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  1. Successful management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 using single injection interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 of the upper limb is a painful and debilitating condition. Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) in conjugation with other modalities was shown to be a feasible therapy with variable success. We reported a case of CRPS type 1 as diagnosed by International Association for the Study of Pain criteria in which pharmacological approaches failed to achieve adequate pain relief and even were associated with progressive dysfunction of the upper extremity. Single injection ISB, in combination with physical therapy and botulinum toxin injection, was successful to alleviate pain with functional restoration. PMID:25422619

  2. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  3. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  4. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  5. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician January 15, 2007, http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0115/p194.html) Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A ... Physician November 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/991101ap/2012.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  6. Loin pain hematuria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Adeel S.; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B.; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  7. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Adeel S; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-02-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  8. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life. PMID:26224572

  9. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Redmond, John M; Chen, Austin W; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-04-01

    Patients who have lateral hip pain historically have been diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. Although this strategy is effective for most patients, a substantial number of patients continue to have pain and functional limitations. Over the past decade, our understanding of disorders occurring in the peritrochanteric space has increased dramatically. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome encompasses trochanteric bursitis, external coxa saltans (ie, snapping hip), and abductor tendinopathy. A thorough understanding of the anatomy, examination findings, and imaging characteristics aids the clinician in treating these patients. Open and endoscopic treatment options are available for use when nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. PMID:26990713

  10. The therapeutic effects of acupuncture on patients with chronic neck myofascial pain syndrome: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Cheng, Yung-Yen; Hung, Hung-Chang; Li, Tsai-Chung; Yen, Sch-May; Huang, I-Shin

    2010-01-01

    Chronic neck myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common disorder seen in clinics. There is no gold standard method to treat myofascial pain. We investigated the effects of acupuncture on patients with chronic neck MPS by a single-blind randomized controlled trial. A total of 35 patients were randomly allocated to an acupuncture group (AG) or a sham acupuncture group (SG). Each subject received acupuncture treatment twice per week for three consecutive weeks. The primary outcome measure was quality of life as assessed with Short Form-36, and secondary outcome measures were neck range of motion (ROM), motion-related pain, and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), as determined by a blinded investigator. The clinical assessments were made before treatment (BT) and after six acupuncture treatments (AT), as well as four weeks (F1) and 12 weeks (F2) after the end of the treatment. A total of 34 patients completed the trial. The results indicated that there is no significant difference in the ROM, motion-related pain, and SF-MPQ scores between AG and SG at AT, F1 and F2 (all p > 0.05). However, AG has greater improvement in physical functioning and role emotional of Short Form-36 quality of life at F2. The results indicate that acupuncture may be used to improve the quality of life in patients with chronic neck MPS. PMID:20821817

  11. Myofascial pain syndrome treatments.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Iaccarino, Mary Alexis

    2014-05-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional pain disorder caused by taut bands of muscle fibers in skeletal muscles called myofascial trigger points. MPS is a common disorder, often diagnosed and treated by physiatrists. Treatment strategies for MPS include exercises, patient education, and trigger point injection. Pharmacologic interventions are also common, and a variety of analgesics, antiinflammatories, antidepressants, and other medications are used in clinical practice. This review explores the various treatment options for MPS, including those therapies that target myofascial trigger points and common secondary symptoms. PMID:24787338

  12. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  13. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  14. Central pain: "new" syndromes and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1993-10-01

    Central pain syndrome is defined as pain associated with a lesion of the central nervous system. It has a low incidence but is frequently intractable and does not have effective treatment. The cause of central pain is speculative; however, the single common sensory abnormality in patients with central pain is interruption of spinothalamocortical nociceptive pathways. It appears that severe central nervous system lesions, with total destruction of ascending sensory systems, do not lead to a central pain syndrome; and that setting of mild, moderate, or severe disruption of the anterolateral ascending system with partial or complete preservation of the dorsal column/medial lemniscus functions is most frequently associated with central pain syndrome. Furthermore, even during remission, dysesthesias and pain could be triggered by additional afferent input to the large fiber/dorsal column/medial lemniscus system and, once established, they may not be abolished by additional deafferentation. PMID:8413354

  15. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  16. [COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Blažeković, Ivan; Bilić, Ervina; Žagar, Marija; Anić, Branimir

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) represents a state of constant and often disabling pain, affecting one region (usually hand) and often occurs after a trauma whose severity does not correlate with the level of pain. The older term for this condition of chronic pain associated with motor and autonomic symptoms is reflex sympathetic dystrophy or causalgia. The aim of this review, based on contemporary literature, is to show the epidemiology and etiology, proposed pathophysiological mechanisms, method of diagnosis and treatment options, prevention and mitigation of this under-recognized disease. CRPS I occurs without known neurological damage, unlike CRPS II, where the history of trauma is present and in some cases damage to the peripheral nervous system can be objectively assessed using electromyoneurography. New diagnostic methods, such as quantitative sensory testing (CST), challenge this division because the CST findings in patients with CRPS I can suggest damage to Adelta peripheral nerve fibers. Except for distinguishing type I and type II disease, it is important to bear in mind the diversity of clinical presentation of CRPS in acute and chronic phase of the disease. This regional pain syndrome typically includes the autonomic and motor signs and thus differs from other peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. The complexity of the clinical presentation indicates the likely presence of different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease. Previous studies have demonstrated the autonomic dysfunction, neurogenic inflammation and neuroplastic changes. The diagnosis of CRPS is based on anamnesis and clinical examination on the basis of which the disease can be graded according to the Budapest Criteria. A valuable aid in differentiating subtypes of the disease is electromyoneurography. The treatment of CRPS is as complex as the clinical picture and the pathophysiology of the disease and requires interdisciplinary cooperation and individual approach

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Emily S.; De La Cerda, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neurologic disorder that often results in debilitating chronic pain, but the diagnosis may elude providers as it is one of exclusion. A history of trauma may be elucidated. We report a case of CRPS and review the clinical findings, appropriate workup, and treatment options for the patient. The patient we describe went through an extensive workup before receiving the correct diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis leads to prolonged suffering for the patient and, at times, unnecessary invasive debridement procedures. Raising awareness of this entity may help physicians make the correct diagnosis early, as well as initiate a collaborative effort between neurology, anesthesiology, and dermatology to provide the patient the most favorable outcome. PMID:27365892

  18. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress. PMID:24830289

  19. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  20. The refractory painful arc syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watson, M

    1978-11-01

    Twenty-three patients with a severe refractory painful arc syndrome have been treated by excision of the outer end of the clavicle and division of the coracoacromial ligament through a deltoid-splitting approach. After a follow-up of more than six months all patients have been relieved of night pain. Six still have slight pain on movement, but the rest are symptom-free. PMID:711806

  1. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  2. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  3. Effectiveness of manipulative physiotherapy for the treatment of a neurogenic cervicobrachial pain syndrome: a single case study -- experimental design.

    PubMed

    Cowell, I M; Phillips, D R

    2002-02-01

    A single case study ABC design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of manipulative physiotherapy in a 44-year-old woman with an 8-month history of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain. Clinical examination demonstrated significant signs of upper quadrant neural tissue mechanosensitivity indicating that neural tissue was the dominant tissue of origin for the subject's complaint of pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed correlating discal pathology at the C5/6 intersegmental level. The study involved a 4-week pre-assessment phase, a 4-week treatment phase and a 2-week home exercise phase. Functional disability was measured using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire and pain was assessed using the McGill Short Form Pain Questionnaire. Cervical motion was measured by a cervical range of motion device (CROM) and the range of shoulder abduction with a mediclino inclinometer. Manipulative physiotherapy treatment involved a cervical lateral glide mobilization technique. Following treatment, visual analysis revealed beneficial effects on pain, functional disability as well as cervical and shoulder mobility. These improvements were maintained over the home exercise phase and at 1-month follow-up. The single case limits generalization of the findings, but the results support previous studies in this area and gives further impetus to controlled clinical trials. PMID:11884154

  4. Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Gagan

    2012-08-01

    Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy include numerous catastrophic cardiovascular events. Acute myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and amniotic fluid embolism are the most important causes of nonobstetric mortality and morbidity in pregnancy. Each of these could result in poor maternal and fetal outcomes if not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. However, their diagnosis and management is limited by fetal risks of diagnostic procedures, dangers of pharmacotherapy and interventions that have neither been widely studied nor validated. This article reviews the current literature on epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of 4 potentially lethal chest pain syndromes in pregnancy. PMID:22813362

  5. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  6. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... an important role in sustaining the pain. Another theory is that CRPS is caused by a triggering ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... plays an important role in the pain. Another theory is that CRPS is caused by a triggering ... the nervous system. This includes the nerves that control the blood vessels and sweat glands. The damaged ...

  8. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mallow, Michael; Nazarian, Levon N

    2014-05-01

    Lateral hip pain, or greater trochanteric pain syndrome, is a commonly seen condition; in this article, the relevant anatomy, epidemiology, and evaluation strategies of greater trochanteric pain syndrome are reviewed. Specific attention is focused on imaging of this syndrome and treatment techniques, including ultrasound-guided interventions. PMID:24787333

  9. Central pain and dysesthesia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1998-11-01

    This article presents recent observations about different recognized central pain syndromes (CPS) and discusses them in light of contemporary microelectrode and imaging findings. Different theories regarding the generation of CPS are reviewed, with an emphasis on difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. The author discourages destructive procedures for treatment of CPS, favoring, instead, reversible procedures such as stimulation techniques and drug delivery systems. PMID:9767069

  10. Challenging pain syndromes: Parsonage-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clark C; Bevelaqua, Anna-Christina

    2014-05-01

    Parsonage-Turner syndrome (PTS) is a rare disorder typically characterized by an abrupt onset of upper extremity pain followed by progressive neurologic deficits, including weakness, atrophy, and occasionally sensory abnormalities. The exact cause and pathophysiology of PTS are complex and incompletely understood. Autoimmune, genetic, infectious, and mechanical processes have all been implicated. No specific treatments have been proven to reduce neurologic impairment or improve the prognosis of PTS. Most patients with PTS are treated with a multidisciplinary approach that includes both physical therapy and pharmacologic treatment, often with multiple agents. Further research is needed. PMID:24787332

  11. The complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Horowitz, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the current consensus-derived name for a syndrome usually triggered by limb trauma. Required elements include prolonged, disproportionate distal-limb pain and microvascular dysregulation (e.g., edema or color changes) or altered sweating. CRPS-II (formerly "causalgia") describes patients with identified nerve injuries. CRPS-I (formerly "reflex sympathetic dystrophy") describes most patients who lack evidence of specific nerve injuries. Diagnosis is clinical and the pathophysiology involves combinations of small-fiber axonopathy, microvasculopathy, inflammation, and brain plasticity/sensitization. Females have much higher risk and workplace accidents are a well-recognized cause. Inflammation and dysimmunity, perhaps facilitated by injury to the blood-nerve barrier, may contribute. Most patients, particularly the young, recover gradually, but treatment can speed healing. Evidence of efficacy is strongest for rehabilitation therapies (e.g., graded-motor imagery), neuropathic pain medications, and electric stimulation of the spinal cord, injured nerve, or motor cortex. Investigational treatments include ketamine, botulinum toxin, immunoglobulins, and transcranial neuromodulation. Nonrecovering patients should be re-evaluated for neurosurgically treatable causal lesions (nerve entrapment, impingement, infections, or tumors) and treatable potentiating medical conditions, including polyneuropathy and circulatory insufficiency. Earlier impressions that CRPS represents malingering or psychosomatic illness have been replaced by evidence that CRPS is a rare complication of limb injury in biologically susceptible individuals. PMID:26563805

  12. Surgical Options for Atypical Facial Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Shervin; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-07-01

    Atypical neuropathic facial pain is a syndrome of intractable and unremitting facial pain that is secondary to nociceptive signaling in the trigeminal system. These syndromes are often recalcitrant to pharmacotherapy and other common interventions, including microvascular decompression and percutaneous procedures. Herein, the authors present two other viable approaches (nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone lesioning and motor cortex stimulation), their indications, and finally a possible treatment algorithm to consider when assessing patients with atypical facial pain. PMID:27325003

  13. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lanny

    2012-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topics addressed in this issue are Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and associated chronic pain; the information is meant to help readers understand the mechanisms for pain in this connective tissue disorder as well as general treatment principles for chronic pain management. PMID:22616833

  14. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and Beck Depression Scale (BDS) were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0%) had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10). There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0%) patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%). Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%). Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5%) patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P <0.001). No significant differences were observed among the different stroke location groups and pain questionnaires and

  15. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Events Upcoming and past meetings Follow Us Social media, RSS feeds, and more Follow Us Health Information > ... Chronic Pain Association American Pain Society American Urogynecologic ... Claimants' Representatives Social Security Administration United Ostomy ...

  16. [Behavioral aspects of chronic pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J T

    2000-06-01

    The knowledge of biological pain mechanisms are not sufficient for the understanding of patients with chronic pain syndromes such as low back, cervicobrachial and muscle pain. Psychological and psychosocial aspects play important roles in the setting and perpetuation of symptoms. Mood and anxiety disorders, secondary gains such as early retirement and financial compensations, must all be acknowledged by the physician as possible contributors to the symptoms. Abnormal illness behavior may better characterize patients with chronic pain syndromes. Behavior observation, which is akin to medical practice, is therefore a powerful tool in the diagnosis and management of these syndromes. Physicians ought be very careful in not reinforcing the patients already strong organic convictions regarding their symptoms, avoiding making decisions based on patients complaints and alleged disabilities, and assigning poorly defined and disputable diagnosis labels. Society needs also to refrain from policies that encourage abnormal illness behaviors. PMID:10849642

  17. [Complex regional pain syndrome versus chronic regional pain syndrome (Hand-Finger Syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Wulle, C

    2010-02-01

    Dystrophy is a main factor of CRPS. A large number of patients do not develop dystrophy but, instead, they suffer from pain with limitation in movement, possible paraesthesia and/or swelling. This is then a chronic regional pain syndrome or (shoulder-arm-) hand-finger syndrome. These patients should never be confronted with the diagnosis Morbus Sudeck or algodystrophy, which are today also well known among non-professionals, to avoid pushing them into a status of constant severe invalidity. Histories, clinical examination, as well as a good personal understanding of the patient are indispensable. Knowing that pain, or the extent of pain, remains subjective until today, the clinical diagnosis depends on the absence of side differences in: a) the circumference of soft tissues of both upper extremities; b) the callosity of the palm; c) the bone-density. These three parameters allow verification of the consequences of the pain complaints (indirect pain verification). It is essential to find the cause for their suffering and to treat it as far as possible: 1) Too long and inappropriate immobilisation (patient's suffering not considered sufficiently). These patients can recover quickly when the right diagnosis is made in good time. 2) Limitation of movement due to scar, neuroma, or elongation pain: a) bizarre functional disabilities can develop; b) due to the patient's complaints, one or several operations would finally be performed, which will not lead to an improvement but rather to an aggravation of the pain; c) socially-induced purposeful pain increase, the typical statement of the patient will be: "I can't stand it any longer". Patients who are socially over-burdened, or have psycho-social problems, may experience a decline of performance or a post-traumatic stress disorder. Several patients will be introduced as illustrations for each of the relevant groups. PMID:20205065

  18. Fear of pain in children and adolescents with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E

    2016-02-01

    A significant proportion of children and adolescents with chronic pain endorse elevated pain-related fear. Pain-related fear is associated with high levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and school impairment. Because of faulty nerve signaling, individuals with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome may be more prone to develop pain-related fear as they avoid use of and neglect the affected body area(s), resulting in exacerbated symptoms, muscle atrophy, maintenance of pain signaling, and ongoing pain-related disability. Not surprisingly, effective treatments for elevated pain-related fears involve exposure to previously avoided activities to downregulate incorrect pain signaling. In the context of intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment of youth with neuropathic pain, decreasing pain-related fear is associated with improved physical and psychological functioning, whereas high initial pain-related fear is a risk factor for less treatment responsiveness. An innovative approach to targeting pain-related fear and evidence of a neural response to treatment involving decoupling of the amygdala with key fear circuits in youth with complex regional pain syndrome suggest breakthroughs in our ability to ameliorate these issues. PMID:26785161

  19. Patellofemoral pain syndrome in Iranian female athletes.

    PubMed

    Nejati, Parisa; Forogh, Bijan; Moeineddin, Reza; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Nejati, Mina

    2011-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190), volleyball (103), running (42), fencing (45) and rock climbing (38). The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 %) soccer players, 21/103(20.38 %) volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 %) runners, 6/45(13.33 %) fencers and 10/38 (26.31%) rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners. PMID:21681705

  20. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Alis Kolter

    2007-02-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, painful bladder syndrome primarily found in women. Although the direct cause(s) of IC are unknown, several theories exist. Common symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, and pain. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, use of pharmacologic agents, and surgery. Patients benefit from prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatments. Important clinical features of IC in women including the pathology, common symptoms, and recommended evaluation and management strategies are reviewed. PMID:17390922

  1. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen.

  2. [Back pain and acne conglobata: SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kühn, F; Fehr, S; Stoll, T

    2007-04-11

    We report on a young woman suffering from SAPHO syndrome with back pain and arthritis of the sternoclavicular joints. This inflammatory disorder of the osteoarticular system (synovitis, osteitis, and hyperostosis) is associated with severe acne or palmoplantar pustulosis. The patient was treated with pamidronate, NSAID and physiotherapy which improved the musculoskeletal symptoms completely. The acne was treated with isotretinoin. PMID:17506389

  3. Pain Part 8: Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beneng, Kiran; Renton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a rare but impactful condition affecting mainly post-menopausal women resulting in constant pain and significant difficulty with eating, drinking and daily function. The aetiology of BMS remains an enigma. Recent evidence suggests it likely to be neuropathic in origin, the cause of which remains unknown. There is no cure for this condition and the unfortunate patients remain managed on a variety of neuropathic pain medication, salivary substitutes and other non-medical interventions that help the patient 'get through the day'. Some simple strategies can assist both clinician and patient to manage this debilitating condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: The dental team will recognize patients presenting with burning mouth syndrome. They are difficult patients to manage and are often referred to secondary care and, ultimately, depend on their general medical practitioners for pain management. PMID:27439272

  4. Pain insensitivity syndrome misinterpreted as inflicted burns.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; Baartmans, Martin G A; Vos, Paul; Dokter, Jan; White, Tonya; Tibboel, Dick

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of a 10-year-old child with severe burns that were misinterpreted as inflicted burns. Because of multiple injuries since early life, the family was under suspicion of child abuse and therefore under supervision of the Child Care Board for 2 years before the boy was burned. Because the boy incurred the burns without feeling pain, we conducted a thorough medical examination and laboratory testing, evaluated detection and pain thresholds, and used MRI to study brain morphology and brain activation patterns during pain between this patient and 3 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. We found elevated detection and pain thresholds and lower brain activation during pain in the patient compared with the healthy controls and reference values. The patient received the diagnosis of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV on the basis of clinical findings and the laboratory testing, complemented with the altered pain and detection thresholds and MRI findings. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV is a very rare congenital pain insensitivity syndrome characterized by the absence of pain and temperature sensation combined with oral mutilation due to unawareness, fractures, and anhidrosis caused by abnormalities in the peripheral nerves. Health care workers should be aware of the potential presence of this disease to prevent false accusations of child abuse. PMID:24733875

  5. Therapeutic effects of traditional Thai massage on pain, muscle tension and anxiety in patients with scapulocostal syndrome: a randomized single-blinded pilot study.

    PubMed

    Buttagat, Vitsarut; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Chatchawan, Uraiwon; Arayawichanon, Preeda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT), muscle tension and anxiety associated with scapulocostal syndrome (SCS). Twenty patients were randomly allocated to receive a 30-min session of either TTM or physical therapy modalities (PT: ultrasound therapy and hot pack) for 9 sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Pain intensity, PPT, muscle tension and anxiety were measured before and immediately after the first treatment session, 1 day after the last treatment session and 2 weeks after the last treatment session. Results indicated that the TTM group showed a significant improvement in all parameters after the first treatment session and at 1 day and 2 weeks after the last treatment session (p < 0.05). For all outcomes, similar changes were observed in the PT group except for PPT (p < 0.05). The adjusted post-test mean values of each assessment time point for pain intensity and muscle tension were significantly lower in the TTM group than those of the PT group (p < 0.01). In addition, the values for PPT were significantly higher in the TTM group (p > 0.05). We therefore suggest that TTM could be an alternative treatment for the patient with SCS. PMID:22196428

  6. Pediatric complex regional pain syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Rotem; Uziel, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, intensified localized pain condition that can affect children and adolescents as well as adults, but is more common among adolescent girls. Symptoms include limb pain; allodynia; hyperalgesia; swelling and/or changes in skin color of the affected limb; dry, mottled skin; hyperhidrosis and trophic changes of the nails and hair. The exact mechanism of CRPS is unknown, although several different mechanisms have been suggested. The diagnosis is clinical, with the aid of the adult criteria for CRPS. Standard care consists of a multidisciplinary approach with the implementation of intensive physical therapy in conjunction with psychological counseling. Pharmacological treatments may aid in reducing pain in order to allow the patient to participate fully in intensive physiotherapy. The prognosis in pediatric CRPS is favorable. PMID:27130211

  7. Behavioral Concepts in the Analysis of Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; Gil, Karen M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews behavioral and psychological concepts currently applied to the assessment and treatment of chronic pain syndromes, including operant conditioning and psychophysiologic concepts such as the stress-pain hypothesis, the pain-muscle spasm-pain cycle, and the neuromuscular pain model. Discusses relaxation and biofeedback training and concepts…

  8. Neuropathic pain syndrome displayed by malingerers

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, José L.; Verdugo, Renato J.

    2009-01-01

    Among 237 patients communicating chronic pain, associated with sensory-motor and “autonomic” displays, qualifying taxonomically for Neuropathic Pain, there were 16 shown through surveillance to be malingerers. When analyzed through neurological methods, their profile was characteristically atypical. There were no objective equivalents of peripheral or central processes impairing nerve impulse transmission. In absence of medical explanation all 16 had been adjudicated, by default, the label Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). We emphasize that CRPS patients may not only harbor unrecognized pathology (“lesion”) of the nervous system (CRPS II); or hypothetical central neuronal “dysfunction” (CRPS I); or conversion disorder; but may display a recognizable simulated illness without neuropsychiatric pathology. PMID:20686134

  9. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen F.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  10. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-05-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  11. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  12. Lumbopelvic manipulation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Michael S; Wofford, Nancy H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A recent clinical prediction rule (CPR) identified characteristics that may predict an immediate reduction in pain following lumbopelvic manipulation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. The purpose of this single-arm cohort study was to replicate the proposed CPR in a different population and investigate changes in self-reported pain, hip range of motion, strength, and function immediately following lumbopelvic manipulation. Methods: Forty-four subjects (63·6% female; mean age 27·4 years) met inclusion criteria. Hip internal rotation range of motion, lower extremity strength using a handheld dynamometer, and single/triple hop tests were assessed prior to and immediately following a spinal manipulation. A global rating of change questionnaire was administered after testing and telephonically at 1 week. Paired t-tests compared pre- and post-manipulation range of motion, strength, and hop test limb symmetry indices (α = 0·05). Results: Fifty-seven percent of subjects had a successful outcome measured by the numerical pain rating scale immediately following manipulation. Twenty-five of subjects experienced a successful outcome as measured by the global rating of change questionnaire at 1 week. No single individual or combination of predictor variables predicted a positive outcome immediately following the lumbopelvic manipulation (+likelihood ratio 0·7 with three of five predictor variables present). Statistically significant differences (P<0·05) were found in hip extension and abduction strength and hip internal rotation symmetry post-manipulation, but do not appear to be clinically meaningful. Discussion: The previously identified CPR was not able to be replicated and no clinically meaningful changes in range of motion, strength, or function were apparent. Future research should focus on a comprehensive impairment-based treatment approach in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:23904749

  13. Erectile Dysfunction in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Outcomes from a Multi-Center Study and Risk Factor Analysis in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhu; Chen, Shengfu; Yang, Qiyun; Wan, Zi; Han, Dayu; Xiao, Haipeng; Sun, Xiangzhou; Deng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and explore the influence of UPOINT domains, National Institutes of Health-CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI) and other factors on ED prevalence. This was a prospective study of consecutive patients with CP/CPPS seen at 11 tertiary hospitals during January–July 2014. ED was diagnosed as a score of<21 on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Patients from one center were evaluated by the UPOINT system and NIH-CPSI. Each patient was assessed using clinical examination, asocio-demographic questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), NIH-CPSI and IIEF-5.1406 patients from 11 centers (mean age, 32.18 years; range 18–60 years) were enrolled. ED was found in 638/1406 patients (45.4%), and was categorized as mild in 291(45.6%), moderate in 297(46.6%) and severe in50(7.7%). 192 patients from one center(mean age,31.3 years; range 18–57 years) were further studied.IIEF-5 score correlated negatively with NIH-CPSI(r = 0.251), PHQ (r = 0.355) and PCS (r = 0.322)scores (P<0.001).PHQ score correlated positively with NIH-CPSI (r = 0.586) and PCS(r = 0.662) scores (P<0.001).NIH-CPSI, PHQ, PCS and IIEF-5 scores did not differ significantly between class IIIA and IIIB CP/CPPS. Multivariate logistic regression showed that UPOINT psychological (P) domain and NIH-CPSI symptom severity were independent risk factors for ED in CP/CPPS. It is concluded that psychological factors and symptom severity are independent risk factors for ED in CP/CPPS. PMID:27120096

  14. A single case report of recurrent surgery for chronic back pain and its implications concerning a diagnosis of Münchausen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Callegari, C; Bortolaso, P; Vender, S

    2006-01-01

    While undergoing treatment in the psychiatric department, A.C., a 40-year-old white male, who had arrived in the casualty department complaining of an uncontrollable anxiety attack and in a state of fluctuating consciousness, was found to be suffering from a psychopathological condition characterized by pathological lying, gambling, compulsive restlessness, a long clinical history of chronic back pain, with multiple invasive diagnostic investigations and repeated surgery for disc hernia with relative complications, culminating in the fitment of a fixed neurostimulator, a slow-discharge morphine pump and the patient being granted a full disability pension. The continual increases in the doses of morphine suggested a tendency towards drug addiction. After providing a brief overview of the historical background and current concepts relating to the relationship between factitious disorders, malingering and hysteria, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis of the case, suggesting a diagnosis of Münchausen syndrome (the hypothesis best supported by the clinical evidence). This diagnosis, although the subject of much academic debate, is, unfortunately, still not frequently encountered in the medical literature, with the result that even today it has a strong clinical, relational and social impact. PMID:16796826

  15. [Pain syndrome of the musculoskeletal system in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Höfel, L; Draheim, N; Häfner, R; Haas, J P

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain syndromes in children and adolescents are defined as continuous or recurrent pain without an underlying causative diagnosis and lasting for more than 3 months. It is estimated that every fourth child in Germany suffers from chronic pain with every twentieth suffering from extreme recurrent pain. The incidence of chronic pain in children and adolescents is increasing with headache, abdominal pain and musculoskeletal pain being the most frequent. The quality of life declines not only due to the pain but to relieving postural and psychological factors, such as fear and sadness. School attendance, social activities and hobbies are mostly affected. This review summarizes the background of chronic pain syndromes and introduces a multimodal therapeutic approach. PMID:26892925

  16. Chronic Pain Syndromes in Gynaecological Practice: Endometriosis and Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Siedentopf, F.

    2012-01-01

    As gynaecologists frequently function as “general practitioners” for women, gynaecologists are frequently confronted with questions which initially appear to have only a tenuous connection to their field. Chronic pain syndromes represent a particular challenge, especially as pain syndromes are often associated with severe psychosocial stress for the affected woman. This article discusses some of the psychometric aspects of chronic pain in endometriosis and fibromyalgia together with practical therapeutic approaches. PMID:26640283

  17. Conditioned pain modulation in women with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more vigilant to pain-associated stimuli. The aims of this study were to compare women with IBS (n = 20) to healthy control (HC, n = 20) women on pain sensitivity, conditioned pain modulation (CPM) efficiency, and salivary corti...

  18. Rethinking the Psychogenic Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Somatoform Disorders and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Renee J.; Chopra, Pradeep; Richardi, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Explaining the etiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from the psychogenic model is exceedingly unsophisticated, because neurocognitive deficits, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and distortions in cognitive mapping are features of CRPS pathology. More importantly, many people who have developed CRPS have no history of mental illness. The psychogenic model offers comfort to physicians and mental health practitioners (MHPs) who have difficulty understanding pain maintained by newly uncovered neuro inflammatory processes. With increased education about CRPS through a biopsychosocial perspective, both physicians and MHPs can better diagnose, treat, and manage CRPS symptomatology. PMID:24223338

  19. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome. PMID:26528703

  20. Practical management of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) describes a diversity of painful conditions following trauma, coupled with abnormal regulation of blood flow and sweating, trophic changes, and edema of skin. The excruciating pain and diverse autonomic dysfunctions in CRPS are disproportionate to any inciting and recovering event. CRPS type I is formerly identified as "reflex sympathetic dystrophy." CRPS type II is the new term for "causalgia" that always coexists with documented nerve injury. The present diagnostic criteria of CRPS I and II depend solely on meticulous history and physical examination without any confirmation by specific test procedure (or gold standard). There are only few clinical studies with large-scale randomized trials of pharmacologic agents on the treatment of CRPS. Bisphosphonates have been studied in multiple controlled trials, based on theoretical benefit of bone resorption, to offer pain relief and functional improvement in patients with CRPS. Many current rationales in treatment of CRPS (such as topical agents, antiepileptic drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, and opioids) are mainly dependent on efficacy originate in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. There are additional innovative therapies on CRPS that are still in infancy. No wonder all the treatment of individual CRPS case nowadays is pragmatic at best. Although the interventional therapies in CRPS (such as nerve blockade, sympathetic block, spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation, implantable spinal medication pumps, and chemical and surgical sympathectomy) may offer more rapid response, yet it is still controversial with unpredictable outcome. Nevertheless, we need to start pain management immediately with the ambition to restore function in every probable case of CRPS. An interdisciplinary setting with comprehensive approach (pharmacologic, interventional, and psychological in conjunction with rehabilitation pathway) has been proposed as protocol in the practical management

  1. Yoga intervention and functional pain syndromes: a selective review.

    PubMed

    Sutar, Roshan; Yadav, Suresh; Desai, Geetha

    2016-06-01

    The definition of functional pain syndromes is varied across literature. No effort has been made to see all functional pain disorder groups under broad nomenclature which would exclude conditions for which pathophysiology is strongly known. Since these disorders are commonly treated with alternative treatment modalities and impose significant burden on health utilization, an effort to look into studies on yoga-based interventions on 'functional pain syndromes' (FPS) was made. This study defined FPS as 'Chronic relapsing remitting pain conditions, the origin of which is difficult to trace with no definite physical pathology on clinical suspicion or available laboratory measures and are valid based on subjective pain reporting, associated distress and socio-occupational dysfunction'. Chronic headache, neck pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, pelvic pain, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and somatoform pain disorders were included for this review. The review found four meta-analyses on the selected topic both indicating modest efficacy and benefit of yoga in these disorders. Future efforts should be directed to do a large meta-analysis of functional pain syndromes. PMID:27291934

  2. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  3. Musculoskeletal pain syndromes that affect adolescents.

    PubMed

    Szer, I S

    1996-07-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common pains of adolescence, along with headache and abdominal pain, and arthralgia is the single most common reason for referral to the pediatric rheumatologist. Not surprisingly, the pediatric rheumatologist is frequently called to distinguish organic from functional symptoms. During the past decade, the pediatric rheumatology community has been evaluating increasing numbers of adolescents and preadolescents who experience musculoskeletal symptoms presumably as a defense against emotional stress from achievement either in academic work or in sports. To complicate the challenge further, coexistent organic and psychologic disturbance is not rare. Clearly, organic illness does not protect a patient from emotional plan, and it may be most difficult to differentiate nonorganic pain in a patient with a known organic illness. Conversely, adolescents with organic illness may use their disease for secondary gain. Fear of misdiagnosis of physical illness as psychiatric and the notion that all of the patient's complaints should be explained by a unifying diagnosis cause diagnostic error in both psychogenic illness with physical manifestations and physical illness with psychogenic symptoms. PMID:8673201

  4. New aetiology of patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chas, Julie; Mariot, Philippe; Tassart, Marc; Pialoux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old man with more than 100 different male sexual partners per year. He reported using cocaine, ecstasy, γ-hydroxybutyric acid and crystal mephedrone and presented with bilateral gonalgia resistant to standard analgesia. He had no noteworthy medical history, and physical examination and laboratory tests were uninformative. MRI showed marked intra-articular effusion but no meniscus or ligament damage. The aetiological diagnosis in this case was made by excluding other potential causes. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common and challenging injuries. In this first case reported, the aetiology was found to be mechanical, due to the position adopted during fellatio with multiple male partners. PMID:24859542

  5. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The

  6. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The same level

  7. Slowly progressive Lemierre's syndrome with orbital pain and exophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Hama, Yuka; Koga, Masatoshi; Fujinami, Jun; Asayama, Shinya; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an oropharyngeal bacterial infection characterized by rapidly progressive septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. A lack of appropriate antibiotic therapy can be life-threatening. We describe the case of a 39-year-old man with Lemierre's syndrome who presented with long-lasting orbital pain and acute exophthalmos 6 weeks after initial infection. This report is to help clinicians consider the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome when encountering a patient with long-lasting orbital pain and acute exophthalmos. Neck ultrasonography is useful for detecting thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein in Lemierre's syndrome patients. PMID:26419364

  8. [Effect of stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome in rats after sciatic nerve transection].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A V; Kukushkin, M L

    1993-05-01

    Effect of immobilization and painful stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome, appeared after sciatic nerve section, has been studied in Wistar rats. It has been determined that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pain syndrome in rats without clinical signs of pain syndrome up to the moment of stress influence. There has been made a conclusion that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pathologic algic system, which is the basis of pain syndrome. The fact that stress can cause analgesia in normal animals in contrast to those with potential pain syndrome is explained to different mechanisms of physiological and pathological pain. PMID:8043822

  9. Terminology, criteria, and definitions in complex regional pain syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Katherine; Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome has long been recognized as a severe and high impact chronic pain disorder. However, the condition has historically been difficult to define and classify and little attention has been given to where complex regional pain syndrome sits within other apparently similar chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia and regional pain syndrome. In this review challenges in regard to nomenclature, definitions, and classification of complex regional pain syndrome are reviewed and suggestions are provided about future directions. PMID:26715858

  10. Are Pain-Related Fears Mediators for Reducing Disability and Pain in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1? An Explorative Analysis on Pain Exposure Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J.; Staal, J. Bart; van Dongen, Robert T. M.; Frölke, Jan Paul M.; Klomp, Frank P.; van de Meent, Henk; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether pain-related fears are mediators for reducing disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 when treating with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Design An explorative secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Participants Fifty-six patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Interventions The experimental group received Pain Exposure Physical Therapy in a maximum of five treatment sessions; the control group received conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Outcome measures Levels of disability, pain, and pain-related fears (fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and kinesiophobia) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. Results The experimental group had a significantly larger decrease in disability of 7.77 points (95% CI 1.09 to 14.45) and in pain of 1.83 points (95% CI 0.44 to 3.23) over nine months than the control group. The potential mediators pain-related fears decreased significantly in both groups, but there were no significant differences between groups, which indicated that there was no mediation. Conclusion The reduction of pain-related fears was comparable in both groups. We found no indication that pain-related fears mediate the larger reduction of disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy compared to conventional treatment. Trial registration International Clinical Trials Registry NCT00817128 PMID:25919011

  11. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  12. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  13. Free flap transfer for complex regional pain syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ken; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A patient with complex regional pain syndrome type II was successfully treated using free anterolateral thigh flap transfer with digital nerve coaptation to the cutaneous nerve of the flap. Release of the scarred tissue and soft tissue coverage with targeted sensory nerve coaptation were useful in relieving severe pain.

  14. [Pathogenetic mechanisms of phantom-pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, V K; Kukushkin, M L; Gurko, N C

    2015-01-01

    This review considers the literature data on the epidemiology of phantom-pain syndrome (PPS) presents the results of numerous clinical studies demonstrating the lack of effectiveness of the vast majority of modem non-pharmacological and pharmacological methods of treatment of PPS. Detail presents data on the patho genetic mechanisms underlying the PPS. According to most researchers, the major role in the patho genesis of the PPS has the reorganization of the somatosensory area of the cerebral cortex of the brain. At the same time discusses the views of researchers who believe that the main reason PPS is to strengthen nociceptive and nonnociceptive afferentation in the peripheral newous system. The comparison of these conflicting data it is concluded that in the genesis of the PPS plays the role of both primary and secondary sensitization. Leading important dysfunction of the central nervous system. Details the modern understanding of the mechanisms underlying the high efficiency of suppression of PPS during stimulation of motor cortex. PMID:27116887

  15. Fibromyalgia syndrome and myofascial pain syndrome. Do they exist?

    PubMed

    Bohr, T W

    1995-05-01

    "It is in the healing business that the temptations of junk science are the strongest and the controls against it the weakest." Despite their subjective nature, these syndromes (particularly MPS) have little reliability and validity, and advocates paint them as "objective." Despite a legacy of poor-quality science, enthusiasts continue to cite small, methodologically flawed studies purporting to show biologic variables for these syndromes. Despite a wealth of traditional pain research, disciples continue to ignore the placebo effect, demonstrating a therapeutic hubris despite studies showing a dismal natural history for FS. In reviewing the literature on MPS and FS, F.M.R. Walshe's sage words come to mind that the advocates of these syndromes are "better armed with technique than with judgment." A sympathic observer might claim that labeling patients with monikers of nondiseases such as FS and MPS may not be such a bad thing. After all, there is still a stigma for psychiatric disease in our society, and even telling a sufferer that this plays only a partial role may put that patient on the defensive. Labeling may have iatrogenic consequences, however, particularly in the setting of the work place. Furthermore, review of a typical support group newsletter gives ipso facto proof of this noxious potential. The author of a flyer stuffed inside the newsletter complains that getting social security and disability benefits for "the invisible disability" can be "an uphill battle. But don't loose (sic) hope." Apparently the "seriousness of the condition" is not appreciated by the medical community at large, and "clinician bias may well be the largest threat," according to Boston epidemiologist Dr. John Mason. Sufferers are urged to trek to their local medical library and pull four particular articles claiming FS patients have more "stress," "daily hassles," and difficulty working compared with arthritis patients. If articles can't be located, patients are told to ask their

  16. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christine N; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2013-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a common clinical syndrome characterized by genital/pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. There is also growing recognition of the association of sexual dysfunction with CP/CPPS including erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory pain, and premature ejaculation. In this review, we discuss the association between CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction, potential mechanisms for sexual dysfunction, and treatment strategies for erectile dysfunction in CP/CPPS. PMID:23579441

  17. [Botulinum toxin for the treatment of pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joaquim J; Couto, Marina; Costa, João; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mário M; Sampaio, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Although botulinum toxin (BoNT) is being used for therapeutic purposes for more than 20 years, the list of potential new indications continues to increase and includes various pain syndromes. The pain relief experienced by patients with dystonia and spasticity from intramuscular BoNT injections suggested that other chronic skeletal-muscles pain conditions may also benefit. BoNT inhibits the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction thereby reducing striatal muscle contractions and the proposed analgesic property was initially attributed to muscular relaxation. A specific analgesic BoNT effect is difficult to conclude from studies where pain is conditioned by other associated symptoms like dystonia, muscle contraction or spasticity. One alternative is to critically appraise clinical trials where BoNT was studied as the active intervention and pain evaluated as an outcome. From this analysis there is convincing evidence for the effectiveness of BoNT in the treatment of pain associated with cervical dystonia. For all other pain syndromes there have been relatively few, small sized, placebo-controlled studies (myofascial pain syndrome, chronic neck and low back pain, piriformis syndrome and fibromyalgia) and the results of these studies have been contradictory or non conclusive. To establish the analgesic properties of BoNT there is a need for appropriately designed, exploratory randomized controlled studies in well accepted human models of nociceptive or neuropathic pain. This does not exclude the subsequent need to conduct pragmatic trials to evaluate the effectiveness of BoNT in conditions where the improvement of pain or any associated clinical sign or symptom may be of clinical relevance. PMID:17058384

  18. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome responsive to pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, FH; Liu, W; Geigel, E; Castaneda, S; Rossi, EM; Schnacky, K

    2015-01-01

    Report three cases of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome responsive to pregabalin along with a review of its literature. Three patients with PLMT syndrome improved with pregabalin. The first and third patient reported improvement in pain scores, quality of life, and quality of sleep sustained over time. The second and third patient had near complete remission of toe movements, but pregabalin was discontinued in the second patient due to aggravation of leg edema. PLMT is a rare and debilitating disorder characterized by lower limb pain and involuntary toes or feet movements. Its pathophysiology remains unknown and its therapy refractory to most drugs, except for pregabalin, as shown in this case series. PLMT is a rare and incapacitating syndrome due to the lack of an effective pain therapy. We report three patients with PLMT who favorable responded to pregabalin. We propose pregabalin be considered in the management of PLMT. PMID:25766346

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis in pain management, marijuana for pain.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Scott M

    2007-01-01

    This feature presents information for patients in a question and answer format. It is written to simulate actual questions that many pain patients ask and to provide answers in a context and language that most pain patients will comprehend. Issues addressed in this issue are carpel tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis, marijuana. PMID:17844729

  20. Stretch-induced cervicobrachial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintner, J

    1990-01-01

    The case records of 22 patients who presented with severe and persistent cervicobrachial pain were reviewed. The onset of their pain followed the performance of a forceful activity (lifting, pulling or pushing) using one or both arms in the outstretched position. Their symptoms and the findings on physical examination were both consistent with stretch-induced damage to neural tissues related to the painful upper limb. The predominant site of painful neural pathology appeared to be within the cervical spine. PMID:25025877

  1. Role of Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Donna-Ann; Maslin, Benjamin; Legler, Aron; Springer, Erin; Asgerally, Abbas; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of chronic pain. This review examines alternative and complimentary therapies, which can be incorporated as part of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. In the present investigation, literature from articles indexed on PubMed was evaluated including topics of alternative therapies, complimentary therapies, pain psychology, biofeedback therapy, physical exercise therapies, acupuncture, natural and herbal supplements, whole-body cryotherapy, and smartphone technologies in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. This review highlights the key role of psychology in the treatment of chronic pain. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be the most impactful while biofeedback therapy has also been shown to be effective for chronic pain. Exercise therapy has been shown to be effective in short-, intermediate-, and long-term pain states. When compared to that in sham controls, acupuncture has shown some benefit for neck pain immediately after the procedure and in the short term and improvement has also been demonstrated in the treatment of headaches. The role of smartphones and whole-body cryotherapy are new modalities and further studies are needed. Recent literature suggests that several alternate therapies could play a role in the treatment of chronic pain, supporting the biopsychosocial model in the treatment of pain states. PMID:27038968

  2. Loin Pain Haematuria Syndrome - A Narrative Review of Pain Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain haematuria syndrome (LPHS) is an uncommon clinical entity that has divided renal physicians, pain practitioners, and even psychiatrists since its initial description. A relative paucity of data exists regarding the condition, with best practice guidelines lacking amid the existing threads of anecdotal experiences and variable follow-up observations. The aim of this article was to review the cumulative published experience of pain relief strategies for LPHS. PMID:27103962

  3. Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome-A Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Chandola, H C; Chakraborty, Arunangshu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pain and fatigue associated to the musculoskeletal system are among the leading causes of patients to visit their physicians and nearly one-third of such patients suffer from fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic debilitating disorder characterized by widespread pain with tenderness in specific areas, leading to fatigue, headache and sleep disorder. Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS), is also a localized musculoskeletal pain producing condition whose diagnostic and management criteria differ from FMS but still considered by many only a subtype of FMS. Till date no exact cause has been held responsible for these painful conditions, therefore treatment of these disorders is always a challenge. The therapies are not precise but multimodal including pharmacological and alternative approaches. This article describes the existing knowledge pertaining to these conditions in regard of causative factors diagnosis and management. PMID:20640108

  4. Inflammation in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Parkitny, Luke; McAuley, James H.; Di Pietro, Flavia; Stanton, Tasha R.; O’Connell, Neil E.; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We conducted a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis to determine whether complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is associated with a specific inflammatory profile and whether this is dependent on the duration of the condition. Methods: Comprehensive searches of the literature using MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and reference lists from published reviews identified articles that measured inflammatory factors in CRPS. Two independent investigators screened titles and abstracts, and performed data extraction and risk of bias assessments. Studies were subgrouped by medium (blood, blister fluid, and CSF) and duration (acute and chronic CRPS). Where possible, meta-analyses of inflammatory factor concentrations were performed and pooled effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. Results: Twenty-two studies were included in the systematic review and 15 in the meta-analysis. In acute CRPS, the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-8 and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors I (sTNF-RI) and II (sTNF-RII) were significantly increased in blood. In chronic CRPS, significant increases were found in 1) TNFα, bradykinin, sIL-1RI, IL-1Ra, IL-2, sIL-2Ra, IL-4, IL-7, interferon-γ, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and sRAGE (soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products) in blood; 2) IL-1Ra, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and IL-6 in blister fluid; and 3) IL-1β and IL-6 in CSF. Chronic CRPS was also associated with significantly decreased 1) substance P, sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sP-selectin, and sGP130 in blood; and 2) soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in CSF. Most studies failed to meet 3 or more of our quality criteria. Conclusion: CRPS is associated with the presence of a proinflammatory state in the blood, blister fluid, and CSF. Different inflammatory profiles were found for acute and chronic cases. PMID:23267031

  5. Intrathecal drug administration in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ver Donck, Ann; Vranken, Jan H; Puylaert, Martine; Hayek, Salim; Mekhail, Nagy; Van Zundert, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Chronic pain may recur after initial response to strong opioids in both patients with cancer and patients without cancer or therapy may be complicated by intolerable side effects. When minimally invasive interventional pain management techniques also fail to provide satisfactory pain relief, continuous intrathecal analgesic administration may be considered. Only 3 products have been officially approved for long-term intrathecal administration: morphine, baclofen, and ziconotide. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide for the management of patients with severe chronic refractory noncancer pain was illustrated in 3 placebo-controlled trials. A randomized study showed this treatment option to be effective over a short follow-up period for patients with pain due to cancer or AIDS. The efficacy of intrathecal opioid administration for the management of chronic noncancer pain is mainly derived from prospective and retrospective noncontrolled trials. The effect of intrathecal morphine administration in patients with pain due to cancer was compared with oral or transdermal treatment in a randomized controlled trial, which found better pain control and fewer side effects with intrathecal opioids. Other evidence is derived from cohort studies. Side effects of chronic intrathecal therapy may either be technical (catheter or pump malfunction) or biological (infection). The most troublesome complication is, however, the possibility of granuloma formation at the catheter tip that may induce neurological damage. Given limited studies, the evidence for intrathecal drug administration in patients suffering from cancer-related pain is more compelling than that of chronic noncancer pain. PMID:24118774

  6. Outcome After Pituitary Radiosurgery for Thalamic Pain Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Motohiro Chernov, Mikhail F.; Taira, Takaomi; Ochiai, Taku; Nakaya, Kotaro; Tamura, Noriko; Goto, Shinichi; Yomo, Shoji; Kouyama, Nobuo; Katayama, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Izawa, Masahiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes after pituitary radiosurgery in patients with post-stroke thalamic pain syndrome. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2006, 24 patients with thalamic pain syndrome underwent pituitary radiosurgery at Tokyo Women's Medical University and were followed at least 12 months thereafter. The radiosurgical target was defined as the pituitary gland and its connection with the pituitary stalk. The maximum dose varied from 140 to 180 Gy. Mean follow-up after treatment was 35 months (range, 12-48 months). Results: Initial pain reduction, usually within 48 h after radiosurgery, was marked in 17 patients (71%). However, in the majority of cases the pain recurred within 6 months after treatment, and at the time of the last follow-up examination durable pain control was marked in only 5 patients (21%). Ten patients (42%) had treatment-associated side effects. Anterior pituitary abnormalities were marked in 8 cases and required hormonal replacement therapy in 3; transient diabetes insipidus was observed in 2 cases, transient hyponatremia in 1, and clinical deterioration due to increase of the numbness severity despite significant reduction of pain was seen once. Conclusions: Pituitary radiosurgery for thalamic pain results in a high rate of initial efficacy and is accompanied by acceptable morbidity. It can be used as a primary minimally invasive management option for patients with post-stroke thalamic pain resistant to medical therapy. However, in the majority of cases pain recurrence occurs within 1 year after treatment.

