186 (186Re) that contains a hydroxyl group at the central carbon of its bisphosphonate structure, we attached a stable 186Re-MAMA chelate to the amino group of a 4-amino butylidene-bisphosphonate derivative [N-[2-[[4-[(4-hydroxy-4,4-diphosphonobutyl)amino]-4-oxobutyl]-2-thioethylamino]acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolate] oxorhenium (V) (186Re-MAMA-HBP) and we investigated the effect of a hydroxyl group at the central carbon of its bisphosphonate structure on affinity for hydroxyapatite and on biodistribution by conducting a comparative study with [N-[2-[[3-(3,3-diphosphonopropylcarbamoyl)propyl]-2-thioethylamino]acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolate] oxorhenium (V) (186Re-MAMA-BP). The precursor of 186Re-MAMA-HBP, trityl (Tr)-MAMA-HBP, was obtained by coupling a Tr-MAMA derivative to 4-amino-1-hydroxybutylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate. 186Re-MAMA-HBP was prepared by a reaction with 186ReO(4-) and SnCl2 in citrate buffer after the deprotection of the Tr groups of Tr-MAMA-HBP. After reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, 186Re-MAMA-HBP had a radiochemical purity of over 95%. Compared with 186Re-MAMA-BP, 186Re-MAMA-HBP showed a greater affinity for hydroxyapatite beads in vitro and accumulated a significantly higher level in the femur in vivo. Thus, the introduction of a hydroxyl group into 186Re complex-conjugated bisphosphonates would be effective in enhancing accumulation in bones. These findings provide useful information on the design of bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:16720243

  12. Evaluating a Human Rights-Based Advocacy Approach to Expanding Access to Pain Medicines and Palliative Care: Global Advocacy and Case Studies from India, Kenya, and Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Diederik; Amon, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care has been defined as care that is person-centered and attentive to physical symptoms and psychological, social, and existential distress in patients with severe or life-threatening illness. The identification of access to palliative care and pain treatment as a human rights issue first emerged among palliative care advocates, physicians, and lawyers in the 1990s, with a basis in the right to health and the right to be free from cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment. Using a case study approach, we evaluate the results of a human rights-based advocacy approach on access to pain medicine and palliative care in India, Kenya, and Ukraine. In each country, human rights advocacy helped raise awareness of the issue, identify structural barriers to care, define government obligations, and contribute to the reform of laws, policies, and practices impeding the availability of palliative care services. In addition, advocacy efforts stimulated civil society engagement and high-level political leadership that fostered the implementation of human rights-based palliative care programs. Globally, access to palliative care was increasingly recognized by human rights bodies and within global health and drug policy organizations as a government obligation central to the right to health. PMID:26766856

  13. 125I brachytherapy in the palliation of painful bone metastases from lung cancer after failure or rejection of conventional treatments

    PubMed Central

    Gilani, Saba; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fujun; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to assess the safety and effect of 125I seed implantation for palliation of painful bone metastases from lung cancer after failure or rejection of conventional treatments. Materials and Methods 89 patients with painful bone metastases secondary to lung cancer were consented and enrolled in this study from June 2013 to May 2015. All patients had failed or refused conventional treatments underwent percutaneous CT-guided 125I seed implantation. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used to measure pain intensity prior to treatment (T0), 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks (T2, T4, T6, T8 and T12) after treatment in a 24-hour period. Analgesic, quality of life (QOL) scores and complications were also recorded. Four patients were excluded as they were lost to follow-up or had incomplete data. Results 85 patients with 126 bone metastases from lung cancer were treated. There were significantly lower scores after treatment in the visual analog scale (VAS) and analgesic. The VAS scores for worst pain was 6.3±1.8 at T0. At T2, T4, T6, T8 and T12, the score in a 24-hour period decreased to 4.9±1.2 (P<0.01), 3.7±1.3 (P<0.01), 3.4±1.2 (P<0.01), 2.6±0.9 (P<0.01), and 1.4±0.8 (P<0.01) respectively. Comparison of QOL scores showed improvements including sleep, appetite, spiritual state, and fatigue at T2, T4, T6, T8 and T12 when compared to T0. No serious complications or massive bleeding were observed. Conclusions 125I brachytherapy is a safe and effective method for palliation of painful bone metastases from lung cancer after failure or rejection of conventional treatments. PMID:26919235

  14. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging and 153Sm-EDTMP Bone Pain Palliation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nanabala, Raviteja; Pillai, M R A; Thomas, Boben

    2016-07-01

    Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a potential tool in the imaging of recurrent prostate cancer. Ga-PSMA imaging is also useful for radiotherapy planning and in targeted therapy with Lu-PSMA. A few case reports regarding the use of Ga-PSMA in nonprostate cancer malignancies are also reported. We describe the use of Ga-PSMA imaging before Sm-EDTMP bone pain palliation therapy in a 58-year-old hormone refractory prostate cancer patient with extensive bone metastases. PMID:27055142

  15. Production, biodistribution assessment and dosimetric evaluation of 177Lu-TTHMP as an agent for bone pain palliation

    PubMed Central

    Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Recently, bone-avid radiopharmaceuticals have been shown to have potential benefits for the treatment of widespread bone metastases. Although 177Lu-triethylene tetramine hexa methylene phosphonic acid (abbreviated as 177Lu-TTHMP), as an agent for bone pain palliation, has been evaluated in previous studies, there are large discrepancies between the obtained results. In this study, production, quality control, biodistribution, and dose evaluation of 177Lu-TTHMP have been investigated and compared with the previously reported data. Methods: TTHMP was synthesized and characterized, using spectroscopic methods. Radiochemical purity of the 177Lu-TTHMP complex was determined using instant thin-layer chromatography (ITLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. The complex was injected to wild-type rats and biodistribution was studied for 7 days. Preliminary dose evaluation was investigated based on biodistribution data in rats. Results: 177Lu was prepared with 2.6-3 GBq/mg specific activity and radionuclide purity of 99.98%. 177Lu-TTHMP was successfully prepared with high radiochemical purity (>99%). The complex showed rapid bone uptake, while accumulation in other organs was insignificant. Dosimetric results showed that all tissues received almost insignificant absorbed doses in comparison with bone tissues. Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, this radiopharmaceutical can be a good candidate for bone pain palliation therapy in skeletal metastases.

  16. Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Liang; Chow, Edward; Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying; Fairchild, Alysa; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo; Kumar, Aswin; Forges, Fabien; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chie, Wei-Chu; Bottomley, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying

  17. Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the Palliative Outcome Scale, the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, and the Brief Pain Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Agra-Varela, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Some domains of the questionnaires used to measure symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in patients with advanced cancer seem to measure similar dimensions or constructs, so it would be useful for clinicians to demonstrate the interchangeability of equivalent domains of the questionnaires in measuring the same constructs. Objective This study investigated the reliability and concurrent validity of the Palliative Outcome Scale (POS), the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), used to measure symptom control in patients with advanced cancer. Design This was an evaluative study. Setting/Subjects Subjects were patients with advanced cancer attended by Spanish primary care physicians. Measurements Secondary analysis was performed of 117 outpatients who completed the POS, BPI, and RSCL at two different times, with an interval of 7 to 10 days. Bland and Altman analyses and plot, repeatability coefficient, as well as Spearman correlations were carried out. Results There were 117 included patients. Mean age was 69.4 (11.5) years, gender was 60% male, 37.6% completed only elementary school, diagnoses were mainly digestive and lung cancer, with a low functional rate and presence of oncologic pain. First and second questionnaire rounds showed significant correlations and agreement. Agreement was shown between pain intensity of BPI and pain and physical scales of RSCL, and between physical symptoms of RSCL and of POS, with significant correlations in equivalent dimensions. Conclusion BPI, POS, and RSCL have shown adequate reliability and moderate concurrent validity among them. PMID:23808642

  18. 175Yb-TTHMP as a good candidate for bone pain palliation and substitute of other radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Safarzadeh, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most frequent causes of pain in cancer patients. Different radioisotopes such as P-32, Sm-153, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Re-186 with several chemical ligands as ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (DOTMP), and propylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (PDTMP) are recommended for bone pain palliation. In this work, 175Yb-triethylenetetraminehexamethylene phosphonic acid (TTHMP) was produced as a proper alternative to other radiopharmaceuticals. Relatively long half-life (T1/2 = 4.18 days), maximum energy beta particle Eβ =470 keV (86.5%), low abundance gamma emission 396 keV (6.4%), 286 keV (3.01%), 113.8 keV (1.88%) and low cost are considered advantageous of Yb-175 are to wider usage of this isotope; in addition, TTHMP is an ideal carrier moiety for bone metastases. Production, quality control, and biodistribution studies of 175Yb-TTHMP were targeted. Yb-175 chloride was obtained by thermal neutron bombardment of a natural Yb2O3 sample at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR), radiolabeling was completed in 1 h by the addition of TTHMP at the room temperature and pH was 7.5-8, radiochemical purity was higher than 95%. Biodistribution studies in normal rats were carried out. The results showed favorable biodistribution features of 175Yb-TTHMP, indicating significant accumulation in bone tissues compared with clinically used bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. This research presents 175Yb-TTHMP can be a good candidate for bone pain palliation and substitute of other radiopharmaceuticals, however, further biological studies in other mammals are still needed. PMID:25210277

  19. Dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion for palliative care and pain relief in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Le, Bao T; Tran, Hau D; Hoang, Cuong; Tran, Hung Q; Tran, Dao M; Pham, Cu Q; Pham, Tuan D; Ha, Trung V; Bui, Nga T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (adenocarcinoma of the prostate) is the most widespread cancer in men. It causes significant suffering and mortality due to metastatic disease. The main therapy for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) includes androgen manipulation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and/or radioisotopes. However, these therapeutic approaches are considered palliative at this stage, and their significant side effects can cause further decline in patients' quality of life and increase non-cancer-related morbidity/mortality. In this study, the authors have used the infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) to treat 18 patients with MPC. The 90-day follow-up of the patients having undergone the proposed therapeutic regimen showed significant improvement in clinical symptoms, blood and biochemistry tests, and quality of life. There were no major side effects from the treatment. In searching for new and better methods for palliative treatment and pain relief, this study strongly suggested therapy with DMSO-SB infusions could provide a rational alternative to conventional treatment for patients with MPC. PMID:21936635

  20. Palliative Surgery in Treating Painful Metastases of the Upper Cervical Spine: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinghuo; Ye, Zhewei; Pu, Feifei; Chen, Songfeng; Wang, Baichuan; Zhang, Zhicai; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu

    2016-05-01

    Increased incidence of upper cervical metastases and higher life expectancy resulted in higher operative rates in patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the methods and the clinical outcomes of palliative surgery for cervical spinal metastases.A systematic review of a 15-case series of upper cervical metastases treated with palliative surgery was performed. All cases underwent palliative surgery, including anterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 3 cases, posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 10 cases, and combined anterior and posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 2 cases. Patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically after the operation, and visual analog scale (VAS) and activities of daily living scores were calculated. In addition, a literature review was performed and patients with upper cervical spine metastases were analyzed.The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months (range, 3-26 months) in this consecutive case series. The pain was substantially relieved in 93.3% (14/15) of the patients after the operation. The VAS and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores showed improved clinical outcomes, from 7.86 ± 1.72 and 11.13 ± 2.19 preoperatively to 2.13 ± 1.40 and 14.26 ± 3.03 postoperatively, respectively. The mean survival time was 9.5 months (range, 5-26 months). Dural tear occurred in 1 patient. Wound infections, instrumentation failure, and postoperative death were not observed. Among our cases and other cases reported in the literature, 72% of the patients were treated with simple anterior or posterior operation, and only 12% of the patients (3/25) underwent complex combined anterior and posterior operation.Metastatic upper cervical spine disease is not a rare occurrence. Balancing the perspective of patients on palliative surgery concerning the clinical benefits of operation versus its operative risks can assist the decision for surgery. PMID:27149472

  1. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  2. Education in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Weissman, David E; Blust, Linda

    2005-02-01

    Palliative care education includes the domains of pain and nonpain symptom management, communications skills, ethics and law, psychosocial care, and health systems. Defining key attitudes, knowledge, and skill objectives, and matching these to appropriate learning formats, is essential in educational planning. Abundant educational resource material is available to support classroom and experiential palliative care training. PMID:15639043

  3. Efficacy and Safety of a Fixed Combination of Tramadol and Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) as Pain Therapy Within Palliative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Husic, Samir; Izic, Senad; Matic, Srecko; Sukalo, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Goal: The goal of the research was to determine the efficacy of a fixed combination of tramadol and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of pain of patients with the advanced stage of cancer. Material and methods: A prospective study was conducted at the Center for Palliative Care, University Clinical Center Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, from January 1st to December 31st 2013. A total of 353 patients who were treated with a fixed combination of tramadol and acetaminophen (37.5 mg and 325 mg) at the initial dosage 3x1 tablet (112.5 mg tramadol and 975 mg acetaminophen) for pain intensity 4, up to 4x2 tablets (300 mg of tramadol and 2600 mg paracetamol) for pain intensity 7 and 8. If the patient during previous day has two or more pain episodes that required a “rescue dose” of tramadol, increased was the dose of fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen to a maximum of 8 tablets daily (300 mg of tramadol and 2600 mg paracetamol). Statistical analysis was performed by biomedical software MedCalc for Windows version 9.4.2.0. The difference was considered significant for P<0.05. Results: The average duration of treatment with a fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen was 57 days (13-330 days). Already after 24 hours of treatment the average pain score was significantly lower (p<0.0001) compared to the admission day [5.00 (4:00 to 8:00) during the first days versus 2.00 (1:00 to 7:00) during the second day of treatment]. The average dose of the fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen tablets was 4.8 ± 1.8 (180 mg of tramadol and 1560 mg paracetamol). Side effects, in the treatment of pain with a fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen, were found in 29.18% of patients, with a predominance of nausea and vomiting. Conclusion: Fixed combination of tramadol and acetaminophen can be used as an effective combination in the treatment of chronic cancer pain, with frequent dose evaluation and mild side effects. PMID:25870531

  4. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  5. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  6. Preparation, Biological Evaluation and Dosimetry Studies of 175Yb-Bis-Phosphonates for Palliative Treatment of Bone Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Ashraf; Jalilian, Amir R.; Yousefnia, Hassan; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Samani, Ali Bahrami; Daha, Fariba Johari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Khalaj, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Optimized production and quality control of ytterbium-175 (Yb-175) labeled pamidronate and alendronate complexes as efficient agents for bone pain palliation has been presented. Methods: Yb-175 labeled pamidronate and alendronate (175Yb-PMD and 175Yb-ALN) complexes were prepared successfully at optimized conditions with acceptable radiochemical purity, stability and significant hydroxyapatite absorption. The biodistribution of complexes were evaluated up to 48 h, which demonstrated significant bone uptake ratios for 175Yb-PAM at all-time intervals. It was also detected that 175Yb-PAM mostly washed out and excreted through the kidneys. Results: The performance of 175Yb-PAM in an animal model was better or comparable to other 175Yb-bone seeking complexes previously reported. Conclusion: Based on calculations, the total body dose for 175Yb-ALN is 40% higher as compared to 175Yb-PAM (especially kidneys) indicating that 175Yb-PAM is probably a safer agent than 175Yb-ALN. PMID:27529886

  7. Lumbar paravertebral blockade as intractable pain management method in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Hoffmann, Karolina; Główka, Franciszek; Łuczak, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Optimal symptoms control in advanced cancer disease, with refractory to conventional pain treatment, needs an interventional procedure. This paper presents coadministration of local anesthetic (LA) via paravertebral blockade (PVB) as the alternative to an unsuccessful subcutaneous fentanyl pain control in a 71-year old cancer patient with pathological fracture of femoral neck, bone metastases, and contraindications to morphine. Bupivacaine in continuous infusion (0.25%, 5 mL · hour−1) or in boluses (10 mL of 0.125%–0.5% solution), used for lumbar PVB, resulted in pain relief, decreased demand for opioids, and led to better social interactions. The factors contributing to an increased risk of systemic toxicity from LA in the patient were: renal impairment; heart failure; hypoalbuminemia; hypocalcemia; and a complex therapy with possible drug-drug interactions. These factors were taken into consideration during treatment. Bupivacaine’s side effects were absent. Coadministered drugs could mask LA’s toxicity. Elevated plasma α1-acid glycoprotein levels were a protective factor. To evaluate the benefit-risk ratio of the PVB treatment in boluses and in constant infusion, bupivacaine serum levels were determined and the drug plasma half-lives were calculated. Bupivacaine’s elimination was slower when administered in constant infusion than in boluses (t½ = 7.80 hours versus 2.64 hours). Total drug serum concentrations remained within the safe ranges during the whole treatment course (22.9–927.4 ng mL−1). In the case presented, lumbar PVB with bupivacaine in boluses (≤ 137.5 mg · 24 hours−1) was an easy to perform, safe, effective method for pain control. Bupivacaine in continuous infusion (≤150 mg · 12 hours−1) had an acceptable risk-benefits ratio, but was ineffective. PMID:24043944

  8. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Palliative Care KidsHealth > For Parents > Palliative Care Print A A ... decisions about their child's care. Who Needs Palliative Care? Any child who has a serious, complex, or ...

  9. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing ... care at the end of life, always includes palliative care. But you may receive palliative care at any ...

