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Sample records for pain tolerance threshold

  1. Self-reported pain sensitivity: lack of correlation with pain threshold and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Robert R; Fillingim, Roger B

    2007-07-01

    Many recent studies and several reviews have highlighted the potential clinical applications of experimental pain testing (e.g., for predicting post-surgical pain, treatment responsiveness, etc.). However, the implementation of quantitative sensory testing of pain sensitivity on a broad scale is limited by requirements of time, equipment, and expertise, and their associated costs. One reasonable question is whether one can obtain, via self-report, a valid index of an individual's pain sensitivity and pain tolerance. We analyzed data from a large number of subjects (n=505) who had undergone standardized thermal pain testing, and found that while higher self-reported pain sensitivity was associated with higher scores on a measure of anxiety, no relationship was observed between subjects' self-report of pain sensitivity and subjects' actual pain threshold or tolerance. These findings suggest that circumventing psychophysical pain testing by assessing individuals' self-reported pain sensitivity is unlikely to be a useful strategy. PMID:17118681

  2. Effect of GaAs Laser at 904 nm in the Pain Threshold in Tibia and Tolerance in Deltoid Evaluated by Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luiz G. P.; Sato, Sidney K.; Silveira, Landulfo; Aimbire, Flvio; Moreira, Leonardo M.; Pinheiro, Antnio L. B.

    2011-08-01

    The use of LLLT in pain relief is a controversial issue in Physiotherapy, with the efficacy of LLLT associated to pain relief still requiring significant study. Objective. This work focuses on the evaluation of the effect of low power GaAs laser at 904 nm in pressure pain threshold and tolerance in tibia and deltoid muscle, respectively. A total of 17 subjects were divided in two groups: active and sham laser. Measurements were taken before and after laser irradiation in healthy individuals using a pressure algometry, first verifying the viability of algometry to evaluate the pain threshold and tolerance inter individuals and comparing the differences of right and left sides in the same patients, and finally evaluating the pain threshold and tolerance before and after a single laser application. Laser energy density was of 4.0 J/cm2 with power density of 137 mW/cm2. Comparing algometry values of active laser group and the sham group, the pain tolerance in the deltoid muscle did not change among groups after laser irradiation, while it was also encountered a statistically significant difference in the pain threshold in tibia when comparing the laser active and sham laser (p<0.05). It was found that the active laser was effective in maintaining the pain threshold in tibia. The effective laser action in raising the pain threshold in tibia upon healthy individuals can suggest that the laser could be applied not only as curative but also with preventive purpose.

  3. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the “fingers point” of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  4. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the "fingers point" of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  5. Assessment of pressure-pain thresholds and central sensitization of pain in lateral epicondylalgia.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Anders; Amris, Kirstine; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Bartels, Else Marie; Torp-Pedersen, Sren; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsoe, Bente

    2013-02-01

    OBJECTIVE.: To assess pain sensitivity and spreading hyperalgesia in lateral epicondylalgia (LE). SUBJECTS.: Twenty-two women with LE, and 38 controls were included. OUTCOME MEASURES.: Computerized cuff pressure algometry was used for assessment of pressure-pain threshold and tolerance. The stimulus was applied using a single (stimulation-area: 241?cm(2) ) or double-chambered (stimulation-area: 482?cm(2) ) tourniquet on the arm and leg. Spatial summation was expressed as the ratio between pressure-pain thresholds to single and double cuff-chamber stimulation. During 10-minute constant pressure stimulation at intensity relative to the individual pain threshold, the pain intensity was continuously recorded using an electronic visual analogue scale (VAS), and from this the degree of temporal summation was estimated. For LE, a Doppler ultrasound examination of the elbow was made to identify inflammation. RESULTS.: In LE compared with controls the pressure-pain threshold and tolerance were on average reduced by respectively 31% (nonsignificant) and 18% (nonsignificant) on the lower arm and by 32% (P?pain thresholds were on average reduced by 20% (P?pain tolerance by 10% (nonsignificant) on the painful compared with the asymptomatic side. Spatial summation (P?pain hypersensitivity and Doppler ultrasound into clinically meaningful subgroups with varying duration of symptoms and different degrees of central sensitization. These groups may require different pain management strategies. PMID:23279601

  6. Computer-Delivered Social Norm Message Increases Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pulvers, Kim; Schroeder, Jacquelyn; Limas, Eleuterio F.; Zhu, Shu-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Few experimental studies have been conducted on social determinants of pain tolerance. Purpose This study tests a brief, computer-delivered social norm message for increasing pain tolerance. Methods Healthy young adults (N=260; 44 % Caucasian; 27 % Hispanic) were randomly assigned into a 2 (social norm)×2 (challenge) cold pressor study, stratified by gender. They received standard instructions or standard instructions plus a message that contained artifically elevated information about typical performance of others. Results Those receiving a social norm message displayed significantly higher pain tolerance, F(1, 255)=26.95, p<.001, ηp2=.10 and pain threshold F(1, 244)=9.81, p=.002, ηp2=.04, but comparable pain intensity, p>.05. There were no interactions between condition and gender on any outcome variables, p>.05. Conclusions Social norms can significantly increase pain tolerance, even with a brief verbal message delivered by a video. PMID:24146086

  7. Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, R. I. M.; Baron, Rebecca; Frangou, Anna; Pearce, Eiluned; van Leeuwen, Edwin J. C.; Stow, Julie; Partridge, Giselle; MacDonald, Ian; Barra, Vincent; van Vugt, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested this hypothesis in a series of six experimental studies in both the laboratory (watching videos) and naturalistic contexts (watching stage performances), using change in pain threshold as an assay for endorphin release. The results show that pain thresholds are significantly higher after laughter than in the control condition. This pain-tolerance effect is due to laughter itself and not simply due to a change in positive affect. We suggest that laughter, through an endorphin-mediated opiate effect, may play a crucial role in social bonding. PMID:21920973

  8. Multimodal Distribution of Human Cold Pain Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Ltsch, Jrn; Dimova, Violeta; Lieb, Isabel; Zimmermann, Michael; Oertel, Bruno G.; Ultsch, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Background It is assumed that different pain phenotypes are based on varying molecular pathomechanisms. Distinct ion channels seem to be associated with the perception of cold pain, in particular TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been highlighted previously. The present study analyzed the distribution of cold pain thresholds with focus at describing the multimodality based on the hypothesis that it reflects a contribution of distinct ion channels. Methods Cold pain thresholds (CPT) were available from 329 healthy volunteers (aged 18 37 years; 159 men) enrolled in previous studies. The distribution of the pooled and log-transformed threshold data was described using a kernel density estimation (Pareto Density Estimation (PDE)) and subsequently, the log data was modeled as a mixture of Gaussian distributions using the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to optimize the fit. Results CPTs were clearly multi-modally distributed. Fitting a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to the log-transformed threshold data revealed that the best fit is obtained when applying a three-model distribution pattern. The modes of the identified three Gaussian distributions, retransformed from the log domain to the mean stimulation temperatures at which the subjects had indicated pain thresholds, were obtained at 23.7 C, 13.2 C and 1.5 C for Gaussian #1, #2 and #3, respectively. Conclusions The localization of the first and second Gaussians was interpreted as reflecting the contribution of two different cold sensors. From the calculated localization of the modes of the first two Gaussians, the hypothesis of an involvement of TRPM8, sensing temperatures from 25 24 C, and TRPA1, sensing cold from 17 C can be derived. In that case, subjects belonging to either Gaussian would possess a dominance of the one or the other receptor at the skin area where the cold stimuli had been applied. The findings therefore support a suitability of complex analytical approaches to detect mechanistically determined patterns from pain phenotype data. PMID:25992576

  9. Personality Correlates of Pain Perception and Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukin, Penny R.; Ray, A. Bartow

    1982-01-01

    Explored personality correlates of pain perception and tolerance in a nonmedical sample and setting. Results showed no significant correlations with personality measures and cold-pressor scores, but a significant relationship between pain tolerance and cognitive focus; those who focused on the experimental situation had much shorter tolerance

  10. Fault-tolerant thresholds for encoded ancillae with homogeneous errors

    SciTech Connect

    Eastin, Bryan

    2007-02-15

    I describe a procedure for calculating thresholds for quantum computation as a function of error model given the availability of ancillae prepared in logical states with independent, identically distributed errors. The thresholds are determined via a simple counting argument performed on a single qubit of an infinitely large Calderbank-Shor-Steane code. I give concrete examples of thresholds thus achievable for both Steane and Knill style fault-tolerant implementations and investigate their relation to threshold estimates in the literature.

  11. Headache attributed to masticatory myofascial pain: impact on facial pain and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Costa, Y M; Porporatti, A L; Stuginski-Barbosa, J; Bonjardim, L R; Speciali, J G; Conti, P C R

    2016-03-01

    There is no clear evidence on how a headache attributed to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) can hinder the improvement of facial pain and masticatory muscle pain. The aim of this study was to measure the impact of a TMD-attributed headache on masticatory myofascial (MMF) pain management. The sample was comprised of adults with MMF pain measured according to the revised research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) and additionally diagnosed with (Group 1, n = 17) or without (Group 2, n = 20) a TMD-attributed headache. Both groups received instructions on how to implement behavioural changes and use a stabilisation appliance for 5 months. The reported facial pain intensity (visual analogue scale - VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT - kgf cm(-2) ) of the anterior temporalis, masseter and right forearm were measured at three assessment time points. Two-way anova was applied to the data, considering a 5% significance level. All groups had a reduction in their reported facial pain intensity (P < 0001). Mean and standard deviation (SD) PPT values, from 133 (054) to 196 (106) kgf cm(-2) for the anterior temporalis in Group 1 (P = 0016), and from 127 (035) to 172 (060) kgf cm(-2) for the masseter in Group 2 (P = 0013), had significant improvement considering baseline versus the 5th-month assessment. However, no differences between the groups were found (P > 0100). A TMD-attributed headache in patients with MMF pain does not negatively impact pain management, but does change the pattern for muscle pain improvement. PMID:26440358

  12. Lack of effect of chronic dextromethorphan on experimental pain tolerance in methadone-maintained patients

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Peggy A.; Ling, Walter; Torrington, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Good evidence exists to suggest that individuals on opioid maintenance for the treatment of addiction (i.e. methadone) are less tolerant of experimental pain than are matched controls or ex-opioid addicts, a phenomenon theorized to reflect opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Agonist activity at the excitatory ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on dorsal horn neurons has been implicated in the development of both OIH and its putative expression at the clinical levelopioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of the NMDA-receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan (DEX), to reverse or treat OIH in methadone-maintenance (MM) patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double-blind conditions, changes in pain threshold and tolerance [cold pressor (CP) and electrical stimulation (ES)] following a 5-week trial of DEX (titrated to 480 mg/day) in comparison with placebo was evaluated in a well-characterized sample of MM patients. The sample (n = 40) was 53% male and ethnically diverse (53% Latino, 28% African American, 10% White, 9% other), with a mean age of 48.0 years (SD = 6.97). Based on t-test analyses, no difference was found between groups on CP pain threshold, CP pain tolerance, ES pain threshold or ES pain tolerance, both pre- and postmedication. Notably, DEX-related changes significantly differed by gender, with women tending to show diminished tolerance for pain with DEX therapy. These results support that chronic high-dose NMDA antagonism does not improve tolerance for pain in MM patients, although a gender effect on DEX response is suggested. PMID:18507735

  13. Silica Nanoconstruct Cellular Toleration Threshold In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Herd, Heather L.; Malugin, Alexander; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-01-01

    The influence of geometry of silica nanomaterials on cellular uptake and toxicity on epithelial and phagocytic cells was studied. Three types of amine-terminated silica nanomaterials were prepared and characterized via the modified Stober method, namely spheres (17827 nm), worms (23222 nm 1348314 nm) and cylinders (21429 nm 42866 nm). The findings of the study suggest that in this size range and for the cell types studied, geometry does not play a dominant role in the modes of toxicity and uptake of these particles. Rather, a concentration threshold and cell type dependent toxicity of all particle types was observed. This correlated with confocal microscopy observations, as all nanomaterials were observed to be taken up in both cell types, with a greater extent in phagocytic cells. It must be noted that there appears to be a concentration threshold at ~100 g/mL, below which there is limited to no impact of the nanoparticles on membrane integrity, mitochondrial function, phagocytosis or cell death. Analysis of cell morphology by transmission electron microscopy, colocalization experiments with intracellular markers and Western Blot results provide evidence of potential involvement of lysosomal escape, autophagic like activity, compartmental fusion and recycling in response to intracellular nanoparticle accumulation. These processes could be involved in cellular coping or defense mechanisms. The manipulation of physicochemical properties to enhance or reduce toxicity paves the way for the safe design of silica-based nanoparticles for use in nanomedicine. PMID:21342660

  14. Imagined Pain Tolerance Test: An Instrument to Measure American Indians' Perception of Their Tolerance of Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Gary A.

    1981-01-01

    The Imagined Pain Tolerance Test, a paper and pencil test designed to test differences in perceptions between American Indians and non-Indians, appears to have utility as a research instrument. Available from: White Cloud Center, Gaines Hall UOHSC, 840 Southwest Gaines Road, Portland, OR 97201. (Author/CM)

  15. Modification of Electrical Pain Threshold by Voluntary Breathing-Controlled Electrical Stimulation (BreEStim) in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Berliner, Jeffrey C.; Melton, Danielle H.; Li, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain has a distinct sensory and affective (i.e., unpleasantness) component. BreEStim, during which electrical stimulation is delivered during voluntary breathing, has been shown to selectively reduce the affective component of post-amputation phantom pain. The objective was to examine whether BreEStim increases pain threshold such that subjects could have improved tolerance of sensation of painful stimuli. Methods Eleven pain-free healthy subjects (7 males, 4 females) participated in the study. All subjects received BreEStim (100 stimuli) and conventional electrical stimulation (EStim, 100 stimuli) to two acupuncture points (Neiguan and Weiguan) of the dominant hand in a random order. The two different treatments were provided at least three days apart. Painful, but tolerable electrical stimuli were delivered randomly during EStim, but were triggered by effortful inhalation during BreEStim. Measurements of tactile sensation threshold, electrical sensation and electrical pain thresholds, thermal (cold sensation, warm sensation, cold pain and heat pain) thresholds were recorded from the thenar eminence of both hands. These measurements were taken pre-intervention and 10?min post-intervention. Results There was no difference in the pre-intervention baseline measurement of all thresholds between BreEStim and EStim. The electrical pain threshold significantly increased after BreEStim (27.56.7% for the dominant hand and 28.510.8% for the non-dominant hand, respectively). The electrical pain threshold significantly decreased after EStim (9.12.8% for the dominant hand and 10.24.6% for the nondominant hand, respectively) (F[1, 10]?=?30.992, p?=?.00024). There was no statistically significant change in other thresholds after BreEStim and EStim. The intensity of electrical stimuli was progressively increased, but no difference was found between BreEStim and EStim. Conclusion Voluntary breathing controlled electrical stimulation selectively increases electrical pain threshold, while conventional electrical stimulation selectively decreases electrical pain threshold. This may translate into improved pain control. PMID:23894632

  16. Intrarater Reliability of Pain Intensity, Tissue Blood Flow, Thermal Pain Threshold, Pressure Pain Threshold and Lumbo-Pelvic Stability Tests in Subjects with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Paungmali, Aatit; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Taneyhill, Khanittha; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This preliminary study aimed to determine the intrarater reliability of the quantitative tests for the study of non-specific low back pain. Methods Test-retest reliability of the measurements of ratio data was determined by an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurements (SEMs), coefficient of variation (CV), and one-way repeated measures ANOVA using the values collected from 13 young individuals (25.8 6.2 years) with chronic non-specific low back pain on two occasions separated by 2 days. Percent agreement of the ordinal data was also determined by Cohen's Kappa statistics (kappa). The measures consisted of tissue blood flow (BF), average pain visual analog scales (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain threshold (CPT), heat pain threshold (HPT) and lumbo-pelvic stability test (LPST). An acceptable reliability was determined as the ICC values of greater than 0.85, SEMs less than 5%, CV less than 15%, the kappa scores of greater than 80% and no evidence of systematic error (ANOVA, P>0.05). Results ICC of all measures in the lumbo-sacral area were greater than 0.87. The kappa was also greater than 83%. Most measures demonstrated a minimal error of measurements and less potential of systemic error in nature. Only the SEMs and the CV of the CPT exceeded the acceptable level. Conclusions It is concluded that most of the quantitative measurements are reliable for the study of non-specific low back pain, however the CPT should be applied with care as it has a great variation among individuals and potential of measurement error. PMID:22461960

  17. Low intensity vagal nerve stimulation lowers human thermal pain thresholds.

    PubMed

    Ness, T J; Fillingim, R B; Randich, A; Backensto, E M; Faught, E

    2000-05-01

    The effect of vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) on thermal pain sensation was studied in eight subjects who had vagal nerve stimulators surgically implanted for purposes of seizure control. Prior to their involvement in the study, all subjects had the intensity of their VNS (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0-2.75 mA) adjusted upwards until achieving their desired clinical effect of reduced seizures. Thermal pain thresholds were determined using a Medoc TSA-2001 with a thermode applied to the skin of the forearm. During VNS at settings 100% of those used clinically to control their seizures, subjects showed a statistically significant decrease in their thermal pain threshold of 1.1+/-0.4 degrees C. Acute effects of graded VNS on thermal pain thresholds were determined in seven of the subjects after cessation of chronic VNS. Two thermal threshold measurements were obtained while the subject received sham stimulation (0 mA intensity), during tactile control stimulation and during 30 s of VNS at intensities approximately 33, 66 and 100% of the settings utilized to control their seizures. Tactile control stimulation was provided by electrical stimulation of the skin of the ankle with the intensity adjusted by the patient to match the intensity of any sensations felt in the neck during VNS. Subjects were not aware of the settings employed. Their stimulator was adjusted with each trial and an ascending/descending ordering of intensity was utilized with an inter-trial interval of 2 min. Thermal pain thresholds were significantly decreased in relation to tactile control stimulation at all intensities of VNS tested with the greatest effect occurring at the 66% level. Subjects were also monitored non-invasively and hemodynamic responses to VNS were determined. No significant alterations in hemodynamic variables were observed. The findings of this human study are consistent with experiments in non-human animals which demonstrate a pro-nociceptive effect of low intensity VNS. PMID:10779664

  18. Effect of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Allsop, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Swearing produces a pain lessening (hypoalgesic) effect for many people; an emotional response may be the underlying mechanism. In this paper, the role of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance and pain perception is assessed. In a repeated-measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to play for 10 minutes a first-person shooter video game vs a golf video game. Sex differences were explored. After playing the first-person shooter video game, aggressive cognitions, aggressive affect, heart rate, and cold pressor latency were increased, and pain perception was decreased. These data indicate that people become more pain tolerant with raised state aggression and support our theory that raised pain tolerance from swearing occurs via an emotional response. PMID:23045874

  19. Reduced Cold Pain Tolerance in Chronic Pain Patients Following Opioid Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Younger, Jarred; Barelka, Peter; Carroll, Ian; Kaplan, Kim; Chu, Larry; Prasad, Ravi; Gaeta, Ray; Mackey, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Objective One potential consequence of chronic opioid analgesic administration is a paradoxical increase of pain sensitivity over time. Little scientific attention has been given to how cessation of opioid medication affects the hyperalgesic state. In this study, we examined the effects of opioid tapering on pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients. Design Twelve chronic pain patients on long-term opioid analgesic treatment were observed in a 7- to 14-day inpatient pain rehabilitation program, with cold pain tolerance assessed at admission and discharge. The majority of participants were completely withdrawn from their opioids during their stay. Outcome Measures We hypothesized that those patients with the greatest reduction in daily opioid use would show the greatest increases in pain tolerance, as assessed by a cold pressor task. Results A linear regression revealed that the amount of opioid medication withdrawn was a significant predictor of pain tolerance changes, but not in the direction hypothesized. Greater opioid reduction was associated with decreased pain tolerance. This reduction of pain tolerance was not associated with opioid withdrawal symptoms or changes in general pain. Conclusions These findings suggest that the withdrawal of opioids in a chronic pain sample leads to an acute increase in pain sensitivity. PMID:18564998

  20. Pain Tolerance, Arousal, and Personality Relationships of Athletes and Nonathletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Kerry; Freischlag, Jerry

    1975-01-01

    In this study, college athletes and nonathletes performed a muscular endurance task to determine pain tolerance, during which galvanic skin-response measures of arousal were obtained. The Bernreuter Personality Inventory was administered after this treatment. (JS)

  1. Changes of cutaneous sensory thresholds induced by non-painful transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in normal subjects and in subjects with chronic pain.

    PubMed Central

    Zoppi, M; Francini, F; Maresca, M; Procacci, P

    1981-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of the nervi cutaneus surae medialis was applied to 59 healthy subjects and 30 patients suffering from chronic myofascial pain in one lower limb, with an intensity of current that induced a well tolerated tingling sensation. Each period of stimulation lasted 24 minutes. The thresholds of the tactile, tingling and painful sensations were tested at fixed intervals before, during and after stimulation. Trains of constant current square waves in the distribution area of the stimulated nerve (local thresholds) and in other areas (general thresholds) were used. In all subjects repeated changes of the current were necessary in order to maintain constant tingling during the first period of TENS (changing phase); after that few if any changes of the current were necessary (steady phase). There were changes in thresholds within the territory of the electrically stimulated nerve, and marked changes elsewhere and generally in the body. In healthy subjects local thresholds increased during both phases of TENS; general thresholds decreased during the changing phase and increased during the steady phase. After TENS, thresholds showed the same trend as during the steady phase. Trends of the sensory thresholds during and after TENS differed in different subjects according to their thresholds before TENS. Thresholds did not return to normal for more than 20 minutes after TENS. In the group of 30 patients there was a significant difference between thresholds on the two sides of the body. The difference between the two sides was reduced by TENS. Pain relief induced by TENS may be related to this fact. PMID:6975355

  2. Insular Cortex Mediates Increased Pain Tolerance in Yoga Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Villemure, Chantal; ?eko, Marta; Cotton, Valerie A.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Yoga, an increasingly popular discipline among Westerners, is frequently used to improve painful conditions. We investigated possible neuroanatomical underpinnings of the beneficial effects of yoga using sensory testing and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. North American yogis tolerated pain more than twice as long as individually matched controls and had more gray matter (GM) in multiple brain regions. Across subjects, insular GM uniquely correlated with pain tolerance. Insular GM volume in yogis positively correlated with yoga experience, suggesting a causal relationship between yoga and insular size. Yogis also had increased left intrainsular white matter integrity, consistent with a strengthened insular integration of nociceptive input and parasympathetic autonomic regulation. Yogis, as opposed to controls, used cognitive strategies involving parasympathetic activation and interoceptive awareness to tolerate pain, which could have led to use-dependent hypertrophy of insular cortex. Together, these findings suggest that regular and long-term yoga practice improves pain tolerance in typical North Americans by teaching different ways to deal with sensory inputs and the potential emotional reactions attached to those inputs leading to a change in insular brain anatomy and connectivity. PMID:23696275

  3. Pain and pressure pain thresholds in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Anette; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Smstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Helseth, Slvi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although pain is a significant symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pain is poorly understood in adolescents with CFS. The aim of this study was to explore pain distribution and prevalence, pain intensity and its functional interference in everyday life, as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in adolescents with CFS and compare this with a control group of healthy adolescents (HC). Methods This is a casecontrol, cross-sectional study on pain including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 HCs, aged 1218?years. We measured pain frequency, pain severity and pain interference using self-reporting questionnaires. PPT was measured using pressure algometry. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of the Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial. Results Adolescents with CFS had significantly lower PPTs compared with HCs (p<0.001). The Pain Severity Score and the Pain Interference Score were significantly higher in adolescents with CFS compared with HCs (p<0.001). Almost all adolescents with CFS experienced headache, abdominal pain and/or pain in muscles and joints. Moreover, in all sites, the pain intensity levels were significantly higher than in HCs (p<0.001). Conclusions We found a higher prevalence of severe pain among adolescents with CFS and lowered pain thresholds compared with HCs. The mechanisms, however, are still obscure. Large longitudinal population surveys are warranted measuring pain thresholds prior to the onset of CFS. Trial registration number Clinical Trials, NCT01040429; The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25287104

  4. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  5. Levodopa raises objective pain threshold in Parkinson's disease: a RIII reflex study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdelat?Mas, A; Simonetta?Moreau, M; Thalamas, C; Ory?Magne, F; Slaoui, T; Rascol, O; Brefel?Courbon, C

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) describe painful sensations that could be related to neuropathic pain. Experimental data have indicated the involvement of basal ganglia and dopaminergic pathways in central nociceptive processing. Aim The objective of this study was to assess and compare the effect of levodopa on the objective pain threshold in patients with PD and healthy subjects. Methods The objective pain threshold was assessed by the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII) in 13 PD patients and 10 healthy subjects. Patients and healthy subjects were evaluated under two randomised conditions: with levodopa (ON) and without (OFF). Results Levodopa significantly increased the RIII threshold of PD patients (6.9 (1.2)?mA in the OFF condition vs 8 (1.1)?mA in the ON position; p?=?0.02). RIII threshold was significantly lower in PD patients than in healthy subjects in the OFF condition (6.9 (1.2)?mA vs 9.7 (3.4)?mA; p?=?0.02). RIII threshold did not change after levodopa administration in healthy subjects. Conclusion These results provide evidence of a dopaminergic modulation of objective pain threshold in PD patients. In addition, the decrease in RIII threshold in PD patients, in the OFF condition, compared with controls, confirms the existence of an objective pain perception disturbance in PD. PMID:17504881

  6. Performance of music elevates pain threshold and positive affect: implications for the evolutionary function of music.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, R I M; Kaskatis, Kostas; MacDonald, Ian; Barra, Vinnie

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that music arouses emotional responses. In addition, it has long been thought to play an important role in creating a sense of community, especially in small scale societies. One mechanism by which it might do this is through the endorphin system, and there is evidence to support this claim. Using pain threshold as an assay for CNS endorphin release, we ask whether it is the auditory perception of music that triggers this effect or the active performance of music. We show that singing, dancing and drumming all trigger endorphin release (indexed by an increase in post-activity pain tolerance) in contexts where merely listening to music and low energy musical activities do not. We also confirm that music performance results in elevated positive (but not negative) affect. We conclude that it is the active performance of music that generates the endorphin high, not the music itself. We discuss the implications of this in the context of community bonding mechanisms that commonly involve dance and music-making. PMID:23089077

  7. Association of increased pain threshold by noise with central opioid neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Fung; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Tsai, Yao-Tsung; Tsai, Huei-Yann

    2009-04-30

    Several studies indicated that stress would induce analgesia. Noise, one of the stressors, was assumed to be one of the elements to enhance the threshold of pain tolerance. Since noise might affect human's daily life, it is important to know the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. The objective of this study was to explore the possible mechanism which was trying to explain how the noise affects central nervous system and the possible relationship between this effect and the involvement of opioid neurons. In the preliminary study, the analgesic effect was corroborated in ICR mice in a formalin study. The results are as follows: [1] Naloxone (a micro-opioid receptor antagonist; 1 mg/kg, i.p.), beta-FNA (a delta-opioid receptor antagonist; 5, 10 mg, i.c.v.) and naltrindole (a delta-opioid receptor antagonist; 1, 5 mg/kg, i.p.) were found to reduce antinociceptive effect. [2] nor-BNI (a kappa-antagonist; 1 microg, i.c.v.) had much effect on noise induced analgesic. In conclusion, this study suggests that noise stress enhanced the threshold of analgesia, which might be related to micro- and delta-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. PMID:19764344

  8. Tactile sensory and pain thresholds in the face and tongue of subjects asymptomatic for oro-facial pain and headache.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, I; Komiyama, O; Ayuse, T; De Laat, A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the tactile sensory and pain thresholds in the face, tongue, hand and finger of subjects asymptomatic for pain. Sixteen healthy volunteers (eight men and eight women, mean age 357 years, range 27-41) participated. Using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, the tactile detection threshold (TDT) and the filament-prick pain detection threshold (FPT) were measured at five sites: on the cheek skin (CS), tongue tip (TT), palm side of the thenar skin (TS), dorsum of the hand (DH) and the finger tip (FT). The difference between the tactile sensory and pain threshold (FPT-TDT) was also calculated. Both for the TDT and FPT, TT and DH had the lowest and highest values, respectively. As for the FPT-TDT, there were no significant differences among the measurement sites. As the difference between FPT and TDT (FPT-TDT) is known to be an important consideration in interpreting QST (quantitative sensory testing) data and can be altered by neuropathology, taking the FPT-TDT as a new parameter in addition to the TDT and FPT separately would be useful for case-control studies on oro-facial pain patients with trigeminal neuralgia, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome/glossodynia. PMID:25041286

  9. Psychophysical Investigations into the Role of Low-Threshold C Fibres in Non-Painful Affective Processing and Pain Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Sumaiya; Nagi, Saad S.; McGlone, Francis; Mahns, David A.

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that C low-threshold mechanoreceptors (CLTMRs) contribute to touch-evoked pain (allodynia) during experimental muscle pain. Conversely, in absence of ongoing pain, the activation of CLTMRs has been shown to correlate with a diffuse sensation of pleasant touch. In this study, we evaluated (1) the primary afferent fibre types contributing to positive (pleasant) and negative (unpleasant) affective touch and (2) the effects of tactile stimuli on tonic muscle pain by varying affective attributes and frequency parameters. Psychophysical observations were made in 10 healthy participants. Two types of test stimuli were applied: stroking stimulus using velvet or sandpaper at speeds of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 cm/s; focal vibrotactile stimulus at low (20 Hz) or high (200 Hz) frequency. These stimuli were applied in the normal condition (i.e. no experimental pain) and following the induction of muscle pain by infusing hypertonic saline (5%) into the tibialis anterior muscle. These observations were repeated following the conduction block of myelinated fibres by compression of sciatic nerve. In absence of muscle pain, all participants reliably linked velvet-stroking to pleasantness and sandpaper-stroking to unpleasantness (no pain). Likewise, low-frequency vibration was linked to pleasantness and high-frequency vibration to unpleasantness. During muscle pain, the application of previously pleasant stimuli resulted in overall pain relief, whereas the application of previously unpleasant stimuli resulted in overall pain intensification. These effects were significant, reproducible and persisted following the blockade of myelinated fibres. Taken together, these findings suggest the role of low-threshold C fibres in affective and pain processing. Furthermore, these observations suggest that temporal coding need not be limited to discriminative aspects of tactile processing, but may contribute to affective attributes, which in turn predispose individual responses towards excitatory or inhibitory modulation of pain. PMID:26372601

  10. A Novel Quantitative Pain Assessment Instrument That Provides Means of Comparing Patient’s Pain Magnitude With a Measurement of Their Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lanny L.; Pittsley, Andrew; Becker, Ruth; Young, Allison De

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional pain assessment instruments are subjective in nature. They are limited to subjective reporting of the presence and magnitude of pain. There is no means of validating their response or assessing their pain tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine the potential value of a novel addition to the traditional physical examination concerning a patient’s pain and more importantly their pain tolerance. Methods Extensive preliminary data were collected on 359 consecutive private practice knee patients referable the subject’s pain, including the magnitude, the most pain ever experienced, and their opinion of personal pain tolerance. The novel evaluation included physical testing of a series of small ball drops through a vertical tube from various fixed levels on the index finger and patella. The patient’s response to this impact testing provided quantitative information, from which a comparison was made to their pain opinion and also to that of other patients with similar demographics. Results Nine percent of the patients rated their pain tolerance below the midpoint on the visual analog scale. Seventy-one percent thought they were above the midpoint on the scale in regards to pain tolerance. There were discrepancies in both directions between the subject’s opinion on pain tolerance and their rating of their pain experience to the ball drop testing. Twenty-eight percent of the entire patient group rated themselves above 5 on tolerance, but experienced above the average discomfort compared to other subjects reporting on the finger impact testing. Conclusions This report introduces a novel method for collecting data concerning pain that can be subjected to quantification. The database included quantitative measures providing the opportunity to confirm, validate or refute the patient’s assertions concerning pain magnitude and tolerance. This method is best described as a patient pain profile. It has the potential to give both the patient and the physician quantified objective information rendering insight not otherwise available. PMID:26346200

  11. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 4611 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3.8]). That subgroup exhibited significant differences in sensory thresholds when compared to the 18 responders (VAS from 7 [3] to 3 [1]). First, responders' thresholds for A-delta and C fibers in the PPBS area were significantly lower than those in the pain-free area before treatment but corrected after acupuncture (from respectively 60 [30] and 63 [10]% to 91 [11] and 106 [36]%). That might account for a nociceptive hypersensitivity in the PPBS that corrected after treatment. On the contrary, in non-responders nociceptive thresholds were similar in both the PPBS and the pain-free areas before treatment and did not change after EA. However, absolute values for thresholds in the pain-free areas where significantly lower for non-responders than for responders. The fact that non-responders had significant pain scores while presenting with lowered nociceptive thresholds even in the pain-free areas might evoke the possibility of a generalized supra-spinal hyperalgesia. The fact that acupuncture did not correct the pain nor the nociceptive thresholds in this subgroup requires further investigation. We also observed a statistically and clinically relevant reduction in VAS for pruritus for all patients - even those from the subgroup of non-responders to pain - that is worth to be mentioned and requires further studies to be confirmed. This observational study is the first that confirms the effects of acupuncture on analgesia and nociceptive thresholds in the clinical setting of burn pain only for patients presenting with a burn-localized but not a generalized hyperalgesia. PMID:26188894

  12. Effect of intravenous sodium amytal on cutaneous sensory abnormalities, spontaneous pain and algometric pain pressure thresholds in neuropathic pain patients: a placebo-controlled study. II.

    PubMed

    Mailis, A; Amani, N; Umana, M; Basur, R; Roe, S

    1997-03-01

    This study investigated the behaviour exhibited by 17 neuropathic pain patients (almost half of whom had documented neurological injury) with diffuse pain and extraterritorial sensory, sudomotor and vasomotor abnormalities, under the influence of intravenous administration of saline-controlled sodium amytal (SA), a medium action barbiturate. After SA (but not after normal saline) infusion, there was a dramatic and selective reduction of allodynia (touch-evoked pain) in all patients displaying this phenomenon, while pin prick and cold hypo- or hyperalgesia, as well as algometric pressure thresholds of the symptomatic limb (as a measurement of deep pain) were minimally changed in most patients. Spontaneous subjective pain was reduced substantially but not totally. The patients were able (once allodynia was eliminated) to recognize a deep-seated pain of which they were unaware before, evoked by firm but gentle palpation of the limb. Sympathetic blocks and A-fibre ischemic blocks in several patients and spinal stimulation in one patient produced effects identical to those observed during SA administration. The deep pain component was maintained despite elimination of allodynia even under stages of sleep induced by SA, at which time the patients would withdraw only the symptomatic limb upon firm but gentle palpation. We argue that neuropathic pain patients have two separate pain components, a cutaneous one (touch-evoked pain or allodynia) mediated by large fibres as a product of central sensitization, and a deep pain component mediated via nociceptors, which can be easily discriminated during systemic administration of SA. PMID:9106811

  13. Pubertal status moderates the association between mother and child laboratory pain tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie CI; Li, Ning; Parker, Delana; Seidman, Laura C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited information regarding the relationship between parent and child responses to laboratory pain induction in the absence of experimental manipulation. OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between responses to cold and pressure pain tasks in 133 nonclinical mothers and children (mean age 13.0 years; 70 girls), and the moderating effects of child sex and pubertal status on these mother-child relationships. METHODS: Mothers and children independently completed the cold and pressure pain tasks. Multiple linear regression analyses examined the association between mothers’ and children’s laboratory pain responses. The moderating effects of child sex and pubertal status were tested in the linear models by examining the interaction among mother laboratory pain responses, and child sex and pubertal status. RESULTS: Mothers’ cold pain anticipatory anxiety and pressure pain intensity were associated with children’s pressure pain anticipatory anxiety. Mothers’ pressure pain tolerance was associated with children’s pain tolerance for both the cold and pressure pain tasks. Mothers’ cold pain tolerance was associated with children’s pressure pain tolerance. Pubertal status moderated two of the three significant mother-child pain tolerance relationships, such that the associations held for early pubertal but not for late pubertal children. Sex did not moderate mother-child pain associations. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that mother-child pain relationships are centred primarily on pain avoidance behaviour, particularly among prepubertal children. These findings may inform interventions focused on pain behaviours, with a particular emphasis on mothers of prepubertal children, to reduce acute pain responses in their children. PMID:24367794

  14. Factors influencing pricking pain threshold using a CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Voegelin, M R; Zoppi, M; Meucci, R; Jafrancesco, D; Bartoli, A

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the best experimental conditions in healthy subjects for the measurement of the minimal thermal energy density E1 which induced pricking pain on the volar surface of the left forearm by means of CO2 laser pulses. E1 was measured on a well-defined area, using laser pulses of different durations and constant power P. The dependence of E1 on the stimulus power P, the size A of the radiated area and the surface temperature T(e) were explored. In the first part of the study, these relations were obtained using a computer program, from the calculated spatio-temporal distribution of the skin temperature during, and following, a laser pulse which caused pricking pain. The second part studied a set of subsequent measurements carried out on a group of five healthy trained subjects and agreed only in part with the calculated data. We found that the measurement error on E(t) was less than 10% with P between 1.5 and 3 W, and A between 0.15 and 0.25 cm2, respectively. The influence of sensitization and adaptation phenomena on the measured data was also explored. We also show a rhythmic annual change of T(e) and E1. PMID:12636187

  15. Relationships between pain thresholds, catastrophizing and gender in acute whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Rivest, Karine; Ct, Julie N; Dumas, Jean-Pierre; Sterling, Michele; De Serres, Sophie J

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying sensory hypersensitivity (SH) in acute whiplash associated disorders (WAD) are not well understood. We examined the extent of the relationships between the sensory measures of pressure pain threshold (PPT) and cold pain threshold (CPT), catastrophizing, pain and disability levels and gender in acute WAD. Thirty-seven subjects reporting neck pain following a motor vehicle accident were examined within five weeks post-injury. Measures of neck pain and disability (Neck Disability Index, NDI) and catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, PCS) were taken. CPT was assessed in the cervical spine and PPTs were assessed in the cervical spine (PPTcx) and at a remote site (PPTdistal). CPT and PCS were moderately correlated (r=0.46; p < 0.01); however there were no significant relationships between PPT (cervical and distal) and PCS. Both CPT (r=0.55, p < 0.01) and PPTcx (r=-0.42, p < 0.01) were significantly correlated with NDI but PPTdistal was not (r=-0.08, p=0.65). Finally, gender modulated the relationships between sensory measures, catastrophizing, and pain and disability levels. In conclusion, subjects with higher levels of catastrophizing presented with sensory hypersensitivity to cold stimuli in the acute phase of whiplash. Differences between genders are in accordance with the growing body of evidence suggesting that the relationships between some psychological factors and injury-related symptoms are modulated by gender. PMID:19892580

  16. Reliability and responsiveness of algometry for measuring pressure pain threshold in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Ozdincler, Arzu Razak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to establish the intrarater reliability and responsiveness of a clinically available algometer in patients with knee osteoarthritis as well as to determine the minimum-detectable-change and standard error of measurement of testing to facilitate clinical interpretation of temporal changes. [Subjects] Seventy-three patients with knee osteoarthritis were included. [Methods] Pressure pain threshold measured by algometry was evaluated 3 times at 2-min intervals over 2 clinically relevant sitesmediolateral to the medial femoral tubercle (distal) and lateral to the medial malleolus (local)on the same day. Intrarater reliability was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficients. The minimum-detectable-change and standard error of measurement were calculated. As a measure of responsiveness, the effect size was calculated for the results at baseline and after treatment. [Results] The intrarater reliability was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.930.97). The standard error of measurement and minimum-detectable-change were 0.700.66 and 1.621.53, respectively. The pressure pain threshold over the distal site was inadequately responsive in knee osteoarthritis, but the local site was responsive. The effect size was 0.70. [Conclusion] Algometry is reliable and responsive to assess measures of pressure pain threshold for evaluating pain patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26180358

  17. Decreased pain threshold and enhanced synaptic transmission in the anterior cingulate cortex of experimental hypothyroidism mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones are essential for the maturation and functions of the central nervous system. Pain sensitivity is related to the thyroid status. However, information on how thyroid hormones affect pain processing and synaptic transmission in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is limited. Nociceptive threshold and synaptic transmission in the ACC were detected in the experimental hypothyroidism (HT) mice. Results HT was induced by methimazole and potassium perchlorate in distilled drinking water for 4 weeks. The threshold of pain perception to hot insults, but not mechanical ones, decreased in hypothyroid mice. After treatment with tri-iodothyronine (T3) or thyroxine (T4) for 2 weeks, thermal pain threshold recovered. Electrophysiological recordings revealed enhanced glutamatergic synaptic transmission and reduced GABAergic synaptic transmission in the ACC. Supplementation with T3 or T4 significantly rescued this synaptic transmission imbalance. In the same model, HT caused the up-regulation of the GluR1 subunit of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor and NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but it down-regulated γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors in the ACC. Supplementation with T3 or T4 notably recovered the levels of above proteins. Conclusions These results suggest that HT promotes hypersensitivity to noxious thermal, and that supplementation with T3 or T4 rescues the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the ACC. PMID:24943008

  18. Prediction of threshold pain skin temperature from thermal properties of materials in contact.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Chianta, M A; Piergallini, J R

    1982-12-01

    Aerospace design engineers have long sought concrete data with respect to the thermal safety of materials in contact with human skin. A series of studies on this subject has been completed and some of the results have been reported earlier. In these studies over 2,000 observations were made of pain threshold during contact with materials at elevated temperatures. Six materials were used representing the full range of thermal properties from good conductors to good insulators. Previous reports gave methods for determining the maximum permissible temperatures for any material in safe contact with bare skin for 1-5 s solely from a knowledge of its thermal properties. This report presents the comparison of the theoretical and experimental contact temperatures at pain threshold and provides a method for deriving the skin temperature productive of threshold pain from the thermal properties of any material within the range of those studies. Ratios reflecting the heat transfer coefficient associated with the materials in contact are related to their thermal properties so that the skin temperature at pain threshold may be determined from that calculated from heat transfer theory. Tabular and graphical representation of these data permits interpolation within the range of properties so that any material of known thermal conductivity, density and specific heat may be assessed with respect to its effect on the skin temperature during contact to the end point of pain. These data, in conjunction with those already reported, constitute a system for the complete assessment of the thermal aspects of practically any material suitable for construction and manufacturing applications with respect to safe contact with human skin. PMID:7159344

  19. Overcoming pain thresholds with multilevel modelsan example using quantitative sensory testing (QST) data

    PubMed Central

    Blankenburg, Markus R.; S, Moritz; Zernikow, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of somatosensory function is a cornerstone of research and clinical practice in neurology. Recent initiatives have developed novel protocols for quantitative sensory testing (QST). Application of these methods led to intriguing findings, such as the presence lower pain-thresholds in healthy children compared to healthy adolescents. In this article, we (re-) introduce the basic concepts of signal detection theory (SDT) as a method to investigate such differences in somatosensory function in detail. SDT describes participants responses according to two parameters, sensitivity and response-bias. Sensitivity refers to individuals ability to discriminate between painful and non-painful stimulations. Response-bias refers to individuals criterion for giving a painful response. We describe how multilevel models can be used to estimate these parameters and to overcome central critiques of these methods. To provide an example we apply these methods to data from the mechanical pain sensitivity test of the QST protocol. The results show that adolescents are more sensitive to mechanical pain and contradict the idea that younger children simply use more lenient criteria to report pain. Overall, we hope that the wider use of multilevel modeling to describe somatosensory functioning may advance neurology research and practice. PMID:26557435

  20. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo?/?) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo?/? mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo?/? mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  1. Wireless peripheral nerve stimulation increases pain threshold in two neuropathic rat models.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, Will; Casavant, Reema; Engineer, Navzer; Beall, Patrick; Pierce, David; Jain, Ravi; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2012-06-01

    Neurostimulation approaches including spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation are typically used to treat intractable chronic pain in individuals who are refractory to pain medications. Our earlier studies have shown that a voltage controlled capacitive discharge (VCCD) method of stimulation of nerve activation is able to selectively recruit activity in large myelinated nerve fibers. In this study, we were able to wirelessly activate the sciatic nerve using the VCCD waveform. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this waveform can effectively improve two of the most troublesome pain symptoms experienced by patients with chronic neuropathic pain mechanical and cold hyperalgesia. Neuropathic mechanical hyperalgesia was reproduced using the Spinal Nerve Ligation (SNL) rat model whereas cold allodynia was reproduced using the Chronic Constriction Injury (CCI) model in male rats. Von Frey and cold plate tests were used to evaluate paw withdrawal threshold and latency to withdrawal before and after stimulation in experimental and control rats. Paw withdrawal threshold increased significantly compared to post-lesion baseline after VCCD stimulation in SNL rats. We also observed a significant improvement in cold allodynia in the active implant CCI rats after stimulation. These results suggest that the VCCD stimulation using a wireless microstimulator may be effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:22487199

  2. Microscopic quantum dynamics study on the noise threshold of fault-tolerant quantum error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.C.; Silbey, R.J.

    2005-07-15

    Quantum circuits implementing fault-tolerant quantum error correction (QEC) for the three-qubit bit-flip code and five-qubit code are studied. To describe the effect of noise, we apply a model based on a generalized effective Hamiltonian where the system-environment interactions are taken into account by including stochastic fluctuating terms in the system Hamiltonian. This noise model enables us to investigate the effect of noise in quantum circuits under realistic device conditions and avoid strong assumptions such as maximal parallelism and weak storage errors. Noise thresholds of the QEC codes are calculated. In addition, the effects of imprecision in projective measurements, collective bath, fault-tolerant repetition protocols, and level of parallelism in circuit constructions on the threshold values are also studied with emphasis on determining the optimal design for the fault-tolerant QEC circuit. These results provide insights into the fault-tolerant QEC process as well as useful information for designing the optimal fault-tolerant QEC circuit for particular physical implementation of quantum computer.

  3. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20-22?years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3?min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  4. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20–22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  5. Effects of two different intensities of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain thresholds of contralateral muscles in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Katsuyoshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Izumi, Masashi; Aso, Koji; Sugimura, Natsuki; Enoki, Hayato; Nagano, Yasunori; Ishida, Kenji; Tani, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the differential effects of high-intensity and low-intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the contralateral side on the pain threshold in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults, volunteers received two intensity levels (motor-level, 1.5 times the muscle motor threshold; sensory-level, sensory threshold of the common peroneal nerve), for 30?s on separate days. Pressure pain threshold was recorded on the contralateral tibialis anterior and deltoid muscle before, during, and after stimulation. [Results] Motor-level stimulation significantly increased the pressure pain threshold at both muscle sites, while effects of sensory-level stimulation on pressure pain thresholds were significant only at the deltoid site. The percent change in pressure pain thresholds at both sites was significantly higher during motor-level stimulation. [Conclusion] Motor-level stimulation, applied unilaterally to one leg, produced immediate contralateral diffuse and segmental analgesic effects. This may be of therapeutic benefit in patients for whom transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation cannot be directly used at the painful site. PMID:26504290

  6. [Influence of simulated microgravity on the threshold of pain sensitivity in humans with single dose of ketorolac].

    PubMed

    Baranov, M V; Kovalev, A S; Perfilov, D F; Chernogorov, R V; Repenkova, L G

    2015-01-01

    The data supporting the influence of simulated microgravity effects on pain sensitivity were obtained in the series of experiments involving human. In conditions of antiorthostatic hypokinesia (ANOH) and immersion revealed no reduction in pain sensitivity in the morning, which is typical for normal conditions. Ketorolac has no effect on pain sensitivity, when determining the pain threshold (PT) by method of thermoalgometry. However, the conditions of simulated microgravity substantially alter the pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, increasing the rate of absorption of the drug and reduce its relative bioavailability and retention time in the blood plasma. This may require changes in pain therapy schemes in space flight. PMID:26571803

  7. Evaluation of thermal, pain, and vibration sensation thresholds in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, D; Mayer, P; Gries, F A

    1988-01-01

    Small and large fibre function was studied in 40 non-ketotic, newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetic patients and 48 age-matched controls, using 12 quantitative tests for assessment of cutaneous sensation. Patients were aged 10-39 years and had been treated with insulin for 4-31 days. Thermal discrimination (foot), warm and cold thermal perception (thenar eminence and foot), and heat and cold pain perception thresholds (thenar eminence) were significantly elevated in the patients as compared with the controls (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001). No significant differences in thermal discrimination (thenar), heat and cold pain perception (foot), and metacarpal as well as malleolar vibration perception thresholds were noted between the groups. The rates of abnormalities among the individual tests ranged from 0% to 27.5%, being lowest for vibration perception and highest for thermal perception thresholds after cold stimuli. The results in nine of 12 tests correlated significantly with age, but only two were related to HbA1c. Thus, sensory neural functions transmitted by small fibres, but not those transmitted by large fibres, were impaired in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetics after the correction of initial ketosis and hyperglycaemia. Cooling perception tests were most sensitive in detecting abnormality. An age-related involvement of different small fibre functions was present in these patients. PMID:3236020

  8. Latitudinal variation in thermal tolerance thresholds of early life stages of corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, E. S.; Keith, S. A.; Byrne, M.; Schmidt-Roach, S.; Baird, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    Organisms living in habitats characterized by a marked seasonal temperature variation often have a greater thermal tolerance than those living in more stable habitats. To determine the extent to which this hypothesis applies to reef corals, we compared thermal tolerance of the early life stages of five scleractinian species from three locations spanning 17° of latitude along the east coast of Australia. Embryos were exposed to an 8 °C temperature range around the local ambient temperature at the time of spawning. Upper thermal thresholds, defined as the temperature treatment at which the proportion of abnormal embryos or median life span was significantly different to ambient controls, varied predictably among locations. At Lizard Island, the northern-most site with the least annual variation in temperature, the proportion of abnormal embryos increased and life span decreased 2 °C above ambient in the two species tested. At two southern sites, One Tree Island and Lord Howe Island, where annual temperature variation was greater, upper temperature thresholds were generally 4 °C or greater above ambient for both variables in the four species tested. The absolute upper thermal threshold temperature also varied among locations: 30 °C at Lizard Island; 28 °C at One Tree Island; 26 °C at Lord Howe Island. These results support previous work on adult corals demonstrating predictable differences in upper thermal thresholds with latitude. With projected ocean warming, these temperature thresholds will be exceeded in northern locations in the near future, adding to a growing body of evidence indicating that climate change is likely to be more detrimental to low latitude than high latitude corals.