  7. Potential therapeutic effect of intravesical botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is characterized by bladder pain associated with urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria and sterile urine. Recent studies have shown that these bladder dysfunctions could originate from chronic inflammation or urothelial insult and proceed to a cascade of tissue reactions, which finally ascends to the central nervous system. Pilot studies of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis had been introduced since 2005 with a promising result. Recent evidence suggests that botulinum toxin type A could significantly improve symptoms such as daytime frequency, nocturia, pain, quality of life and bladder capacity in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients. Single injection of botulinum toxin could not achieve long-term successful therapeutic result, and repeat injections could provide a better long-term success rate. However, patients with ulcer type bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis might not gain a benefit from botulinum toxin type A injection. Laboratory evidence showed that botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis injection could induce peripheral desensitization, reduces bladder chronic inflammation and decreases apoptotic signal molecules in the urothelium. The present article reviewed the recent advances of botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807497

  8. Bertolotti Syndrome: A Diagnostic and Management Dilemma for Pain Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil; Jain, Suruchi; Shamshery, Chetna

    2013-01-01

    Background Bertolotti's syndrome (BS), a form of lumbago in lumbosacral transitional vertebrae, is an important cause of low back pain in young patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the etiology of low back pain and the efficacy of treatment offered to patients with BS. Methods All patients of BS Castellvi type1a during a period of 6 months were enrolled in the study. The patients underwent interventional pain procedures for diagnosis and pain relief. Response to the therapy was assessed based on VAS and ODI scores. A 50% decrease in VAS score or a VAS score less than 3 would be considered adequate pain relief. Results All 20 patients diagnosed with BS during the 6-month observation period had scoliosis. Common causes of back pain were the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint, neoarticulation, the SI joint, and disc degeneration. Responses to various interventions for pain relief were different and inconsistent from patient to patient. In particular, responses to interventions for neoarticular pain were generally poor. Conclusions Pain in patients with BS does not usually respond to interventional pain treatment. A very dynamic treatment approach must be pursued while managing BS patients, and the treatment plan must be individualized at various stages in order to obtain satisfactory pain relief. PMID:24156003

  9. Pain, Catastrophizing, and Depression in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jong Kyou

    2013-01-01

    Persistent and disabling pain is the hallmark of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). However, disease severity (as measured by objective indexes such as those that use radiography or serology) is only marginally related to patients' reports of pain severity, and pain-related presentation can differ widely among individuals with CP/CPPS. Increasing evidence in support of the biopsychosocial model of pain suggests that cognitive and emotional processes are crucial contributors to inter-individual differences in the perception and impact of pain. This review describes the growing body of literature relating depression and catastrophizing to the experience of pain and pain-related sequelae in CP/CPPS. Depression and catastrophizing are consistently associated with the reported severity of pain, sensitivity to pain, physical disability, poor treatment outcomes, and inflammatory disease activity and potentially with early mortality. A variety of pathways, from cognitive to behavioral to neurophysiological, seem to mediate these deleterious effects. Collectively, depression and catastrophizing are critically important variables in understanding the experience of pain in patients with CP/CPPS. Pain, depression, and catastrophizing might all be uniquely important therapeutic targets in the multimodal management of a range of such conditions. PMID:23869268

  10. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pattanik, Manorama; Titarmore, Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging. PMID:25097327

  11. The Biochemical Origin of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response. PART 2 of 3 –Inflammatory Profile of Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome / reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing

  12. Children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome: More psychologically distressed than other children in pain?

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E; Williams, Sara E; Carullo, Veronica P; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Bruehl, Stephen; Berde, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Historically, in both adult and pediatric populations, a lack of knowledge regarding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and absence of clear diagnostic criteria have contributed to the view that this is a primarily psychiatric condition. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that children with CRPS are more functionally disabled, have more pain and are more psychologically distressed than children with other pain conditions. METHODS: A total of 101 children evaluated in a tertiary care pediatric pain clinic who met the International Association for the Study of Pain consensus diagnostic criteria for CRPS participated in the present retrospective study. Comparison groups included 103 children with abdominal pain, 291 with headache and 119 with back pain. Children and parents completed self-report questionnaires assessing disability, somatization, pain coping, depression, anxiety and school attendance. RESULTS: Children with CRPS reported higher pain intensity and more recent onset of pain at the initial tertiary pain clinic evaluation compared with children with other chronic pain conditions. They reported greater functional disability and more somatic symptoms than children with headaches or back pain. Scores on measures of depression and anxiety were within normal limits and similar to those of children in other pain diagnostic groups. CONCLUSIONS: As a group, clinic-referred children with CRPS may be more functionally impaired and experience more somatic symptoms compared with children with other pain conditions. However, overall psychological functioning as assessed by self-report appears to be similar to that of children with other chronic pain diagnoses. Comprehensive assessment using a biopsychosocial framework is essential to understanding and appropriately treating children with symptoms of CRPS. PMID:23662291

  13. Similarities between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and vulvodynia: implications for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Moldwin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and vulvodynia are chronic pain syndromes that appear to be intertwined from the perspectives of embryology, pathology and epidemiology. These associations may account for similar responses to various therapies. PMID:26816866

  14. Enlargement of choroid plexus in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyu; Hotta, Jaakko; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Forss, Nina; Hari, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus, located in brain ventricles, has received surprisingly little attention in clinical neuroscience. In morphometric brain analysis, we serendipitously found a 21% increase in choroid plexus volume in 12 patients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) compared with age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. No enlargement was observed in a group of 8 patients suffering from chronic pain of other etiologies. Our findings suggest involvement of the choroid plexus in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Since the choroid plexus can mediate interaction between peripheral and brain inflammation, our findings pinpoint the choroid plexus as an important target for future research of central pain mechanisms. PMID:26388497

  15. Orofacial pain syndromes: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Klasser, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Patients will often visit their primary medical practitioner with orofacial pain complaints. Hence, it is important to recognize and have an understanding of these conditions to properly evaluate and potentially manage these disorders. If the practitioner is uncertain or uncomfortable with these conditions, then patient referral to a knowledgeable health care practitioner should be considered for further evaluation and management. In this article, the evaluation and management of various neuropathic, neurovascular, and vascular pains are discussed. PMID:25443681

  16. Intramuscular hemangioma mimicking myofascial pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwee; Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-06-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  17. Intramuscular Hemangioma Mimicking Myofascial Pain Syndrome : A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-01-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  18. Current studies on myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Ta-Shen

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies have clarified the nature of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). In an MTrP region, multiple hyperirritable loci can be found. The sensory components of the MTrP locus are sensitized nociceptors that are responsible for pain, referred pain, and local twitch responses. The motor components are dysfunctional endplates that are responsible for taut band formation as a result of excessive acetylcholine (ACh) leakage. The concentrations of pain- and inflammation-related substances are increased in the MTrP region. It has been hypothesized that excessive ACh release, sarcomere shortening, and release of sensitizing substances are three essential features that relate to one another in a positive feedback cycle. This MTrP circuit is the connection among spinal sensory (dorsal horn) neurons responsible for the MTrP phenomena. Recent studies suggest that measurement of biochemicals associated with pain and inflammation in the MTrP region, the sonographic study of MTrPs, and the magnetic resonance elastography for taut band image are potential tools for the diagnosis of MTrPs. Many methods have been used to treat myofascial pain, including laser therapy, shockwave therapy, and botulinum toxin type A injection. PMID:19728962

  19. The Brain-Gut Axis in Abdominal Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Tillisch, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bidirectional brain-gut interactions in gastrointestinal (GI) illness is increasingly recognized, most prominently in the area of functional GI syndromes such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, and functional chest pain. The brain receives a constant stream of interoceptive input from the GI tract, integrates this information with other interoceptive information from the body and with contextual information from the environment, and sends an integrated response back to various target cells within the GI tract. This system is optimized to assure homeostasis of the GI tract during physiological perturbations and to adapt GI function to the overall state of the organism. In health, the great majority of interoceptive information reaching the brain is not consciously perceived but serves primarily as input to autonomic reflex pathways. In patients with functional abdominal pain syndromes, conscious perception of interoceptive information from the GI tract, or recall of interoceptive memories of such input, can occur in the form of constant or recurrent discomfort or pain. This is often associated with alterations in autonomic nervous system output and with emotional changes. A model is proposed that incorporates reported peripheral and central abnormalities in patients with IBS, extrapolates similar alterations in brain-gut interactions to patients with other chronic abdominal pain syndromes, and provides novel treatment targets. PMID:21090962

  20. [Cervical myofascial pain syndrome. Narrative review of physiotherapeutic treatment].

    PubMed

    Capó-Juan, M A

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon that depends on the interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Between 15-25% of adults suffer from chronic pain at some point in their lives. Cervical chronic pain is considered a public health problem affecting 9.6% men and 21.9% women, according to the latest National Health Survey 2011-12. A high percentage of medical consultations due to muscle pain turn out to be myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Its existence implies the presence of myofascial trigger points which can be latent or active throughout the whole population. The aim of this review is to update knowledge in the various therapies applied by the physiotherapist in the treatment of this syndrome at cervical level. From the review it appears that some of the most used techniques that may be useful in the short or medium term are: ischemic compression and/or trigger point pressure release and dry needling. Furthermore, various combinations of treatment modalities are used to treat this syndrome, taking other aspects into account, such as education. PMID:25963463

  1. Painful Os Peroneum Syndrome: Underdiagnosed Condition in the Lateral Midfoot Pain.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; de Souza, Barbara Nogueira Caracas; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Os peroneum is an accessory ossicle located within the peroneus longus tendon. The painful os peroneum syndrome (POPS) results from a wide spectrum of conditions, including fractures, diastases, and other causes. POPS can result in tenosynovitis or discontinuity of the peroneus longus tendon with a clinical presentation of pain in the lateral aspect of the midfoot. Authors report a typical case of POPS, illustrating this entity through different imaging methods (radiographs, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging). We emphasize the prevalence of this ossicle and discuss painful complications. PMID:27478674

  2. Painful Os Peroneum Syndrome: Underdiagnosed Condition in the Lateral Midfoot Pain

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Barbara Nogueira Caracas

    2016-01-01

    Os peroneum is an accessory ossicle located within the peroneus longus tendon. The painful os peroneum syndrome (POPS) results from a wide spectrum of conditions, including fractures, diastases, and other causes. POPS can result in tenosynovitis or discontinuity of the peroneus longus tendon with a clinical presentation of pain in the lateral aspect of the midfoot. Authors report a typical case of POPS, illustrating this entity through different imaging methods (radiographs, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging). We emphasize the prevalence of this ossicle and discuss painful complications. PMID:27478674

  3. Medial Abrasion Syndrome: A Neglected Cause of Knee Pain in Middle and Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Lee, Ching-Chih; Hsu, Chia-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Knee pain is a prevailing health problem of middle and old age. Medial plica-related medial abrasion syndrome (MAS), although a well-known cause of knee pain in younger individuals, has rarely been investigated in older individuals. This prospective study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and clinical manifestations of this syndrome as a cause of knee pain in middle and old age. The outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for this syndrome were also evaluated. A total of 232 knees of 169 patients >40 years of age (41–82, median: 63 years old) suffering from chronic knee pain were analyzed. The clinical diagnosis, predisposing factors, presenting symptoms, and physical signs were investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter of the clinical presentation for the diagnosis of MAS were evaluated after confirmation by arthroscopy. For patients with MAS, the roentgenographic and arthroscopic manifestations were investigated, and arthroscopic medial release (AMR) was performed. The outcomes were evaluated by the changes in the pain domain of the Knee Society scoring system and by patient satisfaction. The prevalence of medial plica was 95%, and osteoarthritis (OA) was the most common clinical diagnosis. Symptoms of pain and crepitus in motion and local tenderness during physical examination were the most sensitive parameters for the diagnosis. A history of a single knee injury combined with local tenderness and a palpable band found during physical examination were the most specific parameters for the diagnosis. The majority of patients suffering from this syndrome were successfully treated using AMR, yielding a satisfaction rate of 85.5% after a minimum of 3 years. MAS is a common cause of knee pain in middle and old age and can be effectively treated by AMR. Its concomitance with OA warrants further investigation. PMID:25906102

  4. Relationship between Sleep and Pain in Adolescents with Juvenile Primary Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Margaret N.; Sherry, David D.; Boyne, Kathleen; McCue, Rebecca; Gallagher, Paul R.; Brooks, Lee J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate sleep quality in adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) and determine whether sleep abnormalities, including alpha-delta sleep (ADS), correlate with pain intensity. We hypothesized that successful treatment for pain with exercise therapy would reduce ADS and improve sleep quality. Design: Single-center preintervention and postintervention (mean = 5.7 ± 1.0 weeks; range = 4.0-7.3 weeks) observational study. Patients: Ten female adolescents (mean age = 16.2 ± 0.65 SD yr) who met criteria for JPFS and completed treatment. Interventions: Multidisciplinary pain treatment, including intensive exercise therapy. Measurements and Results: Pain and disability were measured by a pain visual analog scale (VAS) and the Functional Disability Inventory. Subjective sleep measures included a sleep VAS, an energy VAS, and the School Sleep Habits Survey. Objective sleep measures included actigraphy, polysomnography (PSG), and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Baseline PSG was compared with that of healthy age- and sex-matched control patients. At baseline, patients had poorer sleep efficiency, more arousals/awakenings, and more ADS (70.3% of total slow wave sleep [SWS] versus 21.9% SWS, P = 0.002) than controls. ADS was unrelated to pain, disability, or subjective sleep difficulty. After treatment, pain decreased (P = 0.000) and subjective sleep quality improved (P = 0.008). Objective sleep quality, including the amount of ADS, did not change. Conclusions: Although perceived sleep quality improved in adolescents with JPFS after treatment, objective measures did not. Our findings do not suggest exercise therapy for pain improves sleep by reducing ADS, nor do they support causal relationships between ADS and chronic pain or subjective sleep quality. Citation: Olsen MN; Sherry DD; Boyne K; McCue R; Gallagher PR; Brooks LJ. Relationship between sleep and pain in adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome. SLEEP 2013

  5. Systematic review of chronic pain in persons with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velvin, G; Bathen, T; Rand-Hendriksen, S; Geirdal, A Ø

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the literature on chronic pain in adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS), critically appraising and synthesizing relevant literature. A systematic review was conducted by searching the published literature databases using available medical, physical, psychological, social databases and other sources. All studies that addressed pain in MFS, published in peer-reviewed journals were assessed. Of 351 search results, 18 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria. All studies were cross-sectional and quantitative; no randomized controlled trials or intervention studies were found. Most studies had small sample sizes, low response rates and mainly dealt with other aspects of the diagnosis than pain. Only one article dealt mainly with pain. The research on chronic pain in MFS is limited in size and quality. Despite these limitations, studies describe that the prevalence of pain in patients with MFS is high, varying from 47 to 92% and affecting several anatomic sites. In addition, chronic pain limits daily function and few studies describe treatment options for pain in patients with MFS. Research is needed to obtain more evidence-based knowledge for developing more appropriate rehabilitation programs for people with MFS. PMID:26607862

  6. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC. PMID:27376330

  7. [PECULIARITIES OF TREATMENT VERTEBROGENIC PAIN SYNDROMES].

    PubMed

    Klymenko, O; Belska, I

    2015-01-01

    The results of studying the pathogenetic features of back pain at vertebrogenic of Spine, and disorders of life of patients in relation to it. Application of therapy with the standard treatment and the complex medicine of the vitamins B. PMID:27089720

  8. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  9. Chest Pain in Adolescent Japanese Male Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin K.; Naheed, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Acute chest pain with very elevated troponin level and abnormal EKG in adult population is considered sine qua non to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) unless proved otherwise. Similar presentation in adolescent population is seen less often but raises suspicion for ACS. Most common etiology for chest pain with cardiac enzyme elevation in adolescent population is usually viral myopericarditis. The adolescent population presenting with chest pain and elevated cardiac enzymes should be carefully evaluated for ACS and other etiologies including myocarditis, myopericarditis, pulmonary embolism, acute rheumatic fever, and trauma. We report one Japanese adolescent male with mycoplasma pneumoniae myocarditis who presented to the ER with chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes, and abnormal EKG. PMID:25202456

  10. Sensitization of the Nociceptive System in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichs, Carolina; Baron, Ralf; Gierthmühlen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is characterized by sensory, motor and autonomic abnormalities without electrophysiological evidence of a nerve lesion. Objective Aims were to investigate how sensory, autonomic and motor function change in the course of the disease. Methods 19 CRPS-I patients (17 with acute, 2 with chronic CRPS, mean duration of disease 5.7±8.3, range 1–33 months) were examined with questionnaires (LANSS, NPS, MPI, Quick DASH, multiple choice list of descriptors for sensory, motor, autonomic symptoms), motor and autonomic tests as well as quantitative sensory testing according to the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain at two visits (baseline and 36±10.6, range 16–53 months later). Results CRPS-I patients had an improvement of sudomotor and vasomotor function, but still a great impairment of sensory and motor function upon follow-up. Although pain and mechanical detection improved upon follow-up, thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity increased, including the contralateral side. Increase in mechanical pain sensitivity and loss of mechanical detection were associated with presence of ongoing pain. Conclusions The results demonstrate that patients with CRPS-I show a sensitization of the nociceptive system in the course of the disease, for which ongoing pain seems to be the most important trigger. They further suggest that measured loss of function in CRPS-I is due to pain-induced hypoesthesia rather than a minimal nerve lesion. In conclusion, this article gives evidence for a pronociceptive pain modulation profile developing in the course of CRPS and thus helps to assess underlying mechanisms of CRPS that contribute to the maintenance of patients’ pain and disability. PMID:27149519

  11. Efficacy of dry needling for treatment of myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, Yacov; Kent, John

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial pain is a major cause of musculoskeletal regional pain. Myofascial pain, which is a high-prevalence but eminently treatable condition, is almost universally underdiagnosed by physicians and undertreated by physical therapy modalities. Large numbers of patients can be left suffering in chronic pain for years. Dry needling, also referred to as Intramuscular Stimulation, is a method in the arsenal of pain management which has been known for almost 200 years in Western medicine, yet has been almost completely ignored. With the increase in research in this field over the past two decades, there are many high-quality studies that demonstrate dry needling to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of myofascial pain when diagnosed and treated by adequately-trained physicians or physical therapists. This article provides an overview of recent literature regarding the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome, evidence for the efficacy of dry needling as a central component of its management, and a glimpse at developments in recent imaging methods to aid in the treatment of these problems. PMID:25322743

  12. Pharmacology of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Barkin, Robert L; Wang, Victor C

    2011-01-01

    The perpetual pursuit of pain elimination has been constant throughout human history and pervades human cultures. In some ways it is as old as medicine itself. Cultures throughout history have practiced the art of pain management through remedies such as oral ingestion of herbs or techniques believed to have special properties. In fact, even Hippocrates wrote about the practice of trepanation, the cutting of holes in the body to release pain. Current therapies for management of pain include the pervasive utilization of opioids, which have an extensive history, spanning centuries. There is general agreement about the appropriateness of opioids for the treatment of acute and cancer pain, but the long-term use of these drugs for treatment of chronic non-malignant pain remains controversial. The pros and cons regarding these issues are beyond the scope of this review. Instead, the purpose of this review will be directed towards the pharmacology of commonly prescribed opioids in the treatment of various chronic pain syndromes. Opium, derived from the Greek word for "juice," is extracted from the latex sap of the opium poppy (Papaverum somniferum). The juice of the poppy is the source of some 20 different alkaloids of opium. These alkaloids of opioids can be divided into 2 chemical classes: phenanthrenes (morphine, codeine, and thebaine) and benzylisoquinolines (agents that do not interact with opioid receptors). PMID:21785485

  13. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  14. Compassionate Care for Patients With Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Melissa A; Smith, Carolyn E; Pomidor, Michelle A

    2015-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a debilitating condition characterized by specific symptoms such as intense pain and loss of function. This syndrome can be so devastating that it affects quality of life. Often, CRPS is misdiagnosed and misunderstood, which can be extremely frustrating for patients. The purpose of the survey in this study was to query actual patients living with CRPS to gain additional knowledge and suggestions to help improve their care. Respondents expressed a variety of emotions when asked about their healthcare experiences, which suggests that healthcare providers need to be better educated about CRPS so they can provide more compassionate care for patients trying to cope with this condition. PMID:26153786

  15. Restless legs syndrome and pain disorders: what's in common?

    PubMed

    Goulart, Leonardo Ierardi; Delgado Rodrigues, Raimundo Nonato; Prieto Peres, Mario Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Between 10 % and 30 % of the population report chronic pain. More than half of these also have sleep complaints. From considering these data, it can be inferred there is a significant overlapping between these conditions. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease (RLS/WED) is characterized by complaints of an "urge to move" frequently associated with dysesthesias. From that perspective, these sensations can also have painful characteristics. By the same token, the presence of comorbid diseases as predicted by a higher prevalence RLS/WED, have many of them with pain as an important complaint. Pain is a multidimensional response involving several levels of expression ranging from somatosensory to emotional. The potential shared mechanisms between RLS/WED and pain may involve sleep deprivation/fragmentation effect, inducing an increase in markers of inflammation and reduction in pain thresholds. These are modulated by several different settings of neurotransmitters with a huge participation of monoaminergic dysfunctional circuits. A thorough comprehension of these mechanisms is of utmost importance for the correct approach and treatment choices. PMID:25249423

  16. The effectiveness and cost evaluation of pain exposure physical therapy and conventional therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is a new treatment option for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. It has been evaluated in retrospective as well as in prospective studies and proven to be safe and possibly effective. This indicates that Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is now ready for clinical evaluation. The results of an earlier performed pilot study with an n = 1 design, in which 20 patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 were treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy, were used for the design and power calculation of the present study. After completion and evaluation of this phase III study, a multi-centre implementation study will be conducted. The aim of this study is to determine whether Pain Exposure Physical Therapy can improve functional outcomes in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Methods/design This study is designed as a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. 62 patients will be randomized with a follow-up of 9 months to demonstrate the expected treatment effect. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 is diagnosed in accordance with the Bruehl/International Association for the Study of Pain criteria. Conventional therapy in accordance with the Dutch guideline will be compared with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Primary outcome measure is the Impairment level SumScore, restricted version. Discussion This is the first randomized controlled study with single blinding that has ever been planned in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 and does not focus on a single aspect of the pain syndrome but compares treatment strategies based on completely different pathophysiological and cognitive theories. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00817128; National Trial Register NTR2090 PMID:22515496

  17. Autoimmune etiology of complex regional pain syndrome (M. Sudeck).

    PubMed

    Blaes, F; Schmitz, K; Tschernatsch, M; Kaps, M; Krasenbrink, I; Hempelmann, G; Bräu, M E

    2004-11-01

    Sera of 12 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) were tested for the occurrence of autoantibodies against nervous system structures. Immunohistochemistry revealed autoantibodies against autonomic nervous system structures in 5 of 12 (41.6%) of the patients. Western blot analysis showed neuronal reactivity in 11 of 12 (91.6%) patients. The authors hypothesize that CRPS can result from an autoimmune process against the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:15534271

  18. Eagle's syndrome - Masquerading as ear pain: Review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeenahamed, Sahuthullah; Laliytha, Bijay Kumar; Sivaraman, Shivakumar; Ambiga, Pazhani; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sudhaa, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The name styloid process (SP) was derived from the Greek word “stylos” meaning a pillar. It is a bony, cylindrical, needle-shaped projection, which originates from the posterior-inferior side of the petrous bone, immediately in front of the stylomastoid foramen, and goes obliquely down and forward. When elongated leads to pain and discomfort called Eagle's syndrome. Elongated SP accounts approximately to 4–7% of the population, 4% only are symptomatic. PMID:26538879

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome after thromboendarterectomy: which type is it?

    PubMed

    Baillet, Georges; Planchon, Claude Alain; Tamgac, Feyzi; Thomassin, Martine; Foult, Jean-Marc

    2002-09-01

    The authors describe a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and discuss its type according to the presence or absence of nerve injury. A patient underwent thromboendarterectomy of the right popliteal artery. Subsequently, right lower limb reflex sympathetic dystrophy developed, which was confirmed by scintigraphy and responded well to calcitonin treatment. Typing according to the new classification of CRPS type I or II with possible nerve injury is discussed, and a short review of the literature is included. PMID:12192276

  20. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  1. Does temporomandibular disorder pain dysfunction syndrome affect dietary intake?

    PubMed

    Irving, J; Wood, G D; Hackett, A F

    1999-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorder pain dysfunction syndrome (TDPDS) is the most common cause of facial pain after toothache. The symptoms are varied but are likely to affect the choice, intake and enjoyment of food. This has not been previously investigated. In this paper a preliminary study of 35 patients attending a department of oral and maxillofacial surgery at a general hospital is presented. Thirty-one subjects reported that eating was a problem; 15 prepared food differently and 24 considered that their choice of food was limited. Four of the five foods most often reported to be difficult to eat are valuable in the diet: meat (22), apples (20), bread (13), toast (7) and toffees (6). Twenty-three subjects reported eating a softer diet. Most (25) reported pain when eating. Such circumstances make it harder for TDPDS sufferers to meet current nutritional guidelines, especially, perhaps, for some to achieve an adequate intake of iron. PMID:10765783

  2. The Painful Shoulder: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yousaf; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Malal, Joby; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disorders are considered to be among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability encountered in both primary and secondary care. The general pathology of subacromial impingment generally relates to a chronic repetitive process in which the conjoint tendon of the rotator cuff undergoes repetitive compression and micro trauma as it passes under the coracoacromial arch. However acute traumatic injuries may also lead to this condition. Diagnosis remains a clinical one, however advances in imaging modalities have enabled clinicians to have an increased understanding of the pathological process. Ultrasound scanning appears to be a justifiable and cost effective assessment tool following plain radiographs in the assessment of shoulder impingment, with MRI scans being reserved for more complex cases. A period of observed conservative management including the use of NSAIDs, physiotherapy with or without the use of subacromial steroid injections is a well-established and accepted practice. However, in young patients or following any traumatic injury to the rotator cuff, surgery should be considered early. If surgery is to be performed this should be done arthroscopically and in the case of complete rotator cuff rupture the tendon should be repaired where possible. PMID:24082973

  3. Infantile Pain Episodes Associated with Novel Nav1.9 Mutations in Familial Episodic Pain Syndrome in Japanese Families

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Daiki; Harada, Kouji H.; Youssefian, Shohab; Shioi, Hirotomo; Kabata, Risako; Domon, Yuki; Kubota, Kazufumi; Kitano, Yutaka; Takayama, Yasunori; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kousaku; Saito, Yoshiaki; Asano, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy has been correlated with various voltage-gated sodium channel mutations in sensory neurons. Recently Nav1.9, a voltage-gated sodium channel subtype, has been established as a genetic influence for certain peripheral pain syndromes. In this study, we performed a genetic study in six unrelated multigenerational Japanese families with episodic pain syndrome. Affected participants (n = 23) were characterized by infantile recurrent pain episodes with spontaneous mitigation around adolescence. This unique phenotype was inherited in an autosomal-dominant mode. Linkage analysis was performed for two families with 12 affected and nine unaffected members, and a single locus was identified on 3p22 (LOD score 4.32). Exome analysis (n = 14) was performed for affected and unaffected members in these two families and an additional family. Two missense variants were identified: R222H and R222S in SCN11A. Next, we generated a knock-in mouse model harboring one of the mutations (R222S). Behavioral tests (Hargreaves test and cold plate test) using R222S and wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice, young (8–9 weeks old; n = 10–12 for each group) and mature (36–38 weeks old; n = 5–6 for each group), showed that R222S mice were significantly (p < 0.05) more hypersensitive to hot and cold stimuli than WT mice. Electrophysiological studies using dorsal root ganglion neurons from 8–9-week-old mice showed no significant difference in resting membrane potential, but input impedance and firing frequency of evoked action potentials were significantly increased in R222S mice compared with WT mice. However, there was no significant difference among Nav1.9 (WT, R222S, and R222H)-overexpressing ND7/23 cell lines. These results suggest that our novel mutation is a gain-of-function mutation that causes infantile familial episodic pain. The mouse model developed here will be useful for drug screening for familial episodic pain syndrome associated with SCN11A mutations

  4. Brain Functional and Anatomical Changes in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Chanda, Mona L.; Parks, Elle L.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Research into the pathophysiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome has primarily focused on markers of peripheral dysfunction. We present the first neuroimaging investigation to our knowledge to characterize brain function and anatomy in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Materials and Methods We collected data from 19 male patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and 16 healthy age and gender matched controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained from 14 patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome as they rated spontaneous pain inside the scanner. Group differences (16 patients per group) in gray matter total volume and regional density were evaluated using voxel-based morphometry, and white matter integrity was studied with diffusion tensor imaging to measure fractional anisotropy. Functional and anatomical imaging outcomes were correlated with the clinical characteristics of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Results Spontaneous pelvic pain was uniquely characterized by functional activation within the right anterior insula, which correlated with clinical pain intensity. No group differences were found in regional gray matter volume, yet density of gray matter in pain relevant regions (anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices) positively correlated with pain intensity and extent of pain chronicity. Moreover the correlation between white matter anisotropy and neo-cortical gray matter volume was disrupted in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Conclusions We provide novel evidence that the pain of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is associated with a chronic pelvic pain syndrome specific pattern of functional brain activation and brain anatomical reorganization. These findings necessitate further investigations into the role of central mechanisms in the initiation and maintenance of chronic prostatitis

  5. Associates of Physical Function and Pain in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Irrgang, James J.; Fritz, Julie M.; Wisniewski, Stephen; McGinty, Gerald T.; Childs, John D.; Domenech, Manuel A.; Jones, Scott; Delitto, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether impairment of muscle strength, soft tissue length, movement control, postural and biomechanic alterations, and psychologic factors are associated with physical function and pain in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Rehabilitation outpatient. Participants Seventy-four patients diagnosed with PFPS. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Measurements were self-reported function and pain; strength of quadriceps, hip abduction, and hip external rotation; length of hamstrings, quadriceps, plantar flexors, iliotibial band/tensor fasciae latae complex, and lateral retinaculum; foot pronation; Q-angle; tibial torsion; visual observation of quality of movement during a lateral step-down task; anxiety; and fear-avoidance beliefs. Results After controlling for age and sex, anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs about work and physical activity were associated with function, while only fear-avoidance beliefs about work and physical activity were associated with pain. Conclusions Psychologic factors were the only associates of function and pain in patients with PFPS. Factors related to physical impairments did not associate to function or pain. Our results should be validated in other samples of patients with PFPS. Further studies should determine the role of other psychologic factors, and how they relate to anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs in these patients. PMID:19236982

  6. Four treatment strategies for complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Jae Won; Choy, Won Sik

    2012-06-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) poses a dilemma for many clinicians due to its unknown etiology and largely unsuccessful treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of 4 treatment modalities for CRPS type 1. A total of 59 patients were divided into 4 groups based on treatment modality: group A, an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10); group B, oral gabapentin (n=12); group C, intravenous (IV) 10% mannitol and steroid (n=11); group D, a combination of IV 20% mannitol and steroid with oral gabapentin (n=26). The patients remained under medical supervision after discharge and were evaluated either once a month or once every 2 months until final follow-up at a mean of 8 months. Patients in group A showed improvement in pain level, finger range of motion, swelling, and grip strength, without statistical significance (P=.076, P=.062, P=.312, and P=.804, respectively). Patients in group B showed significant improvement in pain level (P<.001), and patients in group C showed improvement in pain, finger range of motion, and swelling (P=.127), which rendered functional impairment unchanged. In comparison, patients in group D showed recovery of grip strength and improvement in pain level, finger range of motion, and (P<.001, P=.016, P=.031, and P=.047, respectively). Based on these results, a protocol including a combination of IV 20% mannitol and steroid with oral gabapentin is an acceptable and effective treatment for CRPS type 1. PMID:22691654

  7. Pain and pressure pain thresholds in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Anette; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although pain is a significant symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pain is poorly understood in adolescents with CFS. The aim of this study was to explore pain distribution and prevalence, pain intensity and its functional interference in everyday life, as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in adolescents with CFS and compare this with a control group of healthy adolescents (HC). Methods This is a case–control, cross-sectional study on pain including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 HCs, aged 12–18 years. We measured pain frequency, pain severity and pain interference using self-reporting questionnaires. PPT was measured using pressure algometry. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of the Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial. Results Adolescents with CFS had significantly lower PPTs compared with HCs (p<0.001). The Pain Severity Score and the Pain Interference Score were significantly higher in adolescents with CFS compared with HCs (p<0.001). Almost all adolescents with CFS experienced headache, abdominal pain and/or pain in muscles and joints. Moreover, in all sites, the pain intensity levels were significantly higher than in HCs (p<0.001). Conclusions We found a higher prevalence of severe pain among adolescents with CFS and lowered pain thresholds compared with HCs. The mechanisms, however, are still obscure. Large longitudinal population surveys are warranted measuring pain thresholds prior to the onset of CFS. Trial registration number Clinical Trials, NCT01040429; The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25287104

  8. [Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS)].

    PubMed

    Scheiner, David A; Perucchini, Daniele; Fink, Daniel; Betschart, Cornelia

    2015-08-19

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is still an etiologically poorly understood chronic pain syndrome. BPS is a clinical diagnosis. The current treatment modalities are aimed at symptom relief because no cure is possible. Analgesics may be used at any point in treatment but preferably for short-term relief for flares or bladder pain. AUA has issued clinical practice guidelines with a stepwise approach. The first-line therapy begins with self-care and behavior modification. Physical therapy and oral medications such as amitriptyline, PPS, or antihistamines belong to the second-line therapy. Third-line therapy requires cystoscopy and hydrodistension, treatment of Hunner lesions, or intravesical use of e.g. DMSO. Neuromodulation is considered a fourth-line therapy in patients who have failed third-line treatments. Fifth-line therapies consist of intravesical injection of BoNT or oral cyclosporin A. Cystectomy is the sixth-line therapy and the treatment of last resort. PMID:26286495

  9. Short-Term Effects of Patellar Kinesio Taping on Pain and Hop Function in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Scott R.; Brody, Lori Thein; Rosenthal, Michael; Wise, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most prevalent orthopaedic condition among physically active individuals, contributing to an estimated 30% to 40% of all sports medicine visits. Techniques using Kinesio Tape (KT) have become increasingly popular; however, there has been scant research supporting its use on patients with PFPS. Hypothesis: The use of patellar KT to treat patients with PFPS will provide a statistically significant improvement in short-term pain and single-leg hop measures as compared with sham placement of KT. Study Design: Nonrandomized controlled clinical trial with repeated-measures design. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Forty-nine subjects (41 females, 8 males) between the ages of 12 and 24 years with PFPS participated in this study. Each subject underwent patellar kinesio taping with both experimental and sham applications while completing 4 functional tasks and the single-leg triple jump test (STJT). The treatment outcome was analyzed using separate paired t tests to measure improvement on a numeric pain rating scale. A 2-way, 2 × 2 analysis of variance was used to analyze the relationship between taping condition (experimental vs sham) and side (involved vs uninvolved) for STJT scores. Results: Separate paired t tests found step-up, step-down, and STJT pain improvement statistically significant between taping conditions. The 2-factor analysis of variance yielded a significant main effect for taping condition, but the main effect for side was not significant. The interaction between taping condition and side was significant. This showed there was little change in STJT distance between repeated measures performed on the untaped, noninvolved leg. However, subjects’ STJT distances were significantly greater for the experimental KT application than the sham application for the involved side. Conclusion: Patellar kinesio taping provided an immediate and statistically significant improvement in pain and single-leg hop

  10. Painful Bladder Filling and Painful Urgency Are Distinct Characteristics in Men and Women with Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes – A MAPP Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. Henry; Krieger, John N.; Pontari, Michel A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Hou, Xiaoling; Landis, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe bladder-associated symptoms in patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS) and to correlate these symptoms with urologic, non-urologic, psychosocial, and quality of life measures. Methods Participants were 233 women and 191 men with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome or chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in a multi-center study. They completed a battery of measures, including items asking if their pain worsened with bladder filling (“painful filling”) or if their urge to urinate was due to pain, pressure, or discomfort (“painful urgency”). Participants were categorized into 3 groups: 1) “both” painful filling and painful urgency, 2) “either” painful filling or painful urgency, or 3) “neither.” Results Seventy-five percent of men and 88% of women were categorized as “both” or “either.” These bladder characteristics were associated with more severe urologic symptoms (increased pain, frequency, urgency), higher somatic symptom burden, depression, and worse quality of life (all p<0.01, 3-group trend test). A gradient effect was observed across groups (both > either > neither). Compared to those in the “neither” group, men categorized as “both” or “either” reported more frequent UCPPS symptom flares, catastrophizing, and irritable bowel syndrome, and women categorized as “both” or “either” were more likely to have negative affect and chronic fatigue syndrome. Conclusions Men and women with bladder symptoms characterized as painful filling or painful urgency had more severe urologic symptoms, more generalized symptoms, and worse quality of life than participants who reported neither characteristic, suggesting that these symptom characteristics might represent important subsets of UCPPS patients. PMID:26192257

  11. Patients With Chronic Pelvic Pain: Endometriosis or Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome share similar symptoms. Interstitial cystitis was once considered rare, but it is now recognized as more common than previously thought. This review examines evidence that patients presenting with symptoms typically attributed to endometriosis or with unresolved pelvic pain after treatment for endometriosis may, in fact, have interstitial cystitis, and suggests approaches for appropriate diagnosis. Methods: A MedLine search using “chronic pelvic pain,” “endometriosis,” “interstitial cystitis,” and “bladder origin pain” as key words was performed for the most recent English-language articles. Additional references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each publication. Discussion: The symptoms of endometriosis and inter-stitial cystitis frequently overlap, and these 2 conditions may even coexist in the same patient. In cases of unresolved endometriosis and persistent pelvic pain, patients may have interstitial cystitis. A variety of tools are available to aid in identifying interstitial cystitis. Conclusion: Gynecologists should be alert to the possible presence of interstitial cystitis in patients who present with chronic pelvic pain typical of endometriosis. PMID:17761077

  12. Chinese scalp acupuncture relieves pain and restores function in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hommer, Dean H

    2012-10-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) can result from trauma or after surgery. It is often difficult to manage effectively. If not recognized early, it can result in significant debilitation. Symptoms attributed to CRPS include neuropathic pain, allodynia, sudomotor changes, and decreased range of motion. It can occur with (Type II) or without (Type I) nerve injury. A number of soldiers sustaining extremity injuries during combat have manifested these symptoms. Two subjects were diagnosed with CRPS after sustaining upper extremity injuries during military operations. After failing conservative treatment, Chinese Scalp Acupuncture (CSA) was used once to twice a week for 1 to 4 weeks. CSA resulted in improvement in the pain visual analog scale or numeric rating scale by over 80% in two soldiers with upper extremity CRPS. Additionally, decreased sensory changes and improved function were noted on exam and therapy assessments. Notably, the pain reduction, functional improvement, and normalization of sensation have been fully maintained between treatments. The treatment response had been sustained at 20-month follow-up with no recurrence. CSA provided lasting pain reduction, and improved function and sensation in this group of combatants with upper extremity CRPS. PMID:23113454

  13. Coracoid syndrome: a neglected cause of anterior shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; BARBADORO, PAMELA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the present prospective open-label study was designed to gain further insights into a condition thought to constitute a neglected but not uncommon syndrome characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process, not related to rotator cuff or pectoralis minor tendinopathy, long head of the biceps tendon disorders, or instability. The aim was to clarify its prevalence, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and response to corticosteroid injections. Methods patients with primary anterior shoulder pain precisely reproduced by deep pressure on the apex of the coracoid process were recruited. Patients with clinical or instrumental signs of other shoulder disorders were excluded. Patients were given an injection of triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg/ml 1 ml at the coracoid trigger point. They were evaluated after 15, 30 and 60 days and at 2 years using Equal Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) and the Italian version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Results between January 1 and December 31 2010, we treated 15 patients aged 26–66 years. The majority were women (86.67%). At 15 days, 6 (40%) patients reported complete resolution of their symptoms, while 9 (60%) complained of residual symptoms and received another injection. At 30 days, 14 (93.33%) patients were pain-free and very satisfied. At 2 years, the 14 patients who had been asymptomatic at 30 days reported that they had experienced no further pain or impaired shoulder function. The analysis of variance for repeated measures showed a significant effect of time on EQ-VAS and SST scores. Conclusions the present study documents the existence, and characteristics, of a “coracoid syndrome” characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process and showed that the pain is usually amenable to steroid treatment. This syndrome should be clearly distinguished from anterior shoulder pain due to other causes, in

  14. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern. PMID:24845149

  15. Effect of Therapeutic Modalities on Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lake, David A.; Wofford, Nancy H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common orthopaedic condition for which operative and nonoperative treatments have been used. Therapeutic modalities have been recommended for the treatment of patients with PFPS—including cold, ultrasound, phonophoresis, iontophoresis, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, electrical stimulation for pain control, electromyographic biofeedback, and laser. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of therapeutic modalities for the treatment of patients with PFPS. Data Sources: In May and August 2010, Medline was searched using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science Citation Index, Science Direct, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health, and Your Journals@OVID. Study Selection: Selected studies were randomized controlled trials that used a therapeutic modality to treat patients with PFPS. The review included articles with all outcome measures relevant for the PFPS patient: knee extension and flexion strength (isokinetic and isometric), patellofemoral pain assessment during activities of daily life, functional tests (eg, squats), Kujala patellofemoral score, and electromyographic recording from knee flexors and extensors and quadriceps femoris cross-sectional areas. Data Extraction: Authors conducted independent quality appraisals of studies using the PEDro Scale and a system designed for analysis of studies on interventions for patellofemoral pain. Results: Twelve studies met criteria: 1 on the effects of cold and ultrasound together, ice alone, iontophoresis, and phonophoresis; 3, neuromuscular electrical stimulation; 4, electromyographic biofeedback; 3, electrical stimulation for control of pain; and 1, laser. Discussion: Most studies were of low to moderate quality. Some reported that therapeutic modalities, when combined with other treatments, may be of some benefit for pain management or other symptoms. There was no consistent evidence of any beneficial effect when a therapeutic modality was used alone

  16. Patterns of hyperalgesia in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sieweke, N; Birklein, F; Riedl, B; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1999-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by a triad of sensory, motor and autonomic dysfunctions, with long-standing pain and temperature differences of the affected and contralateral limb as predominant symptoms. The pathogenesis of the disorder still remains unclear. Among the main hypotheses of an underlying pathophysiology we find inflammatory processes and dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Whether the main site of dysfunction is found centrally or peripherally is not known. With psychophysical methods we studied patterns of hyperalgesia to obtain a better understanding of the neuropathic pain component in CRPS. Forty patients in an acute phase of CRPS and a median duration of the disease of 10 weeks, were included in the study. Hyperalgesia to heat was tested with a thermode providing feedback-controlled temperature increases. Two forms of mechanical hyperalgesia were examined: phasic mechanical stimuli by using a custom-made impact stimulator for the determination of individual pain thresholds, tonic mechanical stimuli were applied using a pinch-device. Additionally a 'wind-up' paradigm was used to study a pain phenomenon of presumed central origin: a defined impact stimulus was given once and five times in repetition. A subpopulation of patients was reevaluated for mechanical hyperalgesia after i.v. injection of 500 mg acetyl-salicylic acid. Hyperalgesia to heat was insignificant. We found, however, a marked mechanical hyperalgesia to phasic impact stimuli (P < 0.005), whereas, static stimulation (squeezing skin folds) results were insignificant again. Wind-up related pain was also significantly enhanced in the affected limb (P < 0.02). The anti-inflammatory agent had no effect. These results indicate a non-inflammatory pathogenesis in CRPS presumably central in origin. PMID:10204729

  17. Cervico-thoracic or lumbar sympathectomy for neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Sebastian; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review is an update on ‘Sympathectomy for neuropathic pain’ originally published in Issue 2, 2003. The concept that many neuropathic pain syndromes (traditionally this definition would include complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS)) are “sympathetically maintained pains” has historically led to treatments that interrupt the sympathetic nervous system. Chemical sympathectomies use alcohol or phenol injections to destroy ganglia of the sympathetic chain, while surgical ablation is performed by open removal or electrocoagulation of the sympathetic chain, or minimally invasive procedures using thermal or laser interruption. Objectives To review the evidence from randomised, double blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of chemical and surgical sympathectomy for neuropathic pain. Sympathectomy could be compared with placebo (sham) or other active treatment. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library to May 2010. We screened references in the retrieved articles and literature reviews, and contacted experts in the field of neuropathic pain. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo or active controlled studies assessing the effects of sympathectomy for neuropathic pain and CRPS. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. No pooled analysis of data was possible. Main results Only one study satisfied our inclusion criteria, comparing percutaneous radiofrequency thermal lumbar sympathectomy with lumbar sympathetic neurolysis using phenol in 20 participants with CRPS. There was no comparison of sympathectomy versus sham or placebo. No dichotomous pain outcomes were reported. Average baseline scores of 8-9/10 on several pain scales fell to about 4/10 initially (1 day) and remained at 3-5/10 over four months. There were no significant differences between groups, except for “unpleasant sensation”, which was higher with

  18. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  19. Effects of Neoprene Wrist/Hand Splints on Handwriting for Students with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Single System Design Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Lauren; Wesley, Alison; Wallen, Margaret; Bundy, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pain associated with hypermobility of wrist and hand joints can contribute to decreased handwriting output. This study examined the effectiveness of a neoprene wrist/hand splint in reducing pain and increasing handwriting speed and endurance for students with joint hypermobility syndrome. Methods: Multiple baseline, single system design…

  20. Rethinking Cocaine-Associated Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan B.; Marhefka, Gregary D.

    2011-01-01

    Every year more than 500,000 patients present to the emergency department with cocaine-associated complications, most commonly chest pain. Many of these patients undergo extensive work-up and treatment. Much of the evidence regarding cocaine’s cardiovascular effects, as well as the current management of cocaine-associated chest pain and acute coronary syndromes, is anecdotally derived and based on studies written more than 2 decades ago that involved only a few patients. Newer studies have brought into question many of the commonly held theories and practices regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this common clinical scenario. However, there continues to be a paucity of prospective, randomized trials addressing this topic as it relates to clinical outcomes. We searched PubMed for English-language articles from 1960 to 2011 using the keywords cocaine, chest pain, coronary arteries, myocardial infarction, emergency department, cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram, coronary computed tomography, observation unit, β-blockers, benzodiazepines, nitroglycerin, calcium channel blockers, phentolamine, and cardiomyopathy; including various combinations of these terms. We reviewed the abstracts to confirm relevance, and then full articles were extracted. References from extracted articles were also reviewed for relevant articles. In this review, we critically evaluate the limited historical evidence underlying the current teachings on cocaine’s cardiovascular effects and management of cocaine-associated chest pain. We aim to update the reader on more recent, albeit small, studies on the emergency department evaluation and clinical and pharmacologic management of cocaine-associated chest pain. Finally, we summarize recent guidelines and review an algorithm based on the current best evidence. PMID:22134939

  1. Transient and persistent pain induced connectivity alterations in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  2. Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P. Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  3. [From Morbus Sudeck to complex regional pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Kozlowski, K; Schumacher, T; Goerig, M; Beck, H

    2011-04-01

    Burning pain and autonomic disorders, such as change of skin color, hyperhidrosis, edema and stiffness in joints of extremities were first described in 1864 by Silas W. Mitchell. The German expression "Morbus Sudeck" takes its name from the surgeon Paul Sudeck from Hamburg who described spotty decalcification in x-rays in 1900. In the Anglo-Saxon world, the theory that the sympathetic nervous system was involved in the generation and sustention of these alterations was based on the observations of the French surgeon René Leriche and in 1846 James A. Evans introduced the expression sympathetic reflex dystrophy. As doubts arose that the sympathetic nervous system could not be the sole culprit, the descriptive phrase of complex regional pain syndrome was introduced to substitute for more than 60 synonyms focusing on the fact that the disease develops after minor trauma or nerve lesions and does not correlate with the severity of the trauma. Diagnosing this syndrome is still hampered by the fact that no specific laboratory or radiological marker has yet been identified. Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to therapy seem to be inevitable. Since Sudeck first described the disease, 110 years have passed. The underlying hypothesis and theories as well as the development during this time period are summarized. PMID:21350971

  4. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: electromyography in a frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelli, D. S.; Kuriki, H. U.; Polito, L. F.; Azevedo, F. M.; Negrão Filho, R. F.; Alves, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), has a multifactorial etiology and affects approximately 7 to 15% of the population, mostly women, youth, adults and active persons. PFPS causes anterior or retropatelar pain that is exacerbated during functional motor gestures, such as up and down stairs or spending long periods of time sitting, squatting or kneeling. As the diagnostic evaluation of this syndrome is still indirect, different mechanisms and methodologies try to make a classification that distinguishes patients with PFPS in relation to asymptomatic. Thereby, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of the electromyographic (EMG) signal in the frequency domain of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) in patients with PFPS, during the ascent of stairs. 33 young women (22 control group and 11 PFPS group), were evaluated by EMG during ascent of stairs. The VMO mean power frequency (MPF) and the VL frequency 95% (F95) were lower in symptomatic individuals. This may be related to the difference in muscle recruitment strategy exerted by each muscle in the PFPS group compared to the control group.

  5. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates a 1999 Cochrane review showing that ibuprofen at various doses was effective in postoperative pain in single dose studies designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy. New studies have since been published. Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) analgesics both by prescription and as an over-the-counter medicine. Ibuprofen is used for acute and chronic painful conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to May 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ibuprofen (any formulation) in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Seventy-two studies compared ibuprofen and placebo (9186 participants). Studies were predominantly of high reporting quality, and the bulk of the information concerned ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg. For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo the NNT for ibuprofen 200 mg (2690 participants) was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6475 participants) it was 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6). The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200 mg and 54% with 400 mg. Remedication within 6 hours was less

  6. Movement, Function, Pain, and Postoperative Edema in Axillary Web Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blaes, Anne H.; Haddad, Tuffia C.; Hunter, David W.; Hirsch, Alan T.; Ludewig, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Axillary web syndrome (AWS) is a condition that may develop following breast cancer surgery and that presents as a palpable axillary cord of tissue. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the clinical characteristics of AWS related to movement, function, pain, and postoperative edema and (2) to define the incidence of and risk factors for AWS within the first 3 months following breast cancer surgery. Design This was a prospective cohort study with a repeated-measures design. Methods Women who underwent breast cancer surgery with sentinel node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection (N=36) were assessed for AWS, shoulder range of motion, function, pain, and postoperative edema (using girth measurements, bioimpedance, and tissue dielectric constant) at 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Demographic characteristics were used for risk analysis. Results Seventeen women (47.2%) developed AWS, and AWS persisted in 10 participants (27.8%) at 12 weeks. Abduction range of motion was significantly lower in the AWS group compared with the non-AWS group at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no differences between groups in measurements of function, pain, or edema at any time point. Trunk edema measured by dielectric constant was present in both groups, with an incidence of 55%. Multivariate analysis determined lower body mass index as being significantly associated with AWS (odds ratio=0.86; 95% confidence interval=0.74, 1.00). Limitations Limitations included a short follow-up time and a small sample size. Conclusion Axillary web syndrome is prevalent following breast/axilla surgery for early-stage breast cancer and may persist beyond 12 weeks. The early consequences include movement restriction, but the long-term effects of persistent AWS cords are yet unknown. Low body mass index is considered a risk factor for AWS. PMID:25977305

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome-significant progress in understanding.