  10. Grief and Palliative Care: Mutuality

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Grief and palliative care are interrelated and perhaps mutually inclusive. Conceptually and practically, grief intimately relates to palliative care, as both domains regard the phenomena of loss, suffering, and a desire for abatement of pain burden. Moreover, the notions of palliative care and grief may be construed as being mutually inclusive in terms of one cueing the other. As such, the discussions in this article will center on the conceptualizations of the mutuality between grief and palliative care related to end-of-life circumstances. Specifically, the complementarity of grief and palliative care, as well as a controvertible view thereof, will be considered. PMID:25278758

  11. ¹⁷⁷Lu-Labeled Agents for Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy and Bone Pain Palliation in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Balter, Henia; Victoria, Trindade; Mariella, Terán; Javier, Gaudiano; Rodolfo, Ferrando; Andrea, Paolino; Graciela, Rodriguez; Juan, Hermida; Eugenia, De Marco; Patricia, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Lutetium-177 is an emerging radionuclide due its convenient chemical and nuclear properties. In this paper we describe the development and evaluation in Uruguay of the targeted 177Lu labelled radiopharmaceuticals EDTMP (for bone pain palliation) and DOTA-TATE (neuroendocrine tumors). We optimized the preparation of these 177Lu radiopharmaceuticals including radiolabelling, quality control methods, in vitro and in vivo stability and their therapeutic application in patients. Radiation dosimetry aspects of 177Lu are also included. Nine male patients with prostate cancer and four female patients with breast carcinoma with multiple bone metastatic lesions were treated with 177Lu-EDTMP. Four patients with gastroentheropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) and one patient with bronchial NET were treated with 1- 3 cycles with a cumulative dose of 4.44-22.2 GBq of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. Scintigraphic images of the patients treated with 177Lu-EDTMP evidenced high and rapid uptake in bone metastasis, remaining after 7 days post administration. Images allow skeletal visualization with high definition and demonstrate increased uptake in bone metastases. For 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, partial remissions were obtained in 4 patients and the remaining patient did not show significant progression 3 months after the second cycle. No serious adverse effects were registered, even in two patients with confirmed renal disease and high risk for renal disease Dosimetry assessments confirm the predictive value of the personalized therapy with radiolabelled peptides. We found it is possible to accumulate high therapeutic doses in tumours in sequential administrations of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, increasing the probability of biological response without significant impairment of the renal function in patients with risk factors. These results demonstrate the attractive therapeutic properties of these two 177Lu labelled agents and the feasibility of this metabolic therapy in regions far away from 177Lu producing

  12. The management of cancer-related breakthrough pain: recommendations of a task group of the Science Committee of the Association for Palliative Medicine of Great Britain and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew N; Dickman, Andrew; Reid, Colette; Stevens, Anna-Marie; Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2009-04-01

    A task group of the Science Committee of the Association for Palliative Medicine of Great Britain and Ireland (APM) was convened to produce some up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, clinical guidelines on the management of cancer-related breakthrough pain in adults. On the basis of a review of the literature, the task group was unable to make recommendations about any individual interventions, but was able to make a series of 12 recommendations about certain generic strategies. However, most of the aforementioned recommendations are based on limited evidence (i.e., case series, expert opinion). The task group also proposed a definition of breakthrough pain, and some diagnostic criteria for breakthrough pain. PMID:18707904

  13. Human absorbed dose estimation for a new (175)Yb-phosphonate based on rats data: Comparison with similar bone pain palliation agents.

    PubMed

    Vaez-Tehrani, Mahdokht; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Afarideh, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the absorbed dose to human organs for (175)Yb-BPAMD was evaluated based on the biodistribution studies in rats. The results showed that the bone surface would receive the highest absorbed dose after injection of (175)Yb-BPAMD with 13.32mGy/MBq, while the other organs receive insignificant absorbed dose. Also, the comparison of (175)Yb-BPAMD with other therapeutic phosphonate complexes demonstrated noticeable characteristics for this new agent. Generally, based on the obtained results, (175)Yb-BPAMD can be considered as a promising agent for bone pain palliative therapy in near future. PMID:27337650

  14. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  15. Treating Palliative Care Patients with Pain with the Body Tambura: A Prospective Case Study at St. Joseph's Hospice for Dying destitute in Dindigul South India

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Cordula; Teut, M; Samwel, Kakuko Lopoyetum; Narayanasamy, S; Rathapillil, T; Thathews, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Body Tambura is a recently invented stringed instrument that is used for receptive music therapy designed to be placed and attached on the human body. The aim of this study was to record perceived effects of a treatment with the Body Tambura on palliative care patients with special reference to pain. Materials and Methods: A prospective case study was carried out with patients of St. Joseph's Hospice for Dying Destitute in Dindigul/South India. Patients were treated with a treatment after baseline assessment and also on the next day. Outcomes were measured quantitatively by using a numeric rating scale (0–10, 10 maximum intensity of pain felt) at baseline, directly after treatment, and the day after the treatment to determine the intensity of the pain. Results: Ten patients (five women and five men) participated in the study. The majority described the therapy as a pleasant experience. The pain intensity at baseline was reduced from 8.3 ± standard deviation (SD) 1.16 to 4.6 ± 1.52 at day 1 and from 4.6 ± 2.07 to 2.4 ± 1.58 at day 2. Conclusion: A clinically relevant pain reduction was described as short time outcome; the therapy was received and perceived well. Forthcoming research should include a control group, randomization, a larger number of participants, and a longer period of treatment. PMID:26009680

  16. Palliative care: an evolving field in medicine.

    PubMed

    Eti, Serife

    2011-06-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems: physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. This article discusses illness trajectories and prognostic estimates, prognostic tools, educating physicians and nurses in palliative care, research in palliative medicine, and palliative care in hospitals and the community. PMID:21628032

  17. Determining the Incidence of Pain Flare Following Palliative Radiotherapy for Symptomatic Bone Metastases: Results From Three Canadian Cancer Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Hird, Amanda; Chow, Edward Zhang Liying; Wong, Rebecca; Wu, Jackson; Sinclair, Emily; Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Loblaw, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare following radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Materials and Methods: Patients with bone metastases treated with RT were eligible. Worst pain scores and analgesic consumption were collected before, daily during, and for 10 days after treatment. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in the worst pain score (0-10) compared to baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, or a 25% increase in analgesic intake with no decrease in worst pain score. Pain flare was distinguished from progression of pain by requiring the worst pain score and analgesic intake return to baseline levels after the increase/flare (within the 10-day follow-up period). Results: A total of 111 patients from three cancer centers were evaluable. There were 50 male and 61 female patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 40-89 years). The primary cancers were mainly breast, lung, and prostate. Most patients received a single 8 Gy (64%) or 20 Gy in five fractions (25%). The overall pain flare incidence was 44/111 (40%) during RT and within 10 days following the completion of RT. Patients treated with a single 8 Gy reported a pain flare incidence of 39% (27/70) and, with multiple fractions, 41% (17/41). Conclusion: More than one third of the enrolled patients experienced a pain flare. Identifying at-risk individuals and managing potential pain flares is crucial to achieve an optimal level of care.

  18. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  19. Development of a rhenium-186-labeled MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate for the palliation of metastatic bone pain based on the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mukai, Takahiro; Arano, Yasushi; Ono, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Ishino, Seigo; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Saji, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium-186-1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonate (186Re-HEDP) has been used for the palliation of metastatic bone pain. Delayed blood clearance and high gastric uptake of radioactivity have been observed upon injection, due to the instability of (186)Re-HEDP in vivo. In this study, on the basis of the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals, we designed a stable 186Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3) complex-conjugated bisphosphonate, [[[[(4-hydroxy-4,4-diphosphonobutyl)carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethanethiolate]oxorhenium(V) (186Re-MAG3-HBP). As a precursor, [1-hydroxy-1-phosphono-4-[2-[2-[2-(2-tritylmercaptoacetylamino)acetylamino]acetylamino]acetylamino]butyl]phosphonic acid (Tr-MAG3-HBP) was synthesized by the conjugation of N-[(tritylmercapto)acetyl]glycylglycylglycine (Tr-MAG3) with the bisphosphonate analogue. After deprotection of the trityl group of Tr-MAG3-HBP, 186Re-labeling was performed by reacting 186ReO4- with SnCl2 in citrate buffer. After purification by HPLC, 186Re-MAG3-HBP showed a radiochemical purity of over 95%. To compare the stability of 186Re-MAG3-HBP and 186Re-HEDP, these (186)Re complexes were incubated in phosphate buffer. No measurable decomposition of 186Re-MAG3-HBP occurred over a 24-h period, while only approximately 30% of 186Re-HEDP remained intact 24 h postincubation. In biodistribution experiments, the radioactivity level of 186Re-MAG3-HBP in bone was significantly higher than that of (186)Re-HEDP. Blood clearance of 186Re-MAG3-HBP was faster than that of 186Re-HEDP. In addition, the gastric accumulation of 186Re-MAG3-HBP radioactivity was lower than that of 186Re-HEDP. In conclusion, 186Re-MAG3-HBP is expected to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of metastatic bone pain. PMID:16029015

  20. Would Larger Radiation Fields Lead to a Faster Onset of Pain Relief in the Palliation of Bone Metastases?

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward Makhani, Leila; Culleton, Shaelyn; Makhani, Nadiya; Davis, Lori; Campos, Sarah; Sinclair, Emily

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Hemibody irradiation has been shown to relieve bony metastatic pain within 24-48 hours of treatment, whereas for local external beam radiation, onset of pain relief is 1-4 weeks after radiation. The primary objective of this study is to examine whether there is a relationship between the areas of radiation treatment and onset of pain relief. Methods and Materials: From Jan 1999 to Jan 2002, a total of 653 patients with symptomatic bone metastases were treated with external beam radiation. Pain scores and analgesic consumption were recorded at baseline and Weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. The areas of radiation treatment for all patients were calculated, then correlated with the response and analyzed in various ways. We first compared pain score alone with mean radiation field size. Second, we combined pain score and analgesic consumption. Last, we implemented the International Consensus end points for pain score and analgesic intake. Results: Assessment of 653 patients showed no significant correlation comparing pain scores alone with radiation field area, with the exception of Week 4 for partial responders. Again, no significant correlation was found when combining both analgesic intake and pain score against radiation field size. Even when implementing the International Consensus end point definitions for radiation response, the only significant correlation between radiation field size and response was observed in Week 2 for partial response. Conclusion: There was no statistical significance between mean areas of radiation treatment with the onset of pain relief.

  1. The Team Approach to Pain Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... says that the NIH Clinical Center's Pain and Palliative Care Service helped bring her pain under control. Roberts ... under control. The NIH Clinical Center's Pain and Palliative Care Service worked with Roberts and her physicians to ...

  2. Comparison of Single Versus Multiple Fractions for Palliative Treatment of Painful Bone Metastasis: First Study from North West India

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Bagri, Puneet Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Maharia, Sitaram; Narayan, Satya; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone metastasis is a usual cause of pain in advanced cancer. Conventional radiation schedules require larger hospital stay and thus are not suitable for patients with poor general condition. This prospective observational study aims to compare the pain-relieving efficacy of different radiation fractionation schedules, i.e., 8 Gy administered in a single fraction versus 30 Gy administered in 10 fractions. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty consecutive patients of bone metastasis were evaluated for the study, with 63 patients being excluded due to non-fulfillment of the inclusion criteria. The response to radiotherapy leading to pain relief as per the Visual Analog Scale was recorded at the end of treatment, 8 days, 15 days and 1 month during the follow-up visits. Results: Sixty-two percent of the patients received a single fraction while the remaining received 10 fractions. In the 10-fraction group, overall response was present in 60% of the patients. Stable pain was present in 23% of the patients while 9% patients had progressive pain. At 1 month of completion of treatment, 9% patients were lost to follow-up. In the single-fraction arm, overall response was seen in 58%, stable pain in 27% and progressive pain in 7% of the patients. Six percent of the patients were lost to follow-up. Conclusions: Single-fraction treatment for bony metastasis is as effective as multiple fractions to relieve bony pain and provides treatment convenience to both the patient and the caregiver. PMID:25709185

  3. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... you with all of these questions and discussions. Making Decisions About End-of-Life Care DNR/DNI/AND ... Experience Positive Growth? Grieving and Palliative Care Overview Making Decisions About End-of-Life Care DNR/DNI/AND ...

  4. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  5. Palliative Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matzo, Marianne

    2016-06-01

    This article is the first in a series on palliative care developed in collaboration with the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA; http://hpna.advancingexpertcare.org). The HPNA aims to guide nurses in preventing and relieving suffering and in giving the best possible care to patients and families, regardless of the stage of disease or the need for other therapies. The HPNA offers education, certification, advocacy, leadership, and research. PMID:27227867

  6. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem; Pehlivan, Berrin; Selek, Ugur

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  7. A Freeze-Dried Kit for the Preparation of (188)Re-HEDP for Bone Pain Palliation: Preparation and Preliminary Clinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Madhava B; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan; Kameswaran, Mythili; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan; Aswathy, K K; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2016-05-01

    (188)Re-HEDP is an established radiopharmaceutical used for pain palliation in patients with osseous metastasis. Considering commercial availability of (188)W/(188)Re generator, the accessibility to a lyophilized kit would make preparation of this radiopharmaceutical feasible at the hospital radiopharmacy having access to a generator. A protocol for the preparation of a single-vial lyophilized hydroxyethane 1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) kit was developed and its consistency was checked by preparing six batches. Each sterile lyophilized kit prepared as per the protocol contained 9 mg of HEDP, 3 mg of gentisic acid, and 4 mg of SnCl2.2H2O. Randomly selected kits from all six batches were subjected to thorough quality control tests that were passed by all batches. (188)Re-HEDP could be prepared by addition of 1 mL of freshly eluted Na(188)ReO4 (up to 3700 MBq) containing 1 μmol of carrier ReO4(-) (perrhenate) and heating at 100°C for 15 minutes. (188)Re-HEDP with >95% radiochemical purity could be consistently prepared using the lyophilized kits. Sterile (188)Re-HEDP prepared using the lyophilized kit was evaluated in patients with osseous metastasis. Post-therapy images of the patient were compared with (99m)Tc-MDP bone scan and found to be satisfactory. The bone-to-background as well as tumor-to-normal bone uptake ratio was found to be significant. All patients who received therapy reported significant pain relief within a week to 10 days post-administration of (188)Re-HEDP. PMID:27183437

  8. The growth of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Mansel, J Keith; Swetz, Keith M

    2014-06-01

    Palliative care specialists focus on meeting the needs of patients with serious and/or life-threatening illnesses. These physicians have expertise in managing complex pain and nonpain symptoms, providing psychosocial and spiritual support to patients and their families, and communicating about complex topics and advance care planning. The American Board of Medical Specialties has allowed 10 of its member boards to co-sponsor certification in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Thus, physicians from specialties ranging from pediatrics to surgery now practice hospice and palliative medicine. At the core of this field, however, are physicians who trained as internists and are boarded by the American Board of Internal Medicine. This article discusses the central principles of palliative care and explores its growth in two areas: oncology and critical care medicine. PMID:25029799

  9. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  10. Palliation: Hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kr; Goenka, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinomas are common tumors of the bile duct that are often unresectable at presentation. Palliation, therefore, remains the goal in the majority of these patients. Palliative treatment is particularly indicated in the presence of cholangitis and pruritus but is often also offered for high-grade jaundice and abdominal pain. Endoscopic drainage by placing stents at endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) is usually the preferred modality of palliation. However, for advanced disease, percutaneous stenting has been shown to be superior to endoscopic stenting. Endosonography-guided biliary drainage is emerging as an alternative technique, particularly when ERCP is not possible or fails. Metal stents are usually preferred over plastic stents, both for ERCP and for percutaneous biliary drainage. There is no consensus as to whether it is necessary to place multiple stents within advanced hilar blocks or whether unilateral stenting would suffice. However, recent data have suggested that, contrary to previous belief, it is useful to drain more than 50% of the liver volume for favorable long-term results. In the presence of cholangitis, it is beneficial to drain all of the obstructed biliary segments. Surgical bypass plays a limited role in palliation and is offered primarily as a segment III bypass if, during a laparotomy for resection, the tumor is found to be unresectable. Photodynamic therapy and, more recently, radiofrequency ablation have been used as adjuvant therapies to improve the results of biliary stenting. The exact technique to be used for palliation is guided by the extent of the biliary involvement (Bismuth class) and the availability of local expertise. PMID:25232449

  11. Oral ketamine in the palliative care setting: a review of the literature and case report of a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 and glomus tumor-associated complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soto, Eliezer; Stewart, Douglas R; Mannes, Andrew J; Ruppert, Sarah L; Baker, Karen; Zlott, Daniel; Handel, Daniel; Berger, Ann M

    2012-06-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been shown to be effective not only for its anesthetic properties but also for the analgesic and opiate-sparing effects. However, data on efficacy and safety of oral ketamine for the treatment of neuropathic or cancer pain syndromes is limited with most of the evidence based on small clinical trials and anecdotal experiences. In this review, we will analyze the clinical data on oral ketamine in the palliative care setting. After an extensive search using five major databases, a total of 19 relevant articles were included. No official clinical guidelines for the use of oral ketamine in this patient population were found. Studies on oral ketamine for cancer and neuropathic pain have shown mixed results which could be partially due to significant differences in hepatic metabolism. In addition, we will include a case report of a 38-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) with history of chronic, severe pain in her fingertips secondary to multiple glomus tumors which evolved into CRPS resistant to multiple therapies but responsive to oral ketamine. Based on our experience with oral ketamine, this drug should be administered after an intravenous trial to monitor response and side effects in patients with an adequate functional status. However, patients in the palliative care and hospice setting, especially the one at the end of their lives, may also benefit from oral ketamine even if an intravenous trial is not feasible. PMID:21803784

  12. Oral Ketamine in the Palliative Care Setting: A Review of the Literature and Case Report of a Patient With Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and Glomus Tumor-Associated Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Eliezer; Stewart, Douglas R.; Mannes, Andrew J.; Ruppert, Sarah L.; Baker, Karen; Zlott, Daniel; Handel, Daniel; Berger, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been shown to be effective not only for its anesthetic properties but also for the analgesic and opiate-sparing effects. However, data on efficacy and safety of oral ketamine for the treatment of neuropathic or cancer pain syndromes is limited with most of the evidence based on small clinical trials and anecdotal experiences. In this review, we will analyze the clinical data on oral ketamine in the palliative care setting. After an extensive search using five major databases, a total of 19 relevant articles were included. No official clinical guidelines for the use of oral ketamine in this patient population were found. Studies on oral ketamine for cancer and neuropathic pain have shown mixed results which could be partially due to significant differences in hepatic metabolism. In addition, we will include a case report of a 38-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) with history of chronic, severe pain in her fingertips secondary to multiple glomus tumors which evolved into CRPS resistant to multiple therapies but responsive to oral ketamine. Based on our experience with oral ketamine, this drug should be administered after an intravenous trial to monitor response and side effects in patients with an adequate functional status. However, patients in the palliative care and hospice setting, especially the one at the end of their lives, may also benefit from oral ketamine even if an intravenous trial is not feasible. PMID:21803784

  13. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful bone metastases: pooled data bioeffect dose response analysis of dose fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen, T.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Samuel, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases develop in up to 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients and result in immobility, anxiety, and depression, severely diminishing the patients quality of life. Radiotherapy is a frequently used modality for bone metastasis and has been shown to be effective in reducing metastatic bone pain and in some instances, causing tumor shrinkage or growth inhibition. There is controversy surrounding the optimal fractionation schedule and total dose of external beam radiotherapy, despite many randomized trials and overviews addressing the issue. This study was undertaken to apply BED to clinical fractionation data of radiotherapeutic management of bone metastases in order to arrive at optimum BED values for acceptable level of response rate. A computerised literature search was conducted to identify all prospective clinical studies that addressed the issue of fractionation for the treatment of bone metastasis. The results of these studies were pooled together to form the database for the analysis. A total of 4111 number of patients received radiation dose ranging from 4 to 40.5 Gy in 1 to 15 fractions with dose per fraction ranging from 2 to 10 Gy. Single fraction treatments were delivered in 2013 patients and the dose varied from 4 to 10 Gy. Multifraction treatments were delivered in 2098 patients and the dose varied from 15 to 40.5 Gy. The biological effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each fractionation schedule using the linear quadratic model and an α/β value of 10 Gy. Response rate increased significantly beyond a BED value of 14.4 Gy (p < 0.01). Based on our analysis and indications from the literature about higher retreatment and fracture rate of single fraction treatments, minimum BED value of 14.4 Gy is recommended.