  9. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Melton, Danielle H; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP) after traumatic limb amputation. Methods Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were enrolled. Ten patients had chronic PLP, while the other seven patients had no PLP. Tactile-sensation threshold, cold- and warm-sensation thresholds, cold- and heat-pain thresholds, electrical-sensation threshold (EST), and electrical-pain threshold on the distal residual limb and the symmetrical site on the sound limb were measured in all tested patients. Their thresholds were compared within the PLP and non-PLP group, and between the groups. Results The novel findings included: 1) electrical-pain threshold was only decreased in the sound limb in the PLP group and there was no difference between two limbs in the non-PLP group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with PLP; and 2) EST was increased on the affected limb as compared to the sound limb within the PLP group, but there were no significant differences in EST between the PLP and non-PLP group. There were in general no significant differences in other tested thresholds within the groups and between groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate central sensitization in the patients with PLP after traumatic limb amputation. PMID:25945065

  10. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  11. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  12. Overhead and noise threshold of fault-tolerant quantum error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2003-10-01

    Fault-tolerant quantum error correction (QEC) networks are studied by a combination of numerical and approximate analytical treatments. The probability of failure of the recovery operation is calculated for a variety of Calderbank-Shor-Steane codes, including large block codes and concatenated codes. Recent insights into the syndrome extraction process, which render the whole process more efficient and more noise tolerant, are incorporated. The average number of recoveries that can be completed without failure is thus estimated as a function of various parameters. The main parameters are the gate {gamma} and memory {epsilon} failure rates, the physical scale-up of the computer size, and the time t{sub m} required for measurements and classical processing. The achievable computation size is given as a surface in parameter space. This indicates the noise threshold as well as other information. It is found that concatenated codes based on the [[23,1,7

  13. Overhead and noise threshold of fault-tolerant quantum error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2003-10-01

    Fault-tolerant quantum error correction (QEC) networks are studied by a combination of numerical and approximate analytical treatments. The probability of failure of the recovery operation is calculated for a variety of Calderbank-Shor-Steane codes, including large block codes and concatenated codes. Recent insights into the syndrome extraction process, which render the whole process more efficient and more noise tolerant, are incorporated. The average number of recoveries that can be completed without failure is thus estimated as a function of various parameters. The main parameters are the gate ? and memory ? failure rates, the physical scale-up of the computer size, and the time tm required for measurements and classical processing. The achievable computation size is given as a surface in parameter space. This indicates the noise threshold as well as other information. It is found that concatenated codes based on the [[23,1,7

  14. The growth threshold conjecture: a theoretical framework for understanding T-cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Arias, Clemente F; Herrero, Miguel A; Cuesta, Jos A; Acosta, Francisco J; Fernndez-Arias, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive immune responses depend on the capacity of T cells to target specific antigens. As similar antigens can be expressed by pathogens and host cells, the question naturally arises of how can T cells discriminate friends from foes. In this work, we suggest that T cells tolerate cells whose proliferation rates remain below a permitted threshold. Our proposal relies on well-established facts about T-cell dynamics during acute infections: T-cell populations are elastic (they expand and contract) and they display inertia (contraction is delayed relative to antigen removal). By modelling inertia and elasticity, we show that tolerance to slow-growing populations can emerge as a population-scale feature of T cells. This result suggests a theoretical framework to understand immune tolerance that goes beyond the self versus non-self dichotomy. It also accounts for currently unexplained observations, such as the paradoxical tolerance to slow-growing pathogens or the presence of self-reactive T cells in the organism. PMID:26587263

  15. The growth threshold conjecture: a theoretical framework for understanding T-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Clemente F.; Herrero, Miguel A.; Cuesta, José A.; Acosta, Francisco J.; Fernández-Arias, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses depend on the capacity of T cells to target specific antigens. As similar antigens can be expressed by pathogens and host cells, the question naturally arises of how can T cells discriminate friends from foes. In this work, we suggest that T cells tolerate cells whose proliferation rates remain below a permitted threshold. Our proposal relies on well-established facts about T-cell dynamics during acute infections: T-cell populations are elastic (they expand and contract) and they display inertia (contraction is delayed relative to antigen removal). By modelling inertia and elasticity, we show that tolerance to slow-growing populations can emerge as a population-scale feature of T cells. This result suggests a theoretical framework to understand immune tolerance that goes beyond the self versus non-self dichotomy. It also accounts for currently unexplained observations, such as the paradoxical tolerance to slow-growing pathogens or the presence of self-reactive T cells in the organism. PMID:26587263

  16. Winter cold-tolerance thresholds in field-grown Miscanthus hybrid rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Murilo de Melo; Friesen, Patrick Calvin; Sage, Rowan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cold tolerance of winter-dormant rhizomes was evaluated in diploid, allotriploid, and allotetraploid hybrids of Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus grown in a field setting. Two artificial freezing protocols were tested: one lowered the temperature continuously by 1°C h–1 to the treatment temperature and another lowered the temperature in stages of 24h each to the treatment temperature. Electrolyte leakage and rhizome sprouting assays after the cold treatment assessed plant and tissue viability. Results from the continuous-cooling trial showed that Miscanthus rhizomes from all genotypes tolerated temperatures as low as –6.5 °C; however, the slower, staged-cooling procedure enabled rhizomes from two diploid lines to survive temperatures as low as –14 °C. Allopolyploid genotypes showed no change in the lethal temperature threshold between the continuous and staged-cooling procedure, indicating that they have little ability to acclimate to subzero temperatures. The results demonstrated that rhizomes from diploid Miscanthus lines have superior cold tolerance that could be exploited to improve performance in more productive polyploid lines. With expected levels of soil insulation, low winter air temperatures should not harm rhizomes of tolerant diploid genotypes of Miscanthus in temperate to sub-boreal climates (up to 60°N); however, the observed winter cold in sub-boreal climates could harm rhizomes of existing polyploid varieties of Miscanthus and thus reduce stand performance. PMID:25788733

  17. Real men are made, not born! Incidental exposure to energy drinks may promote men's tolerance of physical pain.

    PubMed

    Abetkoff, Darren; Karlsson, Torulf; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2015-12-01

    The energy drink market has grown exponentially since the debut of Red Bull. Advertising of energy drinks tends to reinforce an emphasis on masculine identification. However, no previous study has addressed the symbolic effect of energy drinks on pain tolerance, that is, a particular masculine characteristic. We conducted a priming-based experiment to show that energy drink primes elevated men's pain tolerance. Induced conformity to masculinity norms mediated the priming effect of energy drinks on pain tolerance. These findings suggest that mere reminders of masculinity-related products can lead men to behave accordingly in seemingly irrelevant domains (i.e., pain tolerance). Besides distraction and placebo treatment, the connection between a symbolic masculinity prime and greater tolerance of pain may shed lights on an alternative route for pain control. PMID:26437721

  18. The effects of distraction on exercise and cold pressor tolerance for chronic low back pain sufferers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M H; Petrie, S M

    1997-01-01

    Distraction has been found to be effective for the attenuation of experimental and acute clinical pain but its efficacy for chronic pain management remains unclear. There are even some suggestions that distraction may be a counterproductive strategy for chronic pain sufferers. In this study we found that a word shadowing distraction task increased the ability of a group of 12 female and eight male chronic low back pain (CLBP) sufferers to carry out a brief (maximum 300 s) step-up exercise that temporarily increased their pain (P < 0.05). This 15% increase in exercise time was not accompanied by an increase in reported pain after the exercise. Interestingly, the same distraction task did not increase the cold pressor (CP) tolerance time for the CLBP group but produced a 26% increase in tolerance time for a pain-free control group consisting of nine females and nine males (P < 0.05). Also, performance on the distraction task during the CP was worse for the CLBP group than the controls (P < 0.05). Although these findings should be interpreted cautiously because of the parameters of the experiment, they do suggest that distraction is a potentially useful technique to assist chronic pain sufferers. PMID:9060011

  19. The effect of traditional cupping on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomised controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: -17.9?mm VAS, 95%CI -29.2 to -6.6; PM: -19.7, 95%CI -32.2 to -7.2; PaDi: -1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI -2.5 to -0.4; all P < 0.05) and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P < 0.05). No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa); pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P < 0.01). Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  20. Dynamic Compression Enhances Pressure-to-Pain Threshold in Elite Athlete Recovery: Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; McNeal, Jeni R; Murray, Steven R; Stone, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Athlete recovery-adaptation is crucial to the progress and performance of highly trained athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess peristaltic pulse dynamic compression (PPDC) in reducing short-term pressure-to-pain threshold (PPT) among Olympic Training Center athletes after morning training. Muscular tenderness and stiffness are common symptoms of fatigue and exercise-induced muscle microtrauma and edema. Twenty-four highly trained athletes (men = 12 and women = 12) volunteered to participate in this study. The athletes were randomly assigned to experimental (n = 12) and control (n = 12) groups. Pressure-to-pain threshold measurements were conducted with a manual algometer on 3 lower extremity muscles. Experimental group athletes underwent PPDC on both legs through computer-controlled circumferential inflated leggings that used a peristaltic-like pressure pattern from feet to groin. Pressures in each cell were set to factory defaults. Treatment time was 15 minutes. The control group performed the same procedures except that the inflation pump to the leggings was off. The experimental timeline included a morning training session, followed by a PPT pretest, treatment application (PPDC or control), an immediate post-test (PPT), and a delayed post-test (PPT) after the afternoon practice session. Difference score results showed that the experimental group's PPT threshold improved after PPDC treatment immediately and persisted the remainder of the day after afternoon practice. The control group showed no statistical change. We conclude that PPDC is a promising means of accelerating and enhancing recovery after the normal aggressive training that occurs in Olympic and aspiring Olympic athletes. PMID:24531439

  1. Virtual-Reality Distraction and Cold-Pressor Pain Tolerance: Does Avatar Point of View Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Linda J.; Weiss, Karen E.; Jimeno, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study tested the effects of distraction using virtual-reality (VR) technology on acute pain tolerance in young adults. Forty-one undergraduate students, aged 18–23 years, used a VR head-mounted display helmet, steering wheel, and foot pedal to play an auto racing video game while undergoing exposure to very cold water (cold pressor set at 1°C). Two different game views were tested that were hypothesized to affect the degree to which participants felt “present” in the virtual environment: a first-person view, in which the participant saw the virtual environment through the eyes of the game character being manipulated; and a third-person view, in which the participant viewed the game character from a distance. The length of time participants tolerated the cold-water exposure (pain tolerance) under each distraction condition was compared to a baseline (no distraction) trial. Subjects also rated the degree to which they felt “present” in the virtual environment after each distraction trial. Results demonstrated that participants had significantly higher pain tolerance during both VR-distraction conditions relative to baseline (no distraction) trials. Although participants reported a greater sense of presence during the first-person condition than the third-person condition, pain-tolerance scores associated with the two distraction conditions did not differ. The types of VR applications in which presence may be more or less important are discussed. PMID:20950186

  2. Virtual-reality distraction and cold-pressor pain tolerance: does avatar point of view matter?

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Lynnda M; Herbert, Linda J; Weiss, Karen E; Jimeno, Monica

    2010-10-01

    This study tested the effects of distraction using virtual-reality (VR) technology on acute pain tolerance in young adults. Forty-one undergraduate students, aged 18-23 years, used a VR head-mounted display helmet, steering wheel, and foot pedal to play an auto racing video game while undergoing exposure to very cold water (cold pressor set at 1 C). Two different game views were tested that were hypothesized to affect the degree to which participants felt "present" in the virtual environment: a first-person view, in which the participant saw the virtual environment through the eyes of the game character being manipulated; and a third-person view, in which the participant viewed the game character from a distance. The length of time participants tolerated the cold-water exposure (pain tolerance) under each distraction condition was compared to a baseline (no distraction) trial. Subjects also rated the degree to which they felt "present" in the virtual environment after each distraction trial. Results demonstrated that participants had significantly higher pain tolerance during both VR-distraction conditions relative to baseline (no distraction) trials. Although participants reported a greater sense of presence during the first-person condition than the third-person condition, pain-tolerance scores associated with the two distraction conditions did not differ. The types of VR applications in which presence may be more or less important are discussed. PMID:20950186

  3. Shared Mechanisms for Opioid Tolerance and a Transition to Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Reichling, David B.; Levine, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical pain conditions may remain responsive to opiate analgesics for extended periods, but such persistent acute pain can undergo a transition to an opiate-resistant chronic pain state that becomes a much more serious clinical problem. To test the hypothesis that cellular mechanisms of chronic pain in the primary afferent also contribute to the development of opiate resistance, we employed a recently developed model of the transition of from acute to chronic pain, hyperalgesic priming. Repeated intradermal administration of the potent and highly selective ?-opioid agonist, DAMGO, to produce tolerance for its inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) hyperalgesia, simultaneously produced hyperalgesic priming. Conversely, injection of an inflammogen, carrageenan, used to produce priming produced DAMGO tolerance. Both effects were prevented by inhibition of protein kinase C? (PKC?). Carrageenan also induced opioid dependence, manifest as ?-opioid receptor antagonist (CTOP)-induced hyperalgesia that, like priming, was PKC?- and Gi-dependent. These findings suggest that the transition from acute to chronic pain, and development of ?-opioid receptor tolerance and dependence may be linked by common cellular mechanisms in the primary afferent. PMID:20357116

  4. The body fades away: investigating the effects of transparency of an embodied virtual body on pain threshold and body ownership

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Matteo; Kilteni, Konstantina; Maselli, Antonella; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of “ownership” over an external dummy/virtual body (or body part) has been proven to have both physiological and behavioural consequences. For instance, the vision of an “embodied” dummy or virtual body can modulate pain perception. However, the impact of partial or total invisibility of the body on physiology and behaviour has been hardly explored since it presents obvious difficulties in the real world. In this study we explored how body transparency affects both body ownership and pain threshold. By means of virtual reality, we presented healthy participants with a virtual co-located body with four different levels of transparency, while participants were tested for pain threshold by increasing ramps of heat stimulation. We found that the strength of the body ownership illusion decreases when the body gets more transparent. Nevertheless, in the conditions where the body was semi-transparent, higher levels of ownership over a see-through body resulted in an increased pain sensitivity. Virtual body ownership can be used for the development of pain management interventions. However, we demonstrate that providing invisibility of the body does not increase pain threshold. Therefore, body transparency is not a good strategy to decrease pain in clinical contexts, yet this remains to be tested. PMID:26415748

  5. The body fades away: investigating the effects of transparency of an embodied virtual body on pain threshold and body ownership.

    PubMed

    Martini, Matteo; Kilteni, Konstantina; Maselli, Antonella; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of "ownership" over an external dummy/virtual body (or body part) has been proven to have both physiological and behavioural consequences. For instance, the vision of an "embodied" dummy or virtual body can modulate pain perception. However, the impact of partial or total invisibility of the body on physiology and behaviour has been hardly explored since it presents obvious difficulties in the real world. In this study we explored how body transparency affects both body ownership and pain threshold. By means of virtual reality, we presented healthy participants with a virtual co-located body with four different levels of transparency, while participants were tested for pain threshold by increasing ramps of heat stimulation. We found that the strength of the body ownership illusion decreases when the body gets more transparent. Nevertheless, in the conditions where the body was semi-transparent, higher levels of ownership over a see-through body resulted in an increased pain sensitivity. Virtual body ownership can be used for the development of pain management interventions. However, we demonstrate that providing invisibility of the body does not increase pain threshold. Therefore, body transparency is not a good strategy to decrease pain in clinical contexts, yet this remains to be tested. PMID:26415748

  6. Threshold of Musculoskeletal Pain Intensity for Increased Risk of Long-Term Sickness Absence among Female Healthcare Workers in Eldercare

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars L.; Clausen, Thomas; Burr, Hermann; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Musculoskeletal disorders increase the risk for absenteeism and work disability. However, the threshold when musculoskeletal pain intensity significantly increases the risk of sickness absence among different occupations is unknown. This study estimates the risk for long-term sickness absence (LTSA) from different pain intensities in the low back, neck/shoulder and knees among female healthcare workers in eldercare. Methods Prospective cohort study among 8,732 Danish female healthcare workers responding to a questionnaire in 20042005, and subsequently followed for one year in a national register of social transfer payments (DREAM). Using Cox regression hazard ratio (HR) analysis we modeled risk estimates of pain intensities on a scale from 09 (reference 0, where 0 is no pain and 9 is worst imaginable pain) in the low back, neck/shoulders and knees during the last three months for onset of LTSA (receiving sickness absence compensation for at least eight consecutive weeks) during one-year follow-up. Results During follow-up, the 12-month prevalence of LTSA was 6.3%. With adjustment for age, BMI, smoking and leisure physical activity, the thresholds of pain intensities significantly increasing risk of LTSA for the low back (HR 1.44 [95%CI 1.071.93]), neck/shoulders (HR 1.47 [95%CI 1.101.96]) and knees (HR 1.43 [95%CI 1.061.93]) were 5, 4 and 3 (scale 09), respectively, referencing pain intensity of 0. Conclusion The threshold of pain intensity significantly increasing the risk for LTSA among female healthcare workers varies across body regions, with knee pain having the lowest threshold. This knowledge may be used in the prevention of LTSA among health care workers. PMID:22911772

  7. Phase and Sex Effects in Pain Perception: A Critical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goolkasian, Paula

    1985-01-01

    Reviews the literature in pain perception to clarify the influence of sex and menstrual phase on the phenomenon of pain. The appropriateness of the measures of pain threshold, pain tolerance, discrimination accuracy, and of response bias to the study of pain are discussed. (Author)

  8. Cortex glial cells activation, associated with lowered mechanical thresholds and motor dysfunction, persists into adulthood after neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Sato, Karina Laurenti; Machado, Nathalia Leilane Berto; de Cssia do Carmo, Elisabete; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli

    2014-01-01

    We investigated if changes in glial activity in cortical areas that process nociceptive stimuli persisted in adult rats after neonatal injury. Neonatal pain was induced by repetitive needle prickling on the right paw, twice per day for 15 days starting at birth. Wistar rats received either neonatal pain or tactile stimulation and were tested behaviorally for mechanical withdrawal thresholds of the paws and gait alterations, after 15 (P15) or 180 (P180) days of life. Brains from rats on P15 and P180 were immunostained for glial markers (GFAP, MCP-1, OX-42) and the following cortical areas were analyzed for immunoreactivity density: prefrontal, anterior insular, anterior cingulated, somatosensory and motor cortices. Withdrawal thresholds of the stimulated paw remained decreased on P180 after neonatal pain when compared to controls. Neonatal pain animals showed increased density for both GFAP and MCP-1 staining, but not for OX-42, in all investigated cortical areas on both experimental times (P15 and P180). Painful stimuli in the neonatal period produced pain behaviors immediately after injury that persisted in adult life, and was accompanied by increase in the glial markers density in cortical areas that process and interpret pain. Thus, long-lasting changes in cortical glial activity could be, at least in part, responsible for the persistent hyperalgesia in adult rats that suffered from neonatal pain. PMID:24667146

  9. The Impact of Demand Characteristics on Brief Acceptance- and Control-Based Interventions for Pain Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Bryan; Forsyth, John P.; Maher, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The present analog study compared the effectiveness of an acceptance- and control-based intervention on pain tolerance using a cold pressor task, and is a partial replication and extension of the Hayes, Bissett et al. (Hayes, S. C., Bissett, R.T., Korn, Z., Zettle, R. D., Rosenfarb, I. S., Cooper, L. D., & Grundt, A. M. (1999). "The impact of

  10. The Impact of Demand Characteristics on Brief Acceptance- and Control-Based Interventions for Pain Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Bryan; Forsyth, John P.; Maher, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The present analog study compared the effectiveness of an acceptance- and control-based intervention on pain tolerance using a cold pressor task, and is a partial replication and extension of the Hayes, Bissett et al. (Hayes, S. C., Bissett, R.T., Korn, Z., Zettle, R. D., Rosenfarb, I. S., Cooper, L. D., & Grundt, A. M. (1999). "The impact of…

  11. Superconducting quantum circuits at the surface code threshold for fault tolerance.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Veitia, A; Sank, D; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Mutus, J; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Neill, C; O'Malley, P; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Korotkov, A N; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2014-04-24

    A quantum computer can solve hard problems, such as prime factoring, database searching and quantum simulation, at the cost of needing to protect fragile quantum states from error. Quantum error correction provides this protection by distributing a logical state among many physical quantum bits (qubits) by means of quantum entanglement. Superconductivity is a useful phenomenon in this regard, because it allows the construction of large quantum circuits and is compatible with microfabrication. For superconducting qubits, the surface code approach to quantum computing is a natural choice for error correction, because it uses only nearest-neighbour coupling and rapidly cycled entangling gates. The gate fidelity requirements are modest: the per-step fidelity threshold is only about 99 per cent. Here we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in a superconducting multi-qubit processor, achieving an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92 per cent and a two-qubit gate fidelity of up to 99.4 per cent. This places Josephson quantum computing at the fault-tolerance threshold for surface code error correction. Our quantum processor is a first step towards the surface code, using five qubits arranged in a linear array with nearest-neighbour coupling. As a further demonstration, we construct a five-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using the complete circuit and full set of gates. The results demonstrate that Josephson quantum computing is a high-fidelity technology, with a clear path to scaling up to large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum circuits. PMID:24759412

  12. Pressure Pain Thresholds Increase after Preconditioning 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Tonya M.; Witney, Alice G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Objective Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. Method 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Results Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001) with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01). In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05), with no significant effect on pressure pain. Conclusion This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia. PMID:24658333

  13. Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Katie E.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in snow cover due to climate change could alter the energetics and physiology of ectothermic animals that overwinter beneath snow, yet how snow cover interacts with physiological thresholds is unknown. We applied numerical simulation of overwintering metabolic rates coupled with field validation to determine the importance of snow cover and freezing to the overwintering lipid consumption of the freeze-tolerant Arctiid caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella. Caterpillars that overwintered above the snow experienced mean temperatures 1.3C lower than those below snow and consumed 18.36 mg less lipid of a total 68.97-mg reserve. Simulations showed that linear temperature effects on metabolic rate accounted for only 30% of the difference in lipid consumption. When metabolic suppression by freezing was included, 93% of the difference between animals that overwintered above and below snow was explained. Our results were robust to differences in temperature sensitivity of metabolic rate, changes in freezing point, and the magnitude of metabolic suppression by freezing. The majority of the energy savings was caused by the non-continuous reduction in metabolic rate due to freezing, the first example of the importance of temperature thresholds in the lipid use of overwintering insects.

  14. Psychophysiology of pain.

    PubMed

    Sternbach, R A

    1975-01-01

    The recent literature on pain states shows: pain thresholds are relatively constant for an individual, but pain tolerance is influenced by psychological state; the expression of pain is a function partly of ethnic membership and degree of extroversion; pain complaints are determined as well by cultural and extroversive factors, and also degree of neuroticism. Studies of pain patients reveals that those with acute pain tend to show normal personality profiles, but the degree of pain experienced is related to the degree of anxiety present. Most chronic pain patients, like those with psychogenic pain, show somatic preoccupations and reactive depression. The treatment and/or rehabilitation of pain patients has developed in three areas. In cases of peripheral neuropathy and some spinal cord lesions, electrical stimulation with "neural pacemakers" can often "close the gate" to pain signals and provide significant reduction or abolition of pain. Psychotropic medications, particularly the tricyclic antidepressants, sometimes in combination with phenothiazines and antihistamines, are effective in many instances of central pain, and help increase the pain tolerance and decrease the need for narcotics in other pain states. Operant conditioning, including the use of biofeedback, extinguishes pain behavior and increases pain-incompatible behaviors, with good long-term results. PMID:5384

  15. Evaluation of sensitivity, motor and pain thresholds across the menstrual cycle through medium-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Barbosa, Mariana; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Nunes, Fabiana Roberta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify variations in nervous thresholds in different phases of the menstrual cycle in eumenorrheic women and users of oral contraceptives. METHOD: An observational study was performed including 56 volunteers, consisting of 30 eumenorrheic women who were non-users of oral contraceptives and 26 users of oral contraceptives. An electrical stimulator was employed to assess their nervous thresholds, with pulses applied at a fixed frequency of 2,500 Hz, modulated at 50 Hz, with phase variances of 20 ?s, 50 ?s and 100 ?s. Sensitivity, motor and pain thresholds were evaluated during five menstrual cycle phases: phase 1 - menstrual, phase 2 - follicular, phase 3 - ovulatory, phase 4 - luteal and phase 5 - premenstrual. RESULTS: The results indicated low sensitivity thresholds of 100 ?s for non-users of oral contraceptives and 50 ?s for oral contraceptive users in phase 5. Low motor thresholds of 20 ?s, 50 ?s and 100 ?s were observed for non-users of oral contraceptives in phase 5, while that of oral contraceptive users was 100 ?s. Finally, a low pain threshold of 100 ?s was observed in phase 5, but only in the oral contraceptive group. CONCLUSION: Nervous thresholds vary systematically across the phases of the menstrual cycle, with or without the use of oral contraceptives. These variations should be taken into account during research performed in women. PMID:23917651

  16. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  17. Is experimentally induced pain associated with socioeconomic status? Do poor people hurt more?

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovi?, Ana; Stip?i?, Ana; Bra, Marijana; ?or?evi?, Veljko; Brajkovi?, Lovorka; Hayward, Caroline; Pavi?, Arsen; Kol?i?, Ivana; Polaek, Ozren

    2014-01-01

    Background The association of pain and socioeconomic status is widely reported, yet much less clearly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of experimentally induced pain threshold and tolerance with socioeconomic status. Material/Methods The study sample consisted of 319 adult subjects from the population of the island of Vis, Croatia, which was previously shown to have a high level of social homogeneity. A manual dolorimeter was used to measure mechanical pressure pain threshold (least stimulus intensity) and pain tolerance (maximum tolerance stimulus intensity) on both hands. Pain tolerance interval was defined as the difference between pain tolerance and threshold. Years of schooling and material status were used as socioeconomic estimates. Results Both of the socioeconomic estimates were significantly correlated with pain threshold, tolerance, and tolerance interval (P<0.001). The mixed modeling analysis, controlled for the effects of age, gender, and 4 psychological variables, indicated that education was not a significant predictor in any of the 3 models. However, lower material status was significantly associated with lower pain tolerance (P=0.038) and narrower pain tolerance interval (P=0.032), but not with pain threshold (P=0.506). The overall percentages of explained variance were lower in the tolerance interval model (20.2%) than in pain tolerance (23.1%) and threshold (33.1%), suggesting the increasing share of other confounding variables in pain tolerance and even more so in tolerance interval model. Conclusions These results suggest a significant association between experimentally induced pain tolerance and tolerance interval with material status, suggesting that poor people indeed do hurt more. PMID:25029965

  18. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael Philip

    2006-04-01

    Sativex is one of the first cannabis-based medicines to undergo conventional clinical development and to be approved as a prescription medicine. It is an oromucosal spray that allows flexible, individualised dosing. Patients self titrate their overall dose and pattern of dosing according to their response to and tolerance of the medicine. This usually results in the administration of approximately 8-12 sprays/day. Each spray delivers tetrahydrocannabinol 2.7 mg and cannabidiol 2.5 mg, giving an approximate average dose of tetrahydrocannabinol 22-32 mg/day and cannabidiol 20-30 mg/day. Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms. Sativex has been approved for use in neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis in Canada. If ongoing studies replicate the results already observed, further approvals for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and for neuropathic pain are likely. PMID:16553576

  19. Case report: efficacy and tolerability of ketamine in opioid-refractory cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Amin, Priya; Roeland, Eric; Atayee, Rabia

    2014-09-01

    A 36-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer involving bones, liver, lung, and pleura/chest wall with worsening back pain received weight-based intravenous (IV) ketamine and was transitioned to oral ketamine for cancer-related neuropathic pain. She had responded poorly to outpatient pain regimen of oxycodone sustained and immediate release, hydromorphone, gabapentin, and duloxetine (approximate 480 mg total oral morphine equivalents [OME]), reporting an initial pain score of 10/10. She was started on hydromorphone parenteral patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) bolus dose in addition to her outpatient regimen. Despite escalating doses of opioids and the addition of a lidocaine 5% patch, the patient's pain remained uncontrolled 6 days after admission. On hospital day 7, utilizing a hospital weight-based ketamine protocol, the patient was started on subanesthetic doses of ketamine at 0.2 mg/kg/h (288 mg/24 h) and titrated over 2 days to 0.4 mg/kg/h (576 mg/24 h). Then, a 3-day rotation from intravenous to oral ketamine was initiated, and the patient was discharged on ketamine oral solution, 75 mg every 8 hours. When the patient's dose was increased to 0.4 mg/kg/h, adequate pain relief was charted by the nurse within 120 minutes, "patient pain free and resting comfortably." Her pain continued to be well managed, with an average pain score of 5/10 with the ketamine continuous infusion and sustained with conversion to oral ketamine without any report of side effects. This was a 37% reduction in pain scores. With the patient's stabilized dose of ketamine, opioid requirements decreased by 61.4% (1017.5 mg reduction in total OME). The use of weight-based dosing of IV continuous infusion and transition to oral ketamine was effective and tolerable in the management of opioid-refractory, neuropathic cancer pain. It is hoped that this case report promotes a discussion regarding ketamine dosing in refractory neuropathic cancer pain. PMID:25102039

  20. Associations between Pressure-Pain Threshold, Symptoms, and Radiographic Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Adam P.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Gracely, Richard H.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between generalized evoked pressure pain sensitivity with distal pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and the presence, severity, or number of involved knee/hip joints with radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) or related symptoms. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses come from the second follow-up (2008–11) of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n=1,602). Pressure-pain threshold measurements were averaged over two trials from both the left and right trapezius. Outcomes of radiographic knee and hip OA were both defined by a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2–4 and site-specific symptoms were ascertained at clinical interview. Associations were determine with multiple logistic regression models, and two-way interactions were tested at p<0.05. Results The sample was 67.2% female and 31.0% African American. Participants’ mean age was 67.9 (SD 9.0); mean body mass index was 31.5 (SD 7.1); mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score was 6.5 (SD 7.4); and mean total PPT was 3.6kg (SD 0.7). Significant associations were found between PPT and self-reported knee/hip symptoms. No significant associations were found between PPT and presence, severity, or number of joints with knee and hip rOA without accompanying symptoms. No significant interactions were found with demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion Pressure-pain threshold was significantly associated with self-reported single and multi-joint symptoms. In contrast, after adjustment, PPT measured at the trapezius was not associated with asymptomatic knee or hip rOA. As such, PPT may prove to be a useful indicator of rOA pain processing and of why individuals respond favorably and others do not to treatments targeting rOA. PMID:24643946

  1. An indentation apparatus for evaluating discomfort and pain thresholds in conjunction with mechanical properties of foot tissue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuping; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S; Witana, Channa P; Rodrigo, W D Asanka S

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of human foot tissue in vivo as well as discomfort and pain thresholds are important for various applications. In this study, an apparatus for measuring the discomfort and pain thresholds and the mechanical properties of human tissues is presented. The apparatus employs a stepper motor that controls the indentation speed, as well as a load cell and potentiometer that determine the corresponding reaction force and tissue deformation (displacement), respectively. A LabVIEW program (LabVIEW 8, National Instruments Corporation; Austin, Texas) was developed to control the indentation via a data acquisition card. The apparatus can accommodate indentor displacements up to 35 mm and can impart forces up to 150 N at a controlled indentation speed in the range of 0 to 10 mm/s. Tests showed that the displacement measurement error is <0.17 mm in the nominal range (0.5% in the full scale) and the measurement error of force is <1.6 N in the nominal range (1.1% in the full scale). Experimental results indicate that the apparatus is reliable and flexible for measuring the mechanical properties of foot tissue in vivo in conjunction with pain and discomfort thresholds. PMID:21110259

  2. Evaluation of physiologic pain in relation to pain substances in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ogedengbe, John Onimisi; Adelaiye, Alexander Babatunde; Mohammed, Aliyu; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun; Odili, Augustine Nonso; Adeyemi, Olusoji Matthew; Akeju, Stella; Peter, Philomina

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at finding a relationship between pain modulators in the blood and physiological pain in apparently healthy Nigerians. It also aimed at establishing a pilot study for finding reference values for plasma levels of substance P, serotonin and tryptophan for the first time among Nigerians. Volunteers were made up of 110 residents of Abuja, aged between 21 and 50 years. Cold pressor test was used to induce pain assessing pain intensity, threshold and tolerance. ELISA was used to assay for plasma substance P, serotonin and tryptophan. Pain parameters from cold pressor test were correlated with plasma pain modulators measured. Results from cold pressor test revealed pain intensity to be 5.790.25cm, pain threshold 28.772.32s and pain tolerance 143.6224.39s. Blood plasma level of substance P was 116.5220.53pg/mL, serotonin 454.1830.16ng/mL and tryptophan 12.770.67?g/mL. There was negative correlation between pain threshold and plasma substance P, pain tolerance and plasma substance P and pain threshold and plasma serotonin. There was however a positive correlation between pain intensity and plasma serotonin. In conclusion, the regression formulas may aid in using cold pressor test to predict blood substance levels of the measured pain modulators in a low resource setting like Nigeria where ELISA test is very expensive. PMID:26323369

  3. The relation between the effect of a subhypnotic dose of thiopental on claw pain threshold in rats and adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine levels

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Ince, Ilker; Celik, Mine; Dostbil, Aysenur; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Altuner, Durdu; Kurt, Nezahat; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    Thiopental sodium (TPS) needs to be applied together with adrenalin in order to establish its analgesic effect in general anesthesia. We aimed to investigate the effect of TPS on the claw pain threshold in rats and evaluated its relationship with endogenous adrenalin (ADR), noradrenalin (NDR), and dopamine (DOP) levels. Intact and adrenalectomized rats were used in the experiment. Intact animals were divided into the following groups: 15 mg/kg TPS (TS), 0.3 mg/kg ADR+15 mg/kg TPS (ATS) and 0.3 mg/kg ADR alone (ADR). Adrenalectomized animals were divided into the following groups: 15 mg/kg TPS (A-TS), 0.3 mg/kg ADR+15 mg/kg TPS (A-ATS) and 0.3 mg/kg ADR alone (A-ADR). Claw pain threshold and blood ADR, NDR, and DOP levels were measured. The TS groups claw pain threshold was found low. However, the claw pain thresholds of the ATS and ADR groups increased significantly. In the A-TS group, the pain threshold decreased compared with normal, and in the A-ATS and A-ADR groups, the pain threshold increased. TPS reduced the blood ADR levels in intact rats; however, no significant changes were observed in the NDR and DOP levels. #TPS provides hyperalgesia by reducing the production of ADR in rats. The present study shows that to achieve analgesic activity, TPS needs to be applied together with ADR. PMID:26211784

  4. Catastrophizing as a mediator of sex differences in pain: differential effects for daily pain versus laboratory-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Robert R; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Sullivan, Michael J; Fillingim, Roger B

    2004-10-01

    Sex differences in the experience of pain have been widely reported, with females generally reporting more frequent clinical pain and demonstrating greater pain sensitivity. However, the mechanisms underpinning such differences, while subject to intense speculation, are not well-characterized. Catastrophizing is a cognitive and affective process that relates strongly to enhanced reports of pain and that varies as a function of sex. It is thus a prime candidate to explain sex differences; indeed, several prior studies offer evidence that controlling for catastrophizing eliminates the gap between men and women in reported pain. We recruited 198 healthy young adults (115 female) who took part in laboratory studies of pain responses, including thermal pain, cold pain, and ischemic pain, and who also completed questionnaires assessing catastrophizing, mood, and day-to-day painful symptoms (e.g. headache, backache). Women reported greater levels of catastrophizing, more recent painful symptoms, and demonstrated lower pain thresholds and tolerances for noxious heat and cold relative to men. Mediational analyses suggested that after controlling for negative mood, catastrophizing mediated the sex difference in recent daily pain but did not mediate the much larger sex differences in pain threshold and tolerance. These findings highlight the role of catastrophizing in shaping pain responses, as well as illuminating potentially important differences between experimental pain assessment and the clinical experience of pain. PMID:15363877

  5. Acupuncture at both ST25 and ST37 improves the pain threshold of chronic visceral hypersensitivity rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Zhou, En-Hua; Shi, Yin; Li, Na; Yuan, Ling-Song; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of electro-acupuncture (EA) in relieving chronic visceral hypersensitivity (CVH) in IBS rats. However, ST25 which is a key acupoint for patients with IBS has not been reported in these experiments. Eight CVH rats were treated by EA at both ST25 and ST37 for 20 min, once daily for seven consecutive days, model rats (n = 8) and normal rats (n = 8) as controls. After the first EA treatment, the abdominal withdrawal reflex scores were investigated to evaluate the pain threshold. After seven EA treatments, the concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-HT3 receptor (5-HT3R) and 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) in colon tissue were assayed quantitatively by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that EA improved the pain threshold of CVH rats, reduced the 5-HT concentration and increased the 5-HT4R concentration, but had no effect on the 5-HT3R concentration. Further studies are needed to optimize the choice of two-matching points for EA in the treatment of CVH rats. PMID:19387829

  6. Correlation between the levels of non-specific physical symptoms and pressure pain thresholds measured by algometry in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, D; Macedo, L; Goffredo Filho, G; Goes, C; Tesch, R

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies showed that patients with chronic TMD pain also feature increased sensitivity in other craniofacial regions, and even in remote peripheral areas, suggesting that nociceptive processing is centrally facilitated in this patient population. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of a negative correlation between the levels of non-specific physical symptoms and pressure pain thresholds measured by algometry at sites distant from the chief complaint of oro-facial pain in patients with TMD. A total of 20 female patients were evaluated comprising 11 patients diagnosed with myofascial pain (Group I of RDC/TMD) and 9 patients with arthralgia (Group III of RDC/TMD), with both reporting chronic TMD pain for at least 3months. Patients were tested by the pressure algometry technique, and, in the same visit, clinical diagnosis and levels of non-specific physical symptoms, including pain-related issues or not, were obtained. The raw scores were then standardised into a T-score. The possible correlation between the dependent variable levels of non-specific physical symptoms and pressure pain thresholds measured by algometry at sites distant from the chief complaint of oro-facial pain was assessed with Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results were considered statistically significant, which stood a lower than 5% probability of occurring by chance (P<005). A statistically significant (P=002) negative correlation (-051) was found to exist between the levels of non-specific physical symptoms, only if including issues involving pain-related symptoms, and experimental pressure pain thresholds in patients with painful TMD. PMID:25293389

  7. Habitat selection and ranges of tolerance: how do species differ beyond critical thresholds?

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Mary Ann; Johnson, Douglas H

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity to habitat fragmentation often has been examined in terms of thresholds in landscape composition at which a species is likely to occur. Observed thresholds often have been low or absent, however, leaving much unexplained about habitat selection beyond initial thresholds of occurrence, even for species with strong habitat preferences. We examined responses to varying amounts of tree cover, a widely influential measure of habitat loss, for 40 woodland bird species in a mixed woodland/grassland landscape in eastern North Dakota, USA. We used LOESS smoothing to describe incidence for each species at three scales: within 200, 400, and 1200 m around sample locations. For the 200-m scale, we also calculated the most-preferred range of tree cover (within which at least half of observations were predicted to occur) for each species. Only 10 of 40 species had occurrence thresholds greater than about 10% tree cover. After initial occurrence, species showed three general patterns: some increased monotonically with tree cover; some increased up to an asymptote; some peaked at intermediate amounts of tree cover and then declined. These patterns approximate selection for interior woodlands and for edge-rich environments, but incidence plots provide greater detail in landscape-scale selection than do those categories. For most species, patterns persisted at larger scales, but for some, larger scales had distinctly different patterns than local scales. Preferred ranges of tree cover varied from <20% tree cover (common grackle, Quiscalus quiscula) to >60% (veery, Catharus fuscescens). We conclude that incidence patterns provide more information on habitat selection than do threshold measures for most species: in particular, they differentiate species preferring concentrated woodlands from those preferring mixed landscapes, and they show contrasting degrees of selectiveness. [Correction added on 16 October 2012, after first online publication: the Abstract section has been reworded]. PMID:23170216

  8. Comparison of Pressure Pain Threshold, Grip Strength, Dexterity and Touch Pressure of Dominant and Non-Dominant Hands within and Between Right- and Left-Handed Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tulum, Zeliha; P?nar, Lamia; Ba?kurt, Ferdi

    2004-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate differences in pressure pain threshold, grip strength, manual dexterity and touch pressure threshold in the dominant and non-dominant hands of right- and left-handed subjects, and to compare findings within and between these groups. Thirty-nine right-handed and twenty-one left-handed subjects participated in the study. Pressure pain threshold was assessed using a dolorimeter, grip strength was assessed with a hand-grip dynamometer, manual dexterity was evaluated using the VALPAR Component Work Sample-4 system, and touch pressure threshold was determined using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments. Results for the dominant and non-dominant hands were compared within and between the groups. In the right-handed subjects, the dominant hand was significantly faster with the VALPAR Component Work Sample-4, showed significantly greater grip strength, and had a significantly higher pressure pain threshold than the non-dominant hand. The corresponding results for the two hands were similar in the left-handed subjects. The study revealed asymmetrical manual performance in grip strength, manual dexterity and pressure pain threshold in right-handed subjects, but no such asymme-tries in left-handed subjects. PMID:15608401

  9. Neuropathic Pain Activates the Endogenous ? Opioid System in Mouse Spinal Cord and Induces Opioid Receptor Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei; Petraschka, Michael; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Caron, Marc G.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Pintar, John E.; Terman, Gregory W.; Chavkin, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Release of endogenous dynorphin opioids within the spinal cord after partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) is known to contribute to the neuropathic pain processes. Using a phosphoselective antibody [? opioid receptor (KOR-P)] able to detect the serine 369 phosphorylated form of the KOR, we determined possible sites of dynorphin action within the spinal cord after pSNL. KOR-P immunoreactivity (IR) was markedly increased in the L4 L5 spinal dorsal horn of wild-type C57BL/6 mice (721 d) after lesion, but not in mice pretreated with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI). In addition, knock-out mice lacking prodynorphin, KOR, or G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) did not show significant increases in KOR-P IR after pSNL. KOR-P IR was colocalized in both GABAergic neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes in both ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horn. Consistent with sustained opioid release, KOR knock-out mice developed significantly increased tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both the early (first week) and late (third week) interval after lesion. Similarly, mice pretreated with norBNI showed enhanced hyperalgesia and allodynia during the 3 weeks after pSNL. Because sustained activation of opioid receptors might induce tolerance, we measured the antinociceptive effect of the ? agonist U50,488 using radiant heat applied to the ipsilateral hindpaw, and we found that agonist potency was significantly decreased 7 d after pSNL. In contrast, neither prodynorphin nor GRK3 knock-out mice showed U50,488 tolerance after pSNL. These findings suggest that pSNL induced a sustained release of endogenous prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides that activated an anti-nociceptive KOR system in mouse spinal cord. Thus, endogenous dynorphin had both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions after nerve injury and induced GRK3-mediated opioid tolerance. PMID:15140929

  10. Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Sharon L.; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B.; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Ruddell, Darren M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90–97 °F; 32.2‒36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide. PMID:24658410

  11. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuseillicit drugs as well as prescription drugsand ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  12. Reduction of pain thresholds in fibromyalgia after very low-intensity magnetic stimulation: A double-blinded, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Maest, Ceferino; Blanco, Manuel; Nevado, Angel; Romero, Julia; Rodrguez-Rubio, Patricia; Galindo, Javier; Lorite, Juan Bautista; de las Morenas, Francisco; Fernndez-Argelles, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to electromagnetic fields has been reported to have analgesic and antinociceptive effects in several organisms. OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of very low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation on symptoms associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in the Sagrado Corazn Hospital, Seville, Spain. Female fibromyalgia patients (22 to 50 years of age) were randomly assigned to either a stimulation group or a sham group. The stimulation group (n=28) was stimulated using 8 Hz pulsed magnetic fields of very low intensity, while the sham group (n=26) underwent the same protocol without stimulation. Pressure pain thresholds before and after stimulation were determined using an algometer during the eight consecutive weekly sessions of the trial. In addition, blood serotonin levels were measured and patients completed questionnaires to monitor symptom evolution. RESULTS: A repeated-measures ANOVA indicated statistically significant improvement in the stimulation group compared with the control group with respect to somatosensory pain thresholds, ability to perform daily activities, perceived chronic pain and sleep quality. While improvement in pain thresholds was apparent after the first stimulation session, improvement in the other three measures occurred after the sixth week. No significant between-group differences were observed in scores of depression, fatigue, severity of headaches or serotonin levels. No adverse side effects were reported in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Very low-intensity magnetic stimulation may represent a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia. PMID:24308025

  13. Blockade of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Attenuates Morphine Tolerance and Facilitates the Pain Relieving Properties of Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Eidson, Lori N.