    PubMed

    Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    Research into complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has made significant progress. First, there was the implementation of the official IASP "Budapest" diagnostic criteria. It would be desirable to also define exclusion and outcome criteria that should be reported in studies. The next step was to recognize the complex pathophysiology. After trauma, some inflammation is physiological; in acute CRPS, this inflammation persists for months. There is an abundance of inflammatory and a lack of anti-inflammatory mediators. This proinflammatory network (cytokines and probably also other mediators) sensitizes the peripheral and spinal nociceptive system, it facilitates the release of neuropeptides from nociceptors inducing the visible signs of inflammation, and it stimulates bone cell or fibroblast proliferation, and endothelial dysfunction leading to vascular changes. Trauma may also expose nervous system structures to the immune system and triggers autoantibodies binding to adreno- and acetylcholine receptors. In an individual time frame, the pain in this inflammatory phase pushes the transition into "centralized" CRPS, which is dominated by neuronal plasticity and reorganization. Sensory-motor integration becomes disturbed, leading to a loss of motor function; the body representation is distorted leading to numbness and autonomic disturbances. In an attempt to avoid pain, patients neglect their limb and learn maladaptive nonuse. The final step will be to assess large cohorts and to analyze these data together with data from public resources using a bioinformatics approach. We could then develop diagnostic toolboxes for individual pathophysiology and select focused treatments or develop new ones. PMID:25789441

  8. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines. PMID:20356382

  9. Static Balance in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Citaker, Seyit; Kaya, Defne; Yuksel, Inci; Yosmaoglu, Baran; Nyland, John; Atay, Ozgur Ahmet; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2011-01-01

    Background: The relationship between one-leg static standing balance (OLSSB) and patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is unknown. Hypothesis: OLSSB decreases in patients with PFPS. Design: Prospective case series. Methods: Fifty-two women with unilateral PFPS were enrolled in this study. OLSSB was evaluated with a stabilometer. Q angle was measured with a lengthened-arm universal goniometer. Lower extremity alignment was analyzed with full-length standing anteroposterior teleroentgenograms. Quadriceps and hamstring strength was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results: There were significant differences in OLSSB, Q angle, and strength of quadriceps and hamstring between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides. There was a correlation between the strength of the quadriceps and hamstring and OLSSB, while there was no correlation between OLSSB and the severity of pain, lower extremity alignment, and Q angle on the symptomatic side. Conclusions: OLSSB and quadriceps and hamstring strength decreased and Q angle increased on the symptomatic side in PFPS patients. A relationship between OLSSB and pain, Q angle, and lower extremity alignment was not detected, while there was a correlation between the strength of the quadriceps and hamstring and OLSSB. Clinical Relevance: A quadriceps and hamstring strengthening may be beneficial to improve OLSSB in patients with PFPS. PMID:23016053

  10. Complex regional pain syndrome: observations on diagnosis, treatment and definition of a new subgroup.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, A; Puchalski, P

    2013-07-01

    Several definitions and sets of diagnostic criteria of complex regional pain syndrome have been proposed, but to date none has been accepted completely. This article presents a specific subtype of the disease, called 'chronic, refractory complex regional pain syndrome' which is extremely severe, disabling and resistant to treatment. It also emphasizes difficulties with diagnosing complex regional pain syndrome because of its variable clinical presentation and diagnostic criteria being insufficiently precise. The necessity to distinguish between criteria for clinical use and for scientific purposes is suggested with a proposal of practical guideline for diagnosing acute complex regional pain syndrome. A review of treatments for complex regional pain syndrome is presented, with opinion on their effectiveness: good in an early stage, less well in chronic and generally poor in the chronic, refractory subtype. PMID:23221182

  11. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 in a pediatric patient: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Bükülmez, Ayşegül; Solak, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 is one of the causes of morbidity of childhood which is also named reflex symphathetic dystrophia. The syndrome is characterized with regional pain and vasomotor, sudomotor and sensory changes in the distal parts of the extremities involved. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 shows difference in children in terms of clinical picture and imaging methods compared to adults. The most important point is that the prognosis is generally better in children if early diagnosis and treatment is provided. On the other hand, causes including presence of psychological factors or less contribution of imaging methods in children lead to delayed diagnosis or erroneous diagnosis. In this article, a 10 year-old male patient who was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 was described. Thus, we aimed to remind clinicians that this syndrome should also be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pain in children. PMID:26078637

  12. Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martín, Pablo; Gallego-Izquierdo, T; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome with physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] A computer-based review conducted of four databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PEDro, and the University Library) was completed based on the inclusion criteria of patellofemoral pain syndrome patients treated with physical exercise methods and examination with self-reported pain and/or functional questionnaires. [Results] The findings of ten clinical trials of moderate to high quality were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of physical exercise as conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Conclusion] The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles. PMID:26311988

  13. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul HH

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers–Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3). PMID:26316810

  14. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3). PMID:26316810

  15. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain secondary to median arcuate ligament syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Ivy N; Harr, Jeffrey N; Brody, Fred

    2016-07-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain is a common entity in young athletes. An uncommon aetiology of this type of pain is median arcuate ligament syndrome. This article details an 18-year-old field hockey player who presented with a 1-year history of exercise-related transient abdominal pain. Despite a trial of preventative strategies, the patient's pain persisted, prompting surgical intervention. Following a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release, the patient's symptoms resolved. Therefore, when exercise-related transient abdominal pain persists despite precautionary measures, median arcuate ligament syndrome should be considered. PMID:26542078

  16. Maxillary sinusitis as a differential diagnosis in temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1985-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may be diagnosed incorrectly as TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome because of a similarity of signs and symptoms. Both conditions can manifest with headache, facial pain radiating to the ear and the maxillary teeth, preauricular pain, and pain in the buccal vestibule posterior and superior to the maxillary tuberosity. It can be concluded that (1) more consideration should be given to sinus disturbances as a differential diagnosis in TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome, (2) it may be preferable to refer some patients with TMJ pain to a medical center where specialists in dentistry, otolaryngology, neurology, rheumatology, and psychiatry can evaluate the patient, and (3) TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome should be evaluated and treated by a dentist experienced in management of this disorder. PMID:3856028

  17. A new syndrome with overlapping features of Townes-brocks syndrome and single median maxillary central incisor syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Thirunavukkarasu Arun; Chandrasekaran, Venkatesh; Balachandran, Sathish

    2012-01-01

    A 14-month-old boy with overlapping features of Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) and single median maxillary incisor syndrome (SMMCIS) is being reported with brief review of the above syndromes and possible differential diagnosis. PMID:23716951

  18. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of “subacromial impingement syndrome” of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as “impingement” of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. “Subacromial pain syndrome”, SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears. PMID:24847788

  19. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are both associated with recurrent abdominal pain and are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Based on the biopsychosocial model of functional disease, the Rome III criteria have helped frame FAP and IBS in terms of being a positive diagnosis and not a diagnosis of exclusion. However, the lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of pathologic mechanisms likely involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article discusses the epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, clinical approach and therapeutic options for the management of FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:21731470

  20. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, EungDon; Roh, MiSun; Kim, SooHyang; Jo, DaeHyun

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS). In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB) has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation.

  1. Single dose oral piroxicam for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne; Loke, Yoon; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2000. Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with analgesic properties, and is used mainly for treating rheumatic disorders. Some drugs have been directly compared against each other within a trial setting to determine their relative efficacies, whereas other have not. It is possible, however, to compare analgesics indirectly by examining the effectiveness of each drug against placebo when used in similar clinical situations. Objectives To determine the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose piroxicam compared with placebo in moderate to severe postoperative pain. To compare the effects of piroxicam with other analgesics. Search methods Published studies were identified from systematic searching of MEDLINE, Biological Abstracts, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Oxford Pain Relief Database in December 2007. Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. Selection criteria The following inclusion criteria were used: full journal publication, randomised placebo controlled trial, double-blind design, adult participants, postoperative pain of moderate to severe intensity at the baseline assessment, postoperative administration of oral or intramuscular piroxicam. Data collection and analysis Summed pain intensity and pain relief data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to yield the number of participants obtaining at least 50% pain relief. This was used to calculate estimates of relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) for one participant to obtain at least 50% pain relief. Information was collected on adverse effects and estimates of relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-harm (NNH) were calculated. Main results In this update no further studies were found. The original search identified three studies (141 participants) which compared oral piroxicam 20 mg with placebo and

  2. Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Jia-Ren; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 μs, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA.

  3. Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jia-Ren Chang; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 μs, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA. PMID:22047323

  4. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: Different from the Adult Chronic Pain Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; King, Christopher; Ting, Tracy V; Arnold, Lesley M

    2016-04-01

    While a majority of research has focused on adult fibromyalgia (FM), recent evidence has provided insights into the presence and impact of FM in children and adolescents. Commonly referred as juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), youths, particularly adolescent girls, present with persistent widespread pain and cardinal symptoms observed in adult FM. A majority of youth with JFM continue to experience symptoms into adulthood, which highlights the importance of early recognition and intervention. Some differences are observed between adult and juvenile-onset FM syndrome with regard to comorbidities (e.g., joint hypermobility is common in JFM). Psychological comorbidities are common but less severe in JFM. Compared to adult FM, approved pharmacological treatments for JFM are lacking, but non-pharmacologic approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and exercise) show promise. A number of conceptual issues still remain including (1) directly comparing similarities and differences in symptoms and (2) identifying shared and unique mechanisms underlying FM in adults and youths. PMID:26984803

  5. An overview of the management of post-vasectomy pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Phin; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    Post-vasectomy pain syndrome remains one of the more challenging urological problems to manage. This can be a frustrating process for both the patient and clinician as there is no well-recognized diagnostic regimen or reliable effective treatment. Many of these patients will end up seeing physicians across many disciplines, further frustrating them. The etiology of post-vasectomy pain syndrome is not clearly delineated. Postulations include damage to the scrotal and spermatic cord nerve structures via inflammatory effects of the immune system, back pressure effects in the obstructed vas and epididymis, vascular stasis, nerve impingement, or perineural fibrosis. Post-vasectomy pain syndrome is defined as at least 3 months of chronic or intermittent scrotal content pain. This article reviews the current understanding of post-vasectomy pain syndrome, theories behind its pathophysiology, evaluation pathways, and treatment options. PMID:26952956

  6. How can we strengthen the quadriceps femoris in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Callaghan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose: the aim of this article was to review the clinical approach of quadriceps strengthening programmes. Methods: a literature search was carried out from 1980 up to September 2011. Eligible studies were those that: (1) evaluated the patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (not healthy or asymptomatic subjects) (2) examined the effect of kinetic chain exercises (3) examined the effect of weight-bearing exercises (4) compared the effect of the combined exercises programme in the treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Results and conclusion: patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome may tolerate a closed kinetic chain exercises programme better than open kinetic chain. Weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing quadriceps exercises can significantly improve subjective and clinical outcomes in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Combining treatments as an initial approach to treating patellofemoral pain but developing individualized more functional, global treatments are essential. PMID:23738270

  7. An overview of the management of post-vasectomy pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Phin; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    Post-vasectomy pain syndrome remains one of the more challenging urological problems to manage. This can be a frustrating process for both the patient and clinician as there is no well-recognized diagnostic regimen or reliable effective treatment. Many of these patients will end up seeing physicians across many disciplines, further frustrating them. The etiology of post-vasectomy pain syndrome is not clearly delineated. Postulations include damage to the scrotal and spermatic cord nerve structures via inflammatory effects of the immune system, back pressure effects in the obstructed vas and epididymis, vascular stasis, nerve impingement, or perineural fibrosis. Post-vasectomy pain syndrome is defined as at least 3 months of chronic or intermittent scrotal content pain. This article reviews the current understanding of post-vasectomy pain syndrome, theories behind its pathophysiology, evaluation pathways, and treatment options. PMID:26952956

  8. Activation of cutaneous immune responses in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Birklein, Frank; Drummond, Peter D.; Li, Wenwu; Schlereth, Tanja; Albrecht, Nahid; Finch, Philip M.; Dawson, Linda F.; Clark, J. David; Kingery, Wade S.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is unresolved, but TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated in experimental skin blister fluid from CRPS affected limbs, as is tryptase, a marker for mast cells. In the rat fracture model of CRPS exaggerated sensory and sympathetic neural signaling stimulate keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation, causing the local production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines leading to pain behavior. The current investigation used CRPS patient skin biopsies to determine whether keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation occur in CRPS skin and to identify the cellular source of the up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6, and tryptase observed in CRPS experimental skin blister fluid. Skin biopsies were collected from the affected skin and the contralateral mirror site in 55 CRPS patients and the biopsy sections were immunostained for keratinocyte, cell proliferation, mast cell markers, TNF-α, and IL-6. In early CRPS keratinocytes were activated in the affected skin, resulting in proliferation, epidermal thickening, and up-regulated TNF-α and IL-6 expression. In chronic CRPS there was reduced keratinocyte proliferation with epidermal thinning in the affected skin. Acute CRPS patients also had increased mast cell accumulation in the affected skin, but there was no increase in mast cell numbers in chronic CRPS. PMID:24462502

  9. Single dose oral diclofenac for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Philip; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), available as a potassium salt (immediate-release) or sodium salt (delayed-release). This review updates an earlier review published in The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Issue 2, 2004) on ‘Single dose oral diclofenac for postoperative pain’. Objectives To assess single dose oral diclofenac for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biological Abstracts, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, and reference lists of articles were searched; last search December 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of single dose, oral diclofenac (sodium or potassium) for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and quality, and extracted data. The area under the pain relief versus time curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations. Relative benefit (risk) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) were calculated. Information on adverse events, time to remedication, and participants needing additional analgesia was also collected. Main results Fifteen studies (eight additional studies) with 1512 participants more than doubled the information available at each dose. Overall 50% to 60% of participants experienced at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours at any dose with diclofenac, compared to 10 to 20% with placebo, giving NNTs of about 2.5 for doses of 25 mg to 100 mg (similar to earlier review); no dose response was demonstrated. At 50 mg and 100 mg, NNTs for diclofenac potassium (2.1 (1.8 to 2.4) and 1.9 (1.7 to 2.2)) were significantly lower (better) than for diclofenac sodium (6.7 (4.2 to 17) and 4.5 (3.2 to 7.7)). The median time to use of rescue medication was 2 hours for placebo, 4.3 hours for diclofenac 50 mg and 4.9 hours

  10. Physical Activity and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wu, Kana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a prevalent urologic disorder among men, but its etiology is still poorly understood. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of CP/CPPS in a large cohort of male health professionals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed from 1986 to 2008. The study population included 20,918 men who completed all CP/CPPS questions on the 2008 questionnaire. Leisure-time physical activity, including type and intensity of activity, was measured by questionnaire in 1986. A National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain score was calculated based on the responses on the 2008 questionnaire. Participants with pain scores ≥ 8 were considered CP/CPPS cases (n=689). Results Higher leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risk of CP/CPPS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing >35.0 to ≤3.5 MET-h/wk of physical activity was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56, 0.92, p for trend <0.001). Observed inverse associations between physical activity and CP/CPPS were similar for both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Sedentary behavior, measured as time spent watching television, was not associated with risk of CP/CPPS (p for trend 0.64). Conclusions Findings from this study, the first large scale and most comprehensive study to date on this association, suggest that higher levels of leisure-time physical activity may lower risk of CP/CPPS in middle-aged and older men. PMID:25116086

  11. Tarsal tunnel syndrome masked by painful diabetic polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ormeci, Tugrul; Mahirogulları, Mahir; Aysal, Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Various causes influence the etiology of tarsal tunnel syndrome including systemic diseases with progressive neuropathy, such as diabetes. Presentation of case We describe a 52-year-old male patient with complaints of numbness, burning sensation and pain in both feet. The laboratory results showed that the patient had uncontrolled diabetes, and the EMG showed distal symmetrical sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve entrapment at the right. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the cyst in relation to medial plantar nerve, and edema- moderate atrophy were observed at the distal muscles of the foot. Discussion Foot neuropathy in diabetic patients is a complex process. So, in planning the initial treatment, medical or surgical therapy is selected based on the location and type of the pathology. Foot deformities can be corrected with resting, anti-inflammatory treatment, appropriate shoes, orthesis and socks, and if required, ankle stabilization can be attempted. If the patient is still unresponsive, surgical treatment may be applied. Conclusion It is essential to investigate more localized reasons like tarsal tunnel syndrome that may mimic diabetic neuropathy, should be treated primarily. PMID:26333036

  12. Connective tissue, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s), and head and cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a growing group of hereditary disorders of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and vascular and internal organ fragility. In contrast with other well known heritable connective tissue disorders with severe cardiovascular involvement (e.g., Marfan syndrome), most EDS patients share a nearly normal life span, but are severely limited by disabling features, such as pain, fatigue and headache. In this work, pertinent literature is reviewed with focus on prevalence, features and possible pathogenic mechanisms of headache in EDSs. Gathered data are fragmented and generally have a low level of evidence. Headache is reported in no less than 1/3 of the patients. Migraine results the most common type in the hypermobility type of EDS. Other possibly related headache disorders include tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, headache attributed to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage, headache secondary to Chiari malformation, cervicogenic headache and neck-tongue syndrome, whose association still lacks of reliable prevalence studies. The underlying pathogenesis seems complex and variably associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia, cervical spine and temporomandibular joint instability/dysfunction, meningeal fragility, poor sleep quality, pain-killer drugs overuse and central sensitization. Particular attention is posed on a presumed subclinical cervical spine dysfunction. Standard treatment is always symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. Assessment and management procedures are discussed in order to put some basis for ameliorating the actual patients' needs and nurturing future research. PMID:25655119

  13. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  14. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: From Clinical Findings to Basic Understandings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is one of the less common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Conventional therapy has unsatisfactory response to it so people turn to Chinese medicine for help. Currently, we reviewed the whole picture of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) clinical and basic application in the treatment of FAPS, especially the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, the single herb, and Chinese medicine formulae, thus to provide a solid base to further develop evidence-based study for this common gastrointestinal complaint in the future. We developed the search strategy and set the inclusion and exclusion criteria for article search. From the included articles, we totally retrieved 586 records according to our searching criteria, of which 16 were duplicate records and 291 were excluded for reasons of irrelevance. The full text of 279 articles was retrieved for detailed assessment, of which 123 were excluded for various reasons. The number one used single herb is Radix Ginseng. The most common syndrome was liver qi depression. The most frequently used classic formula was Si-Mo-Tang. This reflected the true situation of clinical practice of Chinese medicine practitioners and could be further systematically synthesized as key points of the therapeutic research for FAPS. PMID:27366194

  15. 'Spousal Revenge Syndrome'- description of a new chronic pelvic pain syndrome patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Makovey, Iryna; Dolinga, Robert; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    Psychological factors may play a role in the pathophysiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). This case series describes a cohort of 10 men presenting with CP/CPPS whose symptoms began after an extramarital sexual encounter, who strongly believed they had a sexually transmitted infection (STI) despite negative testing, and who have had no improvement with empiric antibiotic treatment. Patients' clinical presentation and physical exam findings are reviewed. All men were clinically phenotyped with the UPOINT system. Pelvic floor spasm and not infection was prominent in these men. Treatment recommendations are proposed and compliance assessed. PMID:26892062

  16. Pain experience and expression in Rett syndrome: Subjective and objective measurement approaches

    PubMed Central

    Barney, Chantel C.; Feyma, Timothy; Beisang, Arthur; Symons, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is associated with myriad debilitating health issues and significant motor and communicative impairments. Because of the former there is concern about the possibility of recurrent and chronic pain but because of the latter it remains difficult to determine what pain ‘looks like’ in RTT. This study investigated pain experience and expression using multiple complementary subjective and objective approaches among a clinical RTT sample. Following informed consent, 18 participants (all female) with RTT (mean age= 12.8 years, SD= 6.32) were characterized in terms of pain experience and interference, typical pain expression, and elicited pain behavior during a passive range of motion-like examination procedure. Parents completed the Dalhousie Pain Interview (DPI; pain type, frequency, duration, intensity), the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI; pain interference), and the Non-Communicating Children’s Pain Checklist – Revised (NCCPC-R; typical pain expression). A Pain Examination Procedure (PEP) was conducted and scored using the Pain and Discomfort Scale (PADS). The majority of the sample (89%) were reported to experience pain in the previous week which presented as gastrointestinal (n=8), musculoskeletal (n=5), and seizure related pain (n=5) that was intense (scored 0–10; M= 5.67, SD= 3.09) and long in duration (M= 25.22 hours, SD= 53.52). Numerous pain-expressive behaviors were inventoried (e.g., vocal, facial, mood/interaction changes) when parents reported their child’s typical pain behaviors and based on independent direct observation during a reliably coded pain exam. This study provides subjective and objective evidence that individuals with RTT experience recurring and chronic pain for which pain expression appears intact. PMID:26425056

  17. Single dose oral lumiracoxib for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Yvonne M; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumiracoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor. COX-2 inhibitors were developed to avoid COX-1-related gastrointestinal (GI) problems while maintaining the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of traditional non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Objectives To review the analgesic efficacy, duration of analgesia, and adverse effects of a single oral dose of lumiracoxib for moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE to February 2010. Selection criteria Single oral dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of lumiracoxib for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and the data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR 6) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. These derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, the relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Numbers of participants using rescue medication, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results In this updated review four studies met the inclusion criteria. In total 366 participants were treated with lumiracoxib 400 mg, 51 with lumiracoxib 100 mg, and 212 with placebo. Active comparators were naproxen 500 mg, rofecoxib 50 mg, celecoxib 200 mg, celecoxib 400 mg, and ibuprofen 400 mg. With lumiracoxib 400 mg 50% of participants had at least 50% pain relief over six hours, compared with 8% given placebo; RB 6.9 (95% CI 4.1 to 12), NNT 2.4 (2.1 to 2.8). Median time to onset of analgesia was shorter for lumiracoxib 400 mg (0.6 to 1.5 hours) than

  18. Novel Treatment of Chronic Bladder Pain Syndrome and Other Pelvic Pain Disorders by OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is defined as pain in the pelvic organs and related structures of at least 6 months’ duration. The pathophysiology of CPP is uncertain, and its treatment presents challenges. Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), known for its antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant activity, has been used recently to treat refractory CPP with promising results. In patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, most studies suggest intravesical BoNT-A injection reduces bladder pain and increases bladder capacity. Repeated BoNT-A injection is also effective and reduces inflammation in the bladder. Intraprostatic BoNT-A injection could significantly improve prostate pain and urinary frequency in the patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Animal studies also suggest BoNT-A injection in the prostate decreases inflammation in the prostate. Patients with CPP due to pelvic muscle pain and spasm also benefit from localized BoNT-A injections. BoNT-A injection in the pelvic floor muscle improves dyspareunia and decreases pelvic floor pressure. Preliminary studies show intravesical BoNT-A injection is useful in inflammatory bladder diseases such as chemical cystitis, radiation cystitis, and ketamine related cystitis. Dysuria is the most common adverse effect after BoNT-A injection. Very few patients develop acute urinary retention after treatment. PMID:26094697

  19. Management of patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Gatti, D; Rossini, M; Adami, S

    2016-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) includes different conditions characterized by regional pain and sensory, motor, sudomotor, vasomotor, and/or trophic findings, affecting a peripheral limb usually after a noxious event, such as a trauma or surgery. The pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Limited data are available on the incidence of CRPS-I, and the disease is underestimated and under-diagnosed. The disease shows a female preponderance approximately 3:1 with a peak age of incidence around the 5th and 6th decade. The available diagnostic criteria for CRPS-I rely on clinical criteria that are unfortunately focused on the signs and symptoms of the chronic and late disease, while little emphasis is given to the typical imaging (X-rays, bone scintigraphy, MRI) findings of the early phase. Over the last decades, several therapies have been proposed but the few studies available are often too small to be conclusive and rarely evolved to randomized controlled trials (RCTs). On the basis of the results of a few RCTs, only short courses of high bisphosphonate doses appear to provide substantial benefits. The best results are seen in patients in the early phase of the disease, often with the persistent remission or complete healing of the conditions. Since the only accredited mechanism of action of bisphosphonates is the suppression of osteoclastic bone resorption, it is likely the initial dramatic bone loss plays a role in the maintenance and evolution of CRPS-I. Short courses of high doses of bisphosphonates should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with CRPS-I. PMID:26928187

  20. Early intervention for adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-reported knee pain is highly prevalent among adolescents. As much as 50% of the non-specific knee pain may be attributed to Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS). In the short term, exercise therapy appears to have a better effect than patient education consisting of written information and general advice on exercise or compared with placebo treatment. But the long-term effect of exercise therapy compared with patient education is conflicting. The purpose of this study is to examine the short- and long-term effectiveness of patient education compared with patient education and multimodal physiotherapy applied at a very early stage of the condition among adolescents. Methods/Design This study is a single blind pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial. Four upper secondary schools have been invited to participate in the study (approximately 2500 students, aged 15-19 years). Students are asked to answer an online questionnaire regarding musculoskeletal pain. The students who report knee pain are contacted by telephone and offered a clinical examination by a rheumatologist. Subjects who fit the inclusion criteria and are diagnosed with PFPS are invited to participate in the study. A minimum of 102 students with PFPS are then cluster-randomised into two intervention groups based on which school they attend. Both intervention groups receive written information and education. In addition to patient education, one group receives multimodal physiotherapy consisting primarily of neuromuscular training of the muscles around the foot, knee and hip and home exercises. The students with PFPS fill out self-reported questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after inclusion in the study. The primary outcome measure is perception of recovery measured on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from "completely recovered" to "worse than ever" at 12 months. Discussion This study is designed to investigate the effectiveness of patient education compared with patient

  1. Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Laurence; McQuay, Henry J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2004 - this original review had been split from a previous title on ‘Single dose paracetamol (acetaminophen) with and without codeine for postoperative pain’. The last version of this review concluded that paracetamol is an effective analgesic for postoperative pain, but additional trials have since been published. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol using current data, and to compare the findings with other analgesics evaluated in the same way. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral paracetamol for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database and reference lists of articles to update an existing version of the review in July 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of paracetamol for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with paracetamol or placebo experiencing at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, using validated equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) was calculated, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use, were sought as measures of duration of analgesia. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Fifty-one studies, with 5762 participants, were included: 3277 participants were treated with a single oral dose of paracetamol and 2425 with placebo. About half of participants treated with paracetamol at standard doses achieved at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, compared with about 20% treated with placebo. NNTs for at

  2. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention. PMID:24378860

  3. A possible role of the locus coeruleus in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Heightened sensitivity to painful stimulation commonly spreads from the affected limb to the ipsilateral forehead in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, acoustic startle evokes greater auditory discomfort and increases in limb pain when presented on the affected than unaffected side. In contrast, limb pain ordinarily evokes analgesia in the ipsilateral forehead of healthy participants, and acoustic startle suppresses limb pain. Together, these findings suggest that hemilateral and generalized pain control mechanisms are disrupted in CRPS, and that multisensory integrative processes are compromised. Failure to inhibit nociceptive input from the CRPS-affected limb could sensitize spinal and supraspinal neurons that receive convergent nociceptive and auditory information from hemilateral body sites. Somatosensory, auditory, and emotional inputs may then aggravate pain by feeding into this sensitized nociceptive network. In particular, a disturbance in hemilateral pain processing that involves the locus coeruleus could exacerbate the symptoms of CRPS in some patients. PMID:23162445

  4. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  5. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. PMID:25796467

  6. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  7. Nociceptive transmission and modulation via P2X receptors in central pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yung-Hui; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Painful sensations are some of the most frequent complaints of patients who are admitted to local medical clinics. Persistent pain varies according to its causes, often resulting from local tissue damage or inflammation. Central somatosensory pathway lesions that are not adequately relieved can consequently cause central pain syndrome or central neuropathic pain. Research on the molecular mechanisms that underlie this pathogenesis is important for treating such pain. To date, evidence suggests the involvement of ion channels, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated cation channel P2X receptors, in central nervous system pain transmission and persistent modulation upon and following the occurrence of neuropathic pain. Several P2X receptor subtypes, including P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, have been shown to play diverse roles in the pathogenesis of central pain including the mediation of fast transmission in the peripheral nervous system and modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. This review article highlights the role of the P2X family of ATP receptors in the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain and pain transmission. We discuss basic research that may be translated to clinical application, suggesting that P2X receptors may be treatment targets for central pain syndrome. PMID:27230068

  8. Hypersensitivity and pain induced by operative procedures and the "cracked tooth" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S; Boston, D

    1997-01-01

    Various dental conditions are responsible for tooth hypersensitivity and pain. They include hypersensitive dentin; the "cracked tooth" syndrome; pulp and periapical irritation, inflammation and/or degeneration; barodontalgia (aerodontalgia); and periodontal pathoses, particularly the pulpal-periodontal syndrome. Each operative condition is reviewed with respect to its etiology, symptomatology, and diagnosis. Some treatment recommendations are made to prevent or reduce symptoms. PMID:9515403

  9. Chronic pain in Noonan Syndrome: A previously unreported but common symptom.

    PubMed

    Vegunta, Sravanthi; Cotugno, Richard; Williamson, Amber; Grebe, Theresa A

    2015-12-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a multiple malformation syndrome characterized by pulmonic stenosis, cardiomyopathy, short stature, lymphatic dysplasia, craniofacial anomalies, cryptorchidism, clotting disorders, and learning disabilities. Eight genes in the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway are implicated in NS. Chronic pain is an uncommon feature. To investigate the prevalence of pain in NS, we distributed a two-part questionnaire about pain among NS individuals at the Third International Meeting on Genetic Syndromes of the Ras/MAPK Pathway. The first part of the questionnaire queried demographic information among all NS participants. The second part was completed by individuals with chronic pain. Questions included musculoskeletal problems and clinical features of pain. Forty-five questionnaires were analyzed; 53% of subjects were female. Mean age was 17 (2-48) years; 47% had a PTPN11 mutation. Sixty-two percent (28/45) of individuals with NS experienced chronic pain. There was a significant relationship between prevalence of pain and residing in a cold climate (P = 0.004). Pain occurred commonly in extremities/joints and head/trunk, but more commonly in extremities/joints (P = 0.066). Subjects with hypermobile joints were more likely to have pain (P = 0.052). Human growth hormone treatment was not statistically significant among subjects without chronic pain (P = 0.607). We conclude that pain is a frequent and under-recognized clinical feature of NS. Chronic pain may be associated with joint hypermobility and aggravated by colder climate. Our study is a preliminary investigation that should raise awareness about pain as a common symptom in children and adults with NS. PMID:26297936

  10. Nursing Care of Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Dulski, Laura A; Martin, Patricia B; Blobaum, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is a chronic condition affecting approximately 3.3 million women in the United States. It is defined by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases as "urinary pain that can't be attributed to other causes such as infection or urinary stones." Because of the intimate nature of the symptoms, women are often reluctant to seek treatment. When they do, they require a care provider with specialized nursing skills. Nursing practice based on carefully reviewed literature will result in the provision of comprehensive and compassionate nursing care for women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. PMID:27067933

  11. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  12. Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Wiffen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-five Cochrane Reviews of randomised trials testing the analgesic efficacy of individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain have been published. This overview brings together the results of all those reviews and assesses the reliability of available data. Objectives To summarise data from all Cochrane Reviews that have assessed the effects of pharmaceutical interventions for acute pain in adults with at least moderate pain following surgery, who have been given a single dose of oral analgesic taken alone. Methods We identified systematic reviews in The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single Review Group, had a standard title, and had as their primary outcome numbers of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. For individual reviews we extracted the number needed to treat (NNT) for this outcome for each drug/dose combination, and also the percentage of participants achieving at least 50% maximum pain relief, the mean of mean or median time to remedication, the percentage of participants remedicating by 6, 8, 12, or 24 hours, and results for participants experiencing at least one adverse event. Main results The overview included 35 separate Cochrane Reviews with 38 analyses of single dose oral analgesics tested in acute postoperative pain models, with results from about 45,000 participants studied in approximately 350 individual studies. The individual reviews included only high-quality trials of standardised design and outcome reporting. The reviews used standardised methods and reporting for both efficacy and harm. Event rates with placebo were consistent in larger data sets. No statistical comparison was undertaken. There were reviews but no trial data were available for acemetacin, meloxicam, nabumetone, nefopam, sulindac, tenoxicam, and tiaprofenic acid. Inadequate amounts of data were available for dexibuprofen, dextropropoxyphene 130

  13. Painful Bladder Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation in a Case of Upper Tract Fungus Balls.

    PubMed

    Bajic, Petar; Wetterlin, Jessica; Bresler, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract fungus balls are a rare pathologic entity which may be asymptomatic or have variable presentations. To date, there have been no documented cases of fungus balls presenting as painful bladder syndrome. Painful bladder syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which may include pelvic pain, urgency and frequency not explained by other causes. Here, we present the first case of these two entities concurrently. Our patient had a longstanding history of diabetes, nephrolithiasis and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with symptoms of painful bladder syndrome and work-up revealed filling defects within the renal collecting system concerning for malignancy. Subsequent ureteroscopy revealed dense white debris consistent with candida fungus balls. Following clearance of the debris and antifungal therapy, our patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27390583

  14. Painful Bladder Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation in a Case of Upper Tract Fungus Balls

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Petar; Wetterlin, Jessica; Bresler, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract fungus balls are a rare pathologic entity which may be asymptomatic or have variable presentations. To date, there have been no documented cases of fungus balls presenting as painful bladder syndrome. Painful bladder syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which may include pelvic pain, urgency and frequency not explained by other causes. Here, we present the first case of these two entities concurrently. Our patient had a longstanding history of diabetes, nephrolithiasis and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with symptoms of painful bladder syndrome and work-up revealed filling defects within the renal collecting system concerning for malignancy. Subsequent ureteroscopy revealed dense white debris consistent with candida fungus balls. Following clearance of the debris and antifungal therapy, our patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27390583

  15. Management of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. Symptom-based Rome III criteria for FAP and IBS have been validated and help the clinician in making a positive diagnosis. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Over the years, a wide range of therapies have been proposed and studied. The lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors probably involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS, and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article reviews the current literature on the efficacy of pharmacologic, dietary and psychosocial interventions for FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:20528117

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome – type I: What’s in a name?

    PubMed Central

    Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Within a two year period in the 1940’s, two Boston physicians published dramatically opposing views on the underlying nature of a syndrome now known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Evans suggested, in several papers in 1946–1947, that sympathetic reflexes maintain pain and dystrophy in affected limbs. Foisie, in 1947, suggested arterial vasospasms were key in the etiology of this pain syndrome. Evans’ hypothesis established the nomenclature for this syndrome for 60 years, and his term “reflex sympathetic dystrophy” guided clinical treatment and research activities over the same period. Foisie’s proposed nomenclature was unrecognized, and had virtually no impact on the field. Recent evidence suggests that Evans’ contribution to the field may have in fact lead clinicians and researchers astray all those years. This focus article on CRPS compares recent observations with these 2 earlier theories and asks the question -- what if we had adopted Foisie’s nomenclature from the beginning? PMID:20634146

  17. Single injection of platelet-rich plasma as a novel treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Michael Alexander; Johnson, Elizabeth O.; Babis, George C.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.

    2015-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have confirmed that platelet-rich plasma has therapeutic effects on many neuropathies, but its effects on carpal tunnel syndrome remain poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether single injection of platelet-rich plasma can improve the clinical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Fourteen patients presenting with median nerve injury who had suffered from mild carpal tunnel syndrome for over 3 months were included in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, 1–2 mL of platelet-rich plasma was injected into the region around the median nerve at the proximal edge of the carpal tunnel. At 1 month after single injection of platelet-rich plasma, Visual Analogue Scale results showed that pain almost disappeared in eight patients and it was obviously alleviated in three patients. Simultaneously, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire showed that upper limb function was obviously improved. In addition, no ultrasonographic manifestation of the carpal tunnel syndrome was found in five patients during ultrasonographic measurement of the width of the median nerve. During 3-month follow-up, the pain was not greatly alleviated in three patients. These findings show very encouraging mid-term outcomes regarding use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26807124

  18. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  19. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C.; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  20. Groin pain syndrome: an association of different pathologies and a case presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bisciotti, Gian Nicola; Auci, Alessio; Di Marzo, Francesco; Galli, Roberto; Pulici, Luca; Carimati, Giulia; Quaglia, Alessandro; Volpi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background groin pain affects all types of athletes, especially soccer players. Many diseases with different etiologies may cause groin pain. Purpose offer a mini review of groin pain in soccer accompanied by the presentation of a case report highlighting the possible association of more clinical frameworks into the onset of groin pain syndrome, in order to recommend that clinical evaluations take into account possible associations between bone, muscle and tendon such as inguinal canal disease. Conclusion the multifactorial etiology of groin pain syndrome needs to be examined with a comprehensive approach, with standardized clinical evaluation based on an imaging protocol in order to evaluate all possible diseases. Study design Mini review- Case report (Level V). PMID:26605198

  1. Complex regional pain syndrome-like symptoms during herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Berry, James D; Rowbotham, Michael C; Petersen, Karin Lottrup

    2004-07-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) associated with herpes zoster (HZ) was first reported by Sudeck in 1901 (Sudeck, 1901) and is recognized clinically. However, only 13 cases have been published in the literature, and nothing is known about the incidence, prevalence, or natural history (Chester, 1992; Foster et al., 1989; Grosslight et al., 1986; Ketz and Schliack,1968; Kishimoto et al., 1995; Querol and Cisneros, 2001; Sudeck, 1901; Visitsunthorn and Prete, 1981). The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of CRPS-like symptoms in a prospectively gathered cohort of subjects with HZ and to follow the natural history of their pain and sensory disturbance during the first 6 months after onset of HZ. Subjects were evaluated at four time points after HZ: 2-6 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Only subjects aged 50 or older with pain VAS ratings of >/=20/100 at 2-6 weeks were eligible. The first (screening) visit included a neurological and physical examination that was updated at each subsequent visit. Assessments included ratings of pain intensity, allodynia severity, and rash severity. The neurological exam included determination of presence or absence of the following CRPS-like symptoms: (1) increased sweating, (2) color changes, (3) skin temperature changes, (4) weakness of the affected area based on physical exam, (5) edema, and (6) extension of CRPS-like symptoms outside the affected dermatome. For subjects with HZ in dermatomes that can include the limbs (C4-T2 and L1-S2), extremity involvement was considered present if allodynia or rash extended beyond the neck of the humerus (upper extremity), the inguinal ligament (anterior lower extremity), or gluteal sulcus (posterior lower extremity). Involvement of the extremity was considered proximal if neither HZ rash nor allodynia extended past the elbow (upper extremity) or knee (lower extremity). Of the first 75 subjects recruited, 25 had HZ outbreaks in dermatomes that extended into the

  2. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  3. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  4. When flexibility is not necessarily a virtue: a review of hypermobility syndromes and chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Khubchandani, Raju; Cimaz, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in children. Among the most common causes for this problem are different conditions associated with hypermobility. Pediatricians and allied professionals should be well aware of the characteristics of the different syndromes associated with hypermobility and facilitate early recognition and appropriate management. In this review we provide information on Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan Syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Stickler syndrome, and discuss their characteristics and clinical management. PMID:26444669

  5. Palmitoylethanolamide, a neutraceutical, in nerve compression syndromes: efficacy and safety in sciatic pain and carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid modulator in animals and humans, and has been evaluated since the 1970s as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug in more than 30 clinical trials, in a total of ~6,000 patients. PEA is currently available worldwide as a nutraceutical in different formulations, with and without excipients. Here we describe the results of all clinical trials evaluating PEA’s efficacy and safety in nerve compression syndromes: sciatic pain and pain due to carpal tunnel syndrome, and review preclinical evidence in nerve impingement models. Both the pharmacological studies as well as the clinical trials supported PEA’s action as an analgesic compound. In total, eight clinical trials have been published in such entrapment syndromes, and 1,366 patients have been included in these trials. PEA proved to be effective and safe in nerve compression syndromes. In one pivotal, double blind, placebo controlled trial in 636 sciatic pain patients, the number needed to treat to reach 50% pain reduction compared to baseline was 1.5 after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, no drug interactions or troublesome side effects have been described so far. Physicians are not always aware of PEA as a relevant and safe alternative to opioids and co-analgesics in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Especially since the often prescribed co-analgesic pregabaline has been proven to be ineffective in sciatic pain in a double blind enrichment trial, PEA should be considered as a new and safe treatment option for nerve compression syndromes. PMID:26604814

  6. Lumbar facet injection for the treatment of chronic piriformis myofascial pain syndrome: 52 case studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jen-Ting; Chen, Han-Yu; Hong, Chang-Zern; Lin, Ming-Ta; Chou, Li-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Tsai, Chien-Tsung; Chang, Wen-Dien

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of lumbar facet joint injection for piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Fifty-two patients with chronic myofascial pain in the piriformis muscle each received a lumbar facet injection into the ipsilateral L5–S1 facet joint region, using the multiple insertion technique. Subjective pain intensity, trunk extension range, and lumbar facet signs were measured before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after injection. Thirty-six patients received follow-up for 6 months. Results Immediately after the injection, 27 patients (51.9%) had complete pain subsidence, 19 patients (36.5%) had pain reduction to a tolerable level, and only 6 patients (11.5%) had no pain relief to a tolerable level. Mean pain intensity was reduced from 7.4±0.9 to 1.6±2.1 after injection (P<0.01). This effectiveness lasted for 2 weeks in 49 patients (94.2%), and lasted for approximately 6 months in 35 (97.2%) of 36 patients. The mean range of motion increased from 13.4±6.8 degrees to 22.1±6.0 degrees immediately after injection, and further increased 2 weeks and 6 months later. Immediately after injection, 45 patients (86.5%) had no facet sign. In addition, 90.4% and 94.4% of patients had no facet sign after 2 weeks and after 6 months, respectively. Conclusions It is important to identify the possible cause of piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. If this pain is related to lumbar facet lesions, lumbar facet joint injection can immediately suppress piriformis myofascial pain symptoms. This effectiveness may last for at least 6 months in most patients. This study further supports the importance of eliminating the underlying etiological lesion for complete and effective relief of myofascial pain syndrome. PMID:25170256

  7. Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Toward Animal Models of Irritable-Bowel Syndrome and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Rachel D.; O’Mahony, Siobhain M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent. PMID:25762939

  8. [Evoked cortical somatosensory potentials in painful cervicobrachial radicular syndromes].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Marks, E; Miszczak, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors determined the subjective, objective and maximal pain threshold by means of electrical stimulation in two groups of subjects. Group I comprised healthy subjects, group II patients with right-sided radicular cervicobrachial pains. The method applied by the authors for objective determination of pain threshold with evoked cortical somatosensory potential differentiated both groups which suggests its practical usefulness in clinical practice and expertise. PMID:683429

  9. Interactions between Pain and the Motor Cortex: Insights from Research on Phantom Limb Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Léonard, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Pain is a significantly disabling problem that often interacts with other deficits during the rehabilitation process. The aim of this paper is to review evidence of interactions between pain and the motor cortex in order to attempt to answer the following questions: (1) Does acute pain interfere with motor-cortex activity? (2) Does chronic pain interfere with motor-cortex activity, and, conversely, does motor-cortex plasticity contribute to chronic pain? (3) Can the induction of motor plasticity by means of motor-cortex stimulation decrease pain? (4) Can motor training result in both motor-cortex reorganization and pain relief? Summary of Key Points: Acute experimental pain has been clearly shown to exert an inhibitory influence over the motor cortex, which can interfere with motor learning capacities. Current evidence also suggests a relationship between chronic pain and motor-cortex reorganization, but it is still unclear whether one causes the other. However, there is growing evidence that interventions aimed at normalizing motor-cortex organization can lead to pain relief. Conclusions: Interactions between pain and the motor cortex are complex, and more studies are needed to understand these interactions in our patients, as well as to develop optimal rehabilitative strategies. PMID:22654236

  10. [Combined surgical and physical treatment in traumatic painful syndromes of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Stachowski, B; Kaczmarek, J; Nosek, A; Kocur, L

    1976-01-01

    Clinical observations suggest the need for changing therapeutic management to a more active one in cases of cervical spine injury with damage to the spinal cord and nerve roots or brachial plexus. In 248 patients with these injuries treated initially conservatively the incidence of cervicobrachial pain was analysed. Neuralgic pains were present in 31.5% of cases, causalgic pains in 2.4% and sympathalgic pains in 2%. Conservative treatment conducted in these patients (89 cases) during many months after trauma had no effect on return of mobility. Long-term application of physioterapy prevented only temporarily the development of trophic changes and only partially relieved pains. Only surgical decompression of the spinal cord or spinal nerves with stabilization of damaged vertebrae caused disappearance of painful syndromes and improvement in the motor activity of the extremities. These observations show that early surgical intervention for decompression of the spinal cord, roots or brachial plexus should be advocated in these cases. PMID:980212

  11. Stellate ganglion pulsed radiofrequency ablation for stretch induced complex regional pain syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Singh Rana, Shiv Pratap; Abraham, Mary; Gupta, Varun; Biswas, Shubhashish; Marda, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) following injury or nerve damage, as its name signifies, is a challenging entity, and its successful management requires a multidisciplinary approach. It not only manifests as severe pain, but also gives rise to functional disability, lack of sleep, lack of enjoyment of life and poor quality of life. Various pain interventional techniques have been described in the literature for the management of CRPS ranging from sympathetic blocks to spinal cord stimulator. A 34-year-old liver transplant donor, who developed position-induced right upper limb neuropathic pain suggestive of CRPS type II was managed initially with medications and later with stellate ganglion block under fluoroscopic guidance at cervical C7 position. Following an initial significant improvement in pain and allodynia, which was transient, a pulsed radiofrequency ablation of stellate ganglion was performed successfully to provide prolonged and sustained pain relief, which persisted up to 14 months of follow-up. PMID:26543471

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief. PMID:26361386

  13. Pain Reduction in Myofascial Pain Syndrome by Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Standard Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakrajai, Piyaraid; Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Jensen, Mark P.; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tunkamnerdthai, Orathai; Keeratitanont, Keattichai; Auvichayapat, Paradee

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in the shoulder is among the most prevalent pain problems in the middle-aged population worldwide. Evidence suggests that peripheral and central sensitization may play an important role in the development and maintenance of shoulder MPS. Given previous research supporting the potential efficacy of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for modulating pain-related brain activity in individuals with refractory central pain, we hypothesized that anodal tDCS when applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) combined with standard treatment will be more effective for reducing pain in patients with MPS than standard treatment alone. Method Study participants were randomized to receive either (1) standard treatment with 5-consecutive days of 1 mA anodal tDCS over M1 for 20 min or (2) standard treatment plus sham tDCS. Measures of pain intensity, shoulder passive range of motion, analgesic medication use, and self-reported physical functioning were administered before treatment and again at post-treatment and 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-week follow-up. Results Thirty-one patients with MPS were enrolled. Participants assigned to the active tDCS condition reported significantly more pre- to post-treatment reductions in pain intensity that were maintained at 1-week post-treatment, and significant improvement in shoulder adduction PROM at 1-week follow-up than participants assigned to the sham tDCS condition. Conclusion 5 consecutive days of anodal tDCS over M1 combined with standard treatment appears to reduce pain intensity, and may improve PROM, faster than standard treatment alone. Further tests of the efficacy and duration of effects of tDCS in the treatment of MPS are warranted. PMID:25373724

  14. Restless Legs Syndrome After Single Low Dose Quetiapine Administration.

    PubMed

    Soyata, Ahmet Z; Celebi, Fahri; Yargc, Lutfi I

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is an underdiagnosed sensori-motor disorder and psychotropic drugs are one of the main secondary causes of the illness. The most common psychotropic agents that cause restless legs syndrome are antidepressants; however, antipsychotics have also been reported to induce restless legs syndrome. The prevalence, vulnerability factors and the underlying mechanism of antipsychotic-induced restless legs syndrome are unclear. A possible explanation is that dopaminergic blockade is the main precipitator of the syndrome. Quetiapine-induced restless legs syndrome is another point of interest because of its low binding to D2 receptors. We herein report the case of a restless legs syndrome that emerged after a single low dose quetiapine administration. PMID:26582164

  15. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment of complex regional pain syndrome: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Djuric, Vlad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various forms of sympathetic chain neurolysis (sympathectomy) have, at one time or another, held promise as effective treatment options for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Complications, such as worsening pain and the development of new pain syndromes, have prevented sympathectomy from emerging as a standard intervention. In an effort to avoid poor outcomes associated with neurolysis, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been proposed as a potential treatment alternative for a number of chronic neuropathic pain states, including some forms of CRPS. METHODS: The present report describes three cases in which patients diagnosed with lower extremity CRPS type I obtained substantial and lasting intervals of pain relief following PRF of the lumbar sympathetic chain. Over a period of four years, 14 fluoroscopically guided procedures using PRF lesioning of the lumbar sympathetic chain at L2, L3 and L4 were performed in three individuals with CRPS type I of the lower limb. Outcome measures included pre- and post-treatment self-reported pain and medication requirements. RESULTS: Substantial pain relief (>50%) was achieved in 91.7% of PRF applications at three months and 83.3% at six months, with some treatments resulting in persistent relief well beyond 12 months. Medication use decreased to a comparable degree, with discontinuation of opiates after all but three treatments. CONCLUSIONS: PRF lesioning of the lumbar sympathetic chain can be an effective treatment for patients with CRPS type I of the lower extremity, with the potential to provide ≥6 months of substantial pain relief. PMID:24945285

  16. Hyperalgesia after volar wrist tattoo: a case of complex regional pain syndrome?

    PubMed

    Morte, Paul D; Magee, Larry M

    2011-03-01

    Hyperalgesia after a volar wrist tattoo with features consistent with complex regional pain syndrome and a brief literature review is presented. This is the first case of disseminated hyperalgesia reported from a tattoo. It could be related to the increased pain associated with wrist tattooing and the proximity to the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The response to prednisone was robust. Further cases may appear considering popularization of wrist tattoos by celebrities. PMID:21321489

  17. Phenoxybenzamine in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Potential Role and Novel Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Inchiosa, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a relatively long history of the use of the α-adrenergic antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). One form of this syndrome, CRPS I, was originally termed reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) because of an apparent dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system in the region of an extremity that had been subjected to an injury or surgical procedure. The syndrome develops in the absence of any apparent continuation of the inciting trauma. Hallmarks of the condition are allodynia (pain perceived from a nonpainful stimulus) and hyperalgesia (exaggerated pain response to a painful stimulus). In addition to severe, unremitting burning pain, the affected limb is typically warm and edematous in the early weeks after trauma but then progresses to a primarily cold, dry limb in later weeks and months. The later stages are frequently characterized by changes to skin texture and nail deformities, hypertrichosis, muscle atrophy, and bone demineralization. Earlier treatments of CRPS syndromes were primarily focused on blocking sympathetic outflow to an affected extremity. The use of an α-adrenergic antagonist such as phenoxybenzamine followed from this perspective. However, the current consensus on the etiology of CRPS favors an interpretation of the symptomatology as an evidence of decreased sympathetic activity to the injured limb and a resulting upregulation of adrenergic sensitivity. The clinical use of phenoxybenzamine for the treatment of CRPS is reviewed, and mechanisms of action that include potential immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory effects are presented. Also, a recent study identified phenoxybenzamine as a potential intervention for pain mediation from its effects on gene expression in human cell lines; on this basis, it was tested and found to be capable of reducing pain behavior in a classical animal model of chronic pain. PMID:24454356

  18. Stimulation of the medial plantar nerve for complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Lazarro, Amanda

    2010-11-01

    We describe a 47-year old male with complex regional pain syndrome II in the distribution of the medial plantar nerve following metatarsal fracture, which was treated with peripheral nerve stimulation. Using a new technique of nerve stimulation with a percutaneous-type electrode, the patient experienced sustained relief at 12 months follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peripheral neurostimulation effectively managing pain for the medial plantar nerve. PMID:20708936

  19. Post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome: clinical features and epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ratti, Chiara; Nordio, Andrea; Resmini, Giuseppina; Murena, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that occurs after a tissue injury (fractures, sprain, surgery) of the upper or lower extremities. A clear pathophysiological mechanism has not been established yet and different patterns are considered to play a role in the genesis of the disease. The diagnosis is made by different diagnosis criteria and a gold standard has not been established yet. Incidence of CRPS is unclear and large prospective studies on the incidence and prevalence of CRPS are scarce. The aim of this review is to give an overview on the prevalent data regarding this chronic syndrome. PMID:27134626

  20. Hand pain other than carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS): the role of occupational factors.

    PubMed

    Andréu, José-Luis; Otón, Teresa; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Sanz, Jesús

    2011-02-01

    Some occupational factors have been implicated in the development of disorders manifested as hand pain. The associations seem to be well documented in processes such as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) or writer's cramp. There are contradictory data in the literature about the relationships of trigger finger, De Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT) and tenosynovitis of the wrist with occupational factors. In this article, we review current knowledge about clinical manifestations, case definition, implicated occupational factors, diagnosis and treatment of the most relevant hand pain disorders that have been associated with occupational factors, excluding carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). PMID:21663848

  1. Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) using low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Chopra, Pradeep; Cooper, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain syndrome, which involves glial activation and central sensitization in the central nervous system. Here, we describe positive outcomes of two CRPS patients, after they were treated with low-dose naltrexone (a glial attenuator), in combination with other CRPS therapies. Prominent CRPS symptoms remitted in these two patients, including dystonic spasms and fixed dystonia (respectively), following treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN). LDN, which is known to antagonize the Toll-like Receptor 4 pathway and attenuate activated microglia, was utilized in these patients after conventional CRPS pharmacotherapy failed to suppress their recalcitrant CRPS symptoms. PMID:23546884

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of painful Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome in a professional handball player.