  14. Palliative care in advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Merel, Susan E; Merel, Susan; DeMers, Shaune; Vig, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Because neurodegenerative dementias are progressive and ultimately fatal, a palliative approach focusing on comfort, quality of life, and family support can have benefits for patients, families, and the health system. Elements of a palliative approach include discussion of prognosis and goals of care, completion of advance directives, and a thoughtful approach to common complications of advanced dementia. Physicians caring for patients with dementia should formulate a plan for end-of-life care in partnership with patients, families, and caregivers, and be prepared to manage common symptoms at the end of life in dementia, including pain and delirium. PMID:25037291

  15. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  16. [Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases].

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Hisayasu

    2015-11-01

    Bone metastasis is associated with many symptoms such as bone pain, pathological fracture, and spinal cord compression. Especially, pain secondary to bone metastases is a serious problem in many patients with metastatic cancer. Radiotherapy can provide remarkable pain relief, reduce the requirement for analgesic drugs, and prevent pathological fracture or spinal cord compression with few complications in most patients. Many randomized controlled trials have shown equivalent extent of pain relief between single-fraction and multiple-fraction regimens. Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective for palliation of pain in non-responders or patients with recurrent pain after an initial satisfactory response to a previous radiation therapy. Systemic administration of radioisotopes is an important palliative care option for painful multifocal bone metastases detected on nuclear imaging; however, the application of this option depends on the histologic features of the tumor and distribution of the metastases. Metastatic spinal cord compression is the most frequent oncologic emergency and necessitates timely and appropriate treatment. External beam radiotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression. Surgical decompression and stabilization should be considered for metastatic spinal cord compression or pathological fracture in select patients. Postoperative radiotherapy should be administered to patients who have undergone surgical intervention for bone metastases. For patients at a high risk for oncologic emergency, optimal prophylactic management is highly recommended. PMID:26602393

  17. Palliative Care in Rural Minnesota: Findings from Stratis Health's Minnesota Rural Palliative Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Deb; Shearer, Janelle; Weng, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care, which involves managing symptoms, controlling pain and addressing stress caused by a chronic or terminal illness, has been shown to keep patients out of the hospital and allow them to stay home and live more comfortably with their illness. Typically, it is provided by an interdisciplinary team led by a physician trained in palliative medicine. Rural areas have not always had access to such specialists. Yet, today, rural health care organizations are finding ways to create palliative care programs that meet the needs of their chronically ill and aging populations. This article describes a six-year initiative led by Stratis Health to advance palliative care in rural Minnesota. It highlights the work of FirstLight Health System in Mora and describes Stratis Health's Rural Palliative Care Measurement Pilot Project, an effort to develop and test measures for evaluating rural palliative care programs. PMID:26897897

  18. What is palliative care?

    MedlinePlus

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help patients with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease ...

  19. What is palliative care?

    MedlinePlus

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help people with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease and ...

  20. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Knight, Carl; Albertsen, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare. We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is because of a central feature in Daniels' account, namely that care should be provided to restore people's opportunities. Daniels' view is both unable to provide pain relief to those who need it as a supplement to treatment and, without justice-based reasons to provide palliative care to those whose opportunities cannot be restored. We conclude that this makes Daniels' framework much less attractive. PMID:25689627

  1. Current trends in palliative heart care.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rongyun

    2016-02-01

    Palliative care is an alternate therapeutic approach that involves specialised medical care of a patient diagnosed with serious life threatening illness like heart failure (HF). The prime aim of the palliative care is to provide patient with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress of the diagnosed disease. The palliative care helps in improving the quality of life for both the patient and the family. Advanced HF is a disease process that carries a high burden of symptoms, suffering, and death. Palliative care can complement traditional care to improve symptom amelioration, patient-caregiver communication, emotional support, and medical decision making. The present review summarized all the available on alternative palliative approaches provided to heart patient by a team of physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. PMID:25926080

  2. Palliative or Comfort Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... or efforts to cure your illness. Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Health Administration benefits, and private health insurance cover many palliative care services. Many hospitals provide palliative care, and it ...

  3. [Palliative care - also in geriatrics?].

    PubMed

    Sandgathe Husebø, B; Husebø, S

    2001-10-01

    Red Cross Clinic is the largest geriatric center in Norway (240 beds). Major parts of the center are: long time geriatric ward (215 beds), rehabilitation and acute ward (25 beds), day clinic (45 patients) and a teaching and research unit. A palliative care unit (10 beds) will be opened in spring 2000. In mai 1998 a national project: Palliative care for the elderly was opened at our center. The projects main goal is to develop and support proper palliative care to all severe ill and dying patients in Norway. In a prospective study we examined 179 consecutive deaths between 1998 and 1999. Average age was 84.5. Major symptom problems were pain, dyspnoea, death-rattle and anxiety. In the last 24 hours 83% of the patients received opioids, 67% of the cases morphine (mean daily dosage 31.8 mg). 37% of the patients received scopolamine (mean daily dosage 0.8 mg), 12% benzodiazepines and 3% of the patients haloperidol. 152 (85%) of the deaths were expected, 27 (15%) unexpected. In 137 patients (77%) open, honest, frank communication with patient or their nearest kin regarding the imminent death was possible. In our experience it is a myth that the relatives want doctors to practise "maximal therapy". All old patients in geriatric clinics and nursing homes need palliative care. We have found no international textbooks of geriatrics with chapters on palliative care or textbooks on palliative care with chapters on the elderly. They need doctors and nurses who are properly trained and educated in palliative care. In most countries in Europe this training and education is not provided. PMID:11810376

  4. Things Philippine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ongteco, Belen C.

    Presented in this booklet are brief descriptions of items and activities that are symbolic of Filipino culture. Some of the items and activities described include traditional Philippine clothing, a traditional fan, games and toys, eating utensils, and a native shopping bag. A biographical sketch of Dr. Jose Rizal, the "martyr of the Filipino…

  5. [Practical pain control in pediatric oncology. Recommendations of the German Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, the German Association for the Study of Pain, the German Society of Palliative Care, and the Vodafone Institute of Children's Pain Therapy and Palliative Care].

    PubMed

    Zernikow, B; Schiessl, C; Wamsler, C; Janssen, G; Griessinger, N; Fengler, R; Nauck, F

    2006-02-01

    In pediatric oncology, optimal pain control is still a challenge. A structured pain history and the regular scoring of pain intensity using age-adapted measuring tools are hallmarks of optimal pain control. Psychological measures are as important as drug therapy in the prophylaxis or control of pain, especially when performing invasive procedures. Pain control is oriented toward the WHO multistep therapeutic schedule. On no account should the pediatric patient have to climb up the "analgesic ladder" - strong pain requires the primary use of strong opioids. Give opioids preferably by the oral route and by the clock - short-acting opioids should be used to treat breakthrough pain. Alternatives are i.v. infusion, patient-controlled analgesia, and transdermal applications. Constipation is the adverse effect most often seen with (oral) opioid therapy. Adverse effects should be anticipated, and prophylactic treatment should be given consistently. The assistance of pediatric nurses is of the utmost importance in pediatric pain control. Nurses deliver the basis for rational and effective pain control by scoring pain intensity and documenting drug administration as well as adverse effects. The nurses' task is also to prepare the patient for and monitor the patient during painful procedures. It is the responsibility of both nurse and doctor to guarantee emergency intervention during sedation whenever needed. In our guideline we comment on drug selection and dosage, pain measurement tools, and documentation tools for the purpose of pain control. Those tools may be easily integrated into daily routine. PMID:16421708

  6. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development. PMID:27481751

  7. Children’s palliative care now! Highlights from the second ICPCN conference on children’s palliative care, 18–21 May 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Downing, J; Kiman, R; Boucher, S; Nkosi, B; Steel, B; Marston, C; Lascar, E; Marston, J

    2016-01-01

    The International Children’s Palliative Care Network held its second international conference on children’s palliative care in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from the 18th–21st May 2016. The theme of the conference was ‘Children’s Palliative Care…. Now!’ emphasising the need for palliative care for children now, as the future will be too late for many of them. Six pre-conference workshops were held, addressing issues connected to pain assessment and management, adolescent palliative care, ethics and decision-making, developing programmes, the basics of children’s palliative care, and hidden aspects of children’s palliative care. The conference brought together 410 participants from 40 countries. Plenary, concurrent, and poster presentations covered issues around the status of children’s palliative care, genetics, perinatal and neonatal palliative care, the impact of children’s palliative care and the experiences of parents and volunteers, palliative care as a human right, education in children’s palliative care, managing complex pain in children, spiritual care and when to initiate palliative care. The ‘Big Debate’ explored issues around decision-making and end of life care in children, and gave participants the opportunity to explore a sensitive and thought provoking topic. At the end of the conference, delegates were urged to sign the Commitment of Buenos Aires which called for governments to implement the WHA resolution and ensure access to palliative care for neonates, children and their families, and also commits us as palliative care providers to share all that we can and collaborate with each other to achieve the global vision of palliative care for all children who need it. The conference highlighted the ongoing issues in children’s palliative care and participants were continually challenged to ensure that children can access palliative care NOW. PMID:27610193

  8. Children's palliative care now! Highlights from the second ICPCN conference on children's palliative care, 18-21 May 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Downing, J; Kiman, R; Boucher, S; Nkosi, B; Steel, B; Marston, C; Lascar, E; Marston, J

    2016-01-01

    The International Children's Palliative Care Network held its second international conference on children's palliative care in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from the 18th-21st May 2016. The theme of the conference was 'Children's Palliative Care…. Now!' emphasising the need for palliative care for children now, as the future will be too late for many of them. Six pre-conference workshops were held, addressing issues connected to pain assessment and management, adolescent palliative care, ethics and decision-making, developing programmes, the basics of children's palliative care, and hidden aspects of children's palliative care. The conference brought together 410 participants from 40 countries. Plenary, concurrent, and poster presentations covered issues around the status of children's palliative care, genetics, perinatal and neonatal palliative care, the impact of children's palliative care and the experiences of parents and volunteers, palliative care as a human right, education in children's palliative care, managing complex pain in children, spiritual care and when to initiate palliative care. The 'Big Debate' explored issues around decision-making and end of life care in children, and gave participants the opportunity to explore a sensitive and thought provoking topic. At the end of the conference, delegates were urged to sign the Commitment of Buenos Aires which called for governments to implement the WHA resolution and ensure access to palliative care for neonates, children and their families, and also commits us as palliative care providers to share all that we can and collaborate with each other to achieve the global vision of palliative care for all children who need it. The conference highlighted the ongoing issues in children's palliative care and participants were continually challenged to ensure that children can access palliative care NOW. PMID:27610193

  9. Palliative care in the ambulatory geriatric practice.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E; Nirmalasari, Olivia; Graham, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Geriatrics and palliative care often overlap. This article focuses on 2 areas where the disciplines may differ in their approach. The first is planning for extreme illness and death, with explicit acknowledgment that limiting therapy might be a good idea. This situation is likely to have a different impact in the course of a routine geriatrics visit than in a palliative care context. The second is pain management, especially chronic pain. In patients with sharply limited life expectancy, the risk/benefit equation tilts easily toward narcotic use. In frail elders working to remain independent, the calculus may be quite different. PMID:25920055

  10. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  11. Nurturing humanism through teaching palliative care.

    PubMed

    Block, S; Billings, J A

    1998-07-01

    After many years of neglect by the medical establishment, the discipline of palliative medicine is finally moving into academic health centers (AHCs). While hospice programs have cared for dying patients in the community for years with little input from mainstream medicine, palliative care is gaining a foothold in AHCs, challenging these centers to integrate the hospice approach with biomedicine. The discipline of palliative care promises to be a rich source of learning and growth for physicians-in-training. Teaching about palliative care affirms two essential but vulnerable dimensions of the practice of medicine--the importance of relationship-centered care and the value of doctoring as a source of meaning and growth for physicians. In addition to fostering fundamental humanistic learning, palliative medicine is an excellent vehicle for teaching basic but often neglected clinical competencies, including pain and symptom control, communication, and working as part of a health care team. Because palliative care settings offer extraordinary learning opportunities, the authors recommend that clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated into the core curricula of all medical schools as well as appropriate residency programs. PMID:9679465

  12. Esophagus Cancer: Palliative Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor about cancer of the esophagus? Palliative therapy for cancer of the esophagus Palliative therapy is ... therapy Electrocoagulation Laser ablation Argon plasma coagulation Radiation therapy External-beam radiation can often help relieve some ...

  13. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... palliative care is beneficial? Yes. Research shows that palliative care and its many components are beneficial to patient and family health and well-being. A number of studies in recent years have shown that patients who ...

  14. [Recommendations for the palliative care of dying neonates].

    PubMed

    Cignacco, E; Stoffel, L; Raio, L; Schneider, H; Nelle, M

    2004-08-01

    Neonates and infants have the highest mortality rate in the pediatric patient population, but there is a paucity of data about their palliative care. Most neonate deaths occur during the first week of life so it is mostly the staff of NICUS's and obstetrical wards who are confronted with the palliative care of dying neonates. Clinical experience shows that many aspects of care in palliative situations are not well known to the health care providers. This is especially true for pain assessment and pain treatment during the dying process. A search of the literature on this subject resulted in only a few publications; hence, this article basically describes clinical experience in the palliative care of neonates. In this article some recommendations for decision-making and standardization of palliative care for dying neonates are presented. PMID:15326558

  15. Distress, Stress and Solidarity in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deMontigny, Johanne

    1993-01-01

    Notes that role of psychologist on palliative care unit is to be there for terminally ill, their friends, and their families, both during the dying and the bereavement and for the caregiver team. Focuses on work of decoding ordinary words which for many patients hide painful past. Stresses necessity to remain open to unexpected. (Author/NB)

  16. Pain Symptoms Associated with Opioid Use among Vulnerable Persons with HIV: An exploratory study with implications for palliative care and opioid abuse prevention.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Amy R; Nguyen, Trang Q; Robinson, Allysha C; Harrell, Paul T; Mitchell, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Current or former injection drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at high risk for pain, which adversely affects their quality of life and may increase their risk for illicit drug use or relapse. We explored associations between pain symptoms and substance use among injection-drug-using study participants with HIV who had histories of heroin use. Using generalized estimating equations and controlling for prior substance use, we found that pain in each six-month period was associated with the use of heroin and prescription opioids, but not the use of nonopioid drugs or alcohol. Routine clinical assessment and improved management of pain symptoms may be needed for persons with HIV and a history of injection drug use, particularly those with chronic pain, for whom there is increased risk for heroin use. PMID:26856123

  17. NIH Research on Treating Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIH Clinical Center. The NIH Pain and Palliative Care Service conducts studies in pain and symptom management, quality of life, complementary therapies, and palliative medicine outcomes. Hospice care is end-of-life ...