    2013-01-01

    The ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is an integral locus for morphine action. Although it is clear that glia contribute to the development of morphine tolerance, to date, the investigation of their role has been limited to spinal and medullary loci. Opioids induce a neuroinflammatory response that opposes acute and long-term analgesia, thereby limiting their efficacy as therapeutic agents. Recent data suggest that the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), along with its coreceptor myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2), mediates these effects. To date, the brain loci through which TLR4 modulates morphine tolerance have not been identified. We have previously demonstrated that chronic subcutaneous morphine results in tolerance that is accompanied by increases in vlPAG glial cell activity. Using in vivo pharmacological manipulations of vlPAG glia and TLR4 in the adult male rat, we show that intra-vlPAG administration of the general glial cell metabolic inhibitor propentofylline or the astrocyte activity inhibitor fluorocitrate attenuate tolerance to morphine. Characterization of MD-2 expression within the PAG revealed dense MD-2 expression throughout the vlPAG. Further, antagonizing vlPAG TLR4 dose dependently prevented the development of morphine tolerance, and vlPAG microinjections of TLR4 agonists dose dependently produced a “naive” tolerance to subsequent challenge doses of morphine. Finally, using a model of persistent inflammatory pain and pharmacological manipulation of TLR4 we demonstrate that systemic antagonism of TLR4 potentiated acute morphine antihyperalgesia. These results, together, indicate that vlPAG glia regulate morphine tolerance development via TLR4 signaling, and implicate TLR4 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. PMID:24089500

  14. A Novel Magnetic Stimulator Increases Experimental Pain Tolerance in Healthy Volunteers - A Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kortekaas, Rudie; Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; van Wijhe, Marten; Aleman, André; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘complex neural pulse’TM (CNP) is a neuromodulation protocol employing weak pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). A pioneering paper reported an analgesic effect in healthy humans after 30 minutes of CNP-stimulation using three nested whole head coils. We aimed to devise and validate a stimulator with a novel design entailing a multitude of small coils at known anatomical positions on a head cap, to improve applicability. The main hypothesis was that CNP delivery with this novel device would also increase heat pain thresholds. Twenty healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study. Thirty minutes of PEMF (CNP) or sham was applied to the head. After one week the other treatment was given. Before and after each treatment, primary and secondary outcomes were measured. Primary outcome was heat pain threshold (HPT) measured with thermal quantitative sensory testing. Other outcomes were warmth detection threshold, and aspects of cognition, emotion and motor performance. As hypothesized heat pain threshold was significantly increased after the PEMF stimulation. All other outcomes were unaltered by the PEMF but there was a trend level reduction of cognitive performance after PEMF stimulation as measured by the digit-symbol substitution task. Results from this pilot study suggest that our device is able to stimulate the brain and to modulate its function. This is in agreement with previous studies that used similar magnetic field strengths to stimulate the brain. Specifically, pain control may be achieved with PEMF and for this analgesic effect, coil design does not appear to play a dominant role. In addition, the flexible configuration with small coils on a head cap improves clinical applicability. Trial Registration Dutch Cochrane Centre NTR1093 PMID:23620795

  15. [Efficacy and tolerability of the combined therapy with mesipol and baclosan in chronic recurrent vertebrogenic pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Karneev, A N; Solov'eva, E Iu; Fedin, A I

    2008-01-01

    An article highlights the pathogenetic aspects of treatment of reflex pain syndromes in the degenerative-dystrophic spinal lesions. Attention is focused on a rational combination of medications that may shorten the duration of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy to prevent the development of side-effects caused by non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications. The results of own research of analgesic efficacy and tolerability of treatment in 50 patients with chronic skeletal-muscle pain syndromes in the state of exacerbation assigned to the combination of a non-steroid anti-inflammatory medication mesipol (meloxicam) with a central myorelaxant baclosan (baclofen) are discussed. It was found the positive effect of therapy not only on pain syndrome but on comorbid symptoms as well. PMID:18833172

  16. Autonomic responses and pain perception in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rainero, I; Vighetti, S; Bergamasco, B; Pinessi, L; Benedetti, F

    2000-01-01

    We analysed the effects of electrical noxious stimulation on the autonomic nervous system of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients who were assessed by means of the Mini Mental State Examination test (MMSE). To do this, we used electrical stimuli at two different intensities: just above pain threshold and twice pain threshold. We recorded heart rate and systolic blood pressure by using conventional electrocardiography and finger photo-plethysmography. When a pain stimulus just above threshold was delivered, AD patients were found to have blunted autonomic responses compared to controls of the same age. Similarly, prestimulus expectation produced a less pronounced increase of the responses in AD patients compared to the controls. However, when the painful stimulus was increased to twice the pain threshold, the systolic blood pressure increase of AD patients did not differ from the controls, whereas heart rate increase was still slightly diminished. By contrast, pain perception was similar in the two groups when the stimulus was at pain threshold, whereas it was blunted in AD patients when the stimulus was twice the pain threshold. These findings show that in AD mild noxious stimulation produces blunted autonomic responses and normal pain perception, whereas strong noxious stimulation produces quasi-normal autonomic responses and blunted pain perception. These results indicate that AD patients have an increased threshold for both autonomic activation and pain tolerance. PMID:10985870

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin A enhances the analgesic effects on inflammatory pain and antagonizes tolerance induced by morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Valentina; Marinelli, Sara; Eleuteri, Cecilia; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia

    2012-03-01

    Over the recent years compelling evidence has accumulated indicating that botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) results in analgesic effects on neuropathic as well as inflammatory pain, both in humans and in animal models. In the present study, the pharmacological interaction of BoNT/A with morphine in fighting inflammatory pain was investigated in mice using the formalin test. Moreover, the effects of BoNT/A on the tolerance-induced by chronic administration of morphine were tested and the behavioral effects were correlated with immunofluorescence staining of glial fibrillary acidic protein, the specific marker of astrocytes, at the spinal cord level. An ineffective dose of BoNT/A (2 pg/paw) combined with an ineffective dose of morphine (1 mg/kg) exerted a significant analgesic action both during the early and the late phases of formalin test. A single intraplantar injection of BoNT/A (15 pg/paw; i.pl.), administered the day before the beginning of chronic morphine treatment (7 days of s.c. injections of 20 mg/kg), was able to counteract the occurrence of tolerance to morphine. Moreover, BoNT/A reduces the enhancement of the expression of astrocytes induced by inflammatory formalin pain. Side effects of opiates, including the development of tolerance during repeated use, may limit their therapeutic use, the possibility of using BoNT/A for lowering the effective dose of morphine and preventing the development of opioid tolerance would have relevant implications in terms of potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:22281280

  18. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful

  19. Pain rating schema: three distinct subgroups of individuals emerge when rating mild, moderate, and severe pain

    PubMed Central

    Frey-Law, Laura A; Lee, Jennifer E; Wittry, Alex M; Melyon, Myles

    2014-01-01

    Background While the validity of pain assessment has been well documented, the underlying schema (ie, organized, preconceived ideas) of how individuals interpret numerical pain ratings is not well understood. This studys objectives were to examine numerical pain intensity ratings, from (0 to 10 cm on the visual analog scale [VAS]) across multiple severities of commonly experienced acute pain conditions to determine whether the ratings differed between these pain conditions and/or between individuals. Methods A community sample (N=365, 66% female) rated their anticipated pain intensity (VAS) for threshold, mild, moderate, severe, and tolerance level, using several common pain conditions: headache, toothache, joint injury, delayed-onset muscle soreness, burns, and general pain. Results Cluster analysis revealed three subgroups of individuals, suggesting three types of underlying pain rating schema: 1) Low Rating subgroup (low VAS pain intensity ratings across all the pain severity categories); 2) Low/High Rating subgroup (low VAS pain intensity rating for mild, but high VAS pain intensity rating for severe pain); and 3) High Rating subgroup (high VAS pain intensity ratings across all the pain severity categories). Overall, differences between pain conditions were small: muscle soreness pain intensity was consistently rated lower than the other pain types across severities. The highest pain ratings varied between joint injury and general pain, depending on severity level. No effects of sex or current experience of pain were noted. Conclusion The results indicate that: 1) three distinct pain schemas were present in this community-based sample, indicating significant variation in how pain scales are utilized and/or interpreted between clusters of individuals; 2) pain ratings vary by condition, but these differences are minor; and 3) pain rating schemas are not significantly different between males and females or between individuals with and without current pain. PMID:24379696

  20. Effectiveness and gastrointestinal tolerability during conversion and titration with once-daily OROS hydromorphone extended release in opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Martin E; Nalamachu, Srinivas R; Khan, Arif; Kutch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone extended-release tablets (OROS hydromorphone ER) during dose conversion and titration. Patients and methods A total of 459 opioid-tolerant adults with chronic moderate to severe low back pain participated in an open-label, 2- to 4-week conversion/titration phase of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal trial, conducted at 70 centers in the United States. Patients were converted to once-daily OROS hydromorphone ER at 75% of the equianalgesic dose of their prior total daily opioid dose (5:1 conversion ratio), and titrated as frequently as every 3 days to a maximum dose of 64 mg/day. The primary outcome measure was change in pain intensity numeric rating scale; additional assessments included the Patient Global Assessment and the RolandMorris Disability Questionnaire scores. Safety assessments were performed at each visit and consisted of recording and monitoring all adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs. Results Mean (standard deviation) final daily dose of OROS hydromorphone ER was 37.5 (17.8) mg. Mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) numeric rating scale scores decreased from 6.6 (0.1) at screening to 4.3 (0.1) at the final titration visit (mean [SEM] change, ?2.3 [0.1], representing a 34.8% reduction). Mean (SEM) change in Patient Global Assessment was ?0.6 (0.1), and mean change (SEM) in the RolandMorris Disability Questionnaire was ?2.8 (0.3). Patients achieving a stable dose showed greater improvement than patients who discontinued during titration for each of these measures (P < 0.001). Almost 80% of patients achieving a stable dose (213/268) had a ?30% reduction in pain. Commonly reported AEs were constipation (15.4%), nausea (11.9%), somnolence (8.7%), headache (7.8%), and vomiting (6.5%); 13.0% discontinued from the study due to AEs. Conclusion The majority of opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain were successfully converted to effective doses of OROS hydromorphone ER within 2 to 4 weeks. PMID:23658495

  1. The effect of culture on pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Harthy, M; Ohrbach, R; Michelotti, A; List, T

    2016-02-01

    Cross-cultural differences in pain sensitivity have been identified in pain-free subjects as well as in chronic pain patients. The aim was to assess the impact of culture on psychophysical measures using mechanical and electrical stimuli in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and pain-free matched controls in three cultures. This case-control study compared 122 female cases of chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) with equal numbers of age- and gender-matched TMD-free controls. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and tolerance (PPTo) were measured over one hand and two masticatory muscles. Electrical perception threshold and electrical pain threshold (EPT) and tolerance (EPTo) were recorded between the thumb and index fingers. Italian females reported significantly lower PPT in the masseter muscle than other cultures (P < 0·001) and in the temporalis muscle than Saudis (P = 0·003). Swedes reported significantly higher PPT in the thenar muscle than other cultures (P = 0·017). Italians reported significantly lower PPTo in all muscles than Swedes (P ≤ 0·006) and in the masseter muscle than Saudis (P < 0·001). Italians reported significantly lower EPTo than other cultures (P = 0·01). Temporomandibular disorder cases, compared to TMD-free controls, reported lower PPT and PPTo in all the three muscles (P < 0·001). This study found cultural differences between groups in the PPT, PPTo and EPTo. Overall, Italian females reported the highest sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical stimulation, while Swedes reported the lowest sensitivity. Mechanical pain thresholds differed more across cultures than did electrical pain thresholds. Cultural factors may influence response to type of pain test. PMID:26371794

  2. Engagement of signaling pathways of protease-activated receptor 2 and ?-opioid receptor in bone cancer pain and morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Hou, Wei; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Zheng, Honggang; Li, Conghuang; Hua, Baojin

    2015-09-15

    Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms suffered by patients with progression of cancer. Using a rat model of bone cancer, recent findings suggest that proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling pathways contribute to neuropathic pain and blocking PAR2 amplifies antinociceptive effects of systemic morphine. The purpose of our study was to examine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of PAR2 in regulating bone cancer-evoked pain and the tolerance of systemic morphine. Breast sarcocarcinoma Walker 256 cells were implanted into the tibia bone cavity of rats and this evoked significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our results showed that the protein expression of PAR2 and its downstream pathways (protein kinases namely, PKC? and PKA) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) were amplified in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of bone cancer rats compared to control rats. Blocking spinal PAR2 by using FSLLRY-NH2 significantly attenuated the activities of PKC?/PKA signaling pathways and TRPV1 expression as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Also, inhibition of PKC?/PKA and TRPV1 significantly diminished the hyperalgesia observed in bone cancer rats. Additionally, blocking PAR2 enhanced the attenuations of PKC?/PKA and cyclic adenosine monophosphate induced by morphine and further extended analgesia of morphine via ?-opioid receptor (MOR). Our data revealed specific signaling pathways, leading to bone cancer pain, including the activation of PAR2, downstream PKC?/PKA, TRPV1 and resultant sensitization of MOR. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of bone cancer pain often observed in clinics. PMID:25708385

  3. Decreased pain sensitivity among people with schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of experimental pain induction studies.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Brendon; Thompson, Trevor; Acaster, Sarah; Vancampfort, Davy; Gaughran, Fiona; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-11-01

    Patients with schizophrenia report reduced pain sensitivity in clinical studies, but experimental studies are required to establish pain sensitivity as a potential endophenotype. We conducted a systematic review of electronic databases from database inception until April 15, 2015, including experimental studies investigating pain among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder vs healthy controls. A random-effect meta-analysis yielding Hedges' g ±95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect size (ES) measure was conducted. Primary outcome was a pooled composite of pain threshold and pain tolerance; secondary outcomes included these parameters individually, plus sensory threshold, physiological pain response, and pain intensity or unpleasantness. Across 17 studies, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 387; age, 30.7 ± 6.9 years; females, 31.9%; illness duration, 7.0 ± 5.7 years) were compared with controls (n = 483; age, 29.5 ± 7.4 years; females, 31.0%). Patients had elevated pain threshold/pain tolerance vs controls (ES = 0.583; 95% CI, 0.212-0.954; P = 0.002; studies = 15). Results were similar in antipsychotic-free individuals (ES = 0.599; 95% CI, 0.291-0.907; P < 0.0001; studies = 8), with trend-level significance in antipsychotic-treated individuals (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, -0.007 to 1.125; P = 0.047; studies = 9). Likewise, patients with schizophrenia had increased pain tolerance (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, 0.235-0.897; P = 0.0001; studies = 6), sensory threshold (ES = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.505-1.727; P < 0.0001; studies = 5), and pain threshold (ES = 0.696; 95% CI, 0.407-0.986; P < 0.001; studies = 9), as well as reduced physiological response to noxious stimuli (ES = 0.456; 95% CI, 0.131-0.783; P = 0.006) and pain intensity/unpleasantness ratings (ES = 0.547; 95% CI, 0.146-0.949; P = 0.008). Findings were similarly significant in antipsychotic-free patients with schizophrenia (analysable parameters = 4) and antipsychotic-treated individuals (analysable parameters = 2). Finally, greater psychiatric symptoms moderated increased pain threshold, and younger patient age moderated increased pain tolerance. Decreased pain sensitivity seems to be an endophenotype of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. How this alteration links to other dimensions of schizophrenia and physical comorbidity-related help-seeking behaviour/morbidity/mortality requires further study. PMID:26207650

  4. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  5. Effect of gene polymorphism of COMT and OPRM1 on the preoperative pain sensitivity in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Ding, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Ma, Jia-Ming; Hong, Tao; Pan, Shi-Nong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of COMT and OPRM1 gene polymorphisms on the preoperative pain sensitivity in tumor patients. Methods: 300 cases of cancer patients undergoing elective surgery were included, and the Val158 Met loci of COMT gene and OPRM1 loci of A118 G gene were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Pain threshold and pain tolerance threshold were measured using electrical stimulation to investigate the preoperative pain sensitivity in patients with different genotypes. Results: For the COMT gene, the pain threshold and pain tolerance threshold of patients with M allele both decreased (both P < 0.001); for PPRM1 gene, pain threshold and pain tolerance threshold of patients with G allele decreased (both P < 0.001). We also found that there was an interaction between the two genes. Conclusion: Gene polymorphisms of COMT and OPRM1 were correlated with the preoperative pain sensitivity of cancer patients. The patients with M allele of COMT and G allele of OPRM1 had higher preoperative pain sensitivity. PMID:26309696

  6. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin alleviates bone cancer pain and morphine tolerance via µ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zongming; Wu, Shaoyong; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhong, Junfeng; Lv, Anqing; Jiao, Jing; Chen, Zhonghua

    2016-04-15

    The current study was to examine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in regulating bone cancer-evoked pain and the tolerance of systemic morphine. Breast sarcocarcinoma Walker 256 cells were implanted into the tibia bone cavity of rats and this evoked significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our results showed that the protein expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1), p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) as well as phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathways were amplified in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord of bone cancer rats compared with control rats. Blocking spinal mTOR by using rapamycin significantly attenuated activities of PI3K signaling pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Additionally, rapamycin enhanced attenuations of protein kinase Cɛ (PKCɛ)/protein kinase A (PKA) induced by morphine and further extended analgesia of morphine via µ-opioid receptor (MOR). Our data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways leading to bone cancer pain, including the activation of mTOR and PI3K and downstream PKCɛ/PKA, and resultant sensitization of MOR. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of bone cancer pain often observed in clinics. PMID:26566757

  7. Pain.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Invasive stimulation of the motor (precentral) cortex using surgically implanted epidural electrodes is indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain that is refractory to medical treatment. Controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS), but MCS outcome remains variable and validated criteria for selecting good candidates for implantation are lacking. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive approach that could be used as a preoperative tool to predict MCS outcome and also could serve as a therapeutic procedure in itself to treat pain disorders. This requires repeated rTMS sessions and a maintenance protocol. Other studies have also demonstrated the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in relieving chronic pain syndromes. The most studied target is the precentral cortex, but other targets, such as the prefrontal and parietal cortices, could be of interest. The analgesic effects of cortical stimulation relate to the activation of various circuits modulating neural activities in remote structures, such as the thalamus, limbic cortex, insula, or descending inhibitory controls. In addition to the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain by epidural MCS, new developments of this type of strategy are ongoing, for other types of pain syndrome and stimulation techniques. PMID:24112914

  8. Structural Health Monitoring: Leveraging Pain in the Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi

    2012-07-01

    Tissue damage, or the perception thereof, is managed through pain experience. The neurobiological process of pain triggers most effective defense mechanisms for our safety. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is also a very similar function, albeit in engineering systems. SHM technology can leverage many aspects of pain mechanisms to progress in several critical areas. Discrimination between features from the undamaged and damaged structures can follow the threshold gate mechanism of the pain perception. Furthermore, the sensing mechanisms can be adaptive to changes by adjusting the threshold as does the pain perception. A distributed sensor network, often advanced by SHM, can be made fault-tolerant and robust by following the perception way of self-organization and redundancy. Data handling in real life is a huge challenge for large-scale SHM. As sensory data of pain is first cleaned, the threshold is then processed through experiential information gathering and use.

  9. The development of tolerance to intrathecal morphine in rat models of visceral and cutaneous pain.

    PubMed

    Ness, T J; Follett, K A

    1998-05-22

    The development of tolerance to intrathecal morphine was studied in rats chronically implanted with intrathecal catheters connected to osmotic minipumps. Measures of cutaneous nociception were the hot plate (HP) and tail flick (TF) tests. Measures of visceral nociception were visceromotor (VM) responses to ramped colorectal distension (CRD) and cardiovascular (CV) responses to phasic colorectal distension. Tolerance to a continuous infusion of 6 or 20 nmol/h of morphine sulfate developed over 6 days. A significant reduction in the dose-dependent effects of intrathecal morphine in the TF and HP tests and VM and CV responses to CRD occurred in rats receiving continuous infusions of morphine. The development of tolerance to intrathecal morphine was similar in both cutaneous and visceral models. PMID:9665657

  10. Newer generation fentanyl transmucosal products for breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Frank; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Porta-Sales, Josep; Tagarro, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Oral normal-release morphine has long been considered the gold-standard treatment for cancer breakthrough pain. However, its relatively long time to analgesic onset, delay in maximal analgesic effect and prolonged duration of action make it unsuitable for the management of breakthrough pain episodes. These limitations led to the development of an oral transmucosal formulation of the fast-acting opioid fentanyl (oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate [OTFC] lozenge on a plastic handle; Actiq), which has been shown to produce more rapid and effective pain relief than oral morphine. However, the formulation itself has some limitations. Consequently, investigators have continued to develop other, newer generation, transmucosal formulations of fentanyl to further improve the management of breakthrough pain. Recently, five such compounds (Effentora/Fentora, Abstral, Instanyl, Breakyl/OnsolisTM and PecFent) have been concurrently approved in Europe and/or the US, and have documented efficacy in quickly relieving breakthrough pain episodes. All of the available pivotal efficacy trials of these agents are randomized, double-blind comparisons with placebo. There are no head-to-head trials comparing any of the newer transmucosal formulations with each other. Only one non-pivotal study of intranasal fentanyl spray used a transmucosal preparation as an active comparator. However, that comparator was OTFC, not one of the newer transmucosal products. Close examination of the existing trials assessing these newer transmucosal preparations reveals significant variation in many study parameters, such as patient selection criteria, severity of breakthrough pain episodes, proportions of patients with a neuropathic pain component, titration protocols, choice of the primary endpoints, protocols for repeat dosing and rescue medication, the separation of treated episodes and the extent of the placebo response, all of which may have affected efficacy results. It is therefore difficult to evaluate the relative efficacies of these treatments on the basis of the available trials. Furthermore, given the differences in design between studies, the value of any potential meta-analyses including these trials would likely be limited. Blinded head-to-head comparisons of new transmucosal fentanyl preparations would be the only way to conclusively determine comparative effectiveness, but given the impracticalities of conducting such studies, these are unlikely. PMID:21819159

  11. Evaluation of the Analgesic Activity of Standardized Aqueous Extract of Terminalia chebula in Healthy Human Participants Using Hot Air Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pokuri, Venkata Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain affects millions of people worldwide, opioid analgesics have been used for chronic painful conditions. Due to their adverse effects, safer alternatives would be beneficial. Terminalia chebula, with proven analgesic action has been evaluated in the hot air pain model for its analgesic activity. Aim To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose of Terminalia chebula using hot air pain model in healthy human participants. Setting and Design Randomized, Double blind, Placebo controlled, Cross over study. Materials and Methods After taking written informed consent to IEC approved protocol, 12 healthy human participants were randomized to receive either single oral dose of two capsules of Terminalia chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double blinded manner. Thermal pain was assessed using hot air analgesiometer, to deliver thermal pain stimulus. Mean Pain Threshold time and Mean Pain Tolerance time measured in seconds at baseline and 180 minutes post drug. A washout period of two weeks was given for cross-over between the two treatments. Results Terminalia chebula significantly increased mean pain threshold and tolerance time compared to baseline and placebo. Mean pain threshold time increased from 34.062.63 seconds to 41.002.99 seconds (p<0.001) and mean pain tolerance time increased from 49.67 3.72 seconds to 57.303.07 seconds (p<0.001). The increase in mean percentage change for pain threshold time is 20.42% (p<0.001) and for pain tolerance time is 17.50% (p<0.001). Conclusion In the present study, Terminalia chebula significantly increased Pain Threshold time and Pain Tolerance time compared to Placebo. Study medications were well tolerated. PMID:26155489

  12. A meta-analysis of efficacy and tolerability of buprenorphine for the relief of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Aung, Kyan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize available evidence on the analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine in treating cancer pain and related adverse effects. We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials, assessing the efficacy of buprenorphine, regardless of delivery system. The primary endpoints were patient-reported 'pain intensity' and 'pain relief'. Statistical heterogeneity among included studies was assessed with the I (2) test. The summary relative risk (RR) and 95% CI were derived, if two or more studies reported the similar outcome. Sixteen RCTs (n?=?1329) with buprenorphine were included: 8 transdermal (TD), 5 sublingual (SL), 2 intramuscular injection (IM) and 1 subcutaneous infusion (SC) studies; with both SL and IM routes being assessed in one study. Only a few studies reported the same outcome in a similar way, creating difficulty for pooling of the outcome data. Many studies had a high risk of bias. In 2 studies (n?=?241), the 'global impression change' was significantly different between TD buprenorphine and the combined placebo and morphine (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.59; I (2): 42%); the 'number-needed-to-treat' (NNT) was 4.9 (95% CI: 3.1-10.9). In 2 studies (n?=?331), 'requirement for rescue SL buprenorphine' was comparable between TD buprenorphine and placebo (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.71-2.18; I (2) : 40%). In 2 studies (n?=?141), 'incidence of nausea' was less in TD buprenorphine (RR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.2-0.71, I (2): 0%, NNT: 9.3, 5.6-28.5). Due to the small number of participants in a small number of studies, the results of the present review provide insufficient evidence to position adequately the use of buprenorphine in treatment of cancer pain. Large multicenter RCTs that compare TD buprenorphine with standard analgesic treatment is needed to position TD buprenorphine in the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer pain treatment. PMID:24600544

  13. [Double-blind comparative study of the effectiveness and tolerance of 900 mg dexibuprofen and 150 mg diclofenac sodium in patients with painful gonarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Hawel, R; Klein, G; Mitterhuber, J; Brugger, A

    1997-01-31

    In this randomized double-blind, parallel-group study the efficacy of 300 mg oral dexibuprofen three times daily and 50 mg oral diclofenac sodium three times daily was tested for equivalence in 110 patients with painful osteoarthritis of the knee. During the 15-day treatment period the functional index for knee osteoarthritis according to Lequesne was improved under dexibuprofen by a mean of 7.4 and by a mean of 7.3 under treatment with diclofenac sodium. The test for equivalence by one-sided Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test shows equivalent efficacy of dexibuprofen by a Mann-Whitney-statistic of 0.505 and 0.415 as its lower boundary of the 95% confidence interval. The descriptive analysis of secondary criteria such as intensity of pain, rest pain, pain at beginning, nocturnal pain, tenderness, restriction of movement, handicap, subjective estimation of disease progression, as well as global judgement of efficacy and tolerance by investigator and patient confirm equivalence of both preparations. The pooled analysis of all parameters, tolerability included, by a Mann-Whitney-statistic of 0.520 with the lower boundary of the 95% confidence interval of 0.467 shows equivalence of both drugs with a trend to superiority of dexibuprofen due to its better tolerability. 7.3% of the patients on dexibuprofen and 14.5% of the patients on diclofenac sodium dropped out because of side-effects. PMID:9123945

  14. Neuropathic pain activates the endogenous kappa opioid system in mouse spinal cord and induces opioid receptor tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Petraschka, Michael; McLaughlin, Jay P; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Caron, Marc G; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Pintar, John E; Terman, Gregory W; Chavkin, Charles

    2004-05-12

    Release of endogenous dynorphin opioids within the spinal cord after partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) is known to contribute to the neuropathic pain processes. Using a phosphoselective antibody [kappa opioid receptor (KOR-P)] able to detect the serine 369 phosphorylated form of the KOR, we determined possible sites of dynorphin action within the spinal cord after pSNL. KOR-P immunoreactivity (IR) was markedly increased in the L4-L5 spinal dorsal horn of wild-type C57BL/6 mice (7-21 d) after lesion, but not in mice pretreated with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI). In addition, knock-out mice lacking prodynorphin, KOR, or G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) did not show significant increases in KOR-P IR after pSNL. KOR-P IR was colocalized in both GABAergic neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes in both ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horn. Consistent with sustained opioid release, KOR knock-out mice developed significantly increased tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both the early (first week) and late (third week) interval after lesion. Similarly, mice pretreated with norBNI showed enhanced hyperalgesia and allodynia during the 3 weeks after pSNL. Because sustained activation of opioid receptors might induce tolerance, we measured the antinociceptive effect of the kappa agonist U50,488 using radiant heat applied to the ipsilateral hindpaw, and we found that agonist potency was significantly decreased 7 d after pSNL. In contrast, neither prodynorphin nor GRK3 knock-out mice showed U50,488 tolerance after pSNL. These findings suggest that pSNL induced a sustained release of endogenous prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides that activated an anti-nociceptive KOR system in mouse spinal cord. Thus, endogenous dynorphin had both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions after nerve injury and induced GRK3-mediated opioid tolerance. PMID:15140929

  15. An open-label, long-term study examining the safety and tolerability of pregabalin in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Kenji; Koga, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Yoshiyama, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studies of pregabalin for the treatment of central neuropathic pain have been limited to double-blind trials of 4–17 weeks in duration. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term safety and tolerability of pregabalin in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain. The efficacy of pregabalin was also assessed as a secondary measure. Patients and methods This was a 53-week, multicenter, open-label trial of pregabalin (150–600 mg/day) in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or cerebral stroke. Results A total of 103 patients received pregabalin (post-stroke =60; spinal cord injury =38; and multiple sclerosis =5). A majority of patients (87.4%) experienced one or more treatment-related adverse events, most commonly somnolence, weight gain, dizziness, or peripheral edema. The adverse event profile was similar to that seen in other indications of pregabalin. Most treatment-related adverse events were mild (89.1%) or moderate (9.2%) in intensity. Pregabalin treatment improved total score, sensory pain, affective pain, visual analog scale (VAS), and present pain intensity scores on the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and ten-item modified Brief Pain Inventory (mBPI-10) total score at endpoint compared with baseline. Improvements in SF-MPQ VAS and mBPI-10 total scores were evident in all patient subpopulations. Mean changes from baseline in SF-MPQ VAS and mBPI-10 scores at endpoint were −20.1 and −1.4, respectively. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that pregabalin is generally well tolerated and provides sustained efficacy over a 53-week treatment period in patients with chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:25114584

  16. The role of sleep problems in central pain processing in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yvonne C.; Lu, Bing; Edwards, Robert R.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Nassikas, Nicholas J.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, pain may exist out of proportion to peripheral inflammation. This observation suggests that central nervous system pain amplification mechanisms, such as diminished conditioned pain modulation (CPM), may play a role in enhancing pain perception among some RA patients. We examined CPM, pressure pain threshold and pressure pain tolerance among RA patients compared to controls. Methods Fifty-eight female RA patients and 54 age-matched controls without chronic pain underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) to assess CPM, pressure pain threshold and pressure pain tolerance. CPM was induced using a cold water bath, and pain threshold (when patients first felt pain) and tolerance (when pain was too much to bear) were assessed with an algometer. Associations between RA and QST measures were analyzed using linear regression. Sleep problems, mental health and inflammation were assessed as mediators of the relationship between RA and QST measures. Results Median CPM levels were 0.5 kg/cm2 (interquartile range (IQR) ?0.1, 1.6) among RA patients compared to 1.5 kg/cm2 (IQR ?0.1, 2.5) among controls (P = 0.04). Relative to controls, RA patients had lower pain threshold and tolerance at the wrists (P ? 0.05). Compared to controls, RA patients had greater problems with sleep, catastrophizing, depression and anxiety (P < 0.0001). Mediation analyses suggested that low CPM levels may be partially attributable to sleep disturbance (P = 0.04). Conclusion RA patients have impaired CPM relative to pain-free controls. Sleep problems may mediate the association between RA and attenuated CPM. PMID:23124650

  17. Peripherally driven low-threshold inhibitory inputs to lamina I local-circuit and projection neurones: a new circuit for gating pain responses

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Liliana L; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V

    2014-01-01

    Spinal lamina I is a key element of the pain processing system which relays primary afferent input to supraspinal areas. However, little is known about how the signal is modulated by its intrinsic network including local-circuit neurones (LCNs) and much less numerous anterolateral tract projection neurones (PNs). Here, we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings in an isolated spinal cord preparation to examine properties of identified LCNs (n=85) and PNs (n=73) in their functionally preserved local networks. Forty LCNs showed spontaneous rhythmic firing (27Hz) at zero current injection, which persisted in the presence of blockers of fast synaptic transmission. In the remaining cases, most LCNs and PNs fired tonically in response to depolarizing current injections. We identified LCNs and PNs receiving low-threshold primary afferent-driven inhibitory inputs, which in many cases were disynaptic and temporally preceded classical high-threshold excitatory inputs. This direct inhibitory link between low-threshold afferents and PNs can function as a postsynaptic gate controlling the nociceptive information flow in the spinal cord. The LCNs were found to be integrated into the superficial dorsal horn network by their receipt of monosynaptic and disynaptic inputs from other lamina I and II neurones. One-third of LCNs and two-thirds of PNs tested responded to substance P application. Thus, substance P released by a noxious afferent stimulation may excite PNs in two ways: directly, and via the activation of presynaptic LCN circuitries. In conclusion, we have described important properties of identified lamina I neurones and their roles in a new circuit for gating pain responses. PMID:24421354

  18. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W.; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samse, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  19. Agreeable Smellers and Sensitive Neurotics Correlations among Personality Traits and Sensory Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Croy, Ilona; Springborn, Maria; Ltsch, Jrn; Johnston, Amy N. B.; Hummel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Correlations between personality traits and a wide range of sensory thresholds were examined. Participants (N?=?124) completed a personality inventory (NEO-FFI) and underwent assessment of olfactory, trigeminal, tactile and gustatory detection thresholds, as well as examination of trigeminal and tactile pain thresholds. Significantly enhanced odor sensitivity in socially agreeable people, significantly enhanced trigeminal sensitivity in neurotic subjects, and a tendency for enhanced pain tolerance in highly conscientious participants was revealed. It is postulated that varied sensory processing may influence an individual's perception of the environment; particularly their perception of socially relevant or potentially dangerous stimuli and thus, varied with personality. PMID:21556139

  20. Tolerability of the capsaicin 8% patch following pretreatment with lidocaine or tramadol in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain: A multicentre, randomized, assessor-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, TS; Hye, K; Fricov, J; Vanelderen, P; Ernault, E; Siciliano, T; Marques, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Application of the capsaicin 8% patch is associated with treatment-related discomfort. Consequently, pretreatment for 60?min with anaesthetic cream is recommended; however, this may be uncomfortable and time consuming. Methods We conducted a multicentre, randomized (1:1), assessor-blinded study in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain to assess tolerability of the capsaicin patch following topical lidocaine (4%) or oral tramadol (50?mg) pretreatment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients tolerating capsaicin patch application (ability to receive ?90% of a 60-min application). Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores were assessed before, during and after treatment. Results Overall, 122 patients were included (61 per arm). The capsaicin patch was tolerated by 121 patients. Tolerability of the capsaicin patch was similar following pretreatment with lidocaine and tramadol. Following patch application, pain levels increased up to 55?min (change from baseline of 1.3 for lidocaine and 1.4 for tramadol). After patch removal, tramadol-treated patients experienced greater pain relief up to the end of day 1; in the evening, mean changes in NPRS scores from baseline were 0 for lidocaine and ?1 for tramadol. Proportions of patients reporting increases of ?2 NPRS points or >33% from baseline at one or more time point(s) on the day of treatment were similar between arms. Adverse event incidence was comparable between arms. Conclusions Capsaicin 8% patch tolerability was similar in the two arms, with comparable results for most secondary endpoints. Tramadol given 30?min before patch application should be considered as an alternative pretreatment option in patients receiving capsaicin patch treatment. What's already known about this topic? Application of topical capsaicin, a treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions associated with allodynia, can cause painful discomfort. Therefore, a 60-min application of local anaesthetic cream before capsaicin 8% patch treatment was originally recommended. What does this study add? Oral analgesic pretreatment may reduce overall capsaicin patch treatment time and potential unpleasantness associated with applying a topical agent to an allodynic area. Based on LIFT data showing similar tolerability to capsaicin patch regardless of pretreatment method, the European Medicines Agency has issued a type II variation stating: treatment area may be pretreated with a topical anaesthetic or an oral analgesic may be given prior to patch application. PMID:24664539

  1. Tolerability of NGX-4010, a capsaicin 8% patch, in conjunction with three topical anesthetic formulations for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Peppin, John F; Murphy, Frederick T; Tobias, Jeffrey K; Vanhove, Geertrui F

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of NGX-4010, a capsaicin 8% patch, following pretreatment with three different topical anesthetics in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain. Methods This open-label, multicenter study enrolled 117 patients with post-herpetic neuralgia, HIV-associated distal sensory polyneuropathy, or painful diabetic neuropathy. Patients received pretreatment with one of three lidocaine 4%-based topical anesthetics (L.M.X.4® [Ferndale Laboratories Inc, Ferndale, MI], Topicaine® Gel [Estela Basso, Jupiter, FL], or Betacaine Enhanced Gel 4 [Tiberius Inc, Tampa, FL]) for 60 minutes followed by a single 60- or 90-minute NGX-4010 application, and were followed for 12 weeks. Tolerability and safety measures included “pain now” Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores, dermal assessments, medication use for treatment-related pain, adverse events (AEs), clinical laboratory parameters, physical examinations, and vital signs. The primary efficacy variable was the percentage change in mean NPRS scores for “average pain for the past 24 hours” from baseline to weeks 2 through 12. Results Treatment with NGX-4010 following pretreatment with any of the three topical anesthetics was generally safe and well tolerated. Nearly all patients completed ≥90% of the planned NGX-4010 application duration. The most common treatment-related AEs, application-site burning and application-site pain, were transient, mostly mild or moderate, and could be adequately managed by local cooling or short-acting oral opioid analgesics. Although slightly more patients used medication for treatment-related discomfort following pretreatment with Topicaine compared with L.M.X.4 or Betacaine, there were no statistical differences between the topical anesthetics. Neuropathic pain reduction from baseline to weeks 2 through 12 was approximately 30% and was similar among the topical anesthetics; the proportion of responders ranged from 45% to 50%. Conclusion Treatment with NGX-4010 following pretreatment with any of the three topical anesthetics was generally safe and well tolerated; no significant differences in the parameters measured were noted between the pretreatment groups. PMID:22328830

  2. Pain Sensitivity Subgroups in Individuals With Spine Pain: Potential Relevance to Short-Term Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bialosky, Joel E.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cluster analysis can be used to identify individuals similar in profile based on response to multiple pain sensitivity measures. There are limited investigations into how empirically derived pain sensitivity subgroups influence clinical outcomes for individuals with spine pain. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to investigate empirically derived subgroups based on pressure and thermal pain sensitivity in individuals with spine pain and (2) to examine subgroup influence on 2-week clinical pain intensity and disability outcomes. Design A secondary analysis of data from 2 randomized trials was conducted. Methods Baseline and 2-week outcome data from 157 participants with low back pain (n=110) and neck pain (n=47) were examined. Participants completed demographic, psychological, and clinical information and were assessed using pain sensitivity protocols, including pressure (suprathreshold pressure pain) and thermal pain sensitivity (thermal heat threshold and tolerance, suprathreshold heat pain, temporal summation). A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used to create subgroups based on pain sensitivity responses. Differences in data for baseline variables, clinical pain intensity, and disability were examined. Results Three pain sensitivity cluster groups were derived: low pain sensitivity, high thermal static sensitivity, and high pressure and thermal dynamic sensitivity. There were differences in the proportion of individuals meeting a 30% change in pain intensity, where fewer individuals within the high pressure and thermal dynamic sensitivity group (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval=0.1, 0.8) achieved successful outcomes. Limitations Only 2-week outcomes are reported. Conclusions Distinct pain sensitivity cluster groups for individuals with spine pain were identified, with the high pressure and thermal dynamic sensitivity group showing worse clinical outcome for pain intensity. Future studies should aim to confirm these findings. PMID:24764070

  3. Sex differences and hormonal modulation of deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Richard J.; Ji, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    Women disproportionately suffer from many deep tissue pain conditions. Experimental studies show that women have lower pain thresholds, higher pain ratings and less tolerance to a range of painful stimuli. Most clinical and epidemiological reports suggest female gonadal hormones modulate pain for some, but not all, conditions. Similarly, animal studies support greater nociceptive sensitivity in females in many deep tissue pain models. Gonadal hormones modulate responses in primary afferents, dorsal horn neurons and supraspinal sites, but the direction of modulation is variable. This review will examine sex differences in deep tissue pain in humans and animals focusing on the role of gonadal hormones (mainly estradiol) as an underlying component of the modulation of pain sensitivity. PMID:23872333

  4. Identification of Molecular Fingerprints in Human Heat Pain Thresholds by Use of an Interactive Mixture Model R Toolbox (AdaptGauss)

    PubMed Central

    Ultsch, Alfred; Thrun, Michael C.; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Lötsch, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained during cell experiments, laboratory animal research, or human studies often display a complex distribution. Statistical identification of subgroups in research data poses an analytical challenge. Here were introduce an interactive R-based bioinformatics tool, called “AdaptGauss”. It enables a valid identification of a biologically-meaningful multimodal structure in the data by fitting a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to the data. The interface allows a supervised selection of the number of subgroups. This enables the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to adapt more complex GMM than usually observed with a noninteractive approach. Interactively fitting a GMM to heat pain threshold data acquired from human volunteers revealed a distribution pattern with four Gaussian modes located at temperatures of 32.3, 37.2, 41.4, and 45.4 °C. Noninteractive fitting was unable to identify a meaningful data structure. Obtained results are compatible with known activity temperatures of different TRP ion channels suggesting the mechanistic contribution of different heat sensors to the perception of thermal pain. Thus, sophisticated analysis of the modal structure of biomedical data provides a basis for the mechanistic interpretation of the observations. As it may reflect the involvement of different TRP thermosensory ion channels, the analysis provides a starting point for hypothesis-driven laboratory experiments. PMID:26516852

  5. Identification of Molecular Fingerprints in Human Heat Pain Thresholds by Use of an Interactive Mixture Model R Toolbox (AdaptGauss).

    PubMed

    Ultsch, Alfred; Thrun, Michael C; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Lötsch, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained during cell experiments, laboratory animal research, or human studies often display a complex distribution. Statistical identification of subgroups in research data poses an analytical challenge. Here were introduce an interactive R-based bioinformatics tool, called "AdaptGauss". It enables a valid identification of a biologically-meaningful multimodal structure in the data by fitting a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to the data. The interface allows a supervised selection of the number of subgroups. This enables the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to adapt more complex GMM than usually observed with a noninteractive approach. Interactively fitting a GMM to heat pain threshold data acquired from human volunteers revealed a distribution pattern with four Gaussian modes located at temperatures of 32.3, 37.2, 41.4, and 45.4 °C. Noninteractive fitting was unable to identify a meaningful data structure. Obtained results are compatible with known activity temperatures of different TRP ion channels suggesting the mechanistic contribution of different heat sensors to the perception of thermal pain. Thus, sophisticated analysis of the modal structure of biomedical data provides a basis for the mechanistic interpretation of the observations. As it may reflect the involvement of different TRP thermosensory ion channels, the analysis provides a starting point for hypothesis-driven laboratory experiments. PMID:26516852

  6. Observations on clinical therapeutic effect in treating soft tissue injuries by acupuncture, with pain threshold and electromyography as parameters.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C X; Xing, J H; Yan, C Y

    1989-03-01

    360 observations were made on 120 cases of soft tissue injury divided into groups. 1. Among the 100 patients in the acupuncture treatment group, 300 observations were made; among the 20 controls there were 60 observations. The effective rate in the acupuncture treatment group was 85.00%; in the control group it was 41.67%, a very significant difference (P less than 0.01). 2. Relationship between therapeutic course and effect. The effective rate for the first course was 74.00%; it was 90.50% when more than two courses were given, a very significant difference (P less than 0.01) indicating the marked effect of acupuncture treatment. 3. Based on the therapeutic theory of TCM syndrome differentiation and reinforcement method in the asthenia state, and reducing method in asthenia state, different manipulations were used for asthenia-heat and asthenia-cold types with good clinical results. There was no significant difference (P greater than 0.05) between the effective rate in these two types, pointing up the significance of the TCM syndrome differentiation theory in clinical acupuncture. 4. There was very significant difference (P less than 0.01) in the degree of pressed pain on the patient's tender spot before and after acupuncture treatment, also (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.001 respectively) in the EMG amplitude on the affected side of the lumbar area before and after acupuncture treatment during light and heavy force in extension action of back muscles. Acupuncture treatment on soft tissue disease based on TCM syndrome differentiation theory is thus shown to be effective. PMID:2761282

  7. Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic nononcological pain in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Marcassa, Claudio; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Rollone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults. Increasing evidence indicates strong opioids as a valid option for chronic pain management in geriatrics. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodonenaloxone (OXN-PR) in patients aged ?70 years. Methods This open-label prospective study assessed older patients nave to strong opioids presenting with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Patients were prescribed OXN-PR at an initial dose of 10/5 mg/day for 28 days. In case of insufficient analgesia, the initial daily dose could be increased gradually. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline, assessed by a ten-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at day 28 (T28). Changes in cognitive state, daily functioning, quality of life, constipation, and other adverse events were assessed. Results Of 53 patients enrolled (mean 81.76.2 years [range 7092 years]), 52 (98.1%) completed the 28-day observation. At T28, the primary end point (?30% reduction in mean pain from baseline in the absence of bowel function deterioration) was achieved in 38 patients (71.7%). OXN-PR significantly relieved pain (NRS score 3.26; P<0.0001), as well as daily need for rescue paracetamol (from 86.8% at baseline to 40.4% at T28; P<0.001), and reduced impact of pain on daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form from 6.21.5 to 3.42.1; P<0.0001). OXN-PR was also associated with significant improvement in daily functioning (Barthel Index from 53.314.1 to 61.314.3; P<0.01). No changes were observed in cognitive status and bowel function. OXN-PR was well tolerated; only one patient (1.9%) prematurely withdrew from treatment, due to drowsiness. Conclusion Findings from this open-label prospective study suggest that low-dose OXN-PR may be effective and well tolerated for treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in older patients. Besides its effectiveness, these data indicate that low-dose OXN-PR may be considered a safe analgesic option in this fragile population and warrants further investigation in randomized controlled studies. PMID:25565782

  8. Adult attachment and reports of pain in experimentally-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nicole Emma; Meredith, Pamela Joy; Strong, Jenny

    2011-05-01

    Attachment theory has been proposed as a framework for understanding the development of chronic pain, with evidence supporting the overrepresentation of insecure attachment styles in chronic pain populations and links between insecure attachment and factors known to impact one's ability to cope with pain. The present study sought to extend two earlier studies exploring the relationships between adult attachment and communication of an acute pain experience, in anticipation of providing insight into individual differences in vulnerability in development of chronic pain. It was hypothesised that: (a) fearful attachment would be associated with perceptions of the pain as less intense, and (b) anxious attachment would be associated with lower pain thresholds. A convenience sample of 82 healthy adults completed self-report measures of attachment, neuroticism, and negative affect prior to taking part in a coldpressor pain inducement task. Results demonstrated that fearful attachment was associated with lower levels of pain intensity throughout the coldpressor task. In addition, dismissing attachment was also associated with less intense pain, as well as increased coldpressor endurance (tolerance) in the presence of a known assessor. These associations were retained after controlling for measures of neuroticism, negative affect, age, and social desirability. The results of this study are consistent with the proposition that fearful and dismissing individuals tend to mask their underlying distress caused by the pain experience, potentially leading to difficulties coping with pain over time. PMID:21095633

  9. Pain Intensity Recognition Rates via Biopotential Feature Patterns with Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, Sascha; Treister, Roi; Werner, Philipp; Traue, Harald C.; Crawcour, Stephen; Andrade, Adriano; Walter, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinically used methods of pain diagnosis do not allow for objective and robust measurement, and physicians must rely on the patient’s report on the pain sensation. Verbal scales, visual analog scales (VAS) or numeric rating scales (NRS) count among the most common tools, which are restricted to patients with normal mental abilities. There also exist instruments for pain assessment in people with verbal and / or cognitive impairments and instruments for pain assessment in people who are sedated and automated ventilated. However, all these diagnostic methods either have limited reliability and validity or are very time-consuming. In contrast, biopotentials can be automatically analyzed with machine learning algorithms to provide a surrogate measure of pain intensity. Methods In this context, we created a database of biopotentials to advance an automated pain recognition system, determine its theoretical testing quality, and optimize its performance. Eighty-five participants were subjected to painful heat stimuli (baseline, pain threshold, two intermediate thresholds, and pain tolerance threshold) under controlled conditions and the signals of electromyography, skin conductance level, and electrocardiography were collected. A total of 159 features were extracted from the mathematical groupings of amplitude, frequency, stationarity, entropy, linearity, variability, and similarity. Results We achieved classification rates of 90.94% for baseline vs. pain tolerance threshold and 79.29% for baseline vs. pain threshold. The most selected pain features stemmed from the amplitude and similarity group and were derived from facial electromyography. Conclusion The machine learning measurement of pain in patients could provide valuable information for a clinical team and thus support the treatment assessment. PMID:26474183

  10. Pressure pain thresholds assessed over temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy individuals, patients with tension-type headache, and those with migraine--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sanne; Petersen, Marie Weinreich; Svendsen, Anette Sand; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and summarize the available scientific literature addressing pressure pain threshold (PPT) values over the temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy humans, patients with tension-type headache (TTH), and those with migraine both in males and females. Six relevant medical databases for the literature search were included: PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, BioMed Central, and Embase. The search strategy was performed applying 15 keywords (eg, pressure pain threshold, temporalis muscle, tension type headache, pressure algometer) and their combinations. A total of 156 articles were identified, and 40 relevant articles were included. The main outcomes of the systematic review were extracted, and it was demonstrated that the PPT values in general were lower in patients compared with healthy subjects, and this was especially noted for temporalis in both females (migraine: 231.2 38.3 kPa < TTH: 248.4 39.3 kPa < healthy: 282.1 70.8 kPa) and males (migraine: 225.5 61.2 kPa < TTH: 264.2 32.5 kPa < healthy: 314.8 63.3 kPa). The masseter muscle seemed to be more sensitive than the other 2 muscles, in both females (healthy: masseter 194.1 62.7 kPa < frontalis 277.5 51.1 kPa < temporalis 282.1 70.8 kPa) and males (healthy: masseter 248.2 48.4 kPa < temporalis 314.8 63.3 < frontalis 388 kPa). Females had lower PPT values than those of males in temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles. This work is the first to systematically review the scientific literature addressing PPT values over craniofacial muscles of healthy subjects, patients with TTH, and those with migraine to provide the PPT value ranges. Based on these findings, a set of guidelines was established to assist future studies including PPT assessments over craniofacial muscles. PMID:25955963

  11. The role of threat-expectancy in acute pain: effects on attentional bias, coping strategy effectiveness and response to pain.

    PubMed

    Boston, Alison; Sharpe, Louise

    2005-12-15

    The aims of this study were threefold. Firstly, to investigate the effect of increasing threat-expectancy on attentional biases towards pain-related words. Secondly, to determine the interaction between threat-expectancy and the effectiveness of two coping strategies on pain threshold and tolerance. Thirdly, to investigate the relationship between fear of pain and the experimental manipulations. One hundred undergraduate psychology students were randomly assigned to receive either threat-increasing or reassuring information about the cold pressor task. After reading the information, all participants completed the dot-probe task for four categories of pain-related words. Following the dot-probe task, participants were randomly allocated to one of two coping strategy conditions (focusing on affective vs sensory aspects of pain). Participants then completed the cold pressor task while engaging in the relevant coping strategy. There was a significant effect of threat on bias towards affective vs sensory pain words. Participants in the threat condition showed a stronger bias towards affective pain words. In contrast, the no-threat condition displayed a stronger bias towards sensory pain words. Significant interaction effects were observed between threat and coping strategy for threshold and tolerance. These results indicated that focusing on sensory pain sensations was helpful in the absence of threat, however, in the presence of threat was relatively unhelpful in comparison to focusing on the affective components of pain. The present results provide support for the fear-avoidance model of pain [Vlaeyen JWS, Linton SJ. Fear-avoidance and its consequences in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a state of the art. Pain 2000;85:317-332] and confirm the importance of threat-expectancy in hypervigilance towards pain and fear avoidance. PMID:16298490

  12. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  13. The mirage of impairing drug concentration thresholds: a rationale for zero tolerance per se driving under the influence of drugs laws.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; DuPont, Robert L

    2012-06-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Drivers with measurable quantities of potentially impairing illicit or prescription drugs in their body fluids are multiple times more likely to be involved in motor vehicle crashes than those without such drugs in their bodies. Drug-related impairment, however, cannot be inferred solely on the basis of the presence of drugs in biological fluids. Thus, for more than a quarter century, there has been a search for drug blood concentrations that are the equivalent of the 0.08 g/dL threshold for alcohol-impaired driving in the United States. We suggest that such equivalents are a mirage, and cannot be determined due to variable drug tolerance, lack of consistent relationships between drug blood concentrations and impairment, innumerable drug combinations and multiple other factors. Thus, while the idea of determining impairing drug concentrations is attractive, it is ultimately unattainable, and withholding drugged driving legislation pending the acquisition of such data is tantamount to a plan for inaction with regard to an important and growing public health and safety problem. We propose specific legislation to address alcohol- and drug-impaired driving in the United States. PMID:22582272

  14. Experimental Pain Responses Support Peripheral and Central Sensitization in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Simon, Corey B.; Valencia, Carolina; George, Steven Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to 1) examine the pattern of experimental pain responses in the affected and non-affected extremities in patients with shoulder pain and 2) explore the intra-individual association between sensitization states derived from experimental pain testing. Methods Experimental pain responses from 58 patients with shoulder pain (17 females, ages 18 to 52) were compared to those from 56 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (16 females, ages 21 to 58). Experimental pain responses included pressure pain threshold (PPT), thermal pain threshold and tolerance, and suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR). Comparisons were made between the affected and non-affected extremity of clinical participants and the average response of extremities in healthy participants. Peripheral and central sensitization indexes were computed for clinical participants using standardized scores and percentile cut-offs based on the data from the healthy control sample. Experimental pain responses in clinical participants observed beyond the 25th and 75th percentile of healthy control sample responses were used for investigation of intra-individual association of sensitization states. Results PPT on the affected side acromion and masseter of clinical participants were diminished compared to their non-affected side (p < 0.015). Bilateral sensitivity in clinical participants was noted for PPT at the acromion and SHPR (p < 0.015). Peripheral and central sensitization indexes demonstrated that individuals with shoulder pain present with variable patterns of peripheral and central sensitization. Conclusions Collectively, experimental pain responses supported peripheral and central sensitization in response to pressure and thermal stimuli. No clear association was made between individuals exhibiting peripheral or central sensitization and suggests heterogeneity in pain processing in this clinical population. PMID:23619203

  15. Interaction of a Cannabinoid-2 Agonist With Tramadol on Nociceptive Thresholds and Immune Responses in a Rat Model of Incisional Pain.