    PubMed

    Kajetanek, C; Thaunat, M; Guimaraes, T; Carnesecchi, O; Daggett, M; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2016-09-01

    Sinding-Larsen-Johansson (SLJ) syndrome is a type of osteochondrosis of the distal pole of the patella most often caused by repeated microtrauma. Here, we describe the case of a professional athlete with painful SLJ syndrome treated arthroscopically. A 29-year-old male professional handball player presented with anterior knee pain that persisted after 4 months of an eccentric rehabilitation protocol and platelet-rich plasma injections. Despite this conservative treatment, the patient could not participate in his sport. The SLJ lesion was excised arthroscopically, which led to complete disappearance of symptoms and return to competitive sports after 5 months. PMID:27450859

  3. Goldenhar Syndrome and Pain-Related Temporomandibular Disorders. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Crow, Heidi; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2016-04-01

    Goldenhar syndrome (GS) is a development syndrome, characterized by incomplete development of the craniofacial region. The involvement is mainly unilateral; it varies from being mild to severe; and it can range from malocclusion and facial asymmetry to a more complex phenotype with complete absence of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint. However, orthopedic symptoms of orofacial pain and dysfunction have not generally been considered as part of the symptom complex in GS cases. The case presented here is of a 15-year-old Caucasian patient, who was referred for evaluation because of bilateral pain in the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints. PMID:27348947

  4. REHABILITATION OF SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME EMPHASIZING SCAPULAR DYSKINESIS IN AMATEUR ATHLETES: A CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Katherinne F.; Monteiro, Renan L.; Lucareli, Paulo R.G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Study design Case series Background and Purpose Scapular dyskinesis has been associated with several shoulder injuries. Recent literature has suggested that a greater activation of the scapular muscles can play an important role in reducing subacromial impingement in patients with shoulder pain. Thus, the purpose of this case series was to describe a rehabilitation program that emphasizes scapular dyskinesis correction for those with clinical evidence of subacromial pain syndrome. Case Descriptions The four amateur athletes in this series showed clinical evidence of subacromial pain syndrome and scapular dyskinesis and each underwent a treatment protocol consisting of three phases. Phase 1 emphasized pain relief, scapular control, and recovery of normal range of motion (ROM), Phase 2 focused on muscular strengthening, and Phase 3 emphasized sensory motor training. Outcomes All subjects demonstrated decreased pain, improved sports performance and function, increased muscular strength for shoulder elevation and external rotation, and increased ROM for internal rotation. Improvement in serratus anterior (SA) activation was also noted. Discussion The results of this case series suggest that subjects with clinical tests positive for subacromial pain syndrome can show significant improvement with an intervention focused on scapular dyskinesis correction. SA activation can play an important role in this process given that all subjects presented with better recruitment after rehabilitation, as measured by electromyography. Levels of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27525180

  5. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes: A White Paper Detailing Current Challenges in the Field.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J; Goldenberg, Don L; Harris, Richard E; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-09-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients' lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  6. Expectations and effects of a single yoga session on pain perception

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Marie-Louise Gander; Thuraisingam, Silvia; Känel, Roland v; Egloff, Niklaus

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies show yoga may benefit chronic pain management. We investigated the effect of a single yoga session on the perception of pain, measured by a standardized pain provocation test in healthy yoga participants while also comparing pain perception to participants’ own expectations. Materials and Methods: Ninety yoga participants were recruited at hatha yoga schools in Switzerland. Pain perception was measured with a standardized algometric pain provocation test; i.e., a calibrated peg was applied for 10 seconds after which the participant rated pain intensity on a 0–10 numerical rating scale. The test was applied to the middle finger, ear lobe, and second toe before and after a 60-minute yoga session. Results: Sixty out of 90 (66.7%) yoga participants expected a reduced pain perception after the yoga session. However, 36 (40%) participants actually experienced less pain after compared to before the yoga session. But overall, pain perception statistically did not significantly change from before to after the yoga session at any of the three body locations assessed. The expectations and also the previous yoga experience did not significantly influence the participants’ pain perception. Conclusions: Regardless of the high positive expectations on the influence of yoga on pain, a single yoga session does not significantly influence pain perception induced by a pain provocation test. Hypoalgesic effects of yoga should be explained otherwise. PMID:26170598

  7. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  8. [HEART RHYTHM VARIABILITY ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE SPINAL PAIN SYNDROME DURING DRY IMMERSION].

    PubMed

    Sun, I; Voronkov, Yu I; Ardashev, V N; Glukhova, S I

    2015-01-01

    The spinal pain syndrome appears in cosmonauts on both short and long-duration missions. This untoward factor may affect body systems functioning and complicate the successful accomplishment of space mission. Purpose of the investigation was to examine the lumbar spine and to elucidate whether its condition relates to the spinal pain development and changes in heart rate variability (HRV) in the microgravity environment. The experiment was conducted in dry immersion as a method of microgravity effects simulation. It was shown that in dry immersion locomotion reproduces the patterns peculiar for significant gravitational unloading. Spinal pain intensity, angles and heights of the lumbar intervertebral discs and HRV were measured in 19 selected volunteers. During the experiment, all the volunteers developed pains in the back that abated gradually. Pain dependence on the height of intervertebral discs and cardiac regulatory mechanisms were investigated. PMID:26292423

  9. Occupational Overuse Syndrome (Technological Diseases): Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, a Mouse Shoulder, Cervical Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tiric-Campara, Merita; Krupic, Ferid; Biscevic, Mirza; Spahic, Emina; Maglajlija, Kerima; Masic, Zlatan; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Technological diseases are diseases of the modern era. Some are caused by occupational exposures, and are marked with direct professional relation, or the action of harmful effects in the workplace. Due to the increasing incidence of these diseases on specific workplaces which may be caused by one or more causal factors present in the workplace today, these diseases are considered as professional diseases. Severity of technological disease usually responds to the level and duration of exposure, and usually occurs after many years of exposure to harmful factor. Technological diseases occur due to excessive work at the computer, or excessive use of keyboards and computer mice, especially the non-ergonomic ones. This paper deals with the diseases of the neck, shoulder, elbow and wrist (cervical radiculopathy, mouse shoulder and carpal tunnel syndrome), as is currently the most common diseases of technology in our country and abroad. These three diseases can be caused by long-term load and physical effort, and are tied to specific occupations, such as occupations associated with prolonged sitting, working at the computer and work related to the fixed telephone communication, as well as certain types of sports (tennis, golf and others). PMID:25568584

  10. Psychological distress and stressful life events in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Julia; Brehmer, Hannah; Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Zernikow, Boris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge regarding the association between psychological factors and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in children. Specifically, it is not known which factors precipitate CRPS and which result from the ongoing painful disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as the experience of stressful life events in children with CRPS compared with children with chronic primary headaches and functional abdominal pain. METHODS: A retrospective chart study examined children with CRPS (n=37) who received intensive inpatient pain treatment between 2004 and 2010. They were compared with two control groups (chronic primary headaches and functional abdominal pain; each n=37), who also received intensive inpatient pain treatment. Control groups were matched with the CRPS group with regard to admission date, age and sex. Groups were compared on symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as stressful life events. RESULTS: Children with CRPS reported lower anxiety and depression scores compared with children with abdominal pain. A higher number of stressful life events before and after the onset of the pain condition was observed for children with CRPS. CONCLUSIONS: Children with CRPS are not particularly prone to symptoms of anxiety or depression. Importantly, children with CRPS experienced more stressful life events than children with chronic headaches or abdominal pain. Prospective long-term studies are needed to further explore the potential role of stressful life events in the etiology of CRPS. PMID:26035287

  11. [Serotonin syndrome and pain medication : What is relevant for practice?].

    PubMed

    Schenk, M; Wirz, S

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a dangerous and rare complication of a pharmacotherapy and can lead to death. Caused by unwanted interactions of serotonergic drugs, it is characterised by a neuroexcitatory triad of mental changes, neuromuscular hyperactivity and autonomic instability. Opioids with serotonergic effects include the phenylpiperidine series opioids fentanyl, methadone, meperidine and tramadol and the morphine analogues oxycodone and codeine. In combination with certain serotonergic drugs, e.g. antidepressants, they can provoke serotonin syndrome. In patients with such combinations, special attention should be paid to clinical signs of serotonergic hyperactivity. Higher risk combinations (e.g. monoamine oxidase inhibitors with tramadol) must be avoided. Treatment with serotonergic agents must be stopped in moderate or severe serotonin syndrome. Patients with a severe serotonin syndrome require symptomatic intensive care and specifically a pharmacological antagonism with cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine. PMID:25860200

  12. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  13. Motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain syndromes: a case series experience.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Darrow, David; Monsivais, Daniel; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Gjini, Klevest

    2014-06-18

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition lacking effective management and responding poorly to standard treatment protocols. Motor cortex stimulation has emerged as a new and promising therapeutic tool with outcomes potentially affected by the specific causes and location. In this study we report a series of eight cases in the neurosurgery practice of one of the authors (R.J.B.), including neuropathic pain syndromes of trigeminal or thalamic origin with or without anesthesia dolorosa. Pain relief was evaluated on the basis of comparison of Visual Analog scores at baseline and at 3 months after surgery. In addition, we assessed differences in pain relief outcomes between cases with trigeminal neuralgia and thalamic stroke, as well as cases with or without anesthesia dolorosa (i.e. pain with numbness of the affected area). Visual Analog Scale scores showed a statistically significant decrease of 4.19 (P=0.002) at 3 months follow-up compared with baseline. Pain relief levels in four of five patients in the subgroup with facial pain were higher than 50%, and none of the patients in the subgroup with thalamic and phantom limb pain showed such a good outcome. Furthermore, we found larger pain relief levels in facial pain conditions with versus without anesthesia dolorosa. These results point to utility of motor cortex stimulation in relieving neuropathic pain, as well as better outcomes for patients with facial pain and anesthesia dolorosa. Future studies should incorporate methods to noninvasively trial those patients who may benefit from surgical implantation to predict the outcomes and maximize their negative predictive value. PMID:24780896

  14. [Local and general humoral immunity in patients with migraine, Horton's syndrome and autonomic pain].

    PubMed

    Puzin, M N; Kulakov, A V; Balashov, K E; Sharov, M N; Vodop'ianov, N P

    1989-01-01

    Patients with migraines, Horton syndrome and autonomic pains were subjected to immunological investigation that revealed different degrees of local and general immunity disorders: increase in blood serum IfA and salival IgAc concentrations. These changes are believed to be capable of serving as diagnostic and prognostic indices. PMID:2728720

  15. Chronic Pelvic Pain due to Pelvic Congestion Syndrome: The Role of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeshan, Arul; Upponi, Sara; Hon, Lye-Quen; Uthappa, M. C.; Warakaulle, Dinuke R.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-11-15

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a common cause of gynecologic referral. Pelvic congestion syndrome, which is said to occurs due to ovarian vein incompetence, is a recognized cause of CPP. The aim of this paper is to briefly describe the clinical manifestations, and to review the role of diagnostic and interventional radiology in the management of this probably under-diagnosed condition.

  16. Uncommon causes of anterior knee pain: a case report of infrapatellar contracture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ellen, M I; Jackson, H B; DiBiase, S J

    1999-01-01

    The uncommon causes of anterior knee pain should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a painful knee when treatment of common origins become ineffective. A case is presented in which the revised diagnosis of infrapatellar contracture syndrome was made after noting delayed progress in the rehabilitation of an active female patient with a presumed anterior horn medial meniscus tear and a contracted patellar tendon. The patient improved after the treatment program was augmented with closed manipulation under arthroscopy and infrapatellar injection of both corticosteroids and a local anesthetic. Infrapatellar contraction syndrome and other uncommon sources of anterior knee pain, including arthrofibrosis, Hoffa's syndrome, tibial collateral ligament bursitis, saphenous nerve palsy, isolated ganglions of the anterior cruciate ligament, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and knee tumors, are subsequently discussed. Delayed functional advancement in a rehabilitation program requires full reassessment of the patient's diagnosis and treatment plan. Alternative diagnoses of knee pain are not always of common origins. Ample knowledge of uncommon causes of anterior knee pain is necessary to form a full differential diagnosis in patients with challenging presentations. PMID:10418845

  17. Seizures and pain uncertainty associated with parenting stress and Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byiers, Breanne J; Tervo, Raymond C; Feyma, Timothy J; Symons, Frank J

    2014-04-01

    Data were collected parenting stress, adaptive behavior, pain, and health issues from the caregivers of 35 girls and women with Rett syndrome (mean age = 20.3). A majority (60%) of parents reported stress in the clinical range on at least 1 subscale of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Seizures and uncertainty about their daughter's gastrointestinal pain experience were significantly associated with higher levels of parenting stress. No other child factors (adaptive behavior, age, residential status) were significantly related to parenting stress. Factors related to chronic health concerns (seizures, ambiguous pain presentation) may be important when considering family stress issues in relation to general outcomes for girls with Rett syndrome and related developmental disorders. PMID:23307883

  18. The four-in-one arthroplasty for the painful arc syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, T J; Neviaser, R J; Neviaser, J S; Neviaser, J S

    1982-03-01

    The painful arc syndrome of the shoulder is a manifestation of rotator cuff tendinitis associated with tenosynovitis of the long head of the biceps under and just distal to the transverse humeral ligament. Eighty-nine patients with clinical signs of the painful arc syndrome were proven to have an associated biceps tenosynovitis by arthrography and at surgical treatment. The four-in-one arthroplasty consists of: (1) excision of the coracoacromial ligament; (2) acromioclavicular arthroplasty; (3) excision of the anterior inferior area of the acromion process; and (4) transfer and tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. The operation decompresses the acromial arch and also eliminates the biceps tenosynovitis by tenodesis. Almost invariably, there was relief of pain within four to five months of postoperative rehabilitation, and at an average follow-up of two to eight years. PMID:7067240

  19. The Responsive Amygdala: Treatment-induced Alterations in Functional Connectivity in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simons, LE; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-gender matched controls before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared to controls, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pre-treated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy controls from Time 1 to Time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity following an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  20. The responsive amygdala: treatment-induced alterations in functional connectivity in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, L E; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-09-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear, and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-sex matched control subjects before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared with control subjects, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pretreated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy control subjects from time 1 to time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores; and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity after an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  1. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Thiago R. T.; Oliveira, Bárbara A.; Ocarino, Juliana M.; Holt, Kenneth G.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. PMID:26039034

  2. [Small fiber neuropathy in a patient with complete Heerfordt syndrome manifesting as refractory facial pain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshiaki; Miyagawa, Shinji; Matsui, Kazutaka; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of complete Heerfordt syndrome accompanied by the involvement of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) manifesting as refracory facial pain. A 30-year-old man presented with pyrexia, a 2-week history of facial burning pain, and difficulty of mastication. After admission to our hospital, neurological examinations showed bilateral facial pain, trigeminal motor palsy, left facial nerve palsy, bilateral sensory neural deafness, uveitis and swelling of the parotid gland. Other examinations revealed bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, high serum titer of angiotensin coenzyme, and no response in a tuberculin-tested, non-caseating epithelioid granuloma from lip biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of complete Heerfordt syndrome. Mandibular skin biopsy with immunostaining for PGP 9.5 showed SFN. High-dose corticosteroids proved somewhat effective against SFN as facial pain, but reducing the corticosteroid dose proved difficult, as symptoms were refractory to other immunosuppressants and pain-control drugs such as anti-epileptics and anti-depressants. The patient died of acute pancreatitis 3 years after disease onset. Autopsy showed no granuloma in hilar lymph node, trigeminal nerve, cranial base, nerve root, and muscle. SFN in this case probably represent a cause of refractory facial pain. PMID:25087562

  3. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P < 0.001) at both short and long follow-ups. Deep dry needling and passive stretching is more effective than passive stretching alone in people with nonspecific neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. PMID:27537209

  4. Recurrent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recurrent abdominal pain continues to be one of the most ubiquitous conditions faced by the healthcare team, and has a significant emotional and economic impact. We have moved from considering it a psychological condition to recognizing the physiological and environmental contributions, and consider...

  5. Lubiprostone does not Influence Visceral Pain Thresholds in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, William E.; Palsson, Olafur S.; Gangarosa, Lisa; Turner, Marsha; Tucker, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical trials, lubiprostone reduced the severity of abdominal pain. Aims The primary aim was to determine whether lubiprostone raises the threshold for abdominal pain induced by intraluminal balloon distention. A secondary aim was to determine whether changes in pain sensitivity influence clinical pain independently of changes in transit time. Methods Sixty-two patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) participated in an 8-week crossover study. All subjects completed a 14-day baseline ending with a barostat test of pain and urge sensory thresholds. Half, randomly selected, then received 48 ug/day of lubiprostone for 14 days ending with a pain sensitivity test and a Sitzmark test of transit time. This was followed by a 14-day washout and then a crossover to 14 days of placebo with tests of pain sensitivity and transit time. The other half of the subjects received placebo before lubiprostone. All kept symptom diaries. Results Stools were significantly softer when taking lubiprostone compared to placebo (Bristol Stool scores 4.20 vs. 3.44, p<0.001). However, thresholds for pain (17.36 vs. 17.83 mmHg, lubiprostone vs. placebo) and urgency to defecate (14.14 vs. 14.53 mmHg) were not affected by lubiprostone. Transit time was not significantly different between lubiprostone and placebo (51.27 vs. 51.81 hours), and neither pain sensitivity nor transit time was a significant predictor of clinical pain. Conclusions Lubiprostone has no effect on visceral sensory thresholds. The reductions in clinical pain that occur while taking lubiprostone appear to be secondary to changes in stool consistency. PMID:21914041

  6. [Evaluation and correction of the pain syndrome in premature newborns with CNS infringement].

    PubMed

    Gadzhieva, N N

    2009-04-01

    Premature newborn may feel different kinds of pain, thus incomplete diagnostics and unjustified therapy may lead to unfavourable physiological effects. All the pain feelings that a child experiences are acute and recurrent or persistent leading to a pain syndrome if there is no intervention. Currently a huge arsenal of pharmacological drugs is available to control pain. There are a lot of researches described in the literature on the effectiveness of the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokynetics and complications related to administration of different analgetics in newborns. However the unfavorable complications identified prevent their use in newborns. Analgesic effect can be made not only by proper analgetics, but combined homeopathic medications as well. One of such medications, which has no side effects is traumel S. The current paper reflects outcomes of the clinical research took place over the 79 pre-term newborns with infringement of the CNS who are subject of a big number of the prescribed treatment manipulation and procedures whereas most of them are quite painful. There is necessity of applying anesthesia treatment for avoiding clinical and biochemical consequences of the pain syndrome. Application of the traumel C intramuscularly or traumel C ointment per os just before and during painful manipulation affect drop pain level of a newborn. Appreciation of pain is subject to the level of CNS lesions because during severe disorders behavioral reaction to pain is certainly reduced. Premature newborns from control group, in the dynamics of neonatal period, manifested reliable reduction (R<0,05) of neurokinin A from 17.52 to 2.08 ng/ml, substance P from 2.5 to 0.3 n/ml compare to seek newborns. During comparison of the results it was revealed that premature newborns, with hypoxemic-ischemic lesion of CNS, treated based on traditional allopathic therapy from the first day of life, manifest significantly high level of neurokinin A and substance P, maintained until the

  7. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve pain from diabetes Read More "Chronic Pain" Articles Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and ...

  8. Motor Imagery and Its Effect on Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Nélio Silva; Martins, Ana Carolina Gomes; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Leite, Marco Antônio A.; Teixeira, Silmar; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Bittencourt, Juliana; Matta, André Palma da Cunha; Filho, Pedro Moreira

    2015-01-01

    The motor imagery (MI) has been proposed as a treatment in the complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1), since it seems to promote a brain reorganization effect on sensory-motor areas of pain perception. The aim of this paper is to investigate, through an integrative critical review, the influence of MI on the CRPS-1, correlating their evidence to clinical practice. Research in PEDro, Medline, Bireme and Google Scholar databases was conducted. Nine randomized controlled trials (level 2), 1 non-controlled clinical study (level 3), 1 case study (level 4), 1 systematic review (level 1), 2 review articles and 1 comment (level 5) were found. We can conclude that MI has shown effect in reducing pain and functionality that remains after 6 months of treatment. However, the difference between the MI strategies for CRPS-1 is unknown as well as the intensity of mental stress influences the painful response or effect of MI or other peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26788264

  9. Motor Imagery and Its Effect on Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Nélio Silva; Martins, Ana Carolina Gomes; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Teixeira, Silmar; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Bittencourt, Juliana; Matta, André Palma da Cunha; Filho, Pedro Moreira

    2015-12-29

    The motor imagery (MI) has been proposed as a treatment in the complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1), since it seems to promote a brain reorganization effect on sensory-motor areas of pain perception. The aim of this paper is to investigate, through an integrative critical review, the influence of MI on the CRPS-1, correlating their evidence to clinical practice. Research in PEDro, Medline, Bireme and Google Scholar databases was conducted. Nine randomized controlled trials (level 2), 1 non-controlled clinical study (level 3), 1 case study (level 4), 1 systematic review (level 1), 2 review articles and 1 comment (level 5) were found. We can conclude that MI has shown effect in reducing pain and functionality that remains after 6 months of treatment. However, the difference between the MI strategies for CRPS-1 is unknown as well as the intensity of mental stress influences the painful response or effect of MI or other peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26788264

  10. The Pharmacological Management of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glyn; Howard, Richard

    2016-08-01

    The awareness of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the pediatric population is increasing. The condition involves regional pain that is out of proportion to any initiating event (if there is one) and is associated with sensory, functional, autonomic, and inflammatory changes in the region of the pain. The signs and symptoms of CRPS can vary between patients and stage of the disease process. Like many chronic pain conditions, it is often associated with significant disability and a detrimental effect on quality of life. It has a complex pathophysiology that remains poorly understood but provides many potential targets for treatments. Management involves a biopsychosocial formulation that encompasses physical and psychological interventions alongside pharmacological strategies. We review the current evidence for the treatment of this condition in children, with particular reference to pharmacological management. PMID:27194166

  11. The pterygopalatine ganglion and its role in various pain syndromes: from anatomy to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Piagkou, Maria; Demesticha, Theano; Troupis, Theodore; Vlasis, Konstantinos; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Makri, Aggeliki; Mazarakis, Antonios; Lappas, Dimitrios; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Johnson, Elizabeth O

    2012-06-01

    The postsynaptic fibers of the pterygopalatine or sphenopalatine ganglion (PPG or SPG) supply the lacrimal and nasal glands. The PPG appears to play an important role in various pain syndromes including headaches, trigeminal and sphenopalatine neuralgia, atypical facial pain, muscle pain, vasomotor rhinitis, eye disorders, and herpes infection. Clinical trials have shown that these pain disorders can be managed effectively with sphenopalatine ganglion blockade (SPGB). In addition, regional anesthesia of the distribution area of the SPG sensory fibers for nasal and dental surgery can be provided by SPGB via a transnasal, transoral, or lateral infratemporal approach. To arouse the interest of the modern-day clinicians in the use of the SPGB, the advantages, disadvantages, and modifications of the available methods for blockade are discussed.▪ PMID:21956040

  12. Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation

    PubMed Central

    Wiebelitz, Karl Rüdiger; Beer, André-Michael

    2012-01-01

    A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case. PMID:23097614

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Buría, José L.; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A.; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P < 0.01): individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention. PMID:26649058

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Arias-Buría, José L; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P < 0.01): individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention. PMID:26649058

  15. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  16. Lifestyle and Risk of Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome in a Cohort of United States Male Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Giovannucci, Edward; Willett, Walter C.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Wu, Kana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a prevalent urological disorder among men of all ages, its etiology remains unknown. Only a few previous studies have examined associations between lifestyle factors and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, of which most were limited by the cross-sectional study design and lack of control for possible confounders. To address these limitations we performed a cohort study of major lifestyle factors (obesity, smoking and hypertension) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome risk in the HPFS (Health Professionals Follow-up Study), a large ongoing cohort of United States based male health professionals. Materials and Methods The HPFS includes 51,529 men who were 40 to 75 years old at baseline in 1986. At enrollment and every 2 years thereafter participants have completed questionnaires on lifestyle and health conditions. In 2008 participants completed an additional set of questions on recent chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome pain symptoms modified from the NIH (National Institutes of Health)-CPSI (Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index) as well as questions on approximate date of symptom onset. The 653 participants with NIH-CPSI pain scores 8 or greater who first experienced symptoms after 1986 were considered incident chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome cases and the 19,138 who completed chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome questions but did not report chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome related pain were considered noncases. Results No associations were observed for baseline body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, cigarette smoking and hypertension with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome risk (each OR ≤1.34). Conclusions In this large cohort study none of the lifestyle factors examined was associated with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome risk. As the etiology of chronic

  17. Acute abdominal pain in a man with Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, M; Nedooshan, J J; Rafat, S; Rafie, R; Rafiei, M; Moghadam, R N

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis or emboli have rarely been reported in Cushing syndrome (CS). Here we describe the first case of mesenteric ischaemia secondary to ventricular emboli in a patient with CS. Laboratory evaluation showed increased fibrinogen and factor VIII. Previous studies showed that venous thromboembolism (VTE) increases in CS. This case for the first time described arterial system thrombosis and emboli in a patient with adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent CS. PMID:25943108

  18. Complex regional pain syndrome: diagnostic controversies, psychological dysfunction, and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Theodore S; Christo, Paul J; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2004-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) types I and II are neuropathic pain disorders that involve dysfunction of the peripheral and central nervous system. CRPS type I and type II were known formerly as reflex sympathetic dystrophy and causalgia, respectively. Most experts believe that a multidisciplinary approach including pharmacotherapy, physiotherapy, and psychotherapy is warranted. Historically, there has been considerable controversy regarding this disease entity. In particular, the precise mechanism of the sympathetic dysfunction as well as the nature of the psychological dysfunction commonly observed in patients with CRPS has been the subject of considerable debate. Current strides in our understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease have improved treatment options. PMID:15248369

  19. Mirror visual feedback for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (type 1).

    PubMed

    McCabe, Candida S; Haigh, Richard C; Blake, David R

    2008-04-01

    Mirror visual feedback was originally devised as a therapeutic tool to relieve perceived involuntarily movements and paralysis in the phantom limb. Since this pioneering work was conducted in the mid-1990s, the technique has been applied to relieve pain and enhance movement in other chronic conditions such as stroke and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1. This review describes how mirror visual feedback was first developed with amputees, its original application in CRPS, and how further research has demonstrated its potential benefit within graded motor imagery programs. We discuss the potential mechanisms behind this technique and consider the implications for clinical practice. PMID:18474189

  20. The Use of Transdermal Buprenorphine in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, Sarah; Vartan, Christine M; Nazario, Mitchell; DiScala, Sandra; Cuevas-Trisan, Ramon; Melendez-Benabe, John

    2016-06-01

    Management of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be challenging. Various pharmacological approaches have produced mixed results. Buprenorphine activates mu-opioid receptors and antagonizes kappa and delta receptors, acts at N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and is an orphan-related ligand-1 receptor agonist. It is available in transdermal patches that last for up to 7 days. This report describes two patients with refractory CRPS who were treated with transdermal buprenorphine. The patients experienced approximately 50% reduction in pain intensity scores. Application site rash that occurred was managed with topical steroid spray used before applying the patch. PMID:27172230

  1. The management of greater trochanteric pain syndrome: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Reid, Diane

    2016-03-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common cause of lateral hip pain. Most cases respond to conservative treatments with a few refractory cases requiring surgical intervention. For many years, this condition was believed to be caused by trochanteric bursitis, with treatments targeting the bursitis. More recently gluteal tendinopathy/tears have been proposed as potential causes. Treatments are consequently developing to target these proposed pathologies. At present there is no defined treatment protocol for GTPS. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to evaluate the current evidence for the effectiveness of GTPS interventions, both conservative and surgical. PMID:26955229

  2. Update on the Pathology and Diagnosis of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is characterized by bladder discomfort, urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain. The etiology and pathogenesis of this condition is still unknown and remains diagnosed by exclusion. The histologic findings are also neither specific for diagnosis nor correlated with symptoms. However, the definition and diagnostic criteria for the condition was established in the last decade. In this paper, we review the changes in the definition, terminology, and diagnostic scheme of IC/BPS, and summarize the histologic findings. We also briefly discuss some new pathologic suggestions and new urinary markers, focusing on the most promising ones. PMID:27032552

  3. Self-Reported Spousal Support Modifies the Negative Impact of Pain on Disability in Men with Chronic Prostatitis / Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ginting, Jessica V.; Tripp, Dean A.; Nickel, J. Curtis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine changes in the association between pain and patient quality of life (QoL), depressive symptoms, and disability in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) at varying levels of spouse responses to pain. METHODS One-hundred and eighty-eight men with CP/CPPS completed a questionnaire including demographic information. The outcome variables were mental QoL (SF-12 MCS), physical QoL (SF-12 PCS), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), and disability (Pain Disability Index). Patients also reported on the types of responses they experienced from their spouses (Multidimensional Pain Inventory), and pain (Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire). RESULTS The association between pain and disability was stronger at higher levels of solicitous responses (e.g., “does some of my chores) (β = 0.66, p<.05) than it was at moderate (β = 0.44, p<.05) and lower (β = 0.23, ns) levels. In contrast, the association between pain and disability was stronger at lower levels (β = 0.64, p<.05) of distracting responses (e.g., “tries to get me involved in some activity”) than it was at moderate (β = 0.44, p<.05) and higher (β = 0.25, p<.05) levels. CONCLUSIONS Solicitous responses to pain increased the negative impact of pain on disability, while distracting responses to pain decreased the negative impact of pain on disability in men with CP/CPPS. Solicitous responses may be a reaction to patient pain and associated disability, or may help create or maintain the patient’s pain and disability. In either case, distracting rather than solicitous responses to patient pain are to be encouraged in symptom management. PMID:22054388

  4. [Functional somatic pain syndromes: summary of hypotheses of their overlap and etiology].

    PubMed

    Henningsen, P; Derra, C; Türp, J C; Häuser, W

    2004-04-01

    Currently it is unclear whether functional somatic syndromes can be explained by one common underlying functional syndrome. In any case it does not seem justified to view functional somatic syndromes as purely psychological disorders (somatized anxiety or depression). Psychiatric comorbidity and life time stress including traumatisations are mainly, but not exclusively responsible for triggering health care utilisation. The lowered pain threshold that can be demonstrated clinically and experimentally in fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, tension headache and temporomandibular disorders is currently seen primarily as result of an altered central nervous processing of nociceptive input. In addition some results also hint at a disturbance in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. The predominance of female patients can be due to gender specific illness behaviour as well as to estrogen-induced changes in pain sensitivity. In sum, functional somatic syndromes currently are best explained by a biopsychosocial model of predisposing, triggering and maintaining factors. More research is needed particularly to clarify the role of genetic and of cultural factors. PMID:15067534

  5. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Laedermann, Cedric J.; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  6. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cedric J; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  7. The treatment of myofascial pain-dysfunction syndrome using the biofeedback principle.

    PubMed

    Clarke, N G; Kardachi, B J

    1977-10-01

    Facial pain is a relatively common sequel to bruxism and the biofeedback principle was used on seven subjects experiencing this syndrome. The results obtained were satisfactory and support the concept that the etiology of the M.P.D. syndrome is psychophysiological. This study showed that biofeedback is both a logical and appropriate form of treatment. However, the result with subject 7 indicates that not all patients are willing to wear the equipment but conselling and empathy probably form an equally satisfactory form of treatment. PMID:269245

  8. Consciousness and body image: lessons from phantom limbs, Capgras syndrome and pain asymbolia.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V S

    1998-01-01

    Words such as 'consciousness' and 'self' actually encompass a number of distinct phenomena that are loosely lumped together. The study of neurological syndromes allows us to explore the neural mechanisms that might underlie different aspects of self, such as body image and emotional responses to sensory stimuli, and perhaps even laughter and humour. Mapping the 'functional logic' of the many different attributes of human nature on to specific neural circuits in the brain offers the best hope of understanding how the activity of neurons gives rise to conscious experience. We consider three neurological syndromes (phantom limbs, Capgras delusion and pain asymbolia) to illustrate this idea. PMID:9854257

  9. Consciousness and body image: lessons from phantom limbs, Capgras syndrome and pain asymbolia.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S

    1998-11-29

    Words such as 'consciousness' and 'self' actually encompass a number of distinct phenomena that are loosely lumped together. The study of neurological syndromes allows us to explore the neural mechanisms that might underlie different aspects of self, such as body image and emotional responses to sensory stimuli, and perhaps even laughter and humour. Mapping the 'functional logic' of the many different attributes of human nature on to specific neural circuits in the brain offers the best hope of understanding how the activity of neurons gives rise to conscious experience. We consider three neurological syndromes (phantom limbs, Capgras delusion and pain asymbolia) to illustrate this idea. PMID:9854257

  10. Pain intensity and quality of life perception in children with hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fatoye, Francis; Palmer, Shea; Macmillan, Fiona; Rowe, Philip; van der Linden, Marietta

    2012-05-01

    Hypermobility syndrome (HMS) is a major source of morbidity in children. Impaired quality of life (QoL) has been observed recently in adults with HMS; however, this issue is yet to be investigated in children with this condition. This study compared pain intensity and QoL in children with HMS with healthy controls. It also examined the relationship between pain intensity and QoL in children with HMS. Following ethical approval, 29 children diagnosed with HMS and 37 healthy children aged 8-15 years participated. Informed written consent was obtained from participants and their parents/guardians. Average knee pain over the past week was examined using the Coloured Analogue Scale. QoL was measured via the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to compare pain and QoL scores between the two groups. Spearman Rho correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between pain and QoL. Overall QoL scores in each domain were significantly lower in children with HMS (all p < 0.001) compared with the controls. Pain intensity was significantly higher in children with HMS compared with their healthy counterparts (p < 0.001). A strong negative correlation was observed between pain intensity and overall QoL and all the domains (r range = -0.614 to -0.717; all p < 0.001). In conclusion, the findings of the present study imply that pain and QoL assessment might form important components of clinical examination for children diagnosed with HMS. These children may benefit from appropriate treatment programmes to alleviate pain intensity and improve QoL. PMID:21267571

  11. Psychiatric disorders in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome are frequent, diverse and strongly associated with pain.

    PubMed

    Hershenfeld, Samantha Aliza; Wasim, Syed; McNiven, Vanda; Parikh, Manasi; Majewski, Paula; Faghfoury, Hanna; So, Joyce

    2016-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of hereditary connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, widespread musculoskeletal pain and tissue fragility. Psychiatric disorders and psychosocial impairment are common, yet poorly characterized, findings in EDS patients. We investigated the frequency and types of psychiatric disorders and their relationship to systemic manifestations in a cohort of 106 classic and hypermobility type EDS patients. In this retrospective study, extensive medical chart review was performed for patients referred at two genetics clinics who were diagnosed with EDS. Statistical analysis was undertaken to determine the frequency of psychiatric disorders and association with systemic findings. Psychiatric disorders were found in 42.5% of the EDS cohort, with 22.7% of patients affected with 2 or more psychiatric diagnoses. Anxiety and depression were most commonly reported, with frequencies of 23.6 and 25.5%, respectively. A variety of other psychiatric diagnoses were also identified. Abdominal pain [odds ratio (OR) 7.38], neuropathic pain (OR 4.07), migraines (OR 5.21), joint pain (OR 2.85) and fatigue (OR 5.55) were significantly associated with the presence of a psychiatric disorder. The presence of any pain symptom was significantly associated with having a psychiatric disorder (OR 9.68). Muscle pain (OR 2.79), abdominal pain (OR 5.78), neuropathic pain (OR 3.91), migraines (OR 2.63) and fatigue (OR 3.78) were significantly associated with having an anxiety or mood disorder. Joint hypermobility and the classic dermatological features of EDS showed no significant association with having a psychiatric disorder. Our findings demonstrate a high frequency of psychiatric disorders and an association with pain symptoms in EDS. PMID:26433894

  12. Clinical presentation and chiropractic treatment of Tietze syndrome: A 34-year-old female with left-sided chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Gijsbers, Eefje; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation and chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome. Clinical Features A 34-year-old woman presented with unexplained left-sided chest pain. Electrocardiogram and radiographs were taken at a medical emergency department to rule out cardiovascular and pulmonary causes, and pain medication did not relieve her pain. Physical examination showed tenderness on palpation and swelling of the second and third chondrosternal joints, as well as thoracic joint dysfunction. Heart and lung pathology was ruled out, and chondrosternal joint swelling was present, Tietze syndrome was diagnosed. Intervention and Outcome A treatment plan aimed at restoring normal thoracic and rib joint movement and decreasing inflammation of the chondrosternal joints resulted in lower pain levels. Treatment consisted of diversified high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic manipulation; activator technique; and cryotherapy. Conclusion Chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome was successful in reducing pain levels in this patient's case. PMID:22027210

  13. TIBIOFEMORAL JOINT MOBILIZATION IN THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J.; Mischke, John J.; Courtney, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common source of anterior knee pain. Controversy exists over the exact clinical findings which define PFPS, thus, diagnosis and management can be challenging for clinicians. There is paucity in the literature concerning joint mobilization as treatment for PFPS, particularly at the tibiofemoral joint, as standard management is currently focused on therapeutic exercise, orthotics, bracing and taping. Therefore, the purpose of this case report is to describe the effects of tibiofemoral joint mobilization in the successful treatment of an individual with chronic PFPS as it relates to pain, function and central processing of pain. Study Design Case Report Case Description The subject was a 28-year-old female with a two year history of left anterior, inferior patellar knee pain consistent with chronic PFPS. She demonstrated diminished pressure pain threshold (PPT) and allodynia at the anterior knee, suggesting a component of central sensitization to her pain. She met several common diagnostic criteria for PFPS, however, only tibiofemoral anterior-posterior joint mobilization increased her pain. Subsequent treatment sessions (Visits 1-6) consisted of solely joint mobilization supplemented by instruction in a home exercise program (therapeutic exercise and balance training). As outcomes improved, treatment sessions (Visits 7-8) consisted of solely therapeutic exercise and balance training with focus on return to independent pain free functional activity. Outcomes Improvements consistent with the minimally clinically important difference were noted on the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC). Scores on the Fear Avoidance-Belief Questionnaire (6/24 to 2/24 PA, 31/42 to 5/42 W), PPT (119 to 386 kPa) and Step Down Test (11 to 40 steps) also demonstrated improvement. At a two month follow up, the subject reported continued improvement in functional

  14. How do people with chronically painful joint hypermobility syndrome make decisions about activity?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anne; Corcoran, Kelley; Grahame, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Background: The model of activity avoidance prompted by fear of increased pain and/or harm dominates understanding and research into activity limitation in chronic pain. Yet, the accounts of people with chronic pain on decisions about activity limitation are rarely heard beyond the confines of fear and avoidance questionnaires. Methods: We used semi-structured interviews to explore the decisions of 11 women attending a pain management clinic with chronically painful Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS). Results: Six themes emerged from Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis: the overall aim of keeping pain to a manageable level, considering whether the planned activity was worth it and, running through all judgements, the influence of pain intensity. The decision was tipped towards avoidance by unpredictability of pain and by high emotional cost and towards going ahead with the activity by the wish to exert control and by low emotional cost. Many accounts described a specifiable cost–benefit analysis of individual decisions, weighing the importance of each activity against its potential aversive consequences, which only in a minority of cases was dominated by fear of pain or injury. Conclusion: Assumptions of fear as the basis of activity avoidance should not be used uncritically in clinical settings. Decisions about activity should explore beyond pain expectancy, incorporating goals, values, and decision processes. Summary points The model of fear of pain or re/injury and associated avoidance, an important insight that has generated effective therapeutic interventions, risks being over-applied and assumed rather than demonstrated. Patients’ own accounts, using qualitative analysis of interview in 11 women with long term chronic pain associated with joint hypermobility, give a more nuanced description of complex decision-making around activity. While a few activities were unquestionably avoided because of such fears, others were undertaken when benefits

  15. Recommendations to the primary care practitioners and the patients for managing pelvic pain, especially in painful bladder syndrome for early and better prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Jin; Han, Adelaide Na Yeon; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2015-01-01

    Painful bladder syndrome (PBS) is a common disease presenting with chronic pelvic pain and discomfort with at least one urinary symptom with no identifiable cause. The etiology is still unknown, and the medication has limited effects on pelvic pain or other urinary symptoms. This article presents advanced insight regarding the approach to PBS, particularly pelvic pain for primary care practitioners and patients. We suggest six tips for medical staff and suspected patients for easy diagnosis and proper treatment of pelvic pain. These six tips cover: Self-awareness of the disease; immediate urine culture test; specifying the location of pain urinary incontinence; frequency, or urgency without functional disorder of an overactive bladder helpful dietary control; complementary, and alternative medicine, and finding an expert. These tips might be helpful in advancing the schematic approach and in achieving better prognosis of PBS. Further study should be conducted to achieve better treatment for this disease, including development of a definitive test and diagnosis. PMID:26535214

  16. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and pelvic floor spasm: can we diagnose and treat?

    PubMed

    Westesson, Karin E; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    National Institutes of Health category III prostatitis, also known as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, is a common condition with significant impact on quality of life. This clinically defined syndrome has a multifactorial etiology and seems to respond best to multimodal therapy. At least half of these patients have pelvic floor spasm. There are several approaches to therapy including biofeedback, acupuncture, and myofascial release physical therapy. However, the only multicenter study of pelvic floor physical therapy for pelvic floor spasm in men failed to show an advantage over conventional Western massage. We have proposed a clinical phenotyping system called UPOINT to classify patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain and subsequently direct appropriate therapy. Here, we review the current approach to category III prostatitis and describe how clinical phenotyping with UPOINT may improve therapy outcomes. PMID:20490725

  17. Perspectives on the clinical significance of functional pain syndromes in children

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Molly C; Chow, Erika T; Logan, Deirdre E; Schechter, Neil L; Simons, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Functional pain syndromes (FPS) characterize a subset of individuals who experience pain and related symptoms and disability without clear structural or disease etiology. In the pediatric population, FPS hold high clinical importance due to significant prevalence rates and potential to persist into adulthood. Although extensive research has been executed to disambiguate FPS, the syndromes that fall within its spectrum remain conceptually complex and sometimes ill-defined. This paper provides an overview of available research on the classification and multifaceted etiology of FPS in youth and their effects on interpersonal, psychological, and familial function. Vital aspects of a successful multidisciplinary approach to treating this population are described; however, it is evident that future research requires more longitudinal studies. PMID:26504406

  18. Update on Urinary Tract Markers in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grigorescu, Bogdan; Powers, Kenneth; Lazarou, George

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC)/painful bladder syndrome/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is a chronic hypersensory condition of unknown etiology. Moreover, the optimal modality for diagnosing IC remains disputed. Several urinary markers have been investigated that may have potential utility in the diagnosis or confirmation of IC/BPS. Thus, inflammatory mediators, proteoglycans, urinary hexosamines, proliferative factors, nitric oxide (NO), BK polyomavirus family, and urothelial proinflammatory gene analysis have been found to correlate with varying degrees with the clinical diagnosis or cystoscopic findings in patients with IC/BPS. The most promising urinary biomarker for IC/BPS is antiproliferative factor, a sialoglycopeptide that has demonstrated inhibitory effects on urothelial cell proliferation and a high sensitivity and specificity for IC/BPS symptoms and clinical findings. In this article, we review the urinary markers, possible future therapies for IC/BPS, and the clinical relevance and controversies regarding the diagnosis of IC/BPS. PMID:26571430

  19. Chronic Pain Syndrome Caused by a Bird's Nest Filter: First Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Basheer, Mamoun Ahmad; Hamilton, Mark; Holdaway, Chris

    2008-07-15

    AimTo report the first case of a Bird's Nest IVC filter causing a chronic pain syndrome lasting 13 years through IVC wall penetration and subsequent break off of one of the filter struts.Materials and ResultsA 43-year-old female presented with a 13-year history of abdominal pain following uneventful insertion of a Bird's Nest vena cava filter through a right internal jugular percutanous approach. A year following the procedure, CT scan revealed one arm of the filter to be outside IVC borders. Nine years from the date of insertion the nature of the pain changed acutely following a five feet jump to more localized RUQ pain worse with twisting movements. A CT scan showed the strut to have pierced the IVC wall and penetrated the Unicate process of pancreas. Plain x-rays taken at different times in February 2006 showed one of the struts to be free floating in the peritoneal cavity. The floating strut was removed surgically from the wall of the Ileum. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged pain free three days later.ConclusionChronic pain is an added complication of BNF devices. Although rare, it further emphasizes the need for long-term follow up of patients with IVC filters.