  18. The Use of Massage Therapy for Reducing Pain, Anxiety, and Depression in Oncological Palliative Care Patients: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Falkensteiner, Maria; Mantovan, Franco; Müller, Irene; Them, Christa

    2011-01-01

    A considerable number of cancer patients use complementary medicine therapies in order to alleviate different symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and depression, occurring in connection with cancer. This paper explores the question to what extent massage therapies are able to reduce the amount of pain, anxiety, and depression. For this purpose, a systematic literature analysis was carried out in the electronic databases and specialist journals. There is already evidence that massage therapies can influence the symptoms of pain, anxiety, and depression in a positive way. PMID:22007330

  19. Palliative care in India: Situation assessment and future scope.

    PubMed

    Kar, S S; Subitha, L; Iswarya, S

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, assessment and treatment of pain, and other problems - physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. It is estimated that in India the total number of people who need palliative care is likely to be 5.4 million people a year. Though palliative care services have been in existence for many years, India ranks at the bottom of the Quality of Death index in overall score. However there has been steady progress in the past few years through community-owned palliative care services. One of the key objectives of the National Programme for prevention and control of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke is to establish and develop capacity for palliative and rehabilitative care. Community models for the provision of home-based palliative care is possible by involving community caregivers and volunteers supervised by nurses trained in palliative care. Training of medical officers and health care professionals, and sensitization of the public through awareness campaigns are vital to improve the scope and coverage of palliative care. Process of translating palliative care plan into action requires strong leadership, competent management, political support and integration across all levels of care. PMID:26837989

  20. [Providing regular relief; considerations for palliative care in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Crul, B J; van Weel, C

    2001-10-20

    Over the last few decades the attention devoted to the palliative aspects of medicine, particularly those in hospital care, has declined due to the emphasis on medical technology. In Anglo-Saxon countries a review of this development resulted in structured palliative care that benefited terminally ill patients with a progressive fatal disease, especially cancer patients. Due to increasing national and international criticism of both the practice of euthanasia (assumed to be too liberal) and the lack of attention devoted to structured palliative care in the Netherlands, the Dutch government decided to improve the structure of palliative care. The government's viewpoint is based on the assumption that good palliative care that includes adequate pain control benefits patient care and might eventually lead to fewer requests for euthanasia. The improvements to palliative care should be realised by means of improvements in the structure, training and knowledge. Six academic medical clusters have been designated as Centres for the Development of Palliative Care (Dutch acronym: COPZ) for a 5-year period. Each COPZ must develop the various aspects needed to improve palliative care within the region it serves and ensure that its activities are carefully coordinated with those in the other centres. Research will focus on measuring the efficacy of palliative care as well as ethical and epidemiological aspects. A government committee will assess the appropriateness of the activities undertaken by each of the centres. PMID:11695096

  1. Palliative care and neurology

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  2. Motion monitoring in palliative care using unobtrusive bed sensors.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, M; Goubran, R; Knoefel, F

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care needs are growing with the aging population. Ambient sensors offer patients comfortable and discreet point-of-care monitoring. In this study, two palliative care participants were monitored in a sensorized bed. Motion monitoring by a two-tier gross and fine movement detector provided accurate detection and classification of movement, compared to annotations by an observer. However, ascribing the motion to the patient rather than caregivers or visitors would require supplemental sensors. Motion was indicative of pain, with 13% of time spent moving while in pain versus 3% while not noted as in pain. PMID:25571304

  3. Palliative care in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients, siloed care, lack of knowledge, overlay of comorbidity and frailty, life saving devices with complex trade-offs, and a limited evidence base. This review will summarize the current literature on the emerging role of palliative care in patients with heart failure and the challenges and opportunities for its integration into routine care. It will discuss current initiatives and future directions of the collaborative relationship between the palliative care and heart failure disciplines. PMID:27079896

  4. Palliative medicine in Britain.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Derek

    In Britain, Palliative Medicine was recognized as a subspecialty of Internal Medicine exactly 20 years after Cicely Saunders founded St Christopher's, at exactly the same time that government was at last recognizing the worth and the needs of general practice. Both had far-reaching effects and implications for patients, doctors, and the future of medicine. For Palliative Medicine it meant units wishing to train specialists going through a rigorous selection process; the development of an equally rigorous training program for the doctors who had already gained a higher qualification before starting Palliative Medicine, demonstrating the need for and benefits of palliative medicine to the sceptics in the profession and, now, continuing to recruit the staff for the steadily increasing number of new services. Today there are more Palliative Medicine consultants/specialists than there are oncologists and neurologists combined, with Hospital Palliative Care Teams in every major hospital and cancer center. With nine Chairs in Palliative Medicine, there is now a drive for research and professional education. The specialty faces major challenges, however, ranging from training to care for patients with non-malignant disease to enabling patients to die in the place of their choice-something that rarely happens today; from defining what is distinctive or unique about palliative medicine to clarifying the respective place of general practice and the specialty. Most would agree that the biggest challenge for the young, thriving specialty is how to share its principles with other doctors wherever they work. PMID:18051021

  5. Retroperitoneal Endodermal Sinus Tumor Patient with Palliative Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    This article is a case reflection of a personal encounter on the palliative care treatment required after the removal of a complicated case of a primary extra-gonadal retro-peritoneal endodermal sinus tumor (yolk sac tumor). This reflection is from the perspective of a recently graduated MD student who spent one month with an Indian pain management and palliative care team at the Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH), All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi PMID:26962288

  6. An interdisciplinary and collaborative initiative in palliative care research

    PubMed Central

    Desa, Veena; Danjoux, Cyril; Matyas, Yvette; Fitch, Margaret; Husain, Amna; Horvath, Nina; Myers, Jeff; Clemons, Mark; Hux, Janet E; Barnes, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    The scale and complexity of palliative care increasingly demands that researchers move beyond their own discipline and explore interdisciplinary collaboration. At a Palliative Care Research Retreat held in January 2006 at the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, researchers from multiple care settings with the center and from other Toronto hospitals came together with the vision of becoming Canadian leaders in palliative care research. As a result of this retreat, five interdisciplinary groups were formed to pursue research in the areas of pain and symptom management, access to services, translational research, education, and communication. An overview of the retreat and direction of research for each group is provided. PMID:21197289

  7. Integrating palliative care with usual care of diabetic foot wounds.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is a philosophy and a system for deciding care and can be used alone or integrated with usual chronic disease care. Palliative care encompasses end-of-life care. Palliative care aims to enhance quality of life, optimize function and manage symptoms including early in the course of chronic diseases. The purposes of this article are to outline palliative care and discuss how it can be integrated with usual care of diabetic foot wounds. Many people with diabetes who have foot wounds also have other comorbidities and diabetes complications such as cardiovascular and renal disease and depression, which affect medicine and other treatment choices, functional status, surgical risk and quality of life. Two broad of diabetic foot disease exist: those likely to heal but who could still benefit from integrated palliative care such as managing pain and those where healing is unlikely where palliation can be the primary focus. People with diabetes can die suddenly, although the life course is usually long with periods of stable and unstable disease. Many health professionals are reluctant to discuss palliative care or suggest people to document their end-of-life care preferences. If such preferences are not documented, the person might not achieve their desired death or place of death and health professionals and families can be confronted with difficult decisions. Palliative care can be integrated with usual foot care and is associated with improved function, better quality of life and greater patient and family satisfaction. PMID:26813620

  8. Transforming children's palliative care-from ideas to action: highlights from the first ICPCN conference on children's palliative care.

    PubMed

    Downing, J; Marston, J; Muckaden, Ma; Boucher, S; Cardoz, M; Nkosi, B; Steel, B; Talawadekar, P; Tilve, P

    2014-01-01

    The International Children's Palliative Care Network (ICPCN) held its first international conference on children's palliative care, in conjunction with Tata Memorial Centre, in Mumbai, India, from 10-12 February 2014. The theme of the conference, Transforming children's palliative care-from ideas to action, reflected the vision of the ICPCN to live in a world where every child who needs it, can access palliative care, regardless of where they live. Key to this is action, to develop service provision and advocate for children's palliative care. Three pre-conference workshops were held on 9 February, aimed at doctors, nurses, social workers, and volunteers, and focused around the principles of children's palliative care, and in particular pain and symptom management. The conference brought together 235 participants representing 38 countries. Key themes identified throughout the conference included: the need for advocacy and leadership; for education and research, with great strides having been taken in the development of an evidence base for children's palliative care, along with the provision of education; the importance of communication and attention to spirituality in children, and issues around clinical care, in particular for neonates. Delegates were continually challenged to transform children's palliative care in their parts of the world and the conference culminated in the signing of the ICPCN Mumbai Declaration. The Declaration calls upon governments around the world to improve access to quality children's palliative care services and made a call on the Belgian government not to pass a bill allowing children to be euthanised in that country. The conference highlighted many of the ongoing developments in children's palliative care around the world, and as she closed the conference, Joan Marston (ICPCN CEO) challenged participants to take positive action and be the champions that the children need, thus transforming children's palliative care. PMID:24761156

  9. Radionuclide Treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP is Effective for the Palliation of Bone Pain in the Context of Extensive Bone Marrow Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kairemo, Kalevi; Rasulova, Nigora; Suslaviciute, Justina; Alanko, Tuomo

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is widely used as an effective modality in the management of bone pain. The main indication for this treatment is symptomatic bone metastases, confirmed by bone scintigraphy. We present a case of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) stage T4N2M1b, with a good metabolic response to systemic therapy and radiotherapy of the primary tumor and locoregional disease, which became metabolically less active and remarkably smaller in size (reduction to 1/6 of the original volume). In spite of the good overall response, the patient developed a syndrome with severe bone pain and had progression in the bone marrow metastases, confirmed by 18F-FDG PET/CT. The patient received 153Sm-EDTMP treatment with a good clinical response. However, in the whole body bone scan with the therapeutic dose, there was no visual evidence of bone metastasis. Retrospectively, by drawing the region of interest, it was possible to identify one metastatic site. The possible mechanisms of the efficacy of this treatment modality, in this specific setting, are also discussed. PMID:27408870

  10. [Palliative care in neurology].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  11. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included. PMID:21628042

  12. Spirituality and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows how palliative care developed as a reaction to the compartimentalized technical approach of modern medicine. But what does it mean if we say palliative care wants to treat patients as whole persons? A few pitfalls need to avoided. All disciplines involved in palliative care should act within the limits of their own specific professional role. Physicians and nurses should certainly not force patients into spiritual or religious discussions or practices. They should understand that religion and spirituality also influence the ethical (and thus medical) choices people make, respect their own conscience and worldview too and cultivate conscious compassion. PMID:21811369

  13. The Philippines: Historical Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackford, Julie; Aquino, Belinda A., Ed.

    This book provides readings and student lessons about the Philippines. Lessons and activities follow a chronological sequence and provide a good resource for those interested in the Philippines. The materials begin with prehistoric times and continue to the presidency of Corazon Aquino. Each chapter provides background information along with a…

  14. Future of Palliative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    A ‘need-supply’ and ‘requirement-distribution mismatch’ along with a continuingneed explosion are the biggest hurdles faced by palliative medicine today. It is the need of the hour to provide an unbiased, equitable and evidence-based palliative care to those in need irrespective of the diagnosis, prognosis, social and economic status or geographical location. Palliative care as a fundamental human right, ensuring provision throughout the illness spectrum, global as well as region-specific capacity building, uniform availability of essential drugs at an affordable price, a multidisciplinary team approachand caregiver-support are some of the achievable goals for the future. This supplanted with a strong political commitment, professional dedication and ‘public-private partnerships’ are necessaryto tackle the existing hurdles and the exponentially increasing future need. For effectively going ahead it is of utmost importance to integrate palliative medicine into medical education, healthcare system and societal framework. PMID:25709197

  15. Vitamin D and patients with palliative cancer.

    PubMed

    Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Bergman, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D is a hormone that is synthesised in the skin in the presence of sunlight. Sufficient vitamin D levels are important-not only for a healthy skeleton-but also for a healthy immune system. Many patients with cancer have insufficient vitamin D levels, and low vitamin D levels are associated with increased 'all-cause mortality' and especially mortality due to cancer. Low vitamin D levels have also been associated with increased risk of infections, increased pain, depressive disorders and impaired quality of life. We review the role of vitamin D in the immune system, in relation to cancer disease, pain and depression. We have recently performed an observational study in 100 patients with palliative cancer in Sweden. The main result was that low vitamin D levels were associated with higher opioid dose, that is, more pain. We also describe a case report where vitamin D supplementation resulted in radically decreased opioid dose, less pain and better well-being. Vitamin D supplementation is not connected with any adverse side effects and is easy to administrate. Thus, we hypothesise that vitamin D-supplementation to patients with palliative cancer might be beneficial and could improve their well-being, decrease pain and reduce susceptibility to infections. However, more clinical studies in this field are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:27084421

  16. 'Good palliative care' orders.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, I

    1993-01-01

    A Select Committee of the Parliament of South Australia, considering revisions to legislation governing care of the dying, did not support allowing doctors to assist suicide. They recommended that no liability attach to the provision of reasonable palliative care which happens to shorten life. The Committee affirmed the suggestion that positive open orders to provide 'good palliative care' should replace 'do not resuscitate' orders. PMID:7506978

  17. [Radioprotection and environmental pollution by the use of the radionuclides 89Sr, 186Re, and 153Sm for pain palliation in metastatic bone diseases. Related calculations].

    PubMed

    Sbonias, Evangelos

    2005-01-01

    Due to the fact that the existing commercial analgesic drugs are not able to reduce effectively the pain caused by the metastatic bone disease, the use of radiopharmaceuticals with avidity to selectively localize in the metastatic skeletal sites, such as strondium-89 chloride (89Sr-Cl2), rhenium-186-hydroxy ethylene diphosphonate (186Re-HEDP), and samarium-153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene (153Sm-EDTMP), is widely accepted. However this medical application may be dangerous for the occupied personnel and more for general public, if radioactive waste is not properly disposed. In the following article we try to estimate the degree and the significance of that risk. For that reason we discuss the physical properties of these radionuclides and their distribution in the body of the patient. We conclude that 89Sr is not harmful for the physician, the attending personnel or those who live with the patient, because it radiates beta-radiation, while its gamma-radiation is negligeable. The radionuclides 186Re and 153Sm besides beta-radiation, also emit a perceptible amount of gamma-radiation. It has been shown that the exposure to gamma-radiation from these radionuclides of the physician, the attending personnel or those who live with the patient is very low as compared to the internationally accepted radioprotection limits. However the environmental contamination per treatment by either of these three radionuclides is not negligeable in comparison to the national and international accepted limits. Patients that are not in good clinical condition may pose an additional contamination danger to those attending them. For limiting radiocontamination, the annual number of treatments by the above three previous radionuclides, should be considered according to the ALARA principle in relation with the correct handling of these patients, and also considering the fundamentals of radioprotection. PMID:16142246

  18. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Frequently Asked Questions: What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care is ... for patients and families. Who provides pediatric palliative care? Every palliative care team is different. The team ...

  19. [eLearning service for home palliative care].

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fukushima, Osamu

    2008-12-01

    In order to support the home palliative care learning, we made the eLearning service for home palliative care (beta version) and tried to teach the palliative care to the medical staffs in the community. The various learners (such as nurses, pharmacists and the like) accessed to the online learning and used this eLearning service. After the learners finished eLearning for home palliative care, some questionnaires were distributed to the learners and analyzed by us. The analysis of questionnaires revealed that almost all were satisfied with our eLearning services. Especially the learners were not only interested in using the skills of opioids and the management of pain control, but they had a good cognition for the usage of opioids. PMID:20443298

  20. Victoria BGY palliative care model--a new model for the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Downing, G M; Braithwaite, D L; Wilde, J M

    1993-01-01

    If, as palliative care practitioners, we ensure that distressing symptoms such as pain, vomiting, dyspnea, confusion, and pre-death restlessness are fully controlled (note "fully"), then most people are deeply appreciative and continue to live until they die, confident that whatever happens, their worth, desires, and comfort are secure. Credibility (Latin, fides dignus) is remaining true and reliable to what was agreed. Patients registering with palliative care generally desire comfort, which can only occur when palliative care physicians and programs are capable and willing to apply all three types of palliation discussed here--the BGY model. PMID:7510798

  1. Philippine Astronomy Convention 2009 Abstract: Philippine Ethnoastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, D. L.

    2009-03-01

    Ethnoastronomy refers to the system of beliefs and practices of ethno-linguistic groups regarding astronomical and meteorological phenomena which form part of the upper world in their three-world view of the universe. For the Philippines, the study is relevant in the investigation of Philippine pre-colonial society and culture. It is also important in showing the diversity, commonality, richness and depth of what would be referred to later on as Philippine cultures. Through this study, various Philippine groups which are usually neglected in the writing of history are brought to the forefront to share in the limelight with mainstream groups in tracing the development of this society and culture. The study focuses on the indigenous world view, beliefs, knowledge and practices regarding the sun, the moon, the eclipse and the stars. It shows how astronomical, as well as meteorological, phenomena influence the way people look at the world and the way they think, behave and live. Beliefs and knowledge regarding these phenomena inform their everyday life then and now as they continuously engage in agriculture, fishing, hunting, and trading, in observing various rituals, in building a house, and even in securing good fortune in any undertaking.

  2. Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Submit an Abstract Writing Educational Objectives Palliative Care APRN Fellowships HPNF Chapter Education Grants HPNF Individual ... HPNA Chapters Content Experts Position Statements Fellow in Palliative Care Nursing HPNF and Project on Death in America ...

  3. HIFU for Palliative Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies, with only a 6 % 5-year survival rate and over 50 % of patients being diagnosed at the advanced stage. Current therapies are ineffective, and the treatment of patients with advanced disease is palliative. In the past decade, HIFU ablation has emerged as a modality for palliative treatment of pancreatic tumors. Multiple preclinical and non-randomized clinical trials have been performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Substantial tumor-related pain reduction was achieved in most cases after HIFU treatment and few significant side effects were observed. In addition, some studies indicate that combination of HIFU ablation with chemotherapy may provide a survival benefit. This chapter summarizes the pre-clinical and clinical experience obtained to date in HIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors and discusses the challenges, limitations and new approaches in this modality. PMID:26486333

  4. [Importance of Anesthesiologists in the Work of a Palliative Care Team].