    PubMed

    Stachtari, Chrysoula C; Thomareis, Olympia N; Tsaousi, Georgia G; Karakoulas, Konstantinos A; Chatzimanoli, Foteini I; Chatzopoulos, Stavros A; Vasilakos, Dimitrios G

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the antinociceptive interaction between cannabinoids and tramadol and their impact on proinflammatory response, in terms of serum intereleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) release, in a rat model of incisional pain. Prospective randomized trial assessing the individual or combined application of intraperitoneal tramadol (10 mg/kg) and the selective cannabinoid-2 (CB-2) agonist (R,S)-AM1241 (1 mg/kg) applied postsurgical stress stimulus. Pharmacological specificity was established by antagonizing tramadol with naloxone (0.3 mg/kg) and (R,S)-AM1241 with SR144528 (1 mg/kg). Thermal allodynia was assessed by hot plate test 30 (T30), 60 (T60), and 120 (T120) minutes after incision. Blood samples for plasma IL-6 and IL-2 level determination were obtained 2 hours after incision. Data from 42 rats were included in the final analyses. Significant augmentation of thermal threshold was observed at all time points, after administration of either tramadol or (R,S)-AM1241 compared with the control group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.015, respectively). The combination of (R,S)-AM1241 plus tramadol promoted the induced antinociception in an important manner compared with control (P = 0.002) and (R,S)-AM1241 (P = 0.022) groups. Although the antiallodynic effect produced by tramadol was partially reversed by naloxone 30 and 60 minutes after incision (P = 0.028 and P = 0.016, respectively), SR144528 blocked the effects of (R,S)-AM1241 administration in a significant manner (P = 0.001) at all time points. Similarly, naloxone plus SR144528 also blocked the effects of the combination of (R,S)-AM1241 with tramadol at all time points (P = 0.000). IL-6 level in (R,S)-AM1241 plus tramadol group was significantly attenuated compared with control group (P = 0.000). Nevertheless, IL-2 levels remained unchanged in all experimental groups. It seems that the concomitant administration of a selective CB-2 agonist with tramadol in incisional pain model may improve antinociceptive effects and immune responses of cannabinoids, but this effect does not seem to be superior to that of tramadol alone. PMID:25370921

  16. An Endogenous Pain Control System Is Altered In Subjects With Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Timothy J; Lloyd, L. Keith; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Multiple studies have demonstrated that in healthy subjects painful stimuli applied to one part of the body inhibit pain sensation in other parts of the body, a phenomenon referred to as conditioned pain modulation (CPM). CPM is related to the presence of endogenous pain control systems. Studies have demonstrated deficits in CPM-associated inhibition in many, but not all chronic pain disorders. The present study sought to determine whether CPM was altered in subjects with Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS). Methods and Materials Female subjects with and without the diagnosis of IC/BPS were studied psychophysically using quantitative cutaneous thermal, forearm ischemia and ice water immersion tests. CPM was assessed by quantifying the effects of immersion of the hand in ice water (conditioning stimulus) on threshold and tolerance of cutaneous heat pain (test stimulus) applied to the contralateral lower extremity. Results CPM responses of the subjects with IC/BPS were statistically different from those of healthy control subjects for both cutaneous thermal threshold and tolerance measures. Healthy control subjects demonstrated statistically significant increases in their thermal pain tolerances whereas subjects with the diagnosis of IC/BPS demonstrated statistically significant reductions in their thermal pain tolerances. Conclusions An endogenous pain inhibitory system normally observed with CPM was altered in subjects with IC/BPS. This identifies IC/BPS as similar to several other chronic pain disorders such as fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome and suggests that a deficit in endogenous pain inhibitory systems may be a contributor to such chronic pain disorders. PMID:23973521

  17. Painful and non-painful pressure sensations from human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Mense, Siegfried; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2004-12-01

    Painful and non-painful pressure sensations from muscle are generally accepted to exist but the peripheral neural correlate has not been clarified. The aim of the present human study was to assess the non-painful and painful pressure sensitivity with (1) anaesthetised skin, and (2) anaesthetised skin combined with a block of large diameter muscle afferents. The skin was anaesthetised by a topically applied anaesthetic cream and later lidocaine was administrated subcutaneously. The pressure sensitivity was assessed quantitatively by computer-controlled pressure stimulation on the anterior tibial muscle. Thresholds to detection, pain and pain tolerance were assessed. In the first experiment, computer-controlled needle insertion depths evoking touch and pain sensations were used to assess the efficacy of cutaneous anaesthesia. Touch and pain sensations evoked during needle insertions were found to be superficial in intact skin but when anaesthetised, touch sensation was occasionally evoked at depths related to penetration of the fascia. With the skin completely anaesthetised to brush and von Frey hair pinprick stimulation, skin indentation with the strongest von Frey hair caused a sensation described as a deep touch sensation. Simultaneously, pressure detection and pain thresholds increased but it was still possible to elicit non-painful and painful pressure sensation in all subjects. In a second experiment, a differential nerve block of group I and II afferent fibres was obtained by full-leg ischaemia simultaneously with cutaneous anaesthesia. The efficacy of the tourniquet block was continuously assessed by a battery of somatosensory tests (heat, brush, vibration, electrical and movement detection) applied at the foot simultaneously with pressure stimulation on the anterior tibial muscle. After 20 min of ischaemia, group II afferent fibres mediating the sensations of movement detection, vibration and brush on the foot was blocked but the heat pain threshold was not affected. In this condition (anaesthetised skin and block of group I and II fibres from deep tissue) a pressure sensation was evoked in 70% of subjects although the pressure detection threshold was increased. The pressure pain sensitivity was decreased, which, however, might indicate a partial block of group III and IV muscle afferents. In a third experiment, the tactile sensations elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior muscle and skin at the lower leg were significantly decreased after 20 min of ischaemia, validating the blocking effects of group I and II nerve fibres. The present data show a marginal contribution of cutaneous afferents to the pressure pain sensation that, however, is relatively more dependent on contributions from deep tissue group III and IV afferents. Moreover, a pressure sensation can be elicited from deep tissue probably mediated by group III and IV afferents involving low-threshold mechanoreceptors. PMID:15480607

  18. A New Real-time Method for Detecting the Effect of Fentanyl Using the Preoperative Pressure Pain Threshold and Narcotrend Index

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guangyou; Guo, Shanna; Zhan, Huiming; Qi, Dongmei; Zhang, Yuhao; Zhang, Xianwei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Individual variability in the effects of opioid analgesics such as fentanyl remains a major challenge for tailored pharmacological treatment including postoperative analgesia. This study aimed to establish a new real-time method for detecting the effects of fentanyl and their individual differences in the preoperative period, using the pressure pain threshold (PPT) and Narcotrend index (NTI) test. Eighty women undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to receive either intravenous fentanyl (Group F) or saline (Group S). Before (T1) and 5 (T2) and 10?min (T3) after intravenous injection, the PPT, NTI, respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, and pulse oxygen saturation were measured. The initial time at which the Narcotrend index showed a decline was also recorded. In total, 40 patients in Group S and 38 patients in Group F were included in the final analysis. At 5?min and 10?min after intravenous fentanyl administration, the analgesic effect was determined by measuring the PPT, which was significantly increased (P?

  19. Pulmonary responses during cold induced acute pain.

    PubMed

    Tandon, O P; Himani, A; Singh, S

    1997-01-01

    Cold induced acute pain is associated with many autonomic responses of the cardiovascular system, skin conductance and pupil size. However, there are few reports suggesting changes in pulmonary function. Hence present study reports preliminary data on this. Acute pain was induced in 30 non-smoker males, 30-50 yrs of age by immersing hand in cold water and their respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), inspiratory and expiratory reserve volumes (IRV, ERV) and respective capacities, vital capacity (VC), force vital capacity (FVC), FEV1%, peak flow and flow rates at 75%, 50% and 25% of expired volume (V75,50,25) were measured. Acute pain parameters like pain threshold, tolerance and sensitivity were also recorded. Besides these, heart rate, blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), skin temperature of forehead and opposite palm were also measured. Comparisons were made between values recorded before, during and after cold induced pain. An increase in RR, RV, IC, EC, FVC, FVC%, FEV1 was observed during cold induced pain reflecting an acute state of sympathetic dominance. Positive correlations between heart rate and respiratory rate, and other respiratory with pain parameters were seen during period of induction of acute pain. Hence the study indicates that alterations in pulmonary profile form a part of multidimensional responses observed during cold induced acute pain. PMID:10225027

  20. Effect of spinal monoaminergic neuronal system dysfunction on pain threshold in rats, and the analgesic effect of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Ryuta; Ishida, Mitsuhiro; Asaki, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shinohara, Shunji

    2016-02-26

    Dysfunction in the central serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) systems cause depression and pain. Descending spinal pain modulatory pathways are important in the analgesic mechanisms of antidepressants, particularly serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). While many non-clinical studies have demonstrated the roles of central monoaminergic systems in pain, there is little evidence to illuminate the direct contribution of spinal descending pain modulatory systems independently of depressive-like behavior. To examine the effects of dysfunction of spinal monoaminergic systems on pain sensitivity, we established a rat chronic pain model by administering lumbar-intrathecal reserpine to minimize its influence on brain. Lumbar-intrathecal reserpine evoked persistent mechanical hypersensitivity and corresponding reductions in spinal 5-HT and NE concentrations (from 767.2 to 241.6ng/g and from 455.9 to 41.7ng/g, respectively after reserpine 30nmol). Lumbar-intrathecal reserpine did not deplete brain monoamines or bring about depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. Spinal monoamines depletion-induced pain sensitivity was ameliorated by lumbar-intrathecal administration of the SNRIs (duloxetine and milnacipran) in dose-dependent manners. These suggest that increased pain sensitivity could be induced by dysfunction solely of the descending pain modulatory system, regardless of depressive-like behavior, and lumbar-intrathecal administration of SNRIs could ameliorate the pain sensitivity which might be mediated by affecting the descending pain modulatory system in the spinal cord, not via their antidepressant effects. PMID:26806036

  1. Transgene-mediated enkephalin release enhances the effect of morphine and evades tolerance to produce a sustained antiallodynic effect in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuanglin; Mata, Marina; Goins, William; Glorioso, Joseph C; Fink, David J

    2003-03-01

    We examined the pharmacologic characteristics of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-mediated expression of proenkephalin in the dorsal root ganglion in a rodent model of neuropathic pain. We found that: (i). vector-mediated enkephalin produced an antiallodynic effect that was reversed by naloxone; (ii). vector-mediated enkephalin production in animals with spinal nerve ligation prevented the induction of c-fos expression in second order sensory neurons in the dorsal horn of spinal cord; (iii). the effect of vector-mediated enkephalin enhanced the effect of morphine, reducing the ED(50) of morphine 10-fold; (iv). animals did not develop tolerance to the continued production of vector-mediated enkephalin over a period of several weeks; and, (v). vector transduction continued to provide an analgesic effect despite the induction of tolerance to morphine. This is the first demonstration of gene transfer to provide an analgesic effect in neuropathic pain. The pharmacologic analysis demonstrates that transgene-mediated expression and local release of opioid peptides produce some effects that are distinct from peptide analogues delivered pharmacologically. PMID:12620604

  2. Fentanyl tolerance in the treatment of cancer pain: a case of successful opioid switching from fentanyl to oxycodone at a reduced equivalent dose.

    PubMed

    Sutou, Ichiro; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Yoji

    2015-06-01

    Opioids are not generally deemed to have an analgesic ceiling effect on cancer pain. However, there have been occasional reports of tolerance to opioid development induced by multiple doses of fentanyl. The authors report a case of suspected tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioid, in which an increasing dose of fentanyl failed to relieve the patient's cancer pain symptoms, but opioid switching to oxycodone injections enabled a dose reduction to below the equivalent dose conversion ratio. The patient was a 60-year-old man diagnosed with pancreatic body carcinoma with multiple metastases. The base dose consisted of 12mg/day of transdermal fentanyl patches (equivalent to 3.6mg/day, 150?g/h fentanyl injection), and rescue therapy consisted of 10mg immediate-release oxycodone powders. Despite the total daily dose of fentanyl reaching 5.6mg (equivalent to 560mg oral morphine), the analgesic effect was inadequate; thus, an urgent adjustment was necessary. Due to the moderate dose of fentanyl, the switch to oxycodone injection was done incrementally at a daily dose equivalent to 25% of the fentanyl injection. The total dose of oxycodone was replaced approximately 53.5% of the dose of fentanyl prior to opioid switching. PMID:26095488

  3. Pain measurements in right-left cerebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Vecchi, G P; Caselli, M

    1985-01-01

    Left- and right-brain damaged (BD) subjects were examined to ascertain whether psychophysical parameters of pain-pain threshold (P), tolerance threshold (T), and pain endurance (E)-were modified by brain damage and whether differences exist between LBD and RBD. Noxious stimulus was provided by electrical stimulation. Results showed that P and T scores for the paralysed arms were consistently higher than those of the contralateral side. This was not simply due to modified sensitivity alone; in the RBD group hemi-inattention and aphasia in the LBD group also played a role. A significantly hightened value of pain endurance was found only in the healthy arm in the RBD group. PMID:3974849

  4. Massage on experimental pain in healthy females: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Cynthia W; Hamilton, Nancy A; Rapoff, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    This randomized controlled study evaluated the effect of massage on affect, relaxation, and experimental pain induced by electrical stimulation. Participants were 96 healthy women (M age = 20.13 5.93 years; 84.4% White) randomly assigned to a 15-minute no-treatment control, guided imagery, massage or massage plus guided imagery condition. Multilevel piecewise modeling revealed no group differences in pain intensity, threshold, or tolerance. The two massage conditions generally reported decreased pain unpleasantness, lower unpleasant affect, maintenance of pleasant affect, and increased relaxation compared to the no-treatment condition. The results suggest that massage may alter immediate affective qualities in the context of pain. PMID:23362336

  5. Asians Differ from non-Hispanic Whites in Experimental Pain Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Rowell, Lauren N.; Mechlin, Beth; Ji, Ellen; Addamo, Michael; Girdler, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences between Asians and non-Hispanic Whites (Whites) in pain sensitivity, and its relationship to mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). In 30 Whites (50% female) and 30 Asians (50% female), experimental pain sensitivity was assessed with a hand cold pressor task, yielding measures of pain threshold, tolerance, intensity, and unpleasantness. Mean arterial pressure and HR measurements taken at rest and in response to speech stress were assessed. Perceived stress, anxiety, perfectionism, parental criticism, parental expectations and depressive symptoms were also measured. The results indicated that for the cold pain test, Asians demonstrated significantly lower pain threshold and tolerance levels than Whites. Although no ethnic differences were seen for MAP or HR responses to stress, for whites higher stress MAP levels were correlated with reduced pain sensitivity, while for Asians higher baseline and stress HR levels were correlated with reduced pain sensitivity. Asians reported higher parental expectations and greater parental criticism than Whites. For Asians only, higher levels of perfectionism were related to more depressive symptoms, anxiety and perceived stress. These results indicate that Asian Americans are more sensitive to experimental pain than Whites and suggest ethnic differences in endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms (e.g. MAP and HR). The results may also have implications for understanding ethnic differences in clinical pain. PMID:21561793

  6. Gender differences in pain ratings and pupil reactions to painful pressure stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ellermeier, W; Westphal, W

    1995-06-01

    In order to investigate gender differences in pain perception, the present study employed both a psychophysical and a psychophysiological measure. In experiment 1, 20 subjects rated the painfulness of 4 different levels of tonic pressure applied to their fingers using a verbally anchored categorization procedure. In general agreement with studies of pain threshold and tolerance, female subjects reported greater pain at high levels of stimulation, with no gender difference being evident at low pressure levels. In experiment 2, 16 different subjects were exposed to the same painful pressure stimuli while measuring their pupil reactions using infrared video pupillometry. The pupil dilations seen during the last 10 sec of the 20-sec pressure application turned out to be a highly significant indicator of pain intensity. When female and male subjects were compared on this measure, a similar divergent pattern as in the psychophysical data emerged, with female subjects showing greater pupil dilations at high pressure levels only. The fact that gender differences in pain perception can be demonstrated using an autonomic indicator of pain that is beyond voluntary control suggests that these differences reflect low-level sensory and/or affective components of pain rather than attitudinal or response-bias factors. PMID:7478686

  7. Antinociceptive effects of palatable sweet ingesta on human responsivity to pressure pain.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M E; Holder, M D

    1997-02-01

    Palatable sweet ingestion produces a morphine-like analgesia in both rats and human infants (2-5). To determine whether palatable sweet ingesta induces antinociception in human adults, 60 university students (30 men, 30 women) were exposed to a pressure algometer both before and after consuming either a sweet soft drink, filtered tap water, or nothing (Experiment 1). Pain responsivity was assessed with four pain measures: threshold, tolerance, and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of intensity and unpleasantness. Results showed that women who consumed either soft drink or water reported increased pain tolerance and VAS ratings at posttreatment compared with those receiving nothing. However, differences between groups were not found for men. Moreover, compared to men, women reported lower pain thresholds and tolerances and rated the pain as more intense. In Experiment 2, 40 women consumed either nothing or foods that they rated previously as palatable (chocolate-chip cookies), unpalatable (black olives), or neutral (rice cakes). Women who consumed the palatable sweet food showed increased pain tolerance compared with those receiving the unpalatable food, the neutral food, or nothing. These data constitute the first demonstration that "palatability-induced antinociception" (PIA) can occur in human adults. PMID:9035263

  8. Gender expression, sexual orientation and pain sensitivity in women

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Jacob M; Rowell, Lauren N; Lutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite a growing body of literature investigating sex differences with regard to pain, surprisingly little research has been conducted on the influence of various aspects of self-identity, including gender expression and sexual orientation, on pain sensitivity within each sex, particularly among women. In men, dispositional femininity is linked to greater clinical pain and trait masculinity is associated with higher pain thresholds. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether gender expression and sexual orientation are associated with within-sex differences in ischemic pain sensitivity in healthy young women. METHODS: A convenience sample of 172 females (mean age 21.4 years; range 18 to 30 years of age; 56.0% white, 89% heterosexual) performed an ischemic pain task in counterbalanced order. Desired levels of dispositional femininity for a preferred romantic partner and self-described levels of personal dispositional femininity were measured. RESULTS: Compared with heterosexual women, lesbian and bisexual women reported lower pain intensity ratings early in the discomfort task. Irrespective of sexual orientation, attraction to more feminine romantic partners and dispositional masculinity were correlated with lower pain intensity, and with higher pain thresholds and tolerance levels. DISCUSSION: These preliminary findings suggest that within-sex differences in sexual orientation and other aspects of identity, irrespective of biological sex, may be important to consider when examining experimental pain performance and clinical pain experiences. CONCLUSION: Larger investigations of the psychophysiological relationships among sexual orientation, gender expression and pain sensitivity are warranted. These findings may have implications for differences in clinical pain sensitivity of lesbian and bisexual women compared with heterosexual women. PMID:24575419

  9. Efficacy and tolerability studies evaluating a sleep aid and analgesic combination of naproxen sodium and diphenhydramine in the dental impaction pain model in subjects with induced transient insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S; Laurora, I; Wang, Y; Venkataraman, P; An, R; Roth, T

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of novel combination naproxen sodium (NS) and diphenhydramine (DPH) in subjects with postoperative dental pain along with transient insomnia induced by 5h sleep phase advance. The present studies aimed to demonstrate the added benefit and optimal dosages of the combination product over individual ingredients alone in improving sleep and pain. Methods Each of the two studies was a two-centre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy trial. In the first study, subjects were randomised into one of the following treatment arms: NS 440mg/DPH 50mg, NS 220mg/DPH 50mg, NS 440mg or DPH 50mg. In the second study, subjects received either NS 440mg/DPH 25mg, NS 440mg or DPH 50mg. The co-primary end-points in both studies were wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency (SL) measured by actigraphy. Other secondary sleep and pain end-points were also assessed. Results The intent-to-treat population included 712 and 267 subjects from studies one and two, respectively. In the first study, only the NS 440mg/DPH 50mg combination showed significant improvements in both WASO vs. NS alone (?70.3min p=0.0002) and SL vs. DPH alone (25.50 and 41.50min respectively, p<0.0001). In the second study, the NS 440mg/DPH 25mg combination failed to show any significant improvements vs. either component alone. Conclusions Only the NS 440mg/DPH 50mg combination demonstrated improvement in both sleep latency vs. DPH 50mg and sleep maintenance (WASO) vs. NS 440mg. There were no serious or unexpected adverse events reported in either study. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01280591 (study 1); NCT01495858 (study 2) PMID:25996289

  10. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and effects on human experimental pain of the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor 5 (iGluR5) antagonist LY545694 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Iyengar, Smriti; Chappell, Amy S; Lobo, Evelyn D; Reda, Haatem; Prucka, William R; Verfaille, Steven J

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to establish in healthy volunteers the maximally tolerated multiple dose (MTMD) of the ionotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist LY545694 (part A), and to investigate whether that dose had analgesic or antihyperalgesic effects in the brief thermal stimulation (BTS) pain model (Part B). Part A was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 3 groups of 10 healthy men. To simulate an extended-release formulation, study drug was administered orally over 6hours (12 equally divided aliquots at 30-minute intervals). Part B was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, 3-way crossover study in 27 healthy men. At each of the 3 study periods, subjects received either LY545694 (MTMD; as determined during part A) as a simulated, twice daily extended-release formulation for 4 doses over 3days, gabapentin (600mg 8hours apart; 6 doses over 3days; positive control), or matching placebo. The BTS model was induced twice with a 1-hour interval on each of the 2 study days, before drug administration and at the time of expected peak analgesia of LY545694. Plasma exposure for LY545694 was approximately linear over the 25- to 75-mg dose range. The MTMD of LY545694 was 25mg twice daily. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were significantly smaller after administration of LY545694 and gabapentin compared with placebo (P<.0001 and P=.0004, respectively), but there was no difference between areas after administration of gabapentin and LY545694 (P=.400). Neither gabapentin nor LY545694 reduced the painfulness of skin heating during BTS model induction. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event was dizziness. The results of this study suggest that LY545694 should be explored further as a potential treatment for chronic pain involving neuronal sensitization. PMID:24486883

  11. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. PMID:24182727

  12. [Pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Donnadieu, S; Djian, M C

    1998-12-12

    NEW OPIOID ANALGESICS: Progress in pain reliet has recently been achieved with the introduction of new opioid analgesics such as tramadol and the pediatric preparation of codeine phosphate as well as powerful long-release opioids which can be administered per os, or percutaneously for transdermal fentanyl. CO-ANALGESICS: Other drugs, mainly antidepressants and anti-convulsants, can be usefully combined with analgesics. New serotonin uptake inhibitors and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and lamotrigin) have the advantage of better tolerance. None of these drugs has marketing approval in France for their pain relieving effects. The same is true for clonidine and neostigmine which, after spinal infusion, potentialize opioids and for ketamine which can relieve neuropathy pain by dissociative anesthesia. NEW ANTI-MIGRAINE DRUGS: New drugs have been developed for specific types of pain such as migraine. The new "triptans" are tolerated better than sumatriptan and is reimbursed by the national social security. REFRACTORY NEUROPATHY PAIN: Indications for electrical stimulation techniques conducted in a neurosurgery unit have been identified. Stimulators may be implanted in spinal or supra-spinal localizations. REGULATORY ASPECTS: New legislation has reorganized health care for pain relief in France. The new texts take into consideration personnel training, the health care network and progress in therapeutics. PMID:9893699

  13. Increased Sensitivity to Thermal Pain and Reduced Subcutaneous Lidocaine Efficacy in Redheads

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Edwin B.; Joiner, Teresa V.; Tsueda, Kentaro; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Anesthetic requirement in redheads is exaggerated, suggesting that redheads may be especially sensitive to pain. We therefore tested the hypotheses that women with natural red hair are more sensitive to pain, and that redheads are resistant to topical and subcutaneous lidocaine. Methods: We evaluated pain sensitivity in red-haired (n=30) or dark-haired (n=30) women by determining the electrical current perception threshold, pain perception, and maximum pain tolerance with a Neurometer CPT/C (Neurotron, Inc., Baltimore, MD). We evaluated the analogous warm and cold temperature thresholds with the TSA-II Neurosensory Analyzer (Medoc Ltd., Minneapolis, MN). Volunteers were tested with both devices at baseline and with the Neurometer after 1-hour exposure to 4% liposomal lidocaine and after subcutaneous injection of 1% lidocaine. Data are presented as medians [interquartile ranges]. Results: Current perception, pain perception, and pain tolerance thresholds were similar in the red-haired and dark-haired women at 2000, 250, and 5 Hz. In contrast, redheads were more sensitive to cold pain perception (22.6°C [15.1, 26.1] vs. 12.6°C [0, 20], P=0.004), cold pain tolerance (6.0°C [0, 9.7] vs. 0.0°C [0.0, 2.0], P=0.001), and heat pain (46.3°C [45.7, 47.5] vs. 47.7°C [46.6, 48.7], P=0.009). Subcutaneous, lidocaine was significantly less effective in redheads, e.g., pain tolerance threshold at 2000 Hz stimulation in redheads was 11.0 mA [8.5, 16.5] vs. >20.0 mA [14.5, >20] in others, P=0.005). Conclusion: Red hair is the phenotype for mutations of the melanocortin 1 receptor. Our results indicate that redheads are more sensitive to thermal pain and are resistant to the analgesic effects of subcutaneous lidocaine. Mutations of the melanocortin 1 receptor, or a consequence thereof, thus modulate pain sensitivity. PMID:15731586

  14. The Relationship Between Neck Pain and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Kajaks, Tara; MacDermid, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a significant societal burden due to its high prevalence and healthcare costs. While physical activity can help to manage other forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain, little data exists on the relationship between physical activity and neck pain. The purpose of this study was to compare physical activity levels between individuals with neck pain and healthy controls, and then to relate disability, fear of movement, and pain sensitivity measures to physical activity levels in each of the two participant groups. 21 participants were recruited for each of the two participant groups (n = 42). Data collection included the use of the Neck Disability Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, electrocutaneous (Neurometer® CPT) and pressure stimulation (JTech algometer) for quantitative sensory testing, and 5 days of subjective (Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity) and objective (BioTrainer II) measurements of physical activity. Analysis of Variance and Pearson’s Correlation were used to determine if differences and relationships exist between dependent variables both within and between groups. The results show that individuals with mild neck pain and healthy controls do not differ in subjectively and objectively measured physical activity. While participants with neck pain reported higher neck disability and fear of movement, these factors did not significantly relate to physical activity levels. Perceived activity level was related to pain threshold and tolerance at local neck muscles sites (C2 paraspinal muscle and upper trapezius muscle), whereas measured activity was related to generalized pain sensitivity, as measured at the tibialis anterior muscle site. PMID:24133553

  15. Effects of Videogame Distraction using a Virtual Reality Type Head-Mounted Display Helmet on Cold Pressor Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Karen E.; Dillinger Clendaniel, Lindsay; Law, Emily F.; Ackerman, Claire Sonntag; McKenna, Kristine D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective?To test whether a head-mounted display helmet enhances the effectiveness of videogame distraction for children experiencing cold pressor pain.?Method?Forty-one children, aged 614 years, underwent one or two baseline cold pressor trials followed by two distraction trials in which they played the same videogame with and without the helmet in counterbalanced order. Pain threshold (elapsed time until the child reported pain) and pain tolerance (total time the child kept the hand submerged in the cold water) were measured for each cold pressor trial.?Results?Both distraction conditions resulted in improved pain tolerance relative to baseline. Older children appeared to experience additional benefits from using the helmet, whereas younger children benefited equally from both conditions. The findings suggest that virtual reality technology can enhance the effects of distraction for some children. Research is needed to identify the characteristics of children for whom this technology is best suited. PMID:18367495

  16. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  17. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over study to evaluate the analgesic activity of Boswellia serrata in healthy volunteers using mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Prabhavathi, K.; Chandra, U. Shobha Jagdish; Soanker, Radhika; Rani, P. Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Experimental pain models in human healthy volunteers are advantageous for early evaluation of analgesics. All efforts to develop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which are devoid of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system effects are still far from achieving a breakthrough. Hence we evaluated the analgesic activity of an ayurvedic drug, Boswellia serrata by using validated human pain models which has shown its analgesic activity both in-vitro and preclinical studies to evaluate the analgesic activity of single oral dose (125 mg, 2 capsules) of Boswellia serrata compared to placebo using mechanical pain model in healthy human subjects. Materials and Methods: After taking written informed consent, twelve healthy subjects were randomized (1:1) to receive single oral dose of Boswellia serrata (Shallaki) 125 mg, 2 capsules or identical placebo in a crossover design. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesymeter (by Randall Selitto test) at baseline and at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs after test drug administration. Pain Threshold force and time and Pain Tolerance force and time were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done by paired t-test. Results: Twelve healthy volunteers have completed the study. Mean percentage change from baseline in Pain Threshold force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly increased [Force: 9.7 11.0 vs 2.9 3.4 (P = 0.05) and time: 9.7 10.7 vs 2.8 3.4 (P = 0.04)] at third hr. Mean Percentage change from baseline in Pain Tolerance force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly (P ? 0.01) increased at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs. Conclusion: In the present study, Boswellia serrata significantly increased the Pain Threshold and Pain Tolerance force and time compared to placebo. Both study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug. PMID:25298573

  18. Pain Sensitivity in Adolescent Males with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Testing for Associations with Conduct Disorder and Callous and Unemotional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Northover, Clare; Thapar, Anita; Langley, Kate; van Goozen, Stephanie HM

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced processing and experience of aversive emotional cues is a common component of theories on the development and persistence of aggression and antisocial behaviour. Yet physical pain, arguably the most basic aversive cue, has attracted comparatively little attention. Methods This study measured pain sensitivity and physiological response to painful stimuli (skin conductance level, SCL) in adolescent boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 183), who are at high risk for antisocial behaviour. We compared boys with ADHD with and without a comorbid diagnosis of Conduct Disorder (CD) on pain sensitivity, and examined patterns of association between pain measures, on the one hand, and problem severity and callous and unemotional (CU) traits, on the other. Results Boys with comorbid CD exhibited a higher pain threshold and tolerance than boys with ADHD alone, but the groups did not differ in physiology at the time the pain threshold and tolerance were reported. Regression analyses showed that ADHD problem severity positively predicted pain sensitivity, whereas levels of CU traits negatively predicted pain sensitivity. Conclusions These findings on physical pain processing extend evidence of impairments in aversive cue processing among those at risk of antisocial behaviour. The study highlights the importance of considering comorbidity and heterogeneity of disorders when developing interventions. The current findings could be used to identify subgroups within those with ADHD who might be less responsive to interventions that use corrective feedback to obtain behaviour change. PMID:26225935

  19. Increased Pressure Pain Sensitivity in Women With Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    As-Sanie, Sawsan; Harris, Richard E.; Harte, Steven E.; Tu, Frank F.; Neshewat, Gina; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if women with chronic pelvic pain and variable degrees of endometriosis demonstrate altered pain sensitivity relative to pain-free healthy controls, and whether such differences are related to the presence or severity of endometriosis or comorbid pain syndromes. METHODS Four patient subgroups (endometriosis with chronic pelvic pain (n=42), endometriosis with dysmenorrhea (n=15), pain-free endometriosis (n=35), and chronic pelvic pain without endometriosis (n=22)) were each compared to 30 healthy controls in this cross-sectional study. All patients completed validated questionnaires regarding pain symptoms and underwent screening for comorbid pain disorders. Pain sensitivity was assessed by applying discrete pressure stimuli to the thumbnail using a previously validated protocol. RESULTS While adjusting for age and education, pain thresholds were lower in all subgroups of women with pelvic pain, relative to healthy controls (all p-values <0.01). There was no difference in pain thresholds when comparing endometriosis patients without pelvic pain to healthy controls (mean difference 0.02 kg/m2, 95% confidence interval -0.43, 0.47). The presence and severity of endometriosis and number of comorbid pain syndromes were not associated with a difference in pain thresholds. CONCLUSION Women with chronic pelvic pain demonstrate increased pain sensitivity at a nonpelvic site compared to healthy controls, which is independent of the presence or severity of endometriosis or comorbid pain syndromes. These findings support the notion that central pain amplification may play a role in the development of pelvic pain, and may explain why some women with pelvic pain do not respond to therapies aimed at eliminating endometriosis lesions. PMID:24104772

  20. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    Introduction Types of Pain Pain Assessment Pain Treatments Integrative Pain Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References March 30, 2016 Pain Assessment Effective pain management begins with a comprehensive assessment. This ...

  1. Pain management.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C I

    2012-09-01

    Despite published guidelines and educational programs on the assessment and treatment of cancer-related pain, in any stage of oncological disease, unrelieved pain continues to be a substantial worldwide public health concern either in patients with solid and haematological malignancies. The proper and regular self-reporting assessment of pain is the first step for an effective and individualized treatment. Opioids are the mainstay of analgesic therapy and can be associated with non-opioids drugs such as paracetamol or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and to adjuvant drugs (for neuropathic pain and symptom control). The role and the utility of weak opioids (i.e. codeine, dihydrocodeine, tramadol) are a controversy point. Morphine has been placed by World Health Organization on its Essential Drug List. In the comparative study with other strong opioids (hydromorphone, oxycodone), there is no evidence to show superiority or inferiority with morphine as the first choice opioid. Oral methadone is a useful and safe alternative to morphine. Methadone presents the potential to control pain difficult to manage with other opioids. although the oral route of opioid administration is considered the one of choice, intravenous, subcutaneous, rectal, transdermal, sublingual, intranasal, and spinal routes must be used in particular situation. Transdermal opioids such as fentanyl and buprenorphine are best reserved for patients whose opioid requirements are stable. Switching from one opioid to another can improve analgesia and tolerability. PMID:22987980

  2. Effects of graded oral doses of a new 5-hydroxytryptamine/noradrenaline uptake inhibitor (Ro 15-8081) in comparison with 60 mg codeine and placebo on experimentally induced pain and side effect profile in healthy men.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Steinringer, H; Schneider, S; Mittelbach, G; Gaupmann, G; Abatzi, T A; Stacher-Janotta, G

    1987-01-01

    1. Ro 15-8081 (Hoffmann-La Roche, Basle, Switzerland) is a novel mixed 5-HT/noradrenaline uptake inhibitor producing potent antinociceptive effects in animal pain models. 2. In healthy man, two models with electrically and thermally induced pain, respectively, have been shown to reliably discriminate between the effects of opioid as well as of antipyretic analgesics and placebo. 3. This study investigated the effects of single oral doses of 10, 25, and 50 mg Ro 15-8081 in comparison with 60 mg codeine and placebo on threshold and tolerance to electrically induced pain and on threshold to thermally induced pain. Furthermore, the effects on psychomotor function, self-rated subjective feelings, and side effect profile were studied. 4. Twenty healthy males participated each in five experiments in which they received, in random double-blind fashion, each of the treatments. Every experiment comprised two series of measurements before and twelve after drug administration, carried out at 30 min intervals. 5. Ro 15-8081 produced marked elevations of threshold and tolerance to electrically and of threshold to thermally induced pain. The effects of all doses of Ro 15-8081 were significantly superior to those of placebo. Threshold and tolerance to electrically induced pain were not affected differently by the three doses of Ro 15-8081, whereas the threshold to thermally induced pain was elevated significantly more by 50 mg than by 10 and 25 mg Ro 15-8081. 6. Codeine 60 mg had a more rapid onset of action and greater maximal effects than Ro 15-8081.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3501728

  3. Efficacy and tolerance of repeated oral doses of tolperisone hydrochloride in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm: results of a prospective placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Pratzel, H G; Alken, R G; Ramm, S

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of oral tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm was assessed in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 138 patients, aged between 20 and 75 years, with painful reflex muscle spasm associated with diseases of the spinal column or proximal joints were enrolled in eight rehabilitation centers. Patients were randomized to receive either 300 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo for a period of 21 days. Both treatment groups recovered during the 3 weeks rehabilitation program. However, tolperisone hydrochloride proved to be significantly superior to placebo: the change score of the pressure pain threshold as the primary target parameter significantly increased during therapy with tolperisone hydrochloride (P = 0.03, valid-case-analysis) compared to the results obtained on placebo treatment. The overall assessment of efficacy by the patient also demonstrated significant differences in favor of tolperisone hydrochloride. Best results were seen in patients aged between 40 and 60 years with a history of complaints shorter than 1 year and with concomitant physical therapy. The evaluation of safety data, i.e., adverse events, biochemical and hematological laboratory parameters, demonstrated no differences between tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo. As a conclusion tolperisone hydrochloride represents an effective and safe treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm without the typical side effects of centrally active muscle relaxants. PMID:8951937

  4. [Lateral asymmetry of the human pain sensitivity.].

    PubMed

    Gbel, H; Westphal, W

    1987-09-01

    In repeated clinical studies a preponderance of pain syndromes on the left side of the body has frequently been observed. Experimental studies in humans revealed a lower pain threshold on the left, nondominant side. On the other hand, some studies do not confirm this lateralization. Since pain threshold is not a very valid measure of pain sensitivity in the range beyond threshold, and since clinical studies are limited by simply counting the incidence of the pain syndromes, we investigated whether a significant lateralization of pain sensitivity exists in the entire range beyond pain threshold. Handedness and gender were included as factors. For experimental pain stimulation in 24 subjects three different methods were used: local pressure on the middle phalanxes, a modified submaximal effort tourniquet test, and submerging the hands into cold water. For pain measurement beyond threshold we used the category splitting procedure (Heller).All three methods of stimulation produced corresponding results. Lefthanded subjects showed decreased pain sensitivity on the left side, right-handed subjects on the right side. This was true for the total range of pain sensitivity. For pain induced by pressure, lateral asymmetry increased with pain intensity, for the other two methods it was constant. Lateral asymmetry was found in all subjects, but significant differences could only be demonstrated in female Ss. It is concluded that both gender and handedness contribute to lateral asymmetry of pain sensitivity in man. PMID:18415557

  5. [Neuropathic pain: experimental advances and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Attal, N; Bouhassira, D

    2004-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is a clinical entity designating the different types of pain associated with a lesion of the nervous system including a wide range of pathological conditions from painful peripheral lesions (for example diabetic neuropathy, post-zoster pain, trauma-induced nerve injury) and central pain (particularly stroke-induced pain, spinal lesions, and multiple sclerosis). Despite this wide range of etiologies, neuropathic pain has well characterized clinical features which generally allow distinction from other types of pain: continuous often burn-like pain, paroxysmal pain (electrical discharge, knife stab), evoked pain, highly invalidating pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia), and associated dysethesia and/or paresthesia. Over the last ten Years, very little work has been published on neuropathic pain, which is now becoming a very active domain of research in neurobiology. Advances to date have not been spectacular although better tolerated agents have been recently marketed. Future progress should enable an appropriate response to the therapeutic challenge of neuropathic pain. PMID:15034477

  6. Groin pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg. This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  7. Pain phenomena and possible mechanisms in patients with painful polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Otto, Marit; Bak, Sren; Bach, Flemming W; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Sren H

    2003-01-01

    Painful polyneuropathy is a common neuropathic pain condition characterized by different typical pain phenomena and symptoms. The present study determined the frequency of pain phenomena and signs in painful polyneuropathy, and compared the symptomatology in patients with signs of increased small fiber response with that in patients with signs of deafferentation. Eighty-one consecutive patients with painful polyneuropathy were studied. The most common pain phenomena were deep aching pain (88%) and pain on pressure (69%), followed by pain paroxysms (59%) and less frequently pain on light touch (31%). Patients with increased cold and heat detection thresholds were more likely to have pain paroxysms (odds ratio (OR) 2.5 and 5.2) and patients with pain summation on repetitive mechanical stimulation more often had touch-evoked pain (OR=4.0) than patients without these phenomena. Findings compatible with increased small fiber response were found in six patients (7.4%), in 41 (50.6%) unequivocal signs of deafferentation were found, and 34 patients (42%) could not be classified. There was no significant difference in presenting symptoms between these groups. In conclusion, in painful polyneuropathy, (1). deep aching pain is the most frequently reported pain symptom; (2). the association between pain paroxysms with decreased small fiber function and touch-evoked pain with abnormal pain summation on mechanical stimulation indicate that central nervous system mechanisms are responsible for these symptoms; (3). sensitized small fibers as the single mechanism of pain is rare; and (4). pain symptomatology cannot predict pain mechanisms as being mainly deafferentation or sensitized small fibers. PMID:12507713

  8. Effects of Videogame Distraction and a Virtual Reality Type Head-Mounted Display Helmet on Cold Pressor Pain in Young Elementary School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Karen E.; Law, Emily F.; Sil, Soumitri; Herbert, Linda Jones; Horn, Susan Berrin; Wohlheiter, Karen; Ackerman, Claire Sonntag

    2010-01-01

    Objective?This study examined the effects of videogame distraction and a virtual reality (VR) type head-mounted display helmet for children undergoing cold pressor pain.?Methods?Fifty children between the ages of 6 and 10 years underwent a baseline cold pressor trial followed by two cold pressor trials in which interactive videogame distraction was delivered via a VR helmet or without a VR helmet in counterbalanced order.?Results?As expected, children demonstrated significant improvements in pain threshold and pain tolerance during both distraction conditions. However, the two distraction conditions did not differ in effectiveness.?Conclusions?Using the VR helmet did not result in improved pain tolerance over and above the effects of interactive videogame distraction without VR technology. Clinical implications and possible developmental differences in elementary school-aged children's ability to use VR technology are discussed. PMID:19786489

  9. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls – a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant’s hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual’s self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls.

  10. Heritability of pain catastrophizing and associations with experimental pain outcomes: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Trost, Zina; Strachan, Eric; Sullivan, Michael; Vervoort, Tine; Avery, Ally R; Afari, Niloofar

    2015-03-01

    This study used a twin paradigm to examine genetic and environmental contributions to pain catastrophizing and the observed association between pain catastrophizing and cold-pressor task (CPT) outcomes. Male and female monozygotic (n = 206) and dizygotic twins (n = 194) from the University of Washington Twin Registry completed a measure of pain catastrophizing and performed a CPT challenge. As expected, pain catastrophizing emerged as a significant predictor of several CPT outcomes, including cold-pressor Immersion Tolerance, Pain Tolerance, and Delayed Pain Rating. The heritability estimate for pain catastrophizing was found to be 37% with the remaining 63% of variance attributable to unique environmental influence. Additionally, the observed associations between pain catastrophizing and CPT outcomes were not found attributable to shared genetics or environmental exposure, which suggests a direct relationship between catastrophizing and experimental pain outcomes. This study is the first to examine the heritability of pain catastrophizing and potential processes by which pain catastrophizing is related to experimental pain response. PMID:25599234

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of a hydrocodone extended-release tablet formulated with abuse-deterrence technology for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in patients with osteoarthritis or low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Martin E; Laudadio, Charles; Yang, Ronghua; Narayana, Arvind; Malamut, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of hydrocodone extended release (ER) developed with abuse-deterrence technology to provide sustained pain relief and limit effects of alcohol and tablet manipulation on drug release. Eligible patients with chronic moderate-to-severe low back or osteoarthritis pain were titrated to an analgesic dose of hydrocodone ER (15–90 mg) and randomized to placebo or hydrocodone ER every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 12 in weekly average pain intensity (API; 0=no pain, 10=worst pain imaginable). Secondary measures included percentage of patients with >33% and >50% increases from baseline in weekly API, change from baseline in weekly worst pain intensity, supplemental opioid usage, aberrant drug-use behaviors, and adverse events. Overall, 294 patients were randomized and received ≥1 dose of placebo (n=148) or hydrocodone ER (n=146). Weekly API did not differ significantly between hydrocodone ER and placebo at week 12 (P=0.134); although, in post hoc analyses, the change in weekly API was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER when excluding the lowest dose (15 mg; least squares mean, −0.20 vs 0.40; P=0.032). Significantly more patients had >33% and >50% increase in weekly API with placebo (P<0.05), and mean weekly worst pain intensity was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER at week 12 (P=0.026). Supplemental medication usage was higher with placebo (86%) than hydrocodone ER (79%). Incidence of aberrant drug-use behaviors was low, and adverse events were similar between groups. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, although results support the effectiveness of this hydrocodone ER formulation in managing chronic low back or osteoarthritis pain. Use of the hydrocodone ER 15-mg dose, a robust placebo response, and use of supplemental analgesics, particularly in the placebo group, may have limited detection of a statistically significant treatment effect, and additional research is needed to clarify these findings. PMID:26396543

  12. Pain Sensitivity and Modulation in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Monika; Scott-Sutherland, Jennifer; Santangelo, Gabrielle; Simpson, Norah; Sethna, Navil; Mullington, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep of good quantity and quality is considered a biologically important resource necessary to maintain homeostasis of pain-regulatory processes. To assess the role of chronic sleep disturbances in pain processing, we conducted laboratory pain testing in subjects with primary insomnia. Seventeen participants with primary insomnia (meanSEM 22.60.9 years, 11 women) were individually matched with 17 healthy participants. All participants completed daily sleep and pain diaries over a 2-week period. Laboratory pain testing was conducted in a controlled environment and included (1) warmth detection threshold testing, (2) pain sensitivity testing (threshold detection for heat and pressure pain), and (3) tests to access pain-modulatory mechanisms (temporal summation and pain inhibition). Primary insomnia subjects reported experiencing spontaneous pain on twice as many days as healthy controls during the at-home recording phase (p<0.05). During laboratory testing, primary insomnia subjects had lower pain thresholds than healthy controls (p<0.05 for heat pain detection threshold, p<0.08 for pressure pain detection threshold). Unexpectedly, pain facilitation, as assessed with temporal summation of pain responses, was reduced in primary insomnia compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Pain inhibition, as assessed with the diffuse noxious inhibitory control paradigm (DNIC), was attenuated in insomnia subjects when compared to controls (p<0.05). Based on these findings, we hypothesize that pain-inhibitory circuits in patients with insomnia are in a state of constant activation to compensate for ongoing subclinical pain. This constant activation ultimately results in a ceiling effect of pain-inhibitory efforts, as indicated by the inability of the system to adequately function during challenge. PMID:22396081

  13. Experimental pain responses in children with chronic pain and in healthy children: How do they differ?

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie CI; Evans, Subhadra; Seidman, Laura C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extant research comparing laboratory pain responses of children with chronic pain with healthy controls is mixed, with some studies indicating lower pain responsivity for controls and others showing no differences. Few studies have included different pain modalities or assessment protocols. OBJECTIVES: To compare pain responses among 26 children (18 girls) with chronic pain and matched controls (mean age 14.8 years), to laboratory tasks involving thermal heat, pressure and cold pain. Responses to cold pain were assessed using two different protocols: an initial trial of unspecified duration and a second trial of specified duration. METHODS: Four trials of pressure pain and of thermal heat pain stimuli, all of unspecified duration, were administered, as well as the two cold pain trials. Heart rate and blood pressure were assessed at baseline and after completion of the pain tasks. RESULTS: Pain tolerance and pain intensity did not differ between children with chronic pain and controls for the unspecified trials. For the specified cold pressor trial, 92% of children with chronic pain completed the entire trial compared with only 61.5% of controls. Children with chronic pain exhibited a trend toward higher baseline and postsession heart rate and reported more anxiety and depression symptoms compared with control children. CONCLUSIONS: Contextual factors related to the fixed trial may have exerted a greater influence on pain tolerance in children with chronic pain relative to controls. Children with chronic pain demonstrated a tendency toward increased arousal in anticipation of and following pain induction compared with controls. PMID:22518373

  14. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD. PMID:26713424

  15. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  16. Flank pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  17. Pain (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... moderate pain. 7 to 10 means severe pain. Acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be used to relieve mild pain. Acetaminophen and NSAIDs help relieve mild pain. They may ...