  20. Intradermal Therapy (Mesotherapy) for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Giorgio; Capone, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common cause of severe hand pain. In this study we treated acute pain in CTS patients by means of local intradermal injections of anti-inflammatory drugs (mesotherapy). Methods In twenty-five patients (forty-five hands), CTS diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and neurophysiological examination prior to mesotherapy. A mixture containing lidocaine 10 mg, ketoprophen lysine-acetylsalycilate 80 mg, xantinol nicotinate 100 mg, cyanocobalamine 1,000 mcg plus injectable water was used. Sites of injection were three parallel lines above the transverse carpal ligament and two v-shaped lines, one at the base of the thenar eminence, and the other at the base of the hypothenar eminence. Results The day after the treatment, all but four patients reported a significant reduction in pain and paresthesias. After 12 months, 17 patients had a complete pain relief, eight patients reported recurrence of pain and sensory symptoms and four out of them underwent surgical treatment. Conclusions With the obvious limits of a small-size open-label study, our results suggest that mesotherapy can temporary relieve pain and paresthesias in most CTS patients and in some cases its effect seems to be long-lasting. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings and to compare mesotherapy to conventional approaches for the treatment of CTS. PMID:24478901

  1. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain. PMID:24976753

  2. Novel research approaches for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: thinking beyond the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bavendam, Tamara; Kirkali, Ziya; Kusek, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite years of basic and clinical research focused on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), including clinical trials of candidate therapies, there remains an insufficient understanding of underlying cause(s), important clinical features and a lack of effective treatments for this syndrome. Progress has been limited and is likely due to many factors, including a primary focus on the bladder and lower urinary tract as origin of symptoms without adequately considering the potential influence of other local (pelvic) or systemic factors. Traditionally, there has been a lack of sufficiently diverse expertise and application of novel, integrated methods to study this syndrome. However, some important insights have been gained. For example, epidemiological studies have revealed that IC/BPS is commonly associated with other chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome. These observations suggest that IC/BPS may involve systemic pathophysiology, including alterations of the central nervous system in some patients. Furthermore, there may be multiple causes and contributing factors that manifest in the symptoms of IC/BPS leading to multiple patient sub-groups or phenotypes. Innovative research is necessary to allow for a more complete description of the relationship between this syndrome and other disorders with overlapping symptoms. This report provides examples of such innovative research studies and their findings which have the potential to provide fresh insights into IC/BPS and disorders associated with chronic pain through characterization of broad physiologic systems, as well as assessment of the contribution of the bladder and lower urinary tract. They may also serve as models for future investigation of symptom-based urologic and non-urologic disorders that may remain incompletely characterized by previous, more traditional research approaches. Furthermore, it is anticipated a more holistic

  3. Novel research approaches for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: thinking beyond the bladder.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Chris; Bavendam, Tamara; Kirkali, Ziya; Kusek, John W

    2015-10-01

    Despite years of basic and clinical research focused on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), including clinical trials of candidate therapies, there remains an insufficient understanding of underlying cause(s), important clinical features and a lack of effective treatments for this syndrome. Progress has been limited and is likely due to many factors, including a primary focus on the bladder and lower urinary tract as origin of symptoms without adequately considering the potential influence of other local (pelvic) or systemic factors. Traditionally, there has been a lack of sufficiently diverse expertise and application of novel, integrated methods to study this syndrome. However, some important insights have been gained. For example, epidemiological studies have revealed that IC/BPS is commonly associated with other chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome. These observations suggest that IC/BPS may involve systemic pathophysiology, including alterations of the central nervous system in some patients. Furthermore, there may be multiple causes and contributing factors that manifest in the symptoms of IC/BPS leading to multiple patient sub-groups or phenotypes. Innovative research is necessary to allow for a more complete description of the relationship between this syndrome and other disorders with overlapping symptoms. This report provides examples of such innovative research studies and their findings which have the potential to provide fresh insights into IC/BPS and disorders associated with chronic pain through characterization of broad physiologic systems, as well as assessment of the contribution of the bladder and lower urinary tract. They may also serve as models for future investigation of symptom-based urologic and non-urologic disorders that may remain incompletely characterized by previous, more traditional research approaches. Furthermore, it is anticipated a more holistic

  4. Nonpharmacological approaches for the treatment of urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes in men.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jeannette M

    2009-07-01

    Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, or urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS), remains a common and often challenging disorder to evaluate and treat. Employing a more holistic approach, including urological therapy, physical therapy, and psychosocial perspectives, may be more appropriate for most patients. Growing evidence supports the use of biofeedback, myofascial trigger point release, prescribed exercise regimens, relaxation techniques, and supportive counseling to treat men with UCPPS. PMID:19570490

  5. Evaluation of the Sympathetic Skin Response to the Dry Needling Treatment in Female Myofascial Pain Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Ali Veysel; Alptekin, Hasan Kerem; Esmaeilzadeh, Sina; Cihan, Cem; Aki, Semih; Aksoy, Cihan; Oncu, Julide

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity following dry needling (DN) treatment, by using the sympathetic skin response (SSR) method in female patients diagnosed with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Methods Twenty-nine MPS patients with trapezius muscle pain and 31 healthy subjects were included in this study. During a single treatment session, DN treatment was applied into trigger points, for a duration of 10 minutes. Healthy patients were subjected to SSR in weeks 1 and 4; whereas the patient group was subjected to SSR 1 week prior to their treatment and in the first, second, third and fourth weeks following the completion of their treatment. Results We found diminished latency on both sides. A significantly high algometer measurement (P < 0.05) was observed in the control group. DN treatment was effective in diminishing the visual analog scale (VAS) (P < 0.001), pressure pain threshold (PPT) (P < 0.01), and SSR (P < 0.001). No SSR change was detected in the healthy group after the follow-up period (P > 0.05). Conclusion DN is an effective treatment in MPS and trigger point (TP). This original study is the first to deal with the SSR in MPS and weekly SSR trailing, requiring further investigation to solidy findings. PMID:27298659

  6. Randomized Multicenter Feasibility Trial of Myofascial Physical Therapy for Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Mary P; Anderson, Rodney U; Potts, Jeannette; Payne, Christopher K; Peters, Kenneth M; Clemens, J Quentin; Kotarinos, Rhonda; Fraser, Laura; Cosby, Annamarie; Fortman, Carole; Neville, Cynthia; Badillo, Suzanne; Odabachian, Lisa; Sanfield, Anna; O’Dougherty, Betsy; Halle-Podell, Rick; Cen, Liyi; Chuai, Shannon; Landis, J Richard; Kusek, John W; Nyberg, Leroy M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial designed to compare two methods of manual therapy (myofascial physical therapy (MPT) and global therapeutic massage (GTM)) among patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Materials and Methods Our goal was to recruit 48 subjects with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome at six clinical centers. Eligible patients were randomized to either MPT or GTM and were scheduled to receive up to 10 weekly treatments, each 1 hour in duration. Criteria to assess feasibility included adherence of therapists to prescribed therapeutic protocol as determined by records of treatment, adverse events which occurred during study treatment, and rate of response to therapy as assessed by the Patient Global Response Assessment (GRA). Primary outcome analysis compared response rates between treatment arms using Mantel-Haenszel methods. Results Twenty-three (49%) men and 24 (51%) women were randomized over a six month period. Twenty-four (51%) patients were randomized to GTM, 23 (49%) to MPT; 44 (94%) patients completed the study. Therapist adherence to the treatment protocols was excellent. The GRA response rate of 57% in the MPT group was significantly higher than the rate of 21% in the GTM treatment group (p=0.03). Conclusions The goals to judge feasibility of conducting a full-scale trial of physical therapy methods were met. The preliminary findings of a beneficial effect of MPT warrants further study. PMID:19535099

  7. An assessment of clinicians' and patients' experiences in the management of bladder pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tirlapur, S A; Khan, K S

    2016-02-01

    Current management of bladder pain syndrome (BPS) was evaluated through a prospective electronic questionnaire posted on three patient support groups and sent to all members on the British Society of Urogynaecology (BSUG) database. Methods of diagnosis and treatment were assessed. 133 patients and 69 clinicians participated in the survey. Patients reported their main symptom to be pain when their bladder was full in 80% (n = 107) and the most bothersome symptom was pelvic pain (22%, n = 29). 93% (n = 64) of clinicians made their diagnosis by history and cystoscopy. 78% (n = 54) of clinicians treated patients with amitriptyline and 75% (n = 52) by dietary modification while 77% (n = 102) of patients reported using simple analgesia, 74% (n = 98) dietary modification and 62% (n = 83) low-dose long-term antibiotics. There is wide variation in diagnostic methods and treatments of BPS used by clinicians and experienced by patients with no obvious consensus. National guidance is needed to help standardise care. PMID:26467216

  8. A Rare Case of Parkinson's Disease with Severe Neck Pain Owing to Crowned Dens Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tamura, Masato; Osabe, Keiichi; Tamiya, Takashi; Miki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Mai; Akira, Kanno; Kamei, Satoshi; Takasu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is regarded as one of the most common nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, musculoskeletal pain has been reported as the most common type of PD-associated pain. Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Case Presentation This report describes the case of an 87-year-old woman who had severe bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, gait disturbance and neck pain. Laboratory examination revealed marked elevations of white blood cells (10,100/µl) and C-reactive protein (CRP; 8.63 mg/dl). She was primarily diagnosed with severe and untreated PD, corresponding to Hoehn and Yahr scale score IV, with musculoskeletal pain and urinary tract infection. The patient was treated with antiparkinsonism drugs, antibiotic agents and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but they had only limited effects. Cervical plain computed tomography (CT) scanning detected remarkable crown-like calcification surrounding the odontoid process. Based on CT findings, the patient was diagnosed as having CDS with PD, and was immediately treated with corticosteroid. The severe neck rigidity with pain and the serum CRP level (0.83 mg/dl) of the patient were drastically improved within a week by the additional corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion Severe neck rigidity and bradykinesia in this patient might have strengthened the chondrocalcinosis around the odontoid process. Cervical plain CT scan is necessary and useful for the definitive diagnosis of CDS. CDS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a possible etiology for musculoskeletal pain related to rigidity and bradykinesia in PD. PMID:24926265

  9. Is poststroke complex regional pain syndrome the combination of shoulder pain and soft tissue injury of the wrist?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Wook; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Jong Moon; Hong, Ji Seong; Lim, Hyun Sun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with poststroke complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show different symptoms compared to other types of CRPS, as they usually complain of shoulder and wrist pain with the elbow relatively spared. It is thus also known by the term “shoulder-hand syndrome.” The aim of this study is to present a possible pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS through ultrasonographic observation of the affected wrist before and after steroid injection at the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon in patients suspected with poststroke CRPS. Prospective evaluation and observation, the STROBE guideline checklist was used. Twenty-three patients diagnosed as poststroke CRPS in accordance to clinical criteria were enrolled. They had a Three Phase Bone Scan (TPBS) done and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of EDC tendon was measured by using ultrasonography. They were then injected with steroid at the EDC tendon. The CSA of EDC tendon, visual analogue scale (VAS), and degree of swelling of the wrist were followed up 1 week after the injection. TPBS was interpreted as normal for 4 patients, suspected CRPS for 10 patients, and CRPS for 9 patients. Ultrasonographic findings of the affected wrist included swelling of the EDC tendon. After the injection of steroid to the wrist, CSA and swelling of the affected wrist compared to that before the treatment was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). The VAS score declined significantly after the injection (P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS might be the combination of frozen shoulder or rotator cuff tear of shoulder and soft tissue injury of the wrist caused by the hemiplegic nature of patients with stroke. PMID:27495051

  10. The MAPP research network: a novel study of urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS) may be defined to include interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). The hallmark symptom of UCPPS is chronic pain in the pelvis, urogenital floor, or external genitalia often accompanied by lower urinary tract symptoms. Despite numerous past basic and clinical research studies there is no broadly identifiable organ-specific pathology or understanding of etiology or risk factors for UCPPS, and diagnosis relies primarily on patient reported symptoms. In addition, there are no generally effective therapies. Recent findings have, however, revealed associations between UCPPS and “centralized” chronic pain disorders, suggesting UCPPS may represent a local manifestation of more widespread pathology in some patients. Here, we describe a new and novel effort initiated by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to address the many long standing questions regarding UCPPS, the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network. The MAPP Network approaches UCPPS in a systemic manner, in which the interplay between the genitourinary system and other physiological systems is emphasized. The network’s study design expands beyond previous research, which has primarily focused on urologic organs and tissues, to utilize integrated approaches to define patient phenotypes, identify clinically-relevant subgroups, and better understand treated natural history and pathophysiology. Thus, the MAPP Network provides an unprecedented, multi-layered characterization of UCPPS. Knowledge gained is expected to provide important insights into underlying pathophysiology, a foundation for better segmenting patients for future clinical trials, and ultimately translation into improved clinical management. In addition, the MAPP Network’s integrated multi

  11. Stool-based biomarkers of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braundmeier-Fleming, A.; Russell, Nathan T.; Yang, Wenbin; Nas, Megan Y.; Yaggie, Ryan E.; Berry, Matthew; Bachrach, Laurie; Flury, Sarah C.; Marko, Darlene S.; Bushell, Colleen B.; Welge, Michael E.; White, Bryan A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Klumpp, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC) is associated with significant morbidity, yet underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers remain unknown. Pelvic organs exhibit neural crosstalk by convergence of visceral sensory pathways, and rodent studies demonstrate distinct bacterial pain phenotypes, suggesting that the microbiome modulates pelvic pain in IC. Stool samples were obtained from female IC patients and healthy controls, and symptom severity was determined by questionnaire. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified by16S rDNA sequence analysis. Machine learning by Extended Random Forest (ERF) identified OTUs associated with symptom scores. Quantitative PCR of stool DNA with species-specific primer pairs demonstrated significantly reduced levels of E. sinensis, C. aerofaciens, F. prausnitzii, O. splanchnicus, and L. longoviformis in microbiota of IC patients. These species, deficient in IC pelvic pain (DIPP), were further evaluated by Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, and DIPP species emerged as potential IC biomarkers. Stool metabolomic studies identified glyceraldehyde as significantly elevated in IC. Metabolomic pathway analysis identified lipid pathways, consistent with predicted metagenome functionality. Together, these findings suggest that DIPP species and metabolites may serve as candidates for novel IC biomarkers in stool. Functional changes in the IC microbiome may also serve as therapeutic targets for treating chronic pelvic pain. PMID:27188581

  12. Stool-based biomarkers of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braundmeier-Fleming, A; Russell, Nathan T; Yang, Wenbin; Nas, Megan Y; Yaggie, Ryan E; Berry, Matthew; Bachrach, Laurie; Flury, Sarah C; Marko, Darlene S; Bushell, Colleen B; Welge, Michael E; White, Bryan A; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Klumpp, David J

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC) is associated with significant morbidity, yet underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers remain unknown. Pelvic organs exhibit neural crosstalk by convergence of visceral sensory pathways, and rodent studies demonstrate distinct bacterial pain phenotypes, suggesting that the microbiome modulates pelvic pain in IC. Stool samples were obtained from female IC patients and healthy controls, and symptom severity was determined by questionnaire. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified by16S rDNA sequence analysis. Machine learning by Extended Random Forest (ERF) identified OTUs associated with symptom scores. Quantitative PCR of stool DNA with species-specific primer pairs demonstrated significantly reduced levels of E. sinensis, C. aerofaciens, F. prausnitzii, O. splanchnicus, and L. longoviformis in microbiota of IC patients. These species, deficient in IC pelvic pain (DIPP), were further evaluated by Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, and DIPP species emerged as potential IC biomarkers. Stool metabolomic studies identified glyceraldehyde as significantly elevated in IC. Metabolomic pathway analysis identified lipid pathways, consistent with predicted metagenome functionality. Together, these findings suggest that DIPP species and metabolites may serve as candidates for novel IC biomarkers in stool. Functional changes in the IC microbiome may also serve as therapeutic targets for treating chronic pelvic pain. PMID:27188581

  13. Impaired Empathic Abilities among Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Type I)

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hong-Suk; Lee, Do-Hyeong; Lee, Kyung-Jun; Noh, Eun Chung; Choi, Soo-Hee; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Yong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate differences in empathic abilities between patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) Type I and healthy control subjects (HCs) and to assess correlations between empathic abilities and multidimensional aspects of pain. Methods Empathic ability was measured in 32 patients with CRPS Type I and in 36 HCs using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). A comprehensive assessment of pain was conducted in the patient group using the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories (BDI and BAI), and quality of life was evaluated using the WHO Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Results Patients with CRPS showed impaired cognitive and emotional empathic abilities compared with HCs. Significantly lower levels of perspective taking and empathic concern and higher levels of personal distress on the IRI were exhibited by the patient group. Perspective taking and personal distress were associated with affective distress and poor quality of life in social contexts (BDI, BAI, and WHOQOL). However, empathic concern was positively correlated with pain severity and social support from others (WHYMPI). Conclusion A tendency toward self-oriented distress in social cognition was exhibited among patients with CRPS Type I. Impaired empathic ability was shown to have potentially negative effects on subjective emotional outcomes and social performance in the lives of patients. Interventions to improve emotional awareness and theory of mind would be beneficial for enhancing social functioning in patients with CRPS Type I. PMID:26766944

  14. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjia; Zhao, Jimeng; Wu, Luyi; Dou, Chuanzi; Liu, Huirong; Weng, Zhijun; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Cili; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral) pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25093032

  15. Innovative Program Targets Five Common Pain Syndromes With Non-opioid Alternatives.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    To combat the prescription opioid problem, St. Joseph's Healthcare System in Paterson, NJ, has developed a new program that gives providers options they can use to effectively alleviate pain without resorting to highly addictive medication. Launched in January 2016 in the ED at St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center (SJRMC), the Alternatives to Opioids (ALTO) program utilizes protocols that primarily target five common conditions: renal colic, sciatica, headaches, musculoskeletal pain, and extremity fractures. Administrators say they have successfully treated more than 300 patients under the new program, and they see ALTO as a model other hospitals can duplicate. Among the alternative therapies called for in the ALTO program are trigger point injections, nitrous oxide, and ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. ALTO medications are specifically chosen because of how they affect the pain receptor sites for each different pain syndrome. While the primary goal of the program is to use alternatives to opioids when-ever possible, another important underlying goal is to stop acute pain from becoming chronic. While ALTO therapies typically take a bit longer to deliver than prescribing opioids, administrators note that this has not adversely affected patient flow in the ED. PMID:27295817

  16. Long-term experience with implanted intrathecal drug administration systems for failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, JH; Southall, JL; Gnanadurai, TV; Treharne, GJ; Kitas, GD

    2002-01-01

    Background Continuous intrathecal drug delivery has been shown in open studies to improve pain and quality of life in those with intractable back pain who have had spinal surgery. There is limited data on long term effects and and even less for patients with mechanical back pain without prior spinal surgery. Methods We have investigated spinal drug administration systems for patients with failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain by patient questionnaire study of the efficacy of this therapy and a case notes review. Results 36 patients (97% of 37 approached) completed questionnaires, 24 with failed back syndrome and 12 with chronic mechanical low back pain. Recalled pre-treatment levels with current post-treatment levels of pain and a range of quality of life measures (recorded on 11-point numerical rating scales) were compared. Pain improved significantly in both groups (Wilcoxan signed ranks test, p < 0.005). The majority of quality of life measures improved significantly in the failed back syndrome group (Wilcoxan signed ranks test, p < 0.005) although work interruption and the effect of pain on sex life did not change. There was a trend towards improvement in the majority of quality of life measures in the mechanical back pain group but this did not reach statistical significance due to the smaller numbers in this cohort (p > 0.005, Wilcoxan signed ranks test with Bonferroni correction). Diamorphine was used in all 37 patients, bupivacaine in 32, clonidine in 27 and baclofen in 3. The mean dose of diamorphine increased for the first 2 years but did not change 2–6 years post implant, averaging 4.5 mg/day. Revision surgery was required in 24% of cases, but reduced to 12% in the later years of our experience. Conclusions We conclude that spinal drug administration systems appear to be of benefit in alleviating pain in the failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain but need to be examined prospectively. PMID:12076357

  17. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radnovich, Richard; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT) patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain) were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg). Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily) during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0–10 scale). Results Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18–75, n=21 female). Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, P<0.001) and from 5.6±1.2 to 3.2±2.6 in the injection group (n=31, P<0.001). Similar improvements were seen in each group for worst pain; pain interference with general activity, work, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. Conclusion These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment with the HLT patch has similar efficacy to subacromial corticosteroid injections for the treatment of pain associated with SIS. PMID:25525385

  18. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:26270588

  19. Category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: insights from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network studies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J Curtis; Alexander, Richard B; Anderson, Rodney; Berger, Richard; Comiter, Craig V; Datta, Nand S; Fowler, Jackson E; Krieger, John N; Landis, J Richard; Litwin, Mark S; McNaughton-Collins, Mary; O'Leary, Michael P; Pontari, Michel A; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Shoskes, Daniel A; White, Paige; Kusek, John; Nyberg, Leroy

    2008-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome remains an enigmatic medical condition. Creation of the National Institutes of Health-funded Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network (CPCRN) has stimulated a renewed interest in research on and clinical aspects of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Landmark publications of the CPCRN document a decade of progress. Insights from these CPCRN studies have improved our management of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and offer hope for continued progress. PMID:18765132

  20. The alteration of pain sensitivity at disease-specific acupuncture points in premenstrual syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chae, Younbyoung; Kim, Hee-Young; Lee, Hwa-Jin; Park, Hi-Joon; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; An, Kyungeh; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-04-01

    Acupuncture points (APs) are well known to be small regions of local or referred pain that are more sensitive than surrounding tissue. Based on bibliographical and clinical data, specific conditions are commonly believed to change the pain sensitivity at corresponding APs. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pressure pain threshold (PPT) of specific APs is associated with the severity of premenstrual syndrome. The 46 participants were female students attending a middle school. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) was measured using a structured questionnaire, the menstruation distress questionnaire (MDQ). High PMS (HP) and low PMS (LP) groups were divided based on their MDQ scores. The PPTs at sites in the leg (the APs SP6, GB39, and LR3 and a non-AP 2-cm anterior to SP6) and in the arm (the APs PC6, TE5, and LI4 and a non-AP 2-cm proximal to PC6) were measured using an algometer. The PPT of the HP group at SP6 was significantly lower than that of the LP group (13.50 +/- 0.73 vs. 16.30 +/- 0.66 kilopascals, P < 0.05), but not at other APs or at non-APs. The findings of our study support the hypothesis that the alteration of pain threshold at specific APs is associated with the severity of corresponding diseases. Further studies are needed to determine whether an observation of pain sensitivity at the APs could be used as an adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of a clinical problem. PMID:17378970

  1. A Day-Hospital Approach to Treatment of Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Initial Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Carpino, Elizabeth A.; Chiang, Gloria; Condon, Marianne; Firn, Emily; Gaughan, Veronica J.; Hogan, Melinda, P.T.; Leslie, David S.; Olson, Katie, P.T.; Sager, Susan; Sethna, Navil; Simons, Laura E.; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine clinical outcomes of an interdisciplinary day hospital treatment program (comprised of physical, occupational, and cognitive-behavioral therapies with medical and nursing services) for pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Methods The study is a longitudinal case series of consecutive patients treated in a day hospital pediatric pain rehabilitation program. Participants were 56 children and adolescents ages 8–18 years (median = 14 years) with CRPS spectrum conditions who failed to progress sufficiently with a previous outpatient and/or inpatient treatments. Patients participated in daily physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychological treatment and received nursing and medical care as necessary. The model places equal emphasis on physical and cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management. Median duration of stay was 3 weeks. Outcome measures included assessments of physical, occupational, and psychological functioning at program admission, discharge, and at post-treatment follow-up at a median of 10 months post-discharge. Scores at discharge and follow-up were compared with measures on admission by Wilcoxon tests, paired t tests, or ANOVA as appropriate, with corrections for multiple comparisons. Results Outcomes demonstrate clinically and statistically significant improvements from admission to discharge in pain intensity (p<0.001), functional disability (p<0.001), subjective report of limb function (p<0.001), timed running (p<0.001) occupational performance (p<0.001), medication use (p<0.01), use of assistive devices (p<0.001), and emotional functioning (anxiety, p<0.001; depression, p<0.01). Functional gains were maintained or further improved at follow-up. Discussion A day-hospital interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach appears effective in reducing disability and improving physical and emotional functioning and occupational performance among children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndromes that

  2. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS), and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg) were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals) of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls) were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS. PMID:19925683

  3. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome due to tumoral calcinosis in a patient with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Baek, Dongjin; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jeon, Sanghoon; Lee, Kihwa; Jung, Jaewook; Joo, Hyunchul; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Yonghan; Choi, Young-gyun

    2014-01-01

    Tumoral calcinosis is a rare syndrome characterized by massive subcutaneous soft tissue deposits of calcium phosphate near the large joints. It is more prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis. A 57-year-old woman was referred to our pain clinic with the complaint of severe pain in the left buttock and lateral hip. The patient had been suffering from chronic kidney disease for 10 years and had been undergoing peritoneal dialysis over the past 5 years. The patient's symptom was initially suspected to be of lumbar origin at the L5 level and a left L5 transforaminal epidural block was performed, but without success. Re-evaluation of the physical examination revealed severe tenderness over the left greater trochanter and piriformis muscle. On ultrasonographic evaluation, multiple mass-like lesions in the left buttock were observed. About 30 mL of fluid was aspirated from the cystic lesions, followed by 30 mL mixture of 0.08% levobupivacaine and triamcinolone 40 mg injected into the bursa under ultrasound guidance, which brought pain relief. Trochanteric bursitis was thought of as the cause of the symptoms. The patient was diagnosed with tumoral calcinosis based on the past medical history, simple plain radiographs, and hip magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We diagnosed a case of greater trochanteric pain syndrome due to tumoral calcinosis related to chronic kidney disease in a patient whose symptoms had initially been considered to be radiating leg pain caused by lumbar spinal disease. We report our experience of symptomatic improvement following the repeated ultrasound-guided aspiration of calcific fluid and the injection of a mixture of local anesthetic and steroid. PMID:25415793

  4. The potential impact of various diagnostic strategies in cases of chronic pain syndromes associated with lumbar spine degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bokov, Andrey; Perlmutter, Olga; Aleynik, Alexander; Rasteryaeva, Marina; Mlyavykh, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the possible effects of various diagnostic strategies and the relative contribution of various structures in order to determine the optimal diagnostic strategy in treating patients with noncompressive pain syndromes. Study design Prospective, nonrandomized cohort study of 83 consecutive patients with noncompressive pain syndromes resistant to repeated courses of conservative treatment. The follow-up period was 18 months. Results Nucleoplasty was effective in cases of discogenic pain; the consequences related to false positive results of the discography were significant. The most specific criterion was 80% pain relief after facet joint blocks, whereas 50% pain relief and any subjective pain relief were not associated with a significant increase in the success rate. A considerable rate of false negative results was associated with 80% pain relief, whereas 50% pain relief after facet joint blocks showed the optimal ratio of sensitivity and specificity. Facet joint pain was detected in 50.6% of cases (95% confidence interval 44.1%–66.3%), discogenic pain in 16.9% cases (95% confidence interval 9.5%–26.7%), and sacroiliac joint pain in 7.2% cases (95% confidence interval 2.7%–15%). It was impossible to differentiate the main source of pain in 25.3% of cases. Conclusion It is rational to adjust the diagnostic algorithm to the probability of detecting a particular pain source and, in doing so, reduce the number of invasive diagnostic measures to evaluate a pain source. False positive results of diagnostic measures can negatively affect the overall efficacy of a particular technology; therefore, all reasons for the failure should be studied in order to reach an unbiased conclusion. In choosing diagnostic criteria, not only should the success rate of a particular technology be taken into consideration but also the rate of false negative results. Acceptable diagnostic criteria should be based on a rational balance of sensitivity and specificity. PMID

  5. Treatment of painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis with botulinum toxin A: why isn’t it effective in all patients?

    PubMed Central

    Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is currently used to treat a variety of painful disorders, including painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC). However, BTA is not consistently effective in all patients. This may be due to the disparity of causes of pain, but this may also relate to the processes by which BTA exerts anti-nociceptive effects. This review discusses mechanisms by which BTA may inhibit pain and studies of the use of BTA in PSB/IC patients. It is doubtful that any single treatment will effectively control pain in PBS/IC patients, and it is highly probable that multiple strategies will be required, both within individual patients and across the population of PBS/IC patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss those mechanisms by which BTA acts, with the intent that alternative strategies exploiting these mechanism, or work through alternative pathways, can be identified to more effectively treat pain in PBS/IC patients in the future. PMID:26816853

  6. A study of bone densitometry in patients with complex regional pain syndrome after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V; Kalita, J; Gujral, R; Sharma, V; Misra, U

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—This study was undertaken to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type-I (CRPS-I) after stroke, and to correlate it with various clinical and neurophysiological parameters.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Twenty patients with CRPS-I after stroke were included and a detailed neurological evaluation was carried out. The severity of CRPS-I was graded on the basis of shoulder hand syndrome score. All the patients underwent bone mineral densitometry of paralysed and non-paralysed forearm by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. The BMD of paralysed forearm was also compared with that of age matched healthy controls. Neurophysiological tests included sympathetic skin response in both upper and lower limbs and median somatosensory evoked potentials.
RESULTS—The mean age of patients was 57.2 (45-75) years and eight were females. Eight patients had severe weakness and 12 had moderate weakness of grade 2 on the hemiplegic side. There was significant reduction in BMD in the patients compared with controls (p<0.01). The bone density reduction correlated well with duration of illness (r = −0.673, p<0.01), shoulder hand syndrome score (r = −0.804, p<0.01), and Canadian neurological scale score (r = −0.738 p<0.01). Sympathetic skin response was not recordable bilaterally in all patients. Median somatosensory evoked potentials were not recordable in seven out of 20 patients who also had higher grade of CRPS-I.
CONCLUSION—Our results show significant reduction of BMD in patients with CRPS-I after stroke. The reduction in BMD correlates with the severity of shoulder hand syndrome score, degree of weakness, duration of hemiplegia, and the severity of stroke.


Keywords: stroke; complex regional pain syndrome type I; bone mineral density PMID:11470933

  7. [Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). Pathophysiology, diagnostics, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Köck, F X; Borisch, N; Koester, B; Grifka, J

    2003-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS type I)--formerly termed Sudeck's atrophy or reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD)--causes chronic, poorly controllable pain, autonomic, sensorimotor disorders,and serious trophic alterations in the later stages. It develops in the distal extremities mostly after minimal trauma or surgical intervention and rarely spontaneously. The severity of symptoms is disproportionate to the causative event. The latest scientific findings show that the previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), which was supposed to be a result of a hyperreactive autonomic nervous system,is a very complex syndrome that occurs on different integration levels of the nervous system. Sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) may be facultatively characteristic, but is not to be misunderstood as an underlying mechanism. A neurogenic inflammation reaction has recently been discussed, just as had been postulated by Paul Sudeck long before. That was the reason why the International Association for the Study of Pain (ISAP) introduced the more descriptive term "complex regional pain syndrome" (CRPS) type I in 1994. Due to the complexity of the process necessitating qualified knowledge, it is important to immediately refer patients to a specialized pain OPD or clinic. The diagnosis of CRPS type I is based upon a carefully taken case history and a clinical examination by an experienced practitioner. Imaging diagnostic tools and laboratory findings are of no or only low predicative value. The question of whether SMP exists after diagnosing CRPS type I is eminent for therapy planning. Therefore, diagnostic regional anesthetics are still important in spite of their uncertain prognostic relevance. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical treatment, and psychotherapy play an important role in the primary treatment of CRPS type I as noninvasive procedures. Despite heavy criticism, invasive sympathetic block, subsequent to adequate diagnostics, is an

  8. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) or continuous unilateral distal experimental pain stimulation in healthy subjects does not bias visual attention towards one hemifield.

    PubMed

    Filippopulos, Filipp M; Grafenstein, Jessica; Straube, Andreas; Eggert, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In natural life pain automatically draws attention towards the painful body part suggesting that it interacts with different attentional mechanisms such as visual attention. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients who typically report on chronic distally located pain of one extremity may suffer from so-called neglect-like symptoms, which have also been linked to attentional mechanisms. The purpose of the study was to further evaluate how continuous pain conditions influence visual attention. Saccade latencies were recorded in two experiments using a common visual attention paradigm whereby orientating saccades to cued or uncued lateral visual targets had to be performed. In the first experiment saccade latencies of healthy subjects were measured under two conditions: one in which continuous experimental pain stimulation was applied to the index finger to imitate a continuous pain situation, and one without pain stimulation. In the second experiment saccade latencies of patients suffering from CRPS were compared to controls. The results showed that neither the continuous experimental pain stimulation during the experiment nor the chronic pain in CRPS led to an unilateral increase of saccade latencies or to a unilateral increase of the cue effect on latency. The results show that unilateral, continuously applied pain stimuli or chronic pain have no or only very limited influence on visual attention. Differently from patients with visual neglect, patients with CRPS did not show strong side asymmetries of saccade latencies or of cue effects on saccade latencies. Thus, neglect-like clinical symptoms of CRPS patients do not involve the allocation of visual attention. PMID:26238407

  9. Pain symptoms and stooling patterns do not drive diagnostic costs for children with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in primary or tertiary care

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to (1) compare the cost of medical evaluation for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome brought to a pediatric gastroenterologist versus children who remained in the care of their pediatrician, (2) compare symptom characteristics for th...

  10. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. PMID:27288824

  11. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  12. Is pain the only symptom in patients with benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

    PubMed

    Albayrak, İlknur; Yilmaz, Halim; Akkurt, Halil Ekrem; Salli, Ali; Karaca, Gülten

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate pain, depression level, fatigue, sleep, and quality of life (QoL) among patients with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) and to compare their results with those of healthy controls. The study involved 115 patients and 114 healthy volunteers. Pain level was rated using visual analogue scale (VAS) for all patients. Depression level, fatigue, sleep quality, and QoL of all the participants were evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Short Form-36 (SF-36), respectively. VAS value was 6.29 ± 0.94 in the patient group. Comparison of two groups showed that there were statistically significant differences between the patient group and the control group with respect to BDI, total CIS, PSQI scores, SF-36 subscales (physical function, role physical, bodily pain, general health, role emotional, and mental health), and mental component summary (p < 0.001). While pain is the predominant symptom among BJHS patients, depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, and QoL also commonly occur. Thus, all of these components should be taken into account when assessing patients with BJHS. PMID:24744155

  13. Intrinsic brain networks normalize with treatment in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Sava, Simona; Simons, Laura E.; Drosos, Athena M.; Sethna, Navil; Berde, Charles; Lebel, Alyssa A.; Borsook, David

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (P-CRPS) offers a unique model of chronic neuropathic pain as it either resolves spontaneously or through therapeutic interventions in most patients. Here we evaluated brain changes in well-characterized children and adolescents with P-CRPS by measuring resting state networks before and following a brief (median = 3 weeks) but intensive physical and psychological treatment program, and compared them to matched healthy controls. Differences in intrinsic brain networks were observed in P-CRPS compared to controls before treatment (disease state) with the most prominent differences in the fronto-parietal, salience, default mode, central executive, and sensorimotor networks. Following treatment, behavioral measures demonstrated a reduction of symptoms and improvement of physical state (pain levels and motor functioning). Correlation of network connectivities with spontaneous pain measures pre- and post-treatment indicated concomitant reductions in connectivity in salience, central executive, default mode and sensorimotor networks (treatment effects). These results suggest a rapid alteration in global brain networks with treatment and provide a venue to assess brain changes in CRPS pre- and post-treatment, and to evaluate therapeutic effects. PMID:25379449

  14. Effects of gabapentin enacarbil on restless legs syndrome and leg pain in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige

    2014-06-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Both RLS and DLB can be effectively treated by dopaminergic medications, suggesting the role of dopamine dysfunction in the pathogenesis of both diseases. Here, I report on a Japanese woman with probable DLB and RLS who was treated with gabapentin enacarbil, a non-dopaminergic agent. Because a dopamine agonist, a first-line therapy for moderate to severe RLS, caused the occurrence of metamorphopsia, an alternative treatment of gabapentin enacarbil was used; this treatment improved the patient's RLS without worsening her psychiatric symptoms. An alternative treatment is desirable for DLB patients with RLS because they often experience intolerable side-effects with a dopamine agonist, especially visual hallucinations. Administering gabapentin enacarbil also improved the continuous leg pain that occurred in conjunction with the development of RLS. Although the neurobiological mechanism in the development of pain remains unclear, a range of non-dopaminergic structures likely mediated pain processing in DLB in the present case based on neuropharmacological results. This is the first report reporting the effects of gabapentin enacarbil for RLS and leg pain in a DLB patient with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:24528871

  15. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Qian; Hou, Jingshan; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome in a young athlete with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Khadavi, Michael J; Alm, John C; Emerson, Jane-Anne

    2014-06-01

    A 17-year-old female with type 1 Von Willebrand Disease (vWD) developed left medial calf pain while running track. Over the next 6 months, orthopedic surgery, sports medicine, vascular surgery, and neurology treated her under various working diagnoses; however, the pain, allodynia, coldness, and pale skin color worsened. She was admitted to a tertiary pediatric hospital for intractable pain where PM&R diagnosed her with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1, began gabapentin, and initiated an aggressive inpatient rehabilitation program. During her 3 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation, passive range of motion of knee extension improved from 40° from extension to full extension, and ankle dorsiflexion improved from 15° from neutral to a consistent range of motion beyond neutral. Additional outcome measures were distance of ambulation and assistive device usage; from admission to inpatient rehabilitation to 2 months postdischarge, her weight-bearing tolerance progressed from nonweight-bearing to partial weight-bearing, and ambulation improved from 20 feet with a three-point crutch gait to unlimited distances with a four-point crutch gait. This is the first known case of a bleeding disorder as the likely underlying microvascular pathology associated with CRPS, a theory exposed in 2010. PMID:24666636

  17. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  18. Bisphosphonates in Complex Regional Pain syndrome type I: how do they work?

    PubMed

    Varenna, Massimo; Adami, Silvano; Sinigaglia, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is a disease characterised by extreme pain for which no gold-standard treatment exists to date. In recent years a possible role for bisphosphonates in the treatment of CRPS-I has been proposed. These drugs were first used for their effect in decreasing pain in bone diseases in which bisphosphonates act through their antiosteoclastic properties (metastatic disease, Paget disease, myeloma). In CRPS-I, enhanced osteoclastic activity has never clearly been demonstrated and the benefit shown is possibly exerted by different mechanisms of action. In this paper we review other conjectural mechanisms involved in reducing pain intensity and improving clinical signs and functional status in these patients. The results of most studies on this topic show that bisphosphonates may be effective in the early phases of the disease, when scintigraphic bone scan more frequently shows a local radiotracer accumulation that possibly means a high local concentration of the drug. These features probably represent the required conditions by which bisphosphonates might modulate various inflammatory mediators that are upregulated in CRPS-I. Patients in whom a scintiscan is often negative (long-standing disease or a primarily cold disease) could be less responsive to this treatment. With these limitations, bisphosphonates appear to present a therapeutic strategy that has been proven to reliably offer benefits in patients with CRPS-I. PMID:24959990

  19. Image-guided Nerve Cryoablation for Post-thoracotomy Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, Yilun; Mannes, Andrew J.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) can cause significant patient distress and is frequently difficult to manage. Percutaneous intercostal nerve (ICN) cryoablation by palpation of surface landmarks can be risky, as inaccurate probe placement can lead to hemo- or pneumothorax. Experience with image-guided ICN cryoablation with treatment planning and device navigation is limited. A patient with intractable PTPS was treated with ICN cryoablation under cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance with software-assisted needle trajectory planning and ablation zone simulation. This procedure provided the patient approximately 8 weeks of relief. This case demonstrated that ICN cryoablation is feasible under image-guidance with device navigation and ablation simulation, and may result in a few months of pain relief in cases of intractable PTPS. PMID:23954965

  20. The painful arc syndrome. Clinical classification as a guide to management.

    PubMed

    Kessel, L; Watson, M

    1977-05-01

    Ninety-seven patients suffering from painful arc syndrome of the shoulder were studied. Local anaesthetic and radiographic contrast investigations were carried out. One-third of the patients had lesions in the posterior part of the rotator cuff which resolved after injections of local anaesthetic and steroid. One-third had anterior lesions in the subscapularis tendon: almost all resolved under the same regime but two required division of the coraco-acromial ligament. The remaining third had lesions of the supraspinatus tendon, usually associated with degeneration of the acromio-clavicular joint: most of these failed to gain relief from the local anaesthetic and steroid. Twenty-two operations were performed either by a transcromial or by a deltoid splitting approach. Excision of the outer end of the clavicle and division of the coraco-acromial ligament abolished the pain in most cases. PMID:873977

  1. Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome: a rare cause of pelvic pain in adolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Miranda, Victor; Cabral, António Jorge; Nunes, Sidónia; Paulo, Filomeno; Freitas, Conceição

    2011-01-01

    The Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterised by uterus didelphys with blind hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It usually presents after menarche with progressive pelvic pain during menses secondary to haematocolpos. Awareness is necessary in order to diagnose and treat this disorder properly before complications occur. MRI is the preferred modality for the delineation of uterine malformation. When renal anomalies are encountered, a screening should also be made for congenital abnormalities of the reproductive tract and vice versa. The authors report a case of a girl with this condition who had a prenatal diagnose of right renal agenesis and presented at 13 years old with pelvic pain caused by haematocolpos. PMID:22689557

  2. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.; Meyer, G.A.; Schwab, J.P.; Flatley, T.J.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Knobel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT.

  3. Alfuzosin and Symptoms of Chronic Prostatitis–Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. Curtis; Krieger, John N.; McNaughton-Collins, Mary; Anderson, Rodney U.; Pontari, Michel; Shoskes, Daniel A.; Litwin, Mark S.; Alexander, Richard B.; White, Paige C.; Berger, Richard; Nadler, Robert; O'Leary, Michael; Liong, Men Long; Zeitlin, Scott; Chuai, Shannon; Landis, J. Richard; Kusek, John W.; Nyberg, Leroy M.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Background In men with chronic prostatitis–chronic pelvic pain syndrome, treatment with alpha-adrenergic receptor blockers early in the course of the disorder has been reported to be effective in some, but not all, relatively small randomized trials. Methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of alfuzosin, an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker, in reducing symptoms in men with chronic prostatitis–chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Participation in the study required diagnosis of the condition within the preceding 2 years and no previous treatment with an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker. Men were randomly assigned to treatment for 12 weeks with either 10 mg of alfuzosin per day or placebo. The primary outcome was a reduction of at least 4 points (from baseline to 12 weeks) in the score on the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) (range, 0 to 43; higher scores indicate more severe symptoms). A 4-point decrease is the minimal clinically significant difference in the score. Results A total of 272 eligible participants underwent randomization, and in both study groups, 49.3% of participants had a decrease of at least 4 points in their total NIH-CPSI score (rate difference associated with alfuzosin, 0.1%; 95% confidence interval, −11.2 to 11.0; P = 0.99). In addition, a global response assessment showed similar response rates at 12 weeks: 33.6% in the placebo group and 34.8% in the alfuzosin group (P = 0.90). The rates of adverse events in the two groups were also similar. Conclusions Our findings do not support the use of alfuzosin to reduce the symptoms of chronic prostatitis–chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men who have not received prior treatment with an alpha-blocker. PMID:19092152

  4. Management of pain and fatigue in the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type): principles and proposal for a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Celli, Mauro; Morrone, Aldo; Colombi, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2012-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type (EDS-HT), is a underdiagnosed heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and a wide range of visceral, pelvic, neurologic, and cognitive dysfunctions. Deterioration of quality of life is mainly associated with pain and fatigue. Except for the recognized effectiveness of physiotherapy for some musculoskeletal features, there are no standardized guidelines for the assessment and treatment of pain and fatigue. In this work, a practical classification of pain presentations and factors contributing in generating painful sensations in JHS/EDS-HT is proposed. Pain can be topographically classified in articular limb (acute/subacute and chronic), muscular limb (myofascial and fibromyalgia), neuropathic limb, back/neck, abdominal and pelvic pain, and headache. For selected forms of pain, specific predisposing characteristics are outlined. Fatigue appears as the result of multiple factors, including muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, unrefreshing sleep, dysautonomia, intestinal malabsorption, reactive depression/anxiety, and excessive use of analgesics. A set of lifestyle recommendations to instruct patients as well as specific investigations aimed at characterizing pain and fatigue are identified. Available treatment options are discussed in the set of a structured multidisciplinary approach based on reliable outcome tools. PMID:22786715

  5. Medical Management of Tumor Lysis Syndrome, Postprocedural Pain, and Venous Thromboembolism Following Interventional Radiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzalian, Ali; Armitage, Keith B.; Kapoor, Baljendra; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of minimally invasive image-guided procedures has led to their extensive use in the interdisciplinary management of patients with vascular, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, and oncologic diseases. Given the increased availability and breadth of these procedures, it is important for physicians to be aware of common complications and their management. In this article, the authors describe management of select common complications from interventional radiology procedures including tumor lysis syndrome, acute on chronic postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism. These complications are discussed in detail and their medical management is outlined according to generally accepted practice and evidence from the literature. PMID:26038627

  6. Radiofrequency ablation of stellate ganglion in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chinmoy; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by a combination of sensory, motor, vasomotor, pseudomotor dysfunctions and trophic signs. We describe the use of radiofrequency (RF) ablation of Stellate ganglion (SG) under fluoroscopy, for long-term suppression of sympathetic nervous system, in a patient having CRPS-not otherwise specified. Although the effects of thermal RF neurolysis may be partial or temporary, they may promote better conditions toward rehabilitation. The beneficial effect obtained by the RF neurolysis of SG in this particular patient strongly advocates the use of this mode of therapy in patients with CRPS. PMID:25191200

  7. [Advances in the treatment of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Gen; Zhao, Xiao-Kun

    2008-12-01

    So far the etiology of chronic prostatitis (PC) and particularly chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) remains to be elucidated. According to recent epidemiologic data, CP is the most common urological disease in men below 50 years and occurs in 2.5%-16.0% of the world population. Since the 1990s, researchers of many countries have carried out deeper, more extensive and larger scaled studies than ever before on the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of the disease, with the sponsorship and coordination of such international institutions as the International Prostatitis Collaborative Network (IPCN), the Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network of the National Institute of Health (NIH-CPCRN) and so on. As prevalent as multiple sclerosis, CPPS is the most common yet most poorly understood "prostatitis syndrome". This article reviews the progress in the studies of the treatment of CPPS, explores the main problems and ventures the prospects for the development in this field. PMID:19157239

  8. Multiple orbital neurofibromas, painful peripheral nerve tumors, distinctive face and marfanoid habitus: a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Babovic-Vuksanovic, D; Messiaen, Ludwine; Nagel, Christoph; Brems, Hilde; Scheithauer, Bernd; Denayer, Ellen; Mao, Rong; Sciot, Raf; Janowski, Karen M; Schuhmann, Martin U; Claes, Kathleen; Beert, Eline; Garrity, James A; Spinner, Robert J; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Mautner, Victor; Legius, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Four unrelated patients having an unusual clinical phenotype, including multiple peripheral nerve sheath tumors, are reported. Their clinical features were not typical of any known familial tumor syndrome. The patients had multiple painful neurofibromas, including bilateral orbital plexiform neurofibromas, and spinal as well as mucosal neurofibromas. In addition, they exhibited a marfanoid habitus, shared similar facial features, and had enlarged corneal nerves as well as neuronal migration defects. Comprehensive NF1, NF2 and SMARCB1 mutation analyses revealed no mutation in blood lymphocytes and in schwann cells cultured from plexiform neurofibromas. Furthermore, no mutations in RET, PRKAR1A, PTEN and other RAS-pathway genes were found in blood leukocytes. Collectively, the clinical and pathological findings in these four cases fit no known syndrome and likely represent a new disorder. PMID:22258529

  9. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS): a systematic review of anatomy and potential risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McDermott, Ann Y

    2008-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), a common cause of anterior knee pain, is successfully treated in over 2/3 of patients through rehabilitation protocols designed to reduce pain and return function to the individual. Applying preventive medicine strategies, the majority of cases of PFPS may be avoided if a pre-diagnosis can be made by clinician or certified athletic trainer testing the current researched potential risk factors during a Preparticipation Screening Evaluation (PPSE). We provide a detailed and comprehensive review of the soft tissue, arterial system, and innervation to the patellofemoral joint in order to supply the clinician with the knowledge required to assess the anatomy and make recommendations to patients identified as potentially at risk. The purpose of this article is to review knee anatomy and the literature regarding potential risk factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome and prehabilitation strategies. A comprehensive review of knee anatomy will present the relationships of arterial collateralization, innervations, and soft tissue alignment to the possible multifactoral mechanism involved in PFPS, while attempting to advocate future use of different treatments aimed at non-soft tissue causes of PFPS. Methods A systematic database search of English language PubMed, SportDiscus, Ovid MEDLINE, Web of Science, LexisNexis, and EBM reviews, plus hand searching the reference lists of these retrieved articles was performed to determine possible risk factors for patellofemoral pain syndrome. Results Positive potential risk factors identified included: weakness in functional testing; gastrocnemius, hamstring, quadriceps or iliotibial band tightness; generalized ligamentous laxity; deficient hamstring or quadriceps strength; hip musculature weakness; an excessive quadriceps (Q) angle; patellar compression or tilting; and an abnormal VMO/VL reflex timing. An evidence-based medicine model was utilized to report evaluation

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  11. Re-writing the natural history of pain and related symptoms in the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Bruschini, Michela; Grammatico, Paola; Blundo, Carlo; Camerota, Filippo

    2013-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping connective tissue disorders characterized by chronic/recurrent pain, joint instability complications, and minor skin changes. Fatigue and headache are also common, although are not yet considered diagnostic criteria. JHS/EDS-HT is a unexpectedly common condition that remains underdiagnosed by most clinicians and pain specialists. This results in interventions limited to symptomatic and non-satisfactory treatments, lacking reasonable pathophysiologic rationale. In this manuscript the fragmented knowledge on pain, fatigue, and headache in JHS/EDS is presented with review of the available published information and a description of the clinical course by symptoms, on the basis of authors' experience. Pathogenic mechanisms are suggested through comparisons with other functional somatic syndromes (e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and functional gastrointestinal disorders). The re-writing of the natural history of JHS/EDS-HT is aimed to raise awareness among clinical geneticists and specialists treating chronic pain conditions about pain and other complications of JHS/EDS-HT. Symptoms' clustering by disease stage is proposed to investigate both the molecular causes and the symptoms management of JHS/EDS-HT in future studies. PMID:24254847

  12. Endoneurial pathology of the needlestick-nerve-injury model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, including rats with and without pain behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Max M.; Lee, Jeung Woon; Siegel, Sandra M.; Downs, Heather M.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2011-01-01

    Current rodent models of neuropathic pain produce pain hypersensitivity in almost all lesioned animals and not all identified experimental effects are pain specific. 18G needlestick-nerve-injury (NNI) to one tibial nerve of outbred Sprague-Dawley rats models the phenotype of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), a post-traumatic neuropathic pain syndrome, leaving roughly half of NNI rats with hyperalgesia. We compared endoneurial data from these divergent endophenotypes searching for pathological changes specifically associated with pain-behaviors. Tibial, sural, and common sciatic nerves from 12 NNI rats plus 10 nerves from sham-operated controls were removed 14 days post-surgery for morphometric analysis. PGP9.5+ unmyelinated-fibers were quantitated in plantar hindpaw skin. Distal tibial nerves of NNI rats had endoneurial edema, 30% fewer axons, twice as many mast cells, and thicker blood-vessel walls than uninjured tibial nerves. However the only significant difference between nerves from hyperalgesic versus non-hyperalgesic NNI rats was greater endoneurial edema in hyperalgesic rats (p < 0.01). We also discovered significant axonal losses in uninjured ipsilateral sural nerves of NNI rats, demonstrating spread of neuropathy to nearby nerves formerly thought spared. Tibial and sural nerves contralateral to NNI had significant changes in endoneurial bloodvessels. Similar pathological changes have been identified in CRPS-I patients. The current findings suggest that severity of endoneurial vasculopathy and inflammation may correlate better with neuropathic pain behaviors than degree of axonal loss. Spread of pathological changes to nearby ipsilateral and contralesional nerves might potentially contribute to extraterritorial pain in CRPS. PMID:21676634