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Jun; Sumitani, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    World Health Organization has proposed that palliative medicine should be applied early in the course of the malignant diseases. Regrettably, however, palliative care has been usually provided to patients with the advanced stage of cancer, as terminal care. Recently, palliative medicine begins at the time when patients are diagnosed with cancer. In response to changes in clinical settings of palliative medicine, anesthesiologists, with substantial experience in interdisciplinary pain management, can utilize their advantages in providing palliative medicine to cancer patients: 1) use of opioid analgesics; 2) considering the biopsychosocial model of pain; 3) helping patients live as actively as possible until death; and 4) helping the family cope with the patient's illness and their own bereavement. PMID:27097502

  5. Palliative Therapy for Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... based on the extent of gallbladder cancer Palliative therapy for gallbladder cancer Palliative therapy is treatment given to help control or reduce ... to advance quickly, doctors try to use palliative therapies that are less likely to affect a person’s ...

  6. [Latest pain management for painful bony metastases].

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masayuki

    2006-04-01

    Pain management for painful bony metastases is the most important problem for symptom relief of terminally-ill cancer patients. Pathological fractures often decrease the activity of daily life (ADL) of patients, and cause deterioration of the quality of life (QOL) and prognosis. Basically pharmacological therapies of the World Health Organization (WHO) method are essential for symptom relief from cancer pain. This article provides the latest pain managements (palliative irradiation, bisphosphonate, orthopedic surgery, percutaneous vertebroplasty and radiopharmaceutical therapy) of bony metastases, and mentions the indications and the problems of these interventions. In consideration to prognosis, the QOL and patient's needs, medical staffs have to perform multidisciplinary approach for providing suitable palliative care. PMID:16582515

  7. The Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes towards the Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayed, Ahmad; Sayej, Sumaya; Harazneh, Lubna; Fashafsheh, Imad; Eqtait, Faeda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Palliative care (PC) is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems like physical, psychosocial and…

  8. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  9. [Use of music in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Skrbina, Dijana; Simunović, Dubravka; Santek, Vjerocka; Njegovan-Zvonarević, Tatjana

    2011-12-01

    Man is mortal, which means that as the earthly body perishes being, final. Disease and death will always be an inevitable and integral part of human experience. The way in which we try to identify and respond to the unique and individual needs of the dying is an indication of our maturity as a society. The number of people requiring palliative care is growing. Palliative care does not intend to either accelerate or postpone death she emphasizes the life and looks at dying as a normal process. It is an active form of care for patients with advanced, progressive illness, with the aim of suppressing pain and other symptoms in addition to providing psychological, social and spiritual support which ensures the best possible quality of life for patients and their families. Therefore requires a coordinated and interdisciplinary contribution team. The variety of professions in a team, and determine the needs of patients should be ready to provide physical, psychological, social and spiritual support using methods that result from an interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach. Development of a holistic approach and awareness in the medical and allied professions has led to a renewal of interest in the inclusion of music and other expressive media in contemporary concepts of palliative care, which are consistent with problem areas, clinical manifestations and the needs of patients. Music offers a direct and uncomplicated medium of intimacy, living in a man who listens to her, has a place where words lose their power. Music is like our existence, constantly polarizing and emotionally stimulating, as it touches the medium of the earliest layers of our becoming. The use of music in palliative care has proved very effective for a variety of effects that music creates in patients. These effects are achieved through the use of various musical techniques, such as musical improvisation, songwriting, receiving creative techniques, guided by imagination and music. These techniques

  10. Palliative Care in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hupcey, Judith E; Kitko, Lisa; Alonso, Windy

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients with heart failure is growing; the associated morbidity and mortality remains dismal. Advance care planning, end-of-life conversations, and palliative care referrals are appropriate, but do not occur regularly. Palliative care focuses on patients and families from diagnosis, to hospice, death, and bereavement. It is delivered as basic palliative care by all providers and by specialty-certified palliative care specialists. Nurses are well-positioned to provide basic. Nurses are also instrumental in initiating referrals to the specialized palliative care team as the patient's needs become too complex or the disease progresses and the patient approaches the end of life. PMID:26567500

  11. Prescription Pattern of Analgesic Drugs for Patients Receiving Palliative Care in a Teaching Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Vishma Hydie; Nair, Shoba N; Soumya, MS; Tarey, SD

    2016-01-01

    Background: Drugs used in the palliative care unit for managing symptoms are major contributors toward the expenditure occurring in palliative care. This study was conducted to understand the prescription pattern of analgesic drugs in the patients who are receiving palliative care in a teaching hospital in India by a retrospective study of case records. Methods: Case record based, retrospective, descriptive study was conducted at the Pain and Palliative Care Department of St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bengaluru. Case record files of all patients referred to Pain and Palliative Care Department for the treatment of pain in the year of 2012 were studied. Patients’ age, gender, diagnoses, numerical pain rating scale (0–10), drugs prescribed, dosage, frequency, route of administration were recorded. The difference in drug utilization between the genders was done using Chi-square test. Data were collected from 502 patients of which 280 (56%) were males and 222 (44%) were females. Twelve percent of patients had mild pain (1–3), 34% had moderate pain (4–6), and 54% had severe pain (7–10). The most commonly used analgesic drugs were opioids (47%), followed by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (36%). The opioids used were tramadol (56%), and morphine (38%). Ninety percent of patients with numerical pain scale more than 6 received morphine. There was no difference in analgesic drug utilization with regards to gender. Prescription pattern differed depending on the severity of pain. Opioids were the most commonly used drugs for pain management. Conclusion: The study shows that prescription pattern in palliative care unit of this hospital was in accordance with WHO pain management guidelines. The study showed the current trend in prescription of analgesic drugs in the teaching hospital where the study was conducted. PMID:26962282

  12. Music therapy in the context of palliative care in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Rebecca

    2010-10-01

    There has been much written to support music therapy as an adjunct in managing pain and anxiety in palliative care patients in Western societies, but little written on its use in developing countries. In light of increasing numbers of terminally ill patients in Tanzania owing to HIV/AIDS and cancer, limited access to opioids, and a growing interest in palliative care support, this study looks at the application of music in this context. The study reviews the history and principles of therapeutic music and outlines its role in palliative care. A qualitative study was conducted by questionnaire of 17 professionals involved in home-based palliative care in Tanzania. Findings include beliefs about the power of music, how music is being used to bring comfort to the dying patient, and the most important aspects of helpful music to many Tanzanian palliative care patients. Music can powerfully affect body, mind and spirit. It is vocal music, which is an accepted therapeutic music tool used to bring comfort to the palliative care patient and their family members. Finally, music is an active and participatory activity in Tanzanian culture, even for the dying. PMID:20972382

  13. Fine-tuning Philippine transactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, R.

    1994-11-01

    Expanding the power generation and distribution capability of the Philippines remains a top priority of the Philippine government. It is therefore not surprising that a number of the most significant legislative initiatives approved by the Philippine legislature in the past few years have been designed to encourage these activities in particular. There are several recent, significant statutes that will affect both power and non-power projects undertaken in the Philippines.

  14. Palliative Care in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Alyssia; Silverberg, Joshua Z

    2016-08-01

    As the geriatric population increases in the United States, there is an increase in number of visits to emergency departments for end-of-life and palliative care. This provides the emergency physician with a unique opportunity to alleviate and prevent further suffering in this vulnerable population. Competency in communication strategies that support shared decision making and familiarity with medicolegal terminology increase physician confidence about addressing complaints at the end of life. Familiarity with evidence-based recommendations for symptom management of pain at the end of life aids the emergency physician in creating a positive experience for the patient and their loved ones. PMID:27475020

  15. The perspectives on including palliative care in the Indian undergraduate physiotherapy curriculum.

    PubMed

    Veqar, Zubia

    2013-04-01

    According to the guidelines which were published by WHO in 2008, palliative care has been defined as "An approach that improves the quality of life of the patients and their families who face the problems which are associated with life-threatening illnesses, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of an early identification, an impeccable assessment and the treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual". The intervention which is provided as a part of the palliative care has to be provided by health professionals who strictly work as a part of multidisciplinary team and have been specifically trained to an optimal level of competency in the field. The impairment of the physical function and pain are two key problem areas in palliative care, which a physiotherapist deals with. Is a physiotherapist who is trained in India, trained to work as an efficient member of the team in this field? THIS ARTICLE DEALS WITH THE FOLLOWING: What is palliative care and what is its importance?A multidisciplinary approach to palliative careThe scenario of palliative care in IndiaThe role of physiotherapy in palliative care.The current scenario of physiotherapy education vis a vis palliative care. PMID:23730677

  16. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  17. Palliative care for people with dementia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lillyman, Sue; Bruce, Mary

    2016-02-01

    With growing numbers of people dying with, and from, dementia there is a need for professionals and health-care organisations to review the access to and provision of palliative care. This literature review has identified several key themes in relation to the person dying with dementia including: diagnosis of the dying phase, appropriate timing of referral to specialist palliative care services; ethical decisions in relation to medication and nutrition; the environment; undertreatment especially, for pain relief; over and burdensome treatment interventions; carer involvement; collaborative working and advance decision making. PMID:26926347

  18. Transforming children’s palliative care—from ideas to action: highlights from the first ICPCN conference on children’s palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Downing, J; Marston, J; Muckaden, MA; Boucher, S; Cardoz, M; Nkosi, B; Steel, B; Talawadekar, P; Tilve, P

    2014-01-01

    The International Children’s Palliative Care Network (ICPCN) held its first international conference on children’s palliative care, in conjunction with Tata Memorial Centre, in Mumbai, India, from 10–12 February 2014. The theme of the conference, Transforming children’s palliative care—from ideas to action, reflected the vision of the ICPCN to live in a world where every child who needs it, can access palliative care, regardless of where they live. Key to this is action, to develop service provision and advocate for children’s palliative care. Three pre-conference workshops were held on 9 February, aimed at doctors, nurses, social workers, and volunteers, and focused around the principles of children’s palliative care, and in particular pain and symptom management. The conference brought together 235 participants representing 38 countries. Key themes identified throughout the conference included: the need for advocacy and leadership; for education and research, with great strides having been taken in the development of an evidence base for children’s palliative care, along with the provision of education; the importance of communication and attention to spirituality in children, and issues around clinical care, in particular for neonates. Delegates were continually challenged to transform children’s palliative care in their parts of the world and the conference culminated in the signing of the ICPCN Mumbai Declaration. The Declaration calls upon governments around the world to improve access to quality children’s palliative care services and made a call on the Belgian government not to pass a bill allowing children to be euthanised in that country. The conference highlighted many of the ongoing developments in children’s palliative care around the world, and as she closed the conference, Joan Marston (ICPCN CEO) challenged participants to take positive action and be the champions that the children need, thus transforming children

  19. Palliation and supportive care in radiation medicine.

    PubMed

    Janjan, Nora

    2006-02-01

    The treatment of bone metastases represents a paradigm for evaluating palliative care in terms of symptom relief, toxicities of therapy, and the financial burden to the patient, caregivers, and society. Despite enormous expenditures to treat metastases, patients continue to sustain symptoms of the disease, and uninterrupted aggressive therapies are pursued until death that incur toxicity in approximately 25% of patients. This approach is inconsistent with the goals of palliative care, which should efficiently provide comfort using antineoplastic therapies or supportive care approaches to the patient with the fewest treatment-related side effects, recognizing that the patient will die of the disease.The development of therapies such as bisphosphonates is important in advancing options for palliative care; however, clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of bisphosphonates have not addressed important issues for clinical practice. The primary study endpoints should primarily address pertinent patient outcomes such as pain relief rather than asymptomatic radiographic findings. These studies should define clear indications of when to start and stop the therapy, the appropriate patient populations to receive the therapy, and the cost effectiveness of the treatment relative to other available therapies such as radiation. Cost-utility analyses, which account for a broader domain of cost effectiveness, need to be performed as part of clinical trials, especially for palliative care endpoints. Clinical trials that include these criteria are critical to future practice guideline development. As health care resources continue to become more limited, the criteria for care must be better defined to avoid administration of therapy with limited benefit. Leadership must come from the specialty as clinical trials and clinical practice increasingly interface with health care policy. Goals of therapy must remain clear for the benefit of the individual and all patients. PMID

  20. Pulmonary medicine and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Tucakovic, M; Bascom, R; Bascom, P B

    2001-04-01

    Gynaecological malignancies affect the respiratory system both directly and indirectly. Malignant pleural effusion is a poor prognostic factor: management options include repeated thoracentesis, chemical pleurodesis, symptomatic relief of dyspnoea with oxygen and morphine, and external drainage. Parenchymal metastases are typically multifocal and respond to chemotherapy, with a limited role for pulmonary metastatectomy. Pulmonary tumour embolism is frequently associated with lymphangitic carcinomatosis, and is most common in choriocarcinoma. Thromboembolic disease, associated with the hypercoagulable state of cancer, is treated with anticoagulation. Inferior vena cava filter placement is indicated when anticoagulation cannot be given, or when emboli recur despite adequate anticoagulation. Palliative care has a major role for respiratory symptoms of gynaecological malignancies. Treatable causes of dyspnoea include bronchospasm, fluid overload and retained secretions. Opiates are effective at relieving dyspnoea associated with effusions, metatases, and lymphangitic tumour spread. Non-pharmacological therapies include energy conservation, home redesign, and dyspnoea relief strategies, including pursed lip breathing, relaxation, oxygen, circulation of air with a fan, and attention to spiritual suffering. Identification and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, sinusitis, and asthma can improve many patients' coughs. Chest wall pain responds to local radiotherapy, nerve blocks or systemic analgesia. Case examples illustrate ways to address quality of life issues. PMID:11358403

  1. Palliative care and pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Daisy J A; McCormick, James R

    2014-06-01

    Numerous barriers exist to the timely introduction of palliative care in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The complex needs of patients with advanced COPD require the integration of curative-restorative care and palliative care. Palliative care and pulmonary rehabilitation are both important components of integrated care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Pulmonary rehabilitation provides the opportunity to introduce palliative care by implementing education about advance care planning. Education about advance care planning addresses the information needs of patients and can be an effective strategy to promote patient-physician discussion about these issues. PMID:24874135

  2. Overcoming the Obstacles in Promoting Hospice Palliative Care--Sharing Experiences of the Taiwan Changhua Christian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hospice palliative care for terminal patients is necessary, yet challenges are on the way worldwide. This study demonstrated that hospice palliative care has been quickly developed in Taiwan due to the support of the National Health Insurance system, the promotion by civil societies and religious groups, patient's legal right for DNR, easier access to pain killers through medical prescription, and well-planned hospice staff training programs. This paper introduces how hospice consultation is provided by a comprehensive hospice palliative team at Changhua Christian Hospital to establish trust and cooperation with the medical team, and to improve hospice-palliative care referral and utilization rates. PMID:26867341

  3. Country Profiles, The Philippines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concepcion, Mercedes B.

    A profile of the Philippines is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition,…

  4. Palliative care, double effect and the law in Australia.

    PubMed

    White, B P; Willmott, L; Ashby, M

    2011-06-01

    Care and decision-making at the end of life that promotes comfort and dignity is widely endorsed by public policy and the law. In ethical analysis of palliative care interventions that are argued potentially to hasten death, these may be deemed to be ethically permissible by the application of the doctrine of double effect, if the doctor's intention is to relieve pain and not cause death. In part because of the significance of ethics in the development of law in the medical sphere, this doctrine is also likely to be recognized as part of Australia's common law, although hitherto there have been no cases concerning palliative care brought before a court in Australia to test this. Three Australian States have, nonetheless, created legislative defences that are different from the common law with the intent of clarifying the law, promoting palliative care, and distinguishing it from euthanasia. However, these defences have the potential to provide less protection for doctors administering palliative care. In addition to requiring a doctor to have an appropriate intent, the defences insist on adherence to particular medical practice standards and perhaps require patient consent. Doctors providing end-of-life care in these States need to be aware of these legislative changes. Acting in accordance with the common law doctrine of double effect may not provide legal protection. Similar changes are likely to occur in other States and Territories as there is a trend towards enacting legislative defences that deal with the provision of palliative care. PMID:21707893

  5. A comprehensive review of palliative care in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Reena; Alici, Yesne; Breitbart, William

    2014-02-01

    One of the most challenging roles for the psychiatrist is to help guide terminally ill patients physically, psychologically and spiritually through the dying process. Patients with advanced cancer, and other life-threatening medical illnesses are at increased risk for developing major psychiatric complications and have an enormous burden of both physical as well as psychological symptoms. In fact, surveys suggest that psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and hopelessness are as frequent, if not more so, than pain and other physical symptoms in palliative care settings. Psychiatrists have a unique role and opportunity to offer competent and compassionate palliative care to those with life-threatening illness. In this article we provide a comprehensive review of basic concepts and definitions of palliative care and the experience of dying, and the role of the psychiatrist in palliative care including assessment and management of common psychiatric disorders in the terminally ill, with an emphasis on suicide and desire for hastened death. Psychotherapies developed for use in palliative care settings, and management of grief and bereavement are also reviewed. PMID:24716503

  6. Occupational health and safety issues among nurses in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A B; Cabrera, Suzanne L; Gee, Gilbert C; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A

    2009-04-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  7. Occupational Health and Safety Issues Among Nurses in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A. B.; Cabrera, Suzanne L.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  8. Innovative palliative care in Edmonton.