  18. Childhood adversities and laboratory pain perception

    PubMed Central

    Pieritz, Karoline; Rief, Winfried; Euteneuer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Childhood adversity has frequently been related to a wide range of psychosomatic complaints in adulthood. The present study examined the relationship between different forms of childhood adversity and laboratory measures of pain. Heat pain tolerance and perceived heat pain intensity were measured in a community-based sample of 62 women (aged 20–64 years). Participants completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), which assesses five forms of childhood adversity: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, and emotional neglect. Somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and pain catastrophizing were assessed as potential mediators. Bivariate analyses indicated that emotional abuse but no other forms of childhood adversity were significantly related to decreased heat pain tolerance (r=−0.27; P<0.05). Accordingly, multiple regression analyses revealed that only emotional abuse was a significant predictor of heat pain tolerance (β=−0.62; P=0.034) when entering all CTQ subscales simultaneously. Although emotional abuse was also related to somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and pain catastrophizing, none of these variables mediated the relationship between childhood adversity and laboratory pain (P>0.1). No significant associations were found between any forms of childhood adversity and heat pain intensity. Our findings indicate that the severity of emotional childhood abuse is associated with decreased pain tolerance, an affective component of pain, but not with heat pain intensity, which has been described as a sensory component of pain. PMID:26316757

  19. Nociception, Pain, Negative Moods, and Behavior Selection.

    PubMed

    Baliki, Marwan N; Apkarian, A Vania

    2015-08-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context, we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury, while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior, and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms, and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: the limbic brain imparting risk, and the mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats. PMID:26247858

  20. Persistence behavior of chronic low back pain patients in an acute pain situation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A J; Brands, A M

    1986-01-01

    The test behavior of 24 chronic low back pain patients was compared with the behavior of 24 healthy control Ss., matched for age and sex, in an experimental, acute pain situation (cold pressor-test). Chronic low back pain patients showed poorer persistence behavior and reported more pain. Thus, elements of typical chronic low back pain behavior were also present in an acute pain situation. These findings are discussed within the framework of stimulus-generalization theory. In addition, the effect of different coping strategies on pain tolerance was reconfirmed. The chronic low back pain group and the control group did not cope differently. PMID:2942681

  1. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  2. Positive Traits Linked to Less Pain through Lower Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Pulvers, Kim; Carrillo, Janet; Merchant, Gina; Thomas, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between positive traits, pain catastrophizing, and pain perceptions. We hypothesized that pain catastrophizing would mediate the relationship between positive traits and pain. First, participants (n = 114) completed the Trait Hope Scale, the Life Orientation Test- Revised, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Participants then completed the experimental pain stimulus, a cold pressor task, by submerging their hand in a circulating water bath (0º Celsius) for as long as tolerable. Immediately following the task, participants completed the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ-SF). Pearson correlation found associations between hope and pain catastrophizing (r = −.41, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.20, p < .05). Optimism was significantly associated with pain catastrophizing (r = −.44, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.19, p < .05). Bootstrapping, a non-parametric resampling procedure, tested for mediation and supported our hypothesis that pain catastrophizing mediated the relationship between positive traits and MPQ-SF pain report. To our knowledge, this investigation is the first to establish that the protective link between positive traits and experimental pain operates through lower pain catastrophizing. PMID:22199416

  3. Chronic pain: a neuroscientific understanding.

    PubMed

    Basser, David S

    2012-01-01

    The neuroscientific understanding of chronic pain presented evolved through the integration of clinical, research and theoretical conceptualizations associated with chronic idiopathic orofacial pain after posing the following three questions: (1) What if chronic idiopathic orofacial pain was viewed from a neuroscientific perspective as part of a global syndrome rather than a site-specific anatomo-physiological perspective? (2) What if it was assumed that rather than serving no useful purpose chronic idiopathic orofacial pain served a useful purpose? (3) Would current knowledge be sufficient to explain chronic idiopathic orofacial pain? The understanding defines chronic pain as being a centrally perceived event expressing the continual or episodic persistence of a level of peripheral and/or central neural activity above the pain threshold of a sensitized nervous system that is sufficient to maintain the sensitization. This ongoing neural activity may be associated with or independent of the neural activity that initiated the sensitization. In effect the nervous system is "bruised" and the "bruising" is being maintained (prodded) by the total neural activity of the system irrespective of its origin; the normal protective healing function of the nervous system, pain, continues its warning when the activity of the system activates the switch that is the pain threshold. The common clinical history of initial trauma and ongoing stress suggests that chronic pain might be thought of as an expression of post-traumatic stress. Treatment based on the presented understanding would aim to reduce and maintain total neural activity below the pain threshold level and ideally down to where the sensitization can be reduced or even resolved by neuroplastic processes, the level rather than the origin of neural activity being relevant to the pain mitigation. A review of chronic pain in the light of this understanding will provide the opportunity to formulate, test and refine new and existing strategies for its prevention and treatment, thereby offering hope to the millions of sufferers worldwide. PMID:22019262

  4. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  5. The role of beta-arrestin2 in the severity of antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence induced by different opioid pain therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Raehal, Kirsten M; Bohn, Laura M

    2011-01-01

    Ligands acting at the same receptor can differentially activate distinct signal transduction pathways, which in turn, can have diverse functional consequences. Further, receptors expressed in different tissues may utilize intracellular signaling proteins in response to a ligand differently as well. The mu opioid receptor (MOR), which mediates many of the pharmacological actions of opiate therapeutics, is also subject to differential signaling in response to diverse agonists. To study the effect of diverse agonists on MOR signaling, we examined the effects of chronic opiate treatment on two distinct physiological endpoints, antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence, in mice lacking the intracellular regulatory molecule, ?arrestin2. While ?arrestin2 knockout (?arr2-KO) mice do not become tolerant to the antinociceptive effects of chronic morphine in a hot plate test, tolerance develops to the same degree in both wild type and ?arr2-KO mice following chronic infusion with methadone, fentanyl, and oxycodone. Studies here also assess the severity of withdrawal signs precipitated by naloxone following chronic infusions at three different doses of each opiate agonist. While there are no differences in withdrawal responses between genotypes at the highest dose of morphine tested (48 mg/kg/day), the ?arr2-KO mice display several less severe withdrawal responses when the infusion dose is lowered (12 or 24 mg/kg/day). Chronic infusion of methadone, fentanyl, and oxycodone all lead to equivalent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal responses in both genotypes at all doses tested. These results lend further evidence that distinct agonists can differentially impact on opioid-mediated responses in vivo in a ?arrestin2-dependent manner. PMID:20713067

  6. Is the Deficit in Pain Inhibition in Fibromyalgia Influenced by Sleep Impairments?

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Savoie, Emilie; Marchand, Serge; Morin, Mlanie; Bourgault, Patricia; Brissette, Nathalie; Rattanavong, Vongmaly; Cloutier, Christian; Bissonnette, Alain; Potvin, Stphane

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (ICPM) underlies the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia (FM), but there is high variability in ICPM efficacy in this syndrome that remains poorly understood. Based on emerging data showing that age, anxiety, depression and sleep can modulate ICPM efficacy, the main objective of this study was to determine the clinical correlates of experimentally-induced pain perception in FM. Fifty FM patients and 39 healthy controls (HC) were tested. Anxiety, depression, sleep and FM symptoms were measured with questionnaires or interview-type scales. Experimental pain testing consisted of two tonic heat pain stimulations separated by a 2-minute cold pressor test (CPT). Thermal pain thresholds and tolerance were higher in HC compared to FM patients. Pain ratings during the CPT were lower in HC relative to FM patients. ICPM efficacy was stronger in HC compared to FM patients. Finally, sleep quality was the only factor significantly related to ICPM efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report this association in FM. Future studies will need to replicate this finding, to determine whether impaired sleep is primary or secondary to deficient pain inhibition, and to characterize the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this association. PMID:23091577

  7. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult. PMID:20356798

  8. Somatosensory function following painful repetitive electrical stimulation of the human temporomandibular joint and skin.

    PubMed

    Ayesh, E E; Jensen, T S; Svensson, P

    2007-05-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common pain problems in the population with uncertain pathophysiology and mechanisms. The aim of this experimental study was to: (1) Establish an experimental pain model using electrical stimuli to describe characteristics of nociception from the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and overlying skin. (2) Test the hypothesis that there would be sex-related differences in TMJ sensitivity. Forty-three healthy subjects (24 men and 19 women) participated. Using two unipolar needle electrodes into the skin (above the TMJ) in one session or into the TMJ in the other session, sensory detection threshold (SDT), pain detection threshold (PDT), and summation threshold (SumT) were measured, before and after repetitive electrical stimulation. Painful repetitive electrical stimulation was applied for 20 min with individually adjustment of the intensity of the stimuli to keep the pain rating around five on a 0-10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Sensitivity to tactile and pin-prick stimuli were assessed at 11 sites around the TMJ using two von Frey nylon filaments (5.16 and 84.96 g), as well as pressure pain threshold (PPT) and pressure pain tolerance (PPTOL) before the stimulation, after 20 min of stimulation and finally 15 min after the end of stimulation. Numerical rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 100 was used to rate the intensity of applied von Frey filaments. SDT, PDT, and SumT were higher in the TMJ than in the skin. These three measures increased after painful repetitive stimulation for 20 min (de-sensitization). In contrast to this effect, a hypersensitivity to pin-prick stimuli was detected around the TMJ area on the stimulated side after 20 min of electrical stimulation in the TMJ, but not in the skin. A bilateral hyposensitivity to tactile stimuli was detected after skin and TMJ stimulation. PPT and PPTOL did not show a significant change over time. Except for lower TMJ PPTOLs in women than men there were no significant sex-related differences in mechanical or electrical measures. The present findings indicate differences in the elicitation of hypersensitivity following repetitive electrical stimulation of skin and deep tissues. The mechanisms underlying these findings are not clear but differences in the induction of long-term potentiation and depression is a possibility. From a clinical point of view, the lack of sex differences in most of the used measures indicates that the higher prevalence of women than men amongst patients with persistent TMJ pain problems not entirely can be ascribed to a higher sensitivity of the TMJ. Further studies will examine the somatosensory sensitivity of patients with TMJ pain problems. PMID:17146645

  9. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  10. Elbow pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  11. Heel pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  12. Neck pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causes of neck pain: Take over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or acetaminophen ( ... prescribe a muscle relaxant or a more powerful pain reliever. Over-the-counter medications often work as well ...

  13. Knee pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  14. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status

  15. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  16. Sleep and pain sensitivity in adults.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Brge; Lallukka, Tea; Petrie, Keith J; Steingrmsdttir, lf Anna; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2015-08-01

    Sleep problems and pain are major public health concerns, but the nature of the association between the 2 conditions is inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether a range of sleep measures is associated with experimental increased pain sensitivity. A cross-sectional large population-based study from 2007 to 2008, the Troms 6 study, provided data from 10,412 participants (age: mean [SD], 58 [13] years; 54% women). Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep onset latency (SOL), and sleep efficiency, as well as frequency and severity of insomnia. The main outcome measure was pain sensitivity tests, including assessment of cold-pressor pain tolerance. We found that all sleep parameters, except sleep duration, were significantly associated with reduced pain tolerance. Both the frequency and severity of insomnia, in addition to SOL and sleep efficiency, were associated with pain sensitivity in a dose-response manner. Adjusting for demographics and psychological distress reduced the strengths of the hazard ratios, but most associations remained significant in the fully adjusted models. There was also a synergistic interaction effect on pain tolerance when combining insomnia and chronic pain. We conclude that sleep problems significantly increase the risk for reduced pain tolerance. Because comorbid sleep problems and pain have been linked to elevated disability, the need to improve sleep among patients with chronic pain, and vice versa, should be an important agenda for future research. PMID:25915149

  17. Dopamine and Pain Sensitivity: Neither Sulpiride nor Acute Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Depletion Have Effects on Thermal Pain Sensations in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Susanne; Ceko, Marta; Louis-Foster, Mytsumi; Elfassy, Nathaniel M.; Leyton, Marco; Shir, Yoram; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Based on animal studies and some indirect clinical evidence, dopamine has been suggested to have anti-nociceptive effects. Here, we investigated directly the effects of increased and decreased availability of extracellular dopamine on pain perception in healthy volunteers. In Study 1, participants ingested, in separate sessions, a placebo and a low dose of the centrally acting D2-receptor antagonist sulpiride, intended to increase synaptic dopamine via predominant pre-synaptic blockade. No effects were seen on thermal pain thresholds, tolerance, or temporal summation. Study 2 used the acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD) method to transiently decrease dopamine availability. In one session participants ingested a mixture that depletes the dopamine amino acid precursors, phenylalanine and tyrosine. In the other session they ingested a nutritionally balanced control mixture. APTD led to a small mood-lowering response following aversive thermal stimulation, but had no effects on the perception of cold, warm, or pain stimuli. In both studies the experimental manipulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission was successful as indicated by manipulation checks. The results contradict proposals that dopamine has direct anti-nociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. Based on dopamines well-known role in reward processing, we hypothesize that also in the context of pain, dopamine acts on stimulus salience and might play a role in the initiation of avoidance behavior rather than having direct antinociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. PMID:24236199

  18. Management of painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brix Finnerup, Nanna; Hein Sindrup, Sren; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is the most common type of pain in neuropathy. In painful polyneuropathies the pain usually has a "glove and stocking" distribution. The pain may be predominantly spontaneous, e.g., with a burning, pricking, or shooting character or characterized by evoked pain such as mechanical or cold allodynia. In the clinical setting, the prevention of painful neuropathies and treatment of underlying neuropathy remains inadequate and thus symptomatic treatment of the pain and related disability needs to be offered. Most randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) published in painful neuropathy have been conducted in patients with diabetes and to what extent a treatment which is found effective in painful diabetic polyneuropathy can be expected to relieve other conditions like chemotherapy- or HIV-induced neuropathy is unknown. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), gabapentin, pregabalin, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are first drug choices. In patients with localized neuropathic pain, a topical lidocaine patch may also be considered. Second-line treatments are tramadol and other opioids. New types of treatment include botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), high-dose capsaicin patches, and cannabinoids. Other types of anticonvulsant drugs such as lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and lacosamide have a more questionable efficacy in painful polyneuropathy but may have an effect in a subgroup of patients. Combination therapy may be considered in patients with insufficient effect from one drug. Treatment is usually a trial-and-error process and has to be individualized to the single patient, taking into account all comorbidities such as possible concomitant depression, anxiety, diseases, and drug interactions. Side-effects to antidepressants include dry mouth, nausea, constipation, orthostatic hypotension, and sedation. ECG should always be obtained prior to treatment with TCAs, which also should not be used in patients with cardiac incompensation and epilepsy. The most common side-effects of gabapentin and pregabalin are CNS-related side-effects with dizziness and somnolence. Peripheral edema, weight gain, nausea, vertigo, asthenia, dry mouth, and ataxia may also occur. Topical treatments are better tolerated due to lack of systemic side-effects but there is still limited evidence for the long-term efficacy of these drugs. With available drugs, the average pain reduction is about 20-30%, and only 20-35% of the patients will achieve at least 50% pain reduction, which stresses the need of a multidisciplinary approach to pain treatment. PMID:23931787

  19. Brain Chemistry May Change to Cope with Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155317.html Brain Chemistry May Change to Cope With Pain Researchers document ... 2015 FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Brain chemistry may change to help people tolerate arthritis pain, ...

  20. Effect of Age on Response to Experimental Pain in Normal Indian Males

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Indu; Barath, Abhijeet Singh; Verma, Anjali; Garg, Sumit; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Response to experimental pain depends on the nature of the pain stimulus, as well as on gender, racial, cultural and socioeconomic factors. This study investigates the effect of age on pain sensitivity and cardiovascular reactivity produced by experimental pain. We have also compared the values of body mass index (BMI) and resting blood pressure of volunteers with the normal values. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 83 Indian males of different age groups. The volunteers were divided into 4 groups: Children, Young Adults, Middle-Aged Adults and Old Adults; and their basal parameters (BMI, resting pulse and blood pressure) were recorded. Selected volunteers were subjected to cold pressor task (CPT). Pain sensitivity (PS) (pain threshold, tolerance and pain rating on a visual analog scale) and cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) (increase in pulse and blood pressure) were recorded. Results Many volunteers had abnormal values of BMI and resting blood pressure and had to be excluded from the study. PS and CVR between different groups were compared by one-way ANOVA. Significant differences in PS were observed, with highest pain sensitivity in Children and lowest in Old Adults. No significant differences were observed in the CVR. Conclusion The high numbers of volunteers with abnormal basal parameters (BMI and resting blood pressure) show an urgent need to educate the general public about the dangers and risk factors of obesity and hypertension. Less exposure of children to painful encounters may be responsible for their high pain sensitivity while higher values of resting blood pressure and decreased sensitivity of the sensory systems with advancing age may be responsible for the hypoalgesia observed in old adults. PMID:26500901

  1. Noise thresholds for optical quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Christopher M; Haselgrove, Henry L; Nielsen, Michael A

    2006-01-20

    In this Letter we numerically investigate the fault-tolerant threshold for optical cluster-state quantum computing. We allow both photon loss noise and depolarizing noise (as a general proxy for all local noise), and obtain a threshold region of allowed pairs of values for the two types of noise. Roughly speaking, our results show that scalable optical quantum computing is possible for photon loss probabilities <3 x 10(-3), and for depolarization probabilities <10(-4). PMID:16486553

  2. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  3. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  4. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  5. Electronic gaming as pain distraction.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Eleanor; Trevena, Judy; Swain, Nic

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether active distraction reduces participants' experience of pain more than passive distraction during a cold pressor task. In the first experiment, 60 participants were asked to submerge their hand in cold (2C) water for as long as they could tolerate. They did this with no distraction, and then with active (electronic gaming system) and passive (television) distraction, in randomly assigned order. Tolerance time, pain intensity ratings and task absorption ratings were measured for each condition. A second experiment attempted to control for participants' expectations about the effects of distraction on pain. Forty participants underwent the same experimental procedure, but were given verbal suggestions about the effects of distraction by the experimenter before each distraction condition. Participants in both experiments had a significantly higher pain tolerance and reported less pain with the active distraction compared with passive or no distraction. Participants reported being more absorbed, and were significantly more willing to do the task again when they had the active distraction compared with both passive distraction and no distraction. They also had more enjoyment, less anxiety and greater reduction in pain with active distraction than with passive distraction. There was no effect of suggestion. These experiments offer further support for the use of electronic games as a method of pain control. PMID:21369538

  6. Pain assessment after intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Surber, C; Ldin, E; Flckiger, A; Dubach, U C; Ziegler, W H

    1994-12-01

    Several parameters (pH, osmotic pressure) influencing the local tolerance of injectable drugs have been well-documented; however, little attention has been paid to pain following an injection--a common problem in clinical practice. A pain questionnaire was used to record pain up to 24 h after a deep ventrogluteal injection. Two groups of healthy volunteers were recruited: the first group (n = 6) received 3 different cotrimoxazole preparations and placebo and the second group (n = 10) received 4 different multivitamin preparations and placebo (double-blind, cross-over). Parameters monitored during and after injection included pain localization (line drawing), pain intensity (visual-analog scale: VAS) and verbal description of pain (pain rating index: PRI). In both groups, the equality of pain (VAS, PRI) induced by the preparations was rejected in all cases (Friedman's test, p < or = 1%). The pairwise comparisons of the groups showed significant differences (p < or = 5%) between various preparations. The correlation (Spearman's rank correlation) between pain parameters VAS and PRI was high. The present investigations have shown that the pain questionnaire is a valuable tool to investigate the subjective pain symptoms during and after the injection of different preparations. PMID:7848364

  7. Ion channel therapeutics for pain.

    PubMed

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-11-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  8. NGX-4010, a high-concentration capsaicin dermal patch for lasting relief of peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Noto, Christopher; Pappagallo, Marco; Szallasi, Arpad

    2009-07-01

    NeurogesX Inc is developing NGX-4010, a rapid-delivery dermal patch application system that contains high-concentration trans-capsaicin, for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Capsaicin evokes a lasting and reversible refractory state in primary sensory neurons involved in the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. NGX-4010 can be applied to the painful skin area up to a total surface area of 1120 cm2. In phase I clinical trials, NGX-4010 increased the threshold for warmth detection, reduced epidermal sensory nerve fiber density and was well tolerated. In phase II trials, NGX-4010 was effective in reducing pain in patients with post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), HIV-associated distal sensory neuropathy (HIV-DSP) and painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). Data from phase III trials in patients with PHN demonstrated that significantly more pain relief was achieved by NGX-4010 (30 to 32% reduction from baseline) compared with a low-concentration capsaicin active control (20 to 24% reduction); however, only one of two studies involving patients with HIV-DSP met the primary endpoint. NGX-4010 appears to have the potential to be an effective adjunctive or a stand-alone therapy for PHN, as well as potentially for HIV-DSP and PDN. NGX-4010 has been granted approval by the European Commission and an NDA has been accepted for filing by the FDA. PMID:19579176

  9. Predictors of Postoperative Movement and Resting Pain following Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rakel, Barbara A.; Blodgett, Nicole Petsas; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Logsden-Sackett, Nyla; Clark, Charles; Noiseux, Nicolas; Callaghan, John; Herr, Keela; Geasland, Katharine; Yang, Xiaoyan; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined preoperative predictors of movement and resting pain following total knee replacement (TKR). We hypothesized that younger patients with higher preoperative pain intensity, pain sensitivity, trait anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and depression would be more likely to experience higher postoperative movement pain than older patients with lower scores on these variables prior to surgery and that predictors would be similar for resting pain. Demographics, analgesic intake, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophizing, resting pain, movement pain (i.e., during active knee range of motion), and quantitative sensory tests, were performed pre-operatively on 215 participants scheduled for a unilateral TKR. On postoperative day 2 (POD2), analgesic intake, resting pain, and movement pain were again assessed. Significant predictors of moderate or severe movement pain were higher preoperative movement pain, von Frey pain intensity (VFPI) and heat pain threshold (HPT). People with severe movement pain preoperatively were 20 times more likely to have severe movement pain postoperatively. When the influence of preoperative movement pain was removed, depression became a predictor. Significant predictors of moderate to severe resting pain were higher preoperative resting pain, depression, and younger age. These results suggest that patients with higher preoperative pain and depression are more likely to have higher pain following TKR and younger patients may have higher resting pain. Cutaneous pain sensitivity predicted movement pain but not resting pain, suggesting that mechanisms underlying movement pain are different from resting pain. Aggressive management of preoperative pain, pain sensitivity, and depression prior to surgery may facilitate postoperative recovery. PMID:22840570

  10. Hypoalgesia induced by elbow manipulation in lateral epicondylalgia does not exhibit tolerance.

    PubMed

    Paungmali, Aatit; Vicenzino, Bill; Smith, Michelle

    2003-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the initial hypoalgesic effect of spinal manipulative therapy was not antagonized by naloxone and did not exhibit tolerance with repeated applications. The implication is that endogenous opioid mechanisms of pain relief are probably not at play in spinal manipulative therapy. The role of endogenous opioid peptides in manipulation of the peripheral joints has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the initial hypoalgesic effect of a peripheral manipulative technique (mobilization-with-movement treatment for the elbow) demonstrated a tolerance to repeated applications (ie, reduction in magnitude of effect over repeated applications). Twenty-four participants with unilateral chronic lateral epicondylalgia participated in the study. A repeated measures study was conducted to examine the effect of repeated applications of the mobilization-with-movement treatment for the elbow on 6 separate treatment occasions at least 2 days apart. Pain-free grip strength and pressure pain threshold were chosen as the pain-related outcome measures. Changes in the percent maximum possible effect scores of measures of hypoalgesia were evaluated across the 6 treatment sessions by using linear trend analysis. The results showed no significant difference for the hypoalgesic effect of the treatment technique between sessions (P >.05). This peripheral manipulative therapy treatment technique appeared to have a similar effect profile to previously studied spinal manipulative therapy techniques, thereby contributing to the body of knowledge that indicates that manipulative therapy most likely induces a predominant non-opioid form of analgesia. PMID:14622665

  11. Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Anna M.; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M.; Montoya, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

  12. Pain: history, culture and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ahmad; Raza, Fauzia; Khan, Iqbal Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Pain, one of the universals of existence, has a long and venerable history, its origin initially attributed to godly punishment for disbelievers; and, with improved understanding, to physical and psycho-social factors. "Pain is emotion or sensation?" has been a debatable issue. Razes developed pleasure-pain theory, founded on the theories of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus. Descartes' Dualism shifted the centre of pain from the heart to the brain but negated the psychological contribution to its pathogenesis. Gate Control Theory, fascinated with the idea of "neurological gates", highlighted the important role of the brain in dealing with the messages received. The International Association of the Study of Pain, in 1979, coined a definition of pain which is currently in use and was last updated on 6th October 2014. Its validity has been challenged and a new definition has been suggested. Whereas the experience is personalized, immeasurable and unsharable, different cultural groups react differently to pain from relative tolerance to over-reaction. Gender and ethnic differences in the perception of pain are well proven and the effects of various religious beliefs adequately scored. Despite extensive research over centuries, understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from optimal. Untiring efforts to identify a paincentre in the brain have been futile. Had it been possible, millions of pain sufferers would have been relieved of their physical agony and mental anguish by the prick of needle. PMID:26203543

  13. Pain Experience and Perception in the Obese Subject Systematic Review (Revised Version).

    PubMed

    Torensma, Bart; Thomassen, Irene; van Velzen, Monique; In 't Veld, Bastiaan Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Pain is an integral part of life and has an important protective function. Pain perception has been shown to differ between subjects and changes with gender, race, and culture. In addition, it has been suggested that obesity influences pain perception and that obesity can be a risk factor for increased pain thresholds. The aim of this systematic review was to examine pain thresholds in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. The electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, and EMBASE were searched using combinations of terms for obese, pain measurement, visual analog scale, quantitative sensory testing, and pain perception. Studies without comparison as well as cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. The search was conducted without restrictions on language or date of publication. From a total of 1818 identified studies, seven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, whereby only one study tested the pain threshold difference between obese and non-obese and also before and after body weight loss surgery. Two studies showed a lower pain threshold and four studies a higher pain threshold in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. Two studies showed no difference in pain threshold before and after substantial body weight loss due to surgery. Weight loss after surgery was not identified as a factor for higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. In view of the heterogeneity of the studies, the variability of the subjects and differences in methodological quality, a meta-analysis could not be performed. From the available literature, there is a tendency towards higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. Neither substantial weight loss, nor gender, were factors explaining difference in threshold. Future randomized, controlled trials should explore demographic variables that could influence pain perception or pain thresholds in obese individuals, and multimodal pain testing is necessary for better understanding of the apparent differences in pain thresholds in obese individuals. PMID:26661107

  14. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  15. Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over-the counter medicine, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to relieve pain, and apply heat to the ... an injury. Use anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen and aspirin, to relieve pain and discomfort, and ...

  16. Finger pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  17. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Neck, shoulder or back pain Dizziness ?xml:namespace> Sleep disorders ; If you have gone through treatment and still experience orofacial pain, you may have a sleep disorder, such as bruxism, or a sleep-related breathing ...

  18. Chest pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your jaw, left arm, or between your shoulder blades. You have nausea, dizziness, sweating, a racing heart, ... such as: Is the pain between the shoulder blades? Under the breast bone? Does the pain change ...

  19. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  20. Breast pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  1. Belly Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Words En Espaol What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, ... cause pain in your belly or abdomen. Keep reading to find out what belly pain is, what ...

  2. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  3. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... practice bulletin no. 51. Chronic pelvic pain. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 103 ,589–605. [top] UCSF Medical Center. (2012). ... women with chronic pelvic pain. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 33 ,130–136 [top] What are common symptoms? » ...

  4. Penis pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  5. Efficacy and side effects of diclofenac patch in treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chern, Shiuan-Horng; Chen, Chen-Chiao

    2010-01-01

    Locally administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been widely used in acute soft-tissue damage and articular musculoskeletal pain. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a topical diclofenac sodium patch in the relief of pain and inflammation as a result of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in the upper trapezius. After sample size calculations indicated that 147 patients would be needed to detect a 25% difference between drug and control, 153 patients with MPS were recruited and randomized to receive either a diclofenac sodium patch or control (menthol) patch. Visual analog scale (VAS), cervical active range of motion, pressure pain threshold of the myofascial trigger point (MTrP), patient global assessment, Neck Disability Index, and the occurrence of adverse events were assessed on Day 0 (baseline), Day 4, and Day 8. Use of the diclofenac sodium patch elicited favorable responses for the VAS, cervical active range of motion, and Neck Disability Index by the end of the treatment course (P<0.05), and was consistently superior to the control patch at all time intervals. No significant differences were observed for the pressure pain threshold of the MTrP for either patch. Tolerability assessment similarly showed the diclofenac patch to be comparatively superior. When assessed at the end of the study, 20 diclofenac patch patients, but only four control patients, considered the tolerability of treatment to be "very good." Significant differences in adverse reactions were observed between the diclofenac and control patches, with the control patch more likely to produce overall skin irritation. This study demonstrate that the diclofenac sodium patch was superior to the control patch in terms of reducing pain and improving functional outcomes, and did not result in significant adverse effects. PMID:19822404

  6. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  7. Inverted Perceptual Judgment of Nociceptive Stimuli at Threshold Level following Inconsistent Cues

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Carmen; Dimova, Violeta; Bu, Julia; Parnham, Michael J.; Oertel, Bruno G.; Ltsch, Jrn

    2015-01-01

    Objective The perception of pain is susceptible to modulation by psychological and contextual factors. It has been shown that subjects judge noxious stimuli as more painful in a respective suggestive context, which disappears when the modifying context is resolved. However, a context in which subjects judge the painfulness of a nociceptive stimulus in exactly the opposite direction to that of the cues has never been shown so far. Methods Nociceptive stimuli (300 ms intranasal gaseous CO2) at the individual pain threshold level were applied after a visual cue announcing the stimulus as either no pain, merely a stimulus, or pain. Among the stimuli at threshold level, other CO2 stimuli that were clearly below or above pain threshold were randomly interspersed. These were announced beforehand in 12 subjects randomly with correct or incorrect cues, i.e., clearly painful or clearly non-painful stimuli were announced equally often as not painful or painful. By contrast, in a subsequent group of another 12 subjects, the stimuli were always announced correctly with respect to the evoked pain. Results The random and often incorrect announcement of stimuli clearly below or above pain threshold caused the subjects to rate the stimuli at pain-threshold level in the opposite direction of the cue, i.e., when the stimuli were announced as pain significantly more often than as non-painful and vice versa (p < 10-4). By contrast, in the absence of incongruence between announcement and perception of the far-from-threshold stimuli, stimuli at pain threshold were rated in the cued direction. Conclusions The present study revealed the induction of associations incongruent with a given message in the perception of pain. We created a context of unreliable cues whereby subjects perceived the stimulus opposite to that suggested by a prior cue, i.e., potentially nociceptive stimuli at pain threshold level that were announced as painful were judged as non-painful and vice versa. These findings are consistent with reported data on the effects of distrust on non-painful cognitive responses. PMID:26147732

  8. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  9. Muscle pain inhibits cutaneous touch perception.

    PubMed

    Stohler, C S; Kowalski, C J; Lund, J P

    2001-06-01

    The processing of noxious and non-noxious sensations differs between chronic pain syndromes, and we believe that studies of sensory processing in the presence of pain will help to clarify the aetiology of the conditions. Here we measured in humans the threshold-level mechanosensitivity in tonic experimental muscle pain. We found (1) that muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline reduced cutaneous threshold-level mechanosensitivity at the site of pain and at the mirror site in the contralateral face, (2) that this effect outlasted the sensation of pain, (3) that it was more pronounced when the painful area was reported to be large, and (4) that the loss of mechanosensitivity was greater in males than females. Comparing our findings to results obtained with other pain models, all classes of nociceptors do not seem to have the same effect on cutaneous mechanosensitivity. The observed threshold-level hypoesthesia is consistent with the hypothesis that the increased mechanical thresholds found in clinic cases of temporomandibular disorders and cervicobrachialgia are a direct result of the activation of muscle nociceptors. PMID:11376905

  10. PainVision Apparatus Is Effective for Assessing Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Orita, Sumihisa; Inoue, Gen; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Konno, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case series. Purpose To determine the utility of "PainVision" apparatus for the assessment of low back pain. Overview of Literature A newly developed device, the PainVision PS-2100 (Nipro, Osaka, Japan), has been used to assess the perception of pain in a quantitative manner. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PainVision for the assessment of low back pain. Methods We assessed 89 patients with low back pain. The numeric rating scale (NRS) score, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) score and the degree of pain calculated by PainVision were measured twice at 4-week intervals in each patient. An electrode was patched on the forearm surface of the patients and the degree of pain was automatically calculated (degree of pain=100[current producing pain comparable with low back pain-current at perception threshold/current at perception threshold]). Correlations between NRS and MPQ scores and the degree of pain were determined using Spearman's rank correlation test. Results There was a strong correlation between the NRS and MPQ scores at each time point (rs=0.60, p<0.0001). The degree of pain also showed a moderate correlation with NRS and MPQ scores at each time point (rs=0.40, p<0.03). The change in the degree of pain over 4 weeks showed a moderate correlation with changes in the NRS and MPQ scores (rs=0.40, p<0.01). Conclusions PainVision as self-reported questionnaires is a useful tool to assess low back pain. PMID:25558322

  11. Management of pain in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2005-03-01

    The elderly are often untreated or undertreated for pain. Barriers to effective management include challenges to proper assessment of pain; underreporting on the part of patients; atypical manifestations of pain in the elderly; a need for increased appreciation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of aging; and misconceptions about tolerance and addiction to opioids. Physicians can effectively manage pain in the elderly by understanding different types of pain (nociceptive and neuropathic), and appropriate use of nonopioid, opioid, and adjuvant medications. Opioids have become more widely accepted for treating older adults who have persistent pain, but their use requires physicians have an understanding of prevention and management of side effects, opioid titration and withdrawal, and careful monitoring. Placebo use is unwarranted and unethical. Nonpharmacologic approaches to pain management are essential and include osteopathic manipulative treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and spiritual interventions. The holistic and interdisciplinary approach of osteopathic medicine offers an approach that can optimize effective pain management in older adults. PMID:18154193

  12. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  13. Sex differences in experimental measures of pain sensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bulls, Hailey W; Freeman, Emily L; Anderson, Austen JB; Robbins, Meredith T; Ness, Timothy J; Goodin, Burel R

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased pain sensitivity and disruption of endogenous pain inhibitory processes may account, at least in part, for the greater prevalence and severity of chronic pain in women compared to men. However, previous studies addressing this topic have produced mixed findings. This study examined sex differences in pain sensitivity and inhibition using quantitative sensory testing (QST), while also considering the influence of other important factors such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=24) each completed a QST battery. This battery included an ischemic pain task (IPT) that used a submaximal effort tourniquet procedure as well as a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) procedure for the assessment of endogenous pain inhibition. Prior to QST, participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Analyses revealed significant sex differences for the ischemic pain task and the conditioned pain modulation procedure, such that women tolerated the ischemic pain for a shorter amount of time and demonstrated less pain inhibition compared with men. This remained true even when accounting for sex differences in depressive symptoms and sleep quality. The results of this study suggest that women may be more pain sensitive and possess less-efficient endogenous pain inhibitory capacity compared with men. Whether interventions that decrease pain sensitivity and enhance pain inhibition in women ultimately improve their clinical pain outcomes is an area of research that deserves additional attention in the future. PMID:26170713

  14. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  15. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been

  16. Temperature and vibration thresholds in vibration syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Nilsson, B Y; Gustavsson, P

    1986-01-01

    In a study to investigate whether the quantitative assessment of temperature and vibration thresholds can improve the evaluation of the neurological symptoms in vibration syndrome 37 patients with neurological symptoms (paraesthesias, numbness, pain) in the hands who had worked with hand held vibrating tools and 46 healthy controls not exposed to vibration were examined. Temperature thresholds were measured on the thenar eminence and on the volar side of the second and third fingers held together. Vibration thresholds were determined on the dorsum of the hand and on the dorsal side of the second and fifth fingers proximal to the nail. The neutral zone between thresholds for warmth and cold was much wider in the patients than in the controls. Patients older than 45 had higher vibration thresholds than controls. Electroneurography was abnormal in 18 of 34 patients and a carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed in six subjects. This investigation is thus indicated in patients with neurological symptoms. Seven of the patients with normal electroneurographic findings had impaired temperature or vibration thresholds or both. Determination of sensory thresholds seems to add valuable information and the methods are, by contrast with electroneurography, easily adapted to the screening of exposed groups outside hospital. Our results indicate that thin myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres might be damaged in the vibration syndrome. Images PMID:3801334

  17. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  18. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  19. Social Modeling Influences on Pain Experience and Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Kenneth D.

    The impact of exposure to social models displaying variably tolerant pain behaviour on observers' expressions of pain is examined. Findings indicate substantial effects on verbal reports of pain, avoidance behaviour, psychophysiological indices, power function parameters, and sensory decision theory indices. Discussion centers on how social models

  20. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  1. Pain in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Schmahl, Christian; Baumgrtner, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Pain processing in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is abnormal primarily with respect to pain thresholds which are typically elevated or perception of phasic nociceptive stimuli which is reduced. In spite of this common finding, nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), often expressed as cutting, is a hallmark sign of the disease and serves to release aversive inner tension. The question thus arises, how does a painful stimulus release inner tension when these patients feel less pain than healthy people? However, intensity discrimination is normal in these patients. Imaging data have provided evidence that inhibitory top-down modulation is increased in BPD patients, and that processing of the affective-emotional pain component is altered. Recent studies have focused on the role of pain, tissue injury and seeing blood in the context of NSSI. Preliminary findings suggest a significant role of pain irrespective of concomitant tissue injury, and of seeing blood expressed as a stronger immediate stress release. Taken together, BPD patients exhibit altered pain processing that can be assigned to altered processing of nociceptive stimuli in prefrontal and limbic brain areas, which may help to mechanistically explain the clinical behavior. PMID:26437258

  2. Transdermal opioids for cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Skaer, Tracy L

    2006-01-01

    Patients with moderate to severe malignancy-related pain frequently require the use of opioid pharmacotherapy. Unfortunately, many cancer patients continue to be prescribed subtherapeutic doses of pain medications resulting in undo suffering and diminished quality of life. The choice of analgesic pharmacotherapy should be individualized and based on the intensity and etiology of pain reported by the patient. Health care providers must be able to readily quantify the relative analgesic potency when converting from one opioid to another or from one route of administration to another. Transdermal fentanyl is effective and well tolerated pharmacotherapy for the cancer pain patients. However, clinicians need to be cognizant that the U.S./U.K. manufacturer's recommendations for equilalagesic dosing of transdermal fentanyl may result in initial doses that produce subtherapeutic levels and unrelieved pain in some patients. A more aggressive dosing algorithm for transdermal fentanyl using a 2:1 (mg/day of oral morphine: mcg/hr of transdermal fentanyl) conversion ratio that considers both a review of the literature and clinical experience should help clinicians individualize cancer pain pharmacotherapy. Transdermal buprenorphine is now being prescribed in Europe and Australia for chronic and cancer pain management. Buprenorphine's mixed agonist/antagonist activity, dosage ceiling, and high affinity to the opiate receptor limits its use to those patients who do not already require large daily doses of opioids. Thus, buprenorphine may not be an appropriate medication for some patients with advanced unremitting cancer pain. PMID:16573839

  3. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  4. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  5. Buprenorphine in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2005-11-01

    Buprenorphine is a broad spectrum, highly lipophilic, and long-acting partial mu opioid receptor agonist that is noncross tolerant to other opioids. Buprenorphine can be given by several routes. Metabolism is through CYP3A4 and CYP2C8 and by conjugases. Constipation and sexual dysfunction appear to be less with buprenorphine than with other opioids. The recent development of a polymer matrix patch delivery system for buprenorphine prevents "dose dumping" and facilitates pain management in those unable to take oral analgesics. Sublingual buprenorphine has been combined with naloxone to prevent illicit conversion to parenteral administration. Buprenorphine has been used extensively to control cancer pain. In certain clinical situations, buprenorphine may have particular advantages over other opioids. PMID:16010532

  6. Pain insensitivity syndrome misinterpreted as inflicted burns.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; Baartmans, Martin G A; Vos, Paul; Dokter, Jan; White, Tonya; Tibboel, Dick

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of a 10-year-old child with severe burns that were misinterpreted as inflicted burns. Because of multiple injuries since early life, the family was under suspicion of child abuse and therefore under supervision of the Child Care Board for 2 years before the boy was burned. Because the boy incurred the burns without feeling pain, we conducted a thorough medical examination and laboratory testing, evaluated detection and pain thresholds, and used MRI to study brain morphology and brain activation patterns during pain between this patient and 3 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. We found elevated detection and pain thresholds and lower brain activation during pain in the patient compared with the healthy controls and reference values. The patient received the diagnosis of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV on the basis of clinical findings and the laboratory testing, complemented with the altered pain and detection thresholds and MRI findings. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV is a very rare congenital pain insensitivity syndrome characterized by the absence of pain and temperature sensation combined with oral mutilation due to unawareness, fractures, and anhidrosis caused by abnormalities in the peripheral nerves. Health care workers should be aware of the potential presence of this disease to prevent false accusations of child abuse. PMID:24733875

  7. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  8. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  9. Acute psychosocial stress reduces pain modulation capabilities in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Anecdotes on the ability of individuals to continue to function under stressful conditions despite injuries causing excruciating pain suggest that acute stress may induce analgesia. However, studies exploring the effect of acute experimental stress on pain perception show inconsistent results, possibly due to methodological differences. Our aim was to systematically study the effect of acute stress on pain perception using static and dynamic, state-of-the-art pain measurements. Participants were 29 healthy men who underwent the measurement of heat-pain threshold, heat-pain intolerance, temporal summation of pain, and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Testing was conducted before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), inducing acute psychosocial stress. Stress levels were evaluated using perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction. Although pain threshold and pain intolerance were unaffected by stress, an increase in temporal summation of pain and a decrease in CPM were observed. These changes were significantly more robust among individuals with stronger reaction to stress ("high responders"), with a significant correlation between the perception of stress and the performance in the pain measurements. We conclude that acute psychosocial stress seems not to affect the sensitivity to pain, however, it significantly reduces the ability to modulate pain in a dose-response manner. Considering the diverse effects of stress in this and other studies, it appears that the type of stress and the magnitude of its appraisal determine its interactions with the pain system. PMID:25250721

  10. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid analgesia, thus restricting LS within a state of remission; or b) extinguishing LS altogether. PMID:25227929

  11. [Pathophysiology of ischemic cardiac pain.].

    PubMed

    Mnzel, T; Bassenge, E

    1988-09-01

    Cardiac pain is a conscious experience that can be explored only indirectly with experimental approaches. The exact machanisms eliciting cardiac pain still remain obscure. The afferent fibres running in the cardiac sympathetic nerves are regarded as the essential pathway for the transmission of cardiac pain. Atria and ventricle are abundantly supplied with sympathetic sensory innervation. In the spinal cord, impulses transmitted by the sympathetic pathway converge with impulses from somatic thoracic structures onto the same ascending spinothalamic neuron which probably explains the mechanism of referred pain (=projection of pain to another organ). Two hypotheses have been put forward to explain the peripheral mechanism for nociception. The intensity mechanism assumes that pain results from an excessive stimulation of receptive structures normally stimulated at lower levels whereas a specific sensation is considered to result from an excitation of a well defined nociceptive apparatus. Ventricular sympathetic afferent fibres whether myelinated or unmyelinated, always possess some mechanosensitivity and respond to normal chemical and mechanical stimuli, thus displaying properties of polymodal receptors. Afferent vagal fibres may contribute to the mechanisms of cardiac nociception by modulating the threshold and characteristics of pain. Experimental studies identified three main mechanisms, which may be responsible for eliciting cardiac pain during ischemic periods in humans: a) nonphysiological motion of the ischemic left ventricular wall (bulging) and an excitation of mechanical receptors by passive stretching. b) The excitation of free sensory nerve endings by chemicals such as bradykinin, PGE(2), adenosin, histamin or potassium. c) A combination of a and b: algogenic chemicals may sensitize mechanical receptors and therefore lower their threshold for nociception. PMID:18415323

  12. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. Special attention will be done to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. PMID:25824642

  13. Intraoperative use of remifentanil and opioid induced hyperalgesia/acute opioid tolerance: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hun; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Soghomonyan, Suren; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of opioids has been increasing in operating room and intensive care unit to provide perioperative analgesia as well as stable hemodynamics. However, many authors have suggested that the use of opioids is associated with the expression of acute opioid tolerance (AOT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) in experimental studies and clinical observations in dose and/or time dependent exposure even when used within the clinically accepted doses. Recently, remifentanil has been used for pain management during anesthesia as well as in the intensive care units because of its rapid onset and offset. Objectives: Search of the available literature to assess remifentanil AOT and OIH based on available published data. Methods: We reviewed articles analyzing remifentanil AOT and OIH, and focused our literature search on evidence based information. Experimental and clinical studies were identified using electronic searches of Medline (PubMed, Ovid, Springer, and Elsevier, ClinicalKey). Results: Our results showed that the development of remifentanil AOT and OIH is a clinically significant phenomenon requiring further research. Discussions and Conclusions: AOT defined as an increase in the required opioid dose to maintain adequate analgesia, and OIH defined as decreased pain threshold after chronic opioid treatment, should be suspected with any unexplained pain report unassociated with the disease progression. The clinical significance of these findings was evaluated taking into account multiple methodological issues including the dose and duration of opioids administration, the different infusion mode, the co-administrated anesthetic drugs effect, method assessing pain sensitivity, and the repetitive and potentially tissue damaging nature of the stimuli used to determine the threshold during opioid infusion. Future studies need to investigate the contribution of remifentanil induced hyperalgesia to chronic pain and the role of pharmacological modulation to reverse this process. PMID:24847273

  14. The use of psychotropic drugs in other painful conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, G

    1976-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that psychotropic drugs may be valuable in the managment of chronic painful conditions and of the pain due to neoplastic disease. An opiate-sparing effect has been postulated. Most of the studies are, unfortunately, uncontrolled. The question arises as to whether psychotropic drugs, in addition to allaying anxiety and depression, alter pain threshold or the appreciation of pain. PMID:67974

  15. Modality and sex differences in pain sensitivity during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Karshikoff, B; Lekander, M; Soop, A; Lindstedt, F; Ingvar, M; Kosek, E; Olgart Hglund, C; Axelsson, J

    2015-05-01

    Systemic inflammation can induce pain hypersensitivity in animal and human experimental models, and has been proposed to be central in clinical pain conditions. Women are overrepresented in many chronic pain conditions, but experimental studies on sex differences in pain regulation during systemic inflammation are still scarce. In two randomized and double blind placebo controlled experiments, we used low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an experimental model of systemic inflammation. The first study employed 0.8ng/kg LPS in a within-subject design of 8 individuals (1 woman), and the second study 0.6ng/kg LPS in a between-subject design of 52 participants (29 women). We investigated the effect on (a) pressure, heat, and cold pain thresholds, (b) suprathreshold noxious heat and cold sensitivity, and (c) conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and differences between men and women. LPS induced significantly lower pressure pain thresholds as compared to placebo (mean change with the 0.8ng/kg dose being -6430kPa P=.04; with the 0.6ng/kg dose -5855kPa, P<.01, compared to before injection), whereas heat and cold pain thresholds remained unaffected (P's>.70). Suprathreshold noxious pain was not affected by LPS in men (P's?.15). However, LPS made women rated suprathreshold noxious heat stimuli as more painful (P=.01), and showed a tendency to rate noxious cold pain as more painful (P=.06) as compared to placebo. Furthermore, LPS impaired conditioned pain modulation, a measure of endogenous pain inhibition, but this effect was also restricted to women (P<.01, for men P=.27). Pain sensitivity correlated positively with plasma IL-6 and IL-8 levels. The results show that inflammation more strongly affects deep pain, rather than cutaneous pain, and suggest that women's pain perception and modulation is more sensitive to immune activation than men's. PMID:25486090

  16. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development. PMID:10814894

  17. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany. PMID:26351130

  18. Dyadic analysis of child and parent trait and state pain catastrophizing in the process of children's pain communication.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Chambers, Christine T; Chorney, Jill; Fernandez, Conrad V; McGrath, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    When explored separately, child and parent catastrophic thoughts about child pain show robust negative relations with child pain. The objective of this study was to conduct a dyadic analysis to elucidate intrapersonal and interpersonal influences of child and parent pain catastrophizing on aspects of pain communication, including observed behaviours and perceptions of child pain. A community sample of 171 dyads including children aged 8 to 12 years (89 girls) and parents (135 mothers) rated pain catastrophizing (trait and state versions) and child pain intensity and unpleasantness following a cold pressor task. Child pain tolerance was also assessed. Parent-child interactions during the cold pressor task were coded for parent attending, nonattending, and other talk, and child symptom complaints and other talk. Data were analyzed using the actor-partner interdependence model and hierarchical multiple regressions. Children reporting higher state pain catastrophizing had greater symptom complaints regardless of level of parent state pain catastrophizing. Children reporting low state pain catastrophizing had similar high levels of symptom complaints, but only when parents reported high state pain catastrophizing. Higher child and parent state and/or trait pain catastrophizing predicted their own ratings of higher child pain intensity and unpleasantness, with child state pain catastrophizing additionally predicting parent ratings. Higher pain tolerance was predicted by older child age and lower child state pain catastrophizing. These newly identified interpersonal effects highlight the relevance of the social context to children's pain expressions and parent perceptions of child pain. Both child and parent pain catastrophizing warrant consideration when managing child pain. PMID:26713422

  19. Treatment of pain in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, K

    2000-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that osteoarthritic pain is strongly linked to disability and quality of life. Pain relief enables patients to regain their mobility and is therefore a key goal in the management of osteoarthritis (OA). Osteoarthritis pain is of multifactorial origin, and inflammatory mechanisms play only a partial role. Non-opioid analgesics are useful in the control of mild-to-moderate pain, but have limitations as regards efficacy, and may cause serious adverse reactions. Symptomatic slow-acting drugs in OA (SYSADOAs) are alternatives, but their usefulness is still unclear. For patients with moderate-to-severe pain, who do not obtain sufficient pain relief with paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or do not tolerate them, the remaining options are opioids. Whereas the adverse reactions of most opioids may preclude the use of these drugs in OA patients, tramadol may be suitable. Tramadol has been investigated in various studies of OA pain and is indicated as an alternative to non-opioids, or as adjunctive therapy when non-opioid therapy is insufficient. However, the choice of analgesic treatment in OA must be highly individual. No guidelines can rigidly define a treatment regimen for such a condition as OA. Simple hints are given how to best use tramadol by selecting the right patients and choosing the right dosing strategy. PMID:11310479

  20. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  1. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for

  2. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time

  3. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  4. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  5. Threshold pion photoproduction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.A.; Scadron, M.D.

    1993-04-01

    The authors show that the low energy expressions for the CGLN pion photoproduction invariant amplitudes when evaluated at threshold yield a 26% enhancement of the de Baenst {gamma}p {r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}p threshold electric dipole amplitude. One can recover the de Baenst result, to lowest two orders in m{sub {pi}}/M{sub N}, by assuming that the Goldberger-Treiman (GT) relation f{sub {pi}}g = m{sub N}g{sub A} is exact. However, accounting for the observed 5% GT discrepancy, and the recent modifications of the Saclay and Mainz threshold data, and comparing the data to the enhanced de Baenst amplitude leads to a large explicit breaking of chiral symmetry. The magnitude of the explicit chiral symmetry breaking is not cleanly extracted from the threshold data because of the GT-like cancellations in the exact {gamma}p{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}p threshold electric dipole amplitude.