  13. Underlying synovial sarcoma in a patient with a history of complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Joshua; Johnston, Leslie; Brennan, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma, although commonly found in the lower extremities, is considered a rare neoplasm. One of the distinguishing features of a synovial sarcoma is its initial benign features that can later turn into a more aggressive lesion. Because of the subtle early features, synovial sarcoma can be mistaken for other pathologic entities that present with clinical signs of erythema, warmth, edema, and pain. We present a patient who was originally diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome. That diagnosis and subsequent treatment of complex regional pain syndrome likely delayed the appropriate evaluation, which led to a 9-month lag in the proper diagnosis. After magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy were performed, synovial sarcoma was diagnosed. The patient was referred to an orthopedic oncologist, who performed a transtibial amputation and chemotherapy. Although rare, neoplasm should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a clinical presentation of a painful erythematous and edematous mass. PMID:23158107

  14. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    DosSantos, Marcos F; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L; Carvalho, Antônio C; DaSilva, Alexandre F

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively. PMID:26903788

  15. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L.; Carvalho, Antônio C.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively. PMID:26903788

  16. Truths, errors, and lies around "reflex sympathetic dystrophy" and "complex regional pain syndrome".

    PubMed

    Ochoa, J L

    1999-10-01

    The shifting paradigm of reflex sympathetic dystrophy-sympathetically maintained pains-complex regional pain syndrome is characterized by vestigial truths and understandable errors, but also unjustifiable lies. It is true that patients with organically based neuropathic pain harbor unquestionable and physiologically demonstrable evidence of nerve fiber dysfunction leading to a predictable clinical profile with stereotyped temporal evolution. In turn, patients with psychogenic pseudoneuropathy, sustained by conversion-somatization-malingering, not only lack physiological evidence of structural nerve fiber disease but display a characteristically atypical, half-subjective, psychophysical sensory-motor profile. The objective vasomotor signs may have any variety of neurogenic, vasogenic, and psychogenic origins. Neurological differential diagnosis of "neuropathic pain" versus pseudoneuropathy is straight forward provided that stringent requirements of neurological semeiology are not bypassed. Embarrassing conceptual errors explain the assumption that there exists a clinically relevant "sympathetically maintained pain" status. Errors include historical misinterpretation of vasomotor signs in symptomatic body parts, and misconstruing symptomatic relief after "diagnostic" sympathetic blocks, due to lack of consideration of the placebo effect which explains the outcome. It is a lie that sympatholysis may specifically cure patients with unqualified "reflex sympathetic dystrophy." This was already stated by the father of sympathectomy, René Leriche, more than half a century ago. As extrapolated from observations in animals with gross experimental nerve injury, adducing hypothetical, untestable, secondary central neuron sensitization to explain psychophysical sensory-motor complaints displayed by patients with blatantly absent nerve fiber injury, is not an error, but a lie. While conceptual errors are not only forgivable, but natural to inexact medical science, lies

  17. Outcomes of a Simple Treatment for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Frederick R.; Compton, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPSI) in children is a disorder of unknown etiology. No standard diagnostic criteria or treatment exists. Published treatment protocols are often time and resource intensive. Nonetheless, CRPSI is not rare and can be disabling. This reports the results of a simple and inexpensive treatment protocol involving no medicines, nerve blockades, physical therapy resources or referrals to pain specialists. The patient is instructed in a self-administered massage and mobilization program. The diagnosis required allodynia (pain on light touch of the skin) and signs or the history of signs of autonomic dysfunction. Methods A chart review of patient coded for “reflex sympathetic dystrophy” or ‘autonomic dysfunction” was performed yielding a cohort of eighty-three patients treated by a common protocol. Most patients were identified in the last 15 years. Most patients with this CRPSI were doubtless coded simply as “foot pain” or “knee pain”, etc and were not identified in this search. Charts were reviewed for patient demographics and outcomes. A subset of patients filled out the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) giving a validated pre-treatment disability measure. Results The cohort characteristics were similar to prior reports with respect to age, gender, location, and history of trauma. Of the 26 patients who completed the PODCI before treatment the Pain/Comfort Core Scale score mean was 20.81(0–63). The Global Functioning Scale score mean was 52.11(27–83.5). Eighty-nine percent of 51 patients who attended clinic until their outcome was definite had no or minimal residual pain. Treatment averaged 2.2 visits per patient, typically over a six-week period. Conclusions A simple, inexpensive protocol can be effective in treating CRPSI in children. The protocol is risk free, inexpensive to families and conservative of physician and physical therapy resources. Level of Evidence Therapeutic

  18. Changes in immune and glial markers in the CSF of patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Guillermo M; Perreault, Marielle J; Reichenberger, Erin R; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is a severe chronic pain condition characterized by sensory, autonomic, motor and dystrophic signs and symptoms. The pain in CRPS is continuous, it worsens over time, and it is usually disproportionate to the severity and duration of the inciting event. This study compares cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and several biochemical factors (glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the nitric oxide metabolites (nitrate plus nitrite), the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate, calcium, total protein and glucose) in patients afflicted with CRPS to levels found in patients suffering with other non-painful or painful conditions. The aim of the study is to determine the degree of involvement of glial cells and immune system mediators in the pathophysiology of CRPS. There was no elevation or reduction of a CSF marker that was specific for CRPS patients. However, there were several patterns of markers that could be helpful in both elucidating the mechanisms involved in the disease process and supporting the diagnosis of CRPS. The most common pattern was found in 50% (11 out of 22) of the CRPS patients and consisted of; elevated IL-6, low levels of IL-4 or IL-10, increased GFAP or MCP1 and increases in at least two of the following markers NO metabolites, calcium or glutamate. The results from this and other similar studies may aid in elucidating the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of CRPS. A better understanding of these mechanisms may lead to novel treatments for this very severe, life-altering illness. PMID:17129705

  19. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength. PMID:27190430

  20. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength. PMID:27190430

  1. No effect of a single session of transcranial direct current stimulation on experimentally induced pain in patients with chronic low back pain--an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Luedtke, Kerstin; May, Arne; Jürgens, Tim P

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical excitability. A small number of studies suggested that tDCS modulates the response to experimental pain paradigms. No trials have been conducted to evaluate the response of patients already suffering from pain, to an additional experimental pain before and after tDCS. The present study investigated the effect of a single session of anodal, cathodal and sham stimulation (15 mins/1 mA) over the primary motor cortex on the perceived intensity of repeated noxious thermal and electrical stimuli and on elements of quantitative sensory testing (thermal pain and perception thresholds) applied to the right hand in 15 patients with chronic low back pain. The study was conducted in a double-blind sham-controlled and cross-over design. No significant alterations of pain ratings were found. Modalities of quantitative sensory testing remained equally unchanged. It is therefore hypothesized that a single 15 mins session of tDCS at 1 mA may not be sufficient to alter the perception of experimental pain and in patients with chronic pain. Further studies applying repetitive tDCS to patients with chronic pain are required to fully answer the question whether experimental pain perception may be influenced by tDCS over the motor cortex. PMID:23189136

  2. Intravesical Liposome and Antisense Treatment for Detrusor Overactivity and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Mahendra P.; Kawamorita, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Tsuyoshi; Chancellor, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The following review focuses on the recent advancements in intravesical drug delivery, which brings added benefit to the therapy of detrusor overactivity and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). Results. Intravesical route is a preferred route of administration for restricting the action of extremely potent drugs like DMSO for patients of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and botulinum toxin for detrusor overactivity. Patients who are either refractory to oral treatment or need to mitigate the adverse effects encountered with conventional routes of administration also chose this route. Its usefulness in some cases can be limited by vehicle (carrier) toxicity or short duration of action. Efforts have been underway to overcome these limitations by developing liposome platform for intravesical delivery of biotechnological products including antisense oligonucleotides. Conclusions. Adoption of forward-thinking approaches can achieve advancements in drug delivery systems targeted to future improvement in pharmacotherapy of bladder diseases. Latest developments in the field of nanotechnology can bring this mode of therapy from second line of treatment for refractory cases to the forefront of disease management. PMID:24527221

  3. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome and Modifiable Intrinsic Risk Factors; How to Assess and Address?

    PubMed Central

    Halabchi, Farzin; Mazaheri, Reza; Seif-Barghi, Tohid

    2013-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a very common disorder of the knee. Due to multiple forces influencing the patellofemoral joint, clinical management of this ailment is particularly intricate. Patellofemoral pain syndrome has a multifactorial nature and multiple parameters have been proposed as potential risk factors, classified as intrinsic or extrinsic. Some of the intrinsic risk factors are modifiable and may be approached in treatment. A number of modifiable risk factors have been suggested, including quadriceps weakness, tightness of hamstring, iliopsoas and gastrosoleus muscles, hip muscles dysfunction, foot overpronation, tightness of iliotibial band, generalised joint laxity, limb length discrepancy, patellar malalignment and hypermobility. In general, the routine approach of physicians to this problem does not include assessment and modification of these risk factors and therefore, it may negatively affect the management outcomes. Changing this approach necessitates an easy and practical protocol for assessment of modifiable risk factors and effective and feasible measures to address them. In this review, we aimed to introduce assessment and intervention packages appropriate for this purpose. PMID:23802050

  4. Ultrastructure of the condylar articular surface in severe mandibular pain-dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toller, P A

    1977-12-01

    Specimens from articular surfaces of normal human mandibular condyles are compared with very small biopsies from articular surfaces of condyles taken at conservative operations in severe pain-dysfunction syndrome (P.D.S.). Immediate fixation was followed by examination using transmission electron-micrography. Normal surfaces exhibit a nearly structureless layer about 2 micron thick, which corresponds with the lamina splendens described in other diarthrodial joints. This layer surmounts a dense main structure of wavy interlacing bundles of collagen interspersed with fibrocytes. Occasional straight elastic fibres were found. Surfaces of all condyles from P.D.S. patients showed loss of lamina splendens, alteration of collagen fibre size, and tendency to dissociation of both collagen and its surrounding ground substance. Depper levels showed aggregations of bizarre structures which the author terms "vermiform bodies", and which appear to be collections of abnormal amounts and types of elastic tissue. It is suggested that the appearances are those of stress elastosis. Such profound ultrastructural changes may affect the joint sliding properties, and also its mechanical integrity under stress. Examination at this degree of magnification suggests a direct relationship between long-standing pain-dysfunction syndrome and the onset of degenerative disease. PMID:415013

  5. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome is associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Herng-Ching; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine this association by comparing the risk of prior irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) between patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and matched controls in Taiwan. Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 4870 cases with CP/CPPS and 4870 age-matched controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations of CP/CPPS with previously diagnosed IBS. We found that a total of 753 (7.7%) of the 9740 sampled patients had IBS prior to the index date; IBS was found in 497 (10.2%) cases and in 256 (5.3%) controls. Conditional logistic regression revealed a higher odds ratio (OR) of prior IBS (OR 2.05, 95% CI = 1.75-2.40) for cases than controls. Furthermore, after adjusting for the patients' monthly income, geographical location, urbanization level, and hypertension and coronary heart disease, the conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that cases were more likely than controls to have prior IBS (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.67-2.29). Furthermore, we found that CP/CPPS was consistently and significantly associated with prior IBS regardless of age group. We concluded that the diagnosis of CP/CPPS was associated with previously diagnosed IBS. Urologists should be aware of the association between CP/CPPS and IBS when treating patients. PMID:27225866

  6. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome is associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Herng-Ching; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine this association by comparing the risk of prior irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) between patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and matched controls in Taiwan. Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 4870 cases with CP/CPPS and 4870 age-matched controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations of CP/CPPS with previously diagnosed IBS. We found that a total of 753 (7.7%) of the 9740 sampled patients had IBS prior to the index date; IBS was found in 497 (10.2%) cases and in 256 (5.3%) controls. Conditional logistic regression revealed a higher odds ratio (OR) of prior IBS (OR 2.05, 95% CI = 1.75–2.40) for cases than controls. Furthermore, after adjusting for the patients’ monthly income, geographical location, urbanization level, and hypertension and coronary heart disease, the conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that cases were more likely than controls to have prior IBS (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.67–2.29). Furthermore, we found that CP/CPPS was consistently and significantly associated with prior IBS regardless of age group. We concluded that the diagnosis of CP/CPPS was associated with previously diagnosed IBS. Urologists should be aware of the association between CP/CPPS and IBS when treating patients. PMID:27225866

  7. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner’s lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion—starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation. PMID:26816851

  8. UROLOGIC CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME FLARES AND THEIR IMPACT: QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS IN THE MAPP NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Bradley, Catherine S.; Clemens, J. Quentin; James, Aimee S.; Konkle, Katy S.; Kreder, Karl J.; Lai, H. Henry; Mackey, Sean C.; Ashe-McNalley, Cody P.; Rodriguez, Larissa V.; Barrell, Edward; Hou, Xiaoling; Robinson, Nancy A.; Mullins, Chris; Berry, Sandra H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although in-depth qualitative information is critical for understanding patients’ symptom experiences and for developing patient-centered outcome measures, only one previous qualitative study has assessed urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS) symptom exacerbations (“flares”). Methods We conducted eight focus groups of female UCPPS (interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome) patients at four sites of the MAPP Research Network (n=57, mean=7/group) to explore the full spectrum of flares and their impact on patients’ lives. Results Flare experiences were common and varied widely in terms of UCPPS symptoms involved, concurrent non-pelvic symptoms (e.g., diarrhea), symptom intensity (mild to severe), duration (minutes to years), and frequency (daily to painful, days-long flares. These latter flares were also most disruptive to participants’ lives, causing some to cancel social events, miss work or school, and in the worst cases, go to the emergency room or on disability leave. Participants also reported a longer-term impact of flares, including negative effects on their sexual functioning and marital, family, and social relationships; and loss of employment or limited career or educational advancement. Emergent themes included the need for a sense of control over unpredictable symptoms and reduced social engagement. Conclusions Given their negative impact, future research should focus on approaches to prevent flares, and to reduce their frequency, severity, and/or duration. Patients’ quality of life may also be improved by providing them with a sense of control over their symptoms through ready access to flare medications/therapy, and by engaging them socially. PMID:25792349

  9. Grey matter changes of the pain matrix in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sinding, Charlotte; Gransjøen, Anne Mari; Schlumberger, Gina; Grushka, Miriam; Frasnelli, Johannes; Singh, Preet Bano

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by a burning sensation in the mouth, usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings. Latest findings indicate that BMS could result from neuropathic trigeminal conditions. While many investigations have focused on the periphery, very few have examined possible central dysfunctions. To highlight changes of the central system of subjects with BMS, we analysed the grey matter concentration in 12 subjects using voxel-based morphometry. Data were compared with a control group (Ct). To better understand the brain mechanisms underlying BMS, the grey matter concentration of patients was also compared with those of dysgeusic patients (Dys). Dysgeusia is another oral dysfunction condition, characterized by a distorted sense of taste and accompanied by a reduced taste function. We found that a major part of the 'pain matrix' presented modifications of the grey matter concentration in subjects with BMS. Six regions out of eight were affected [anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus, lobules of the cerebellum, insula/frontal operculum, inferior temporal area, primary motor cortex, dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex (DLPFC)]. In the anterior cingulate gyrus, the lobules of the cerebellum, the inferior temporal lobe and the DLPFC, pain intensity correlated with grey matter concentration. Dys also presented changes in grey matter concentration but in different areas of the brain. Our results suggest that a deficiency in the control of pain could in part be a cause of BMS and that BMS and dysgeusia conditions are not linked to similar structural changes in the brain. PMID:26741696

  10. The effect of cetylated fatty esters and physical therapy on myofascial pain syndrome of the neck.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Deepak; Jacob, Biju Nirmal; Ajeesh, P S; Bookout, Jack B; Barathur, Raj R

    2011-07-01

    Participants with Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) of the neck were randomly assigned into 2 groups of the double-blinded study: topical cetylated fatty ester complex (CFEC) cream application plus physical therapy (CF-PT; n=37), and placebo cream application plus physical therapy (PL-PT; n=35). There were 3 visits during 4 weeks of treatment. Physical Therapy (PT), given twice/week, included Ischaemic Compression, Deep Pressure Trigger Point Massage and Myofascial Releases. Topical cream [CFEC cream (5.6%) and 1.5% menthol] or placebo cream [1.5% menthol, in a cream base] was applied twice/day. CF-PT provided the fastest and most effective study treatment modality. The addition of CFEC cream to PT resulted in statistically significant improvements, compared to PL-PT, for reduction of pain, neck disability and life quality indicators. Our results indicate that cetylated derivatives of fatty acids can effectively reduce pain and symptoms associated with neck MPS, when combined with physical therapy. PMID:21665114

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Continuous Superficial Radial Nerve Block for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henshaw, Daryl S; Kittner, Sarah L; Jaffe, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    Although there are many potentially effective therapeutic options for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), no definitive treatment exists. Therefore, patients often exhaust both medical and surgical treatment options attempting to find relief for their symptoms. As pain control and restoration of physical movement are primary treatment goals, strategies that include regional anesthesia techniques are commonly employed, but potentially underutilized, treatment modalities. The authors present a patient with refractory CRPS that had significant improvement in both pain control and the ability to tolerate intensive physical therapy following the placement of a superficial radial nerve catheter and an infusion of local anesthetic for 6 days as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. This treatment approach also assisted in the decision-making process related to future treatment options. Although the use of regional anesthesia and perineural infusions of local anesthetic have previously been described as viable treatment options for CRPS, this case report represents the first known use of a superficial radial nerve catheter for treating CRPS as well as the first description of a technique for placing a superficial radial nerve (SRN) catheter using ultrasound guidance. PMID:27159548

  12. Bilateral Painful Ophthalmoplegia: A Case of Assumed Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kastirr, Ilko; Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a man of 47 years with vertical and horizontal paresis of view combined with periorbital pain that developed initially on the right side but extended after 3-4 days to the left. Gadolinum uptaking tissue in the cavernous sinus was shown by MRI of the orbital region in the T1 spin echo sequence with fat saturation (SEfs) with a slice thickness of 2 mm. As no other abnormalities were found and the pain resolved within 72 hours of treatment with cortison a bilateral Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (THS) was assumed. THS is an uncommon cause for Painful Ophthalmoglegia (PO) and only few cases of bilateral appearance have been reported. Even though the diagnostic criteria for THS oblige unilateral symptoms we suggest that in patients with bilateral PO THS should not be excluded as a differential diagnosis. Further more when using MRI to detect granulomatous tissue in the orbital region the chosen sequence should be T1 SEfs and slice thickness should possibly be as low as 2 mm, as granulomas are often no larger than 1-2 mm. PMID:27134970

  13. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS. PMID:26431145

  14. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Park, Zee-Yong; Kim, Yong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS. PMID:25313364

  15. IL-17 is not essential for inflammation and chronic pelvic pain development in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Motrich, Ruben D; Breser, María L; Sánchez, Leonardo R; Godoy, Gloria J; Prinz, Immo; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-03-01

    Pain and inflammation in the absence of infection are hallmarks in chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) patients. The etiology of CP/CPPS is unclear, and autoimmunity has been proposed as a cause. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) models have long been used for studying CP/CPPS. Herein, we studied prostate inflammation induction and chronic pelvic pain development in EAP using IL-12p40-KO, IL-4-KO, IL-17-KO, and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice. Prostate antigen (PAg) immunization in C57BL/6 mice induced specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses and severe prostate inflammation and cell infiltration, mainly composed of CD4 T cells and macrophages. Moreover, chronic pelvic pain was evidenced by increased allodynia responses. In immunized IL-17-KO mice, the presence of a prominent PAg-specific Th1 immune response caused similar prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. Furthermore, markedly high PAg-specific Th1 immune responses, exacerbated prostate inflammation, and chronic pelvic pain were detected in immunized IL-4-KO mice. Conversely, immunized IL-12p40-KO mice developed PAg-specific Th2 immune responses, characterized by high IL-4 secretion and neither infiltration nor damage in the prostate. As observed in wild-type control animals, IL12p40-KO mice did not evidence tactile allodynia responses. Our results suggest that, as in patients, chronic pelvic pain is a consequence of prostate inflammation. After PAg immunization, a Th1-associated immune response develops and induces prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. The absence of Th1 or Th2 cytokines, respectively, diminishes or enhances EAP susceptibility. In addition, IL-17 showed not to be essential for pathology induction and chronic pelvic pain development. PMID:26882345

  16. Derangement of body representation in complex regional pain syndrome: report of a case treated with mirror and prisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafal, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps the most intriguing disorders of body representation are those that are not due to primary disease of brain tissue. Strange and sometimes painful phantom limb sensations can result from loss of afference to the brain; and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)—the subject of the current report—can follow limb trauma without pathology of either the central or peripheral nervous system. This enigmatic and vexing condition follows relatively minor trauma, and can result in enduring misery and a useless limb. It manifests as severe pain, autonomic dysfunction, motor disability and ‘neglect-like’ symptoms with distorted body representation. For this special issue on body representation we describe the case of a patient suffering from CRPS, including symptoms suggesting a distorted representation of the affected limb. We report contrasting effects of mirror box therapy, as well as a new treatment—prism adaptation therapy—that provided sustained pain relief and reduced disability. The benefits were contingent upon adapting with the affected limb. Other novel observations suggest that: (1) pain may be a consequence, not the cause, of a disturbance of body representation that gives rise to the syndrome; (2) immobilisation, not pain, may precipitate this reorganisation of somatomotor circuits in susceptible individuals; and (3) limitation of voluntary movement is neither due to pain nor to weakness but, rather, to derangement of body representation which renders certain postures from the repertoire of hand movements inaccessible. PMID:19967390

  17. Derangement of body representation in complex regional pain syndrome: report of a case treated with mirror and prisms.

    PubMed

    Bultitude, Janet H; Rafal, Robert D

    2010-07-01

    Perhaps the most intriguing disorders of body representation are those that are not due to primary disease of brain tissue. Strange and sometimes painful phantom limb sensations can result from loss of afference to the brain; and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)-the subject of the current report-can follow limb trauma without pathology of either the central or peripheral nervous system. This enigmatic and vexing condition follows relatively minor trauma, and can result in enduring misery and a useless limb. It manifests as severe pain, autonomic dysfunction, motor disability and 'neglect-like' symptoms with distorted body representation. For this special issue on body representation we describe the case of a patient suffering from CRPS, including symptoms suggesting a distorted representation of the affected limb. We report contrasting effects of mirror box therapy, as well as a new treatment-prism adaptation therapy-that provided sustained pain relief and reduced disability. The benefits were contingent upon adapting with the affected limb. Other novel observations suggest that: (1) pain may be a consequence, not the cause, of a disturbance of body representation that gives rise to the syndrome; (2) immobilisation, not pain, may precipitate this reorganisation of somatomotor circuits in susceptible individuals; and (3) limitation of voluntary movement is neither due to pain nor to weakness but, rather, to derangement of body representation which renders certain postures from the repertoire of hand movements inaccessible. PMID:19967390

  18. Metformin increases pressure pain threshold in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiałka, Marta; Milewicz, Tomasz; Sztefko, Krystyna; Rogatko, Iwona; Majewska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the strong preclinical rationale, there are only very few data considering the utility of metformin as a potential pain therapeutic in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the association between metformin therapy and pressure pain threshold (PPT) in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We hypothesized that metformin therapy in lean PCOS women increases PPT. Materials and methods Twenty-seven lean PCOS women with free androgen index phenotype >5 and 18 lean healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Fifteen of the PCOS women were randomly assigned to be treated with metformin 1,500 mg daily for 6 months. PPT and plasma β-endorphin levels were measured in all women at the beginning of the study and after 6 months of observation. Results We observed an increase in PPT values measured on deltoid and trapezius muscle in the PCOS with metformin group after 6 months of metformin administration (4.81±0.88 kg/cm2, P<0.001 on deltoid muscle, and 5.71±1.16 kg/cm2 on trapezius muscle). We did not observe any significant changes in PPT values in the PCOS without treatment group and in controls. We did not observe any significant changes in serum β-endorphin levels in any studied groups during the 6-month observation. Conclusion We conclude that metformin therapy increases PPT in lean PCOS women, without affecting plasma β-endorphin concentration. Our results may suggest the potential role of metformin in pain therapy. We propose that larger, randomized studies on metformin impact on pain perception should be performed. PMID:27536069

  19. Physical Therapy Management of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I in a 14-Year-Old Patient Using Strain Counterstrain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Cristiana Kahl

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the examination, intervention, and outcomes for a patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I (CRPS I) treated with Strain Counterstrain (SCS). The patient was diagnosed with CRPS I following a Grade II ankle sprain. Treatment consisted of SCS once per week for six months with one additional session each week in Months 4 through 6 for strengthening, endurance, and gait training. A re-examination was performed monthly. A clinically significant decrease of 2 points in overall pain as measured with a numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) occurred as of Month 2; a 2-point decrease in tenderness on 10 of 13 SCS tender points also measured with an NPRS was documented as early as Month 1. Throughout the treatment period, an increase in function was noted by way of patient report and objective tests and measures. Gait improved with regard to cadence, use of an assistive device, and weight-bearing status. Single limb stance on the involved leg increased from 0 (s) to 40 (s) over the course of treatment and ankle active range of motion as measured with a goniometer and muscle strength as measured with manual muscle tests both returned to normal values. CRPS I remains a poorly understood and difficult-to-treat chronic syndrome. By way of its proposed effects on the neuromuscular system and facilitated segments, SCS may be an additional effective treatment tool in the management of some patients diagnosed with CRPS I. PMID:19066641

  20. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Caused by Lumbar Herniated Intervertebral Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hee; Choi, Sang Sik; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kin, Jung Eun

    2016-07-01

    Most cases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occur after some inciting injury. There are a few cases of CRPS after an operation for disc disease. CRPS from a mild herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) without surgical intervention is even rarer than CRPS after an operation for disc disease.A 22-year-old man was transferred to a pain clinic. He had continuously complained about back and right leg pain. He presented with a skin color change in the right lower leg, intermittent resting tremor, stiffness, and swelling in the right leg. He complained of a pulling sensation and numbness in his right buttock, posterior thigh, lateral calf, and ankle. This symptom was in accordance with L4/5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed L4/5 HIVD that was central to the bilateral subarticular protrusion.He was diagnosed as having CRPS, which fits the revised International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria. He fulfilled 4 symptom categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color change, sweating changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction) and 3 of 4 sign categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction). The bone scan and thermography also revealed CRPS.For the past 2 months, we have performed intensive treatments. But, he never became pain-free and walking for 5 minutes led to persistent leg pain. We decided to perform percutaneous nucleoplasty, which can directly decompress a HIVD. On the next day, he achieved dramatic symptom relief. The visual analog scale (VAS) score improved to 3, compared to the VAS score of 9 at the first visit. The skin color change, allodynia, and tremor in the right leg disappeared, and the temperature asymmetry normalized. Motor weakness of the right leg also recovered.We report an unusual case of CRPS that was caused by L4/5 HIVD without a history of trauma or surgery. It has a clear causal relationship between HIVD

  1. Equal Improvement in Men and Women in the Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Using a Multi-modal Protocol with an Internal Myofascial Trigger Point Wand.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rodney U; Wise, David; Sawyer, Tim; Nathanson, Brian H; Nevin Smith, J

    2016-06-01

    Both men and women require treatment for urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS), which includes interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, pelvic floor dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. However, it is unknown if men and women respond differently to a protocol that includes specific physical therapy self-treatment using an internal trigger point wand and training in paradoxical relaxation. We performed a retrospective analysis by gender in a single arm, open label, single center clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a protocol for the treatment of UCPPS from October, 2008 to May, 2011. 314 adult men (79.9 %) and 79 (20.1 %) women met inclusion criteria. The median duration of symptoms was 60 months. The protocol required an initial 6-day clinic for training followed by a 6-month self-treatment period. The treatment included self-administered pelvic floor trigger point release with an internal trigger point device for physical therapy along with paradoxical relaxation training. Notable gender differences in prior treatments were observed. Men had a lower median [Interquartile Range] NIH-CPSI score at baseline than women (27 [21, 31] vs. 29 [22, 33], p = 0.04). Using a 1-10 scale with 10 = Most Severe, the median reduction in trigger point sensitivity was 3 units for both men and women after 6 months therapy (p = 0.74). A modified Intention to Treat analysis and a multivariate regression analysis found similar results. We conclude that men and women have similar, significant reductions in trigger point sensitivity with this protocol. PMID:26721470

  2. Visceral pain perception in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy volunteers is affected by the MRI scanner environment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Reuben K; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Li, Xinhua; Cao, Yang; Ho, Khek Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background The MRI scanner environment induces marked psychological effects, but specific effects on pain perception and processing are unknown and relevant to all brain imaging studies. Objectives and methods We performed visceral and somatic quantitative sensory and pain testing and studied endogenous pain modulation by heterotopic stimulation outside and inside the functional MRI scanner in 11 healthy controls and 13 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Results Rectal pain intensity (VAS 0–100) during identical distension pressures increased from 39 (95% confidence interval: 35–42) outside the scanner to 53 (43–63) inside the scanner in irritable bowel syndrome, and from 42 (31–52) to 49 (39–58), respectively, in controls (ANOVA for scanner effect: p = 0.006, group effect: p = 0.92). The difference in rectal pain outside versus inside correlated significantly with stress (r = −0.76, p = 0.006), anxiety (r = −0.68, p = 0.02) and depression scores (r = −0.67, p = 0.02) in controls, but not in irritable bowel syndrome patients, who a priori had significantly higher stress and anxiety scores. ANOVA analysis showed trends for effect of the scanner environment and subject group on endogenous pain modulation (p = 0.09 and p = 0.1, respectively), but not on somatic pain (p > 0.3). Conclusion The scanner environment significantly increased visceral, but not somatic, pain perception in irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy controls in a protocol specifically aimed at investigating visceral pain. Psychological factors, including anxiety and stress, are the likely underlying causes, whereas classic endogenous pain modulation pathways activated by heterotopic stimulation play a lesser role. These results are highly relevant to a wide range of imaging applications and need to be taken into account in future pain research. Further controlled studies are indicated to clarify these findings. PMID:26966533

  3. Syndrome-based discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    May, E E; Dolan, P; Crozier, P; Brozik, S

    2006-01-01

    The ability to discriminate nucleic acid sequences is necessary for a wide variety of applications: high throughput screening, distinguishing genetically modified organisms (GMOs), molecular computing, differentiating biological markers, fingerprinting a specific sensor response for complex systems, etc. Hybridization-based target recognition and discrimination is central to the operation of nucleic acid sensor systems. Therefore developing a quantitative correlation between mishybridization events and sensor out put is critical to the accurate interpretation of results. In this work, using experimental data produced by introducing single mutations (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) in the probe sequence of computational catalytic molecular beacons (deoxyribozyme gates) [1], we investigate coding theory algorithms for uniquely categorizing SNPs based on the calculation of syndromes. PMID:17947098

  4. Correlation Between Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chung, Chi-Jung; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has been investigated in Western countries and identified to be associated with chronic pelvic pain and inflammation. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a complex syndrome that is significantly more prevalent in women than in men. Chronic pelvic pain is a main symptom of BPS/IC, and chronic inflammation is a major etiology of BPS/IC. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between BPS/IC and PID using a population-based dataset. We constructed a case–control study from the Taiwan National Health Insurance program. The case cohort comprised 449 patients with BPS/IC, and 1796 randomly selected subjects (about 1:4 matching) were used as controls. A Multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to estimate the association between BPS/IC and PID. Of the 2245 sampled subjects, a significant difference was observed in the prevalence of PID between BPS/IC cases and controls (41.7% vs 15.4%, P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) for PID among cases was 3.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.89–4.71). Furthermore, the ORs for PID among BPS/IC cases were 4.52 (95% CI: 2.55–8.01), 4.31 (95% CI: 2.91–6.38), 3.00 (95% CI: 1.82–4.94), and 5.35 (95% CI: 1.88–15.20) in the <35, 35–49, 50–64, and >65 years age groups, respectively, after adjusting for geographic region, irritable bowel syndrome, and hypertension. Joint effect was also noted, specifically when patients had both PID and irritable bowel disease with OR of 10.5 (95% CI: 4.88–22.50). This study demonstrated a correlation between PID and BPS/IC. Clinicians treating women with PID should be alert to BPS/IC-related symptoms in the population. PMID:26579800

  5. Chronic non-specific low back pain – sub-groups or a single mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Wand, Benedict Martin; O'Connell, Neil Edward

    2008-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a substantial health problem and has subsequently attracted a considerable amount of research. Clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of a variety of interventions for chronic non-specific low back pain indicate limited effectiveness for most commonly applied interventions and approaches. Discussion Many clinicians challenge the results of clinical trials as they feel that this lack of effectiveness is at odds with their clinical experience of managing patients with back pain. A common explanation for this discrepancy is the perceived heterogeneity of patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. It is felt that the effects of treatment may be diluted by the application of a single intervention to a complex, heterogeneous group with diverse treatment needs. This argument presupposes that current treatment is effective when applied to the correct patient. An alternative perspective is that the clinical trials are correct and current treatments have limited efficacy. Preoccupation with sub-grouping may stifle engagement with this view and it is important that the sub-grouping paradigm is closely examined. This paper argues that there are numerous problems with the sub-grouping approach and that it may not be an important reason for the disappointing results of clinical trials. We propose instead that current treatment may be ineffective because it has been misdirected. Recent evidence that demonstrates changes within the brain in chronic low back pain sufferers raises the possibility that persistent back pain may be a problem of cortical reorganisation and degeneration. This perspective offers interesting insights into the chronic low back pain experience and suggests alternative models of intervention. Summary The disappointing results of clinical research are commonly explained by the failure of researchers to adequately attend to sub-grouping of the chronic non-specific low back pain population. Alternatively, current approaches

  6. Factors Associated with the Success of Trial Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients with Chronic Pain from Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Kim, Deok-ryeong; Lee, Sang-won

    2013-01-01

    Objective Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an effective means of treatment of chronic neuropathic pain from failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Because the success of trial stimulation is an essential part of SCS, we investigated factors associated with success of trial stimulation. Methods Successful trial stimulation was possible in 26 of 44 patients (63.6%) who underwent insertion of electrodes for the treatment of chronic pain from FBSS. To investigate factors associated with successful trial stimulation, patients were classified into two groups (success and failure in trial). We investigated the following factors : age, sex, predominant pain areas (axial, limb, axial combined with limbs), number of operations, duration of preoperative pain, type of electrode (cylindrical/paddle), predominant type of pain (nociceptive, neuropathic, mixed), degree of sensory loss in painful areas, presence of motor weakness, and preoperative Visual Analogue Scale. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, degree of pain, number of operations, and duration of pain (p>0.05). Univariate analysis revealed that the type of electrode and presence of severe sensory deficits were significantly associated with the success of trial stimulation (p<0.05). However, the remaining variable, sex, type of pain, main location of pain, degree of pain duration, degree of sensory loss, and presence of motor weakness, were not associated with the trial success of SCS for FBSS. Conclusion Trial stimulation with paddle leads was more successful. If severe sensory deficits occur in the painful dermatomes in FBSS, trial stimulation were less effective. PMID:24527193

  7. Potential Risk Factors for the Onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Edward A.; Mulder, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthetists in the acute and chronic pain teams are often involved in treating Complex Regional Pain Syndromes. Current literature about the risk factors for the onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 (CRPS 1) remains sparse. This syndrome has a low prevalence, a highly variable presentation, and no gold standard for diagnosis. In the research setting, the pathogenesis of the syndrome continues to be elusive. There is a growing body of literature that addresses efficacy of a wide range of interventions as well as the likely mechanisms that contribute to the onset of CRPS 1. The objective for this systematic search of the literature focuses on determining the potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1. Eligible articles were analysed, dated 1996 to April 2014, and potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were identified from 10 prospective and 6 retrospective studies. Potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were found to include being female, particularly postmenopausal female, ankle dislocation or intra-articular fracture, immobilisation, and a report of higher than usual levels of pain in the early phases of trauma. It is not possible to draw definite conclusions as this evidence is heterogeneous and of mixed quality, relevance, and weighting strength against bias and has not been confirmed across multiple trials or in homogenous studies. PMID:25688265

  8. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is associated with trait anxiety in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FAP and IBS affect 10-15% of school age children and bear many physiological similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress and increased GI permeability later in life...

  9. fMRI Reveals Distinct CNS Processing during Symptomatic and Recovered Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebel, A.; Becerra, L.; Wallin, D.; Moulton, E. A.; Morris, S.; Pendse, G.; Jasciewicz, J.; Stein, M.; Aiello-Lammens, M.; Grant, E.; Berde, C.; Borsook, D.

    2008-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in paediatric patients is clinically distinct from the adult condition in which there is often complete resolution of its signs and symptoms within several months to a few years. The ability to compare the symptomatic and asymptomatic condition in the same individuals makes this population interesting for the…

  10. Single dose oral tiaprofenic acid for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Moore, Maura; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Tiaprofenic acid is a a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is widely available around the world, with indications for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, periarticular disorders, and strains and sprains. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, using clinical studies of patients with established pain, and with outcomes measured primarily over 6 hours using standard methods. This type of study has been used for many decades to establish that drugs have analgesic properties. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, and any associated adverse events. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to June 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered tiaprofenic acid in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We planned to use area under the “pain relief versus time” curve to derive the proportion of participants with tiaprofenic acid experiencing at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations; to use number needed to treat to benefit (NNT); the proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period; time to use of rescue analgesia; information on adverse events and withdrawals. Main results Not one of eleven studies identified by the searches and examined in detail studied oral tiaprofenic acid against placebo in patients with established postoperative pain and therefore no results are available. Authors’ conclusions In the absence of evidence of efficacy for oral tiaprofenic acid in acute postoperative pain, its use in this indication is not justified at present. Because trials clearly

  11. Incidence of post obturation pain following single and multi visit root canal treatment in a teaching hospital of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, S; Khurshiduzzaman, M

    2014-04-01

    Post obturation pain is the pain of any degree after endodontic treatment. There are different opinions regarding incidence of post obturation pain related to single and multi visit root canal treatment. This prospective study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of post obturation pain in single visit and multi visit root canal treatment and to compare the incidence of pain between the two treatment groups. A total of 120 cases of endodontically involved asymptomatic non vital single rooted teeth were selected for this study. The patients were assigned and divided in to two treatment groups, sixty patients each. In single visit group, all teeth were prepared and filled using the standardized preparation and lateral condensation filling technique. In the multi visit treatment group, at the first appointment, the teeth were prepared, and dressed with calcium hydroxide paste for 7 days. At the second appointment, the teeth were prepared and obturated by using lateral condensation technique. The frequency of post obturation pain was recorded as no pain, slight, moderate and severe pain and evaluated at the day 1 and at the day 7 after obturation. The data were analyzed statistically by using SPSS version-12. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. The study showed that the post obturation pain in the single visit treatment group was more than multi visit treatment group, which is significant (p value <0.044). Out of the 120 patients, 86(71.7%) patients had no pain, 19(15.8%) had slight pain and 15(12.5%) patients had moderate pain at the day 1 after obturation. At the day 7 after obturation, 108(90%) patients had no pain, 9(7.5%) had slight pain and 3(2.5%) patients had moderate pain. No patient noticed severe pain during the follow up period. Older patient had significantly more post obturation pain than the younger patient. There was higher incidence of post obturation pain following the single visit root canal treatment. In multi visit root canal treatment with

  12. Spinal cord stimulation as a treatment for refractory neuropathic pain in tethered cord syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The spinal cord is a target for many neurosurgical procedures used to treat chronic severe pain. Neuromodulation and neuroablation are surgical techniques based on well-known specific anatomical structures. However, anatomical and electrophysical changes related to the tethered spinal cord make it more difficult to use these procedures. Case presentation We report the case of a 37-year-old Caucasian woman who had several surgical interventions for tethered cord syndrome. These interventions resulted in severe neuropathic pain in her lower back and right leg. This pain was treated by spinal cord stimulation using intra-operative sensory mapping, which allowed the cord's optimal placement in a more caudal position. Conclusion The low-voltage and more caudally placed electrodes are specific features of this treatment of tethered cord syndrome. PMID:20184768

  13. Microcirculatory changes identified by photoacoustic microscopy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I after stellate ganglion blocks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Yi, Xiaobin; Xing, Wenxin; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain syndrome that causes intractable pain, disability, and poor quality of life for patients. The etiology and pathophysiology of CRPS are still poorly understood. Due to a lack of proper diagnostic tools, the prognosis of CRPS is primarily based on clinical observation. The objective of this work is to evaluate a new imaging modality, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), for assisting diagnoses and monitoring the progress and treatment outcome of CRPS. Blood vasculature and oxygen saturation (sO2) were imaged by PAM from eight adult patients with CRPS-1. Patients’ hands and cuticles were imaged both before and after stellate ganglion block (SGB) for comparison. For all patients, both vascular structure and sO2 could be assessed by PAM. In addition, more vessels and stronger signals were observed after SGB. The results show that PAM can help diagnose and monitor CRPS. PMID:25144451

  14. Efficacy of pulsed low-intensity electric neuromuscular stimulation in reducing pain and disability in patients with myofascial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iodice, P; Lessiani, G; Franzone, G; Pezzulo, G

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is characterized by chronic pain in multiple myofascial trigger points and fascial constrictions. In recent years, the scientific literature has recognized the need to include the patient with MPS in a multidimensional rehabilitation project. At the moment, the most widely recognized therapeutic methods for the treatment of myofascial syndrome include the stretch and spray pressure massage. Microcurrent electric neuromuscular stimulation was proposed in pain management for its effects on normalizing bioelectricity of cells and for its sub-sensory application. In this study, we tested the efficacy of low-intensity pulsed electric neuromuscular stimulus (PENS) on pain in patients with MPS of cervical spine muscles. We carried out a prospective-analytic longitudinal study at an outpatient clinic during two weeks. Forty subjects (mean age 42±13 years) were divided into two groups: treatment (TrGr, n=20) and control group (CtrlGr, n=20). Visual-analog scale (VAS) values, concerning the spontaneous and movement-related pain in the cervical-dorsal region at baseline (T0) and at the end of the study (T1), showed a reduction from 7 to 3.81 (p < 0.001) in TrGr. In the CtrlGr, VAS was reduced from 8.2 to 7.2 (n.s.). Moreover, the pressure pain threshold at T0 was 2.1 vs 4.2 at T1 (p < 0.001) in TrG. In the CtrlGR we observed no significant changes. Modulated low-intensity PENS is an innovative therapy permitting to act on the transmission of pain and on the restoration of tissue homeostasis. It seems to affect the transmission of pain through the stimulation of A-beta fibers. The above results show that low-intensity PENS can be considered as an effective treatment to reduce pain and disability in patients with MPS. PMID:27358158

  15. Mechanism of depression of the spinal pain syndrome by serotonin derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhanovskii, G.N.; Lutsenko, N.G.; Grafova, V.N.; Danilova, E.I.; Lutsenko, V.K.; Gordeev, E.N.; Kalacheva, N.A.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1986-09-01

    The authors compare the ability of 5-HT derivatives to stimulate adenylate cyclase in the nervous system with their action on the intensity of the spinal pain syndrome (SPS), induced by the creation of a generator of pathologically enhanced excitation in the lumbar segments of the spinal cord of rats. An SPS was induced in rats by applying the sodium salt of benzylpenicillin to the dorsal surface of the lumbar segments of the spinal cord. The effect of 5-HT derivatives on activity of serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was estimated from the change in cAMP concentration in the synaptosomes. During the experiments, the disintegrated synaptosomes were removed by centrifugation after which the cAMP concentration in the supernatant was determined by means of a kit of reagents for radioligand determination of cAMP. Radioactivity was measured on a scintillation spectrometer.

  16. The Chinese approach to complementary and alternative medicine treatment for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ran; Ali, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) remains a challenge due to poor understanding on its etiology. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as an optional treatment, has been widely used, because no definitive conventional therapy is available. The different domain of CAM provides miscellaneous treatments for IC/BPS, which mainly include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, biofeedback, yoga, massage, physical therapy, Qigong, traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Clinical evidence has shown that each therapy can certainly benefit a portion of IC/BPS patients. However, the target patient group of each therapy has not been well studied and randomized, controlled trials are needed to further confirm the efficacy and reliability of CAM on managing IC/BPS. Despite these limitations, CAM therapeutic characteristics including non-invasive and effectiveness for specific patients allow clinicians and patients to realize multimodal and individualized therapy for IC/BPS. PMID:26816867

  17. Etofenamate and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment of painful spinal syndromes.

    PubMed

    Coletta, R; Maggiolo, F; Di Tizio, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients suffering from painful syndromes of the spine were admitted to a randomized controlled clinical trial. They were divided into two groups and treated either with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), one application every other day, for 20 days or with TENS and an ointment containing etofenamate 10% gel, 3-5 cm daily on the day of TENS therapy, and the same dose twice daily on the other days. The associated therapy achieved, when compared with TENS alone, a statistically significant better outcome. Furthermore a marked improvement of symptoms was observed in a shorter period of time. Therapy was well tolerated and in only four cases mild, self-limiting, skin reactions were observed. On the basis of these results the use of etofenamate and TENS could represent a viable alternative to systemic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug therapy. PMID:2972631

  18. Resolution of Crohn's disease and complex regional pain syndrome following treatment of paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuenstner, J Todd; Chamberlin, William; Naser, Saleh A; Collins, Michael T; Dow, Coad Thomas; Aitken, John M; Weg, Stuart; Telega, Grzegorz; John, Kuruvilla; Haas, David; Eckstein, Torsten M; Kali, Maher; Welch, Christine; Petrie, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A cohort of family members with various chronic diseases including Crohn’s disease, asthma, complex regional pain syndrome, hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and lymphangiomatosis and/or evidence of infection by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are described in this series of case reports. MAP was cultured from the blood of three members affected by the first five diseases and there was accompanying elevated anti-MAP IgG in two members. The patient affected by the sixth disease has a markedly elevated anti-MAP titer. The two patients affected by the first four diseases have been treated with a combination of anti-MAP antibiotics and ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy with resolution of the disease symptomatology and inability to culture MAP in post treatment blood samples. These case reports of patients with MAP infections provide supportive evidence of a pathogenic role of MAP in humans. PMID:25852293

  19. Evaluation of a prototype tool for communicating body perception disturbances in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turton, Ailie J; Palmer, Mark; Grieve, Sharon; Moss, Timothy P; Lewis, Jenny; McCabe, Candida S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) experience distressing changes in body perception. However representing body perception is a challenge. A digital media tool for communicating body perception disturbances was developed. A proof of concept study evaluating the acceptability of the application for patients to communicate their body perception is reported in this methods paper. Thirteen CRPS participants admitted to a 2-week inpatient rehabilitation program used the application in a consultation with a research nurse. Audio recordings were made of the process and a structured questionnaire was administered to capture experiences of using the tool. Participants produced powerful images of disturbances in their body perception. All reported the tool acceptable for communicating their body perception. Participants described the positive impact of now seeing an image they had previously only imagined and could now convey to others. The application has provided a novel way for communicating perceptions that are otherwise difficult to convey. PMID:24009577

  20. The Chinese approach to complementary and alternative medicine treatment for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) remains a challenge due to poor understanding on its etiology. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), as an optional treatment, has been widely used, because no definitive conventional therapy is available. The different domain of CAM provides miscellaneous treatments for IC/BPS, which mainly include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, biofeedback, yoga, massage, physical therapy, Qigong, traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Clinical evidence has shown that each therapy can certainly benefit a portion of IC/BPS patients. However, the target patient group of each therapy has not been well studied and randomized, controlled trials are needed to further confirm the efficacy and reliability of CAM on managing IC/BPS. Despite these limitations, CAM therapeutic characteristics including non-invasive and effectiveness for specific patients allow clinicians and patients to realize multimodal and individualized therapy for IC/BPS. PMID:26816867

  1. Resolution of Crohn's disease and complex regional pain syndrome following treatment of paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kuenstner, J Todd; Chamberlin, William; Naser, Saleh A; Collins, Michael T; Dow, Coad Thomas; Aitken, John M; Weg, Stuart; Telega, Grzegorz; John, Kuruvilla; Haas, David; Eckstein, Torsten M; Kali, Maher; Welch, Christine; Petrie, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A cohort of family members with various chronic diseases including Crohn's disease, asthma, complex regional pain syndrome, hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and lymphangiomatosis and/or evidence of infection by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are described in this series of case reports. MAP was cultured from the blood of three members affected by the first five diseases and there was accompanying elevated anti-MAP IgG in two members. The patient affected by the sixth disease has a markedly elevated anti-MAP titer. The two patients affected by the first four diseases have been treated with a combination of anti-MAP antibiotics and ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy with resolution of the disease symptomatology and inability to culture MAP in post treatment blood samples. These case reports of patients with MAP infections provide supportive evidence of a pathogenic role of MAP in humans. PMID:25852293

  2. Treating Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome as a Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Philip C; Bosch, David C

    2014-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is both frustrating and difficult. The etiology is uncertain and there is no definitive treatment. Consequently, both patients and doctors tend to be unhappy and unsatisfied with the quality of care. The American Urological Association (AUA) provides a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of IC/BPS. Recommended first-line treatments include patient education, self-care practices, behavior modifications, and stress management. Management of IC/BPS may be also improved if both patients and doctors treat this condition as a chronic disease. This article reviews the AUA first-line treatments for IC/BPS and considers the benefits of treating this condition as a chronic disease. PMID:25009448

  3. Eagle's syndrome veiling as pain of odontogenic origin: Report of two cases with cone beam computed tomography illustration

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Vikash; Rai, Shalu; Misra, Deepankar; Panjwani, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    Eagle's syndrome, also known as an elongated styloid process, is a condition that may be the source of craniofacial and cervical pain. It is infrequently reported but is probably more common than generally considered. The symptoms related to Eagle's syndrome can be confused with those attributed to a wide variety of facial neuralgia and or oral, dental, and temporomandibular joint diseases. In this paper, there are two cases, which reported to the Department of Oral Medicine, Diagnosis, and Maxillofacial Radiology, with a chief complaint of radiating pain in the preauricular region of the face. After radiographic investigation, these cases are considered as a case of Eagle's syndrome because of increase in the size of the styloid process. PMID:27390501

  4. German translation and external validation of the Radboud Skills Questionnaire in patients suffering from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome commonly complain of substantial limitations in their activities of daily living. The Radboud Skills Questionnaire measures alterations in the level of disability of patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, but this instrument is currently not available in German. The goals of our study were to translate the Dutch Radboud Skills Questionnaire into German and to assess its external criterion validity with the German version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire. Methods We translated the Radboud Skills Questionnaire according to published guidelines. Demographic data and validity were assessed in 57 consecutive patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 of the upper extremity. Information on age, duration of symptoms, type of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 and type of initiating event was obtained. We assessed the external criterion validity by comparing the German Radboud Skills Questionnaire and the German Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire and calculated the prediction intervals. Results Score values ranged from 55.4 ± 22.0 for the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire score and 140.1 ± 39.2 for the Radboud Skills Questionnaire. We found a high correlation between the Radboud Skills Questionnaire and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (R2 = 0.83). Conclusion This validation of the Radboud Skills Questionnaire demonstrates that this German version is a simple and accurate instrument to assess and quantify disabilities of patients suffering from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 of the upper extremity for clinical and research purposes PMID:20515455

  5. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  6. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  7. Recent advances in the treatment of pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer pain and chronic non-malignant pain can be difficult to manage and may not respond satisfactorily to standard analgesics. Sequential empiric analgesic trials are usually done to manage individual patients. Experimental human pain models have helped to clarify mechanisms of opioid and adjuvant analgesic actions. Combinations of opioids and adjuvant analgesics better relieve pain than either opioids or adjuvant analgesics alone, as demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. The analgesic activity of antidepressants is largely dependent upon norepinephrine reuptake and activation of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors. Corticosteroids reduce postoperative orthopedic incident pain, which may allow patients to ambulate earlier and with less pain. Spinal corticosteroids reduce lower hemibody pain. Gabapentinoids as single high doses reduce postoperative pain and certain acute pain syndromes. Individuals who experience flares of pain while on spinal opioids benefit from intrathecal boluses of levobupivicaine or sublingual ketamine. Interventional approaches to pain management are often necessary due to the limitations of systemic analgesics. Electronics stimulators (peripheral, spinal and motor cortex) improve difficult to manage chronic pain syndromes. Pulsed radiofrequency reduces pain without tissue damage, which could be an advantage over chemical or radiofrequency neurotomy. Botulinum toxin A reduces focal neuropathic pain that is durable. Interventional related successes in relieving pain are operator dependent. Most reported benefits of systemic and regional analgesics and interventional approaches to pain relief are not based on randomized trials and are subject to selection bias, sampling error, and placebo responses, which may over-inflate reported benefits. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm reported benefits. PMID:21173850

  8. The enigma of men with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Hans C.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a common and frequently misdiagnosed disorder in men. Hallmark symptoms are the presence of chronic discomfort attributed to the urinary bladder associated with bladder filling and relieved with bladder emptying, often associated with irritative voiding symptoms, in the absence of any other identifiable cause. It is often grouped with another common clinical entity, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Men with IC/BPS often suffer from a delay in diagnosis and subsequent treatment, often being categorized as having prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, or epididymitis before the correct diagnosis is reached. The etiology of IC/BPS is poorly understood, and its pathogenesis may involve multiple pathways leading to a common clinical entity. Diagnostic criteria continue to evolve over time as the understanding of IC/BPS improves, and a clinical diagnosis with properly performed history and physical exam is suitable for diagnosis after other processes such as infection, radiation, or pharmaceutical exposure are appropriately excluded. No set pathological findings, biomarkers, or phenotypic descriptions have been universally accepted as a result of conflicting studies. Guidelines for diagnostic and treatment options are limited by available data, and few studies incorporate substantial numbers of male patients. Reported outcomes for common therapies are mixed or have not yet been subjected to study in rigorous placebo-controlled clinical trials in men. Lessons learned from the treatment of CP/CPPS can be applied to IC/BPS, by favoring a phenotypically directed, multimodal approach rather than a stepwise algorithm as advocated by current practice guidelines. PMID:26813678

  9. Single dose oral naproxen and naproxen sodium for acute postoperative pain (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Mason, L; Edwards, JE; Moore, RA; McQuay, HJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain is often poorly managed. Treatment options include a range of drug therapies such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) of which naproxen is one. Naproxen is used to treat a variety of painful conditions including acute postoperative pain, and is often combined with sodium to improve its solubility for oral administration. Naproxen sodium 550 mg (equivalent to 500 mg of naproxen) is considered to be an effective dose for treating postoperative pain but to date no systematic review of the effectiveness of naproxen/naproxen sodium at different doses has been published. Objectives To assess the efficacy, safety and duration of action of a single oral dose of naproxen or naproxen sodium for acute postoperative pain in adults. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for relevant studies. Additional studies were identified from the reference list of retrieved reports. The most recent search was undertaken in July 2004. Selection criteria Included studies were randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of a single dose of orally administered naproxen or naproxen sodium in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to give the number of patients with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours. Relative risk estimates (RR) and the number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for at least 50% pain relief were then calculated. Information was sought on the percentage of patients experiencing any adverse event, and the number-needed-to-harm was derived. Time to remedication was also estimated. Main results Ten trials (996 patients) met the inclusion criteria: nine assessed naproxen sodium; one combined the results from two small trials of naproxen alone. Included studies scored well for methodological quality. Meta-analysis of six trials (500

  10. Single-dose intramuscular ketorolac versus diclofenac for pain management in renal colic.

    PubMed

    Stein, A; Ben Dov, D; Finkel, B; Mecz, Y; Kitzes, R; Lurie, A

    1996-07-01

    A double-blind controlled study was designed to compare the effective- ness of a single intramuscular dose of 60 mg ketorolac with that of 75 mg diclofenac in the treatment of renal colic and to monitor side effects. Fifty-seven patients completed the study, 27 in the ketorolac group and 30 in the diclofenac group. Effectiveness of treatment was monitored by pain relief reported on a 4-point verbal scale at different time points. At 60 minutes 77.8% and 86.6% (P = 0.4) of patients, and at 120 minutes 81.5% and 96.6% (P = .1 5) of patients, reported significant pain relief following ketorolac and diclofenac doses, respectively. Both groups had an equal 92% significant pain relief at discharge from the emergency department. Both drugs were well tolerated by the patients. Ketorolac therefore, seems as effective as diclofenac in the treatment of renal colic. PMID:8768161

  11. The effects of music listening on pain and stress in the daily life of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Alexandra; Kappert, Mattes B.; Fischer, Susanne; Doerr, Johanna M.; Strahler, Jana; Nater, Urs M.