    PubMed Central

    Fainsinger, R. L.; Bruera, E.; MacMillan, K.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Access to palliative care in Edmonton has been hampered by uneven development, poor distribution of services, and more recently, economic restraints. Family physicians' involvement in palliative care has been hindered by the variety of access points, poor coordination, and inadequate reimbursement for time-consuming and difficult patient care situations. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To provide high-quality palliative care throughout Edmonton in all settings, with patients able to move easily throughout the components of the program; to lower costs by having fewer palliative care patients die in acute care facilities; and to ensure that family physicians receive support to care for most patients at home or in palliative care units. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: The program includes a regional office, home care, and consultant teams. A specialized 14-bed palliative care unit provides acute care. Family physicians are the primary caregivers in the 56 palliative continuing care unit beds. CONCLUSIONS: This program appears to meet most of the need for palliative care in Edmonton. Family physicians, with support from consulting teams, have a central role. Evaluation is ongoing; an important issue is how best to support patients dying at home. Images p1984-a p1986-a PMID:9386885

  9. Knowledge and attitude of final - year medical students in Germany towards palliative care - an interinstitutional questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To care for terminally ill and dying patients requires a thorough medical education, encompassing skills, knowledge, and attitudes in the field of palliative care. Undergraduate medical students in Germany will receive mandatory teaching in palliative care in the near future driven by recent changes in the Medical Licensure Act. Before new curricula can be implemented, the knowledge of medical students with respect to palliative care, their confidence to handle palliative care situations correctly, their therapeutic attitude, and their subjective assessment about previous teaching practices have to be better understood. Method We designed a composite, three-step questionnaire (self estimation of confidence, knowledge questions, and opinion on the actual and future medical curriculum) conducted online of final - year medical students at two universities in Germany. Results From a total of 318 enrolled students, 101 responded and described limited confidence in dealing with specific palliative care issues, except for pain therapy. With regard to questions examining their knowledge base in palliative care, only one third of the students (33%) answered more than half of the questions correctly. Only a small percentage of students stated they had gained sufficient knowledge and experience in palliative care during their studies, and the vast majority supported the introduction of palliative care as a mandatory part of the undergraduate curriculum. Conclusion This study identifies medical students' limited confidence and knowledge base in palliative care in 2 German universities, and underlines the importance of providing a mandatory palliative care curriculum. PMID:22112146

  10. Access to palliative care: insights into ground realities post-2014 amendment to NDPS Act.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, M R

    2016-01-01

    Medical practice today is disease-focused, ignoring the universally accepted definition of health as not just the absence of disease, but the promotion of complete physical, social and mental well-being. Generations of doctors in India have not studied modern pain management, and palliative care is practically unknown in most parts of the country, causing patients to be rejected by hospitals and doctors when they need help the most. The draconian Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (NDPS) Act of 1985, outdated medical and nursing education, lack of public awareness and lack of clear governmental policy are responsible for this sorry state of affairs. The development of a community-oriented palliative care network eventually led to the formulation of a state palliative care policy in Kerala. The acceptance of palliative care as a medical specialty by the Medical Council of India and introduction of a postgraduate degree course in palliative medicine in 2010, the development of a National Programme for Palliative Care in 2012 by the Ministry of Health of the Government of India, and the amendment of the NDPS Act in 2014 have been major positive developments which have the potential to change the current state of affairs. However, these recent achievements represent but one step in the right direction. An improvement in palliative care education, a realistic palliative care policy and implementation of the NDPS Amendment Act are necessary for doing away with the gross, needless violation of the human right to life with dignity. PMID:26826658

  11. Palliative care training and research: the development in europe and the bologna experience.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Deborah; Brighi, Nicole; Muciarelli, Pier-Angelo; Biasco, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Development of palliative care (PC) culture spur the need of proper and formal training. Palliative medicine is not fully recognized as an academic medical discipline due to its humanistic influences, and studies show that physicians declare to be not prepared to provide care and pain management to dying patients. Nowadays, despite leading countries in PC being considered more innovative than other countries,such as Italy, facts show that the achievement of acknowledged discipline went through a long process. In Italy,professionals from about 450 PC units and organizations need to receive a proper and homogeneous training. In Italy, palliative medicine official certification is an undergoing process advocated by a few organizations and in Bologna the Academy of the Sciences of Palliative Medicine operates since 2007 with the defined mission of developing PC culture, also within the University. In order to be as much effective in pursuing its mission, the Academy has strengthened several international cooperation programs and today is leader in PC professional training and research in Italy. The recent law and its feasibility is fastening the process of development of Palliative Care Culture in Italy even if training is not properly regulated and official certification for physician is under evaluation. In Europe, the European Association of Palliative Care is stressing the need for training programs in palliative medicine and the outcomes of the dedicated task force on official certification and specialty in Palliative Medicine will remarkably force policy makers and national councils to officially recognize the discipline. PMID:23766591

  12. Palliative Care Training and Research: The Development in Europe and the Bologna Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, Deborah; Brighi, Nicole; Muciarelli, Pier-Angelo; Biasco, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Development of palliative care (PC) culture spur the need of proper and formal training. Palliative medicine is not fully recognized as an academic medical discipline due to its humanistic influences, and studies show that physicians declare to be not prepared to provide care and pain management to dying patients. Nowadays, despite leading countries in PC being considered more innovative than other countries,such as Italy, facts show that the achievement of acknowledged discipline went through a long process. In Italy,professionals from about 450 PC units and organizations need to receive a proper and homogeneous training. In Italy, palliative medicine official certification is an undergoing process advocated by a few organizations and in Bologna the Academy of the Sciences of Palliative Medicine operates since 2007 with the defined mission of developing PC culture, also within the University. In order to be as much effective in pursuing its mission, the Academy has strengthened several international cooperation programs and today is leader in PC professional training and research in Italy. The recent law and its feasibility is fastening the process of development of Palliative Care Culture in Italy even if training is not properly regulated and official certification for physician is under evaluation. In Europe, the European Association of Palliative Care is stressing the need for training programs in palliative medicine and the outcomes of the dedicated task force on official certification and specialty in Palliative Medicine will remarkably force policy makers and national councils to officially recognize the discipline. PMID:23766591

  13. Tongonani geothermal power development, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Minson, A.A.C.; Fry, T.J.; Kivell, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the features, design and construction of a 112 MWe geothermal power project, representing the first stage development of the substantial geothermal resources of the central Philippine region. The project has been undertaken by the Philippine Government. The National Powe Corporation is responsible for generation and distribution facilities and the Philippine National Oil Company Energy Development Corporation is responsible for controlled delivery of steam to the powe station.

  14. Improving Palliative Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute-funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families. PMID:26114013

  15. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers. PMID:27497014

  16. [Palliative care in pediatrics, ethics and relations with the patient].

    PubMed

    Friedel, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The extension of the Belgian law on euthanasia to minors during the course of 2014 raises questions with regard to the needs of children in the context of paediatric palliative care. These needs concern essentially the focus given to the interrelations between the child, their family and the caregiving team as well as to the relief of the physical, psychological and spiritual pain. Ethical guidelines help to fuel the discussions surrounding professional practices. PMID:25608370

  17. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe. PMID:25841689

  18. Team networking in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Spruyt, Odette

    2011-01-01

    "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members. PMID:21811361

  19. Trends in Philippine Library History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Vicente S.

    This paper divides Philippine library history into three periods, establishing a relationship between historical events and library trends. During the Spanish period, modern library trends were introduced through the establishment of the Sociedad Economica in 1780, but did not influence Philippine library culture until the later part of the 19th…

  20. [Palliative care for glioblastoma].

    PubMed

    Dieudonné, Nathalie; De Micheli, Rita; Hottinger, Andreas

    2016-04-27

    Patients with glioblastoma have a limited life expectancy and an impaired quality of life and they should be offered palliative care soon after the diagnosis is established. Still, only a quarter of patients aged over 65 return home or medical institution after completing treatments. Home care must be promoted by coordinating assistance and care, combining disciplines such as physiotherapy and ergotherapy, medical and nursing care and psychosocial support. Patients are at risk of mood, personality and behavioural disorders. Limited awareness of these troubles and their physical limitations alter their capacity of rehabilitation and social relationships. Isolation of relatives, exhaustion and misunderstandings should be prevented. The therapeutic goals should be discussed and determined upstream to anticipate difficulties and questions concerning end of life. PMID:27281945

  1. 38 CFR 3.41 - Philippine service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Philippine service. 3.41..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.41 Philippine service. (a) For a Regular Philippine Scout or a member of one of the regular components of the Philippine Commonwealth Army...

  2. 38 CFR 3.41 - Philippine service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Philippine service. 3.41..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.41 Philippine service. (a) For a Regular Philippine Scout or a member of one of the regular components of the Philippine Commonwealth Army...

  3. 38 CFR 3.41 - Philippine service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Philippine service. 3.41..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.41 Philippine service. (a) For a Regular Philippine Scout or a member of one of the regular components of the Philippine Commonwealth Army...

  4. 38 CFR 3.41 - Philippine service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Philippine service. 3.41..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.41 Philippine service. (a) For a Regular Philippine Scout or a member of one of the regular components of the Philippine Commonwealth Army...

  5. 38 CFR 3.41 - Philippine service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Philippine service. 3.41..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.41 Philippine service. (a) For a Regular Philippine Scout or a member of one of the regular components of the Philippine Commonwealth Army...

  6. Posthumous Reproduction and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn; Bower, Bethanne; Zoloth, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Posthumous reproduction is an issue fraught with legal, ethical, religious, and moral debate. The involvement of the hospice and palliative care community in this debate may be peripheral due to the fact that other health care professionals would be actually delivering the services. However, the hospice and palliative care community are more likely to treat patients considering posthumous reproduction as they near the end of their lives. This article provides the hospice and palliative care community with a review of the medical, ethical, and legal considerations associated with posthumous reproduction. Having knowledge of these issues, and a list of available resources, will be useful if hospice and palliative care staff find themselves facing a patient or family that is considering posthumous reproduction. PMID:21711126

  7. Spirituality in geriatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Christina M

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an overview of spirituality as an essential domain of geriatrics palliative care, and provides guidelines for clinicians to diagnose spiritual distress and to integrate spirituality into their clinical practice. PMID:25920059

  8. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control shortness of breath: Call your doctor, palliative care team, or hospice nurse for advice Call 911 ... Bicanovsky L. Comfort care: symptom control in the dying. In: Walsh ... . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 181.

  9. Center to Advance Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Learn More Overview Palliative in Practice Blog Report Card getpalliativecare.org Topics Topics of Interest CAPC ensures ... and Families Payer-Provider PCLC Pediatric Policy Report Card Seminar Membership Membership CAPC makes sure you never ...

  10. HIFU for palliative treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.

    2011-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel non-invasive modality for ablation of various solid tumors including uterine fibroids, prostate cancer, hepatic, renal, breast and pancreatic tumors. HIFU therapy utilizes mechanical energy in the form of a powerful ultrasound wave that is focused inside the body to induce thermal and/or mechanical effects in tissue. Multiple preclinical and non-randomized clinical trials have been performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HIFU for palliative treatment of pancreatic tumors. Substantial tumor-related pain reduction was achieved in most cases after HIFU treatment, and no significant side-effects were observed. This review provides a description of different physical mechanisms underlying HIFU therapy, summarizes the clinical experience obtained to date in HIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors, and discusses the challenges, limitations and new approaches in this modality. PMID:22811848

  11. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  12. Cultural and religious considerations in pediatric palliative care

    PubMed Central

    WIENER, LORI; MCCONNELL, DENICE GRADY; LATELLA, LAUREN; LUDI, ERICA

    2012-01-01

    about death (truth telling), the meaning of pain and suffering, the meaning of death and dying, and location of end-of-life care. Significance of results The review of the literature provides insight into the influence of religion and how culture informs lifestyle and shapes the experiences of illness, pain, and end-of-life care. Recommendations for providing culturally sensitive end-of-life care are offered through the framework outlined in the Initiative for Pediatric Palliative Care Quality Improvement Project of 2002. Cultural traditions are dynamic, never static, and cannot be generalized to all families. Guidelines to aid in approaches to palliative care are provided, and providers are encouraged to define these important differences for each family under their care. PMID:22617619

  13. [Palliative care in non-cancer, chronic, progressive diseases].

    PubMed

    Radványi, Ildikó; Nagy, Lajos; Balogh, Sándor; Csikós, Ágnes

    2015-10-18

    Malignant and other chronic diseases cause the death of 2.5 million people in Europe annually. It is anticipated that this number will grow due to the aging of the European population. The death of a significant proportion of patients having progressive chronic disease is preceded by an extended end of life stadium. In this stage the patients have severe symptoms and pain that necessitate their symptomatic treatment and palliative care. The assessment of the life expectancy of patients, estimation of the prognosis of their illness and, therefore, selection of patients with a need of intensified palliative care often pose difficulties. This paper provides a summary on the basic elements of "good palliative care". It introduces the most frequent models for the procession of chronic diseases and those indicators that help practicing doctors to recognise easier patients with a need of intensified palliative care, and as a result provides more adequate medical attendance that is better suited to the specific needs of the patients. PMID:26551310

  14. [Palliative care: an approach based on the professional health categories].

    PubMed

    Hermes, Hélida Ribeiro; Lamarca, Isabel Cristina Arruda

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care has emerged as a humanitarian philosophy of caring for terminally ill patients, alleviating their pain and suffering. This care involves the action of an interdisciplinary team, in which all the professional recognize the limits of their performance will help the terminally ill patient to die with dignity. This article deals with the issue of death and dying, both from the traditional and the contemporary standpoint, and how palliative care have been treated in the job categories of medicine, social work, psychology and nursing. The methodology of this study consists of a literature review of articles in the SciELO database, electronic journals and technical books related to the topic. Analysis of the articles revealed a shortage of subjects that deal with the theme of death in professional curricula, as well as few palliative care services in Brazilian society and barriers faced by this new approach to the terminal patient. This research aims to broaden the discussion of palliative care in public health, and provide information for future studies that will address the theme. PMID:23989564

  15. Sustainable practice improvements: impact of the Comprehensive Advanced Palliative Care Education (CAPCE) program.

    PubMed

    Harris, Diane; Hillier, Loretta M; Keat, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an education program designed to improve palliative care practice through the development of workplace hospice palliative care resources (PCRs), and its impact on knowledge transfer and longer-term changes to clinical practice. Evaluation methods included pre- and post-program questionnaires, and a survey of learners' (n=301) perceptions of program learning strategies. Interviews (n=21) were conducted with a purposeful sample of PCRs and representatives from their work sites. Ratings of the sessions indicated that they were relevant to learners' clinical practice. At follow up, the majority of learners (83%) continued to serve as PCRs. Many positive effects were identified, including enhanced pain and symptom management, staff education, and development of care policies and guidelines. Management support, particularly the prioritization of palliative care and staff development, were factors facilitating sustained implementation. These findings highlight the importance of multimodal learning strategies and supportive work environments in the development of PCRs to enhance palliative care practice. PMID:18251444

  16. Palliative care communication curriculum: what can students learn from an unfolding case?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Shaunfield, Sara; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2011-06-01

    Limited attention to palliative care communication training is offered to medical students. In this work, we pursued unfolding case responses and what they indicated about student tendencies to use palliative care communication as well as what medical students can learn from their own reflective practice about palliative care. Findings showed an overwhelming trend for students to avoid palliative care communication or inclusion of topics including advance directives, place of care, family support, and dying. Instead, students relied heavily on the SPIKES protocol, communication that was strategically vague and ambiguous, and discussions that centered on specialty care and referral. In reflecting on their own case study responses, students noted an absence of direct communication about prognosis, no coordination of care, late hospice entry, and patient pain resulting from communication inefficacies. Future research should focus on the development of formal and adaptive curriculum structures to address these communication needs. PMID:21071434

  17. Country watch: the Philippines.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    The bold, rational approach to condom use brought by Dr. Juan Flavier, Secretary of the Department of Health (DOH), to the Philippines has dramatically increased awareness about AIDS as well as the levels of condom promotion and acceptance. Dr. Flavier became Secretary of the Department in July 1992. Since then, the attention to AIDS-related issues in the Filipino media has dramatically increased. With the moral and tangible support of the President and the Cabinet, and against the platitudes of religious leaders and some senators, Dr. Flavier created media hype over condoms which led to an increase in AIDS awareness from 12% to 86% in little over 1 year. The Secretary is so popular that he received more than 200 speaking invitations/month. December was proclaimed National AIDS Awareness month in 1992 by the DOH and includes special AIDS education and condom distribution activities. An AIDS hotline is operational in Manila; condoms are now openly advertised in the media; and an express door-to-door delivery service has even been launched by a condom distributor. The decision of a 23-year old woman living with AIDS to go public has also helped DOH efforts. Finally, city ordinances in some areas require hotels and motels to provide customers with condoms or make them accessible, and condoms have become part of the standard equipment of the Philippine Armed Forces. PMID:12345381

  18. Where there is no morphine: The challenge and hope of palliative care delivery in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Mervyn; Hartwig, Kari; Mmbando, Paul Z.; Sayed, Abduraoof; de Vries, Elma

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background In Tanzania, a country of 42 million, access to oral morphine is rare. Aim To demonstrate the effectiveness of palliative care teams in reducing patients’ pain and in increasing other positive life qualities in the absence of morphine; and to document the psychological burden experienced by their clinical providers, trained in morphine delivery, as they observed their patients suffering and in extreme pain. Setting One hundred and forty-five cancer patients were included from 13 rural hospitals spread across Tanzania. Method A mixed method study beginning with a retrospective quantitative analysis of cancer patients who were administered the APCA African POS tool four times. Bivariate analyses of the scores at time one and four were compared across the domains. The qualitative arm included an analysis of interviews with six nurses, each with more than five years’ palliative care experience and no access to strong opioids. Results Patients and their family caregivers identified statistically significant (p < 0.001) improvements in all of the domains. Thematic analysis of nurse interviews described the patient and family benefits from palliative care but also their great distress when ‘bad cases’ arose who would likely benefit only from oral morphine. Conclusion People living with chronic cancer-related pain who receive palliative care experience profound physical, spiritual and emotional benefits even without oral morphine. These results demonstrate the need for continued advocacy to increase the availability of oral morphine in these settings in addition to palliative care services. PMID:26245417