  6. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  7. Leg pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... usually seen in boys and overweight children between ages 11 and 15 ... as much as possible. Elevate your leg. Apply ice for up to 15 minutes. ... Other homecare will depend on the cause of your leg pain.

  8. Face pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body. Abscessed tooth (ongoing throbbing pain on one side of the lower face that gets worse with eating or touching) Cluster headache Herpes zoster (shingles) or herpes simplex (cold sores) infection Injury to the face Migraine ...

  9. Joint pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... both rest and exercise are important. Warm baths, massage, and stretching exercises should be used as often ... Does keeping the joint elevated help? Do medicines, massage, or applying heat reduce the pain? What other ...

  10. Neuropathic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... know that it can erode quality of life. Communication Tools View All Everyday Tools During Your Visit ... pain. Online Tool Printable Tool (PDF) Show More Communication Tools Where Does It Hurt? / Nerve Man With ...

  11. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can I find more information and related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). Gastro Kids , a site for kids with ...

  12. Wrist pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  13. Urination Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small masses of minerals) in the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common cause of painful ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Urinary Tract Infections A to Z: Dysuria Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections ...

  14. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  15. Multidimensional Neuropathic Pain Phenotypes after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Widerstrm-Noga, Eva; Felix, Elizabeth R; Adcock, James P; Escalona, Maydelis; Tibbett, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Identifying clinical neuropathic pain phenotypes is a first step to better understand the underlying pain mechanisms after spinal cord injury (SCI). The primary purpose of the present study was to characterize multidimensional neuropathic pain phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing (QST), pain intensity, and utilization of catastrophizing coping strategies. Thermal perception, thermal pain, and vibratory perception thresholds were assessed above and below the level of injury (LOI) in 101 persons with SCI and neuropathic pain, 18 persons with SCI and no neuropathic pain, and 50 able-bodied, pain-free controls. Cluster analysis of QST z-scores below the LOI, pain intensity ratings, and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) catastrophizing subscale scores in subjects with neuropathic pain resulted in two phenotypes: severe neuropathic pain (SNP) with greater pain intensity (7.39??1.57) and thermal and vibratory sensitivity compared with the moderate neuropathic pain (MNP; 5.40??1.43). A factor analysis including all CSQ subscales, the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) total score, and thermal pain sensitivity above and below the LOI resulted in three factors: (1) adaptive pain coping including increasing activities, diverting attention, and reinterpreting pain sensations; (2) catastrophizing, neuropathic pain, and thermal sensitivity including greater NPSI total score, thermal pain sensitivity below the LOI, and catastrophizing; and (3) general pain sensitivity including greater thermal pain sensitivity above the LOI and lower catastrophizing. Our results suggest that neuropathic pain symptom severity post-SCI is significantly associated with residual spinothalamic tract function below the LOI and catastrophizing pain coping. PMID:26414803

  16. Pain management.

    PubMed

    Wild, L

    1990-12-01

    Postoperative pain management in the critically ill patient is a challenge for nurses. Knowing the basis of pain transmission and mechanisms of action of interventions can assist the critical care nurse in making clinical decisions regarding pain control for individual patients. There are a number of modalities available to treat postoperative pain including both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Techniques such as PCA not only can provide good analgesia, but allow the critically ill patient at least one aspect of control in the otherwise highly controlled environment of the critical care unit. Epidural or intrathecal analgesia, using either opioids or LAAs alone or in combination, provides excellent analgesic effect (with minimal side effects) and may improve patient outcomes. Nonpharmacologic techniques, unfortunately, are commonly overlooked as adjuncts to traditional analgesia routines because of the nature of the illness in the critically ill patient. Nonpharmacologic techniques of pain management have a place in the care of the critically ill when applied based on the assessment of an individual patient's needs and abilities to participate in his or her care. Ensuring optimal patient comfort can benefit critically ill patients and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:2096859

  17. Efficient circular thresholding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Kun; Rosin, Paul L

    2014-03-01

    Otsu's algorithm for thresholding images is widely used, and the computational complexity of determining the threshold from the histogram is O(N) where N is the number of histogram bins. When the algorithm is adapted to circular rather than linear histograms then two thresholds are required for binary thresholding. We show that, surprisingly, it is still possible to determine the optimal threshold in O(N) time. The efficient optimal algorithm is over 300 times faster than traditional approaches for typical histograms and is thus particularly suitable for real-time applications. We further demonstrate the usefulness of circular thresholding using the adapted Otsu criterion for various applications, including analysis of optical flow data, indoor/outdoor image classification, and non-photorealistic rendering. In particular, by combining circular Otsu feature with other colour/texture features, a 96.9% correct rate is obtained for indoor/outdoor classification on the well known IITM-SCID2 data set, outperforming the state-of-the-art result by 4.3%. PMID:24464614

  18. Witnessing hateful people in pain modulates brain activity in regions associated with physical pain and reward

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Glenn R.; Sobhani, Mona; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    How does witnessing a hateful person in pain compare to witnessing a likable person in pain? The current study compared the brain bases for how we perceive likable people in pain with those of viewing hateful people in pain. While social bonds are built through sharing the plight and pain of others in the name of empathy, viewing a hateful person in pain also has many potential ramifications. In this functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study, Caucasian Jewish male participants viewed videos of (1) disliked, hateful, anti-Semitic individuals, and (2) liked, non-hateful, tolerant individuals in pain. The results showed that, compared with viewing liked people, viewing hateful people in pain elicited increased responses in regions associated with observation of physical pain (the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the somatosensory cortex), reward processing (the striatum), and frontal regions associated with emotion regulation. Functional connectivity analyses revealed connections between seed regions in the left ACC and right insular cortex with reward regions, the amygdala, and frontal regions associated with emotion regulation. These data indicate that regions of the brain active while viewing someone in pain may be more active in response to the danger or threat posed by witnessing the pain of a hateful individual more so than the desire to empathize with a likable person's pain. PMID:24167496

  19. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePLUS

    Menstruation - painful; Dysmenorrhea; Periods - painful; Cramps - menstrual; Menstrual cramps ... a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost time from ...

  20. Pain as a reward: changing the meaning of pain from negative to positive co-activates opioid and cannabinoid systems.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Thoen, Wilma; Blanchard, Catherine; Vighetti, Sergio; Arduino, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a negative emotional experience that is modulated by a variety of psychological factors through different inhibitory systems. For example, endogenous opioids and cannabinoids have been found to be involved in stress and placebo analgesia. Here we show that when the meaning of the pain experience is changed from negative to positive through verbal suggestions, the opioid and cannabinoid systems are co-activated and these, in turn, increase pain tolerance. We induced ischemic arm pain in healthy volunteers, who had to tolerate the pain as long as possible. One group was informed about the aversive nature of the task, as done in any pain study. Conversely, a second group was told that the ischemia would be beneficial to the muscles, thus emphasizing the usefulness of the pain endurance task. We found that in the second group pain tolerance was significantly higher compared to the first one, and that this effect was partially blocked by the opioid antagonist naltrexone alone and by the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant alone. However, the combined administration of naltrexone and rimonabant antagonized the increased tolerance completely. Our results indicate that a positive approach to pain reduces the global pain experience through the co-activation of the opioid and cannabinoid systems. These findings may have a profound impact on clinical practice. For example, postoperative pain, which means healing, can be perceived as less unpleasant than cancer pain, which means death. Therefore, the behavioral and/or pharmacological manipulation of the meaning of pain can represent an effective approach to pain management. PMID:23265686

  1. Recent development in therapeutics for breakthrough pain.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2010-05-01

    Breakthrough pain is defined as transitory flares of pain. Breakthrough pain is caused by cancer, cancer complications, treatment or comorbidities. The usual onset to maximum breakthrough pain intensity time is 3 min and duration is 30 min; therefore, the assessment for response needs to be at short intervals. The rapid onset and offset of pain results in inadequate responses when oral opioids are used to manage pain flares. Several strategies have been used to manage breakthrough pain: titration of the chronic opioid, independent titration of rescue opioids and alternative routes. Buccal fentanyl has a rapid onset to analgesia and appears to be superior to oral morphine. Newer fentanyl preparations have been released to manage breakthrough pain in the opioid-tolerant individual. Other routes of administration that have a rapid onset to analgesia include intranasal hydrophilic and lipophilic opioids, inhaled opioids delivered by special delivery devices and parenteral morphine. In a small series of patients experiencing severe flares of pain with spinal opioids unrelieved by parenteral opioids, sublingual ketamine and bolus doses of intrathecal local anesthetics have been effective. Nonpharmacological approaches to managing activity-related pain include radiation therapy, surgical correction of impending fractures, kyphoplasty and radioisotopes. PMID:20420495

  2. Back pain during growth.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Carol C

    2013-01-01

    It is wrong to believe that back pain only burdens adults: the yearly incidence during growth ranges from 10-20%, continuously increasing from childhood to adolescence. Rapid growth-related muscular dysbalance and insufficiency, poor physical condition in an increasingly sedentary adolescent community or - vice versa - high level sports activities, account for the most prevalent functional pain syndromes. In contrast to adults the correlation of radiographic findings with pain is high: the younger the patient, the higher the probability to establish a rare morphologic cause such as benign or malignant tumours, congenital malformations and infections. In children younger than 5 years old, the likelihood is more than 50%. The following red flags should lower the threshold for a quick in-depth analysis of the problem: Age of the patient <5 years, acute trauma, functional limitation for daily activities, irradiating pain, loss of weight, duration >4 weeks, history of tumour, exposition to tuberculosis, night pain and fever. High level sport equals a biomechanical field test which reveals the biologic individual response of the growing spine to the sports-related forces. Symptomatic or asymptomatic inhibitory or stimulatory growth disturbances like Scheuermann disease, scoliosis or fatigue fractures represent the most frequent pathomorphologies. They usually occur at the disk-growth plate compound: intraspongious disk herniation, diminuition of anterior growth with vertebral wedging and apophyseal ring fractures often occur when the biomechanical impacts exceed the mechanical resistance of the cartilaginous endplates. Spondylolysis is a benign condition which rarely becomes symptomatic and responds well to conservative measures. Associated slippage of L5 on S1 is frequent but rarely progresses. The pubertal spinal growth spurt is the main risk factor for further slippage, whereas sports activity - even at a high level - is not. Therefore, the athlete should only be precluded from training if pain persists or in case of high grade slips. Perturbance of the sagittal profile with increase of lumbar lordosis, flattening of the thoracic spine and retroflexion of the pelvis with hamstrings contractures are strong signs for a grade IV olisthesis or spondyloptosis with subsequent lumbosacral kyphosis. Idiopathic scoliosis is not related to pain unless it is a marked (thoraco-) lumbar curve or if there is an underlying spinal cord pathology. Chronic back pain is an under recognised entity characterised by its duration (>3 months or recurrence within 3 months) and its social impacts such as isolation and absence from school or work. It represents an independent disease, uncoupled from any initial trigger. Multimodal therapeutic strategies are more successful than isolated, somatising orthopaedic treatment. Primary and secondary preventive active measures for the physically passive adolescents, regular sports medical check-up's for the young high level athletes, the awareness for the rare but potentially disastrous pathologies and the recognition of chronic pain syndromes are the cornerstones for successful treatment of back pain during growth. PMID:23299906

  3. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  4. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  5. Clavicle pain and reduction of incisional and fascial pain after posterior cervical surgery.

    PubMed

    Duetzmann, Stephan; Cole, Tyler; Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; Ratliff, John Kevin; Park, Jon

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Incisional pain after posterior cervical spine surgery can be severe and very unpleasant to the patient. Ongoing incisional pain is one of the key disadvantages of posterior over anterior surgical approaches to the cervical spine. It prolongs hospital stays and delays return to work. In this study, the hypothesized that incisional pain in the immediate postoperative period is caused partially by tension on the skin as well as on the deep cervical fascia and the fascia overlying the trapezius, which are usually sewn together during closure. Reduction of this tension through retraction of the shoulders should therefore reduce pain as well as the amount of pain medication used in the early postoperative period. METHODS In this prospective randomized controlled study, 30 patients who had undergone posterior cervical spine surgery were randomized into 2 groups who either wore or did not wear a clavicle brace to retract the shoulders. Patients in the brace group began wearing the brace on postoperative day (POD) 4 and wore it continuously throughout the 30-day study period. Outcome was assessed by two measures: 1) the daily level of self reported pain according to the visual analog scale (VAS) and 2) the number of pain pills taken during the 30-day postoperative period. RESULTS Wearing a clavicle brace in the immediate postoperative period significantly reduced incisional pain and the amount of pain medication that patients took. Beginning on POD 4 and continuing until day POD 13, the mean daily VAS score for pain was significantly lower in the brace group than in the control group. Furthermore, patients who wore the clavicle brace took less pain medication from POD 4 to POD 12. At this point the difference lost significance until the end of the study period. Four patients were randomized but did not tolerate wearing the brace. CONCLUSIONS Patients who tolerated wearing the clavicle brace after posterior cervical spine surgery had reduced pain and used less pain medication. PMID:26296190

  6. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  7. Shoulder Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in my shoulder? A common cause of shoulder pain is soreness of the tendon (a cord that attaches a muscle to a bone) of the rotator cuff (the part of the shoulder that helps circular motion). Another common cause is soreness of the subacromial bursa (a sac of fluid under the highest ...

  8. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon

  9. Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Studying salt stress is an important means to the understanding of plant ion homeostasis and osmo-balance. Salt stress research also benefits agriculture because soil salinity significantly limits plant productivity on agricultural lands. Decades of physiological and molecular studies have generated a large body of literature regarding potential salt tolerance determinants. Recent advances in applying molecular genetic analysis and genomics tools in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are shading light on the molecular nature of salt tolerance effectors and regulatory pathways. PMID:22303210

  10. Faster magnet sorting with a threshold acceptance algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, S.; Carr, R.

    1994-08-01

    The authors introduce here a new technique for sorting magnets to minimize the field errors in permanent magnet insertion devices. Simulated annealing has been used in this role, but they find the technique of threshold acceptance produces results of equal quality in less computer time. Threshold accepting would be of special value in designing very long insertion devices, such as long FEL's. Their application of threshold acceptance to magnet sorting showed that it converged to equivalently low values of the cost function, but that it converged significantly faster. They present typical cases showing time to convergence for various error tolerances, magnet numbers, and temperature schedules.

  11. Faster magnet sorting with a threshold acceptance algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steve; Carr, Roger

    1995-02-01

    We introduce here a new technique for sorting magnets to minimize the field errors in permanent magnet insertion devices. Simulated annealing has been used in this role, but we find the technique of threshold acceptance produces results of equal quality in less computer time. Threshold accepting would be of special value in designing very long insertion devices, such as long free electron lasers (FELs). Our application of threshold acceptance to magnet sorting showed that it converged to equivalently low values of the cost function, but that it converged significantly faster. We present typical cases showing time to convergence for various error tolerances, magnet numbers, and temperature schedules.

  12. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Management Tools Videos What Is Chronic Pain? What Is Chronic Pain? View Transcript Download Transcript If you ... with chronic pain, you know that chronic pain is different. Ed Covington, MD, director of the Cleveland ...

  13. Somatoform pain disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain disorder ... thought to be related to emotional stress. The pain was often said to be "all in their head." However, patients with somatoform pain disorder seem to experience painful sensations in a ...

  14. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  15. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... earache, toothache, sore throat, sinus pain, facial numbness Muscles and Bones: Arthritis, back pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve ...

  16. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ACPA Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  17. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  18. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Back ... 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Types of Back Pain There are different kinds of back pain. Back ...

  19. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  20. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    M, Voelker; Bp, Schachtel; Sa, Cooper; Sc, Gatoulis

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011. PMID:26603742

  1. Near threshold fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, D. C.; Strum, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior provides a basis for the design and evaluation of components subjected to high cycle fatigue. Typically, the near-threshold fatigue regime describes crack growth rates below approximately 10(exp -5) mm/cycle (4 x 10(exp -7) inch/cycle). One such evaluation was recently performed for the binary alloy U-6Nb. The procedures developed for this evaluation are described in detail to provide a general test method for near-threshold FCGR testing. In particular, techniques for high-resolution measurements of crack length performed in-situ through a direct current, potential drop (DCPD) apparatus, and a method which eliminates crack closure effects through the use of loading cycles with constant maximum stress intensity are described.

  2. Near threshold fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, D.C.; Strum, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior provides a basis for the design and evaluation of components subjected to high cycle fatigue. Typically, the near-threshold fatigue regime describes crack growth rates below approximately 10{sup {minus}5} mm/cycle (4{times}10{sup {minus}7} inch/cycle). One such evaluation was recently performed by the authors for the binary alloy U-6Nb. The procedures developed for this evaluation are described in detail here to provide a general test method for near-threshold FCGR testing. In particular, we describe techniques for high-resolution measurements of crack length performed in-situ through a direct current, potential drop (DCPD) apparatus, and a method which eliminates crack closure effects through the use of loading cycles with constant maximum stress intensity.

  3. Near threshold fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, D.C.; Strum, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior provides a basis for the design and evaluation of components subjected to high cycle fatigue. Typically, the near-threshold fatigue regime describes crack growth rates below approximately 10[sup [minus]5] mm/cycle (4[times]10[sup [minus]7] inch/cycle). One such evaluation was recently performed by the authors for the binary alloy U-6Nb. The procedures developed for this evaluation are described in detail here to provide a general test method for near-threshold FCGR testing. In particular, we describe techniques for high-resolution measurements of crack length performed in-situ through a direct current, potential drop (DCPD) apparatus, and a method which eliminates crack closure effects through the use of loading cycles with constant maximum stress intensity.

  4. Pain Sensitivity and Observer Perception of Pain in Individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Allely, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed literature investigating the relationship between pain expression and perception of pain in individuals with ASD is sparse. The aim of the present systematic PRIMSA review was twofold: first, to see what evidence there is for the widely held belief that individuals with ASD are insensitive to pain or have a high pain threshold in the peer-reviewed literature and, second, to examine whether individuals with ASD react or express pain differently. Fifteen studies investigating pain in individuals with ASD were identified. The case studies all reported pain insensitivity in individuals with ASD. However, the majority of the ten experimental studies reviewed indicate that the idea that individuals with ASD are pain insensitive needs to be challenged. The findings also highlight the strong possibility that not all children with ASD express their physical discomfort in the same way as a neurotypical child would (i.e., cry, moan, seek comfort, etc.) which may lead caregivers and the medical profession to interpret this as pain insensitivity or incorrectly lead them to believe that the child is in no pain. These results have important implications for the assessment and management of pain in children with ASD. PMID:23843740

  5. Bogus visual feedback alters onset of movement-evoked pain in people with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Daniel S; Broecker, Markus; Smith, Ross T; Meulders, Ann; Madden, Victoria J; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2015-04-01

    Pain is a protective perceptual response shaped by contextual, psychological, and sensory inputs that suggest danger to the body. Sensory cues suggesting that a body part is moving toward a painful position may credibly signal the threat and thereby modulate pain. In this experiment, we used virtual reality to investigate whether manipulating visual proprioceptive cues could alter movement-evoked pain in 24 people with neck pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur at a lesser degree of head rotation when visual feedback overstated true rotation and at a greater degree of rotation when visual feedback understated true rotation. Our hypothesis was clearly supported: When vision overstated the amount of rotation, pain occurred at 7% less rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback, and when vision understated rotation, pain occurred at 6% greater rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback. We concluded that visual-proprioceptive information modulated the threshold for movement-evoked pain, which suggests that stimuli that become associated with pain can themselves trigger pain. PMID:25691362

  6. Experimental Pain and Opioid Analgesia in Volunteers at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Doufas, Anthony G.; Tian, Lu; Padrez, Kevin A.; Suwanprathes, Puntarica; Cardell, James A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Panousis, Periklis

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. Methods After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 g/ml), an ?-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. Results Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA) were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO2, P?=?0.0440; IGFBP-1, P?=?0.0013). Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1?, P?=?0.0218; TNF-?, P?=?0.0276). Conclusions Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1) was associated with hypoalgesia and increased potency to opioid analgesia; other pro-inflammatory mediators also predicted an enhanced opioid potency. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00672737. PMID:23382975

  7. Abdominal Pain following Gastric Bypass: Suspects & Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Alexander J.; O’Rourke, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Gastric bypass remains the mainstay of surgical therapy for obesity. Abdominal pain after gastric bypass is common, and accounts for up to half of all postoperative complaints and emergency room visits. This manuscript reviews the most important causes of abdominal pain specific to gastric bypass and discusses management considerations. Data Sources The current surgical literature was reviewed using PubMed, with a focus on abdominal pain after gastric bypass and the known pathologies that underlie its pathogenesis. Conclusions The differential diagnosis for abdominal pain after gastric bypass is large and includes benign and life-threatening entities. Its diverse causes require a broad evaluation that should be directed by history and clinical presentation. In the absence of a clear diagnosis, the threshold for surgical exploration in patients with abdominal pain after gastric bypass should be low. PMID:21333269

  8. Religious Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue looks at three issues of religious tolerance. The first article examines a case recently decided by the United States Supreme Court on student-led prayers at school events. The second article explores the persecution suffered by members of the Mormon religion during the 19th century. The final article looks at Martin Luther and…

  9. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights. PMID:8051515

  10. Biofeedback for pain management in traumatised refugees.

    PubMed

    Muller, Julia; Karl, Anke; Denke, Claudia; Mathier, Fabienne; Dittmann, Jennifer; Rohleder, Nicolas; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pain (CP) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are both frequent and often comorbid in refugees. To date, few controlled trials have studied the efficacy of treatments targeting this comorbidity; no treatment guidelines yet exist. The authors examined the feasibility and efficacy of short-term cognitive behavioural biofeedback (BF) addressing CP in traumatised refugees. The sample comprised 11 severely traumatised refugees with CP and PTSD (mean age = 36 years, SD = 6), who underwent assessment with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, Pain Disability Index, and Visual Rating Scale. Additionally, coping with pain and psychotherapy tolerance were assessed. Acceptance of BF was high. Pre-post effects were small to medium for increased pain management and associated heart rate reactivity but large for coping with pain. The results encourage further research to confirm whether BF is indicated as a treatment component, but not a stand-alone treatment, for traumatised refugees with comorbid CP and PTSD. PMID:19675955

  11. Oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Faria, Ana M C; Weiner, Howard L

    2005-08-01

    Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral antigen. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral antigen induces T-helper 2 [interleukin (IL)-4/IL-10] and Th3 [transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta] T cells plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and latency-associated peptide+ T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-beta, cholera toxin B subunit, Flt-3 ligand, and anti-CD40 ligand. Oral (and nasal) antigen administration suppresses animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental autoimmune encephalitis, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis, and diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, graft rejection, allergy, colitis, stroke, and models of Alzheimer's disease. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS), arthritis, uveitis, and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and nickel allergy. Although positive results have been observed in phase II trials, no effect was observed in phase III trials of CII in rheumatoid arthritis or oral myelin and glatiramer acetate (GA) in MS. Large placebo effects were observed, and new trials of oral GA are underway. Oral insulin has recently been shown to delay onset of diabetes in at-risk populations, and confirmatory trials of oral insulin are being planned. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time, and antigen-specific mechanisms of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy, and early therapy. PMID:16048553

  12. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  13. Laughter, Humor and Pain Perception in Children: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hilber, Sherry Dunay; Mintzer, Lisa Libman; Castaneda, Marleen; Glover, Dorie; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many clinical programs designed to bring humor into pediatric hospitals, there has been very little research with children or adolescents concerning the specific utility of humor for children undergoing stressful or painful procedures. Rx Laughter, a non-profit organization interested in the use of humor for healing, collaborated with UCLA to collect preliminary data on a sample of 18 children aged 716 years. Participants watched humorous video-tapes before, during and after a standardized pain task that involved placing a hand in cold water. Pain appraisal (ratings of pain severity) and pain tolerance (submersion time) were recorded and examined in relation to humor indicators (number of laughs/smiles during each video and child ratings of how funny the video was). Whereas humor indicators were not significantly associated with pain appraisal or tolerance, the group demonstrated significantly greater pain tolerance while viewing funny videos than when viewing the videos immediately before or after the cold-water task. The results suggest that humorous distraction is useful to help children and adolescents tolerate painful procedures. Further study is indicated to explore the specific mechanism of this benefit. PMID:18955244

  14. Neurobiology of Pain in Children: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Loizzo, Alberto; Loizzo, Stefano; Capasso, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of pain in the newborn and the infant is difficult because pain is mainly a subjective phenomenon. Until a few years ago, several myths persisted. First, the myth that children, especially infants, do not feel pain the way adults do, therefore there is no untoward consequences for them. Second, lack of assessment and reassessment for the presence of pain. Third, misunderstanding of how to conceptualise and quantify a subjective experience. Fourth, lack of knowledge of pain treatment. Fifth, the notion that addressing pain in children takes too much time and effort, in ultimate analysis resulting in wasting time. Sixth, fears of hidden -and not easy to diagnose or prevent- adverse effects of analgesic medications, including respiratory depression and addiction. Finally, from a conceptual point of view, high thresholds of pain in neonates and infants were considered to be present by natural character, and useful in protecting infant from pain during birth and transit through the narrow vaginal channel. The present review is focused on the description of different theories on the pain pathogenesis in children. PMID:19543535

  15. Distinct quantitative sensory testing profiles in nonspecific chronic back pain subjects with and without psychological trauma.

    PubMed

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Eich, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Psychological trauma is associated with an increased risk for chronification of nonspecific chronic back pain (nsCLBP) independent of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanisms underlying the role of psychological trauma in nsCLBP are less clear than in PTSD. Therefore, this study considered whether psychological trauma exposure (TE) is accompanied by specific alterations in pain perception. The study included 56 participants with nsCLBP and TE (nsCLBP-TE), 93 participants with nsCLBP without TE (nsCLBP-W-TE), and 31 pain-free controls. All participants underwent a thorough clinical evaluation. The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was used to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory functions in painful (back) and non-painful areas (hand). The protocol consisted of thermal and mechanical detection as well as pain thresholds, vibration thresholds, and pain sensitivity to sharp and blunt mechanical stimuli. Psychological trauma was validated by structured clinical interview. Trauma-associated symptom severity, anxiety, and depressive symptomatology were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Differences in somatosensory function were seen only for pressure pain thresholds. Compared with controls, nsCLBP-TE revealed hyperalgesia generalized in space with lower thresholds in painful and non-painful areas, whereas nsCLBP-W-TE demonstrated localized alterations with decreased thresholds only in the pain-affected area of the back (P ? 0.006). Our findings suggest an augmented central pain processing in nsCLBP-TE (alterations in painful and non-painful areas), whereas nsCLBP-W-TE show only local changes (alterations only in the painful area) suggesting regional sensitization processes. This finding might explain why TE without PTSD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic pain. PMID:25790450

  16. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account

  17. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  18. Setting Graduation Rate Thresholds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, David G.; Rieck, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the college completion/graduation rate thresholds developed by several states and discusses advantages and disadvantages of several statistical approaches, including use of the one standard deviation lower bound method, the logit prediction bound method, the linear regression method, and the logistic regression method. (DB)

  19. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  20. Effects of shoulder stabilization exercise on pain and function in patients with neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youna; Shin, Mary Myong Sook; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of shoulder stability exercise on pain and function in neck pain patients. [Subjects] The study design consisted of a shoulder stability exercise group and a control group. [Methods] The effects of the therapies were evaluated using a visual analog scale of pain, a pressure pain threshold, neck disability index, cervical range of motion, and a closed kinetic chain test. Each group received treatment five times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] Pain levels showed no significant differences between groups, while pain threshold in all muscles, showed significant increases for both control groups. Neck disability significantly decreased for both groups and the differences between the groups were statistically significant. Ranges of motion and limb stability were measured before and after the exercise period. Flexion, extension, and right rotation were not significantly different between groups. The results showed no significant differences in shoulder stability between the groups. [Conclusion] The use of this exercise should have pronounced effects on pain reduction and functional improvement and should also improve the quality of life in patients with neck pain. PMID:26834317

  1. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...

  2. Psoriasis and skin pain: instrumental and biological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Patruno, Cataldo; Napolitano, Maddalena; Balato, Nicola; Ayala, Fabio; Megna, Matteo; Patr, Angela; Cirillo, Teresa; Balato, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of skin pain and the molecular mechanisms responsible for pain in psoriasis remain unclear. This study assessed skin pain in 163 patients (98 males, 65 females, range 18-81 years) with plaque psoriasis, evaluating: the subjective/objective features of this symptom compared with clinical severity of the disease; and the role of interleukin (IL)-33, (involved in both psoriasis and pain pathogenesis), in psoriasis-related pain. Clinical measures used were a questionnaire, plaque Physician Global Assessment (PGA) index, pressure algometry to measure pain threshold and tactile/thermal sensitivity test. IL-33 gene expression was examined in vivo (n = 12) in patients skin and through an ex vivo model of nociception using sodium dodecyl sulphate. Of the psoriatic patients 43.6% reported skin pain during the previous week; itchy, unpleasant, aching, sensitive, hot/burning, tender and cramping were the most reported qualities. Patients' pain threshold decreased with increasing PGA index and pain intensity. Sensitivity to touch/heat was reduced in lesional skin, compared with unaffected psoriatic skin. IL-33 expression was increased in lesional skin of patients reporting pain and in the ex vivo system. In conclusion, symptoms of skin pain should be taken into account in the management of psoriasis. PMID:25178645

  3. Pediatric Pain, Predictive Inference, and Sensitivity Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Coping style and effects of counseling intervention on pain tolerance was studied for 61 elementary school students through immersion of hands in cold water. Bayesian predictive inference tools are able to distinguish between subject characteristics and manipulable treatments. Sensitivity analysis strengthens the certainty of conclusions about…

  4. Fault-tolerant almost exact state transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao-Ming; Wu, Lian-Ao; Modugno, Michele; Yao, Wang; Shao, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We show that a category of one-dimensional XY-type models may enable high-fidelity quantum state transmissions, regardless of details of coupling configurations. This observation leads to a fault-tolerant design of a state transmission setup. The setup is fault-tolerant, with specified thresholds, against engineering failures of coupling configurations, fabrication imperfections or defects, and even time-dependent noises. We propose an experimental implementation of the fault-tolerant scheme using hard-core bosons in one-dimensional optical lattices. PMID:24185259

  5. Partners' Empathy Increases Pain Ratings: Effects of Perceived Empathy and Attachment Style on Pain Report and Display

    PubMed Central

    Hurter, Sarah; Paloyelis, Yannis; de C. Williams, Amanda C.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Pain can be influenced by its social context. We aimed to examine under controlled experimental conditions how empathy from a partner and personal attachment style affect pain report, tolerance, and facial expressions of pain. Fifty-four participants, divided into secure, anxious, and avoidant attachment style groups, underwent a cold pressor task with their partners present. We manipulated how much empathy the participants perceived that their partners had for them. We observed a significant main effect of perceived empathy on pain report, with greater pain reported in the high perceived empathy condition. No such effects were found for pain tolerance or facial display. We also found a significant interaction of empathy with attachment style group, with the avoidant group reporting and displaying less pain than the secure and the anxious groups in the high perceived empathy condition. No such findings were observed in the low empathy condition. These results suggest that empathy from one's partner may influence pain report beyond behavioral reactions. In addition, the amount of pain report and expression that people show in high empathy conditions depends on their attachment style. Perspective Believing that one's partner feels high empathy for one's pain may lead individuals to rate the intensity of pain as higher. Individual differences in attachment style moderate this empathy effect. PMID:24953886

  6. Application of Pain Quantitative Analysis Device for Assessment of Postoperative Pain after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Nagura, Issei; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Takase, Fumiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kokubu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The PainVision™ system was recently developed for quantitative pain assessment. Here, we used this system to evaluate the effect of plexus brachialis block on postoperative pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods : Fifty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. First 26 cases received no plexus brachialis block (control group), and the next 29 cases received the plexus brachialis block before surgery (block group). Patients completed the visual analog scale at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after surgery, and the intensity of postoperative pain was assessed with PainVision™ at 16 hours. The postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents was also recorded. Results : The pain intensity at 16 hours after surgery assessed by PainVision™ was significantly lower in the block group than in the control group (block, 252.0 ± 47.8, control, 489.0 ± 89.1, P < 0.05). However, there were no differences in the VAS values at 16 hours between the 2 groups (block, 4.3 ± 0.6, control, 5.7 ± 0.4, P = N.S.). The pain intensity and VAS at 16 hours after surgery were highly correlated (r = 0.59, P = 0.006 in the block group and r = 0.62, P = 0.003 in the control group). The effect size of the assessment by PainVision™ was bigger than that of VAS (r=0.31 in VAS and 0.51 in Pain vision). Conclusion : The PainVision™ system could be useful to evaluate postoperative pain because it enables the quantification and comparison of pain intensity independent of individual pain thresholds. PMID:26157522

  7. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fbio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; zakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  8. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas. PMID:26611383

  9. Pain in People with Learning Disabilities in Residential Settings--The Need for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacroft, Monica; Dodd, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This audit investigated residential staff beliefs around pain thresholds and strategies they adopt to recognise and manage pain in people with learning disabilities across Surrey. A structured interview was constructed to elicit information. Results demonstrated that pain is not being effectively recognised or managed by residential staff in…

  10. Pain in People with Learning Disabilities in Residential Settings--The Need for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacroft, Monica; Dodd, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This audit investigated residential staff beliefs around pain thresholds and strategies they adopt to recognise and manage pain in people with learning disabilities across Surrey. A structured interview was constructed to elicit information. Results demonstrated that pain is not being effectively recognised or managed by residential staff in

  11. Activation-threshold tuning in an affinity model for the T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Almut; Noest, Andr; de Boer, Rob J.

    2004-01-01

    Naive T cells respond to peptides from foreign proteins and remain tolerant to self peptides from endogenous proteins. It has been suggested that self tolerance comes about by a 'tuning' mechanism, i.e. by increasing the T-cell activation threshold upon interaction with self peptides. Here, we explore how such an adaptive mechanism of T-cell tolerance would influence the reactivity of the T-cell repertoire to foreign peptides. We develop a computer simulation model in which T cells are tolerized by increasing their activation-threshold dependent on the affinity with which they see self peptides presented in the thymus. Thus, different T cells acquire different activation thresholds (i.e. different cross-reactivities). In previous mathematical models, T-cell tolerance was deletional and based on a fixed cross-reactivity parameter, which was assumed to have evolved to an optimal value. Comparing these two different tolerance-induction mechanisms, we found that the tuning model performs somewhat better than an optimized deletion model in terms of the reactivity to foreign antigens. Thus, evolutionary optimization of clonal cross-reactivity is not required. A straightforward extension of the tuning model is to delete T-cell clones that obtain a too high activation threshold, and to replace these by new clones. The reactivity of the immune repertoires of such a replacement model is enchanced compared with the basic tuning model. These results demonstrate that activation-threshold tuning is a functional mechanism for self tolerance induction. PMID:15156919

  12. Acceptance- versus Change-Based Pain Management: The Role of Psychological Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacker, Kara J.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Kounios, John

    2012-01-01

    This study compared two theoretically opposed strategies for acute pain management: an acceptance-based and a change-based approach. These two strategies were compared in a within-subjects design using the cold pressor test as an acute pain induction method. Participants completed a baseline pain tolerance assessment followed by one of the two…

  13. Acceptance- versus Change-Based Pain Management: The Role of Psychological Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacker, Kara J.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Kounios, John

    2012-01-01

    This study compared two theoretically opposed strategies for acute pain management: an acceptance-based and a change-based approach. These two strategies were compared in a within-subjects design using the cold pressor test as an acute pain induction method. Participants completed a baseline pain tolerance assessment followed by one of the two

  14. The importance of mental pain and physical dissociation in youth suicidality.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Shai; Somer, Eli; Holden, Ronald R

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the importance of two suicide risk factors, mental pain and physical dissociation, among young people. Participants were 42 suicidal inpatients, 36 nonsuicidal inpatients, and 45 nonclinical participants. Overall, suicide attempters reported a stronger intensity of and lower tolerance for mental pain and more physical dissociation compared to the other two groups. Suicide attempters with a low tolerance for mental pain showed a higher level of dissociation from pain and insensitivity to bodily cues compared to nonsuicidal inpatients with similar levels of tolerance for mental pain. Physical dissociation contributed significantly to the likelihood of suicidality beyond the contribution of mental pain. Our results accentuate the importance of the combination of mental pain and physical dissociation in suicidality. Further research on the applicability of our findings to self-injurious behavior is warranted. PMID:25760400

  15. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  16. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  17. miR-155 modulates the progression of neuropathic pain through targeting SGK3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaoxing; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Yan; Xie, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to illustrate the potential effects of miR-155 in neuropathic pain and its potential mechanism. Spragure-Dawley (SD) rats were used for neuropathic pain model of bilateral chronic constriction injury (bCCI) construction. Effects of miR-155 expression on pain threshold of mechanical stimuli (MWT), paw withdrawal threshold latency (PMTL) and cold threshold were analyzed. Target for miR-155 was analyzed using bioinformatics methods. Moreover, effects of miR-155 target gene expression on pain thresholds were also assessed. Compared with the controls and sham group, miR-155 was overexpressed in neuropathic pain rats (P<0.05), but miR-155 slicing could significantly decreased the pain thresholds (P<0.05). Serum and glucocorticoid regulated protein kinase 3 (SGK3) was predicted as the target gene for miR-155, and miR-155 expression was negatively correlated to SGK3 expression. Furthermore, SGK3 overexpression could significantly decreased the pain thresholds which was the same as miR-155 (P<0.05). Moreover, miR-155 slicing and SGK3 overexpression could significantly decrease the painthreshold. The data presented in this study suggested that miR-155 slicing could excellently alleviate neuropathic pain in rats through targeting SGK3 expression. miR-155 may be a potential therapeutic target for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26823753

  18. Biological profile and bioavailability of imidazoline compounds on morphine tolerance modulation.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Mammoli, Valerio; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Sagratini, Gianni; Ubaldi, Massimo; Domi, Esi; Mennuni, Laura; Sabatini, Chiara; Galimberti, Chiara; Ferrari, Flora; Milia, Chiara; Comi, Eleonora; Lanza, Marco; Giannella, Mario; Pigini, Maria; Del Bello, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    Tolerance to opioid administration represents a serious medical alert in different chronic conditions. This study compares the effects of the imidazoline compounds 1, 2, and 3 on morphine tolerance in an animal model of inflammatory pain in the rat. 1, 2, and 3 have been selected in that, although bearing a common scaffold, preferentially bind to ?2-adrenoceptors, imidazoline I2 receptors, or both systems, respectively. Such compounds have been tested in vivo by measuring the paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical pressure after complete Freund's adjuvant injection. To determine the ligand levels in rat plasma, an HPLC-mass spectrometry method has been developed. All the compounds significantly reduced the induction of morphine tolerance, showing different potency and duration of action. Indeed, the selective imidazoline I2 receptor interaction (2) restored the analgesic response by maintaining the same time-dependent profile observed after a single morphine administration. Differently, the selective ?2C-adrenoceptor activation (1) or the combination between ?2C-adrenoceptor activation and imidazoline I2 receptor engagement (3) promoted a change in the temporal profile of morphine analgesia by maintaining a mild but long lasting analgesic effect. Interestingly, the kinetics of compounds in rat plasma supported the pharmacodynamic data. Therefore, this study highlights that both peculiar biological profile and bioavailability of such ligands complement each other to modulate the reduction of morphine tolerance. Based on these observations, 1-3 can be considered useful leads in the design of new drugs able to turn off the undesired tolerance induced by opioids. PMID:26593429

  19. Stress-Induced Pain: A Target for the Development of Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Although current therapeutics provide relief from acute pain, drugs used for treatment of chronic pain are typically less efficacious and limited by adverse side effects, including tolerance, addiction, and gastrointestinal upset. Thus, there is a significant need for novel therapies for the treatment of chronic pain. In concert with chronic pain, persistent stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic pain disorders. Stress exacerbation of chronic pain suggests that centrally acting drugs targeting the pain- and stress-responsive brain regions represent a valid target for the development of novel therapeutics. This review provides an overview of how stress modulates spinal and central pain pathways, identifies key neurotransmitters and receptors within these pathways, and highlights their potential as novel targets for therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25194019

  20. [Clinical variants of pain syndromes in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Makhnev, S O; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by well-known motor symptoms as well as by non-motor symptoms including pain syndrome which remains poorly understood and often ignored by physicians. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of chronic pain syndrome and develop approaches to its diagnosis, treatment and systematization. Authors examined 130 patients with PD. Chronic pain was found in 68 (52%) patients. In 51 (75%) patients, pain was located on the side of more severe motor symptoms. The main types of pain in PD were identified related to regional changes in muscle tone, motor fluctuations and primary ("central" pain). More severe symptoms of parkinsonism, cognitive and affective disorders as well as lower pain threshold were identified in patients with pain compared to those without pain. A negative impact of pain on quality of life was shown. The positive effect of dopaminergic therapy on the severity of pain was found in one-third of patients with PD. Criteria for the association of pain with PD and approaches to the correction of different types of pain are discussed. PMID:23994930

  1. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  2. Threshold properties of a microcavity laser with submicroampere threshold current

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Lear, K.L.; Chow, W.W.; Mar, A.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1996-02-01

    We report the threshold characteristics of small oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers. Abrupt threshold transitions 105 times the spontaneous emission background are obtained at injection currents as low as 470 nanoampere.

  3. Race effects on temporal summation to heat pain in youth.

    PubMed

    Morris, Matthew C; Walker, Lynn; Bruehl, Stephen; Hellman, Natalie; Sherman, Amanda L; Rao, Uma

    2015-05-01

    Racial differences in pain responsiveness have been demonstrated in adults. However, it is unclear whether racial differences are also present in youth and whether they extend to experimental pain indices assessing temporal summation of second pain (TSSP). Temporal summation of second pain provides an index of pain sensitivity and may be especially relevant in determining risk for chronic pain. This study assessed pain tolerance and TSSP to evoked thermal pain in 78 healthy youth (age range, 10-17), 51% of whom were African American and 49% were non-Hispanic white. Multilevel models revealed within-individual increases in pain ratings during the temporal summation task in non-Hispanic white youth that were consistent with TSSP. Pain ratings did not change significantly during the temporal summation task in African-American youth. Baseline evoked pain ratings were significantly higher in African-American compared with non-Hispanic white youth. These findings suggest that enhanced responsiveness to evoked thermal pain in African Americans is present in adolescence but is unlikely to be related to elevated TSSP. These results may have implications for understanding racial differences in chronic pain experience in adulthood. PMID:25734994

  4. A novel psychovisual threshold on large DCT for image compression.

    PubMed

    Abu, Nur Azman; Ernawan, Ferda

    2015-01-01

    A psychovisual experiment prescribes the quantization values in image compression. The quantization process is used as a threshold of the human visual system tolerance to reduce the amount of encoded transform coefficients. It is very challenging to generate an optimal quantization value based on the contribution of the transform coefficient at each frequency order. The psychovisual threshold represents the sensitivity of the human visual perception at each frequency order to the image reconstruction. An ideal contribution of the transform at each frequency order will be the primitive of the psychovisual threshold in image compression. This research study proposes a psychovisual threshold on the large discrete cosine transform (DCT) image block which will be used to automatically generate the much needed quantization tables. The proposed psychovisual threshold will be used to prescribe the quantization values at each frequency order. The psychovisual threshold on the large image block provides significant improvement in the quality of output images. The experimental results on large quantization tables from psychovisual threshold produce largely free artifacts in the visual output image. Besides, the experimental results show that the concept of psychovisual threshold produces better quality image at the higher compression rate than JPEG image compression. PMID:25874257

  5. A Novel Psychovisual Threshold on Large DCT for Image Compression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A psychovisual experiment prescribes the quantization values in image compression. The quantization process is used as a threshold of the human visual system tolerance to reduce the amount of encoded transform coefficients. It is very challenging to generate an optimal quantization value based on the contribution of the transform coefficient at each frequency order. The psychovisual threshold represents the sensitivity of the human visual perception at each frequency order to the image reconstruction. An ideal contribution of the transform at each frequency order will be the primitive of the psychovisual threshold in image compression. This research study proposes a psychovisual threshold on the large discrete cosine transform (DCT) image block which will be used to automatically generate the much needed quantization tables. The proposed psychovisual threshold will be used to prescribe the quantization values at each frequency order. The psychovisual threshold on the large image block provides significant improvement in the quality of output images. The experimental results on large quantization tables from psychovisual threshold produce largely free artifacts in the visual output image. Besides, the experimental results show that the concept of psychovisual threshold produces better quality image at the higher compression rate than JPEG image compression. PMID:25874257

  6. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  7. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  8. Physicians Experience with and Expectations of the Safety and Tolerability of WHO-Step III Opioids for Chronic (Low) Back Pain: Post Hoc Analysis of Data from a German Cross-Sectional Physician Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A.; Eberhardt, Alice; Mueller-Schwefe, Gerhard H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe physicians' daily life experience with WHO-step III opioids in the treatment of chronic (low) back pain (CLBP). Methods. Post hoc analysis of data from a cross-sectional online survey with 4.283 Germany physicians. Results. With a reported median use in 17% of affected patients, WHO-step III opioids play a minor role in treatment of CLBP in daily practice associated with a broad spectrum of positive and negative effects. If prescribed, potent opioids were reported to show clinically relevant effects (such as ≥50% pain relief) in approximately 3 of 4 patients (median 72%). Analgesic effects reported are frequently related with adverse events (AEs). Only 20% of patients were reported to remain free of any AE. Most frequently reported AE was constipation (50%), also graded highest for AE-related daily life restrictions (median 46%). Specific AE countermeasures were reported to be necessary in approximately half of patients (median 45%); nevertheless AE-related premature discontinuation rates reported were high (median 22%). Fentanyl/morphine were the most/least prevalently prescribed potent opioids mentioned (median 20 versus 8%). Conclusion. Overall, use of WHO-step III opioids for CLBP is low. AEs, especially constipation, are commonly reported and interfere significantly with analgesic effects in daily practice. Nevertheless, beneficial effects outweigh related AEs in most patients with CLBP. PMID:26568890

  9. Threshold Concepts in Research Education and Evidence of Threshold Crossing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiley, Margaret; Wisker, Gina

    2009-01-01

    Most work on threshold concepts has hitherto related to discipline-specific undergraduate education, however, the idea of generic doctoral-level threshold concepts appeared to us to provide a strong and useful framework to support research learning and teaching at the graduate level. The early work regarding research-level threshold concepts is

  10. Chronic intraoral pain--assessment of diagnostic methods and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Pigg, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis was to broaden our knowledge of chronic intraoral pain. The research questions were: What methods can be used to differentiate inflammatory, odontogenic tooth pain from pain that presents as toothache but is non-odontogenic in origin? What is the prognosis of chronic tooth pain of non-odontogenic origin, and which factors affect the prognosis? Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a relatively rare but severe and chronic pain condition affecting the dentoalveolar region. Recent research indicates that the origin is peripheral nerve damage: neuropathic pain. The condition presents as tooth pain and is challenging to dentists because it is difficult to distinguish from ordinary toothache due to inflammation or infection. AO is of interest to the pain community because it shares many characteristics with other chronic pain conditions, and pain perpetuation mechanisms are likely to be similar. An AO diagnosis is made after a comprehensive examination and assessment of patients' self-reported characteristics: the pain history. Traditional dental diagnostic methods do not appear to suffice, since many patients report repeated care-seeking and numerous treatment efforts with little or no pain relief. Developing methods that are useful in the clinical setting is a prerequisite for a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment decisions. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is used to assess sensory function on skin when nerve damage or disease is suspected. A variety of stimuli has been used to examine the perception of, for example, touch, temperature (painful and non-painful), vibration, pinprick pain, and pressure pain. To detect sensory abnormalities and nerve damage in the oral cavity, the same methods may be possible to use. Study I examined properties of thermal thresholds in and around the mouth in 30 pain-free subjects: the influence of measurement location and stimulation area size on threshold levels, and time variability of thresholds. Thresholds for cold, warmth and painful heat were measured in four intraoral and two extraoral sites. Measurements were repeated 3 times over 6 weeks, using four sizes of stimulation area (0.125-0.81 cm2). The threshold levels were highly dependent on location but less dependent on measuring probe size and time variability was small, and this knowledge is important for the interpretation of QST results. Study II applied a recently developed standardized QST examination protocol (intended for use on skin) inside the oral cavity. Two trained examiners evaluated 21 pain-free subjects on three occasions over 1-3 weeks, at four sites-three intraoral and one extraoral. Most tests had acceptable reliability and the original test instruments and techniques could be applied intraorally with only minor adjustments. Study III examined the value of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in pain investigations. Twenty patients with AO and 5 with symptomatic apical periodontitis (inflammatory tooth pain) participated. The results indicate that when AO is suspected, addition of CBCT can improve the diagnostic certainty compared to sole use of periapical and panoramic radiographs, especially because of the superior ability of CBCT to exclude inflammation as the pain cause. Study IV assessed the long-term prognosis of AO, and analyzed potential outcome predictors. A comprehensive questionnaire including validated and reliable instruments was used to gather data on patient and pain characteristics and pain consequences from 37 patients in 2002 and 2009. Thirty-five percent of the patients reported substantial overall improvement at follow-up, but almost all still had pain of some degree after many years. The initial high level of emotional distress was unchanged. Low baseline pain intensity predicted improvement over time. PMID:22338784

  11. Cancer-related pain management in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Cipta, Andre M; Pietras, Christopher J; Weiss, Timothy E; Strouse, Thomas B

    2015-10-01

    Uncontrolled pain is one of the most feared and debilitating symptoms among cancer patients, and many suffer unnecessarily from suboptimal pain control. Cancer-related pain is often multidimensional and can affect all aspects of a patient's life. Hence, achieving adequate pain relief among cancer patients involves a proper assessment of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical pain issues, matched with an individualized treatment plan involving pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and procedural therapies when appropriate. Providing effective pain relief can help ease the overall burden of disease among oncology patients while helping them tolerate cancer-directed therapies and achieve the most optimal quality of life throughout all phases of the disease continuum. In this review, the authors will discuss the syndromes, assessment of, and treatment for cancer-related pain in the outpatient setting. PMID:26862909