    2015-01-01

    Music listening is associated with both pain- and stress-reducing effects. However, the effects of music listening in daily life remain understudied, and the psycho-biological mechanisms underlying the health-beneficial effect of music listening remain unknown. We examined the effects of music listening on pain and stress in daily life in a sample of women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS; i.e., a condition characterized by chronic pain) and investigated whether a potentially pain-reducing effect of music listening was mediated by biological stress-responsive systems. Thirty women (mean age: 50.7 ± 9.9 years) with FMS were examined using an ecological momentary assessment design. Participants rated their current pain intensity, perceived control over pain, perceived stress level, and music listening behavior five times per day for 14 consecutive days. At each assessment, participants provided a saliva sample for the later analysis of cortisol and alpha-amylase as biomarkers of stress-responsive systems. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that music listening increased perceived control over pain, especially when the music was positive in valence and when it was listened to for the reason of ‘activation’ or ‘relaxation’. In contrast, no effects on perceived pain intensity were observed. The effects of music listening on perceived control over pain were not mediated by biomarkers of stress-responsive systems. Music listening in daily life improved perceived control over pain in female FMS patients. Clinicians using music therapy should become aware of the potential adjuvant role of music listening in daily life, which has the potential to improve symptom control in chronic pain patients. In order to study the role of underlying biological mechanisms, it might be necessary to use more intensive engagement with music (i.e., collective singing or music-making) rather than mere music listening. PMID:26283951

  12. The effects of music listening on pain and stress in the daily life of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Alexandra; Kappert, Mattes B; Fischer, Susanne; Doerr, Johanna M; Strahler, Jana; Nater, Urs M

    2015-01-01

    Music listening is associated with both pain- and stress-reducing effects. However, the effects of music listening in daily life remain understudied, and the psycho-biological mechanisms underlying the health-beneficial effect of music listening remain unknown. We examined the effects of music listening on pain and stress in daily life in a sample of women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS; i.e., a condition characterized by chronic pain) and investigated whether a potentially pain-reducing effect of music listening was mediated by biological stress-responsive systems. Thirty women (mean age: 50.7 ± 9.9 years) with FMS were examined using an ecological momentary assessment design. Participants rated their current pain intensity, perceived control over pain, perceived stress level, and music listening behavior five times per day for 14 consecutive days. At each assessment, participants provided a saliva sample for the later analysis of cortisol and alpha-amylase as biomarkers of stress-responsive systems. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that music listening increased perceived control over pain, especially when the music was positive in valence and when it was listened to for the reason of 'activation' or 'relaxation'. In contrast, no effects on perceived pain intensity were observed. The effects of music listening on perceived control over pain were not mediated by biomarkers of stress-responsive systems. Music listening in daily life improved perceived control over pain in female FMS patients. Clinicians using music therapy should become aware of the potential adjuvant role of music listening in daily life, which has the potential to improve symptom control in chronic pain patients. In order to study the role of underlying biological mechanisms, it might be necessary to use more intensive engagement with music (i.e., collective singing or music-making) rather than mere music listening. PMID:26283951

  13. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene; Maeland, Silje; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey, 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p < 0.001), lower HRQol on SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS: 28.1 versus 49.9; p < 0.001), and higher pain intensity (NRS: 6.4 versus 2.7; p < 0.001) than controls. Neck and shoulder joints were rated as primary painful areas in both groups, with significantly higher frequency in JHS/EDS-HT (neck: 90% versus 27%; shoulder: 80% versus 37%). Further, JHS/EDS-HT most often reported generalized pain (96%). Conclusions Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, increased pain intensity, as well as reduced physical HRQoL compared with controls. Although neck and shoulder were most frequently rated as painful, significantly more JHS/EDS-HT also reported generalized pain compared to controls. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, and most often painful areas in the neck and shoulder joints, which need to be targeted in the treatment strategy. Compared with the general population adults with JHS/EDS-HT have reduced physical HRQoL, supporting a physical approach for this group. Adults with JHS/EDS-HT may present with both specific painful joints and generalized pain. PMID:26824670

  14. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Adam K.; Passe, Melissa A.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  15. Sleep-Related Painful Erections in a Patient With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abouda, Maher; Jomni, Taieb; Yangui, Ferdaws; Charfi, Mohamed Ridha; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-related painful erection (SRPE) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by recurrent, painful penile erections occurring when awakening from rapid eye movement sleep, while erections are painless during wakefulness. Almost 35 cases have been reported worldwide, and only two of them had an associated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We report a new case of a 61-year-old man suffering from SRPE associated with OSAS. The adequate treatment of respiratory events with continuous positive airway pressure did not alleviate the SRPE symptoms and excessive daytime sleepiness. The SRPE diagnosis was made by polysomnography coupled with video surveillance when the patient was referred to the sleep laboratory for residual excessive daytime sleepiness. The patient had 2-4 episodes of SRPE/night. Beta-blocker did not alleviate the SRPE, but a transient improvement was noted when the patient was treated with paroxetine. In contrast with the two previously published cases of SRPE plus OSAS, continuous positive airway treatment did not improve SRPE symptoms in our patient. PMID:26392186

  16. Epigastric pain as presentation of an addisonian crisis in a patient with Schmidt syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lelubre, Christophe; Lheureux, Philippe E R

    2008-02-01

    A 39-year-old woman presented with a 10-day history of epigastric pain accompanied by persistent fatigue and loss of appetite for 3 months. She had presented several weeks earlier with adhesive capsulitis, treated by local infiltration of corticosteroids. She was not taking any other medications. Results of heart, lung, and abdominal examinations were unremarkable, except for mild epigastric tenderness. Purple stretch marks were observed on examination of the skin. The only blood chemistry abnormalities were hyponatremia (125 mEq/L) and hyperkalemia (6.8 mEq/L). Based on the clinical and biologic picture, adrenal insufficiency was suspected. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit and received hydrocortisone intravenously for 3 days. She was then given oral hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. Biologic abnormalities reversed entirely; the final diagnosis was primary autoimmune adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) associated with autoimmune hypothyroidism (Schmidt syndrome). Adrenal insufficiency should be considered in patients with abdominal pain, especially when associated with electrolyte abnormalities. PMID:18272130

  17. Quantitative sensory testing of temperature, pain, and touch in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, Nanda; Defrin, Ruth; Schuengel, Carlo; Lobbezoo, Frank; Evenhuis, Heleen; Scherder, Erik

    2015-12-01

    The spinothalamic pathway mediates sensations of temperature, pain, and touch. These functions seem impaired in children with Down syndrome (DS), but have not been extensively examined in adults. The objective of the present study was to compare the spinothalamic-mediated sensory functions between adults with DS and adults from the general population and to examine in the DS group the relationship between the sensory functions and level of intellectual functioning. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was performed in 188 adults with DS (mean age 37.5 years) and 142 age-matched control participants (median age 40.5 years). Temperature, pain, and touch were evaluated with tests for cold-warm discrimination, sharp-dull discrimination (pinprick), and tactile threshold, respectively. Level of intellectual functioning was estimated with the Social Functioning Scale for Intellectual Disability (intellectual disability level) and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence--Revised (intelligence level). Overall, the difference in spinothalamic-mediated sensory functions between the DS and control groups was not statistically significant. However, DS participants with a lower intelligence level had a statistically significant lower performance on the sharp-dull discrimination test than DS participants with higher intelligence level (adjusted p=.006) and control participants (adjusted p=.017). It was concluded that intellectual functioning level is an important factor to take into account for the assessment of spinothalamic-mediated sensory functioning in adults with DS: a lower level could coincide with impaired sensory functioning, but could also hamper QST assessment. PMID:26460852

  18. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Michelle A O; Jacob, Adam K; Passe, Melissa A; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  19. Interaction of Hyperalgesia and Sensory Loss in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (CRPS I)

    PubMed Central

    Huge, Volker; Lauchart, Meike; Förderreuther, Stefanie; Kaufhold, Wibke; Valet, Michael; Azad, Shahnaz Christina; Beyer, Antje; Magerl, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Background Sensory abnormalities are a key feature of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). In order to characterise these changes in patients suffering from acute or chronic CRPS I, we used Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in comparison to an age and gender matched control group. Methods 61 patients presenting with CRPS I of the upper extremity and 56 healthy subjects were prospectively assessed using QST. The patients' warm and cold detection thresholds (WDT; CDT), the heat and cold pain thresholds (HPT; CPT) and the occurrence of paradoxical heat sensation (PHS) were observed. Results In acute CRPS I, patients showed warm and cold hyperalgesia, indicated by significant changes in HPT and CPT. WDT and CDT were significantly increased as well, indicating warm and cold hypoaesthesia. In chronic CRPS, thermal hyperalgesia declined, but CDT as well as WDT further deteriorated. Solely patients with acute CRPS displayed PHS. To a minor degree, all QST changes were also present on the contralateral limb. Conclusions We propose three pathomechanisms of CRPS I, which follow a distinct time course: Thermal hyperalgesia, observed in acute CRPS, indicates an ongoing aseptic peripheral inflammation. Thermal hypoaesthesia, as detected in acute and chronic CRPS, signals a degeneration of A-delta and C-fibres, which further deteriorates in chronic CRPS. PHS in acute CRPS I indicates that both inflammation and degeneration are present, whilst in chronic CRPS I, the pathomechanism of degeneration dominates, signalled by the absence of PHS. The contralateral changes observed strongly suggest the involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:18648647

  20. Effect of commensals and probiotics on visceral sensitivity and pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Vassilia; Belgnaoui, Afifa Ait; Agostini, Simona; Eutamene, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The last ten years’ wide progress in the gut microbiota phylogenetic and functional characterization has been made evidencing dysbiosis in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional gut disease with high prevalence and negative impact on patient’s quality of life characterized mainly by visceral pain and/or discomfort, representing a good paradigm of chronic gut hypersensitivity. The IBS features are strongly regulated by bidirectional gut-brain interactions and there is increasing evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria and/or their metabolites in these features, including visceral pain. Further, gut microbiota modulation by antibiotics or probiotics has been promising in IBS. Mechanistic data provided mainly by animal studies highlight that commensals or probiotics may exert a direct action through bacterial metabolites on sensitive nerve endings in the gut mucosa, or indirect pathways targeting the intestinal epithelial barrier, the mucosal and/or systemic immune activation, and subsequent neuronal sensitization and/or activation. PMID:25184834

  1. Surgical management of Eagle's syndrome: an approach to shooting craniofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Yoshihiko; Hamasaki, Tadashi; Yumoto, Eiji

    2016-10-01

    Eagle's syndrome (ES) and glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) display very similar symptoms preoperatively. The objective of this study is to determine the surgical outcome of intraoral resection of the styloid process (IRSP) for ES, and to observe preoperative findings and treatment outcome of our cases presenting shooting craniofacial pain. In total, 14 symptomatic patients who presented with typical shooting craniofacial pain, had a styloid process longer than 25 mm, and underwent surgical intervention or medication alone from 2011 to 2015 were involved. They were divided into two groups: Group I included eight patients who underwent surgery following 3 months of medication failure, and Group II included six patients who received medication alone. Preoperative physical, radiographic findings and surgical outcomes were examined. In Group I patients, six cases received IRSP and five of those six cases experienced complete relief from symptoms and were confirmed as ES. Two other cases in Group I received microvascular decompression. One showed complete relief from symptoms, and was confirmed as GPN. The other case showed recurrence 1 year postoperatively, received IRSP with complete relief from symptoms, and was confirmed as ES. In Group II, three cases experienced complete relief from symptoms with 3 months of medication alone. IRSP is an effective treatment for ES. There was no clear difference in the preoperative findings for ES and GPN, suggesting the difficulty in making a preoperative differential diagnosis between the two conditions. Close cooperation between ENT and neurosurgery surgeons is needed. PMID:27106095

  2. Alternative Treatment in Prostate Pain Syndrome Based on Iranian Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Seied Amirhossein; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Minaiee, Bagher; Bahrami, Mohsen; Gooran, Shahram; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unknown etiology and pathophysiology of prostate pain syndrome (PPS) has led to a lack of proper and competent treatment in modern medicine. According to the guidelines of European Association of Urology (EAU), use of complementary treatments is recommended for PPS. In this preliminary study, analyzing the signs and symptoms of PPS from the viewpoint of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) was helpful in selecting the appropriate alternative treatment. Case Presentation: Two male patients diagnosed with PPS were evaluated and treated according to the ITM. Each patient took 15 mL oxymel 45 minutes after lunch and dinner. For each patient, four clinical visits were made with one week intervals and the validated Farsi version of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) and numeric pain rating score (NPRS) were completed for them. Conclusions: Considering the fact that other major pathological causes are ruled out, many of the symptoms and signs observed in these patients were similar to those associated with flatulency-related diseases in ITM. Selecting treatment with oxymel was based on this view and led to improvements in the digestive and urinary symptoms according to Farsi version of the IPSS and NPRS. PMID:25237573

  3. Uroplakin Peptide-Specific Autoimmunity Initiates Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izgi, Kenan; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Bicer, Fuat; Ozer, Ahmet; Sakalar, Cagri; Li, Xiaoxia; Tuohy, Vincent K.; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is enigmatic. Autoimmunity and impaired urothelium might lead the underlying pathology. A major shortcoming in IC/PBS research has been the lack of an appropriate animal model. In this study, we show that the bladder specific uroplakin 3A-derived immunogenic peptide UPK3A 65–84, which contains the binding motif for IAd MHC class II molecules expressed in BALB/c mice, is capable of inducing experimental autoimmune cystitis in female mice of that strain. A highly antigen-specific recall proliferative response of lymph node cells to UPK3A 65–84 was observed, characterized by selectively activated CD4+ T cells with a proinflammatory Th1-like phenotype, including enhanced production of interferon γ and interleukin-2. T cell infiltration of the bladder and bladder-specific increased gene expression of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Either active immunization with UPK3A 65–84 or adoptive transfer of peptide-activated CD4+ T cells induced all of the predominant IC/PBS phenotypic characteristics, including increased micturition frequency, decreased urine output per micturition, and increased pelvic pain responses to stimulation with von Frey filaments. Our study demonstrates the creation of a more specific experimental autoimmune cystitis model that is the first inducible model for IC/PBS that manifests all of the major symptoms of this debilitating condition. PMID:23977210

  4. Randomized Trial of Immediate Postoperative Pain Following Single-incision Versus Traditional Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Liu, Yang; Han, Wei; Liu, Jun; Jin, Lan; Li, Jian-She; Zhang, Zhong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background: We undertook a randomized controlled trial to ascertain if single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) was more beneficial for reducing postoperative pain than traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (TLC). Moreover, the influencing factors of SILC were analyzed. Methods: A total of 552 patients with symptomatic gallstones or polyps were allocated randomly to undergo SILC (n = 138) or TLC (n = 414). Data on postoperative pain score, operative time, complications, procedure conversion, and hospital costs were collected. After a 6-month follow-up, all data were analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Among SILC group, 4 (2.9%) cases required conversion to TLC. Mean operative time of SILC was significantly longer than that of TLC (58.97 ± 21.56 vs. 43.38 ± 19.02 min, P < 0.001). The two groups showed no significant differences in analgesic dose, duration of hospital stay, or cost. Median pain scores were similar between the two groups 7 days after surgery, but SILC-treated patients had a significantly lower median pain score 6 h after surgery (10-point scale: 3 [2, 4] vs. 4 [3, 5], P = 0.009). Importantly, subgroup analyses of operative time for SILC showed that a longer operative time was associated with greater prevalence of pain score >5 (≥100 min: 5/7 patients vs. <40 min, 3/16 patients, P = 0.015). Conclusions: The primary benefit of SILC appears to be slightly less pain immediately after surgery. Surgeon training seems to be important because the shorter operative time for SILC may elicit less pain immediately after surgery. PMID:26668145

  5. Is poststroke complex regional pain syndrome the combination of shoulder pain and soft tissue injury of the wrist?: A prospective observational study: STROBE of ultrasonographic findings in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Wook; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Jong Moon; Hong, Ji Seong; Lim, Hyun Sun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    Patients with poststroke complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show different symptoms compared to other types of CRPS, as they usually complain of shoulder and wrist pain with the elbow relatively spared. It is thus also known by the term "shoulder-hand syndrome."The aim of this study is to present a possible pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS through ultrasonographic observation of the affected wrist before and after steroid injection at the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon in patients suspected with poststroke CRPS.Prospective evaluation and observation, the STROBE guideline checklist was used.Twenty-three patients diagnosed as poststroke CRPS in accordance to clinical criteria were enrolled. They had a Three Phase Bone Scan (TPBS) done and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of EDC tendon was measured by using ultrasonography. They were then injected with steroid at the EDC tendon. The CSA of EDC tendon, visual analogue scale (VAS), and degree of swelling of the wrist were followed up 1 week after the injection.TPBS was interpreted as normal for 4 patients, suspected CRPS for 10 patients, and CRPS for 9 patients. Ultrasonographic findings of the affected wrist included swelling of the EDC tendon. After the injection of steroid to the wrist, CSA and swelling of the affected wrist compared to that before the treatment was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). The VAS score declined significantly after the injection (P < 0.001).Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS might be the combination of frozen shoulder or rotator cuff tear of shoulder and soft tissue injury of the wrist caused by the hemiplegic nature of patients with stroke. PMID:27495051

  6. Autoimmunity contributes to nociceptive sensitization in a mouse model of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Czirr, Eva; Stan, Trisha; Sahbaie, Peyman; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Kingery, Wade S; Clark, J David

    2014-11-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, disabling, chronic condition whose etiology remains poorly understood. The recent suggestion that immunological mechanisms may underlie CRPS provides an entirely novel framework in which to study the condition and consider new approaches to treatment. Using a murine fracture/cast model of CRPS, we studied the effects of B-cell depletion using anti-CD20 antibodies or by performing experiments in genetically B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice. We observed that mice treated with anti-CD20 developed attenuated vascular and nociceptive CRPS-like changes after tibial fracture and 3 weeks of cast immobilization. In mice with established CRPS-like changes, the depletion of CD-20+ cells slowly reversed nociceptive sensitization. Correspondingly, μMT mice, deficient in producing immunoglobulin M (IgM), failed to fully develop CRPS-like changes after fracture and casting. Depletion of CD20+ cells had no detectable effects on nociceptive sensitization in a model of postoperative incisional pain, however. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that CD20+ cells accumulate near the healing fracture but few such cells collect in skin or sciatic nerves. On the other hand, IgM-containing immune complexes were deposited in skin and sciatic nerve after fracture in wild-type, but not in μMT fracture/cast, mice. Additional experiments demonstrated that complement system activation and deposition of membrane attack complexes were partially blocked by anti-CD20+ treatment. Collectively, our results suggest that CD20-positive B cells produce antibodies that ultimately support the CRPS-like changes in the murine fracture/cast model. Therapies directed at reducing B-cell activity may be of use in treating patients with CRPS. PMID:25218828

  7. Autoimmunity contributes to nociceptive sensitization in a mouse model of complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Czirr, Eva; Stan, Trisha; Sahbaie, Peyman; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Kingery, Wade S.; Clark, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, disabling, chronic condition whose etiology remains poorly understood. The recent suggestion that immunological mechanisms may underlie CRPS provides an entirely novel framework in which to study the condition and consider new approaches to treatment. Using a murine fracture/cast model of CRPS, we studied the effects of B-cell depletion using anti-CD20 antibodies or by performing experiments in genetically B-cell-deficient (µMT) mice. We observed that mice treated with anti-CD20 developed attenuated vascular and nociceptive CRPS-like changes after tibial fracture and 3 weeks of cast immobilization. In mice with established CRPS-like changes, the depletion of CD-20+ cells slowly reversed nociceptive sensitization. Correspondingly, µMT mice, deficient in producing immunoglobulin M (IgM), failed to fully develop CRPS-like changes after fracture and casting. Depletion of CD20+ cells had no detectable effects on nociceptive sensitization in a model of postoperative incisional pain, however. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that CD20+ cells accumulate near the healing fracture but few such cells collect in skin or sciatic nerves. On the other hand, IgM-containing immune complexes were deposited in skin and sciatic nerve after fracture in wild-type, but not in µMT fracture/cast, mice. Additional experiments demonstrated that complement system activation and deposition of membrane attack complexes were partially blocked by anti-CD20+ treatment. Collectively, our results suggest that CD20-positive B cells produce antibodies that ultimately support the CRPS-like changes in the murine fracture/cast model. Therapies directed at reducing B-cell activity may be of use in treating patients with CRPS. PMID:25218828

  8. Complex regional pain syndrome: evidence for warm and cold subtypes in a large prospective clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Maihöfner, Christian; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Perez, Roberto S G M; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; Brunner, Florian; Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja; Mackey, Sean; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Livshitz, Anatoly; Harden, R Norman

    2016-08-01

    Limited research suggests that there may be Warm complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and Cold CRPS subtypes, with inflammatory mechanisms contributing most strongly to the former. This study for the first time used an unbiased statistical pattern recognition technique to evaluate whether distinct Warm vs Cold CRPS subtypes can be discerned in the clinical population. An international, multisite study was conducted using standardized procedures to evaluate signs and symptoms in 152 patients with clinical CRPS at baseline, with 3-month follow-up evaluations in 112 of these patients. Two-step cluster analysis using automated cluster selection identified a 2-cluster solution as optimal. Results revealed a Warm CRPS patient cluster characterized by a warm, red, edematous, and sweaty extremity and a Cold CRPS patient cluster characterized by a cold, blue, and less edematous extremity. Median pain duration was significantly (P < 0.001) shorter in the Warm CRPS (4.7 months) than in the Cold CRPS subtype (20 months), with pain intensity comparable. A derived total inflammatory score was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in the Warm CRPS group (compared with Cold CRPS) at baseline but diminished significantly (P < 0.001) over the follow-up period, whereas this score did not diminish in the Cold CRPS group (time × subtype interaction: P < 0.001). Results support the existence of a Warm CRPS subtype common in patients with acute (<6 months) CRPS and a relatively distinct Cold CRPS subtype most common in chronic CRPS. The pattern of clinical features suggests that inflammatory mechanisms contribute most prominently to the Warm CRPS subtype but that these mechanisms diminish substantially during the first year postinjury. PMID:27023422

  9. Evidence of Small-Fiber Polyneuropathy in Unexplained, Juvenile-Onset, Widespread Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that acquired small-fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN), previously uncharacterized in children, contributes to unexplained pediatric widespread pain syndromes. METHODS: Forty-one consecutive patients evaluated for unexplained widespread pain beginning before age 21 had medical records comprehensively analyzed regarding objective diagnostic testing for SFPN (neurodiagnostic skin biopsy, nerve biopsy, and autonomic function testing), plus histories, symptoms, signs, other tests, and treatments. Healthy, demographically matched volunteers provided normal controls for SFPN tests. RESULTS: Age at illness onset averaged 12.3 ± 5.7 years; 73% among this poly-ethnic sample were female (P = .001). Sixty-eight percent were chronically disabled, and 68% had hospitalizations. Objective testing diagnosed definite SFPN in 59%, probable SFPN in 17%, and possible SFPN in 22%. Only 1 of 41 had entirely normal SFPN test results. Ninety-eight percent of patients had other somatic complaints consistent with SFPN dysautonomia (90% cardiovascular, 82% gastrointestinal, and 34% urologic), 83% reported chronic fatigue, and 63% had chronic headache. Neurologic examinations identified reduced sensation in 68% and vasomotor abnormalities in 55%, including 23% with erythromelalgia. Exhaustive investigations for SFPN causality identified only history of autoimmune illnesses in 33% and serologic markers of disordered immunity in 89%. Treatment with corticosteroids and/or intravenous immune globulin objectively and subjectively benefited 80% of patients (12/15). CONCLUSIONS: More than half among a large series of patients with childhood-onset, unexplained chronic widespread pain met rigorous, multitest, diagnostic criteria for SFPN, which extends the age range of acquired SFPN into early childhood. Some cases appeared immune-mediated and improved with immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:23478869

  10. Chest pain due to Pinch-off syndrome: radiological findings and endovascular rescue.

    PubMed

    Viviani, E; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Santagata, A; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Porcellini, M

    2016-01-01

    Port-a-cath is widely used as a route for administration of drugs in hematology and oncology patients and, recently, has been adapted also for hemodialysis patients. Major complications include infection, thrombosis, arrhythmia, and embolization. The Pinch-off-syndrome (POS) means the clavicle and the first rib compress the long-term central venous catheter. The reported incidence rate ranges from 1.4% to 4.1%. This syndrome can be recognized on chest radiography by observing a thinning of the catheter lumen through the passage between the clavicle and the first rib. Catheter fracture is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication that must be recognized and treated promptly. Management of dislodged ports includes percutaneous transcatheter retrieval, open thoracotomy retrieval and oral anticoagulant therapy. Among these techniques, percutaneous transcatheter retrieval is an easy, safe and efficient method. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular retrieval of dislodged intracardiac catheter, separated from its port, in a 58 year-old male patient who presented with chest pain. PMID:26980633

  11. Effects of Intramuscular Electrical Stimulation Using Inversely Placed Electrodes on Myofascial Pain Syndrome in the Shoulder: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Lawrence; Thakur, Ajay; Kumar, Dhanesh

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is one of the common musculoskeletal conditions of the shoulder which may develop sensory-motor and autonomic dysfunctions at the various level of the neuromuscular system. The pain and dysfunction caused by MPS were primarily treated with physical therapy and pharmacological agents in order to achieve painfree movements. However, in recent years intramuscular electrical stimulation (IMES) with conventional electrode placement was used by researchers to maximise therapeutic values. But, in this study an inverse electrode placement was used to deliver electrical impulses intramuscularly to achieve neuro-modulation at the various level of the nervous system. Nine patients with MPS were treated with intramuscular electrode stimulation using inversely placed electrodes for a period of three weeks. All nine subjects recovered from their shoulder pain and disability within the few weeks of intervention. So, this inverse electrode placement may be more appropriate for chronic pain management. PMID:27103970

  12. Effects of Intramuscular Electrical Stimulation Using Inversely Placed Electrodes on Myofascial Pain Syndrome in the Shoulder: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Sukumar; Mathias, Lawrence; Thakur, Ajay; Kumar, Dhanesh

    2016-04-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is one of the common musculoskeletal conditions of the shoulder which may develop sensory-motor and autonomic dysfunctions at the various level of the neuromuscular system. The pain and dysfunction caused by MPS were primarily treated with physical therapy and pharmacological agents in order to achieve painfree movements. However, in recent years intramuscular electrical stimulation (IMES) with conventional electrode placement was used by researchers to maximise therapeutic values. But, in this study an inverse electrode placement was used to deliver electrical impulses intramuscularly to achieve neuro-modulation at the various level of the nervous system. Nine patients with MPS were treated with intramuscular electrode stimulation using inversely placed electrodes for a period of three weeks. All nine subjects recovered from their shoulder pain and disability within the few weeks of intervention. So, this inverse electrode placement may be more appropriate for chronic pain management. PMID:27103970

  13. Single dose oral ketoprofen and dexketoprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Jodie; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Ketoprofen is a non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat acute and chronic painful conditions. Dexketoprofen is the (S)-enantiomer, which is believed to confer analgesia. Theoretically dexketoprofen is expected to provide equivalent analgesia to ketoprofen at half the dose, with a consequent reduction in gastrointestinal adverse events. Objectives To assess efficacy, duration of action, and associated adverse events of single dose oral ketoprofen and dexketoprofen in acute postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to August 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ketoprofen and dexketoprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fourteen studies compared ketoprofen (968 participants) at mainly 25 mg and 50 mg with placebo (520 participants). Seven studies compared dexketoprofen (681 participants) at mainly 10 mg to 25 mg with placebo (289 participants). Studies were of adequate reporting quality, and participants had pain following dental, orthopaedic, obstetric, gynaecological and general surgery. There was considerable clinical heterogeneity between studies in dental and other types of surgery, particularly bunionectomy, which limited analysis

  14. Chronic pain in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: evidence for generalized hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Scheper, Mark; De Wandele, Inge; De Vries, Janneke; Meeus, Mira; Malfait, Fransiska; Engelbert, Raoul; Calders, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Chronic widespread pain is highly present in patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but up to now, evidence for generalized hyperalgesia is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at both symptomatic and asymptomatic body areas differ in EDS-HT patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-three women with EDS-HT and 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls participated. All subjects marked on Margolis Pain Diagram where they felt pain lasting longer than 24 h in the past 4 weeks. Then, they completed several questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, fatigue, disability, and general health status, in order to take the possible influence of these factors on PPTs into account. Patients also completed a form concerning the type of pain they experienced. Thereupon, a blinded researcher assessed PPTs at 14 body locations on the trunk and extremities. PPTs were compared for the two complete groups. In addition, PPTs of patients and controls who did not report pain in a respective zone were compared. PPTs of the patients were significantly lower compared to those of the control group, also when pain-free samples per zone were compared. The mean (SD) PPT was 2.9 (1.62) kg/cm(2) in the EDS-HT patients and 5.2 (1.88) kg/cm(2) in the controls (P < 0.001). No confounding factors responsible for the observed differences could be revealed. In half of the patient group, a predominantly neuropathic pain component was likely present. This study provides evidence for the existence of hyperalgesia even in asymptomatic areas (generalized secondary hyperalgesia). The generalized hyperalgesia may represent the involvement of a sensitized central nervous system, which inquires an adapted pain management for this patient group. PMID:24487572

  15. Central sensitization: a biopsychosocial explanation for chronic widespread pain in patients with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meeus, Mira

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the debilitating fatigue, the majority of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) experience chronic widespread pain. These pain complaints show the greatest overlap between CFS and fibromyalgia (FM). Although the literature provides evidence for central sensitization as cause for the musculoskeletal pain in FM, in CFS this evidence is currently lacking, despite the observed similarities in both diseases. The knowledge concerning the physiological mechanism of central sensitization, the pathophysiology and the pain processing in FM, and the knowledge on the pathophysiology of CFS lead to the hypothesis that central sensitization is also responsible for the sustaining pain complaints in CFS. This hypothesis is based on the hyperalgesia and allodynia reported in CFS, on the elevated concentrations of nitric oxide presented in the blood of CFS patients, on the typical personality styles seen in CFS and on the brain abnormalities shown on brain images. To examine the present hypothesis more research is required. Further investigations could use similar protocols to those already used in studies on pain in FM like, for example, studies on temporal summation, spatial summation, the role of psychosocial aspects in chronic pain, etc. PMID:17115100

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome and acute carpal tunnel syndrome following radial artery cannulation: a neurological perspective and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Reynaldo P

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) associated with acute carpal tunnel syndrome (aCTS) developed in a 38-year-old right-handed man following radial artery cannulation (RAC) during the course of lumbar spine surgery. Inciting events and risk factors that might have led to these complications included: multiple arterial punctures and subsequent hematoma formation, radial artery spasm compounded by aggressive hemostasis, anatomical changes in the wrists related to repetitive manual activities in the workplace, and possible protracted hyperextension of the wrists during perioperative and operative procedure. Although CRPS is considered a rare complication of RAC, the condition is disabling and debilitating, especially when associated with aCTS. PMID:25621693

  17. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Causing Phantom Hand Pain in a Person With a Transradial Amputation: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hanlan, Amy; Finlayson, Heather C; Grant, Chris

    2016-07-01

    In this case, a 47-year-old commercial truck driver with a remote right transradial amputation presented with pain in the medial aspect of his right phantom hand. He was diagnosed with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). This was attributed to the muscular demands associated with using his body-powered prosthesis for many years. TOS remains a controversial diagnosis in the able-bodied population and a unique diagnostic challenge in a patient with a transradial amputation. In this case, consideration of TOS guided the rehabilitation and treatment plan. His pain improved with a conservative stretching program. PMID:26972365

  18. Short-term effects of self-massage combined with home exercise on pain, daily activity, and autonomic function in patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yuan-Chi; Wang, Tzyy-Jiuan; Chang, Cheng-Chiang; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Lin, Shiou-Ping; Chang, Shin-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present was to investigate the short-term effects of a program combining self-massage and home exercise for patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS). [Subjects and Methods] In this retrospective study, 63 patients were allocated to the experimental (n = 32) and control (n = 31) groups. Both groups received 6 sessions of treatment with physical modalities over the course of two weeks. The experimental group completed an additional program with a combination of self-massage and home exercise. The outcome measurements included a pain scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT), neck disability index (NDI), patient-specific functional scales (PSFS), and heart rate variability (HRV). The interactions between the groups and over time were analyzed using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. [Results] Only the experimental group demonstrated significant improvements in the pain scale with varying conditions. The PPTs of the trigger points increased significantly in the experimental group, and significant functional improvements in NDI and PSFS were observed in the same group. There were significant increases in high-frequency HRV and high-frequency % in the experimental group. [Conclusion] Treatment with physical modalities plus combination of self-massage and home exercise is more effective than the physical modalities treatment alone. PMID:25642077

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: an ideal model of care

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priyanka; Gaines, Natalie; Sirls, Larry T.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a complex syndrome that has long been treated with bladder directed therapies, which often fail to address the multiple underlying etiologies that can contribute to this disease process. This disease often involves symptoms that extend beyond the bladder and involve the pelvic floor making it crucial for clinicians to approach the patient using a multidisciplinary team. This article will discuss the underlying etiologies for IC/BPS and describe the multidisciplinary approach which we have found to be extremely successful in managing this patient population. PMID:26816861

  20. Primary somatosensory/motor cortical thickness distinguishes paresthesia-dominant from pain-dominant carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Hyungjun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Mawla, Ishtiaq; Morse, Leslie R; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    Paresthesia-dominant and pain-dominant subgroups have been noted in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a peripheral neuropathic disorder characterized by altered primary somatosensory/motor (S1/M1) physiology. We aimed to investigate whether brain morphometry dissociates these subgroups. Subjects with CTS were evaluated with nerve conduction studies, whereas symptom severity ratings were used to allocate subjects into paresthesia-dominant (CTS-paresthesia), pain-dominant (CTS-pain), and pain/paresthesia nondominant (not included in further analysis) subgroups. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired at 3T using a multiecho MPRAGE T1-weighted pulse sequence, and gray matter cortical thickness was calculated across the entire brain using validated, automated methods. CTS-paresthesia subjects demonstrated reduced median sensory nerve conduction velocity (P = 0.05) compared with CTS-pain subjects. In addition, cortical thickness in precentral and postcentral gyri (S1/M1 hand area) contralateral to the more affected hand was significantly reduced in CTS-paresthesia subgroup compared with CTS-pain subgroup. Moreover, in CTS-paresthesia subjects, precentral cortical thickness was negatively correlated with paresthesia severity (r(34) = -0.40, P = 0.016) and positively correlated with median nerve sensory velocity (r(36) = 0.51, P = 0.001), but not with pain severity. Conversely, in CTS-pain subjects, contralesional S1 (r(9) = 0.62, P = 0.042) and M1 (r(9) = 0.61, P = 0.046) cortical thickness were correlated with pain severity, but not median nerve velocity or paresthesia severity. This double dissociation in somatotopically specific S1/M1 areas suggests a neuroanatomical substrate for symptom-based CTS subgroups. Such fine-grained subgrouping of CTS may lead to improved personalized therapeutic approaches, based on superior characterization of the linkage between peripheral and central neuroplasticity. PMID:26761384

  1. Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) with codeine for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Laurence; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 1998. Combining drugs from different classes with different modes of action may offer opportunity to optimise efficacy and tolerability, using lower doses of each drug to achieve the same degree of pain relief. Previously we concluded that addition of codeine to paracetamol provided additional pain relief, but at expense of additional adverse events. New studies have been published since. This review sought to evaluate efficacy and safety of paracetamol plus codeine using current data, and compare findings with other analgesics evaluated similarly. Objectives Assess efficacy of single dose oral paracetamol plus codeine in acute postoperative pain, increase in efficacy due to the codeine component, and associated adverse events. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database in October 2008 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of paracetamol plus codeine, compared with placebo or the same dose of paracetamol alone, for relief of acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. The area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive proportion of participants with paracetamol plus codeine and placebo or paracetamol alone experiencing least 50% pain relief over four-to-six hours, using validated equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) was calculated using 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use of rescue analgesia, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Twenty-six studies, with 2295 participants, were included comparing paracetamol plus codeine with placebo. Significant dose response was seen for the outcome of at least 50% pain

  2. The fabella syndrome - a rare cause of posterolateral knee pain: a review of the literature and two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this article was to evaluate the risks and benefits of non-operative treatment versus surgical excision of a fabella causing posterolateral knee pain. We performed a systematic review of literature and also present two case reports. Twelve publications were found in a PubMed literature review searching the word “fabella syndrome”. Non-operative treatment and surgical excision of the fabella has been described. Case presentation Two patients presented to our outpatient clinic with persisting posterolateral knee pain. In both cases the presence of a fabella was identified, located in close proximity to the posterolateral femoral condyle. All other common causes of intra- and extra articular pathologies possibly causing the posterolateral knee pain were excluded. Following failure to respond to physiotherapy both patients underwent arthroscopy which excluded other possible causes for posterolateral knee pain. The decision was made to undertake surgical excision of the fabella in both cases without complication. Both patients were examined 6 month and one year after surgery with the Tegner activity score, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and International Knee Documentation Committee Score (IKDC). Conclusion Consistent posterolateral pain during exercise might indicate the presence of a fabella syndrome. Resecting the fabella can be indicated and is a minor surgical procedure with minimal risk. Despite good results in the literature posterolateral knee pain can persist and prevent return to a high level of sports. Level of evidence: IV, case reports and analysis of literature. PMID:24666711

  3. Large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe anemia treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Meigs' syndrome is a rare but well-known syndrome defined as the triad of benign solid ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion. Meigs' syndrome always requires surgical treatment. However, the optimal approach for its management has not been sufficiently investigated. Case presentation We report a patient with a large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe hemolytic anemia that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs’ syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach and the adverse impact that Meigs’ syndrome can have on the patient’s condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. Considering the patient’s serious clinical condition and assuming that she had Meigs' syndrome with a twisted large ovarian mass and possible hemolytic anemia, we first concentrated on effective medical management of our patient and chose the most appropriate surgical treatment after laparoscopic examination. The main aim of our initial approach was preoperative management of the anemia. Blood transfusions and glucocorticoid therapy resulted in stabilization of the hemoglobin level and normalization of the bilirubin levels, which confirmed the appropriateness of this approach. Laparoscopic surgery 4 days after admission enabled definitive diagnosis of the tumor, confirmed torsion and removed the bulky ovarian fibroma, resulting in timely resolution of symptoms, short hospitalization, relatively low morbidity and a rapid return to her social and professional life. Conclusions This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs' syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and

  4. Diet and its role in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Justin I; Shorter, Barbara; Moldwin, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Nearly 90% of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) report sensitivities to a wide variety of dietary comestibles. Current questionnaire-based literature suggests that citrus fruits, tomatoes, vitamin C, artificial sweeteners, coffee, tea, carbonated and alcoholic beverages, and spicy foods tend to exacerbate symptoms, while calcium glycerophosphate and sodium bicarbonate tend to improve symptoms. At present we recommend employing a controlled method to determine dietary sensitivities, such as an elimination diet, in order to identify sensitivities while at the same time maintain optimal nutritional intake. We review current literature with regard to diet's effect upon IC/BPS and common comorbidities (irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, neuropathic pain, vulvodynia, and headache) with a focus upon questionnaire-based investigations. We discuss the pathologic mechanisms that may link diet and IC/BPS related-pain, concentrating upon specific comestibles such as acidic foods, foods high in potassium, caffeine, and alcohol. Up to 90% of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) report sensitivities to a wide variety of comestibles.   Pathological mechanisms suggested to be responsible for the relationship between dietary intake and symptom exacerbation include peripheral and/or central neural upregulation, bladder epithelial dysfunction, and organ 'cross-talk', amongst others.   Current questionnaire-based data suggests that citrus fruits, tomatoes, vitamin C, artificial sweeteners, coffee, tea, carbonated and alcoholic beverages, and spicy foods tend to exacerbate symptoms, while calcium glycerophosphate and sodium bicarbonate tend to improve symptoms. Specific comestible sensitivities varied between patients and may have been influenced by comorbid conditions. This suggests that a controlled method to determine dietary

  5. Do unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients feel pain? Role of laser-evoked potential-induced gamma-band oscillations in detecting cortical pain processing.

    PubMed

    Naro, A; Leo, A; Cannavò, A; Buda, A; Bramanti, P; Calabrò, R S

    2016-03-11

    It has been proposed that a neural signature of aware pain perception could be represented by the modulation of gamma-band oscillation (GBO) power induced by nociceptive repetitive laser stimulation (RLS). The aim of our study was to correlate the RLS-induced GBO modulation with the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) scores (a validated scale assessing possible aware pain perception in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness), in an attempt to differentiate unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) patients from minimally conscious state (MCS) ones (both of them are awake but exhibit no or limited and fluctuant behavioral signs of awareness and mentation, and low and high NCS-R scores, respectively). In addition, we attempted to identify those among UWS patients who probably experienced pain at covert level (i.e. being aware but unable to show pain-related purposeful behaviors, which are those sustained, reproducible, and voluntary behavioral responses to nociceptive stimuli). Notably, the possibility of clearly differentiating UWS from MCS patients has outmost consequences concerning prognosis (worse in UWS) and adequate pain treatment. RLS consisted in 80 trains of three laser stimuli (delivered at 1Hz), at four different energies, able to evoke Aδ-fiber related laser evoked potentials. After each train, we assessed the NCS-R score. EEG was divided into epochs according to the laser trains, and the obtained epochs were classified in four categories according to the NCS-R score magnitude. We quantified the GBO absolute power for each category. RLS protocol induced a strongly correlated increase in GBO power and NCS-R score (the higher the laser stimulation intensity, the higher the NCS-R, independently of stimulus repetition) in all the MCS patients, thus confirming the presence of aware pain processing. Nonetheless, such findings were present even in five UWS individuals. This could suggest the presence of covert pain processing in such subjects

  6. Systematic Review of Acupuncture for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Wu, Jiani; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acupuncture is a promising therapy for relieving symptoms in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), which affects >15% of adult men worldwide. The aim of the study was to assess the effects and safety of the use of acupuncture for CP/CPPS. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Web of Science, CBM, CNKI, Wang-Fang Database, JCRM, and CiNii were searched from their inception through 30 November 2015. Grey literature databases and websites were also searched. No language limits were applied. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with CP/CPPS treated by acupuncture were included. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of RCTs using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tools, respectively. Seven trials were included, involving 471 participants. The result of meta-analysis indicated that compared with sham acupuncture (MD: −6.09 [95%CI: −8.12 to −5.68]) and medicine (Levofloxacinand, Ibuprofen, and Tamsulosin) (MD: −4.57 [95%CI: −7.58 to −1.56]), acupuncture was more effective at decreasing the total NIH-CPSI score. Real acupuncture was superior to sham acupuncture in improving symptoms (pain, voiding) and quality of life (Qof) domain subscores. Compared to sham acupuncture and medicine, acupuncture appears to be more effective at improving the global assessment. Two trials found that there is no significant difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in decreasing the IPSS score. Acupuncture failed to show more favorable effects in improving both symptoms and the Qof domain compared with medicine. Overall, current evidence supports acupuncture as an effective treatment for CP/CPPS-induced symptoms, particularly in relieving pain. Based on the meta-analysis, acupuncture is superior to sham acupuncture in improving symptoms and Qof. Acupuncture might be similar to medicine (Levofloxacinand, Ibuprofen, and Tamsulosin) in its long-term effects, but evidence was limited due to high ROB among included trials as well as

  7. Percutaneous T2 and T3 Radiofrequency Sympathectomy for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Secondary to Brachial Plexus Injury: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Phui, Vui Eng; Nizar, Abd Jalil; Yeo, Sow Nam

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury is often severe, debilitating and difficult to manage. Percuteneous radiofrequency sympathectomy is a relatively new technique, which has shown promising results in various chronic pain disorders. We present four consecutive patients with complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury for more than 6 months duration, who had undergone percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy after a diagnostic block. All four patients experienced minimal pain relief with conservative treatment and stellate ganglion blockade. An acceptable 6 month pain relief was achieved in all 4 patients where pain score remained less than 50% than that of initial score and all oral analgesics were able to be tapered down. There were no complications attributed to this procedure were reported. From this case series, percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy might play a significant role in multi-modal approach of CRPS management. PMID:24156009

  8. Effects of Venlafaxine & Methadone Alone and in Combination with Spontaneous Morphine withdrawal Syndrome & Pain Sensation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fadaei-Kenarsary, Meisam; Farbood, Yaghoob; Taghi Mansouri, Seyed Mohammad; Fathi Moghaddam, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methadone has been used as a drug to detoxify opioid tolerance. Naloxane precipitated morphine withdrawal behaviours were attenuated by venlafaxine as an antidepressant. On the contrary, after detoxifying the opioids, spontaneous withdrawal syndrome may occur with pain sensitivity. Therefore the present study aimed to examine the effects of chronic methadone (70 mg/kg, in drinking water, 7 days), venlafaxine (80 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally, 7 days) and their combinations with the spontaneous morphine withdrawal syndrome and pain sensitivity. Methods: Twenty eight young male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, venlafaxine treated, methadone treated and venlafaxine + methadone treated. Morphine sulfate (10 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously, 4 days) was injected to all animals. Then primary withdrawal behaviours and tail flick test were performed. The test was then followed by methadone or its vehicle administration. Second intervention was venlafaxine or its vehicle injection. Then final withdrawal behaviours and tail flick test were performed. Results: Combination of chronic methadone substitution and venlafaxine administration, significantly reduced freezing behaviour of spontaneous morphine withdrawal syndrome (P<0.01, 379±144%). Chronic methadone administration (P<0.05, 35±8% difference with venlafaxine treated group) induced hyperalgesia. A positive correlation (P=0.001, +63%) was observed between the animals final freezing scores and their response latencies to the painful stimulus. Discussion: Combination of chronic methadone and venlafaxine administrations reduces freezing withdrawal behaviour. Further investigations on analgesic interventions are needed to overcome this hyperalgesia.

  9. Results availability for analgesic device, complex regional pain syndrome, and post-stroke pain trials: comparing the RReADS, RReACT, and RReMiT databases

    PubMed Central

    Dufka, Faustine L.; Munch, Troels; Dworkin, Robert H.; Rowbotham, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence-based medicine rests on the assumption that treatment recommendations are robust, free from bias, and include results of all randomized clinical trials. The Repository of Registered Analgesic Clinical Trials search and analysis methodology was applied to create databases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and central post-stroke pain (CPSP) trials and adapted to create the Repository of Registered Analgesic Device Studies databases for trials of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We identified 34 CRPS trials, 18 CPSP trials, 72 trials of SCS, and 92 trials of rTMS/tDCS. Irrespective of time since study completion, 45% of eligible CRPS and CPSP trials and 46% of eligible SCS and rTMS/tDCS trials had available results (peer-reviewed literature, results entered on registry, or gray literature); peer-reviewed publications could be found for 38% and 39%, respectively. Examining almost 1000 trials across a spectrum of painful disorders (fibromyalgia, diabetic painful neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, migraine, CRPS, CPSP) and types of treatment, no single study characteristic consistently predicts unavailability of results. Results availability is higher 12 months after study completion but remains below 60% for peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations to increase results availability include supporting organizations advocating for transparency, enforcing existing results reporting regulations, enabling all primary registries to post results, stating trial registration numbers in all publication abstracts, and reducing barriers to publishing “negative” trials. For all diseases and treatment modalities, evidence-based medicine must rigorously adjust for the sheer magnitude of missing results in formulating treatment recommendations. PMID:25599303

  10. Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be intractable to treat and patients sometimes suffer for many years. Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed to alleviate symptoms in CRPS patients. This case report describes a patient suffering from intractable CRPS type 1 for 13 years. Due to her swollen painful feet and left knee she is wheelchair-bound. The combination of palmitoylethanolamide and ketamine 10% cream reduced her pain by more than 50% after 1 month of treatment, and a marked reduction in swelling and skin discoloration was noticed. Furthermore, she could walk independently again and she experienced no side effects. Thus, palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine could be a combination therapy option for treating CRPS patients. PMID:23658493

  11. Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be intractable to treat and patients sometimes suffer for many years. Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed to alleviate symptoms in CRPS patients. This case report describes a patient suffering from intractable CRPS type 1 for 13 years. Due to her swollen painful feet and left knee she is wheelchair-bound. The combination of palmitoylethanolamide and ketamine 10% cream reduced her pain by more than 50% after 1 month of treatment, and a marked reduction in swelling and skin discoloration was noticed. Furthermore, she could walk independently again and she experienced no side effects. Thus, palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine could be a combination therapy option for treating CRPS patients. PMID:23658493

  12. Modified Graded Motor Imagery for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 of the Upper Extremity in the Acute Phase: A Patient Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagueux, Emilie; Charest, Joelle; Lefrancois-Caron, Eve; Mauger, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Emilie; Savard, Kim; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a pathologic condition in which the painful experience is disproportionate in time and intensity in comparison with the inciting event. At present, the pathophysiology of CRPS is not well understood. Several studies have indicated that cortical reorganization plays a role in the persistence of the symptoms.…

  13. Steroid atrophy scarring treated with fat grafting in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Leah R; Collawn, Sherry S

    2016-06-01

    Subcutaneous atrophy is a known complication of steroid injections. Excellent results with fat grafting for the treatment of steroid atrophy have been documented. However, the benefit of treating steroid-induced subcutaneous atrophy in an extremity diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has not been described. CRPS, known formerly as reflex sympathetic dystrophy or RSD, causalgia, or reflex neurovascular dystrophy, is a severe, progressive musculoskeletal pain syndrome characterized by pain which is disproportionate to the severity of the inciting event, edema, or skin changes. Common treatment modalities include pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and nerve blocks-each therapy producing varying results. We present a literature review of CRPS and the case of a 15-year-old female who developed CRPS of the left lower leg after arthroscopic debridement with retrograde drilling of an osteochondral lesion. Steroid atrophy of the involved area following a saphenous nerve block complicated the patient's treatment course. The area of atrophy was treated with autologous fat grafting. Following the adipose injection procedure, the patient experienced almost complete resolution of her CPRS-associated pain symptoms, along with improved cosmetic appearance of the area. PMID:26735938

  14. Changes in Symptoms During Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Symptom Flares: Findings From One Site of The Mapp Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Colditz, Graham A.; Pakpahan, Ratna; Bradley, Catherine S.; Goodman, Melody S.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Lai, H. Henry

    2014-01-01

    Aims To provide the first description and quantification of symptom changes during interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome symptom exacerbations (“flares”). Methods Participants at one site of the Trans-Multidisciplinary Approaches to the study of chronic Pelvic Pain Epidemiology and Phenotyping Study completed two 10-day diaries over the one-year study follow-up period, one at baseline and one during their first flare (if not at baseline). On each day of the diary, participants reported whether they were currently experiencing a flare, defined as “symptoms that are much worse than usual” for at least one day, and their levels of urination-related pain, pelvic pain, urgency, and frequency on a scale of 0-10. Linear mixed models were used to calculate mean changes in symptoms between non-flare and flare days from the same participant. Results Eighteen of 27 women and 9 of 29 men reported at least one flare during follow-up, for a total of 281 non-flare and 210 flare days. Of these participants, 44.4% reported one flare, 29.6% reported two flares, and 25.9% reported ≥3 flares over the combined 20-day diary observation period, with reported flares ranging in duration from 1 day to >2 weeks. During these flares, each of the main symptoms worsened significantly by a mean of at least two points and total symptoms worsened by a mean of 11 points for both sexes (all p≤0.01). Conclusions Flares are common and correspond to a global worsening of urologic and pelvic pain symptoms. PMID:24273163

  15. A candidate serum biomarker for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis†‡

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Diaz, Daniel E.; Pozza, Megan E.; Dimitrakov, Jordan; Gilleran, Jason P.; Giusti, M. Monica; Stella, Judith L.; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E.; Buffington, C. A. Tony

    2013-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic markers for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis (IC) currently are not available. This study evaluated the feasibility of diagnosing IC in humans and domestic cats from the spectra of dried serum films (DSFs) using infrared microspectroscopy. Spectra were obtained from films from 29 humans and 34 domestic cats to create classification models using Soft Independent Modeling by Class Analogy (SIMCA). Ultrafiltration of serum improved discrimination capability. The classification models for both species successfully classified spectra based on condition (healthy/sick), and a different set of masked spectra correctly predicted the condition of 100% of the subjects. Classification required information from the 1500–1800 cm–1 spectral region to discriminate between subjects with IC, other disorders, and healthy subjects. Analysis of cat samples using liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy revealed differences in the concentration of tryptophan and its metabolites between healthy and affected cats. These results demonstrate the potential utility of infrared microspectroscopy to diagnose IC in both humans and cats. PMID:19475139

  16. The Prevalence of Autoantibodies in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Mos, Marissa; Stronks, Dirk L.; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity has been suggested as one of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Screening for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is one of the diagnostic tests, which is usually performed if a person is suspected to have a systemic autoimmune disease. Antineuronal antibodies are autoantibodies directed against antigens in the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of these antibodies in CRPS patients with the normal values of those antibodies in the healthy population. Twenty seven (33%) of the 82 CRPS patients of whom serum was available showed a positive ANA test. This prevalence is significantly higher than in the general population. Six patients (7.3%) showed a positive result for typical antineuronal antibodies. This proportion, however, does not deviate from that in the general population. Our findings suggest that autoantibodies may be associated with the pathophysiology of CRPS, at least in a subset of patients. Further research is needed into defining this subset and into the role of autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of CRPS. PMID:25741131

  17. [Prevention and treatment of postoperative pain syndrome in extensive thoracoabdominal oncological surgery].

    PubMed

    Osipova, N A; Petrova, V V; Lastukhin, A V; Kudriavtsev, S B; Vashakmadze, L A; Khomiakov, V M

    2010-01-01

    A procedure has been developed and tested to prevent and treat postoperative pain syndrome during extensive thoracoabdominal surgery for esophageal cancer. The procedure is based on the preventive (12 hours before anesthesia and surgery) application of Durogesic (fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system (TTS)) at an opioid release rate of 50 microg/h for 72 hours. By the end of surgery and anesthesia when intravenous injection of fentanyl is stopped, analgesia continues to be maintdined due to its therapeutic dose coming from TTS. This prevents the development of acute opioid tolerance, hyperalgesia, and destabilization state in the early postanesthetic period and creates the basis for continuous multimodal postoperative analgesia in combination with nonopioid components (lornoxicam, perfalgan) and with none or minimal need for the injectable opioid. This allows an operated patient to have a comfort and stable state. A further investigation on the comparative assessment of the developed procedure with other variants of perioperative systemic and combined anesthesia-analgesia is to be conducted. PMID:20734844

  18. Prostatitis: Infection, neuromuscular disorder, or pain syndrome? Proper patient classification is key.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jeannette; Payne, Richard E

    2007-05-01

    Prostatitis is a broad term used to describe inflammation of the prostate that may be associated with a myriad of lower urinary tract symptoms and symptoms of sexual discomfort and dysfunction. The condition affects 5% to 10% of the male population and is the most common urologic diagnosis in men younger than 50 years. Prostatitis is classified into four categories, including acute and chronic bacterial forms, a chronic abacterial form, and an asymptomatic form. The bacterial forms are more readily recognized and treated, but symptoms in most affected men are not found to have an infectious cause. Indeed, chronic abacterial prostatitis (also known as chronic pelvic pain syndrome) is both the most prevalent form and also the least understood and the most challenging to evaluate and treat. This form of prostatitis may respond to non-prostate-centered treatment strategies such as physical therapy, myofascial trigger point release, and relaxation techniques. Because the various forms of prostatitis call for vastly different treatment approaches, appropriate evaluation, testing, and differential diagnosis are crucial to effective management. PMID:17549825

  19. Acupuncture and Immune Function in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Liong, Men Long; Yuen, Kah Hay; Krieger, John N

    2014-01-01

    Objective The immune system has been implicated as one mechanism underlying the benefits of acupuncture therapy. Evidence suggests that acupuncture can ameliorate symptoms of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), but the association between clinical response and the immune system has not been investigated. Design/Setting We investigated 12 CP/CPPS patients participating in a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing acupuncture versus sham acupuncture for effects on cellular immunity. Blood samples were taken before the first needling and after the last of 20 treatment sessions (week 10). Patients also completed questionnaires examining their CP/CPPS symptoms and mood status at the baseline and end of study visits. Results At the end of study 8 of 12 participants (67%) were classified as treatment responders, 4 participants each from the acupuncture and sham groups. The acupuncture group averaged a 5% increase in natural killer cell levels compared to corresponding sham (-13%; p=0.03). Similarly, patients randomized to acupuncture reported a reduction in other white blood cell parameters examined, supporting the possibility that immunity might be important in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS. Conclusions The specific effect of acupuncture on CP/CPPS remains unclear. Further research is warranted to examine the mechanisms by which acupuncture therapy may improve clinical symptoms in patients with CP/CPPS. PMID:25453515

  20. Neurofeedback training for tourette syndrome: an uncontrolled single case study.

    PubMed

    Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Buodo, Giulia; Leone, Valentino; Palomba, Daniela

    2011-12-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by motor and vocal tic manifestations, often accompanied by behavioral, cognitive and affective dysfunctions. Electroencephalography of patients with TS has revealed reduced Sensorimotor Rhythm (SMR) and excessive fronto-central Theta activity, that presumably underlie motor and cognitive disturbances in TS. Some evidence exists that neurofeedback (NFB) training aimed at enhancing SMR amplitude is effective for reducing tics. The present report is an uncontrolled single case study where a NFB training protocol, involving combined SMR uptraining/Theta downtraining was delivered to a 17-year-old male with TS. After sixteen SMR-Theta sessions, six additional sessions were administered with SMR uptraining alone. SMR increase was better obtained when SMR uptraining was administered alone, whereas Theta decrease was observed after both trainings. The patient showed a reduction of tics and affective symptoms, and improvement of cognitive performance after both trainings. Overall, these findings suggest that Theta decrease might account for some clinical effects seen in conjunction with SMR uptraining. Future studies should clarify the feasibility of NFB protocols for patients with TS beyond SMR uptraining alone. PMID:21915704

  1. Effects of Kinesio Taping versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chen, Fu-Chen; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life. PMID:26185517

  2. Effects of Kinesio Taping versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chen, Fu-Chen; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life. PMID:26185517

  3. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears. PMID:24847788

  4. What I Need to Know about Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. The device delivers small pulses of electricity to the nerves around the bladder. For some ... t feel the pain. Others believe that the electricity releases endorphins , which are hormones that block pain ...

  5. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  6. ‘Pseudofailure’ of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this ‘Pseudofailure’, as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  7. High-Frequency Repetitive Sensory Stimulation as Intervention to Improve Sensory Loss in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I

    PubMed Central

    David, Marianne; Dinse, Hubert R.; Mainka, Tina; Tegenthoff, Martin; Maier, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Achieving perceptual gains in healthy individuals or facilitating rehabilitation in patients is generally considered to require intense training to engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggested that beneficial outcome similar to training can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS). For example, high-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation (HF-rSS) enhances tactile performance and induces cortical reorganization in healthy subjects and patients after stroke. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show impaired tactile performance associated with shrinkage of cortical maps. We here investigated the feasibility and efficacy of HF-rSS, and low-frequency rSS (LF-rSS) to enhance tactile performance and reduce pain intensity in 20 patients with CRPS type I. Intermittent high- or low-frequency electrical stimuli were applied for 45 min/day to all fingertips of the affected hand for 5 days. Main outcome measures were spatial two-point-discrimination thresholds and mechanical detection thresholds measured on the tip of the index finger bilaterally. Secondary endpoint was current pain intensity. All measures were assessed before and on day 5 after the last stimulation session. HF-rSS applied in 16 patients improved tactile discrimination on the affected hand significantly without changes contralaterally. Current pain intensity remained unchanged on average, but decreased in four patients by ≥30%. This limited pain relief might be due to the short stimulation period of 5 days only. In contrast, after LF-rSS, tactile discrimination was impaired in all four patients, while detection thresholds and pain were not affected. Our data suggest that HF-rSS could be used as a novel approach in CRPS treatment to improve sensory loss. Longer treatment periods might be required to induce consistent pain relief. PMID:26635719

  8. Increased capsaicin receptor TRPV1-expressing sensory fibres in irritable bowel syndrome and their correlation with abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, A; Yiangou, Y; Facer, P; Walters, J R F; Anand, P; Ghosh, S

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1) may play an important role in visceral pain and hypersensitivity states. In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal pain is a common and distressing symptom where the pathophysiology is still not clearly defined. TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibres were investigated in colonic biopsies from patients with IBS, and this was related to abdominal pain. Methods: Rectosigmoid biopsies were collected from 23 IBS patients fulfilling Rome II criteria, and from 22 controls. Abdominal pain scores were recorded using a validated questionnaire. TRPV1-, substance P- and neuronal marker protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-expressing nerve fibres, mast cells (c-kit) and lymphocytes (CD3 and CD4) were quantified, following immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies. The biopsy findings were related to the abdominal pain scores. Results: A significant 3.5-fold increase in median numbers of TRPV1-immunoreactive fibres was found in biopsies from IBS patients compared with controls (p<0.0001). Substance P-immunoreactive fibres (p = 0.01), total nerve fibres (PGP9.5) (p = 0.002), mast cells (c-kit) (p = 0.02) and lymphocytes (CD3) (p = 0.03) were also significantly increased in the IBS group. In multivariate regression analysis, only TRPV1-immuno-reactive fibres (p = 0.005) and mast cells (p = 0.008) were significantly related to the abdominal pain score. Conclusions: Increased TRPV1 nerve fibres are observed in IBS, together with a low-grade inflammatory response. The increased TRPV1 nerve fibres may contribute to visceral hypersensitivity and pain in IBS, and provide a novel therapeutic target. PMID:18252749

  9. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) syndrome. Methods In this monocentric, randomized, patient-assessor blinded, placebo-controlled trial, patients with HSP were randomly divided into the rESWT (n=17) and control (n=17) groups. Treatment was administered four times a week for 2 weeks. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Constant-Murley score (CS) were assessed before and after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks. The Modified Ashworth Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores and range of motion of the shoulder were also assessed. Results VAS scores improved post-intervention and at the 2-week and 4-week follow-up in the intervention group (p<0.05). Respective differences in VAS scores between baseline and post-intervention in the intervention and control groups were –1.69±1.90 and –0.45±0.79, respectively (p<0.05), between baseline and 2-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.60±1.74 and –0.34±0.70, respectively (p<0.05), and between baseline and 4-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.61±1.73 and –0.33±0.71, respectively (p<0.05). Baseline CS improved from 19.12±11.02 to 20.88±10.37 post-intervention and to 20.41±10.82 at the 2-week follow-up only in the intervention group (p<0.05). Conclusion rESWT consisting of eight sessions could be one of the effective and safe modalities for pain management in people with HSP. Further studies are needed to generalize and support these results in patients with HSP and a variety conditions, and to understand the mechanism of rESWT for treating HSP. PMID:27446789

  10. In what type of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome is DMSO intravesical instillation therapy effective?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is the most-used agent for intravesical instillation. We conducted this retrospective clinical study to determine in what type of the interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) DMSO was effective. Methods We combined DMSO with hydrodistension in 2003 and from 2004 we performed hydrodistension alone. Hydrodistension had been performed in 7 cases of IC/BPS with Hunner’s lesions (H group) and 7 cases of IC/BPS without Hunner’s lesions (non-H group), and they served as the control group (C group; n=14). There was also a DMSO group (D group; n=14) that consisted of an H group of 7 cases and an non-H group of 7 cases in which the hydrodistension had been immediately followed by intravesical instillation of 50% DMSO 50 mL. Before, and 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months (M) after the intervention, the patients were asked to complete a 4-day frequency-volume chart (FVC) and the O’Leary-Sant IC symptom index (ICSI) questionnaire and IC problem index (ICPI) questionnaire, and to rate their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results All parameters were improved after hydrodistension in both the C group and the D group. However, comparison of the C group and D group according to whether Hunner lesions were present showed that there were no significant differences in any of the postoperative parameters between the non-H groups in the C group and D group, but in the H groups, average and maximum voided volume were significantly higher and the ICSI, ICPI, and VAS scores were lower in the D group. Moreover, the significant differences increased with the duration of the postoperative period. Conclusions DMSO intravesical instillation therapy was useful in both maintaining and improving the effectiveness of hydrodistension in IC/BPS with Hunner lesions. However, DMSO did not have any particular efficacy in the treatment of IC/BPS in the absence of Hunner lesions. PMID:26816859

  11. Pain syndromes in hemiplegic patients and their effects on rehabilitation results

    PubMed Central

    Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Akin, Turkan; Aytekin, Ebru; Komut, Ece Akyol; Ustabasioglu, Fatma; Okur, SibelCaglar; Dogan, YaseminPekin; Erdem, Halil İbrahim; Ataoglu, Emine; Yalcinkaya, EbruYilmaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, type, and location of pain in hemiplegic patients and the effects on rehabilitation results in our inpatient rehabilitation unit. [Subjects and Methods] Patients rehabilitated between January 2010 and July 2012 were investigated retrospectively. Properties of pain were recorded. Pre- and post-rehabilitation motor evaluation and achievement in daily activities were considered, and differences in scores between groups classified as with and without pain were examined. [Results] The number of patients included in the study was 156. The mean age was 64.28 ± 12.45 years, the mean disease duration was 11.10 months, and the gender distribution was 75 males (48%) and 81 females (52%). Fortysix (29.5%) patients had pain complaints. The nociceptive pain ratio was 86.7%, and the neuropathic pain ratio was 13.3%. Pain was mostly localized at the shoulder joint, with the proportion being 86.9%. In the pain group, statistically significant improvement was found in pain scores after the treatment. There was no significant difference between groups in the pre- and post-rehabilitation Brunnstrom motor evaluation and functional independence measurement scores. [Conclusion] Nociceptive pain is more common than neuropathic pain in patients with hemiplegia, and the shoulder joint is the most frequent location of nociceptive pain. PMID:27134349

  12. A delayed chronic pain like condition with decreased Kv channel activity in a rat model of Gulf War Illness pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nutter, T J; Johnson, R D; Cooper, B Y

    2015-12-01

    Following their return from deployment, Gulf War (GW) veterans reported widespread joint and muscle pain at rates that far exceeded those of soldiers returning from other conflicts. It is widely believed that exposure to insecticides, repellants and nerve gas prophylactics contributed to the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI), but an animal model of GW pain has been elusive. In our previous work, we observed that 4-8 weeks exposure to pyridostigmine bromide (PB), permethrin and chlorpyrifos could produce persistent alterations in the physiology of Nav1.9 and Kv7 expressed in deep tissue nociceptors of the dorsal root ganglion. However, behavioral assessments from these same rats were not consistent with a delayed pain syndrome similar to that of GWI pain. In the present studies, we intensified the exposure to anticholinesterases PB and chlorpyrifos while retaining the same dosages. Animals receiving the intensified protocol for 30 days exhibited significant increases in resting for about 8 weeks after exposure. Thereafter, all measures were comparable to controls. Animals treated with intensified anticholinesterases for 60 days exhibited increased resting and reduced movement 12 weeks post-exposure. In whole cell patch studies, muscle and vascular nociceptor KDR and Kv7 ion channels exhibited increased amplitude relative to controls (e.g., normalized current and/or peak conductance) at 8 weeks post-exposures; however, at 12 weeks post-exposure, the amplitude of these currents was significantly decreased in muscle nociceptors. In current clamp studies, muscle nociceptors also manifested increased action potential duration, afterhyperpolarization and increased discharge to muscarinic agonists 12 weeks post-exposure. The decline in activity of muscle nociceptor KDR and Kv7 channel proteins was consistent with increased nociceptor excitability and a delayed myalgia in rats exposed to GW chemicals. PMID:26409647

  13. Limb-specific autonomic dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome modulated by wearing prism glasses.

    PubMed

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Gallace, Alberto; Di Pietro, Flavia; Spence, Charles; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2013-11-01

    In unilateral upper-limb complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the temperature of the hands is modulated by where the arms are located relative to the body midline. We hypothesized that this effect depends on the perceived location of the hands, not on their actual location, nor on their anatomical alignment. In 2 separate cross-sectional randomized experiments, 10 (6 female) unilateral CRPS patients wore prism glasses that laterally shifted the visual field by 20°. Skin temperature was measured before and after 9-minute periods in which the position of one hand was changed. Placing the affected hand on the healthy side of the body midline increased its temperature (Δ°C=+0.47 ± 0.14°C), but not if prism glasses made the hand appear to be on the body midline (Δ°C=+0.07 ± 0.06°C). Similarly, when prism glasses made the affected hand appear to be on the healthy side of the body midline, even though it was not, the affected hand warmed up (Δ°C=+0.28 ± 0.14°C). When prism glasses made the healthy hand appear to be on the affected side of the body midline, even though it was not, the healthy hand cooled down (Δ°C=-0.30 ± 0.15°C). Friedman's analysis of variance and Wilcoxon pairs tests upheld the results (P<0.01 for all). We conclude that, in CRPS, cortical mechanisms responsible for encoding the perceived location of the limbs in space modulate the temperature of the hands. PMID:23886518

  14. Immediate Effects of Lumbopelvic Manipulation and Lateral Gluteal Kinesio Taping on Unilateral Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph; Westrick, Richard; Diebal, Angela; Marks, Christopher; Gerber, J. Parry

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the immediate effects of Kinesio taping directed to the hip and manipulation directed to the lumbopelvic region in individuals with unilateral patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Background: PFPS affects up to 25% of the general population. Despite the high prevalence, this condition is not clearly understood, as evidenced by the numerous proposed causes and recommended treatments. Notwithstanding, recent evidence suggests that treatments directed at the hip or spine may lead to beneficial results. Methods: A convenience sample of 18 participants (12 men and 6 women, 19.5 ± 1.15 years old) with unilateral PFPS was recruited. Participants were randomized by sex to 1 of 3 groups: Kinesio taping, manipulation, and control taping. The main outcome measures included the Y-balance test, squatting range of motion (ROM), and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Results: Compared with the lumbopelvic manipulation and control groups, those in the Kinesio taping group performed significantly better on the Y-balance test (F = 5.59, P = 0.02) and with squatting ROM (F = 3.93, P = 0.04). The Kinesio taping and lumbopelvic groups were also significantly better than the control (sham) group with double-leg squatting ROM performance 3 days later. Conclusion: Kinesio taping may facilitate gluteus medius activation and improve postural stability and a double-leg squat. Clinical Relevance: The improvement in affected limb reach and double-leg squatting ROM highlights the potential for Kinesio taping to improve gluteus medius activation. Lumbopelvic manipulation may also immediately improve rehabilitation programs for PFPS. PMID:24427391

  15. Lower limb control and strength in runners with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esculier, Jean-Francois; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Bouyer, Laurent Julien

    2015-03-01

    Recreational runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) have been shown to present altered movement kinematics, muscle activations, and ground reaction forces (GRF) during running as well as decreased lower limb strength. However, these variables have never been concurrently evaluated in a specific cohort. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare lower limb control variables during running in recreational runners with and without PFPS. Lower limb control during treadmill running under typical training conditions (usual shoes, foot strike pattern, and speed) was compared between runners with (n=21) and without (n=20) PFPS using lower limb kinematics, electromyographic (EMG) recordings from representative muscles (gluteus medius/maximus, quadriceps and soleus), and vertical GRF. Isometric muscle strength was also evaluated. When comparing all runners from both groups, no between-group differences were found in variables commonly associated with PFPS such as peak hip adduction, hip internal rotation, contralateral pelvic drop, EMG of gluteal and quadriceps muscles, vertical loading rate, or lower limb strength. However, runners with PFPS showed significantly higher hip adduction at toe-off, lower excursion in hip adduction during late-stance, and longer duration of soleus activation. Sub-analyses were performed for females and for rearfoot strikers (RFS), and revealed that these subgroups accounted for most of between-group differences in hip adduction kinematics. Specifically for RFS with PFPS, lower activation of gluteus medius as well as lower GRF were observed. Our results suggest that deficits reported in runners with PFPS may vary depending on gender and on foot strike pattern. PMID:25800001

  16. Chronic scrotal pain syndrome (CSPS): the widespread use of antibiotics is not justified.

    PubMed

    Strebel, R T; Schmidt, C; Beatrice, J; Sulser, T

    2013-01-01

    Data supporting the widespread use of antibiotics in patients with chronic scrotal pain syndrome (CSPS) are not available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the presence of bacteria in the genitourinary tract in patients presenting with CSPS. From July 2005 to July 2007 we prospectively enrolled patients presenting with CSPS in our outpatient clinic. The evaluation consisted of a detailed patient's history, physical examination and ultrasound examination of the scrotum. A blood and urinalysis, a Meares-Stamey four-glass test for bacterial cultures and PCR testing for Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae as well as a semen culture were performed. We assessed the symptom severity with the chronic epididymitis symptom index (CESI) score according to Nickel et al. (J Urol 2002, 167:1701; based on the NIH-CPSI). A total of 55 eligible men (median age 34 years) with CSPS were enrolled in the study. The median CESI score was 17 (range 4-26). The majority of patients (n = 39; 71%) were seen by a general practitioner or an urologist before. Of these, 25 patients (64%) were treated with antibiotics and 26 (67%) with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, respectively. A significant bacterial colony count in at least one specimen was detected in 21 of 55 patients (38%). The predominantly detected microorganisms were an Alpha-haemolytic Streptococcus (11 patients) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (10 patients). Thus, only in 12 of 55 (22%) patients isolated bacteria were considered to be of clinical relevance. No factor or condition predictive for a bacterial aetiology for CSPS could be identified. In our microbiological assessment of patients presenting with CSPS we found no evidence for the widely held belief that CSPS is predominantly the result of a chronic bacterial infection. We therefore conclude that the widespread use of antibiotic agents in the treatment of patients with CSPS is not

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome and dysautonomia in a 14-year-old girl responsive to therapeutic plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Hendrickson, Emma T; Gehrie, Eric A; Sidhu, Davinder; Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-08-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), has recently been shown to be associated with autoantibodies against β2-adrenergic and muscarinic M2 receptors. In addition to pain and sudomotor/vasomotor symptoms, dysautonomia is also observed in a subset of CRPS patients. Despite its severity, there are few effective therapies for CRPS described to date. We report a case of a 14-year-old girl with CRPS of her right leg and dysautonomia (gastroparesis, postural tachycardia) refractory to multiple therapies, successfully treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) with albumin replacement. The patient, who has serum anti β2-adrenergic and muscarinic M2 receptor autoantibodies in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ganglionic autoantibodies, underwent an initial course of five TPEs over a 2-week period. She demonstrated a clinical response to TPE as manifested by a rapid improvement in her fatigue and gastroparesis, with a gradual yet significant improvement in her leg pain and sudomotor/vasomotor flares. Following the loading procedures, the patient was treated with rituximab. She continues to require periodic TPE to maintain a remission, with additional immunosuppression being considered long term. Although further studies are needed, TPE (in combination with immunosuppression) may be an appropriate therapy for CRPS patients with detectable autoantibodies, as it is for better characterized diseases with autoantibodies against neuronal surface receptors such as myasthenia gravis or Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:368-374, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011726

  18. Whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain: study protocol for a single-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low back pain affects approximately 80% of people at some stage in their lives. Exercise therapy is the most widely used nonsurgical intervention for low back pain in practice guidelines. Whole body vibration exercise is becoming increasingly popular for relieving musculoskeletal pain and improving health-related quality of life. However, the efficacy of whole body vibration exercise for low back pain is not without dispute. This study aims to estimate the effect of whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain. Methods/Design We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 120 patients with chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly assigned into an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group will participate in whole body vibration exercise twice a week for 3 months. The control group will receive general exercise twice a week for 3 months. Primary outcome measures will be the visual analog scale for pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and adverse events. The secondary outcome measures will include muscle strength and endurance of spine, trunk proprioception, transversus abdominis activation capacity, and quality of life. We will conduct intention-to-treat analysis if any participants withdraw from the trial. Discussion Important features of this study include the randomization procedures, single-blind, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for whole body vibration in chronic low back pain. This study aims to determine whether whole body vibration exercise produces more beneficial effects than general exercise for chronic low back pain. Therefore, our results will be useful for patients with chronic low back pain as well as for medical staff and health-care decision makers. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003708. PMID:24693945

  19. MYH9-related disease: May-Hegglin anomaly, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, and Epstein syndrome are not distinct entities but represent a variable expression of a single illness.

    PubMed

    Seri, Marco; Pecci, Alessandro; Di Bari, Filomena; Cusano, Roberto; Savino, Maria; Panza, Emanuele; Nigro, Alessandra; Noris, Patrizia; Gangarossa, Simone; Rocca, Bianca; Gresele, Paolo; Bizzaro, Nicola; Malatesta, Paola; Koivisto, Pasi A; Longo, Ilaria; Musso, Roberto; Pecoraro, Carmine; Iolascon, Achille; Magrini, Umberto; Rodriguez Soriano, Juan; Renieri, Alessandra; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Balduini, Carlo L; Savoia, Anna

    2003-05-01

    May-Hegglin anomaly, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, and Epstein syndrome are autosomal dominant macrothrombocytopenias distinguished by different combinations of clinical and laboratory signs, such as sensorineural hearing loss, cataract, nephritis, and polymorphonuclear Döhle-like bodies. Mutations in the MYH9 gene encoding for the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) have been identified in all these syndromes. To understand the role of the MYH9 mutations, we report the molecular defects in 12 new cases, which together with our previous works represent a cohort of 19 families. Since no genotype-phenotype correlation was established, we performed an accurate clinical and biochemical re-evaluation of patients. In addition to macrothrombocytopenia, an abnormal distribution of NMMHC-IIA within leukocytes was observed in all individuals, including those without Döhle-like bodies. Selective, high-tone hearing deficiency and cataract was diagnosed in 83% and 23%, respectively, of patients initially referred as having May-Hegglin anomaly or Sebastian syndrome. Kidney abnormalities, such as hematuria and proteinuria, affected not only patients referred as Fechtner syndrome and Epstein syndrome but also those referred as May-Hegglin anomaly and Sebastian syndrome. These findings allowed us to conclude that May-Hegglin anomaly, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, and Epstein syndrome are not distinct entities but rather a single disorder with a continuous clinical spectrum varying from mild macrothrombocytopenia with leukocyte inclusions to a severe form complicated by hearing loss, cataracts, and renal failure. For this new nosologic entity, we propose the term "MHY9-related disease," which better interprets the recent knowledge in this field and identifies all patients at risk of developing renal, hearing, or visual defects. PMID:12792306

  20. Comparison of single-dose ibuprofen lysine, acetylsalicylic acid, and placebo for moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S L; Brahim, J S; Korn, S H; Greene, S S; Suchower, L J

    1994-01-01

    In a single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study, ibuprofen lysine 200 mg (IBL 200) was compared with acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg (ASA 500) and placebo in 183 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, duration and degree of analgesia, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, global evaluation, and requirement for additional analgesic medication; both IBL 200 and ASA 500 were significantly more effective than placebo. IBL 200 also had a significantly faster onset of action, greater peak and overall analgesic effect, and longer duration of analgesia than ASA 500. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:7923312

  1. Comparison of Single Versus Multiple Fractions for Palliative Treatment of Painful Bone Metastasis: First Study from North West India

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Bagri, Puneet Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Maharia, Sitaram; Narayan, Satya; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone metastasis is a usual cause of pain in advanced cancer. Conventional radiation schedules require larger hospital stay and thus are not suitable for patients with poor general condition. This prospective observational study aims to compare the pain-relieving efficacy of different radiation fractionation schedules, i.e., 8 Gy administered in a single fraction versus 30 Gy administered in 10 fractions. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty consecutive patients of bone metastasis were evaluated for the study, with 63 patients being excluded due to non-fulfillment of the inclusion criteria. The response to radiotherapy leading to pain relief as per the Visual Analog Scale was recorded at the end of treatment, 8 days, 15 days and 1 month during the follow-up visits. Results: Sixty-two percent of the patients received a single fraction while the remaining received 10 fractions. In the 10-fraction group, overall response was present in 60% of the patients. Stable pain was present in 23% of the patients while 9% patients had progressive pain. At 1 month of completion of treatment, 9% patients were lost to follow-up. In the single-fraction arm, overall response was seen in 58%, stable pain in 27% and progressive pain in 7% of the patients. Six percent of the patients were lost to follow-up. Conclusions: Single-fraction treatment for bony metastasis is as effective as multiple fractions to relieve bony pain and provides treatment convenience to both the patient and the caregiver. PMID:25709185

  2. The comparison of Neoprene palumbo and Genu direxa stable orthosis effects on pain and activity of daily living in patients with patellofemoral syndrome: a randomized blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Dehghan, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common disorders of the knee. Conservative approaches, as well as surgery, can decrease pain and the syndrome’s progress effectively. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of neoprene palumbo orthosis (NPO) and Genu direxa stable orthosis (GDSO) on pain and the activities of daily living (ADL). Methods Thirty patients (males, ages 18 to 40) participated in this randomized blinded clinical trial. All of them were diagnosed with patella femoral pain syndrome. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 15, with one group using neoprene palumbo (intervention group) and the other group using Genu direxa stable orthoses (control group). Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), pain intensity and activities of daily living (ADL) and joint stiffness were analyzed before treatment and after three weeks of treatment. Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and independent samples t-test. Results Both orthoses reduced the patients’ pain. Both group showed meaningful improvement in pain reduction and ADL increase after using orthosis in each group. In comparing the variables, no significant differences were found between pain severity and ADL (p = 0.592, p = 0.887). In both groups, the mean of pain severity was different before, during, and after using orthosis (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results of this study indicated that Neoprene palumbo and genudirexa stable orthoses improved the signs of patello femoral pain syndrome, including pain intensity and ADL. PMID:26516437

  3. There is a low incidence of recurrent bacteriuria in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients followed longitudinally.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Edward; McMurphy, Carolyn

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this paper was to establish whether patients with confirmed painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presenting with symptoms of UTI have actual bacteriuria vs a flare of their PBS/IC symptoms. One hundred and six (n = 106) consecutive female patients (mean age 39.8 +/- 14 years) with newly diagnosed IC were identified and followed longitudinally for 24 months. At the initial visit and at all subsequent visits, urinary specimens were obtained by sterile catheterization (Bard 14Fr female) and cultured for bacteria. Eight patients had an initially positive urine culture, and repeat cultures 8 weeks after treatment were all negative. Once sterile urine was established, the diagnosis of PBS/IC was confirmed. A pelvic pain/urgency/frequency (PUF) questionnaire score was obtained from 89 patients. After the diagnosis of PBS/IC, all patients received multimodal treatment. Patients were instructed to present to the office whenever they developed symptoms of UTI, at which time a sterile catheter specimen was obtained and sent for culture. Greater than 10(3) colonies were considered positive. Patients who did not report flares were contacted to establish whether unreported treatments were given. Seventy-two patients (68%) had no UTI episodes or flares. The remaining 34 patients (32%) presented with 54 flares, of which 44 were culture-negative and 10 were culture-positive. A single flare was reported by 21 patients during the 24 months, with three positive cultures (14.3%). Recurrent UTI symptoms (two to four flares) were seen in a small group (n = 13) for a total of 33 flares. Of these, seven had two flares each (12 negative, 2 positive), five had three flares each (12 negative, 3 positive), and one patient had four flares (two negative, two positive). Therefore, within the group with recurrent symptoms, seven positive cultures were obtained for a rate of recurrent bacteriuria of 6.6% (7/106). Nine of the 10 positive bacterial cultures were

  4. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  5. Acupuncture-Evoked Response in Somatosensory and Prefrontal Cortices Predicts Immediate Pain Reduction in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R.; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    The linkage between brain response to acupuncture and subsequent analgesia remains poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate this linkage in chronic pain patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Brain response to electroacupuncture (EA) was evaluated with functional MRI. Subjects were randomized to 3 groups: (1) EA applied at local acupoints on the affected wrist (PC-7 to TW-5), (2) EA at distal acupoints (contralateral ankle, SP-6 to LV-4), and (3) sham EA at nonacupoint locations on the affected wrist. Symptom ratings were evaluated prior to and following the scan. Subjects in the local and distal groups reported reduced pain. Verum EA produced greater reduction of paresthesia compared to sham. Compared to sham EA, local EA produced greater activation in insula and S2 and greater deactivation in ipsilateral S1, while distal EA produced greater activation in S2 and deactivation in posterior cingulate cortex. Brain response to distal EA in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and brain response to verum EA in S1, SMA, and PFC were correlated with pain reduction following stimulation. Thus, while greater activation to verum acupuncture in these regions may predict subsequent analgesia, PFC activation may specifically mediate reduced pain when stimulating distal acupoints. PMID:23843881

  6. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B; Lin, Maofan; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS. PMID:27376284

  7. α-Blockers for the Treatment of Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: An Update on Current Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. Curtis; Touma, Naji

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is multifactorial, making its treatment difficult. Multimodal therapy including α-adrenergic antagonists (α-blockers), anti-inflammatory agents, and other pain treatments may provide optimal management for CP/CPPS. Although α-blockers are the most prescribed drugs for patients with CP/CPPS, not all studies support their efficacy. A recent meta-analysis of small trials suggested that treatment with α-blockers, possibly in combination with antibacterial agents, is efficacious in relieving symptoms. Third-generation α1A blockers (silodosin, tamsulosin) may provide efficacy as well as reduced cardiovascular side effects. Future research should aim to identify potential biomarkers associated with treatment response. PMID:23526487

  8. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B.; Lin, Maofan; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS. PMID:27376284

  9. Acute intermittent porphyria leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): a rare cause of abdominal pain and seizures.

    PubMed

    Dagens, Andrew; Gilhooley, Michael James

    2016-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited deficiency in the haem biosynthesis pathway. AIP is rare, affecting around 1 in 75 000 people. Acute attacks are characterised by abdominal pain associated with autonomic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. AIP is rarely associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is a clinicoradiological condition caused by the failure of the posterior circulation to autoregulate, resulting in cerebral oedema, headaches, nausea and seizures. This association is important because drugs used in the management of seizures may worsen an attack of AIP. This article describes a case of AIP and PRES in a young woman. PMID:27277587

  10. The first scintigraphic detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Bernateck, Michael; Karst, Matthias; Gratz, Klaus F; Meyer, Geerd J; Fischer, Michael J; Knapp, Wolfram H; Koppert, Wolfgang; Brunkhorst, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha has been identified as a pathogenic factor in many immunologically based diseases and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In this case series, we used radiolabeled technetium anti-TNF-alpha antibody to scintigraphically image TNF-alpha in 3 patients with type 1 CRPS. The results show that TNF-alpha was localized only in affected hands of patients with early-stage CRPS. No uptake was seen in clinically unaffected hands and late-stage CRPS. Our findings support the growing evidence for neuroimmune disturbance in patients with CRPS and may have important further implications for specific anticytokine treatment in patients with CRPS. PMID:19910617

  11. Photoacoustic microscopy of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-1) after stellate ganglion blocks in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Yi, Xiaobin; Xing, Wenxin; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to assist diagnoses and monitor the progress and treatment outcome of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1). Blood vasculature and oxygen saturation (sO2) were imaged by PAM in eight adult patients with CRPS-1. Patients' hands and cuticles were imaged both before and after stellate ganglion block (SGB) for comparison. For all patients, both the vascular structure and sO2 could be assessed by PAM. In addition, more vessels and stronger signals were observed after SGB.

  12. Identification and Treatment of New Inflammatory Triggers for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Leonard B; Myers, Trisha L; Walters, Arthur S; Schwartz, Oscar A; Younger, Jarred W; Chopra, Pradeep J; Guarino, Anthony H

    2016-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is evoked by conditions that may be associated with local and/or systemic inflammation. We present a case of long-standing CRPS in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in which prolonged remission was attained by directing therapy toward concomitant small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, obstructive sleep apnea, and potential increased microglia activity. We theorize that cytokine production produced by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and obstructive sleep apnea may act as stimuli for ongoing CRPS symptoms. CRPS may also benefit from the properties of low-dose naltrexone that blocks microglia Toll-like receptors and induces production of endorphins that regulate and reduce inflammation. PMID:26867023

  13. Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Repeated Intravescial OnabotulinumtoxinA Injections Plus Hydrodistention in the Treatment of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injection can relieve symptoms of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), but lacks sustainability. Repeated injections have been shown to provide a superior outcome to a single injection, but data on long-term efficacy and safety is limited. In this prospective study, we enrolled patients with refractory IC/BPS, and treated them with 100 U of BoNT-A injection plus hydrodistention followed by repeated injections every six months for up to two years or until the patient wished to discontinue. A “top-up” dose was offered after the fourth injection. Of these 104 participants, 56.7% completed four BoNT-A injections and 34% voluntarily received the fifth injection due to exacerbated IC symptoms. With a follow-up period of up to 79 months, O’Leary-Sant symptom and problem indexes (ICSI, ICPI, OSS), pain visual analogue scale (VAS) functional bladder capacity, frequency episodes, and global response assessment (GRA) all showed significant improvement (p < 0.0001). Those who received repeated injections had a better success rate during the long-term follow-up period. The incidence of adverse events did not rise with the increasing number of BoNT-A injections. A higher pre-treatment ICSI and ICPI score was predictive for successful response to repeated intravesical BoNT-A injections plus hydrodistention. PMID:26506388

  14. Nephrotic syndrome following a single bee sting in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kaarthigeyan, K.; Sivanandam, S.; Jothilakshmi, K.; Matthai, J.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of nephrotic syndrome following a bee sting is rarely reported in the literature. Hypersensitivity is believed to be the precipitating factor for the renal disease. We report a two-year-old boy, who developed generalized edema and decreased urine output, seven days after a bee sting. Physical examination and laboratory findings were consistent with nephrotic syndrome; and corticosteroid treatment induced prompt remission with resolution of clinical symptoms and normalization of laboratory findings. There was no relapse of the disease during a one-year follow up. PMID:22279346

  15. Incidence of post-operative pain after single visit and multiple visit root canal treatment: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Smita; Garg, Aniket

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain after single or multi visit root canal treatment on single rooted teeth in a randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients requiring root canal treatment on permanent single rooted teeth (both vital and non vital) were included. The patients were assigned randomly into two groups of 100 patients each. The teeth in Group1 (n = 100) were obturated at the first visit, whilst those in Group 2 (n = 100) were obturated in a second visit 7 days later. A modified Heft Parker visual analog scale was used to measure pre-operative pain and post-obturation pain at 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after obturation. Independent-sample T-tests was used for statistical analysis. Results: Twelve patients were excluded from the study as they failed to follow the scheduled revisit. Data were obtained from the remaining 188 patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain experienced by two groups. Conclusions: The incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain experience following one- or two-visit root canal treatment on teeth with a single canal were not significantly different. PMID:23112477

  16. Autoantibody pain.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  17. Effects of ozone applied by spinal endoscopy in patients with chronic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de Nêuton, Francisco; Magalhães, Oliveira; Soares, Sandra Correia; Torres, Jaqueline Melo; Ungaretti, Arthur; Cacciacarro, Mariana Fillipi; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last two decades, ozone has emerged as a treatment for low back pain, applied by means of minimally invasive techniques. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the effect and safety of ozone therapy applied in the epidural space for chronic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome. Methods The investigators studied 13 sequential patients of both sexes, between 18 and 70 years old, with persistent chronic pain (more than six months) in the lumbar region and in the lower limbs related to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Pain was classified as neuropathic and non-neuropathic regarding the topography (lumbar and lower limb), based on the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4) questionnaire. The patients received the ozone gas in the lumbar epidural space via spinal-sacral endoscopy. Clinical evaluation was performed before, immediately after (24 hours), and 1, 3, and 6 months after intervention with visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results Overall, the patients had 43.7% reduction of lumbar pain, 60.9% reduction in leg pain in six months followed by 44.0% of improvement in ODI. The reduction of pain and in the disability index was markedly greater in patients with non-neuropathic predominant pain, 95.2%, 80.6%, and 75.3% improvement in lumbar, leg pain, and ODI respectively, while neuropathic predominant pain patients experienced only 12.5%, 42.4%, and 20.9% improvement, also respectively. No neurological or infectious complications were observed acutely or during the follow-up. The present data suggests that epidural ozone might be a therapeutic option for persistent low back pain, especially in non-neuropathic predominant pain patients, but double-blind controlled studies are still required to prove its efficacy. PMID:24259984

  18. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  19. A single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (225, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-11-01

    A description of a single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of the dual basis multiplication algorithm. The same architecture can be applied to design VLSI chips to compute various kinds of number theoretic transforms.

  20. A single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (225, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of the dual basis multiplication algorithm. The same architecture can be applied to design VLSI chips to compute various kinds of number theoretic transforms.

  1. Role of microglia and astrocyte in central pain syndrome following electrolytic lesion at the spinothalamic tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Kobra; Saghaei, Elham; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh; Afhami, Mina; Haeri, Ali; Rahimi, Farzaneh; Jorjani, Masoumeh

    2013-03-01

    Central pain syndrome (CPS) is a debilitating state and one of the consequences of spinal cord injury in patients. Many pathophysiological aspects of CPS are not well documented. Spinal glia activation has been identified as a key factor in the sensory component of chronic pain. In this study, the role of glial subtypes in the process of CPS induced by unilateral electrolytic lesion of spinothalamic tract (STT) is investigated. Male rats received a laminectomy at T8-T9 and then unilateral electrolytic lesion centered on the STT. Thermal and mechanical thresholds as well as locomotor function were measured on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 post-injuries by tail flick, von Frey filament, and open field tests, respectively. To investigate the spinal glial activation following denervation in STT-lesioned groups, Iba1 and GFAP were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting at the same time points. Data showed that STT lesion significantly decreased thermal pain at day 3 in comparison with sham groups. Significant bilateral allodynia appeared in hind paws at day 14 after spinal cord injury and continued to day 28 (P < 0.05). Additionally, electrolytic spinal lesion attenuated locomotor function of injured animals after 7 days (P < 0.05). In both histological assessments and Western blotting, Iba1 increased at days 3 and 7 while increased GFAP occurred from day 14 to 28 after lesion. It appears that microglial activation is important in the early stages of pain development and astrocytic activation occurs later. These events may lead to behavioral outcomes especially central neuropathic pain. PMID:22722907