  19. Palliative social media.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Mark; Watts, Gareth; Boland, Jason; Radbruch, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    The uses of social media have become ubiquitous in contemporary society at an astonishingly fast-paced rate. The internet and in particular platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now part of most people's vocabulary and are starting to replace many face-to-face interactions. The online world, in particular, is alive with discussions, comments and anecdotes about the topics of illness, disease, hospitals, death and dying. The topic of death and dying had in the not too distant past been seen as taboo, but willingness and need to talk openly about it appears to be on the increase. In parallel to this, many public awareness campaigns are highlighting society's need to be more prepared for dying and death. This will have a significant impact on the way terminally ill patients and their families approach the last years, months and weeks of their lives and how they might expect palliative health and social care professionals working with them through these difficult periods to interact with them. We pay particular attention to the areas of digital posterity creation and memorialisation within the wider holistic context of end-of-life care. PMID:24644766

  20. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  1. Aging trends -- the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Biddlecom, A E; Domingo, L J

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a description of the trends in growth of the elderly population in the Philippines and their health, disability, education, work status, income, and family support. The proportion of elderly in the Philippines is much smaller than in other Southeast Asian countries, such as Singapore and Malaysia. The elderly population aged over 65 years increased from 2.7% of total population in 1990 to 3.6% in 1990. The elderly are expected to comprise 7.7% of total population in 2025. The proportion of elderly is small due to the high fertility rate. Life expectancy averages 63.5 years. The aged dependency ratio will double from 5.5 elderly per 100 persons aged 15-64 years in 1990 to 10.5/100 in 2025. A 1984 ASEAN survey found that only 11% of elderly rated their health as bad. The 1990 Census reveals that 3.9% were disabled elderly. Most were deaf, blind, or orthopedically impaired. 16% of elderly in the ASEAN survey reported not seeing a doctor even when they needed to. 54% reported that a doctor was not visited due to the great expense. In 1980, 67% of men and 76% of women aged over 60 years had less than a primary education. The proportion with a secondary education in 2020 is expected to be about 33% for men and 33% for women. 66.5% of men and 28.5% of women aged over 60 years were in the formal labor force in 1990. Women were less likely to receive cash income from current jobs or pensions. 65% of earnings from older rural people was income from agricultural production. 60% of income among urban elderly was from children, and 23% was from pensions. Family support is provided to the elderly in the form of coresidence. In 1988, 68% of elderly aged over 60 years lived with at least one child. Retirement or nursing homes are uncommon. The Philippines Constitution states that families have a duty to care for elderly members. PMID:12292274

  2. Palliative Care: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work together with a ... help you. 3 ? Ask for it! Tell your doctors, nurses, family and caregivers that you want palliative care. ...

  3. Is Palliative Care Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical care Understanding the pros and cons (benefits/burdens) of treatments (e.g., dialysis, additional cancer treatments, ... the Media For Clinicians For Policymakers For Family Caregivers What Is Palliative Care Definition Pediatric Palliative Care ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 250 ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  5. Ambitious Philippine alternative energy plans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-07

    The Philippines is to spend $5.4 billion over the next ten years for the development of alternative sources of energy. These would include the development of fuel woods and other biomass, and the commercialization of a coconut/diesel-oil fuel. It is hoped that the Philippines' dependence on imported oil will be reduced from about 80% today to around 50% by the end of the decade.

  6. Country watch: Philippines.

    PubMed

    Mercado Carreon, L

    1998-01-01

    The Asian Regional Conference on Gender and Communication, held in the Philippines, developed a plan of action to improve the portrayal of women in the mass media. Even in developing countries with traditional attitudes toward women, pornographic-type images are used to boost product sales. The conference's recommendations address the challenges posed by globalization of the media, commercialization of local media, and the increased violation of women's human rights in the media and the question of who has control over the media. After the conference, ISIS Maila assembled a report, "Status of Women and Media: Focus on Violence Against Women," which will be presented at a forum held during the 1998 meeting of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. Gender justice for women in the media requires collaboration among media specialists, women's groups, researchers, nongovernmental organizations, and local and regional networks. PMID:12348696

  7. Pediatric palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Franca; Spizzichino, Marco; Trapanotto, Manuela; Ferrante, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pediatric patients experience all the clinical, psychological, ethical and spiritual problems that severe, irreversible disease and death entail. The international literature indicates a prevalence of incurable disease annually affecting 10/10,000 young people from 0 to 19 years old, with an annual mortality rate of 1/10,000 young people from birth to 17 years old. The needs of this category of patients, recorded in investigations conducted in various parts of the world, reveal much the same picture despite geographical, cultural, organizational and social differences, particularly as concerns their wish to be treated at home and the demand for better communications between the professionals involved in their care and a greater availability of support services. Different patient care models have been tested in Italy and abroad, two of institutional type (with children staying in hospitals for treating acute disease or in pediatric hospices) and two based at home (the so-called home-based hospitalization and integrated home-based care programs). Professional expertise, training, research and organization provide the essential foundations for coping with a situation that is all too often underestimated and neglected. PMID:19490656

  8. Study of Nurses’ Knowledge about Palliative Care: A Quantitative Cross-sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Prem, Venkatesan; Karvannan, Harikesavan; Kumar, Senthil P; Karthikbabu, Surulirajan; Syed, Nafeez; Sisodia, Vaishali; Jaykumar, Saroja

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies have documented that nurses and other health care professionals are inadequately prepared to care for patients in palliative care. Several reasons have been identified including inadequacies in nursing education, absence of curriculum content related to pain management, and knowledge related to pain and palliative care. Aims: The objective of this paper was to assess the knowledge about palliative care amongst nursing professionals using the palliative care knowledge test (PCKT). Settings and Design: Cross-sectional survey of 363 nurses in a multispecialty hospital. Materials and Methods: The study utilized a self-report questionnaire- PCKT developed by Nakazawa et al., which had 20 items (statements about palliative care) for each of which the person had to indicate ‘correct’, ‘incorrect’, or ‘unsure.’ The PCKT had 5 subscales (philosophy- 2 items, pain- 6 items, dyspnea- 4 items, psychiatric problems- 4 items, and gastro-intestinal problems- 4 items). Statistical Analysis Used: Comparison across individual and professional variables for both dimensions were done using one-way ANOVA, and correlations were done using Karl-Pearson's co-efficient using SPSS version 16.0 for Windows. Results: The overall total score of PCKT was 7.16 ± 2.69 (35.8%). The philosophy score was 73 ± .65 (36.5%), pain score was 2.09 ± 1.19 (34.83%), dyspnea score was 1.13 ± .95 (28.25%), psychiatric problems score was 1.83 ± 1.02 (45.75%), and gastro-intestinal problems score was 1.36 ± .97 (34%). (P = .00). The female nurses scored higher than their male counterparts, but the difference was not significant (P > .05). Conclusions: Overall level of knowledge about palliative care was poor, and nurses had a greater knowledge about psychiatric problems and philosophy than the other aspects indicated in PCKT. PMID:23093828

  9. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  10. Interaction of palliative care and primary care.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Dzeng, Elizabeth; Cheng, M Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Primary care physicians are often the first medical providers patients seek out, and are in an excellent position to provide primary palliative care. Primary palliative care encompasses basic skills including basic evaluation and management of symptoms and discussions about goals of care and advance care planning. Specialty palliative care consultation complements primary care by assisting with complex psychosocial-spiritual patient and family situations. This article reviews primary palliative care skill sets and criteria for when to consider referring patients to specialty palliative care and hospice services. PMID:25920056

  11. Best practices for pediatric palliative cancer care: a primer for clinical providers.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deena; Lam, Catherine G; Cunningham, Melody J; Remke, Stacy; Chrastek, Jody; Klick, Jeffrey; Macauley, Robert; Baker, Justin N

    2013-09-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in children and adolescents. Pediatric patients with cancer suffer greatly at the end of life. However, palliative care interventions can reduce suffering and significantly improve the care of these patients and their families. A large percentage of pediatric deaths occur outside of the hospital setting where pediatric palliative resources may not be readily available. Patients in the home setting may be cared for by community hospice programs, which are typically staffed for adult populations. Increasingly, nonpediatric providers are asked to provide palliative care for children and adolescents at the end of life, yet they receive little formal training in this area. This review focuses on the principles of best practice in the provision of palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer. Our intent is to aid clinical providers in delivering optimal care to this patient population. Topics unique to pediatric palliative care that are addressed include: providing pain and symptom management in the broad pediatric range from neonate to adolescent; caring for and interacting with developmentally distinct groups; engaging in shared decision making with parents and adolescents; providing accommodations for prognoses that are often more uncertain than in adult patients; and delivering concurrent disease-directed therapy with palliative care. PMID:24400391

  12. Aberrant Opioid Use and Urine Drug Testing in Outpatient Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Joseph A; Haider, Ali; Edwards, Tonya; Waletich-Flemming, Jessica; Reddy, Suresh; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant opioid use is a public health issue, which has not been adequately described in the palliative care literature. With the increasing integration of palliative care into oncologic care, palliative care clinicians are seeing patients earlier in the disease trajectory, and therefore, more outpatients with chronic pain requiring chronic opioid therapy. This may have resulted in a concomitant rise in the number of patients with aberrant opioid use. In this article, we report on two patients with aberrant opioid-related behavior seen at our palliative care clinic. A high suspicion of opioid abuse, misuse, or diversion based on certain behavioral cues necessitated the ordering of a urine drug test (UDT). The tests helped the medical team to confirm an already existing pattern of maladaptive opioid use. In both cases, we provided ample opioid education and implemented effective strategies to address their aberrant opioid use. These cases suggest the need for palliative care clinicians to develop strategies to effectively address this issue in our field of medicine. It also highlights the usefulness of UDT in the outpatient palliative care setting. PMID:27171327

  13. Hearing Loss in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nelia; Wallhagen, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Age-related hearing loss is remarkably common, affecting more than 60% of adults over the age of 75. Moreover, hearing loss has detrimental effects on quality of life and communication, outcomes that are central to palliative care. Despite its high prevalence, there is remarkably little written on the impact of hearing loss in the palliative care literature. Objective: The objective was to emphasize its importance and the need for further study. We use a case as a springboard for discussing what is known and unknown about the epidemiology, presentation, screening methodologies, and treatment strategies for age-related hearing loss in palliative care. Discussion: The case describes a 65-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) that has progressed despite treatment. No concerns are raised about communication challenges during conversations between the palliative care team and the patient in his quiet room. However, in the midst of a family meeting, shortly after discussing prognosis, the patient reports that he cannot hear what anyone is saying. Conclusion: We describe simple methods of screening patients for hearing loss, and suggest that practical approaches should be used universally in patient encounters. These include facing the patient, pitching one's voice low, using a pocket talker, and creating a hearing-friendly environment when planning a family or group meeting. PMID:25867966

  14. [Nutritional problems in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Ollenschläger, G

    2000-09-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in the palliative care of the seriously ill and dying. Want of appetite and los of weight are direct symptoms of patients with consumptive infectional diseases (AIDS, TBC) as well as cancer or geriatric patients. Severe malnutrition significantly contributes to a loss of quality of life and increases morbidity of palliative patients. The subjective well-being of seriously ill patients is heavily influenced by want of appetite and loss of weight. Patients often find want of appetite and the incapability to eat as pressing as the physical impairment caused by the disease. Therefore the sole aim of palliative dietotherapy has to be to strengthen the general physical and mental condition of the patient. A specific training of home care staff and relatives of seriously ill patients in dealing sensitively with this problem of care is desirable. Above all, in-patient treatment of affected patients for the sole purpose of feeding has to be avoided. Aggressive dietotherapeutic interventions, especially artificial feeding, should be refrained from as far as possible in the terminal phase. Only if the prognosis of a patient in palliative treatment is improving contrary to expectations are strategies of curative dietotherapy valid. PMID:11048342

  15. On the palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    As a physician working in palliative care, the author is often privileged to share special moments with patients and their families at the end of life. This haiku poem recalls one such moment in that precious space between life and death, as an elderly woman, surrounded by her adult daughters, takes her last breath. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270255

  16. Palliative Care: A Holistic Discipline.

    PubMed

    Greer, Steven; Joseph, Marie

    2016-03-01

    Although mind and body are inextricably interwoven, psychological factors have received insufficient attention within medicine. The biomedical model though necessary is not sufficient. In medicine and particularly in palliative care, a holistic biopsychosocial approach is required. A number of examples from clinical practice in a hospice setting are presented. PMID:26631259

  17. Infomarkers for Transition to Goals Consistent with Palliative Care in Dying Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yingwei; Stifter, Janet; Ezenwa, Miriam O.; Lodhi, Muhammad; Khokhar, Ashfaq; Ansari, Rashid; Keenan, Gail M.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHRs) may contain infomarkers that identify patients near the end of life for whom it would be appropriate to shift care goals to palliative care. Discovery and use of such infomarkers could be used to conduct effectiveness research that ultimately could help to reduce the monumental costs for dying care. Our aim was to identify changes in the plans of care that represented infomarkers, which signaled the transition of care goals from non-palliative care goals to those consistent with palliative care. Methods Using an existing electronic health record database generated during a two-year, longitudinal study of 9 diverse medical-surgical units from 4 Midwest hospitals and a known group approach, we evaluated the patient care episodes for 901 patients who died (mean age=74.5±14.6 years). We used ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests to compare patient groups. Results We identified 11 diagnoses, including Death Anxiety and Anticipatory Grieving, whose addition to the care plan, some of which also occurred with removal of non-palliative care diagnoses, represent infomarkers of transition to palliative care goals. There were four categories of patients, those who had: no infomarkers on plans (n=507); infomarkers added on the admission plan (n=194); infomarkers added on a post admission plan (minor transitions, n=109), and infomarkers added and non-palliative care diagnoses removed on a post admission plan (major transition, n=91). Age, length of stay, and pain outcomes differed significantly for these four categories of patients. Significance of Results EHRs contain pertinent infomarkers that if confirmed in future studies could be used for timely referral to palliative care for improved focus on comfort outcomes and to identify palliative care subjects from data repositories for to conduct big data research, comparative effectiveness studies, and health services research. PMID:25711431

  18. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient. PMID:25240668

  19. Geothermal development in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Elizagaque, R.F.; Tolentino, B.S.

    1982-06-01

    The development of geothermal resources and energy in the Philippines is discussed. Philippine National Oil Company-Energy Development Corporation initiated the first semi-commercial generation of geothermal power in July 1977 with the installation of a 3MWe plant. By 1980 the country had 440 MWe on line at Mak-Ban and Tiwi. This placed the Philippines second after the US among countries using geothermal energy for power generation. Before the end of 1981, PNOC-EDC added 6 additional MWe of geothermal power generating capacity to increase the total to 446 MWe. As part of the five-year National Energy Development Programme covering the period 1981-1985, additional power plants will be installed in various project areas to increase the share of geothermal power generation from the present 9.8% to 18.6% of the nationwide power-generation total, or the equivalent of 16.6 million barrels of oil per year. (MJF)

  20. The impact of an aging population on palliative care.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Tony

    2013-12-01

    By 2050, it is predicted that 26% of the population will be aged 80 and over. Although older people have much to contribute, one challenging aspect of an aging population is the increasing rate of dementia. Palliative care is now included as part of the care pathway of a wide variety of nonmalignant diseases. The European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) have jointly called for every older citizen with chronic disease to be offered the best possible palliative care approach wherever they are cared for. This report is adapted from paineurope 2013; Issue 2, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International LTD. and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http://www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication. PMID:24303834

  1. PALLIATIVE CARE FOR OLDER ADULTS: STATE OF THE ART IN LEBANON.

    PubMed

    Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Saab, Mohammad; Hajjar, Ramzi

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care (PC) for older adults constitutes an important human rights challenge and a major public health care priority due to the aging of the population and the lack of health care services addressing the needs of the older people. In Lebanon, the surge in the number of older people with complex needs is unmatched by any increase in the services offered to them. PC in Lebanon is still under- developed and is subject to a number of challenges. These challenges are alarming and must be overcome through introducing health care providers to basic PC principles as recommended by the National Committee for Pain Relief and Palliative Care (NCPRPC). PMID:27169163

  2. Palliative Care Education: Focusing on Care and Not Just Disease | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    At the Institute for Palliative Medicine (IPM) in San Diego, medical residents are re-tooling for one of the most essential aspects of medicine: caring for seriously ill patients. “The goal is to teach them the core competencies in palliative care,” explained Dr. Charles von Gunten, the institute’s provost. These competencies include pain management, good communication skills, and the ability to provide patients with psychosocial and spiritual assessments and to work in interdisciplinary teams in hospitals, as well as through hospice and in nursing homes, he said. |

  3. Smartphone applications in palliative homecare.

    PubMed

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Salins, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility. PMID:25709195

  4. Smartphone Applications in Palliative Homecare

    PubMed Central

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Salins, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility. PMID:25709195

  5. [Legal basics in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Putz, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The German legal framework concerning end of life decisions is based on two pillars: the medical standards and the patient's autonomy. Every medical treatment, including life-saving and palliative measures, requires medical indication and, crucially, the patient's consent. Without the patient's consent even medically indicated treatment is prohibited.In other cases, complying with the patient's wishes, doctors have to treat symptoms the best they can. This includes palliative sedation accepting that the indicated medication may shorten life.It is prohibited to actively kill a patient to shorten his suffering. Assisting a suicide is only permitted if the suicide decision is made freely and on the patient's own responsibility. Businesslike suicide assistance is prohibited. PMID:26983108