  12. The effect of repeated intramuscular alfentanil injections on experimental pain and abuse liability indices in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D. Andrew; Smith, Michael T.; Bigelow, George E.; Moaddel, Ruin; Venkata, S.L. Vatem; Strain, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli following repeated opioid exposures, has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies. However, there is no accepted, prospective model of OIH following repeated opioid exposures currently available in humans. This study assessed a potential prospective OIH model. Methods Double-blind intramuscular (IM) injections of a short-acting opioid, (alfentanil 15 mcg/kg; N=8) were compared to active placebo (diphenhydramine 25 mg; N=3) on cold and pressure pain testing and standard abuse liability measures in eight 10-hour sessions (1 injection/session) over 45 weeks in healthy pain-free males. Decreases from session baseline pain threshold (PThr) and tolerance (PTol) were calculated to represent hyperalgesia, and were assessed both within and across sessions. Results Mean decreases in cold PTol were seen in the alfentanil group at 180 minutes (?3.8 seconds, +/?26.5) and 480 minutes (?1.63 seconds, +/?31.5) after drug administration. There was a trend for differences between conditions on cold PThr hyperalgesia but not for pressure PThr. Alfentanil participants had greater mean ratings on LIKING and HIGH visual analog scales at peak effects (30 minutes), but these scores did not change across sessions. Discussion Repeated alfentanil exposures over 45 weeks resulted in within session decreases in cold pain tolerance from baseline but these differences were not substantially different from diphenhydramine controls. The results did not support the phenomenon of OIH in this model, although definitive conclusions regarding the existence of OIH in humans likely requires a larger sample size or an alternative model. PMID:23446076

  13. Preclinical Assessment of Inflammatory Pain.

    PubMed

    Muley, Milind M; Krustev, Eugene; McDougall, Jason J

    2016-02-01

    While acute inflammation is a natural physiological response to tissue injury or infection, chronic inflammation is maladaptive and engenders a considerable amount of adverse pain. The chemical mediators responsible for tissue inflammation act on nociceptive nerve endings to lower neuronal excitation threshold and sensitize afferent firing rate leading to the development of allodynia and hyperalgesia, respectively. Animal models have aided in our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the generation of chronic inflammatory pain and allowed us to identify and validate numerous analgesic drug candidates. Here we review some of the commonly used models of skin, joint, and gut inflammatory pain along with their relative benefits and limitations. In addition, we describe and discuss several behavioral and electrophysiological approaches used to assess the inflammatory pain in these preclinical models. Despite significant advances having been made in this area, a gap still exists between fundamental research and the implementation of these findings into a clinical setting. As such we need to characterize inherent pathophysiological pathways and develop new endpoints in these animal models to improve their predictive value of human inflammatory diseases in order to design safer and more effective analgesics. PMID:26663896

  14. Therapy of metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    Serafini, A N

    2001-06-01

    Bone metastasis is a common sequella of solid malignant tumors such as prostate, breast, lung, and renal cancers, which can lead to various complications, including fractures, hypercalcemia, and bone pain, as well as reduced performance status and quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach is usually required not only to address the etiology of the pain and its complicating factors but also to treat the patient appropriately. Currently, the treatment of bone pain remains palliative at best with systemic therapy (analgesics, hormones, chemotherapy, steroids, and bisphosphonates) as well as local treatments (such as surgery, nerve blocks, and external beam radiation). However, many of these treatments are limited in their efficacy or duration and have significant side effects that seriously limit the cancer patient's quality of life. Various radiopharmaceuticals have shown good efficacy in relieving bone pain secondary to bone metastasis. This systemic form of metabolic radiotherapy is simple to administer and complements other treatment options. This has been associated with improved mobility in many patients, reduced dependence on narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, improved performance status and quality of life, and, in some studies, improved survival. Additional radiopharmaceuticals are under investigation and appear promising. All of these agents, although comprising different physical and chemical characteristics, offer certain advantages in that they are simple to administer, are well tolerated by the patient if used appropriately, and can be used alone or in combination with the other forms of treatment. PMID:11390554

  15. Pharmacotherapy for breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2012-01-22

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) is a transient exacerbation of pain that occurs either spontaneously, or in relation to a specific predictable or unpredictable trigger, despite relatively stable and adequately controlled background pain. The principal pharmacological treatment of BTP is represented by the administration of opioids as needed. Oral opioids have traditionally been the only available drugs for BTP. However, the onset and duration of action of oral opioids such as morphine or oxycodone may not be suitable for treating many episodes of BTP that are of short onset and duration. Transmucosal administration of lipophilic substances has gained a growing popularity in recent years due to the rapid effect, clinically observable 10-15 minutes after drug administration, and the non-invasive form. Different technologies have been developed to provide fast pain relief with potent opioid drugs such fentanyl, delivered by non-invasive routes (rapid onset opioids, ROOs). All the studies performed with ROOs have recommended that these drugs should be administered to opioid-tolerant patients receiving doses of oral morphine equivalents of at least 60?mg. These preparations, including oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate, fentanyl buccal tablet, sublingual fentanyl, intranasal fentanyl spray, fentanyl-pectin nasal spray and fentanyl buccal soluble film have shown better efficacy than placebo or oral opioids. Long-term studies have confirmed their efficacy and safety. PMID:22233484

  16. Pain from bluebottle jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; McGee, Richard G; Webster, Angela C

    2015-07-01

    An 11-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with severe pain after a jellyfish sting at a New South Wales beach. Bluebottle (Physalia) jellyfish was deemed the most likely cause considering her geographical location. The Australian Resuscitation Council Guideline (2010) suggests immersing in water as hot as can be tolerated for 20?min for treating pain from jellyfish stings. This guideline was written based on past case reports, books and randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We performed a search to assess the most current evidence for relief of pain from Bluebottle jellyfish stings, which yielded two systematic reviews and seven RCTs. Both systematic reviews had similar conclusions, with one of the RCTs used in both reviews showing the most relevance to our presenting patient in terms of demographics, location and jellyfish type. This journal club article is an appraisal of this RCT by Loten et?al. and the validity of its conclusion that hot water immersion is most effective for the relief of pain from Bluebottle stings. PMID:26135148

  17. Pain and pain management in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Beiteke, Ulrike; Bigge, Stefan; Reichenberger, Christina; Gralow, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that 23 million Germans suffer from chronic pain. A recent survey has revealed that 30 % of chronic pain patients are dissatisfied with their pain management. Furthermore, five million Germans suffer from neuropathic pain, 20 % of whom are inadequately treated. Pain is also a symptom of many dermatologic diseases, which is mostly somatic and may be classified as mild in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, research on the quality of life (QoL) has increasingly shown a marked impairment of QoL by moderate pain such as in psoriatic arthritis. -Severe pain is associated with herpes zoster (shingles), leg ulcers, and pyoderma gangrenosum. This article addresses the basics of pain classification and, in a short excerpt, pain transduction/transmission and modulation. The use of standardized diagnostic -scales is recommended for the purpose of recording and monitoring pain intensity, which allows for the optimization of therapy and consistent interdisciplinary -communication. Any dermatology residency program includes the acquisition of knowledge and skills in pain management. This review therefore aims to present fundamental therapeutic concepts based on the expanded WHO analgesic ladder, and describes a step-wise therapeutic approach and combination therapies. The article focuses on the pain management of the above-mentioned severely painful, conservatively treated dermatoses. Besides well-established therapeutic agents and current -therapeutic standards, it discusses specific options based on guidelines (where available). Current knowledge on peri- and postoperative pain management is briefly outlined. This article addresses: ? The fundamentals of the classification and neurophysiology of pain; ? Standards for pain documentation in children and adults; ? General standards for pharmaceutical pain management; ? Current specific treatment options for postherpetic neuralgia, leg ulcers, and -pyoderma gangrenosum in conjunction with the expanded WHO analgesic -ladder. PMID:26408457

  18. Pain and your emotions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... separated. The way your mind controls thoughts and attitudes affects the way your body controls pain. Pain ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 100. Turk DC. Psychosocial aspects of chronic pain. In: Benzon HT. Practical Management ...

  19. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  20. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePLUS

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  1. Overview of Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

  2. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, ... Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a ...

  3. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nerve pain which work by changing how the brain and nerves perceive pain signals from the body. These can be taken in addition to usual pain blockers, but may have side effects of confusion, sleepiness or low blood pressure. As ...

  4. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cells or body chemistry, thus producing pain relief. Marijuana or, by its Latin name, cannabis , continues to remain highly controversial as a pain ... eyes of many individuals campaigning on its behalf, marijuana rightfully belongs with other pain remedies. Scientific studies ...

  5. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Low Back Pain Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... the body to the brain. What causes lower back pain? The vast majority of low back pain is ...

  6. Pain Information Brochure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Top Back Pain Back Pain Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Low Back Pain Fact Sheet National Institute of Neurological Disorders and ...

  7. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  8. Sensory characteristics of chronic non-specific low back pain: a subgroup investigation.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Peter; Waller, Robert; Wright, Anthony; Gardner, Joseph; Johnston, Richard; Payne, Carly; Shannon, Aedin; Ware, Brendan; Smith, Anne

    2014-08-01

    It has been proposed that patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) can be broadly classified based on clinical features that represent either predominantly a mechanical pain (MP) or non-mechanical pain (NMP) profile. The aim of this study was to establish if patients with CNSLBP who report features of NMP demonstrate differences in pain thresholds compared to those who report MP characteristics and pain-free controls. This study was a cross-sectional design investigating whether pressure pain threshold (PPT) and/or cold pain threshold (CPT) at three anatomical locations differed between patients with mechanical CNSLBP (n = 17) versus non-mechanical CNSLBP (n = 19 and healthy controls (n = 19) whilst controlling for confounders. The results of this study provide evidence of increased CPT at the wrist in the NMP profile group compared to both the MP profile and control subjects, when controlling for gender, sleep and depression (NMP versus MP group Odds Ratio (OR): 18.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5-133.1, p = 0.004). There was no evidence of lowered PPT at any site after adjustment for confounding factors. Those with an MP profile had similar pain thresholds to pain-free controls, whereas the NMP profile group demonstrated elevated CPT's consistent with central amplification of pain. These findings may represent different pain mechanisms associated with these patient profiles and may have implications for targeted management. PMID:24731602

  9. Amantadine sulfate reduces experimental sensitization and pain in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kleinbhl, Dieter; Grtelmeyer, Roman; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Hlzl, Rupert

    2006-03-01

    We investigated if established psychophysical measures of enhanced experimental sensitization in chronic musculoskeletal pain can be reduced by adjuvant treatment with a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, amantadine sulfate, and whether a reduction in sensitization might be accompanied by a concurrent improvement in clinical pain. Sensitization was evaluated by an experimental tonic heat model of short-term sensitization with concurrent subjective and behavioral psychophysical scaling. Twenty-six patients with chronic back pain were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and received daily dosages of either placebo or 100 mg of amantadine sulfate during a 1-wk treatment. Participants completed quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds and experimental sensitization before and after treatment and clinical pain ratings before, during, and after treatment. Experimental sensitization and clinical pain were reduced in patients receiving verum. Initially, experimental sensitization was enhanced in patients, with early sensitization at nonpainful intensities of contact heat and enhanced sensitization at painful intensities, as shown previously. After 1 wk of treatment, experimental sensitization was reduced with amantadine sulfate but not with placebo. We conclude that adjuvant chronic pain treatment with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists might be beneficial for chronic pain if enhanced sensitization is involved and that the quantitative sensory test of temporal summation may be used to verify this. PMID:16492838

  10. Pain sensitivity in major depression and its relationship to central serotoninergic function as reflected by the neuroendocrine response to clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Kundermann, Bernd; Hemmeter-Spernal, Julia; Strate, Peter; Gebhardt, Stefan; Huber, Martin Tobias; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Several studies reported a decreased pain sensitivity in patients with depression, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this phenomenon are unclear. While there is extensive evidence that the serotoninergic system plays a key role in pain modulation, especially in pain inhibitory mechanisms via descending pathways, as well as in the pathophysiology of depression, no study so far has examined its potential relevance in mediating the alteration of pain processing. The present study addresses the question of whether indices of serotoninergic dysfunction, as investigated by a neuroendrocine challenge paradigm, are related to pain sensitivity. Nineteen drug-free inpatients with unipolar major depression underwent a neuroendocrine challenge test by measuring cortisol and prolactin in response to intravenously administered clomipramine (12.5mg). Heat/cold pain thresholds, warmth/cold detection thresholds, measures of current pain complaints and mood were assessed the day before and three day after challenge procedure. When patients were classified in subgroups based on a median split of their cortisol response values, the low-responsive group showed significantly elevated heat pain thresholds and nearly significantly elevated cold pain thresholds compared to the high-responsive group. No such group differences were found with regard to somatosensory thresholds, measures of pain complaints and mood. Subgrouping on the basis of prolactin responsiveness did not reveal significant differences in any parameter. In summary, a decreased pain sensitivity was demonstrated in patients characterized by a reduced neuroendocrine responsiveness to clomipramine, suggesting an involvement of serotoninergic dysfunction underlying altered pain perception in depression. PMID:19467668

  11. Assessment of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeans, Mary-Ellen; Stratford, Joseph G.; Melzack, Ronald; Monks, Richard C.

    1979-01-01

    The assessment of pain presents a major problem in both research and clinical practice. Until recently our methods for evaluating pain were based on a sensory conceptual model of pain and an acute care approach to illness. These traditional views are often inadequate, particularly in relation to chronic pain syndromes. Clinical assessment of chronic pain must include extensive physical and psychological examination. New approaches to pain measurement and clinical assessment of the patient are discussed.

  12. Assessing cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Shalini; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Regular assessment for the presence of pain and response to pain management strategies should be high priority in cancer patients. Pain is a multidimensional experience in cancer patients. Pain management will be most effective when treatments are individualized after exploring the various physical and non-physical components of pain, and the patient and family are educated and involved in decision making. This article discusses the various issues that are pertinent to the assessment of pain in cancer patients. PMID:22585314

  13. Neuroplastic Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Painful Symptoms Reduction in Chronic Hepatitis C: A Phase II Randomized, Double Blind, Sham Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brietzke, Aline P.; Rozisky, Joanna R.; Dussan-Sarria, Jairo A.; Deitos, Alicia; Laste, Gabriela; Hoppe, Priscila F. T.; Muller, Suzana; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mário R.; de Amorim, Rivadavio F. B.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pegylated Interferon Alpha (Peg-IFN) in combination with other drugs is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection (HCV) and is related to severe painful symptoms. The aim of this study was access the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in controlling the painful symptoms related to Peg-IFN side effects. Materials and Methods: In this phase II double-blind trial, twenty eight (n = 28) HCV subjects were randomized to receive either 5 consecutive days of active tDCS (n = 14) or sham (n = 14) during 5 consecutive days with anodal stimulation over the primary motor cortex region using 2 mA for 20 min. The primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) pain and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels. Secondary outcomes were the pressure-pain threshold (PPT), the Brazilian Profile of Chronic Pain: Screen (B-PCP:S), and drug analgesics use. Results: tDCS reduced the VAS scores (P < 0.003), with a mean pain drop of 56% (p < 0.001). Furthermore, tDCS was able to enhance BDNF levels (p < 0.01). The mean increase was 37.48% in the active group. Finally, tDCS raised PPT (p < 0.001) and reduced the B-PCP:S scores and analgesic use (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Five sessions of tDCS were effective in reducing the painful symptoms in HCV patients undergoing Peg-IFN treatment. These findings support the efficacy of tDCS as a promising therapeutic tool to improve the tolerance of the side effects related to the use of Peg-IFN. Future larger studies (phase III and IV trials) are needed to confirm the clinical use of the therapeutic effects of tDCS in such condition. Trial registration: Brazilian Human Health Regulator for Research with the approval number CAAE 07802012.0.0000.5327. PMID:26793047

  14. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Quizzes Games Kids' Medical Dictionary En Espaol What Other Kids Are Reading Girls and Puberty Boys ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > Kids > ...

  15. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  16. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV‑) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV‑ centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV‑–based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV‑–based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  17. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain. PMID:16730613

  18. fMRI pain activation in the periaqueductal gray in healthy volunteers during the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    La Cesa, S; Tinelli, E; Toschi, N; Di Stefano, G; Collorone, S; Aceti, A; Francia, A; Cruccu, G; Truini, A; Caramia, F

    2014-04-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG), a brain area belonging to the descending pain modulatory system, plays a crucial role in pain perception. Little information is available on the relationship between PAG activation and perceived pain intensity. In this study, we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans from the PAG during the cold pressor test, a model for tonic pain, in 12 healthy volunteers. fMRI data were acquired with a 12-channel head-coil and a 3-Tesla scanner and analyzed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) software. During the cold pressor test, fMRI showed significant activation clusters in pain-related brain areas: bilateral middle and superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and thalamus, left insula, right inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and in the bilateral PAG (cluster level corrected threshold p<0.05). PAG activation correlated directly with the pain threshold and inversely with the participant's perceived pain intensity (cluster level corrected threshold (p<0.05). The cold pressor test consistently activated the PAG as well as other pain-related areas in the brain. Our study, showing that the greater the PAG activation the higher the pain threshold and the weaker the pain intensity perceived, highlights the key role of the PAG in inhibiting the pain afferent pathway function. Our findings might be useful for neuroimaging studies investigating PAG activation in patients with chronic idiopathic pain conditions possibly related to dysfunction in the descending pain modulatory system. PMID:24468081

  19. Tetrodotoxin suppresses thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat full thickness thermal injury pain model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Petz, Lawrence N; Korz, Walter; Wong, Donald; Clifford, John L

    2015-10-21

    Burn injuries have been identified as the primary cause of injury in 5% of U.S. military personnel evacuated from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Severe burn-associated pain is typically treated with opioids such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone. Side effects of opioids include respiratory depression, cardiac depression, decrease in motor and cognitive function, as well as the development of hyperalgesia, tolerance and dependence. These effects have led us to search for novel analgesics for the treatment of burn-associated pain in wounded combat service members. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker currently in clinical trials as an analgesic. A phase 3 clinical trial for cancer-related pain has been completed and phase 3 clinical trials on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are planned. It has also been shown in mice to inhibit the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. TTX was originally identified as a neurotoxin in marine animals but has now been shown to be safe in humans at therapeutic doses. The antinociceptive effects of TTX are thought to be due to inhibition of Na(+) ion influx required for initiation and conduction of nociceptive impulses. One TTX sensitive sodium channel, Nav1.7, has been shown to be essential in lowering the heat pain threshold after burn injuries. To date, the analgesic effect of TTX has not been tested in burn-associated pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a full thickness thermal injury on the right hind paw. TTX (8?g/kg) was administered once a day systemically by subcutaneous injection beginning 3 days post thermal injury and continued through 7 days post thermal injury. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were assessed 60 and 120min post injection on each day of TTX treatment. TTX significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia at all days tested and had a less robust, but statistically significant suppressive effect on mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that systemic TTX may be an effective, rapidly acting analgesic for battlefield burn injuries and has the potential for replacing or reducing the need for opioid analgesics. PMID:26424077

  20. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  1. Napping Reverses Increased Pain Sensitivity Due to Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Faraut, Brice; Léger, Damien; Medkour, Terkia; Dubois, Alexandre; Bayon, Virginie; Chennaoui, Mounir; Perrot, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To investigate pain sensitivity after sleep restriction and the restorative effect of napping. Design A strictly controlled randomized crossover study with continuous polysomnography monitoring was performed. Setting Laboratory-based study. Participants 11 healthy male volunteers. Interventions Volunteers attended two three-day sessions: “sleep restriction” alone and “sleep restriction and nap”. Each session involved a baseline night of normal sleep, a night of sleep deprivation and a night of free recovery sleep. Participants were allowed to sleep only from 02:00 to 04:00 during the sleep deprivation night. During the “sleep restriction and nap” session, volunteers took two 30-minute naps, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. Measurements and Results Quantitative sensory testing was performed with heat, cold and pressure, at 10:00 and 16:00, on three areas: the supraspinatus, lower back and thigh. After sleep restriction, quantitative sensory testing revealed differential changes in pain stimuli thresholds, but not in thermal threshold detection: lower back heat pain threshold decreased, pressure pain threshold increased in the supraspinatus area and no change was observed for the thigh. Napping restored responses to heat pain stimuli in the lower back and to pressure stimuli in the supraspinatus area. Conclusions Sleep restriction induces different types of hypersensitivity to pain stimuli in different body areas, consistent with multilevel mechanisms, these changes being reversed by napping. The napping restorative effect on pain thresholds result principally from effects on pain mechanisms, since it was independent of vigilance status. PMID:25723495

  2. [Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerance of BPAA gel in 48 patients with extra-articular rheumatic diseases and in 52 patients with osteoarthritis in the painful phase. Open non-comparative study].

    PubMed

    Maloberti, M R; Ferrero, M P; Rossi, G; Pepe, C A

    1989-09-15

    An open trial was carried out in 100 outpatients suffering from osteoarthritis (52 subjects) or extra-articular rheumatic disorders (48 subjects). Treatment consisted in topical application 3 times daily of an experimental product, BPAA gel, with 3% of active substance, for 2 weeks. During treatment the use of steroidal and non-steroidal analgesic and antiinflammatory agents or of any other drug apt to interfere with the parameters of evaluation was carefully avoided. Patients cooperated actively in subjective evaluation of pain parameters (Visual Analogue Self-rating Scale) which was used to integrate objective evaluation. Treatment response was very favorable, the drug proving effective in 83% and fairly effective in 5.7% of patients with osteoarthritis (total 88.7%). The corresponding figures for patients with extra-articular rheumatic disorders were 83.4% and 6.2% (total 89.0%). No local or systemic side-effects were observed in any of the 100 patients, nor did laboratory tests reveal any untoward actions of the drug. PMID:2530026

  3. Optimising threshold levels for information transmission in binary threshold networks: Independent multiplicative noise on each threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bingchang; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of optimising the threshold levels in multilevel threshold system subject to multiplicative Gaussian and uniform noise is considered. Similar to previous results for additive noise, we find a bifurcation phenomenon in the optimal threshold values, as the noise intensity changes. This occurs when the number of threshold units is greater than one. We also study the optimal thresholds for combined additive and multiplicative Gaussian noise, and find that all threshold levels need to be identical to optimise the system when the additive noise intensity is a constant. However, this identical value is not equal to the signal mean, unlike the case of additive noise. When the multiplicative noise intensity is instead held constant, the optimal threshold levels are not all identical for small additive noise intensity but are all equal to zero for large additive noise intensity. The model and our results are potentially relevant for sensor network design and understanding neurobiological sensory neurons such as in the peripheral auditory system.

  4. A Systematic Comparison Between Subjects with No Pain and Pain Associated with Active Myofascial Trigger Points

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Armstrong, Katee; Diao, Guoqing; Heimur, Juliana; Kopecky, John; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Gebreab, Tadesse; Shah, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether standard evaluations of pain distinguish subjects with no pain from those with myofascial pain syndromes (MPS) and active trigger points (MTrPs); and to assess whether self-reports of mood, function and health-related quality of life differ between these groups. Design Prospective, descriptive study. Setting University Patients Adults with and without neck pain Methods We evaluated adults with MPS and active (painful) MTrPs and those without pain. Subjects in the Active (A) group had at least one active MTrP with spontaneous pain which was persistent, lasted more than 3 months and had characteristic pain on palpation. Subjects in the No pain (Np) group had no spontaneous pain. However, some had discomfort on MTrP palpation (latent MTrP) while others in the Np group had no discomfort on palpation of nodules or had no nodules. Outcome Measures Each participant underwent range of motion (ROM) measurement, 10-point manual muscle test, and manual and algometric palpation. The latter determined the pain/pressure threshold using an algometer of 4 pre-determined anatomical sites along the upper trapezius. Participants rated pain using a verbal analogue scale (010); completed the Brief Pain Inventory and Oswestry Disability Scale (ODS), which included a sleep sub-scale; Short Form 36(SF36) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results here were 24 in the A group (mean 36 yrs, 16 women) and 26 in the Np group (mean 26 yrs, 12 women). Subjects in group A differed from Np in number of latent MTrPs (p=.0062); asymmetrical cervical ROM (p=.01 side bending and p=.002 rotation); in all pain reports (p<.0001); algometry (p<.03); POMS (p<.038); SF36 (p<.01) and ODS (p<.0001). Conclusion A systematic musculoskeletal evaluation of people with MPS reliably distinguishes them from subjects with no pain. The two groups are significantly different in their physical findings and self-reports of pain, sleep disturbance, disability, health status and mood. These findings support the view that a local pain syndrome has significant associations with mood, health-related quality of life and function.. PMID:23810811

  5. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Back pain often goes away on its own over several weeks. In some people, back pain persists. It may not go away completely or ... at times. Medicines can also help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter ...

  6. Cortical thickness correlates of pain and temperature sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Erpelding, Nathalie; Moayedi, Massieh; Davis, Karen D

    2012-08-01

    It is well established that there is individual variability in pain and temperature sensitivity. Functional brain imaging studies have found that interindividual heat pain variability correlates with brain activity in sensory and pain modulation areas. Thus, it is possible that these individual differences are associated with variability in gray matter thickness of cortical regions involved in thermoreception and pain. To test this, we investigated the relationship between thermal thresholds and cortical thickness in 80 healthy subjects. Subjects underwent a psychophysical session to determine their cool detection (CD), warm detection (WD), cold pain (CP), and heat pain (HP) threshold. A high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging scan was acquired for each subject. We correlated each threshold measure to cortical thickness of regions associated with thermoreception and pain. The mean ( SD) thresholds were 30.7 C ( 0.8) for CD, 33.8 C ( 0.7) for WD, 11.7 C ( 9.7) for CP, and 45.3 C ( 2.8) for HP. The brain gray matter analysis revealed a strong correlation between greater thermal and pain sensitivity and cortical thickening of the primary somatosensory cortex. Additionally, greater sensitivity to cool stimuli correlated with cortical thickening in the paracentral lobule, and greater WD correlated with cortical thinning in the anterior midcingulate cortex. We also found that greater HP sensitivity correlated with thickening in the posterior midcingulate cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. These cortical gray matter correlates of thermal and pain sensitivity provide a neural basis for individual differences in thermal sensitivity. PMID:22516588

  7. Attempts to control pain prioritize attention towards signals of pain: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Notebaert, Lies; Crombez, Geert; Vogt, Julia; De Houwer, Jan; Van Damme, Stefaan; Theeuwes, Jan

    2011-05-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that a persistent search for solutions for chronic pain may bring along costs at the cognitive, affective, and behavioral level. Specifically, attempts to control pain may fuel hypervigilance and prioritize attention towards pain-related information. This hypothesis was investigated in an experiment with 41 healthy volunteers. Prioritization of attention towards a signal for pain was measured using an adaptation of a visual search paradigm in which participants had to search for a target presented in a varying number of colored circles. One of these colors (Conditioned Stimulus) became a signal for pain (Unconditioned Stimulus: electrocutaneous stimulus at tolerance level) using a classical conditioning procedure. Intermixed with the visual search task, participants also performed another task. In the pain-control group, participants were informed that correct and fast responses on trials of this second task would result in an avoidance of the Unconditioned Stimulus. In the comparison group, performance on the second task was not instrumental in controlling pain. Results showed that in the pain-control group, attention was more prioritized towards the Conditioned Stimulus than in the comparison group. The theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:21349637

  8. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  9. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s). PMID:24958761

  10. [Tramadol in the treatment of pain].

    PubMed

    Curkovi?, B

    2000-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a centrally-acting, synthetic analgesic with a dual mechanism of action-weak opioid and monoaminergic effects. Tramadol is a racemic mixture and its mechanism of action via opioid and noradrenergic/serotonergic mechanisms is related to the independent effects of its two enantiomers. Interestingly, the enantiomers act synergistically to achieve better antinociceptive effect without enhancing side effects, moreover, lowering respiratory depression and tolerance/dependence. In several post-marketing surveillance studies tramadol is showed as effective as codeine, penthazocine, pethidine and morphine with good tolerability. Tramadol might be analgesic of choice for a wide variety of painful conditions. PMID:11552611

  11. C nociceptor activity in human nerve during painful and non painful skin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Van Hees, J; Gybels, J

    1981-07-01

    Percutaneous recordings from more than one hundred single C fibres have been performed in the radial nerve of conscious human subjects. All these fibres belong to the poly-modal C nociceptor group, being excited by mechanical and thermal and also by chemical stimulation. Conduction velocities showed a monophasic distribution with a mean value of 0.86 m/s (SD: 0.17). The mechanical threshold, measured with von Frey hairs, varied between 2.3 and 13.1 g. The receptive field was circular or elliptical; for 33 units the mean axes were 6 mm and 7 mm. Mechanically evoked C fibre discharge even up to more than 10 spikes/s was not necessarily accompanied by pain sensation. Nettle sting evoked an irregular C fibre discharge (maximum 10 spikes/s) accompanied by a pricking and burning sensation; the sensation of itch which was sometimes reported, was not correlated with the discharge frequency. C fibre activation by a chemical irritant (paint remover) also evoked an irregular discharge (maximum 3 to 6 spikes/s), accompanied by pricking and burning pain sensation. The C threshold for radiant heat usually lay below the subject's pain threshold. Increasing skin temperature produced increasing neural firing rate. The mean spike frequency rarely exceeded two spikes/s even with stimuli evoking strong heat pain. The occurrence of subjective heat pain response could be as well predicted from th C fibre spike frequency as from the skin temperature. It is concluded that nociceptive C input provoked by thermal or chemical stimuli correlates well with pain sensation. However, similar C input provided by mechanical stimulation which activates also A beta mechanoreceptors, did not necessarily produce pain sensation. PMID:7288447

  12. Testing the gate-control theory of pain in man

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P. W.; Rudge, P.

    1974-01-01

    According to the gate-control theory of pain, the electrical stimulation of large nerve fibres should stop the pain induced when only C fibres are active. This kind of pain was induced by pressure, repeated pinprick, cold and heat in the ischaemic limb. The peripheral nerves were electrically stimulated in the same way as is done by patients treating their chronic pain by electrical stimulation. There was no change in the quantity nor the quality of the C fibre pain. In other experiments, electrical stimulation of the peripheral nerves induced no change in pain threshold to a heat stimulus when only C fibres were conducting, nor when the whole spectrum of fibres were conducting. Although many experiments have been reported that are consistent with the gate-control theory, the experiments reported here, and others mentioned, are inconsistent with the theory. PMID:4449001

  13. Somatosensory investigation of patients with orofacial pain compared with controls.

    PubMed

    de Siqueira, Silvia R D T; Teixeira, Manoel J; de Siqueira, Jose T T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the sensorial characteristics of orofacial pain in patients compared with control subjects. A total of 336 subjects (282 patients and 54 control subjects) were evaluated to identify their thermal (cold and warm), tactile, and pain thresholds. Numbness was reported by 61.7% of the patients (p<0.001). Patients with trigeminal postherpetic neuralgia and burning mouth syndrome showed loss of thermal perception; patients with postherpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, and posttraumatic painful neuropathy had a decrease in tactile perception compared with the control subjects (p<0.001). In conclusion, other sensorial modalities besides pain are affected by neuropathic orofacial pain; these findings can help in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in orofacial pain. PMID:25162286

  14. Integrated Approach for Pain Management in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Geroin, Christian; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Bruno, Veronica; Smania, Nicola; Tinazzi, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Pain, one of the most frequent nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), is recognized as an important component of the illness that adversely affects patient quality of life. The aims of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the clinical assessment and to provide a detailed overview of the evidence-based pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to treating pain. Results of a literature search include studies investigating pain/sensory abnormalities in PD. The effects of levodopa administration, deep brain stimulation (DBS), pallidotomy, spinal cord stimulation, rehabilitation, and complementary/alternative medicine are reviewed critically. PD patients have altered pain and sensory thresholds; levodopa and DBS improve pain and change sensory abnormalities toward normal levels through antinociceptive and/or modulatory effects that remain unknown. A wide range of nonpharmacologic approaches require further investigation. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in managing pain syndromes in PD. PMID:26879763

  15. Growing pains in children

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, Yosef; Hashkes, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    We review the clinical manifestations of "growing pains", the most common form of episodic childhood musculoskeletal pain. Physicians should be careful to adhere to clear clinical criteria as described in this review before diagnosing a child with growing pain. We expand on current theories on possible causes of growing pains and describe the management of these pains and the generally good outcome in nearly all children. PMID:17550631

  16. A review of the use of ketamine in pain management.

    PubMed

    Tawfic, Qutaiba A

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine is a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. It has been widely used in anesthesia and pain management. Ketamine has been administered via the intravenous, intramuscular, subcutaneous, oral, rectal, topical, intranasal, sublingual, epidural, and caudal routes. Ketamine improves postoperative and posttrauma pain scores and reduces opioid consumption. It has special indication for patients with opioid tolerance, acute hyperalgesia, and neuropathic pain. It also has a role in the management of chronic pain including both cancer and noncancer pain. Recreational use of ketamine is increasing as well through different routes of administration like inhalation, smoking, or intravenous injection. Long-time exposure to ketamine, especially in the abusers, may lead to serious side effects. This review is trying to define the role of ketamine in pain management. PMID:24353050

  17. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  18. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  19. Evidence of Increased Non-Verbal Behavioral Signs of Pain in Adults with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Chronic Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Harper, Vicki N.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Breau, Lynn M.; Bodfish, James W.

    2009-01-01

    The role of pain in relation to self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with intellectual disabilities is not well understood. Some models of SIB are based on altered endogenous opioid system activity which could result in elevated pain thresholds. In this study, non-verbal behavioral signs indicative of pain as measured by the…

  20. Comparison of acceptance and distraction strategies in coping with experimentally induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Hazel; Stewart, Ian; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; McGuire, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Background This study compared an acceptance-based strategy with a control-based strategy (distraction) in terms of the ability of participants to tolerate a painful stimulus, across two experiments. In addition, participants were either actively encouraged, or not, to link pain tolerance with pursuit of valued goals to examine the impact of pursuing a personally meaningful goal or value on the extent to which pain will be tolerated. Methods Participants in experiment 1 (n=41) and experiment 2 (n=52) were equally assigned to acceptance or distraction protocols. Further, half the participants in each group generated examples from their own lives in which they had pursued a valued objective, while the other half did not. In experiment 2, the values focus was enhanced to examine the impact on pain tolerance. Results There were no significant differences overall between the acceptance and distraction groups on pain tolerance in either experiment. However, in experiment 2, individuals classified as accepting in terms of general coping style and who were assigned to the acceptance strategy showed significantly better pain tolerance than accepting individuals who were in the distraction condition. Across both experiments, those with strong goal-driven values in both protocols were more tolerant of pain. Participants appeared to have more difficulty adhering to acceptance than to distraction as a strategy. Conclusion Acceptance may be associated with better tolerance of pain, but may also be more difficult to operationalize than distraction in experimental studies. Matching coping style and coping strategy may be most effective, and enhancement of goal-driven values may assist in pain coping. PMID:25834464

  1. Image analysis using threshold reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomberg, Dan S.

    1991-07-01

    A class of shift-variant reduction operations is introduced, that is useful for performing efficient and controllable shape and texture transformations between resolution levels. In their most general form, the operations proceed in three steps: (a) convolve a binary image with a kernel of arbitrary size; (b) threshold the result; (c) subsample to produce the reduced image. Taking a binary structuring element for the kernel, the threshold convolution on a binary image is equivalent to a rank order filter, and the full reduction operation is a threshold reduction. Threshold reductions that use convolution filters and subsample tiles of equal size are optimized by combining the three operations, using only logical raster operations and producing threshold convolution values only at the sampling points. For 2x reduction, the four possible threshold values (1, 2, 3, and 4) refer to the minimum number of ON pixels within each 2x2 tile for which a pixel in the reduced image will be ON. Algorithms for boolean raster operations are given for 2x, 3x, and 4x threshold reduction, and lookup tables that efficiently implement column raster operations are provided. Threshold reduction rates of 2.5x107 pixel/second can be achieved with a Sun SparcStation2TM . A maskforming image analysis cycle of threshold reduction, augmented by morphology and followed by replicative expansion to full resolution, is described, and some general properties of the cycle are derived. A simple application of threshold reduction to document image analysis, the extraction of halftone regions from scanned images that also contain text and line graphics, is illustrated. A sequence of 2x reductions with first low and then high thresholds is used to create a reduced image consisting of a mask over the halftone regions. In this way, the extraction occurs as a natural consequence of the reductions.

  2. Arthritis and pain. Current approaches in the treatment of arthritic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Bruce L; Langford, Richard M; Wodehouse, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that although persistent arthritic pain is initiated and maintained by articular pathology, it is also heavily influenced by a range of other factors. Strategies for treating arthritic pain are therefore different from those adopted for acute pain. Although published guidelines offer general assistance, the complexity of underlying mechanisms requires that measures designed to relieve pain must take into account individual biological, psychological and societal factors. It follows that a combination of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches offers the best opportunity for therapeutic success, although determining the effectiveness of such complex interventions remains difficult. Pharmacological therapy is often prolonged, and safety and tolerability issues become as important as efficacy over time. PMID:17572915

  3. Distinct neurochemical features of acute and persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Basbaum, Allan I.

    1999-01-01

    To address the neurochemistry of the mechanisms that underlie the development of acute and persistent pain, our laboratory has been studying mice with deletions of gene products that have been implicated in nociceptive processing. We have recently raised mice with a deletion of the preprotachykinin-A gene, which encodes the peptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA). These studies have identified a specific behavioral phenotype in which the animals do not detect a window of pain intensities; this window cuts across thermal, mechanical, and chemical modalities. The lowered thermal and mechanical withdrawal thresholds that are produced by tissue or nerve injury, however, were still present in the mutant mice. Thus, the behavioral manifestations of threshold changes in nociceptive processing in the setting of injury do not appear to require SP or NKA. To identify relevant neurochemical factors downstream of the primary afferent, we are also studying the dorsal horn second messenger systems that underlie the development of tissue and nerve injury-induced persistent pain states. We have recently implicated the ? isoform of protein kinase C (PKC?) in the development of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Acute pain processing, by contrast, is intact in the PKC?-null mice. Taken together, these studies emphasize that there is a distinct neurochemistry of acute and persistent pain. Persistent pain should be considered a disease state of the nervous system, not merely a prolonged acute pain symptom of some other disease conditions. PMID:10393891

  4. Cultural Influences on Pain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shilpa

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between pain and ethnicity is shaped by experience, learning and culture. Mistaken beliefs about the nature of pain and disability, resistance to treatment seeking, reluctance to comply with treatment and failure to accept responsibility of the treatment outcome are not culturally or sub-culturally specific obstacles to pain management. A cultural group's expectations and acceptance of pain as a normal part of life will determine whether pain is seen as a clinical problem that requires a clinical solution. The reviewed literature shows disparities in pain treatment based on ethnic background. Multidisciplinary research needs to investigate the models of pain and treatment in different cultural groups to allow us to understand how pain is presented and how beliefs and expectations about treatment can be married with practical solutions and effective evidence-based pain management. PMID:26525084

  5. Ecohydrology on the Threshold?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, John

    2013-04-01

    This presentation suggests that there are three major limitations to the development of ecohydrology as a coherent disciplinary area. One of the principal controls and feedbacks on patterns of plants and water in the environment is the form of the landscape and landscape-forming processes. Yet (eco)geomorphology is typically overlooked as a topic for ecohydrological investigation. Thus, the process domains used to explain patterns is typically overly restricted. As surface change controls the connectivity of other process, this restriction is significant. However, even when surface change is incorporated, there is often an emphasis on subdisciplinary areas, so that the investigation of patterns across process domains is not carried out in a holistic way. For example, studies of the feedbacks of vegetation on flow resistance are carried out significantly differently when considering wind and water flows (and indeed differently for water flows on hillslopes compared to in channels). Human action is the most important global control on ecohydrology, either from a top-down perspective through climate change, or from a bottom-up perspective through land use and land-use change. The actions of people on ecohydrological and ecogeomorphic processes, though, are typically considered in a static way. Techniques of agent-based modelling are being developed to overcome this limitation, but there need to be parallel developments in field techniques to address the data requirements and empirical underpinnings of such approaches. I argue that to cross the threshold into becoming a more mature discipline ecohydrology/ecogeomorphology needs to take on board the limitations of representations of process, pattern and people. Using examples from studies of land degradation in drylands, as well as from more temperate settings, I will suggest how progress may start to be made.

  6. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  7. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying

  8. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this

  9. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.

  10. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  11. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  12. Pain as a channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raouf, Ramin; Quick, Kathryn; Wood, John N.

    2010-01-01

    Mendelian heritable pain disorders have provided insights into human pain mechanisms and suggested new analgesic drug targets. Interestingly, many of the heritable monogenic pain disorders have been mapped to mutations in genes encoding ion channels. Studies in transgenic mice have also implicated many ion channels in damage sensing and pain modulation. It seems likely that aberrant peripheral or central ion channel activity underlies or initiates many pathological pain conditions. Understanding the mechanistic basis of ion channel malfunction in terms of trafficking, localization, biophysics, and consequences for neurotransmission is a potential route to new pain therapies. PMID:21041956

  13. [Pain on mandibular movements].

    PubMed

    Huddleston Slater, J J R; Stegenga, B

    2006-11-01

    Pain or fatigue in the masticatory muscles or pain in the temporomandibular joints are well-known complaints. Diagnosing these complaints, that have a relation with mandibular movements, can be challenging since they can arise from the teeth and surrounding tissues, the temporomandibular joints or other musculoskeletal structures. Also referred pains are a common finding in this area. Pain history and clinical examination are crucial for a comprehensive diagnosis. Besides the disorders underlying the pain (so called axis I), the impact of the pain on the patient's physical and psychosocial functioning can play an important role in the diagnosis (axis II). PMID:17147030

  14. Easing pain in children.

    PubMed

    Manley, L

    1997-01-01

    The assessment and management of pain in children has been essentially ignored until recently. Thankfully, these "dark ages of pain" are ending. The trauma nurse is an integral part of the pain management team and can have a positive impact on outcome by using a combination of relatively simple strategies. These include using multiple types of assessment to measure the severity of pain; providing adequate pain relief with a combination of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions; and carefully monitoring and documenting the efficacy of all pain management approaches. PMID:9391359

  15. [Botulinum toxins for pain].

    PubMed

    Soinila, Seppo; Haanp, Maija

    2011-01-01

    We review the evidence of botulinum toxins in the treatment of pain. Main indications of botulinum toxin treatment, dystonia and spasticity, involve pain. Increasing evidence suggests direct analgesic effects of botulinum. Botulinum inhibits release of pain mediators (substance P, CGRP, excitatory amino acids, ATP, noradrenaline). Clinical trials have consistently shown analgesic effect of botulinum toxin in post-stroke shoulder pain, bladder dysfunction, chronic migraine, neuropathic pain, bruxism and lateral epicondylitis. Other pain conditions have been studied with yet uncertain results. It seems that the number of patients who would benefit from botulinum toxin treatment will increase considerably in the future. PMID:22238920

  16. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  17. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  18. Dorsal Horn Circuits for Persistent Mechanical Pain.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Cedric; Williams, Sean-Paul G; Zhao, Xinyi; Walsh, Claire E; Gedeon, Jeremy Y; Cagle, Natalie E; Goldring, Adam C; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Liu, Zheng; Marell, Paulina S; Seal, Rebecca P

    2015-08-19

    Persistent mechanical hypersensitivity that occurs in the setting of injury or disease remains a major clinical problem largely because the underlying neural circuitry is still not known. Here we report the functional identification of key components of the elusive dorsal horn circuit for mechanical allodynia. We show that the transient expression of VGLUT3 by a discrete population of neurons in the deep dorsal horn is required for mechanical pain and that activation of the cells in the adult conveys mechanical hypersensitivity. The cells, which receive direct low threshold input, point to a novel location for circuit initiation. Subsequent analysis of c-Fos reveals the circuit extends dorsally to nociceptive lamina I projection neurons, and includes lamina II calretinin neurons, which we show also convey mechanical allodynia. Lastly, using inflammatory and neuropathic pain models, we show that multiple microcircuits in the dorsal horn encode this form of pain. PMID:26291162

  19. Pain and Associated Substance Use among Opioid Dependent Individuals Seeking Office-Based Treatment with Buprenorphine-Naloxone: A Needs Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Declan T.; Savant, Jonathan D.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Moore, Brent A.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives A paucity of studies has examined the pain experiences of opioid dependent individuals seeking office-based buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (BNT). We set out to examine, among those seeking BNT: (a) the prevalence of pain types (i.e., recent pain, chronic pain), (b) the characteristics of pain (intensity, frequency, duration, interference, location, and genesis), and (c) substance use to alleviate pain. Methods We surveyed 244 consecutive individuals seeking office-based buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (BNT) for opioid dependence about physical pain and associated substance use. Results Thirty-six percent of respondents reported chronic pain (CP) (i.e., pain lasting at least 3 months) and 36% reported “some pain” (SP) (i.e., past week pain not meeting the threshold for CP). In comparison to SP respondents, those with CP were, on average, older; reported greater current pain intensity, pain frequency, typical pain duration, typical pain intensity, and typical pain interference; were more likely to report shoulder or pelvis and less likely to report stomach or arms as their most bothersome pain location; and were more likely to report accident or nerve damage and less likely to report opioid withdrawal as the genesis of their pain. Both pain subgroups reported similarly high rates of past-week substance use to alleviate pain. Conclusions and Scientific Significance The high rates of pain and self-reported substance use to manage pain suggest the importance of assessing and addressing pain in BNT patients. PMID:23617861

  20. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  1. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Harrison, E. Katherine; Menon, David K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9Agene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks), and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice.

  2. Diabetic neuropathic pain: a role for testosterone metabolites.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Donato; Giatti, Silvia; Romano, Simone; Porretta-Serapiglia, Carla; Bianchi, Roberto; Milanese, Marco; Bonanno, Giambattista; Caruso, Donatella; Viviani, Barbara; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is associated with neuropathic pain in about 50% of diabetic subjects. Clinical management of neuropathic pain is complex and so far unsatisfactory. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the testosterone metabolites, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and 3?-diol, on nociceptive and allodynia thresholds and on molecular and functional parameters related to pain modulation in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord and in the dorsal root ganglia of rats rendered diabetic by streptozotocin injection. Furthermore, the levels of DHT and 3?-diol were analyzed in the spinal cord. Diabetes resulted in a significant decrease in DHT levels in the spinal cord that was reverted by DHT or 3?-diol treatments. In addition, 3?-diol treatment resulted in a significant increase in 3?-diol in the spinal cord compared with control values. Both steroids showed analgesic properties on diabetic neuropathic pain, affecting different pain parameters and possibly by different mechanisms of action. Indeed, DHT counteracted the effect of diabetes on the mechanical nociceptive threshold, pre- and post-synaptic components, glutamate release, astrocyte immunoreactivity, and expression of interleukin-1? (IL1?), while 3?-diol was effective on tactile allodynia threshold, glutamate release, astrocyte immunoreactivity and the expression of substance P, toll-like receptor 4, tumor necrosis factor-?, transforming growth factor ?-1, IL1?, and translocator protein. These results indicate that testosterone metabolites are potential agents for the treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:24424289

  3. Advanced Innovations for Pain.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Tim J; Deer, Timothy R; Hayek, Salim M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems in terms of both the number of patients afflicted and health care costs. Most patients with chronic pain are treated with medications as the mainstay of therapy, and yet most medically treated patients continue to report ongoing pain. Additionally, adverse effects from pain medications represent a major challenge for clinicians and patients. Spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal drug delivery systems are well-established techniques that have been utilized for over 25 years. Intrathecal drug delivery systems have proven efficacy for a wide variety of intractable pain conditions and fewer adverse effects than systemic medical therapy in patients with refractory cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation is cost-effective and provides improved pain control compared with medical therapy in patients with a variety of refractory pain conditions including complex regional pain syndrome, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chronic radiculopathy. Patients who have intractable pain that has not responded to reasonable attempts at conservative pain care measures should be referred to a qualified interventional pain specialist to determine candidacy for the procedures discussed in this article. PMID:26848005

  4. Increased thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds in rats with depressive-like behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miao; Qi, Wei-Jing; Gao, Ge; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Clinical observations suggest that depressed patients were less sensitive to experimental pain than healthy subjects. However, few animal studies are reported concerning the association of depression and pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) induced depression on the perceived intensity of painful stimulation in rats. We measured the thermal and mechanical paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT) of normal and spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats using hot plate test and von Frey test, respectively. The results showed that rats exposed to UCMS exhibited significantly higher thermal and mechanical pain thresholds in comparison to the non-depressed controls. In particular, the PWT of the SNL group was restored to nearly normal level after three weeks of UCMS, and even comparable to that of the control group. These results strongly suggest that the depressed subjects have decreased sensitivity to externally applied noxious stimulation, which is consistent with our previous findings. Research Highlight ? Unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) induces depressive behaviors in rats ? UCMS elevates contact heat paw withdrawal threshold in normal rats ? UCMS elevates mechanical paw withdrawal threshold in normal rats ? UCMS elevates mechanical paw withdrawal threshold in SNL rats PMID:20637742

  5. Orthodoxy, recalcitrance and in-between: describing variation in seed storage characteristics using threshold responses to water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tolerance of desiccation is typically described by a threshold or low-water-content-limit to survival. This convention provides fairly good distinction between orthodox and recalcitrant seeds, which show thresholds of less than about 0.07 and greater than about 0.2 g H2O g dw-1, respectively. Thresh...

  6. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  7. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  8. INSOMNIA IN CHRONIC DISABLING MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN DISORDERS IS INDEPENDENT OF PAIN AND DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Asih, Sali; Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G.; Brede, Emily; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Insomnia is frequently experienced by patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal disorders, but is often seen as simply a symptom of pain or depression, and not as an independent disorder. Compared to those who experience only chronic pain, patients with both chronic pain and insomnia report higher pain intensity, more depressive symptoms, and greater distress. However, insomnia has not yet been systematically studied in a chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population. PURPOSES This study assessed the prevalence and severity of patient-reported insomnia, as well as the relationship among insomnia, pain intensity, and depressive symptoms, in a chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING A retrospective study of prospectively captured data. PATIENT SAMPLE A consecutive cohort of 326 chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability patients (85% with spinal injuries) entered a functional restoration treatment program. All patients signed a consent form to participate in this protocol. OUTCOME MEASURES Insomnia was assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), a validated patient-report measure of insomnia symptoms. Four patient groups were formed: No Clinically Significant Insomnia (score 0–7); Sub-Threshold Insomnia (score 8–14); Moderate Clinical Insomnia (score 15–21); and Severe Clinical Insomnia (score 22–28). Three patterns of sleep disturbance were also evaluated: Early, Middle, and Late Insomnia. Additional validated psychosocial patient-report data were collected, including the Pain Visual Analog Scale (PVAS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ). METHODS Patients completed a standard psychosocial assessment battery upon admission to the functional restoration program. The program included a quantitatively-directed exercise process in conjunction with a multimodal disability management approach. The four insomnia groups were compared on demographic and psychosocial variables. The shared variances among insomnia, depression, and pain were determined by partial correlational analyses. The writing of this article was supported in part by Grant 1K05 MH 71892 from NIH, focusing on evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to musculoskeletal pain and the monitoring of valid outcomes. None of the authors involved in this study had a conflict of interest. RESULTS The presence of No Clinically Significant Insomnia, Sub-threshold Insomnia, Moderate Clinical Insomnia and Severe Clinical Insomnia was found in 5.5%, 21.2%, 39.6%, and 33.7% of the cohort, respectively. More than 70% of patients reported moderate to severe insomnia symptoms, which is a considerably higher prevalence than found in most patient cohorts studied previously. A step-wise pattern was found, in which Severe Clinical Insomnia patients reported the highest pain, the most severe depressive symptoms, and the greatest disability. The Severe Clinical Insomnia patients also reported a higher number of sleep disturbance types (Early, Middle, and Late insomnia) than the other 3 groups. In fact, 62.9% of them reported all 3 disturbance types. Although correlations were found between insomnia and depressive symptoms, and between insomnia and pain, the shared variances were small (12.9% and 3.6%, respectively), indicating that depression and pain are separate constructs from insomnia. CONCLUSION This research indicates that insomnia is a significant and pervasive problem in a chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population. Most importantly, although insomnia has traditionally been assumed to be simply a symptom of pain or depression, the findings of the present study reveal that it is a construct relatively independent from both pain and depression. Specific insomnia assessment and treatment is therefore recommended for this chronic musculoskeletal pain with disability population. PMID:24333458

  9. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds.

    PubMed

    Groer, P G; Carnes, B A

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types. PMID:12593429

  10. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  11. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Solutions: An appointment secretary was reprimanded for poor attendance due to chronic pain. She was provided periodic ... flexible schedule to allow more time to access public transit. A switchboard operator with chronic pain and fibromyalgia was ... ...

  12. Pain in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  13. Magnets for Pain Relief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for any health-related purpose, yet static, or permanent, magnets are widely marketed for pain control. This fact ... Blackman MR, Kingman A, et al. Low intensity permanent magnets in the treatment of chronic lumbar radicular pain. ...

  14. Dysmenorrhea: Painful Periods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dysmenorrhea? Glossary What is dysmenorrhea? Pain associated with menstruation is called dysmenorrhea . How common is dysmenorrhea? Dysmenorrhea ... the menstrual period? Pain usually occurs right before menstruation starts, as the level of prostaglandins increases in ...

  15. Patient Education on Pain

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... People with Pain Press Room Position Statements Patient Education on Pain AAPM Past President, Perry G. Fine, ... Member Center Patient Center Research Advocacy Practice Management Education Annual Meeting Contact Us Privacy Policy Sitemap Close ...

  16. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as dextromethorphan and ketamine nasal calcitonin, especially for deep bone pain, and topical local anesthetic creams and ... the parts of the brain that control pain (deep brain stimulation). A recent option involves the use ...

  17. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... only on one side Hip pain Discomfort with bending over or standing after sitting for long periods ... process. It will help relieve pain and increase strength. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist for ...

  18. Pain in Blood Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Niscola, Pasquale; Tendas, Andrea; Scaramucci, Laura; Giovannini, Marco; De Sanctis, Vitaliana

    2011-01-01

    Patients with blood-related cancers (BRC) suffer from a substantial symptom burden, including several pain syndromes sustained by different causes and pathogenetic mechanisms. So, with regard to pain, a multifaceted clinical scenario may be observed in this setting. Indeed, pain may be correlated to disease itself, to disease-associated complications, to iatrogenic causes or may be due to unrelated clinical conditions. A close diagnostic procedure for the assessment of the underlying causes of the pain and of its pathogenetic mechanisms may direct the treatment approach which should be based on a multidisciplinary management and requires the integration of etiology-targeted interventions and painkilling drugs. The World Health Organization's three-step analgesic ladder for cancer pain relief can provide adequate pain control using oral drugs in most patients with BRC on pain, although more complex interventions may be necessary for many difficult-to-treat pain syndromes which are not infrequently encountered in this setting. PMID:22346041

  19. The dynamic pain connectome.

    PubMed

    Kucyi, Aaron; Davis, Karen D

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, studies of how pain and attention modulate one another involved explicit cognitive-state manipulations. However, emerging evidence suggests that spontaneous brain-wide network communication is intrinsically dynamic on multiple timescales, and attentional states are in constant fluctuation. Here, in light of studies on neural mechanisms of spontaneous attentional fluctuations and pain variability, we introduce the concept of a dynamic 'pain connectome' in the brain. We describe how recent progress in our understanding of individual differences in intrinsic attention to pain and neural network dynamics in chronic pain can facilitate development of personalized pain therapies. Furthermore, we emphasize that the dynamics of pain-attention interactions must be accounted for in the contemporary search for a 'neural signature' of the pain connectome. PMID:25541287

  20. Communicating about Cancer Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with cancer may be reluctant to discuss their pain with their doctors for a variety of reasons. NCI sponsors research that examines the barriers that prevent patients from talking about pain.

  1. Pain in neonate.

    PubMed

    Kabra, N S; Udani, R H

    1999-01-01

    Anatomical, functional and neurochemical maturation of pain pathways is well developed in fetus and neonates. Various physiological and behavioural responses to painful stimuli in neonates substantiate their ability to feel pain. Biological effects of pain are systematically studied in human fetus and neonates. Pain expressions in the newborn not only reflect tissue damage but are a function of ongoing behavioural state. The ultimate aim should be to keep neonates free from pain and other stressful stimuli as far as possible, by advocating minimal handling protocol, giving comforts after painful procedures, local anesthesia while carrying out painful procedures like cutdown and insertion of chest tubes, and if a baby is ventilated fentanyl and/or midazalam infusion must be carried out during initial periods of ventilation. PMID:10798044

  2. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... it is good to prepare yourself for natural childbirth. ... The pain felt during childbirth is different for every woman. Some women choose natural childbirth, or giving birth without medicine for pain. If all goes ...

  3. American Pain Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Preserve Coverage for Spinal Injections - A Win for Back Pain Patients APS, a member of the Multi-society ... therapies for millions of people who suffer from back pain. Read More » Posted March 24, 2016 Leidos Launches ...

  4. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... was established to enhance pain research and promote collaboration among researchers across the many NIH Institutes and ... resources and tools, and hosts events to promote collaboration and highlight advances in pain research. Follow @NIHPainResearch ...

  5. Lack of endogenous opioid release during sustained visceral pain: a [11C]carfentanil PET study.

    PubMed

    Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Geeraerts, Brecht; Bormans, Guy; Van Laere, Koen; Tack, Jan; Van Oudenhove, Lukas

    2013-10-01

    Opioidergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system is involved in somatic pain, but its role in visceral pain remains unknown. We aimed to quantify endogenous opioid release in the brain during sustained painful gastric distension. Therefore, 2 dynamic [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography scans were performed in 20 healthy subjects during 2 conditions: sustained (20 minutes) painful proximal gastric balloon distension at predetermined individual discomfort threshold (PAIN) and no distension (NO PAIN), in counterbalanced order. Pain levels were assessed during scanning using visual analogue scales and after scanning using the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Emotional state was rated after scanning using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Distribution volume ratios in 21 volumes of interest in the pain matrix were used to quantify endogenous opioid release. During the PAIN compared to the NO PAIN condition, volunteers reported a significantly higher increase in negative affect (5.501.29 versus 0.101.08, P=.0147) as well as higher pain ratings (sensory: 74.059.23 versus 1.500.95, P<.0001; affective: 91.428.13 versus 4.336.56, P<.0001). No difference in endogenous opioid release was demonstrated in any of the volumes of interest. Thus, contrary to its somatic counterpart, no opioid release is detected in the brain during sustained visceral pain, despite similar pain intensities. Endogenous opioids may play a less important role in visceral compared to somatic pain. PMID:23792286

  6. Posttonsillectomy pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sutters, Kimberly A; Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-02-01

    Tonsillectomy, used to treat a variety of pediatric disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, peritonsillar cellulitis or abscesses, and very frequent throat infection, is known to produce nausea, vomiting, and prolonged, moderate-to-severe pain. The authors review the causes of posttonsillectomy pain, current findings on the efficacy of various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in pain management, recommendations for patient and family teaching regarding pain management, and best practices for improving medication adherence. PMID:24445532

  7. Pain Examination and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a clinical challenge to health care providers who care for hand disorders. Pathologic pain that prevents recovery leads to dissatisfaction for both patients and providers. Despite pain being common, the root cause is often difficult to diagnose. This article reviews the examination and diagnostic tools that are helpful in identifying pathologic and neuropathic pain. This article provides tools to speed recognition of these processes to allow earlier intervention and better patient outcomes. PMID:26611385

  8. [Pain and cognition].

    PubMed

    Moroni, Christine; Laurent, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    Pain is a multidimensional subjective experience mediated by emotion, attitudes and other perceptual influences. The functional deficit of patients suffering from pain could be expressed by a cognitive complaint. In this paper, cognitive repercussions of pain, associated factors and iatrogenic factors are presented. According to all the relation between pain and cognition seems complex and involves factors such as depression, anxiety, and medical treatment among others. All these factors interact together and produce a specific cognitive complaint for each patient. PMID:16556515

  9. Ketogenic Diets and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Masino, Susan A.; Ruskin, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Ketogenic diets are well-established as a successful anticonvulsant therapy. Based on overlap between mechanisms postulated to underlie pain and inflammation, and mechanisms postulated to underlie therapeutic effects of ketogenic diets, recent studies have explored the ability for ketogenic diets to reduce pain. Here we review clinical and basic research thus far exploring the impact of a ketogenic diet on thermal pain, inflammation, and neuropathic pain. PMID:23680946

  10. [Osteoporosis pain management].

    PubMed

    Dinges, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic disease with an enormous impact on health care costs. Approximately 8 Mio. people are affected in Germany. A reasonable part of them is suffering from acute and/or chronic pain due to osteoporotic bone fractures and musculoskeletal malfunctioning. Therefore, pain therapy is based on the principles of acute pain treatment and chronic pain therapy.Drug effects and side effects have to be considered with respect to fracture healing, bone mineral density and fracture risk. PMID:19750435

  11. Fault Tolerance with Noisy and Slow Measurements and Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A.; Brennen, Gavin K.; Twamley, Jason

    2010-09-01

    It is not so well known that measurement-free quantum error correction protocols can be designed to achieve fault-tolerant quantum computing. Despite their potential advantages in terms of the relaxation of accuracy, speed, and addressing requirements, they have usually been overlooked since they are expected to yield a very bad threshold. We show that this is not the case. We design fault-tolerant circuits for the 9-qubit Bacon-Shor code and find an error threshold for unitary gates and preparation of p(p,g)thresh=3.7610-5 (30% of the best known result for the same code using measurement) while admitting up to 1/3 error rates for measurements and allocating no constraints on measurement speed. We further show that demanding gate error rates sufficiently below the threshold pushes the preparation threshold up to p(p)thresh=1/3.

  12. The effects of exposure to repeated minor pain during the neonatal period on formalin pain behaviour and thermal withdrawal latencies.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C Celeste; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Preterm infants undergoing untreated, repeated painful procedures as part of their early experience are more likely to behave differently to pain as they mature than infants who were born at term and did not experience excessive exogenous pain. The neonatal rat model was used to investigate the short- and long-term effects of repeated pain in infancy on later development of pain responses. Newborn rat pups were randomly assigned by litter to be left unhandled (UH), handled by being removed from the dam for 15 min four times daily (H), and being handled and receiving pain from a paw prick with a 26G needle four times daily (P) on postnatal days (PD) 2 through 8 (PD2-PD8). Maternal behaviour and grooming of pups on their return to the nest were recorded at PD6 for H and P pups. At PD15, PD36 and PD65, animals were first tested for latency to thermal stimulation threshold using the Hargreaves test and then for inflammatory pain using the formalin test. Pups in the HP group received significantly more grooming from their mothers (359 s) than pups in the H group (295 s, P<0.0001). When accounting for differences in maternal grooming, a decreased thermal threshold in the P group compared with the H group (6.04 s versus 5.3 s, P<0.05) was found, although the correlations were not significant between maternal grooming and thermal thresholds. No group differences were seen with the formalin test. Interestingly, age was a significant factor in both tests, with younger animals showing fewer pain behaviours regardless of group or maternal grooming of the pup. Sex was significant at one age only in latency to thermal stimulation testing. The results suggest that changes in maternal care may be an important factor mediating the long-term effects of repeated neonatal experiences of pain. PMID:14679416

  13. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs

  14. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The location of knee pain can help identify the problem. Pain on the front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or ... synovial fluid) that forms behind the knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in ...

  15. Paine Appointed Administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon announcing the appointment of Dr. Thomas O. Paine as Administrator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The ceremony was held at the White House. Paine had been serving as acting administrator. From left to right: President Richard M. Nixon NASA Administrator Dr. Thomas O. Paine Vice President Spiro T. Agnew

  16. A longitudinal study of pain, personality, and brain plasticity following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Katz, Joel; Davis, Karen D

    2016-03-01

    We do not know precisely why pain develops and becomes chronic after peripheral nerve injury (PNI), but it is likely due to biological and psychological factors. Here, we tested the hypotheses that (1) high Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores at the time of injury and repair are associated with pain and cold sensitivity after 1-year recovery and (2) insula gray matter changes reflect the course of injury and improvements over time. Ten patients with complete median and/or ulnar nerve transections and surgical repair were tested ∼3 weeks after surgical nerve repair (time 1) and ∼1 year later for 6 of the 10 patients (time 2). Patients and 10 age-/sex-matched healthy controls completed questionnaires that assessed pain (patients) and personality and underwent quantitative sensory testing and 3T MRI to assess cortical thickness. In patients, pain intensity and neuropathic pain correlated with pain catastrophizing. Time 1 pain catastrophizing trended toward predicting cold pain thresholds at time 2, and at time 1 cortical thickness of the right insula was reduced. At time 2, chronic pain was related to the time 1 pain-PCS relationship and cold sensitivity, pain catastrophizing correlated with cold pain threshold, and insula thickness reversed to control levels. This study highlights the interplay between personality, sensory function, and pain in patients following PNI and repair. The PCS-pain association suggests that a focus on affective or negative components of pain could render patients vulnerable to chronic pain. Cold sensitivity and structural insula changes may reflect altered thermosensory or sensorimotor awareness representations. PMID:26588697

  17. Pain and pain control in children.

    PubMed

    Schechter, N L

    1985-05-01

    Focused research on pain and pain control in children has developed primarily in the last 10 years and even now is woefully inadequate in relation to the magnitude of the problem. The available research, inferences from the adult literature, and anecdotal information all indicate the elusive nature of pain. Pain is not solely a fixed neurophysiologic response to a noxious stimulus but a product of the interaction of many variables such as age, cognitive set, personality, ethnic background, and emotional state. These factors exert a tremendous influence on the suffering which surrounds the pain message. Technology exists at present to eliminate or substantially reduce pain in almost all cases. There remains, however, a tendency, which is even more pronounced with respect to children, to underestimate or ignore pain. In an overall approach to pain in children, the following points should be considered: A high index of suspicion is necessary to determine if children are experiencing pain since they may have difficulty verbalizing their discomfort. In infants, physiologic variables should be considered (increased heart rate, palmar sweating, increased respiratory rate), and in preschoolers, time should be taken to ascertain that the child actually understands the word "pain" if it is used in questioning them. Some method of continuous monitoring, such as a visual analogue scan, should be considered as part of the treatment plan. Adequate analgesia should be provided. The appropriate dose should be administered at the appropriate pharmacokinetic time. Too little medication may cause obsessive attention to medication-related issues. Too much medication may cause sedation and lack of mental clarity, which is often anxiety-producing for both the parents and the child. The usefulness of p.r.n. medication has been seriously questioned and a time-contingent as opposed to pain-contingent strategy should be applied. Fears of addiction are generally unwarranted. Adjunctive medication may increase the value of offered narcotics and counteract some of their side effects. Although this monograph has focused more attention on pharmacologic than on nonpharmacologic approaches to pain, this is merely a reflection of available data and not necessarily of relative importance. The importance of distraction from pain by nursing, medical, or child life personnel using play techniques cannot be overestimated. Every attempt should be made to relax the child by using creative strategies. Preparation of the child for procedures is often helpful as some of the fear of the unknown is eliminated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2861066

  18. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the dorsolateral pons in the region of the parabrachial nucleus. Furthermore, the magnitudes of these signal reductions in all three brainstem regions were significantly correlated to analgesia magnitude. Defining conditioned pain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry. PMID:26343321

  19. Phenotyping Chronic Pelvic Pain Based on Latent Class Modeling of Physical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, B. W.; Grey, S. F.; Reichenbach, M.; McCarroll, M.; Von Gruenigen, V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Defining clinical phenotypes based on physical examination is required for clarifying heterogeneous disorders such as chronic pelvic pain (CPP). The objective of this study was to determine the number of classes within 4 examinable regions and then establish threshold and optimal exam criteria for the classes discovered. Methods. A total of 476 patients meeting the criteria for CPP were examined using pain pressure threshold (PPT) algometry and standardized numeric scale (NRS) pain ratings at 30 distinct sites over 4 pelvic regions. Exploratory factor analysis, latent profile analysis, and ROC curves were then used to identify classes, optimal examination points, and threshold scores. Results. Latent profile analysis produced two classes for each region: high and low pain groups. The optimal examination sites (and high pain minimum thresholds) were for the abdominal wall region: the pair at the midabdomen (PPT threshold depression of > 2); vulvar vestibule region: 10:00 position (NRS > 2); pelvic floor region: puborectalis (combined NRS > 6); vaginal apex region: uterosacral ligaments (combined NRS > 8). Conclusion. Physical examination scores of patients with CPP are best categorized into two classes: high pain and low pain. Standardization of the physical examination in CPP provides both researchers and general gynecologists with a validated technique. PMID:24455240

  20. Pain Management for Children during Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vasquenza, Kelly; Ruble, Kathy; Chen, Allen; Billett, Carol; Kozlowski, Lori; Atwater, Sara; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Pain management for children during bone marrow and stem cell transplantation is a significant clinical challenge for the health care team. Pain management strategies vary by institution. This paper reports on the use of a pediatric pain management service and patient-and caregiver-controlled analgesia for children undergoing transplant. This 2-year retrospective chart review examined the pain management practices and outcomes of children undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants in a large urban teaching hospital during 2008 and 2009. We concluded that patient- and caregiver-controlled analgesia is a well-tolerated modality for pain control during hospitalization for transplantation at this institution. PMID:25267531

  1. Pain Phenotype in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: Classification and Measurement Properties of painDETECT and Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Scale in a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Moreton, Bryan J; Tew, Victoria; das Nair, Roshan; Wheeler, Maggie; Walsh, David A; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple mechanisms are involved in pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA). The painDETECT and Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) questionnaires screen for neuropathic pain and may also identify individuals with musculoskeletal pain who exhibit abnormal central pain processing. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate painDETECT and S-LANSS for classification agreement and fit to the Rasch model, and to explore their relationship to pain severity and pain mechanisms in OA. Methods A total of 192 patients with knee OA completed questionnaires covering different aspects of pain. Another group of 77 patients with knee OA completed questionnaires and underwent quantitative sensory testing for pressurepain thresholds (PPTs). Agreement between painDETECT and S-LANSS was evaluated using kappa coefficients and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Rasch analysis of both questionnaires was conducted. Relationships between screening questionnaires and measures of pain severity or PPTs were calculated using correlations. Results PainDETECT and S-LANSS shared a stronger correlation with each other than with measures of pain severity. ROC curves identified optimal cutoff scores for painDETECT and S-LANSS to maximize agreement, but the kappa coefficient was low (? = 0.330.46). Rasch analysis supported the measurement properties of painDETECT but not those of S-LANSS. Higher painDETECT scores were associated with widespread reductions in PPTs. Conclusion The data suggest that painDETECT assesses pain quality associated with augmented central pain processing in patients with OA. Although developed as a screening questionnaire, painDETECT may also function as a measure of characteristics that indicate augmented central pain processing. Agreement between painDETECT and S-LANSS for pain classification was low, and it is currently unknown which tool may best predict treatment outcome. PMID:25155472

  2. Investigation of the paradoxical painful sensation ('illusion of pain') produced by a thermal grill.

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, Didier; Kern, Delphine; Rouaud, Jean; Pelle-Lancien, Emilie; Morain, Françoise

    2005-03-01

    A paradoxical painful sensation can be elicited by the simultaneous application of innocuous warm and cold stimuli to the skin. In the present study, we analyzed the conditions of production of this unique experimental illusion of pain in 52 healthy volunteers (27 men, 25 women). The stimuli were produced by a thermode composed of six bars whose temperature was controlled by Peltier elements. The temperature of alternate (even- and odd-numbered) bars could be controlled independently to produce various patterns of the 'thermal grill'. After measuring the cold and heat pain thresholds, a series of combinations of warm and cold stimuli, whose distance to the thermal pain threshold was at least 4 degrees C, were applied on the palmar surface of the right hand during 30s. After each stimulus, the subjects had to describe and rate their sensations on visual analog scales. Paradoxical painful sensations, mostly described as burning, were reported by all the subjects but three. However, the phenomenon was less frequent in approximately one third of ('low responder') volunteers. The frequency and intensity of such painful sensations were directly related to the magnitude (i.e. 5-25 degrees C) of the difference of the temperature between the warm and cold bars of the grill. The combination of increasingly colder temperature to a given warm temperature induces similar effects as combining increasingly warmer temperature to a given cold temperature. These results suggest that pain can be the result of a simple addition of non-noxious warm and cold signals. PMID:15733641

  3. The role of sensitization in musculoskeletal shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    Borstad, John; Woeste, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral and central sensitization are neurophysiological processes that can prolong painful conditions. Painful shoulder conditions are often persistent, perhaps due to the presence of sensitization. Method: This manuscript summarizes six studies that have evaluated those with musculoskeletal shoulder pain for the presence of sensitization. Results: All six manuscripts report evidence of peripheral sensitization, while central sensitization was described in five of the studies. The chronicity of symptoms in subjects who were included in the studies is probably influencing this finding. The primary somatosensory test used to assess sensitization in these studies was Pressure Pain Threshold, a test for lowered nociceptive thresholds. Discussion: It appears that peripheral sensitization manifests consistently in those with musculoskeletal shoulder pathology, probably due to the inflammatory processes related to tissue injury. Central sensitization, while not universally present, was reported in a majority of the manuscripts. Because central sensitization is thought to be a key step on the pathway to chronic pain, evidence for its presence in those with shoulder pain is significant. Clinicians should expect the presence of sensitization with shoulder pathology and make appropriate choices about interventions so as not to exacerbate pain. PMID:26443971

  4. Pain perception in female adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ludscher, Petra; von Kalckreuth, Clemens; Parzer, Peter; Kaess, Michael; Resch, Franz; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian; Brunner, Romuald

    2015-03-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe and often debilitating psychiatric disorder that begins during adolescence. Core features of BPD are affective dysregulation, dysfunctional self-concepts, and difficulties in social interactive domains. A widely accepted marker for severe emotion dysregulation in adult BPD is decreased pain sensitivity. Until now it is unclear whether this characteristic feature of BPD is already present during adolescence. Thus, this study aims to investigate pain sensitivity in adolescent patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for BPD. 20 female adolescent patients with BPD (mean age 16.4years) and 20 healthy age-matched control participants were investigated. Detection and pain thresholds for thermal stimuli were assessed on both hands. Furthermore, self-rating instruments were used to assess overall psychopathology, dissociation, and depression. We found significantly higher pain thresholds in patients with BPD than in healthy controls. Patients with BPD had higher intensities of depression, overall psychopathology, and dissociative symptoms, but there was no correlation between pain sensitivity and any of these measures of psychopathology. These findings are in line with previous findings in adult BPD patients concerning lower pain sensitivity as compared to healthy controls. This provides support for the idea that disturbed pain processing is not only a consequence of chronic BPD but is already present in early stages of BPD. PMID:25053123

  5. Ethnic differences in pain and pain management.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2012-05-01

    Considerable evidence demonstrates substantial ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, progression and outcomes of pain-related conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying these group differences is of crucial importance in reducing and eliminating disparities in the pain experience. Over recent years, accumulating evidence has identified a variety of processes, from neurophysiological factors to structural elements of the healthcare system, that may contribute to shaping individual differences in pain. For example, the experience of pain differentially activates stress-related physiological responses across various ethnic groups, members of different ethnic groups appear to use differing coping strategies in managing pain complaints, providers' treatment decisions vary as a function of patient ethnicity and pharmacies in predominantly minority neighborhoods are far less likely to stock potent analgesics. These diverse factors, and others may all play a role in facilitating elevated levels of pain-related suffering among individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds. Here, we present a brief, nonexhaustive review of the recent literature and potential physiological and sociocultural mechanisms underlying these ethnic group disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:23687518

  6. Ethnic differences in pain and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Considerable evidence demonstrates substantial ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, progression and outcomes of pain-related conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying these group differences is of crucial importance in reducing and eliminating disparities in the pain experience. Over recent years, accumulating evidence has identified a variety of processes, from neurophysiological factors to structural elements of the healthcare system, that may contribute to shaping individual differences in pain. For example, the experience of pain differentially activates stress-related physiological responses across various ethnic groups, members of different ethnic groups appear to use differing coping strategies in managing pain complaints, providers’ treatment decisions vary as a function of patient ethnicity and pharmacies in predominantly minority neighborhoods are far less likely to stock potent analgesics. These diverse factors, and others may all play a role in facilitating elevated levels of pain-related suffering among individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds. Here, we present a brief, nonexhaustive review of the recent literature and potential physiological and sociocultural mechanisms underlying these ethnic group disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:23687518

  7. Sweet Taste and Menthol Increase Cough Reflex Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Dalton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  8. Psychological Aspects of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Rosevelt

    1983-01-01

    Since its inception in June 1979, over 500 patients have been treated at the King/Drew Pain Center in Los Angeles. Based upon the treatment and observations of this patient group, this paper describes the psychologic aspects in patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain, low back pain, phantom limb pain, chest pain, and arthritic pain. PMID:6864816

  9. Neuropathic orofacial pain: cannabinoids as a therapeutic avenue.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick; McKenna, Joseph P; McCreary, Christine; Downer, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) exists in several forms including pathologies such as burning mouth syndrome (BMS), persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). BMS and PIFP are classically diagnosed by excluding other facial pain syndromes. TN and PHN are most often diagnosed based on a typical history and presenting pain characteristics. The pathophysiology of some of these conditions is still unclear and hence treatment options tend to vary and include a wide variety of treatments including cognitive behaviour therapy, anti-depressants, anti-convulsants and opioids; however such treatments often have limited efficacy with a great amount of inter-patient variability and poorly tolerated side effects. Analgesia is one the principal therapeutic targets of the cannabinoid system and many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of cannabinoid compounds in the treatment of neuropathic pain. This review will investigate the potential use of cannabinoids in the treatment of symptoms associated with NOP. PMID:25150831

  10. Thresholds for Correcting Errors, Erasures, and Faulty Syndrome Measurements in Degenerate Quantum Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumer, Ilya; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Pryadko, Leonid P.

    2015-07-01

    We suggest a technique for constructing lower (existence) bounds for the fault-tolerant threshold to scalable quantum computation applicable to degenerate quantum codes with sublinear distance scaling. We give explicit analytic expressions combining probabilities of erasures, depolarizing errors, and phenomenological syndrome measurement errors for quantum low-density parity-check codes with logarithmic or larger distances. These threshold estimates are parametrically better than the existing analytical bound based on percolation.

  11. Thresholds for Correcting Errors, Erasures, and Faulty Syndrome Measurements in Degenerate Quantum Codes.

    PubMed

    Dumer, Ilya; Kovalev, Alexey A; Pryadko, Leonid P

    2015-07-31

    We suggest a technique for constructing lower (existence) bounds for the fault-tolerant threshold to scalable quantum computation applicable to degenerate quantum codes with sublinear distance scaling. We give explicit analytic expressions combining probabilities of erasures, depolarizing errors, and phenomenological syndrome measurement errors for quantum low-density parity-check codes with logarithmic or larger distances. These threshold estimates are parametrically better than the existing analytical bound based on percolation. PMID:26274403

  12. Amplitudes of Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Are Useful to Detect Small Fiber Involvement in Painful Mixed Fiber Neuropathies in Addition to Quantitative Sensory Testing An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels; Kahn, Ann-Kathrin; Zeller, Daniel; Katsarava, Zaza; Sommer, Claudia; eyler, Nurcan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of pain-related evoked potentials (PREP) elicited by electrical stimulation for the identification of small fiber involvement in patients with mixed fiber neuropathy (MFN). Eleven MFN patients with clinical signs of large fiber impairment and neuropathic pain and ten healthy controls underwent clinical and electrophysiological evaluation. Small fiber function, electrical conductivity and morphology were examined by quantitative sensory testing (QST), PREP, and skin punch biopsy. MFN was diagnosed following clinical and electrophysiological examination (chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy: n?=?6; vasculitic neuropathy: n?=?3; chronic axonal neuropathy: n?=?2). The majority of patients with MFN characterized their pain by descriptors that mainly represent C-fiber-mediated pain. In QST, patients displayed elevated cold, warm, mechanical, and vibration detection thresholds and cold pain thresholds indicative of MFN. PREP amplitudes in patients correlated with cold (p?thresholds (p?pain and the presence of par-/dysesthesias correlated negatively with PREP amplitudes (p?thresholds, burning pain, and par-/dysesthesias support employing PREP amplitudes as an additional tool in conjunction with QST for detecting small fiber impairment in patients with MFN. PMID:26696950

  13. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  14. [Neuropathic pain enhances expression of HCN2 channel in rat cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus].

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Li-Cai

    2014-06-25

    The purpose of this research is to explore the distribution and expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels subtype 2 (HCN2) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting nucleus in neuropathic pain, and provide experimental evidence to reveal the biological function and regulation mechanisms of CSF-contacting nucleus in neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain model was produced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Intracerebroventricular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) labeled with horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP) was used to specifically mark distal CSF-contacting nucleus. The thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats were recorded to detect the change of pain threshold. The expressions HCN2 channel and c-Fos proteins in CSF-contacting nucleus were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot. The results showed that, compared with the control group, CTb-treated rats did not show any differences in the expressions of HCN2 channel and c-Fos proteins in CSF-contacting nucleus, as well as pain threshold. At 7, 14 d after CCI operation, the model rats showed not only significantly increased expressions of HCN2 channel and c-Fos in CSF-contacting nucleus, but also decreased pain threshold. ZD7288, a HCN2 channel blocker, could reverse the above changes in neuropathic pain model rats. These results suggest that the CSF-contacting nucleus may be involved in the process of neuropathic pain via the HCN2 channel. PMID:24964850

  15. Efficacy and safety of cimicoxib in the control of perioperative pain in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Grandemange, E; Fournel, S; Woehrl, F

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of cimicoxib (Cimalgex; Vtoquinol SA) for the control of perioperative pain in dogs. Methods A double-blind, randomized, controlled multi-centre field study was conducted in 237 dogs undergoing orthopaedic or soft tissue surgery. Pain was monitored by the attending veterinarian over the 7 days following the surgical procedure using two pain-scoring systems and a visual analogue scale. An enhanced monitoring protocol for postoperative pain was utilized during the first 24 hours after surgery. The dog owner's assessment of perceived analgesia during this time period was also recorded. Results Cimicoxib demonstrated statistically significant non-inferiority compared to carprofen. These findings were confirmed by owners assessments and by the evolution of the pain scores. Both drugs were well tolerated throughout the study. Clinical Significance Cimicoxib had non-inferior efficacy and tolerability when compared to carprofen for the control of perioperative pain in dogs undergoing orthopaedic or soft tissue surgery. PMID:23710692

  16. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,

  17. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  18. [Painful neuropathies and small fiber involvement].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2014-12-01

    It is customary to consider that a purely sensory and painful neuropathy accompanied by normal electroneuromyographic examination may be or must be a small fiber neuropathy. This leads to perform specific tests, such as measuring the intra-epidermal nerve fiber density on skin biopsy or neurophysiological tests, such as evoked potentials to noxious stimuli (laser) or quantification of thermal sensory thresholds. However, these tests are only sensitive to the loss of small fibers (A-delta and C), which does not reflect the mechanisms responsible for peripheral neuropathic pain. Selective loss of small sensory fibers inherently generates a sensory deficit that does not necessarily present a painful character. Also, assigning the cause of a painful neuropathy to a small fiber neuropathy has no pathophysiological sense, although there are indirect links between these two conditions. In fact, it is not possible to explain univocally peripheral neuropathic pain, which reflects complex and diverse mechanisms, involving different types of nerve fibers. In this context, the clinical and laboratory approach must be improved to better understand the underlying mechanisms. It is imperative to interpret the data provided by laboratory tests and to correlate these data to the clinical signs and symptoms presented by the patients. Thus, one must go beyond many a priori and misinterpretations that unfortunately exist in this area at present and are not based on any solid pathophysiological basis. PMID:25459125

  19. Reducing pain during procedures.

    PubMed

    Liebelt, E L

    1996-10-01

    There is an increasing focus on the recognition, assessment, and management of pain in children. Children undergo many painful procedures in different clinical environments and are frequently undertreated for their pain. The pediatrician should be familiar with general concepts about the perception of pain in children. Many pain-assessment tools have been developed and restructured to provide the clinician with valid and reliable scales to assess pain in children and assess the effect of interventions. New pharmacologic agents for conscious sedation are being used with increasing frequency in the pediatric outpatient setting for reducing pain and anxiety. Also there has been increasing use of regional anesthetic techniques for procedures once requiring general anesthesia. There has been an increase in the development of topical anesthetics as well as modifying injectable local anesthetic to decrease the pain of local infiltration. Nonpharmacologic methods of pain management are being tested, developed, and used alone or as adjuncts to pharmacologic therapy for children undergoing painful procedures. It is imperative that clinicians keep themselves informed about new advances pertaining to pain treatment and incorporate them into their practices. PMID:8946121

  20. [Pathophysiology of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele

    2011-08-01

    Abdominal pain can be induced by stimulation of visceral nociceptors. Activation of nociceptors usually requires previous sensitization by pathological events, such as inflammation, ischemia or acidosis. Although abdominal pain can obviously be caused by pathology of a visceral structure, clinicians frequently observe that such a pathology explains only part of the pain complaints. Occasionally, there is lack of objective signs of visceral lesions. There is clear evidence that pain states are associated with profound changes of the central processing of the sensory input. The main consequences of such alterations for patients are twofold: 1) a central sensitization, i.e. an increased excitability of the central nervous system; 2) an alteration of the endogenous pain modulation, which under normal conditions inhibits the processing of nociceptive signals in the central nervous system. Both phenomena lead to a spread of pain to other body regions and an amplification of the pain perception. The interactions between visceral pathology and alterations of the central pain processes represent an at least partial explanation for the discrepancy between objective signs of peripheral lesions and severity of the symptoms. Today, both central hypersensitivity and alteration in endogenous pain modulation can be measured in clinical practice. This information can be used to provide the patients with an explanatory model for their pain. Furthermore, first data suggest that alterations in central pain processing may represent negative prognostic factors. A better understanding of the individual pathophysiology may allow in the future the development of individual therapeutic strategies. PMID:21796591

  1. Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms for Chronic Pain: A Valid Approach for the Development of Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ligon, Casey O; Moloney, Rachel D; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is a multifaceted and complex condition. Broadly classified into somatic, visceral, or neuropathic pain, it is poorly managed despite its prevalence. Current drugs used for the treatment of chronic pain are limited by tolerance with long-term use, abuse potential, and multiple adverse side effects. The persistent nature of pain suggests that epigenetic machinery may be a critical factor driving chronic pain. In this review, we discuss the latest insights into epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs, and we describe their involvement in the pathophysiology of chronic pain and whether epigenetic modifications could be applied as future therapeutic targets for chronic pain. We provide evidence from experimental models and translational research in human tissue that have enhanced our understanding of epigenetic processes mediating nociception, and we then speculate on the potential future use of more specific and selective agents that target epigenetic mechanisms to attenuate pain. PMID:26787772

  2. Pulsed Radiofrequency Application for the Treatment of Pain Secondary to Sacroiliac Joint Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yu Ri; Lee, Na Rea; Kwon, Young Suk; Jang, Ji Su; Lim, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain can result from degeneration, infection, malignancy, and trauma. Patients with metastatic bone pain who do not respond to conventional treatment may need more aggressive neuroinvasive approaches. Recently, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation has emerged as a promising treatment alternative for refractory cases of SI joint pain. Nevertheless, there is no report on the treatment of pain arising from SI joint metastases with PRF. We are reporting about a 63-year-old woman suffering from buttock pain due to breast cancer metastases in the SI joint. We treated this patient with PRF neuromodulation of the L4-S3 primary dorsal rami and lateral branches using a rotating curved needle technique. The patient tolerated the procedures well, without any complications. She experienced about 70% reduction in pain, and pain relief was sustained for 10 months. This result suggests that PRF neuromodulation is a safe, effective treatment for pain from SI joint metastases. PMID:26839672

  3. Pulsed Radiofrequency Application for the Treatment of Pain Secondary to Sacroiliac Joint Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Rea; Kwon, Young Suk; Jang, Ji Su; Lim, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain can result from degeneration, infection, malignancy, and trauma. Patients with metastatic bone pain who do not respond to conventional treatment may need more aggressive neuroinvasive approaches. Recently, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation has emerged as a promising treatment alternative for refractory cases of SI joint pain. Nevertheless, there is no report on the treatment of pain arising from SI joint metastases with PRF. We are reporting about a 63-year-old woman suffering from buttock pain due to breast cancer metastases in the SI joint. We treated this patient with PRF neuromodulation of the L4-S3 primary dorsal rami and lateral branches using a rotating curved needle technique. The patient tolerated the procedures well, without any complications. She experienced about 70% reduction in pain, and pain relief was sustained for 10 months. This result suggests that PRF neuromodulation is a safe, effective treatment for pain from SI joint metastases. PMID:26839672

  4. Mechanisms of immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Herman

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in establishing diagnostic markers of immunological tolerance applicable to efforts to minimize drug immunosuppression in transplantation and chronic immunological diseases. It is hoped that an understanding of the diverse mechanisms that can contribute to tolerance will guide efforts to establish diagnostic tolerance biomarkers. Not only would these be valuable for management of autoimmune diseases, transplants and allergies, but they might also guide efforts to override tolerance processes in cancer and vaccine development. Where tolerance is generated by deletion or inactivation of antigen reactive lymphocytes, it is unlikely that any long-term-valid blood biomarkers might be found. Where tolerance is mediated by active regulatory mechanisms, indicators that can be usefully measured may emerge, but these would likely show significant heterogeneity reflecting the diversity of active tolerance processes operating in different individuals. Given this, the most useful "kits" might be those "smart" enough to detect this diversity of tolerance players. PMID:26036868

  5. Lactose Tolerance Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Hydrogen Breath Test; Lactose Breath Test; Disaccharide Absorption Test; Oral Lactose Tolerance Formal name: Hydrogen Breath Test; Lactose Tolerance Test Related tests: Stool ...

  6. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePLUS

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  7. Pain in children.

    PubMed

    Eland, J M

    1990-12-01

    The assessment and management of children's pain is a topic that has received a great deal of attention since the late 1970s. Nurse researchers have played a dominant role in all areas of pediatric pain relief and likely will continue to do so. There are currently a number of pediatric pain assessment instruments developed that are used in selected practice settings, but their use should be extended to document the existence of pediatric pain and its relief. Pharmacologic interventions for pediatric pain relief have been hampered by incorrect beliefs about analgesic risks, prescribing and administrating habits, and a virtual explosion of information in the area of analgesics. Although nurses have traditionally used nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief, these methods have not been well researched. Continued research efforts in this important area will result in improved diagnosis and management of pediatric pain. PMID:2235640

  8. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  9. Preventing chronic postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postoperative pain is common. Nerve injury and inflammation promote chronic pain, the risk of which is influenced by patient factors, including psychological characteristics. Interventional trials to prevent chronic postoperative pain have been underpowered with inadequate patient follow-up. Ketamine may reduce chronic postoperative pain, although the optimum treatment duration and dose for different operations have yet to be identified. The evidence for gabapentin and pregabalin is encouraging but weak; further work is needed before these drugs can be recommended for the prevention of chronic pain. Regional techniques reduce the rates of chronic pain after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery. Nerve-sparing surgical techniques may be of benefit, although nerve injury is not necessary or sufficient for chronic pain to develop. PMID:26620149

  10. The Pain of Labour

    PubMed Central

    Labor, Simona

    2008-01-01

    Labour is an emotional experience and involves both physiological and psychological mechanisms. The pain of labour is severe but despite this its memory diminishes with time. Labour pain has two components: visceral pain which occurs during the early first stage and the second stage of childbirth, and somatic pain which occurs during the late first stage and the second stage. The pain of labour in the first stage is mediated by T10 to L1 spinal segments, whereas that in the second stage is carried by T12 to L1, and S2 to S4 spinal segments. Pain relief in labour is complex and often challenging without regional analgesia. Effective management of labour pain plays a relatively minor role in a woman's satisfaction with childbirth. PMID:26526404

  11. Avicenna's concept of pain

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, Osama A.; Johnson, Mark I.

    2010-01-01

    Ibn Sina (Latin name Avicenna, 9801037) is a famous Muslim physician who wrote The Canon of Medicine. Pain-related writings within The Canon were identified and analysed and compared to Galen and Modern Pain Theory. We found evidence in The Canon that Avicenna challenged Galen's concept of pain. Galen insisted that injuries (breach of continuity) were the only cause of pain. In contrast, Avicenna suggested that the true cause of pain was a change of the physical condition (temperament change) of the organ whether there was an injury present or not. Avicenna extended Galen's descriptions of 4 to 15 types of pain and used a terminology that is remarkably similar to that used in the McGill Pain Questionnaire. PMID:21483573

  12. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-05-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  13. Phosphorylated neuronal nitric oxide synthase in neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhidong; Liang, Yingping; Deng, Fumou; Cheng, Yong; Sun, Jing; Guo, Lian; Xu, Guohai

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain caused by nervous system damage or system dysfunction. The pathogenesis and the mechanism underlying neuropathic pain remains unclear. The only known neurobiological component involved in the neuropathic pain is nitric oxide (NO). NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) from L-arginine and oxygen. nNOS is involved in the inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. In this study, we aimed to identify whether KN93 reduced the pain in the rats. Sixty adult male SD rat were randomly divided into 4 groups. Sham group and model group were not received treatment. Experimental group received intrathecal injection of KN93, and negative control group received DMSO injection 30 min before pain test. After last test of pain threshold, the rats were sacrificed and lumbar spinal tissues were sampled for analysis of the expression of pnNOS and pCaMK II by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Pain threshold was increased in the rats received KN93 treatment (P<0.01), and the expression levels of pnNOS was increased (P<0.05) in experimental group and accompanied with decrease of CaMK II expression (P<0.05). By administration of KN93, the interaction of nNOS and the adaptor protein CAPON was reduced through inhibition of CaMK II by KN93. In conclusion, this study reveals that KN93 can reduce neuropathic pain via inhibiting the activity of CaMK II, and then increase the level of phosphorylated nNOS, to reduce the interaction with CAPON. PMID:26722464

  14. A possible neural mechanism for photosensitivity in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Martenson, Melissa E; Halawa, Omar I; Tonsfeldt, Karen J; Maxwell, Charlene A; Hammack, Nora; Mist, Scott D; Pennesi, Mark E; Bennett, Robert M; Mauer, Kim M; Jones, Kim D; Heinricher, Mary M

    2016-04-01

    Patients with functional pain disorders often complain of generalized sensory hypersensitivity, finding sounds, smells, or even everyday light aversive. The neural basis for this aversion is unknown, but it cannot be attributed to a general increase in cortical sensory processing. Here, we quantified the threshold for aversion to light in patients with fibromyalgia, a pain disorder thought to reflect dysregulation of pain-modulating systems in the brain. These individuals expressed discomfort at light levels substantially lower than that of healthy control subjects. Complementary studies in lightly anesthetized rat demonstrated that a subset of identified pain-modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla unexpectedly responds to light. Approximately half of the pain-facilitating "ON-cells" and pain-inhibiting "OFF-cells" sampled exhibited a change in firing with light exposure, shifting the system to a pronociceptive state with the activation of ON-cells and suppression of OFF-cell firing. The change in neuronal firing did not require a trigeminal or posterior thalamic relay, but it was blocked by the inactivation of the olivary pretectal nucleus. Light exposure also resulted in a measurable but modest decrease in the threshold for heat-evoked paw withdrawal, as would be expected with engagement of this pain-modulating circuitry. These data demonstrate integration of information about light intensity with somatic input at the level of single pain-modulating neurons in the brain stem of the rat under basal conditions. Taken together, our findings in rodents and humans provide a novel mechanism for abnormal photosensitivity and suggest that light has the potential to engage pain-modulating systems such that normally innocuous inputs are perceived as aversive or even painful. PMID:26785323

  15. Pain Prevention Using Head and Neck Cancer as a Model

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Erin M.; Grant, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a common and often debilitating consequence of cancer and its treatment. Efforts to improve pain management for patients diagnosed with cancer have not resulted in widespread patient reports of acceptable management of pain. Patients and providers alike remain opiophobic due to a number of issues, resulting in suboptimal management of pain. Recent literature has revealed that it may be possible to prevent pain related to cancer and its treatment and therefore avoid or decrease the amount of opioids used to treat pain. This may result in better quality of life for patients. Several newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been found to decrease the perception of pain in a number of patient populations, including those with head and neck cancer. The side-effect profile for the newer AEDs is mild and well tolerated. Future efforts should focus on the use of newer AEDs to prevent pain in other cancer populations, with a focus on ideal dose and scheduling. Once established, recommendations regarding the prevention of pain in patients with cancer can be incorporated into national guidelines. PMID:26413373

  16. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  17. Pain in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, Lynne U

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments in the study of pain in animals have demonstrated the potential for pain perception in a variety of wholly aquatic species such as molluscs, crustaceans and fish. This allows us to gain insight into how the ecological pressures and differential life history of living in a watery medium can yield novel data that inform the comparative physiology and evolution of pain. Nociception is the simple detection of potentially painful stimuli usually accompanied by a reflex withdrawal response, and nociceptors have been found in aquatic invertebrates such as the sea slug Aplysia. It would seem adaptive to have a warning system that allows animals to avoid life-threatening injury, yet debate does still continue over the capacity for non-mammalian species to experience the discomfort or suffering that is a key component of pain rather than a nociceptive reflex. Contemporary studies over the last 10?years have demonstrated that bony fish possess nociceptors that are similar to those in mammals; that they demonstrate pain-related changes in physiology and behaviour that are reduced by painkillers; that they exhibit higher brain activity when painfully stimulated; and that pain is more important than showing fear or anti-predator behaviour in bony fish. The neurophysiological basis of nociception or pain in fish is demonstrably similar to that in mammals. Pain perception in invertebrates is more controversial as they lack the vertebrate brain, yet recent research evidence confirms that there are behavioural changes in response to potentially painful events. This review will assess the field of pain perception in aquatic species, focusing on fish and selected invertebrate groups to interpret how research findings can inform our understanding of the physiology and evolution of pain. Further, if we accept these animals may be capable of experiencing the negative experience of pain, then the wider implications of human use of these animals should be considered. PMID:25833131

  18. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain. PMID:26348457

  19. Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse and Dependence among Adolescents: A Nationally Representative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Ringwalt, Christopher L.; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates the prevalence, patterns, and correlates of adolescents' abuse, sub-threshold dependence, and dependence on prescription pain relievers (PPRs) in a nationally representative sample. Results show dependence on PPRs can take place without abuse and that sub-threshold dependence could have implications for major diagnostic

  20. Relation of the factor to menstrual pain and musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang-Won; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the regions of menstrual pain and of myofascial pain syndrome, which is the main cause of musculoskeletal pain, as well as to examine the changes and relationships among the menstrual pain-related factors, which are pain level, pain area, activity, appetite, mood, and sleeping pattern. The subjects were 13 sufferers of musculoskeletal pain and 17 non-sufferers. Pain diary and pain chart systems were used for the measurement of menstrual pain-related factors and musculoskeletal pain. Data were analyzed using repeated ANOVA. The results show that there are significant differences between the two groups in pain level, activity, and mood during menstruation periods (P< 0.05). The area of musculoskeletal pain and menstrual pain were found to be the same. PMID:25960984