  6. Integration of legal aspects and human rights approach in palliative care delivery-the Nyeri Hospice model.

    PubMed

    Musyoki, David; Gichohi, Sarafina; Ritho, Johnson; Ali, Zipporah; Kinyanjui, Asaph; Muinga, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is patient and family-centred care that optimises quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering. Open Society Foundation public health program (2011) notes that people facing life-threatening illnesses are deeply vulnerable: often in severe physical pain, worried about death, incapacitation, or the fate of their loved ones. Legal issues can increase stress for patients and families and make coping harder, impacting on the quality of care. In the absence of a clear legal provision expressly recognising palliative care in Kenya, providers may face numerous legal and ethical dilemmas that affect the availability, accessibility, and delivery of palliative care services and commodities. In order to ensure positive outcomes from patients, their families, and providers, palliative care services should be prioritised by all and includes advocating for the integration of legal support into those services. Palliative care service providers should be able to identify the various needs of patients and their families including specific issues requiring legal advice and interventions. Access to legal services remains a big challenge in Kenya, with limited availability of specialised legal services for health-related legal issues. An increased awareness of the benefits of legal services in palliative care will drive demand for easily accessible and more affordable direct legal services to address legal issues for a more holistic approach to quality palliative care. PMID:27563351

  7. Integration of legal aspects and human rights approach in palliative care delivery—the Nyeri Hospice model

    PubMed Central

    Musyoki, David; Gichohi, Sarafina; Ritho, Johnson; Ali, Zipporah; Kinyanjui, Asaph; Muinga, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is patient and family-centred care that optimises quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering. Open Society Foundation public health program (2011) notes that people facing life-threatening illnesses are deeply vulnerable: often in severe physical pain, worried about death, incapacitation, or the fate of their loved ones. Legal issues can increase stress for patients and families and make coping harder, impacting on the quality of care. In the absence of a clear legal provision expressly recognising palliative care in Kenya, providers may face numerous legal and ethical dilemmas that affect the availability, accessibility, and delivery of palliative care services and commodities. In order to ensure positive outcomes from patients, their families, and providers, palliative care services should be prioritised by all and includes advocating for the integration of legal support into those services. Palliative care service providers should be able to identify the various needs of patients and their families including specific issues requiring legal advice and interventions. Access to legal services remains a big challenge in Kenya, with limited availability of specialised legal services for health-related legal issues. An increased awareness of the benefits of legal services in palliative care will drive demand for easily accessible and more affordable direct legal services to address legal issues for a more holistic approach to quality palliative care. PMID:27563351

  8. Intracerebroventricular opioids for intractable pain

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    When pain is refractory to systemic opioid and non-opioid analgesic therapy and palliative chemoradiation or ablative or stimulant neurosurgical procedures are not possible, palliative treatment becomes limited, particularly if the patient wishes to be at home at the end of life. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of morphine in the home setting might be presented as an option. The present article reviews the basic and clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety of ICV administration of opioids. Information was gathered from various bibliographic sources, including PubMed and others, and summarized and evaluated to assess the efficacy and safety of ICV opioids for pain relief. Results from ICV infusion of morphine into terminally ill patients refractory to other pain treatments have been reported since the early 1980s. Good efficacy has been achieved for the vast majority of patients, without serious development of analgesic tolerance. There have also been a low incidence of adverse effects, such as constipation and respiratory depression, and a significant retention of alertness associated with this route of administration. Intracerebroventricular infusion of opioid analgesics thus appears to be a safe and effective therapy for the palliative treatment of refractory pain. PMID:22295988

  9. [Malignant wounds in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Rollot, Florence; Nicodeme, Marguerite; Kriegel, Iréne

    2015-01-01

    In the alsence of effective cancer treatment, malignant wounds evolve. The decisions taken by the multi-disciplinary team with regard to their care vary depending on whether the patient is in the initial, advanced or terminal phase of palliative care. Modern dressings can be used to control bleeding, odours and drainage. The aim is to control the symptoms and improve the quality of life, until its end. PMID:26027186

  10. Music therapy in palliative care.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, S.; Mount, B.

    1978-01-01

    Initial observations regarding the use of music therapy at one hospital in the palliative care of patients with advanced malignant disease are presented. In the hands of a trained music therapist, music has proven to be a potent tool for improving the quality of life. The diversity of its potential is particularly suited to the deversity of the challenges - physical, psychosocial and spiritual - that these patients present. Images FIG. 1 PMID:84704

  11. Palliative Care: Video Tells a Mother's Story of Caring Support

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Palliative Care Video Tells a Mother's Story of Caring Support ... the treatment …" Frequently Asked Questions What is palliative care, and when is it provided? Palliative care combines ...

  12. Palliative Care Doula: an innovative model.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Judy C

    2014-01-01

    Walking the journey of serious illness is very difficult and stressful for patients and families. A universal principle of palliative care is caring for the patient/ family unit. This article introduces a model for the Palliative Care Doula for experienced and advanced practice palliative care nurses to support patients and families during the traumatic and vulnerable period of end-of-life care. PMID:25296488

  13. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  14. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  15. [Complementary therapy in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Hübner, J; Stoll, C

    2011-01-01

    Even in the palliative context complementary therapy has a high value for patients and their relatives. In contrast to the methods of conventional medicine naturopathy as a holistic system has positive meanings for patients and their family. Complementary medicine in the palliative setting can be used as a supportive therapy in carefully selected cases. Doctors and patients should be careful regarding effect and side effects and should make sure that supportive therapy is given adequately and in effective doses. Complementary therapy should not be used in order to avoid the question of life and death. An adequate approach to the topic is mandatory, which acknowledges the needs of patients but also looks for their safety. Patients following alternative therapies sometimes neglect helpful therapeutic options. Carefully providing information on these therapies is mandatory. Physicians should avoid losing patients' confidence in their competence and attention in their final course of disease. Also in palliative medicine a sensitive approach to the topic of complementary medicine is mandatory, which accounts for the eligible wishes of patients and their relatives but puts the patients safety first. PMID:21181106

  16. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  17. Philippine Programme Initiates Local Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Describes a public health program for mothers and children developed by UNICEF workers in the Philippines that incorporates literacy and environmental awareness along with the usual focus on immunizations, nutrition, and clean water. The program contained an organic gardening project intended to empower women at the local level. (LZ)

  18. Scientists Investigate Recent Philippine Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar A.; Ong, John Burtkenley T.; Fernandez, Dan Ferdinand D.; Lapus, Mark R.; Rodolfo, Raymond S.; Tengonciang, Arlene Mae P.; Soria, Janneli Lea A.; Baliatan, Eden G.; Quimba, Zareth L.; Uichanco, Christopher L.; Paguican, Engielle Mae R.; Remedio, Armelle Reca C.; Lorenzo, Genevieve Rose H.; Avila, Francia B.; Valdivia, Waldemar

    2006-03-01

    A massive landslide devastated the community of Barangay Guinsaugon, Municipality of St. Bernard, Southern Leyte Province, Philippines, at about 10:30 local time on 17 February. The landslide occurred along the steep fault scarp of the Philippine Fault Zone (PFZ) (Figure 1a), a large and active tectonic structure that traverses the entire length of the Philippines [Allen, 1962]. Barangay Guinsaugon is located at the foot of the scarp, directly in the path of the downward moving mass of earth. As of 24 February, the landslide caused 122 confirmed deaths; 1,328 people still are missing. To assist in the search and rescue operations that followed the landside, a team of geologists and physicists from the University of Philippines (UP-Diliman, Quezon City) and Ateneo de Manila University conducted an investigation of this area on 21-25 February. The UP-Ateneo team provided technical advice on the geology, which included the identification of the type and characteristics of the landslide.

  19. College Choice in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Christine Joy

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational study examined the applicability of major U.S. college choice factors to Philippine high school seniors. A sample of 226 students from a private school in Manila completed the College Choice Survey for High School Seniors. Cronbach's alpha for the survey composite index was 0.933. The purposes of this…

  20. Center stage in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, W. )

    1993-03-01

    At present, early 5,000 MW of private power capacity is operating or under development in the Philippines. Projects include oil- and coal-fired, geothermal, and hydroelectric projects under a variety of financing and ownership arrangements. If all projects and solicitations come to fruition, more than 80% of new capacity added through the year 2000 will be privately owned.

  1. Palliative dental care- a boon for debilitating.

    PubMed

    Mulk, Bhavana Sujana; Chintamaneni, Raja Lakshmi; Mpv, Prabhat; Gummadapu, Sarat; Salvadhi, Shyam Sundar

    2014-06-01

    World Health Organization defines "palliative care" as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care actually deals with patients at the terminal end stage of the disease. We always face a question why a dentist should be in a palliative team? What is the exact role of dentist? Dental treatment may not always be strenuous and curative, but also can focus on improving quality of life of the patient. Hence forth the present paper enlightens the importance of dentist role in palliative team. PMID:25121074

  2. Palliative Dental Care- A Boon for Debilitating

    PubMed Central

    Chintamaneni, Raja Lakshmi; Mpv, Prabhat; Gummadapu, Sarat; Salvadhi, Shyam Sundar

    2014-01-01

    World Health Organization defines “palliative care” as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care actually deals with patients at the terminal end stage of the disease. We always face a question why a dentist should be in a palliative team? What is the exact role of dentist? Dental treatment may not always be strenuous and curative, but also can focus on improving quality of life of the patient. Hence forth the present paper enlightens the importance of dentist role in palliative team. PMID:25121074

  3. Turkish healthcare professionals' views on palliative care.

    PubMed

    Turgay, Gulay; Kav, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The concept of modern palliative care has been disseminating slowly in Turkey and has recently been included in the National Cancer Control Program. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' knowledge and views of palliative care. It was conducted at three hospitals with a sample of 369 healthcare professionals working in adult clinics. Data were collected via open-ended questions and 16 statements from healthcare professionals on their views of palliative care. Most respondents stated that there was a lack of in-service/continuing education in palliative care, and more than half said they had not received any education in palliative care. A majority stated that the meaning and goal of palliative care is "improving the quality of life of a patient who is in the terminal stage." Lack of awareness of palliative care and a lack of educational resources in that field are the most frequently reported barriers to the development of palliative care in Turkey. Palliative care should be included in curricula for healthcare professionals and in-service education programs should be established. PMID:23413762

  4. [Nursing in palliative care to children and adolescents with cancer: integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thailly Faria; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric palliative care is a challenge for nursing because it requires emotional balance and knowledge about its specific features. This study is an integrative literature review that aims to identify nursing actions in palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer, considering peculiarities of the disease and dying process. The review was performed by searching for articles indexed in Biblioteca Virtual da Adolescência (Adolec), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and PubMed databases from January 2004 till May 2009. From 29 references found, six met inclusion criteria. Results show teamwork, home care, pain management, dialogue, family support and particularities of childhood cancer fundamental tools for nursing in palliative care. The complexity of care in this situation requires solidarity, compassion, support and relieving suffering. PMID:21805890

  5. Radiation therapy for the palliation of multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, B.R.; Kurtts, T.A.; Mack, C.F.; Matzner, M.B.; Shimm, D.S. )

    1993-04-02

    This study reviews the experience at the University of Arizona in an effort to define the minimum effective radiation dose for durable pain relief in the majority of patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma. The records of 101 patients with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at the University of Arizona between 1975 and 1990 were reviewed. Three hundred sixteen sites were treated. Ten sites were asymptomatic, including six hemibody fields with advanced disease unresponsive to chemotherapy and four local fields with impending pathological fractures. Three hundred six evaluable symptomatic sites remained. The most common symptom was bone pain. Other symptoms included neurological impairment with a palpable mass. Total tumor dose ranged from 3.0 to 60 Gy, with a mean of 25 Gy. Symptom relief was obtained in 297 of 306 evaluable symptomatic sites (97%). Complete relief of symptoms was obtained in 26% and partial relief in 71%. Symptom relief was obtained in 92% of sites receiving a total dose less than 10 Gy (n = 13) and 98% of sites receiving 10 Gy or more (n = 293). No dose-response could be demonstrated. The likelihood of symptom relief was not influenced by the location of the lesion or the use of concurrent chemotherapy. Of the 297 responding sites, 6% (n = 19) relapsed after a median symptom-free interval of 16 months. Neither the probability of relapse nor the time to relapse was related to the radiation dose. Retreatment of relapsing sites provided effective palliation in all cases. Radiation therapy is effective in palliating local symptoms in multiple myeloma. A total dose of 10 Gy should provide durable symptom relief in the majority of patients. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Philippine president announces population policy.

    PubMed

    1970-02-01

    President Ferdinand Marcos of the Philippines has announced a national policy for family planning, following his recent reelection for a second term of office. Under the policy adopted by the President, the Philippine Government is committed to undertake and encourage programs to provide information and advice for couples wishing to space or limit their child-bearing activities. The Presidential Commission on Population, in a report based on recommendations drawn up after more than 20 meetings by the 22 members, and states that the unfettered population growth will gravely hamper efforts to improve living standards for Filipinos and will block the attainment of national development goals. However, the Commission emphasized that the program will be educational and persuasive, not coercive. Family planning services have been growing rapidly in the Philippines over the past few years as a result of the initiative of several pioneer organizations assisted by the IPPF. President Marcos' government signed the United Nations Declaration on Population in 1967 and in January 1969 he established The Commission on Population. The Philippine press has consistently backed the campaign for widespread availability of family planning services. The Western Pacific Region of the World Health Organization, under it's Director, Dr. Francisco Dy, which has its headquarters in Manila, has its headquarters in Manila, has fostered a regional interest through its technical discussions and the training of field personnel. Depthnews recently reported that the latest Philippine demographic survey asserts that Filipina women are bearing children so fast that the country will hold on to the undisputed title of possessing the highest birth rate in Asia. The growth rate is 3.5%, and the average completed size of a Filipino family is 6.8 children. This swift rate of growth will boost the 1969 population of 37.1 million to 38.4 at the end of this decade. It is noted that unless curbed, it will

  7. Voluntary palliated starvation: a lawful and ethical way to die?

    PubMed

    White, Ben; Willmott, Lindy; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, individuals want control over their own destiny. This includes the way in which they die and the timing of their death. The desire for self-determination at the end of life is one of the drivers for the ever-increasing number of jurisdictions overseas that are legalising voluntary euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, and for the continuous attempts to reform State and Territory law in Australia. Despite public support for law reform in this field, legislative change in Australia is unlikely in the near future given the current political landscape. This article argues that there may be another solution which provides competent adults with control over their death and to have any pain and symptoms managed by doctors, but which is currently lawful and consistent with prevailing ethical principles. "Voluntary palliated starvation" refers to the process which occurs when a competent individual chooses to stop eating and drinking, and receives palliative care to address pain, suffering and symptoms that may be experienced by the individual as he or she approaches death. The article argues that, at least in some circumstances, such a death would be lawful for the individual and doctors involved, and consistent with principles of medical ethics. PMID:25715538

  8. Outpatient Palliative Care for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Susan; Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Rosenberg, Sharon R.; Kalhan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have well-documented symptoms that affect quality of life. Professional societies recommend palliative care for such patients, but the optimal way of delivering this care is unknown. Objective: To describe an outpatient palliative medicine program for patients with COPD. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting/Subjects: Thirty-six patients with COPD followed in a United States academic outpatient palliative medicine clinic. Measurements: Descriptive analysis of sociodemographic data, disease severity and comorbidities, treatments, hospitalizations, mortality, topic discussion, and symptom assessment. Results: Thirty-six patients (representing 5% of the total number of patients with COPD seen in a specialty pulmonary clinic) were seen over 11 months and followed for 2 years. Seventy-seven percent of patients were Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 3–4 and 72% were on oxygen at home. No patients had documented advanced directives at the initial visit but documentation increased to 61% for those who had follow-up appointments. The most commonly documented topics included symptoms (100%), social issues (94%), psychological issues (78%), and advance care planning (75%). Of symptoms assessed, pain was the least prevalent (51.6%), and breathlessness and fatigue were the most prevalent (100%). Symptoms were often undertreated prior to the palliative care appointment. During the 3-year study period, there were 120 hospital admissions (median, 2) and 12 deaths (33%). Conclusions: The patients with COPD seen in the outpatient palliative medicine clinic had many comorbid conditions, severe illness, and significant symptom burden. Many physical and psychological symptoms were untreated prior to the palliative medicine appointment. Whether addressing these symptoms through a palliative medicine intervention affects outcomes in COPD is unknown but represents an

  9. Palliative and end of life care for people living with dementia in care homes: part 1.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary; Agnelli, Joanne; McGreevy, Jessie; Diamond, Monica; Roble, Herlindina; McShane, Elaine; Strain, Joanne

    2016-06-22

    The terms palliative and end of life care are often used interchangeably and healthcare practitioners may perceive that palliative care is only appropriate during the terminal stages of an illness. This article, the first of two parts, provides healthcare practitioners with an overview of the concept of palliative care. It explains how this can be differentiated from end of life care and how it should be commenced in a timely manner, so that people who are living with dementia can contribute to the planning of their future care and death. The policies and tools used in the provision of palliative and end of life care are discussed, including advance care planning and The Gold Standards Framework. The article is framed in a care home context; there is little research about how to optimise palliative care for people living with dementia in care homes. The second part of this article will discuss end of life care and the best practices for providing end of life care, including nutrition and hydration, oral hygiene, pain management and spiritual care. PMID:27332611

  10. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE