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Sample records for pain tolerance threshold

  1. Determining Pain Detection and Tolerance Thresholds Using an Integrated, Multi-Modal Pain Task Battery

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Justin L.; Okkerse, Pieter; van Amerongen, Guido; Groeneveld, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Human pain models are useful in the assessing the analgesic effect of drugs, providing information about a drug's pharmacology and identify potentially suitable therapeutic populations. The need to use a comprehensive battery of pain models is highlighted by studies whereby only a single pain model, thought to relate to the clinical situation, demonstrates lack of efficacy. No single experimental model can mimic the complex nature of clinical pain. The integrated, multi-modal pain task battery presented here encompasses the electrical stimulation task, pressure stimulation task, cold pressor task, the UVB inflammatory model which includes a thermal task and a paradigm for inhibitory conditioned pain modulation. These human pain models have been tested for predicative validity and reliability both in their own right and in combination, and can be used repeatedly, quickly, in short succession, with minimum burden for the subject and with a modest quantity of equipment. This allows a drug to be fully characterized and profiled for analgesic effect which is especially useful for drugs with a novel or untested mechanism of action. PMID:27166581

  2. Effect of electronic dental anesthesia on pain threshold and pain tolerance levels of human teeth subjected to stimulation with an electric pulp tester.

    PubMed Central

    Gerschman, J. A.; Giebartowski, J.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of electronic dental anesthesia on pain threshold and pain tolerance levels of human teeth subjected to stimulation with an electric pulp tester was evaluated. Subjects (n = 120) were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups (baseline, placebo, square wave, and postsynaptic wave). Symptom-free right-sided maxillary incisor teeth were tested for anesthesia with an electric pulp tester. Electrostimulation significantly increased the pain perception threshold and pain tolerance level with both the square wave and postsynaptic wave. The postsynaptic wave was more effective than the square wave. Presented at the Satellite Symposium on Advances in the Management of Acute and Chronic Facial Pain associated with the 6th World Congress on Pain, Melbourne, Australia, 1990. Images Figure 1 PMID:1811428

  3. Effect of GaAs Laser at 904 nm in the Pain Threshold in Tibia and Tolerance in Deltoid Evaluated by Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luiz G. P.; Sato, Sidney K.; Silveira, Landulfo; Aimbire, Flávio; Moreira, Leonardo M.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2011-08-01

    The use of LLLT in pain relief is a controversial issue in Physiotherapy, with the efficacy of LLLT associated to pain relief still requiring significant study. Objective. This work focuses on the evaluation of the effect of low power GaAs laser at 904 nm in pressure pain threshold and tolerance in tibia and deltoid muscle, respectively. A total of 17 subjects were divided in two groups: active and sham laser. Measurements were taken before and after laser irradiation in healthy individuals using a pressure algometry, first verifying the viability of algometry to evaluate the pain threshold and tolerance inter individuals and comparing the differences of right and left sides in the same patients, and finally evaluating the pain threshold and tolerance before and after a single laser application. Laser energy density was of 4.0 J/cm2 with power density of 137 mW/cm2. Comparing algometry values of active laser group and the sham group, the pain tolerance in the deltoid muscle did not change among groups after laser irradiation, while it was also encountered a statistically significant difference in the pain threshold in tibia when comparing the laser active and sham laser (p<0.05). It was found that the active laser was effective in maintaining the pain threshold in tibia. The effective laser action in raising the pain threshold in tibia upon healthy individuals can suggest that the laser could be applied not only as curative but also with preventive purpose.

  4. Ceruletide increases dose dependently both jejunal motor activity and threshold and tolerance to experimentally induced pain in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Steinringer, H; Schmierer, G; Schneider, C; Winklehner, S; Mittelbach, G; De Paolis, C; Praga, C

    1984-01-01

    The effects of ceruletide on jejunal motility and experimentally induced pain were studied in 16 healthy men, who participated each in four experiments and received in random double blind fashion 5, 10, or 20 micrograms ceruletide intramuscularly or placebo. Jejunal pressures were recorded by three perfused catheters with orifices between 10 and 20 cm aboral of the ligament of Treitz. Ceruletide dose dependently diminished phase I and increased phase II type activity and tended to reduce the number, but not the duration, of activity fronts. The number and amplitude of contractions as well as the area under the curve increased significantly and dose dependently as did threshold and tolerance to electrically and threshold to thermally induced pain. Only mild sedative and other side effects occurred. PMID:6714795

  5. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the "fingers point" of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  6. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the “fingers point” of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  7. Are Indians and females less tolerant to pain? An observational study using a laboratory pain model.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, E; Zailinawati, A H; Lim, A W; Chan, J B; Yap, S H; Hla, Y Y; Kamil, M A; Teng, C L

    2009-06-01

    In Malaysia, it is a common belief among health care workers that females and Indians have lower pain threshold. This experience, although based on anecdotal experience in the healthcare setting, does not allow differentiation between pain tolerance, and pain expression. To determine whether there is a difference in the tolerance to pain between the three main ethnic groups, namely the Malays, Chinese and Indians as well as between males and females. This was a prospective study, using a laboratory pain model (ischaemic pain tolerance) to determine the pain tolerance of 152 IMU medical students. The mean age of the students was 21.8 years (range 18-29 years). All of them were unmarried. The median of ischaemic pain tolerance for Malays, Chinese and Indians were 639s, 695s and 613s respectively (p = 0.779). However, statistically significant difference in ischaemic pain tolerance for males and females Indian students were observed. Possible ethnic difference in pain tolerance in casual observation is not verified by this laboratory pain model. Difference in pain tolerance between genders is shown only for Indians. PMID:20058568

  8. Computer-Delivered Social Norm Message Increases Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pulvers, Kim; Schroeder, Jacquelyn; Limas, Eleuterio F.; Zhu, Shu-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Few experimental studies have been conducted on social determinants of pain tolerance. Purpose This study tests a brief, computer-delivered social norm message for increasing pain tolerance. Methods Healthy young adults (N=260; 44 % Caucasian; 27 % Hispanic) were randomly assigned into a 2 (social norm)×2 (challenge) cold pressor study, stratified by gender. They received standard instructions or standard instructions plus a message that contained artifically elevated information about typical performance of others. Results Those receiving a social norm message displayed significantly higher pain tolerance, F(1, 255)=26.95, p<.001, ηp2=.10 and pain threshold F(1, 244)=9.81, p=.002, ηp2=.04, but comparable pain intensity, p>.05. There were no interactions between condition and gender on any outcome variables, p>.05. Conclusions Social norms can significantly increase pain tolerance, even with a brief verbal message delivered by a video. PMID:24146086

  9. Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, R I M; Baron, Rebecca; Frangou, Anna; Pearce, Eiluned; van Leeuwen, Edwin J C; Stow, Julie; Partridge, Giselle; MacDonald, Ian; Barra, Vincent; van Vugt, Mark

    2012-03-22

    Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested this hypothesis in a series of six experimental studies in both the laboratory (watching videos) and naturalistic contexts (watching stage performances), using change in pain threshold as an assay for endorphin release. The results show that pain thresholds are significantly higher after laughter than in the control condition. This pain-tolerance effect is due to laughter itself and not simply due to a change in positive affect. We suggest that laughter, through an endorphin-mediated opiate effect, may play a crucial role in social bonding. PMID:21920973

  10. Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, R. I. M.; Baron, Rebecca; Frangou, Anna; Pearce, Eiluned; van Leeuwen, Edwin J. C.; Stow, Julie; Partridge, Giselle; MacDonald, Ian; Barra, Vincent; van Vugt, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested this hypothesis in a series of six experimental studies in both the laboratory (watching videos) and naturalistic contexts (watching stage performances), using change in pain threshold as an assay for endorphin release. The results show that pain thresholds are significantly higher after laughter than in the control condition. This pain-tolerance effect is due to laughter itself and not simply due to a change in positive affect. We suggest that laughter, through an endorphin-mediated opiate effect, may play a crucial role in social bonding. PMID:21920973

  11. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimulator. A third investigator injected intravenously saline or naloxone. The subjects and investigators 1 and 3 were blind to all treatment conditions. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the four groups. The AES groups exhibited a statistically significant 18% elevation of pain threshold, whereas the two placebo stimulation groups (PS and PN) remained essentially unchanged. The mean pain threshold increased to more than 23% for group AS, but fell to less than 12% for the subjects in group AN, who were given naloxone. These findings indicate a small but significant elevation of pain threshold by AES, an effect partially blocked by naloxone, suggesting an endogenous opioid system as one mechanism for AES analgesia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8185085

  12. Personality Correlates of Pain Perception and Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukin, Penny R.; Ray, A. Bartow

    1982-01-01

    Explored personality correlates of pain perception and tolerance in a nonmedical sample and setting. Results showed no significant correlations with personality measures and cold-pressor scores, but a significant relationship between pain tolerance and cognitive focus; those who focused on the experimental situation had much shorter tolerance…

  13. Quantum fault-tolerant thresholds for universal concatenated schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    Fault-tolerant quantum computation uses ancillary qubits in order to protect logical data qubits while allowing for the manipulation of the quantum information without severe losses in coherence. While different models for fault-tolerant quantum computation exist, determining the ancillary qubit overhead for competing schemes remains a challenging theoretical problem. In this work, we study the fault-tolerance threshold rates of different models for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. Namely, we provide different threshold rates for the 105-qubit concatenated coding scheme for universal computation without the need for state distillation. We study two error models: adversarial noise and depolarizing noise and provide lower bounds for the threshold in each of these error regimes. Establishing the threshold rates for the concatenated coding scheme will allow for a physical quantum resource comparison between our fault-tolerant universal quantum computation model and the traditional model using magic state distillation.

  14. The role of mood states underlying sex differences in the perception and tolerance of pain.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, John P; Lawler, Casey; Robinson, Richard; Morgan, Michael; Kenworthy-Heinige, Tawni

    2006-09-01

    While sex differences in pain reporting are frequently observed, the reasons underlying these differences remain unclear. The present study examined sex differences in self-report and physiological measures of pain threshold and tolerance following the administration of two laboratory pain-induction tasks. The primary study aim centered on determining whether repeated exposure to such tasks would yield sex differences in terms of pain threshold and tolerance. In addition, it was hypothesized that if such differences did exist, negative mood states might account for changes in pain ratings, threshold, and/or tolerance in subsequent exposure to noxious stimuli. Recruited from a convenience sample, 66 participants (44 female and 22 male) were exposed to both thermal and cold noxious stimuli at three separate times, while psychophysiological and self-report data were collected. Because women outnumbered men 2:1, Fisher z transformations were performed to determine whether the observed associations between mood states and pain ratings differed. We found stronger associations between fatigue and thermal-heat pain ratings for men at their first and third exposure to the pain task compared to women (z = 2.11, P < 0.05; z = 3.14, P < 0.001, respectively). Results indicated that women evidenced greater pain tolerance than men on both a behavioral and physiological level; however, they reported greater pain severity than men. Fatigue was also found to be particularly important to reports of pain severity in men and pain tolerance in response to noxious stimuli for women. Possible pathways in which mood states influenced these endpoints are discussed. PMID:17147596

  15. Pain threshold correlates with functional scores in osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuni, Benita; Wang, Haili; Rickert, Markus; Ewerbeck, Volker; Schiltenwolf, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Pain sensitization may be one of the reasons for persistent pain after technically successful joint replacement. We analyzed how pain sensitization, as measured by quantitative sensory testing, relates preoperatively to joint function in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) scheduled for joint replacement. Patients and methods We included 50 patients with knee OA and 49 with hip OA who were scheduled for joint replacement, and 15 control participants. Hip/knee scores, thermal and pressure detection, and pain thresholds were examined. Results Median pressure pain thresholds were lower in patients than in control subjects: 4.0 (range: 0–10) vs. 7.8 (4–10) (p = 0.003) for the affected knee; 4.5 (2–10) vs. 6.8 (4–10) (p = 0.03) for the affected hip. Lower pressure pain threshold values were found at the affected joint in 26 of the 50 patients with knee OA and in 17 of the 49 patients with hip OA. The American Knee Society score 1 and 2, the Oxford knee score, and functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the pressure pain thresholds in patients with knee OA. Also, Harris hip score and the functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the cold detection threshold in patients with hip OA. Interpretation Quantitative sensory testing appeared to identify patients with sensory changes indicative of mechanisms of central sensitization. These patients may require additional pain treatment in order to profit fully from surgery. There were correlations between the clinical scores and the level of sensitization. PMID:25323797

  16. Lack of effect of chronic dextromethorphan on experimental pain tolerance in methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy A; Ling, Walter; Torrington, Matt A

    2008-09-01

    Good evidence exists to suggest that individuals on opioid maintenance for the treatment of addiction (i.e. methadone) are less tolerant of experimental pain than are matched controls or ex-opioid addicts, a phenomenon theorized to reflect opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Agonist activity at the excitatory ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on dorsal horn neurons has been implicated in the development of both OIH and its putative expression at the clinical level-opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of the NMDA-receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan (DEX), to reverse or treat OIH in methadone-maintenance (MM) patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double-blind conditions, changes in pain threshold and tolerance [cold pressor (CP) and electrical stimulation (ES)] following a 5-week trial of DEX (titrated to 480 mg/day) in comparison with placebo was evaluated in a well-characterized sample of MM patients. The sample (n = 40) was 53% male and ethnically diverse (53% Latino, 28% African American, 10% White, 9% other), with a mean age of 48.0 years (SD = 6.97). Based on t-test analyses, no difference was found between groups on CP pain threshold, CP pain tolerance, ES pain threshold or ES pain tolerance, both pre- and postmedication. Notably, DEX-related changes significantly differed by gender, with women tending to show diminished tolerance for pain with DEX therapy. These results support that chronic high-dose NMDA antagonism does not improve tolerance for pain in MM patients, although a gender effect on DEX response is suggested. PMID:18507735

  17. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katerina V.-A.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  18. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katerina V-A; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  19. Imagined Pain Tolerance Test: An Instrument to Measure American Indians' Perception of Their Tolerance of Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Gary A.

    1981-01-01

    The Imagined Pain Tolerance Test, a paper and pencil test designed to test differences in perceptions between American Indians and non-Indians, appears to have utility as a research instrument. Available from: White Cloud Center, Gaines Hall UOHSC, 840 Southwest Gaines Road, Portland, OR 97201. (Author/CM)

  20. Modification of Electrical Pain Threshold by Voluntary Breathing-Controlled Electrical Stimulation (BreEStim) in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Berliner, Jeffrey C.; Melton, Danielle H.; Li, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain has a distinct sensory and affective (i.e., unpleasantness) component. BreEStim, during which electrical stimulation is delivered during voluntary breathing, has been shown to selectively reduce the affective component of post-amputation phantom pain. The objective was to examine whether BreEStim increases pain threshold such that subjects could have improved tolerance of sensation of painful stimuli. Methods Eleven pain-free healthy subjects (7 males, 4 females) participated in the study. All subjects received BreEStim (100 stimuli) and conventional electrical stimulation (EStim, 100 stimuli) to two acupuncture points (Neiguan and Weiguan) of the dominant hand in a random order. The two different treatments were provided at least three days apart. Painful, but tolerable electrical stimuli were delivered randomly during EStim, but were triggered by effortful inhalation during BreEStim. Measurements of tactile sensation threshold, electrical sensation and electrical pain thresholds, thermal (cold sensation, warm sensation, cold pain and heat pain) thresholds were recorded from the thenar eminence of both hands. These measurements were taken pre-intervention and 10−min post-intervention. Results There was no difference in the pre-intervention baseline measurement of all thresholds between BreEStim and EStim. The electrical pain threshold significantly increased after BreEStim (27.5±6.7% for the dominant hand and 28.5±10.8% for the non-dominant hand, respectively). The electrical pain threshold significantly decreased after EStim (9.1±2.8% for the dominant hand and 10.2±4.6% for the non–dominant hand, respectively) (F[1, 10] = 30.992, p = .00024). There was no statistically significant change in other thresholds after BreEStim and EStim. The intensity of electrical stimuli was progressively increased, but no difference was found between BreEStim and EStim. Conclusion Voluntary breathing controlled electrical stimulation selectively

  1. Lower threshold for adenosine-induced chest pain in patients with angina and normal coronary angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Bo; Sylvén, Christer; Waldenström, Anders

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To investigate whether patients with angina-like chest pain and normal coronary angiograms are more sensitive to adenosine as an inducer of chest pain. Design—Increasing doses of adenosine were given in a single blind study as intravenous bolus injections. Chest pain and the electrocardioǵraphic findings were noted. Patients—Eight patients with anginalike chest pain but no coronary stenoses (group A), nine patients with angina and coronary stenoses (group B), and 16 healthy volunteers (group C). Results—In the absence of ischaemic signs on the electrocardiogram adenosine provoked angina-like pain in all patients in groups A and B. The pain was located in the chest, and its quality and location were described as being no different from the patient's habitual angina. In group C, 14 of 16 subjects reported chest pain. The lowest dose resulting in chest pain was lower in group A (0·9 (0·6) mg) than in group B (3·1 (1·5) mg) (p < 0·005) and in group C (6·2 (3·7) mg) (p < 0·005). The maximum tolerable dose was lower in group A (4·7 (2·1) mg) than in group B (9·2 (3·8) mg) (p < 0·05) and in group C (12·0 (4·1) mg) (p < 0·005). Conclusions—Patients with anginalike chest pain and normal coronary angiograms have a low pain threshold and low tolerance to pain induced by adenosine. PMID:1389759

  2. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of "painful" stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called "pain matrix" regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation. PMID:27489536

  3. Effect of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Allsop, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Swearing produces a pain lessening (hypoalgesic) effect for many people; an emotional response may be the underlying mechanism. In this paper, the role of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance and pain perception is assessed. In a repeated-measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to play for 10 minutes a first-person shooter video game vs a golf video game. Sex differences were explored. After playing the first-person shooter video game, aggressive cognitions, aggressive affect, heart rate, and cold pressor latency were increased, and pain perception was decreased. These data indicate that people become more pain tolerant with raised state aggression and support our theory that raised pain tolerance from swearing occurs via an emotional response. PMID:23045874

  4. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of “painful” stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called “pain matrix” regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation. PMID:27489536

  5. Pain tolerance selectively increased by a sweet-smelling odor.

    PubMed

    Prescott, John; Wilkie, Jenell

    2007-04-01

    The mechanism underlying reported analgesic effects of odors in humans is unclear, although odor hedonics has been implicated. We tested whether odors that are sweet smelling through prior association with tasted sweetness might influence pain by activating the same analgesic mechanisms as sweet tastes. Inhalation of a sweet-smelling odor during a cold-pressor test increased tolerance for pain compared with inhalation of pleasant and unpleasant low-sweetness odors and no odor. There were no significant differences in pain ratings among the odor conditions. These results suggest that smelled sweetness can produce a naturally occurring conditioned increase in pain tolerance. PMID:17470253

  6. Rowers' high: behavioural synchrony is correlated with elevated pain thresholds.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Emma E A; Ejsmond-Frey, Robin; Knight, Nicola; Dunbar, R I M

    2010-02-23

    Physical exercise is known to stimulate the release of endorphins, creating a mild sense of euphoria that has rewarding properties. Using pain tolerance (a conventional non-invasive assay for endorphin release), we show that synchronized training in a college rowing crew creates a heightened endorphin surge compared with a similar training regime carried out alone. This heightened effect from synchronized activity may explain the sense of euphoria experienced during other social activities (such as laughter, music-making and dancing) that are involved in social bonding in humans and possibly other vertebrates. PMID:19755532

  7. High pain sensitivity is distinct from high susceptibility to non-painful sensory input at threshold level.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Springborn, Maria; Croy, Ilona; Kaiser, Jochen; Lötsch, Jörn

    2011-04-01

    Individuals may differ considerably in their sensitivity towards various painful stimuli supporting the notion of a person as stoical or complaining about pain. Molecular and functional imaging research provides support that this may extend also to other sensory qualities. Whether a person can be characterized as possessing a generally high or low sensory acuity is unknown. This was therefore assessed with thresholds to painful and non-painful stimuli, with a focus on chemical stimuli that besides pain may evoke clearly non-painful sensations such as taste or smell. In 36 healthy men and 78 women (ages 18 to 52 years), pain thresholds to chemo-somatosensory (intranasal gaseous CO(2)) and electrical stimuli (cutaneous stimulation) were significantly correlated (ρ(2)=0.2268, p<0.001). Two clusters separated persons with either high (n=72) or low (n=22) pain sensitivity. However, the correlation did not extend to non-painful stimuli of other sensory qualities, i.e., for the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol and gustatory thresholds for sour (citric acid) and salty (NaCl). Similarly, pain clusters showed no differences in thresholds to other stimuli. Moreover, no clustering was obtained for thresholds to both painful and non-painful stimuli together. Thus, individuals could not be characterized as highly sensitive (or insensitive) to all chemical stimuli no matter of evoking pain. This suggests that pain is primarily a singular sensory perception distinct from others such as olfaction or taste. PMID:21291919

  8. Fault-tolerant adaptive FIR filters using variable detection threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. K.; Redinbo, G. R.

    1994-10-01

    Adaptive filters are widely used in many digital signal processing applications, where tap weight of the filters are adjusted by stochastic gradient search methods. Block adaptive filtering techniques, such as block least mean square and block conjugate gradient algorithm, were developed to speed up the convergence as well as improve the tracking capability which are two important factors in designing real-time adaptive filter systems. Even though algorithm-based fault tolerance can be used as a low-cost high level fault-tolerant technique to protect the aforementioned systems from hardware failures with minimal hardware overhead, the issue of choosing a good detection threshold remains a challenging problem. First of all, the systems usually only have limited computational resources, i.e., concurrent error detection and correction is not feasible. Secondly, any prior knowledge of input data is very difficult to get in practical settings. We propose a checksum-based fault detection scheme using two-level variable detection thresholds that is dynamically dependent on the past syndromes. Simulations show that the proposed scheme reduces the possibility of false alarms and has a high degree of fault coverage in adaptive filter systems.

  9. [Effects of nitrogen oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate on pressure pain threshold in humans].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    1997-07-21

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on nociceptive thresholds in man. On two different study days twelve healthy subjects received a stair case infusion of GTN (0.015, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 micrograms/kg/min 20 min each dose) or placebo in a randomized double-blind cross-over design. Before the infusion and after 15 min of infusion on each dose, pressure pain detection- and tolerance thresholds were determined by pressure algometry in three different anatomic regions (finger, a temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue and a temporal region without interposed myofascial tissue). Relative to placebo the three higher GTN doses induced a decrease in both detection- and tolerance-thresholds in the temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue. No such changes were observed in the two other stimulated regions. These results could reflect central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO may provide a more likely explanation. PMID:9245041

  10. Discrepancy between stimulus response and tolerance of pain in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads U.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Ballegaard, Martin; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Høgh, Peter; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2015-01-01

    Background: Affective-motivational and sensory-discriminative aspects of pain were investigated in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy elderly controls using the cold pressor test tolerance and repetitive stimuli of warmth and heat stimuli, evaluating the stimulus-response function. Methods: A case-control design was applied examining 33 patients with mild to moderate AD dementia and 32 healthy controls with the cold pressor test (4°C). Warmth detection threshold (WDT) and heat pain threshold (HPT) were assessed using 5 stimulations. A stimulus-response function was estimated using 4 incrementally increasing suprathreshold heat stimuli. Results: Cold pressor tolerance was lower in patients with AD dementia than in controls (p = 0.027). There were no significant differences between groups regarding WDT and HPT. Significant successive increases in HPT assessments indicated habituation (p < 0.0001), which was similar in the 2 groups (p = 0.85). A mixed model for repeated measures demonstrated that pain rating of suprathreshold stimuli depended on HPT (p = 0.0004) and stimulus intensity (p < 0.0001). Patients with AD dementia had significantly lower increases in pain ratings than controls during suprathreshold stimulation (p = 0.0072). Conclusion: Our results indicate that AD dementia is not associated with a propensity toward development of sensitization or a lack of habituation, suggesting preservation of sensory-discriminative aspects of pain perception. The results further suggest that the attenuated cold pressor pain tolerance may relate to impairment of coping abilities. Paradoxically, we found an attenuated stimulus-response function, compared to controls, suggesting that AD dementia interferes with pain ratings over time, most likely due to memory impairment. PMID:25788560

  11. Pain and pressure pain thresholds in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Anette; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although pain is a significant symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pain is poorly understood in adolescents with CFS. The aim of this study was to explore pain distribution and prevalence, pain intensity and its functional interference in everyday life, as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in adolescents with CFS and compare this with a control group of healthy adolescents (HC). Methods This is a case–control, cross-sectional study on pain including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 HCs, aged 12–18 years. We measured pain frequency, pain severity and pain interference using self-reporting questionnaires. PPT was measured using pressure algometry. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of the Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial. Results Adolescents with CFS had significantly lower PPTs compared with HCs (p<0.001). The Pain Severity Score and the Pain Interference Score were significantly higher in adolescents with CFS compared with HCs (p<0.001). Almost all adolescents with CFS experienced headache, abdominal pain and/or pain in muscles and joints. Moreover, in all sites, the pain intensity levels were significantly higher than in HCs (p<0.001). Conclusions We found a higher prevalence of severe pain among adolescents with CFS and lowered pain thresholds compared with HCs. The mechanisms, however, are still obscure. Large longitudinal population surveys are warranted measuring pain thresholds prior to the onset of CFS. Trial registration number Clinical Trials, NCT01040429; The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25287104

  12. Corneal Mechanical Thresholds Negatively Associate With Dry Eye and Ocular Pain Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Spierer, Oriel; Felix, Elizabeth R.; McClellan, Allison L.; Parel, Jean Marie; Gonzalez, Alex; Feuer, William J.; Sarantopoulos, Constantine D.; Levitt, Roy C.; Ehrmann, Klaus; Galor, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations between corneal mechanical thresholds and metrics of dry eye. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of individuals seen in the Miami Veterans Affairs eye clinic. The evaluation consisted of questionnaires regarding dry eye symptoms and ocular pain, corneal mechanical detection and pain thresholds, and a comprehensive ocular surface examination. The main outcome measures were correlations between corneal thresholds and signs and symptoms of dry eye and ocular pain. Results A total of 129 subjects participated in the study (mean age 64 ± 10 years). Mechanical detection and pain thresholds on the cornea correlated with age (Spearman's ρ = 0.26, 0.23, respectively; both P < 0.05), implying decreased corneal sensitivity with age. Dry eye symptom severity scores and Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (modified for the eye) scores negatively correlated with corneal detection and pain thresholds (range, r = −0.13 to −0.27, P < 0.05 for values between −0.18 and −0.27), suggesting increased corneal sensitivity in those with more severe ocular complaints. Ocular signs, on the other hand, correlated poorly and nonsignificantly with mechanical detection and pain thresholds on the cornea. A multivariable linear regression model found that both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) score (β = 0.21, SE = 0.03) and corneal pain threshold (β = −0.03, SE = 0.01) were significantly associated with self-reported evoked eye pain (pain to wind, light, temperature) and explained approximately 32% of measurement variability (R = 0.57). Conclusions Mechanical detection and pain thresholds measured on the cornea are correlated with dry eye symptoms and ocular pain. This suggests hypersensitivity within the corneal somatosensory pathways in patients with greater dry eye and ocular pain complaints. PMID:26886896

  13. Pain neurophysiology education improves cognitions, pain thresholds, and movement performance in people with chronic whiplash: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Truijen, Steven; Craps, Julie; Van den Keybus, Nick; Paul, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Chronic whiplash is a debilitating condition characterized by increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, maladaptive illness beliefs, inappropriate attitudes, and movement dysfunctions. Previous work in people with chronic low back pain and chronic fatigue syndrome indicates that pain neurophysiology education is able to improve illness beliefs and attitudes as well as movement performance. This single-case study (A-B-C design) with six patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) was aimed at examining whether education about the neurophysiology of pain is accompanied by changes in symptoms, daily functioning, pain beliefs, and behavior. Periods A and C represented assessment periods, while period B consisted of the intervention (pain neurophysiology education). Results showed a significant decrease in kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), the passive coping strategy of resting (Pain Coping Inventory), self-rated disability (Neck Disability Index), and photophobia (WAD Symptom List). At the same time, significantly increased pain pressure thresholds and improved pain-free movement performance (visual analog scale on Neck Extension Test and Brachial Plexus Provocation Test) were established. Although the current results need to be verified in a randomized, controlled trial, they suggest that education about the physiology of pain is able to increase pain thresholds and improve pain behavior and pain-free movement performance in patients with chronic WAD. PMID:21328162

  14. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  15. Sensory detection and pain thresholds in spinal cord injury patients with and without dysesthetic pain, and in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M J; Song, Z K; Schandler, S L; Ho, W H; Vulpe, M

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms involved in dysesthetic pain syndrome (DPS) in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, four groups of 13 subjects each--SCI subjects with DPS, SCI subjects without pain, chronic low back pain subjects, and control subjects--were examined for sensory detection and pain thresholds at forearm, neck, and rostral trunk areas. Results indicated that the SCI pain group had significantly lower pain thresholds at all skin sites, compared to the SCI no-pain and chronic low back pain groups, and at the rostral trunk skin site, compared to the control group. The SCI pain group also showed a lower sensory detection threshold at the rostral trunk skin site than did the SCI no-pain group. Equally important, the SCI no-pain group had detection and pain thresholds significantly higher than those of the control group. The results suggest fundamental differences in somatosensory processing when DPS is or is not a consequence of SCI. PMID:8725646

  16. Tactile sensory and pain thresholds in the face and tongue of subjects asymptomatic for oro-facial pain and headache.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, I; Komiyama, O; Ayuse, T; De Laat, A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the tactile sensory and pain thresholds in the face, tongue, hand and finger of subjects asymptomatic for pain. Sixteen healthy volunteers (eight men and eight women, mean age 35·7 years, range 27-41) participated. Using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, the tactile detection threshold (TDT) and the filament-prick pain detection threshold (FPT) were measured at five sites: on the cheek skin (CS), tongue tip (TT), palm side of the thenar skin (TS), dorsum of the hand (DH) and the finger tip (FT). The difference between the tactile sensory and pain threshold (FPT-TDT) was also calculated. Both for the TDT and FPT, TT and DH had the lowest and highest values, respectively. As for the FPT-TDT, there were no significant differences among the measurement sites. As the difference between FPT and TDT (FPT-TDT) is known to be an important consideration in interpreting QST (quantitative sensory testing) data and can be altered by neuropathology, taking the FPT-TDT as a new parameter in addition to the TDT and FPT separately would be useful for case-control studies on oro-facial pain patients with trigeminal neuralgia, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome/glossodynia. PMID:25041286

  17. Reduced heat pain thresholds after sad-mood induction are associated with changes in thalamic activity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Koschke, Mandy; Leuf, Tanja; Schlösser, Ralf; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Negative affective states influence pain processing in healthy subjects in terms of augmented pain experience. Furthermore, our previous studies revealed that patients with major depressive disorder showed increased heat pain thresholds on the skin. Potential neurofunctional correlates of this finding were located within the fronto-thalamic network. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurofunctional underpinnings of the influence of sad mood upon heat pain processing in healthy subjects. For this purpose, we used a combination of the Velten Mood Induction procedure and a piece of music to induce sad affect. Initially we assessed heat pain threshold after successful induction of sad mood outside the MR scanner in Experiment 1. We found a highly significant reduction in heat pain threshold on the left hand and a trend for the right. In Experiment 2, we applied thermal pain stimuli on the left hand (37, 42, and 45 degrees C) in an MRI scanner. Subjects were scanned twice, one group before and after sad-mood induction and another group before and after neutral-mood induction, respectively. Our main finding was a significant group x mood-induction interaction bilaterally in the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus indicating a BOLD signal increase after sad-mood induction and a BOLD signal decrease in the control group. We present evidence that induced sad affect leads to reduced heat pain thresholds in healthy subjects. This is probably due to altered lateral thalamic activity, which is potentially associated with changed attentional processes. PMID:19027763

  18. A Novel Quantitative Pain Assessment Instrument That Provides Means of Comparing Patient’s Pain Magnitude With a Measurement of Their Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lanny L.; Pittsley, Andrew; Becker, Ruth; Young, Allison De

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional pain assessment instruments are subjective in nature. They are limited to subjective reporting of the presence and magnitude of pain. There is no means of validating their response or assessing their pain tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine the potential value of a novel addition to the traditional physical examination concerning a patient’s pain and more importantly their pain tolerance. Methods Extensive preliminary data were collected on 359 consecutive private practice knee patients referable the subject’s pain, including the magnitude, the most pain ever experienced, and their opinion of personal pain tolerance. The novel evaluation included physical testing of a series of small ball drops through a vertical tube from various fixed levels on the index finger and patella. The patient’s response to this impact testing provided quantitative information, from which a comparison was made to their pain opinion and also to that of other patients with similar demographics. Results Nine percent of the patients rated their pain tolerance below the midpoint on the visual analog scale. Seventy-one percent thought they were above the midpoint on the scale in regards to pain tolerance. There were discrepancies in both directions between the subject’s opinion on pain tolerance and their rating of their pain experience to the ball drop testing. Twenty-eight percent of the entire patient group rated themselves above 5 on tolerance, but experienced above the average discomfort compared to other subjects reporting on the finger impact testing. Conclusions This report introduces a novel method for collecting data concerning pain that can be subjected to quantification. The database included quantitative measures providing the opportunity to confirm, validate or refute the patient’s assertions concerning pain magnitude and tolerance. This method is best described as a patient pain profile. It has the potential to give both the

  19. Lubiprostone does not Influence Visceral Pain Thresholds in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, William E.; Palsson, Olafur S.; Gangarosa, Lisa; Turner, Marsha; Tucker, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical trials, lubiprostone reduced the severity of abdominal pain. Aims The primary aim was to determine whether lubiprostone raises the threshold for abdominal pain induced by intraluminal balloon distention. A secondary aim was to determine whether changes in pain sensitivity influence clinical pain independently of changes in transit time. Methods Sixty-two patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) participated in an 8-week crossover study. All subjects completed a 14-day baseline ending with a barostat test of pain and urge sensory thresholds. Half, randomly selected, then received 48 ug/day of lubiprostone for 14 days ending with a pain sensitivity test and a Sitzmark test of transit time. This was followed by a 14-day washout and then a crossover to 14 days of placebo with tests of pain sensitivity and transit time. The other half of the subjects received placebo before lubiprostone. All kept symptom diaries. Results Stools were significantly softer when taking lubiprostone compared to placebo (Bristol Stool scores 4.20 vs. 3.44, p<0.001). However, thresholds for pain (17.36 vs. 17.83 mmHg, lubiprostone vs. placebo) and urgency to defecate (14.14 vs. 14.53 mmHg) were not affected by lubiprostone. Transit time was not significantly different between lubiprostone and placebo (51.27 vs. 51.81 hours), and neither pain sensitivity nor transit time was a significant predictor of clinical pain. Conclusions Lubiprostone has no effect on visceral sensory thresholds. The reductions in clinical pain that occur while taking lubiprostone appear to be secondary to changes in stool consistency. PMID:21914041

  20. The Fine Tuning of Pain Thresholds: A Sophisticated Double Alarm System

    PubMed Central

    Plaghki, Léon; Decruynaere, Céline; Van Dooren, Paul; Le Bars, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Two distinctive features characterize the way in which sensations including pain, are evoked by heat: (1) a thermal stimulus is always progressive; (2) a painful stimulus activates two different types of nociceptors, connected to peripheral afferent fibers with medium and slow conduction velocities, namely Aδ- and C-fibers. In the light of a recent study in the rat, our objective was to develop an experimental paradigm in humans, based on the joint analysis of the stimulus and the response of the subject, to measure the thermal thresholds and latencies of pain elicited by Aδ- and C-fibers. For comparison, the same approach was applied to the sensation of warmth elicited by thermoreceptors. A CO2 laser beam raised the temperature of the skin filmed by an infrared camera. The subject stopped the beam when he/she perceived pain. The thermal images were analyzed to provide four variables: true thresholds and latencies of pain triggered by heat via Aδ- and C-fibers. The psychophysical threshold of pain triggered by Aδ-fibers was always higher (2.5–3°C) than that triggered by C-fibers. The initial skin temperature did not influence these thresholds. The mean conduction velocities of the corresponding fibers were 13 and 0.8 m/s, respectively. The triggering of pain either by C- or by Aδ-fibers was piloted by several factors including the low/high rate of stimulation, the low/high base temperature of the skin, the short/long peripheral nerve path and some pharmacological manipulations (e.g. Capsaicin). Warming a large skin area increased the pain thresholds. Considering the warmth detection gave a different picture: the threshold was strongly influenced by the initial skin temperature and the subjects detected an average variation of 2.7°C, whatever the initial temperature. This is the first time that thresholds and latencies for pain elicited by both Aδ- and C-fibers from a given body region have been measured in the same experimental run. Such an approach

  1. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  2. Factors influencing pricking pain threshold using a CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Voegelin, M R; Zoppi, M; Meucci, R; Jafrancesco, D; Bartoli, A

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the best experimental conditions in healthy subjects for the measurement of the minimal thermal energy density E1 which induced pricking pain on the volar surface of the left forearm by means of CO2 laser pulses. E1 was measured on a well-defined area, using laser pulses of different durations and constant power P. The dependence of E1 on the stimulus power P, the size A of the radiated area and the surface temperature T(e) were explored. In the first part of the study, these relations were obtained using a computer program, from the calculated spatio-temporal distribution of the skin temperature during, and following, a laser pulse which caused pricking pain. The second part studied a set of subsequent measurements carried out on a group of five healthy trained subjects and agreed only in part with the calculated data. We found that the measurement error on E(t) was less than 10% with P between 1.5 and 3 W, and A between 0.15 and 0.25 cm2, respectively. The influence of sensitization and adaptation phenomena on the measured data was also explored. We also show a rhythmic annual change of T(e) and E1. PMID:12636187

  3. Mental pain and suicide risk: application of the Greek version of the Mental Pain and the Tolerance of Mental Pain scale.

    PubMed

    Soumani, A; Damigos, D; Oulis, P; Masdrakis, V; Ploumpidis, D; Mavreas, V; Konstantakopoulos, G

    2011-01-01

    According to Shneidman's theory, mental pain or "psychache", which refers to an endopsychic painful experience consisted of excessively felt negative feelings, is a key component to the understanding of suicidal behaviour, as to its psychological features. Shneidman himself supported that 'suicide is caused by psychache', more precisely suicide occurs when a person can no longer tolerate this pain. Findings of previous studies have shown that mental pain is an independent predictive factor for suicidal behaviour. In the present study we evaluated the psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Mental Pain Scale (MPS) and the Tolerance for Mental Pain Scale (TMPS) ina non clinical sample consisted of 112 participants (73 female and 39 male). Moreover, we explore the relationships between mental pain, depression, and suicide risk and for the first time the effect of the tolerance for mental pain on depression and suicide risk. We hypothesized that both the level of mental pain and the degree of tolerance for mental pain would predict suicide risk, independently of the level of depression. Both MPS and TMPS appear to have satisfactory to high levels of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity. Suicide risk was correlated to mental pain, tolerance for mental pain, and depression. Multiple regression analysis showed that mental pain and tolerance for mental pain have a significant contribution to suicide risk, independently of depression, confirming our hypothesis.Using an additional multivariate regression with the factors extracted from MPS and TMPS as independent variables, we found that especially 'loss of control' of mental pain and the ability to 'contain the pain' contribute uniquely to suicide risk. Our findings offer support to the hypothesis that mental pain is a clinical entity distinct from depression with a specific and important contribution to the suicide risk.Depression alone is not enough to cause suicide. The

  4. The effect on mechanical pain threshold over human muscles by oral administration of granisetron and diclofenac-sodium.

    PubMed

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Kopp, Sigvard; Ernberg, Malin

    2005-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that plasma levels of serotonin (5-HT) and intramuscular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) participate in determining the mechanical pain threshold and tolerance level to pressure applied on the skin over healthy muscles. Other studies reported gender differences regarding responses to noxious stimuli. The present study aimed to determine whether the mechanical pain threshold of healthy muscles is influenced by oral administration of 5-HT3 or PGE2-inhibitors and if there are any gender differences in this respect. Ten healthy female subjects and 10 age-matched healthy male subjects participated in the study, which was randomized and double blind with crossover design. Granisetron (5-HT3-antagonist), diclofenac-sodium (PGE2-antagonist) and placebo were administered for 3 days. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded bilaterally with an algometer over certain orofacial, trunk, and limb muscles before and after administration of the antagonists. The PPT over all muscles combined increased after administration of granisetron. There was no change after administration of placebo. The difference between granisetron and placebo was significant for the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles. Diclofenac-sodium did not influence the PPT and there was no difference compared to placebo. Although the basal PPT values were lower in females, the PPT response to granisetron differed significantly between genders only in the tibialis anterior muscle. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that oral administration of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron increased the PPT over healthy trunk and limb muscles but not over orofacial muscles, and that the response in the limb muscles was greater in males. PMID:15661432

  5. The relationship between fibromyalgia and pressure pain threshold in patients with dyspareunia

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Hasan; Terzi, Rabia; Kale, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the number of tender points, pressure pain threshold and presence of fibromyalgia among women with or without dyspareunia. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study included 40 patients with dyspareunia and 30 healthy controls. The participants were asked if they had engaged in sexual intercourse during the previous four weeks, and dyspareunia was rated from 0 to 3 based on the Marinoff Dyspareunia Scale. A pressure algometer (dolorimeter) was used to measure the pressure pain threshold. Fibromyalgia was diagnosed based on the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria. The depression status of the participants was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found with regard to age, body mass index, habits (alcohol use and smoking), educational status and occupational status between the two groups. Total myalgic score, total control score and tender point mean pain threshold were significantly lower in the group with dyspareunia. The number of tender points was significantly higher in patients with dyspareunia. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 14.7±8.4 in the dyspareunia group compared with 11.2±7.1 in the control group. Five (12.5%) of the patients with dyspareunia were diagnosed with fibromyalgia, whereas no patients in the control group were diagnosed with fibromyalgia. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to the presence of fibromyalgia. CONCLUSION: The finding of lower pressure pain thresholds and a higher number of tender points among patients with dyspareunia suggests that these patients may have increased generalized pain thresholds. Additional studies involving a larger number of patients are required to investigate the presence of central mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dyspareunia. PMID:25996766

  6. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/−) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  7. The role of experiential avoidance in acute pain tolerance: a laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Feldner, Matthew T; Hekmat, Hamid; Zvolensky, Michael J; Vowles, Kevin E; Secrist, Zachary; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W

    2006-06-01

    The present investigation examined the role of experiential avoidance in terms of acute pain tolerance and subsequent recovery. Seventy nonclinical participants completed the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and underwent a well-established cold pressor task. Results indicated that individuals reporting higher levels of experiential avoidance had lower pain endurance and tolerance and recovered more slowly from this particular type of aversive event. Consistent with theoretical prediction, these findings suggest that experiential avoidance may play a role in tolerance of acute pain. PMID:15882839

  8. Lagged association between geomagnetic activity and diminished nocturnal pain thresholds in mice.

    PubMed

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2007-10-01

    A wide variety of behaviors in several species has been statistically associated with the natural variations in geomagnetism. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity are associated with pain thresholds, adult mice were exposed to a hotplate paradigm once weekly for 52 weeks during the dark cycle. Planetary A index values from the previous 6 days of a given hotplate session were correlated with the mean response latency for subjects to the thermal stimulus. We found that hotplate latency was significantly (P < 0.05) and inversely correlated (rho = -0.25) with the daily geomagnetic intensity 3 days prior to testing. Therefore, if the geomagnetic activity was greater 3 days before a given hotplate trial, subjects tended to exhibit shorter response latencies, suggesting lower pain thresholds or less analgesia. These results are supported by related experimental findings and suggest that natural variations in geomagnetic intensity may influence nociceptive behaviors in mice. PMID:17657732

  9. Silent disco: dancing in synchrony leads to elevated pain thresholds and social closeness

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Dunbar, Robin I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Moving in synchrony leads to cooperative behaviour and feelings of social closeness, and dance (involving synchronisation to others and music) may cause social bonding, possibly as a consequence of released endorphins. This study uses an experimental paradigm to determine which aspects of synchrony in dance are associated with changes in pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin release) and social bonding between strangers. Those who danced in synchrony experienced elevated pain thresholds, whereas those in the partial and asynchrony conditions experienced no analgesic effects. Similarly, those in the synchrony condition reported being more socially bonded, although they did not perform more cooperatively in an economic game. This experiment suggests that dance encourages social bonding amongst co-actors by stimulating the production of endorphins, but may not make people more altruistic. We conclude that dance may have been an important human behaviour evolved to encourage social closeness between strangers. PMID:27540276

  10. Overcoming pain thresholds with multilevel models—an example using quantitative sensory testing (QST) data

    PubMed Central

    Blankenburg, Markus R.; Süß, Moritz; Zernikow, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of somatosensory function is a cornerstone of research and clinical practice in neurology. Recent initiatives have developed novel protocols for quantitative sensory testing (QST). Application of these methods led to intriguing findings, such as the presence lower pain-thresholds in healthy children compared to healthy adolescents. In this article, we (re-) introduce the basic concepts of signal detection theory (SDT) as a method to investigate such differences in somatosensory function in detail. SDT describes participants’ responses according to two parameters, sensitivity and response-bias. Sensitivity refers to individuals’ ability to discriminate between painful and non-painful stimulations. Response-bias refers to individuals’ criterion for giving a “painful” response. We describe how multilevel models can be used to estimate these parameters and to overcome central critiques of these methods. To provide an example we apply these methods to data from the mechanical pain sensitivity test of the QST protocol. The results show that adolescents are more sensitive to mechanical pain and contradict the idea that younger children simply use more lenient criteria to report pain. Overall, we hope that the wider use of multilevel modeling to describe somatosensory functioning may advance neurology research and practice. PMID:26557435

  11. The pathophysiology of chronic pain--increased sensitivity to low threshold A beta-fibre inputs.

    PubMed

    Woolf, C J; Doubell, T P

    1994-08-01

    Chronic pain is characterized by abnormal sensitivity, which is due to the generation of pain in response to the activation of the low-threshold mechanoreceptive A beta fibres that normally generate innocuous sensations. Three different processes in the spinal cord can account for this dramatic alteration in sensory processing in the somatosensory system: increased excitability, decreased inhibition and structural reorganization. All have been shown to occur and each may contribute separately or together to the wide range of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain disorders. The unravelling of the cellular mechanisms involved both offers the potential for developing novel therapeutic strategies, which reduce functional synaptic plasticity and prevent central atrophic and regenerative responses in injured neurones, and illustrates the capacity of the adult nervous system for maladaptive modification. PMID:7812141

  12. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20-22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  13. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20–22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  14. Influence of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the threshold and pain intensity in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira; Silvestre, Ana Caroline; da Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Gomes, Mariany Ribeiro; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation frequencies in nociception front of a pressure pain threshold and cold in healthy individuals. Methods Twenty healthy subjects were divided into four groups, all of which have gone through all forms of electrical stimulation at different weeks. Assessments were pre and post-therapy, 20 and 60 minutes after stimulation. To evaluate the pressure pain threshold, an algometer was used with one tapered tip, pressing the hypothenar region until voluntary report the word “pain”. Cold pain intensity was assessed by immersion in water at 5°C for 30 seconds; at the end, the subject was asked to quantify the pain intensity on a Visual Analog Scale for Pain. For electrical stimulation, two electrodes were used near the elbow, for 20 minutes, with an intensity strong, but not painful. The frequency was in accordance with the group: 0Hz (placebo); 7Hz; 100Hz; and 255Hz. Results Both for the assessment of pressure pain threshold as the cold pain intensity, there was no significant difference (p>0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on dermatomes C6 to C8 produced no significant change in pressure pain threshold or cold discomfort. PMID:25295453

  15. Latitudinal variation in thermal tolerance thresholds of early life stages of corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, E. S.; Keith, S. A.; Byrne, M.; Schmidt-Roach, S.; Baird, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    Organisms living in habitats characterized by a marked seasonal temperature variation often have a greater thermal tolerance than those living in more stable habitats. To determine the extent to which this hypothesis applies to reef corals, we compared thermal tolerance of the early life stages of five scleractinian species from three locations spanning 17° of latitude along the east coast of Australia. Embryos were exposed to an 8 °C temperature range around the local ambient temperature at the time of spawning. Upper thermal thresholds, defined as the temperature treatment at which the proportion of abnormal embryos or median life span was significantly different to ambient controls, varied predictably among locations. At Lizard Island, the northern-most site with the least annual variation in temperature, the proportion of abnormal embryos increased and life span decreased 2 °C above ambient in the two species tested. At two southern sites, One Tree Island and Lord Howe Island, where annual temperature variation was greater, upper temperature thresholds were generally 4 °C or greater above ambient for both variables in the four species tested. The absolute upper thermal threshold temperature also varied among locations: 30 °C at Lizard Island; 28 °C at One Tree Island; 26 °C at Lord Howe Island. These results support previous work on adult corals demonstrating predictable differences in upper thermal thresholds with latitude. With projected ocean warming, these temperature thresholds will be exceeded in northern locations in the near future, adding to a growing body of evidence indicating that climate change is likely to be more detrimental to low latitude than high latitude corals.

  16. Effect of raised plasma β endorphin concentrations on peripheral pain and angina thresholds in patients with stable angina

    PubMed Central

    Jarmukli, N; Ahn, J; Iranmanesh, A; Russell, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether changes in plasma concentrations of β endorphins alter angina threshold and peripheral pain threshold in patients with stable angina.
DESIGN—Latin square design comparison of angina thresholds by exercise treadmill test and peripheral pain thresholds using a radiant heat source in eight patients with stable angina under control conditions, after stimulation of pituitary β endorphin release by ketoconazole, after suppression of pituitary β endorphin release by dexamethasone, and after blockade of opioid receptors by intravenous naloxone.
RESULTS—An approximately fivefold increase in circulating concentrations of β endorphins was found after administration of ketoconazole (mean (SEM): 13.9 (1.2) v 73.8 (6.2) pg/ml; p < 0.05), which was associated with an increase in peripheral pain threshold to a radiant heat source (time to onset of pain perception 72 (19) v 123 (40) seconds; p < 0.05), but no significant difference in angina threshold. A reduction in circulating concentrations of β endorphins after pretreatment with dexamethasone was statistically non-significant (13.9 (1.2) v 9.0 (1.5) pg/ml; NS) and was not associated with any change in either peripheral pain or angina thresholds. No effects were seen after blockade of opioid receptors by previous administration of intravenous naloxone.
CONCLUSIONS—Increased plasma concentrations of β endorphins alter peripheral pain threshold but not angina threshold in patients with stable angina pectoris.


Keywords: β endorphin; angina; pain PMID:10409537

  17. Evaluation of thermal, pain, and vibration sensation thresholds in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, D; Mayer, P; Gries, F A

    1988-01-01

    Small and large fibre function was studied in 40 non-ketotic, newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetic patients and 48 age-matched controls, using 12 quantitative tests for assessment of cutaneous sensation. Patients were aged 10-39 years and had been treated with insulin for 4-31 days. Thermal discrimination (foot), warm and cold thermal perception (thenar eminence and foot), and heat and cold pain perception thresholds (thenar eminence) were significantly elevated in the patients as compared with the controls (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001). No significant differences in thermal discrimination (thenar), heat and cold pain perception (foot), and metacarpal as well as malleolar vibration perception thresholds were noted between the groups. The rates of abnormalities among the individual tests ranged from 0% to 27.5%, being lowest for vibration perception and highest for thermal perception thresholds after cold stimuli. The results in nine of 12 tests correlated significantly with age, but only two were related to HbA1c. Thus, sensory neural functions transmitted by small fibres, but not those transmitted by large fibres, were impaired in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetics after the correction of initial ketosis and hyperglycaemia. Cooling perception tests were most sensitive in detecting abnormality. An age-related involvement of different small fibre functions was present in these patients. PMID:3236020

  18. [Influence of simulated microgravity on the threshold of pain sensitivity in humans with single dose of ketorolac].

    PubMed

    Baranov, M V; Kovalev, A S; Perfilov, D F; Chernogorov, R V; Repenkova, L G

    2015-01-01

    The data supporting the influence of simulated microgravity effects on pain sensitivity were obtained in the series of experiments involving human. In conditions of antiorthostatic hypokinesia (ANOH) and immersion revealed no reduction in pain sensitivity in the morning, which is typical for normal conditions. Ketorolac has no effect on pain sensitivity, when determining the pain threshold (PT) by method of thermoalgometry. However, the conditions of simulated microgravity substantially alter the pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, increasing the rate of absorption of the drug and reduce its relative bioavailability and retention time in the blood plasma. This may require changes in pain therapy schemes in space flight. PMID:26571803

  19. Fake feedback on pain tolerance impacts proactive versus reactive control strategies.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Davide; Braem, Senne; Pourtois, Gilles; Brass, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that beliefs about one's own ability to execute a task influence task performance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that beliefs about a specific self-control capacity, namely pain tolerance, modulate basic cognitive control processes. Participants received fake comparative social feedback that their ability to tolerate painful stimulations was either very poor or outstanding after which they performed an unrelated go/no-go task. Participants receiving low-tolerance feedback, relative to high-tolerance feedback, were less successful at inhibiting their responses and more influenced by previous trial conditions, as indicated by an increased slowdown following errors and more failed inhibitions following go-trials. These observations demonstrate a shift from a more proactive to a more reactive control mode. This study shows that providing feedback about one's own capacity to control impulsive reactions to painful stimulations directly influences low-level cognitive control dynamics. PMID:27149180

  20. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Melton, Danielle H; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP) after traumatic limb amputation. Methods Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were enrolled. Ten patients had chronic PLP, while the other seven patients had no PLP. Tactile-sensation threshold, cold- and warm-sensation thresholds, cold- and heat-pain thresholds, electrical-sensation threshold (EST), and electrical-pain threshold on the distal residual limb and the symmetrical site on the sound limb were measured in all tested patients. Their thresholds were compared within the PLP and non-PLP group, and between the groups. Results The novel findings included: 1) electrical-pain threshold was only decreased in the sound limb in the PLP group and there was no difference between two limbs in the non-PLP group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with PLP; and 2) EST was increased on the affected limb as compared to the sound limb within the PLP group, but there were no significant differences in EST between the PLP and non-PLP group. There were in general no significant differences in other tested thresholds within the groups and between groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate central sensitization in the patients with PLP after traumatic limb amputation. PMID:25945065

  1. Winter cold-tolerance thresholds in field-grown Miscanthus hybrid rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Murilo de Melo; Friesen, Patrick Calvin; Sage, Rowan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cold tolerance of winter-dormant rhizomes was evaluated in diploid, allotriploid, and allotetraploid hybrids of Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus grown in a field setting. Two artificial freezing protocols were tested: one lowered the temperature continuously by 1°C h–1 to the treatment temperature and another lowered the temperature in stages of 24h each to the treatment temperature. Electrolyte leakage and rhizome sprouting assays after the cold treatment assessed plant and tissue viability. Results from the continuous-cooling trial showed that Miscanthus rhizomes from all genotypes tolerated temperatures as low as –6.5 °C; however, the slower, staged-cooling procedure enabled rhizomes from two diploid lines to survive temperatures as low as –14 °C. Allopolyploid genotypes showed no change in the lethal temperature threshold between the continuous and staged-cooling procedure, indicating that they have little ability to acclimate to subzero temperatures. The results demonstrated that rhizomes from diploid Miscanthus lines have superior cold tolerance that could be exploited to improve performance in more productive polyploid lines. With expected levels of soil insulation, low winter air temperatures should not harm rhizomes of tolerant diploid genotypes of Miscanthus in temperate to sub-boreal climates (up to 60°N); however, the observed winter cold in sub-boreal climates could harm rhizomes of existing polyploid varieties of Miscanthus and thus reduce stand performance. PMID:25788733

  2. The growth threshold conjecture: a theoretical framework for understanding T-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Clemente F.; Herrero, Miguel A.; Cuesta, José A.; Acosta, Francisco J.; Fernández-Arias, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses depend on the capacity of T cells to target specific antigens. As similar antigens can be expressed by pathogens and host cells, the question naturally arises of how can T cells discriminate friends from foes. In this work, we suggest that T cells tolerate cells whose proliferation rates remain below a permitted threshold. Our proposal relies on well-established facts about T-cell dynamics during acute infections: T-cell populations are elastic (they expand and contract) and they display inertia (contraction is delayed relative to antigen removal). By modelling inertia and elasticity, we show that tolerance to slow-growing populations can emerge as a population-scale feature of T cells. This result suggests a theoretical framework to understand immune tolerance that goes beyond the self versus non-self dichotomy. It also accounts for currently unexplained observations, such as the paradoxical tolerance to slow-growing pathogens or the presence of self-reactive T cells in the organism. PMID:26587263

  3. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  4. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  5. Extraversion and pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G E

    1975-09-01

    According to Eysenck's (1957, 1960, 1967) theory of personality, extroverts are posited as having higher pain thresholds and greater pain tolerance than introverts. The evidence for these hypothesized relationships is reviewed. Findings appear inconclusive in both cases. Probability pooling (Mosteller & Bush, 1954) is therefore performed, grouping the comparable studies and carrying out overall tests of significance. Results support the hypothesized relationships between extraversion and pain threshold and between extraversion and pain tolerance. Possible reasons why certain studies failed to find these results are discussed. PMID:1182410

  6. Pressure pain thresholds fluctuate with - but do not usefully predict - the clinical course of painful temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Sanders, Anne E.; Ohrbach, Richard; Fillingim, Roger B.; Dubner, Ron; Gracely, Richard H.; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Greenspan, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    Central sensitization elicits pain hypersensitivity and is thought to be causally implicated in painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). This causal inference is based on cross-sectional evidence that people with TMD have greater sensitivity than controls to noxious stimuli. We tested this inference in the OPPERA prospective cohort study of 3,258 adults with no lifetime history of TMD when enrolled (Visit 1). During five years of follow-up, one group labelled “persistent TMD cases” (n=72) developed first-onset TMD by Visit 2 that persisted ≥6 months until Visit 3. Another group labelled “transient TMD cases” (n=75) developed first-onset TMD at Visit 2 which resolved by Visit 3. Randomly sampled “controls” (n=126) remained TMD-free throughout all three visits. At each visit, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured by algometry at 10 cranial and bodily sites. In persistent TMD cases, mean PPTs reduced 43 kPa (P<0.0001) between Visits 1 and 2 and thereafter did not change significantly. In transient TMD cases, mean PPTs reduced 41 kPa (P<0.001) between Visits 1 and 2, and then increased 20 kPa (P<0.001) by Visit 3. These patterns were similar after excluding cranial sites symptomatic for TMD. Importantly, Visit 1 PPTs had no clinically useful prognostic value in predicting first-onset TMD (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, P=0.15). Among first-onset cases, Visit 2 PPTs were modest predictors of persistent TMD (OR=1=.36, P=0.002). In this longitudinal study, PPTs reduced when TMD developed then rebounded when TMD resolved. However, pre-morbid PPTs poorly predicted TMD incidence, countering the hypothesis that they signify mechanisms causing first-onset TMD. PMID:25130428

  7. PECAM-1-regulated signalling thresholds control tolerance in anergic transgenic B-cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mae-Xhum; Hayball, John D; Jackson, Denise E

    2008-03-01

    Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is an immunoglobulin (Ig)-immunoreceptor tyrosine based inhibitory motif (Ig-ITIM) superfamily member that recruits and activates protein-tyrosine phosphatases, predominantly SHP-2 and to a lesser extent, SHP-1. Previously, we have shown that deletion of PECAM-1 results in a hyper-proliferative B-cell phenotype. We wanted to test whether the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, PECAM-1 maintains peripheral tolerance by regulating signalling thresholds of B-cells that control autoantibody production or relaxed negative selection of autoreactive B-cells in bone marrow. In order to address this issue, we utilised the classical model of lysozyme/immunoglobulin transgenic mouse model that defines thresholds for eliminating or inactivating self-reactive B-cells. In this study, we show that breeding of double transgenes: soluble hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and its corresponding high-affinity receptor (HEL-Ig) onto PECAM-1 null background resulted in a spontaneous loss of B-cell tolerance in vivo. The resultant PECAM-1(-/-) Dbl Tg mice displayed elevated levels of anti-HEL immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in the serum compared to PECAM-1+/+ anergic counterparts. Dbl Tg B-cells lacking PECAM-1 showed enhanced B-cell proliferation and calcium flux responses to LPS, IL-4 alone, IgM cross-linking and IL-4 indicating augmentation of antigen-receptor signalling. Thus, PECAM-1 is important in maintaining peripheral tolerance in Dbl Tg B-cells. PMID:17977600

  8. The effects of distraction on exercise and cold pressor tolerance for chronic low back pain sufferers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M H; Petrie, S M

    1997-01-01

    Distraction has been found to be effective for the attenuation of experimental and acute clinical pain but its efficacy for chronic pain management remains unclear. There are even some suggestions that distraction may be a counterproductive strategy for chronic pain sufferers. In this study we found that a word shadowing distraction task increased the ability of a group of 12 female and eight male chronic low back pain (CLBP) sufferers to carry out a brief (maximum 300 s) step-up exercise that temporarily increased their pain (P < 0.05). This 15% increase in exercise time was not accompanied by an increase in reported pain after the exercise. Interestingly, the same distraction task did not increase the cold pressor (CP) tolerance time for the CLBP group but produced a 26% increase in tolerance time for a pain-free control group consisting of nine females and nine males (P < 0.05). Also, performance on the distraction task during the CP was worse for the CLBP group than the controls (P < 0.05). Although these findings should be interpreted cautiously because of the parameters of the experiment, they do suggest that distraction is a potentially useful technique to assist chronic pain sufferers. PMID:9060011

  9. Metformin increases pressure pain threshold in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiałka, Marta; Milewicz, Tomasz; Sztefko, Krystyna; Rogatko, Iwona; Majewska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the strong preclinical rationale, there are only very few data considering the utility of metformin as a potential pain therapeutic in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the association between metformin therapy and pressure pain threshold (PPT) in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We hypothesized that metformin therapy in lean PCOS women increases PPT. Materials and methods Twenty-seven lean PCOS women with free androgen index phenotype >5 and 18 lean healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Fifteen of the PCOS women were randomly assigned to be treated with metformin 1,500 mg daily for 6 months. PPT and plasma β-endorphin levels were measured in all women at the beginning of the study and after 6 months of observation. Results We observed an increase in PPT values measured on deltoid and trapezius muscle in the PCOS with metformin group after 6 months of metformin administration (4.81±0.88 kg/cm2, P<0.001 on deltoid muscle, and 5.71±1.16 kg/cm2 on trapezius muscle). We did not observe any significant changes in PPT values in the PCOS without treatment group and in controls. We did not observe any significant changes in serum β-endorphin levels in any studied groups during the 6-month observation. Conclusion We conclude that metformin therapy increases PPT in lean PCOS women, without affecting plasma β-endorphin concentration. Our results may suggest the potential role of metformin in pain therapy. We propose that larger, randomized studies on metformin impact on pain perception should be performed. PMID:27536069

  10. The body fades away: investigating the effects of transparency of an embodied virtual body on pain threshold and body ownership.

    PubMed

    Martini, Matteo; Kilteni, Konstantina; Maselli, Antonella; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of "ownership" over an external dummy/virtual body (or body part) has been proven to have both physiological and behavioural consequences. For instance, the vision of an "embodied" dummy or virtual body can modulate pain perception. However, the impact of partial or total invisibility of the body on physiology and behaviour has been hardly explored since it presents obvious difficulties in the real world. In this study we explored how body transparency affects both body ownership and pain threshold. By means of virtual reality, we presented healthy participants with a virtual co-located body with four different levels of transparency, while participants were tested for pain threshold by increasing ramps of heat stimulation. We found that the strength of the body ownership illusion decreases when the body gets more transparent. Nevertheless, in the conditions where the body was semi-transparent, higher levels of ownership over a see-through body resulted in an increased pain sensitivity. Virtual body ownership can be used for the development of pain management interventions. However, we demonstrate that providing invisibility of the body does not increase pain threshold. Therefore, body transparency is not a good strategy to decrease pain in clinical contexts, yet this remains to be tested. PMID:26415748

  11. The body fades away: investigating the effects of transparency of an embodied virtual body on pain threshold and body ownership

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Matteo; Kilteni, Konstantina; Maselli, Antonella; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of “ownership” over an external dummy/virtual body (or body part) has been proven to have both physiological and behavioural consequences. For instance, the vision of an “embodied” dummy or virtual body can modulate pain perception. However, the impact of partial or total invisibility of the body on physiology and behaviour has been hardly explored since it presents obvious difficulties in the real world. In this study we explored how body transparency affects both body ownership and pain threshold. By means of virtual reality, we presented healthy participants with a virtual co-located body with four different levels of transparency, while participants were tested for pain threshold by increasing ramps of heat stimulation. We found that the strength of the body ownership illusion decreases when the body gets more transparent. Nevertheless, in the conditions where the body was semi-transparent, higher levels of ownership over a see-through body resulted in an increased pain sensitivity. Virtual body ownership can be used for the development of pain management interventions. However, we demonstrate that providing invisibility of the body does not increase pain threshold. Therefore, body transparency is not a good strategy to decrease pain in clinical contexts, yet this remains to be tested. PMID:26415748

  12. Superconducting quantum circuits at the surface code threshold for fault tolerance.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Veitia, A; Sank, D; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Mutus, J; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Neill, C; O'Malley, P; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Korotkov, A N; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2014-04-24

    A quantum computer can solve hard problems, such as prime factoring, database searching and quantum simulation, at the cost of needing to protect fragile quantum states from error. Quantum error correction provides this protection by distributing a logical state among many physical quantum bits (qubits) by means of quantum entanglement. Superconductivity is a useful phenomenon in this regard, because it allows the construction of large quantum circuits and is compatible with microfabrication. For superconducting qubits, the surface code approach to quantum computing is a natural choice for error correction, because it uses only nearest-neighbour coupling and rapidly cycled entangling gates. The gate fidelity requirements are modest: the per-step fidelity threshold is only about 99 per cent. Here we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in a superconducting multi-qubit processor, achieving an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92 per cent and a two-qubit gate fidelity of up to 99.4 per cent. This places Josephson quantum computing at the fault-tolerance threshold for surface code error correction. Our quantum processor is a first step towards the surface code, using five qubits arranged in a linear array with nearest-neighbour coupling. As a further demonstration, we construct a five-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using the complete circuit and full set of gates. The results demonstrate that Josephson quantum computing is a high-fidelity technology, with a clear path to scaling up to large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum circuits. PMID:24759412

  13. Phase and Sex Effects in Pain Perception: A Critical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goolkasian, Paula

    1985-01-01

    Reviews the literature in pain perception to clarify the influence of sex and menstrual phase on the phenomenon of pain. The appropriateness of the measures of pain threshold, pain tolerance, discrimination accuracy, and of response bias to the study of pain are discussed. (Author)

  14. Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Katie E.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in snow cover due to climate change could alter the energetics and physiology of ectothermic animals that overwinter beneath snow, yet how snow cover interacts with physiological thresholds is unknown. We applied numerical simulation of overwintering metabolic rates coupled with field validation to determine the importance of snow cover and freezing to the overwintering lipid consumption of the freeze-tolerant Arctiid caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella. Caterpillars that overwintered above the snow experienced mean temperatures 1.3°C lower than those below snow and consumed 18.36 mg less lipid of a total 68.97-mg reserve. Simulations showed that linear temperature effects on metabolic rate accounted for only 30% of the difference in lipid consumption. When metabolic suppression by freezing was included, 93% of the difference between animals that overwintered above and below snow was explained. Our results were robust to differences in temperature sensitivity of metabolic rate, changes in freezing point, and the magnitude of metabolic suppression by freezing. The majority of the energy savings was caused by the non-continuous reduction in metabolic rate due to freezing, the first example of the importance of temperature thresholds in the lipid use of overwintering insects.

  15. The Impact of Demand Characteristics on Brief Acceptance- and Control-Based Interventions for Pain Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Bryan; Forsyth, John P.; Maher, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The present analog study compared the effectiveness of an acceptance- and control-based intervention on pain tolerance using a cold pressor task, and is a partial replication and extension of the Hayes, Bissett et al. (Hayes, S. C., Bissett, R.T., Korn, Z., Zettle, R. D., Rosenfarb, I. S., Cooper, L. D., & Grundt, A. M. (1999). "The impact of…

  16. Pressure Pain Thresholds Increase after Preconditioning 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Tonya M.; Witney, Alice G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Objective Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. Method 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Results Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001) with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01). In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05), with no significant effect on pressure pain. Conclusion This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia. PMID:24658333

  17. Evaluation of sensitivity, motor and pain thresholds across the menstrual cycle through medium-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Barbosa, Mariana; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Nunes, Fabiana Roberta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify variations in nervous thresholds in different phases of the menstrual cycle in eumenorrheic women and users of oral contraceptives. METHOD: An observational study was performed including 56 volunteers, consisting of 30 eumenorrheic women who were non-users of oral contraceptives and 26 users of oral contraceptives. An electrical stimulator was employed to assess their nervous thresholds, with pulses applied at a fixed frequency of 2,500 Hz, modulated at 50 Hz, with phase variances of 20 μs, 50 μs and 100 μs. Sensitivity, motor and pain thresholds were evaluated during five menstrual cycle phases: phase 1 - menstrual, phase 2 - follicular, phase 3 - ovulatory, phase 4 - luteal and phase 5 - premenstrual. RESULTS: The results indicated low sensitivity thresholds of 100 μs for non-users of oral contraceptives and 50 μs for oral contraceptive users in phase 5. Low motor thresholds of 20 μs, 50 μs and 100 μs were observed for non-users of oral contraceptives in phase 5, while that of oral contraceptive users was 100 μs. Finally, a low pain threshold of 100 μs was observed in phase 5, but only in the oral contraceptive group. CONCLUSION: Nervous thresholds vary systematically across the phases of the menstrual cycle, with or without the use of oral contraceptives. These variations should be taken into account during research performed in women. PMID:23917651

  18. Codeine increases pain thresholds to copper vapor laser stimuli in extensive but not poor metabolizers of sparteine.

    PubMed

    Sindrup, S H; Brøsen, K; Bjerring, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Larsen, U; Angelo, H R; Gram, L F

    1990-12-01

    The analgesic efficacy and kinetics of a single oral dose of 75 mg codeine was investigated in 12 extensive metabolizers and 12 poor metabolizers of sparteine in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. The cosegregation of the O-demethylation of codeine to morphine with the sparteine oxidation polymorphism was confirmed. Hence morphine could not be detected in the plasma of any of the poor metabolizers, whereas detectable morphine plasma levels were found in 10 of 12 extensive metabolizers. Pain thresholds to laser stimuli were determined before drug intake and 90, 150, and 210 minutes after drug intake. Codeine significantly increased the pricking pain thresholds in the extensive metabolizers (p less than 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in the poor metabolizers. No change in pain thresholds occurred with placebo in any of the two phenotypes. In the extensive metabolizers there was a significant positive correlation between the increase in pain threshold and plasma concentration of codeine. The study supports the hypothesis that morphine formation is essential for achievement of analgesia during codeine treatment. PMID:2249379

  19. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  20. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P < 0.05) and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P < 0.05). No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa); pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P < 0.01). Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  1. Altered pressure pain thresholds and increased wind-up in adult patients with chronic back pain with a history of childhood maltreatment: a quantitative sensory testing study.

    PubMed

    Tesarz, Jonas; Eich, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Gerhardt, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with an increased risk of nonspecific chronic low back pain (nsCLBP). However, the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Therefore, this study considered whether distinct types of CM are accompanied by specific alterations in somatosensory function. A total of 176 subjects with nsCLBP and 27 pain-free controls (PCs) were included. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to categorize patients into 2 groups (abused/neglected vs nonabused/nonneglected) for 5 types of CM (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect). The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was performed to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory function, including detection and pain thresholds, pain sensitivity, and assessments of temporal summation (wind-up). Between 17.7% and 51.4% of subjects with nsCLBP reported CM, depending on the type of CM. Childhood Trauma Questionnaire subscores for emotional and sexual abuse were significantly higher in subjects with nsCLBP than in PCs. Compared with PCs, subjects with CM showed reduced pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), irrespective of the type of CM. Regarding distinct types of CM, subjects with nsCLBP with emotional abuse reported significantly higher wind-up than those without, and sexual abuse was accompanied by enhanced touch sensitivity. Our findings suggest that CM is nonspecifically associated with a decreased PPT in nsCLBP. Emotional abuse apparently leads to enhanced spinal pain summation, and sexual abuse leads to enhanced touch sensitivity. These results emphasize the importance of emotional abuse in nsCLBP and suggest that CM can induce long-term changes in adult somatosensory function. PMID:27075429

  2. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael Philip

    2006-04-01

    Sativex is one of the first cannabis-based medicines to undergo conventional clinical development and to be approved as a prescription medicine. It is an oromucosal spray that allows flexible, individualised dosing. Patients self titrate their overall dose and pattern of dosing according to their response to and tolerance of the medicine. This usually results in the administration of approximately 8-12 sprays/day. Each spray delivers tetrahydrocannabinol 2.7 mg and cannabidiol 2.5 mg, giving an approximate average dose of tetrahydrocannabinol 22-32 mg/day and cannabidiol 20-30 mg/day. Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms. Sativex has been approved for use in neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis in Canada. If ongoing studies replicate the results already observed, further approvals for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and for neuropathic pain are likely. PMID:16553576

  3. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fentanyl pectin nasal spray in patients with breakthrough cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A; Lorenzl, Stefan; Lux, Eberhard A; Voltz, Raymond; Perelman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assessment of analgesic effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of fentanyl pectin nasal spray (FPNS) in the treatment of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP) in routine clinical practice. Methods A prospective, open-label, noninterventional study (4-week observation period, 3 month follow-up) of opioid-tolerant adults with BTcP in 41 pain and palliative care centers in Germany. Standardized BTcP questionnaires and patient diaries were used. Evaluation was made of patient-reported outcomes with respect to “time to first effect”, “time to maximum effect”, BTcP relief, as well as changes in BTcP-related impairment of daily life activities, quality-of-life restrictions, and health care resource utilization. Results A total of 235 patients were recruited of whom 220 completed all questionnaires and reported on 1,569 BTcP episodes. Patients reported a significant reduction of maximum BTcP intensity (11-stage numerical rating scale [0= no pain, 10= worst pain conceivable]) with FPNS (mean ± standard deviation = 2.8±2.3) compared with either that reported at baseline (8.5±1.5), experienced immediately before FPNS application (7.4±1.7), or that achieved with previous BTcP medication (6.0±2.0; P<0.001 for each comparison). In 12.3% of BTcP episodes, onset of pain relief occurred ≤2 minutes and in 48.4% ≤5 minutes; maximum effects were reported within 10 minutes for 37.9% and within 15 minutes for 79.4%. By the end of the study, there had been significant improvements versus baseline in BTcP-related daily life activities (28.3±16.9 vs 53.1±11.9), physical (35.9±8.4 vs 26.8±6.5), and mental quality of life (38.7±8.5 vs 29.9±7.9) (P<0.001 for each comparison vs baseline); in addition, health care resource utilization requirements directly related to BTcP were reduced by 67.5%. FPNS was well tolerated; seven patients (3.2%) experienced eight treatment-emergent adverse events of which none was serious. There were no indicators of misuse or abuse

  4. Associations between Pressure-Pain Threshold, Symptoms, and Radiographic Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Adam P.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Gracely, Richard H.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between generalized evoked pressure pain sensitivity with distal pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and the presence, severity, or number of involved knee/hip joints with radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) or related symptoms. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses come from the second follow-up (2008–11) of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n=1,602). Pressure-pain threshold measurements were averaged over two trials from both the left and right trapezius. Outcomes of radiographic knee and hip OA were both defined by a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2–4 and site-specific symptoms were ascertained at clinical interview. Associations were determine with multiple logistic regression models, and two-way interactions were tested at p<0.05. Results The sample was 67.2% female and 31.0% African American. Participants’ mean age was 67.9 (SD 9.0); mean body mass index was 31.5 (SD 7.1); mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score was 6.5 (SD 7.4); and mean total PPT was 3.6kg (SD 0.7). Significant associations were found between PPT and self-reported knee/hip symptoms. No significant associations were found between PPT and presence, severity, or number of joints with knee and hip rOA without accompanying symptoms. No significant interactions were found with demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion Pressure-pain threshold was significantly associated with self-reported single and multi-joint symptoms. In contrast, after adjustment, PPT measured at the trapezius was not associated with asymptomatic knee or hip rOA. As such, PPT may prove to be a useful indicator of rOA pain processing and of why individuals respond favorably and others do not to treatments targeting rOA. PMID:24643946

  5. An indentation apparatus for evaluating discomfort and pain thresholds in conjunction with mechanical properties of foot tissue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuping; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S; Witana, Channa P; Rodrigo, W D Asanka S

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of human foot tissue in vivo as well as discomfort and pain thresholds are important for various applications. In this study, an apparatus for measuring the discomfort and pain thresholds and the mechanical properties of human tissues is presented. The apparatus employs a stepper motor that controls the indentation speed, as well as a load cell and potentiometer that determine the corresponding reaction force and tissue deformation (displacement), respectively. A LabVIEW program (LabVIEW 8, National Instruments Corporation; Austin, Texas) was developed to control the indentation via a data acquisition card. The apparatus can accommodate indentor displacements up to 35 mm and can impart forces up to 150 N at a controlled indentation speed in the range of 0 to 10 mm/s. Tests showed that the displacement measurement error is <0.17 mm in the nominal range (0.5% in the full scale) and the measurement error of force is <1.6 N in the nominal range (1.1% in the full scale). Experimental results indicate that the apparatus is reliable and flexible for measuring the mechanical properties of foot tissue in vivo in conjunction with pain and discomfort thresholds. PMID:21110259

  6. Site-specific visual feedback reduces pain perception.

    PubMed

    Diers, Martin; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Trojan, Jörg; Drevensek, Annika Mira; Erhardt-Raum, Gertrud; Flor, Herta

    2013-06-01

    One of the most common forms of chronic pain is back pain. Until now, nothing has been known about the influence of visualizing one's own back on pain perception at this site. We tested 18 patients with chronic back pain and 18 healthy controls, by implementing online video feedback of the back during painful pressure and subcutaneous electrical stimuli over the trapezius muscle. Pain threshold and pain tolerance were assessed. Pressure pain stimulation intensity was set to 50% above the pain threshold. Subcutaneous stimulation intensity was set to 70% above the pain threshold. Subjects had to rate pain intensity and unpleasantness after each stimulation block on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Visual feedback of the back reduced perceived pain intensity compared to feedback of the hand in both patients and controls. These findings suggest novel intervention modes for chronic back pain based on visualization of body parts by augmented reality applications. PMID:23582151

  7. Acute pain management in opioid-tolerant patients: a growing challenge.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, C A; Roberts, L J; Somogyi, A A; MacIntyre, P E

    2011-09-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, in parallel with other developed countries, the number of patients prescribed opioids on a long-term basis has grown rapidly over the last decade. The burden of chronic pain is more widely recognised and there has been an increase in the use of opioids for both cancer and non-cancer indications. While the prevalence of illicit opioid use has remained relatively stable, the diversion and abuse of prescription opioids has escalated, as has the number of individuals receiving methadone or buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. As a result, the proportion of opioid-tolerant patients requiring acute pain management has increased, often presenting clinicians with greater challenges than those faced when treating the opioid-naïve. Treatment aims include effective relief of acute pain, prevention of drug withdrawal, assistance with any related social, psychiatric and behavioural issues, and ensuring continuity of long-term care. Pharmacological approaches incorporate the continuation of usual medications (or equivalent), short-term use of sometimes much higher than average doses of additional opioid, and prescription of non-opioid and adjuvant drugs, aiming to improve pain relief and attenuate opioid tolerance and/or opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Discharge planning should commence at an early stage and may involve the use of a 'Reverse Pain Ladder' aiming to limit duration of additional opioid use. Legislative requirements may restrict which drugs can be prescribed at the time of hospital discharge. At all stages, there should be appropriate and regular consultation and liaison with the patient, other treating teams and specialist services. PMID:21970125

  8. Nicotine Deprivation Produces Deficits in Pain Perception that are Moderately Attenuated by Caffeine Consumption.

    PubMed

    Baiamonte, Brandon A; Stickley, Sarah C; Ford, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    During withdrawal, nicotine users experience aversive withdrawal symptoms, such as increased nociceptive processing, which may be responsible for subsequent use. Smokers often consume more caffeine than non-smokers and the combined effects of these two psychoactive drugs result in an enhanced analgesic effect of nicotine. We examined the effects of caffeine (via coffee consumption) and nicotine withdrawal on pain perception in minimally deprived smokers and non-smokers. Pain threshold and pain tolerance were assessed using a radiant heat stimulus before and 30 minutes after caffeine consumption. Nicotine deprivation (2 hrs) produced increases in pain threshold and decreases in pain tolerance representative of hyperalgesia. When smokers are nicotine deprived, caffeine consumption diminished baseline elevations in pain threshold, but had no effect on pain tolerance. These data suggest that caffeine consumption can dampen deficits in sensory discrimination related to pain during nicotine deprivation by reducing pain threshold to levels representative of non-smoking controls. PMID:27120004

  9. Effect of brief mindfulness intervention on tolerance and distress of pain induced by cold-pressor task.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Sisi; Chang, Shaochen; Chen, Wenjun; Si, Mei

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that short-term meditation intervention can lead to greater tolerance and lower pain or distress ratings of experimentally induced pain. However, few attempts have been made to examine the effects of short-term mindfulness-based intervention on the tolerance and distress of pain, when delivered in a therapist-free form. The present research explored the effect of brief mindfulness intervention using pre-recorded instruction on pain experimentally induced by the cold-pressor task. The effects of the mindfulness strategy, the distraction strategy and spontaneous strategy, all through the instructions of pre-recorded voices, were compared. The subjects were drawn from healthy college students and randomly assigned to the aforementioned three groups. Our results showed that compared with using spontaneous strategies, the mindfulness intervention significantly improved the participants' pain tolerance and reduced their immersion distress. The distraction strategy also significantly improved the participants' pain tolerance. However, it did not have a significant effect on the participants' level of distress during the immersion period. Our results suggest that brief mindfulness intervention without a therapist's personal involvement is capable of helping people cope with pain induced by the cold-pressor task. PMID:22961992

  10. Human body impedance and threshold currents for perception and pain for contact hazard analysis in the VLF-MF band

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, I.; Wu, D.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1986-05-01

    The body impedance and threshold currents needed to produce sensations of perception and pain have been measured for 367 human subjects for the frequency range 10 kHz to 3 MHz. A sufficient number of subjects (197 male and 170 female subjects of ages between 18 and 70 years) were utilized in the study to make valid statistical predictions for the general adult population. Various types of contact with metallic electrodes were used to simulate the situation where a human being would be in contact with a large metallic object (car, van, school bus, etc.) in an electromagnetic field in the VLF to MF band. Based on these measurements, it is speculated that the body impedance of a human being is inversely proportional to the body dimensions and the threshold current for perception is directly proportional to the square of the body dimensions. Predictions are made, based on scaling, for the corresponding threshold values for ten-year-old children. The average measured impedance and threshold current values are used to calculate threshold electric fields required to produce sensations of perception and pain in humans in contact with these vehicles. It is concluded from these calculations that many situations can exist in which the present ANSI (American National Standards Institute) recommended standard of 632 V/m for the frequency band 0.3-3 MHz is too high. The usefulness of safety devices like electrical safety shoes and gloves has been evaluated and it is concluded that they offer adequate protection from VLF to MF currents only up to a frequency of 1 MHz and 3 MHz, respectively. The current flowing through the hand of a human in conductive contact with the handle of an ungrounded van is shown to be as high as 879 mA and produces a local SAR in the wrist of about 1045 W/kg.

  11. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  12. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  13. The effect of dry needling on pain, pressure pain threshold and disability in patients with a myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Ziaeifar, Maryam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Karimi, Noureddin; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-04-01

    Dry needling (DN) has been used recently by physical therapists as a therapy of choice for patients with myofascial trigger points (TrP). The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of DN in the treatment of TrPs in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. A sample of convenience of 33 patients with TrP in the UT muscle participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard (N = 17) or experimental group (N = 16). The treatment protocol for the standard group consisted of trigger point compression technique (TCT) on MTP, while the patients in the experimental group received DN. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were assessed for both groups before and after the treatment sessions. In addition, the Disability of Arm, Hand, and Shoulder (DASH) was administered. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) revealed a significant improvement in pain, PPT and DASH scores after treatment in the experimental (DN) and standard (TCT) group compared with before treatment (P < 0.05). The ANCOVA revealed significant differences between the DN and TCT groups on the post-measurement VAS score (P = 0.01). There was, however, no significant difference between the two groups on the post-measurement score of the PPT (P = 0.08) and DASH (P = 0.34). DN produces an improvement in pain intensity, PPT and DASH and may be prescribed for subjects with TrP in UT muscles especially when pain relief is the goal of the treatment. PMID:24725800

  14. Salivary Cortisol and Cold Pain Sensitivity in Female Twins

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Kathryn M; Strachan, Eric; Dansie, Elizabeth; Crofford, Leslie J; Buchwald, Dedra; Goldberg, Jack; Poeschla, Brian; Succop, Annemarie; Noonan, Carolyn; Afari, Niloofar

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a dearth of knowledge about the link between cortisol and pain sensitivity. Purpose We examined the association of salivary cortisol with indices of cold pain sensitivity in 198 female twins and explored the role of familial confounding. Methods Three-day saliva samples were collected for cortisol levels and a cold pressor test was used to collect pain ratings and time to threshold and tolerance. Linear regression modeling with generalized estimating equations examined the overall and within-pair associations. Results Lower diurnal variation of cortisol was associated with higher pain ratings at threshold (p = 0.02) and tolerance (p < 0.01). The relationship of diurnal variation with pain ratings at threshold and tolerance was minimally influenced by familial factors (i.e., genetics and common environment). Conclusions Understanding the genetic and non-genetic mechanisms underlying the link between HPA axis dysregulation and pain sensitivity may help to prevent chronic pain development and maintenance. PMID:23955075

  15. Efficacy and Tolerability of Intramuscular Dexketoprofen in Postoperative Pain Management following Hernia Repair Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, P. T.; Porwal, A.; Shinde, J. V.; Erram, S. S.; Kamat, V. V.; Karmarkar, P. S.; Bhagtani, K.; Dhorepatil, S.; Irpatgire, R.; Bhagat, H.; Kolte, S. S.; Shirure, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intramuscular dexketoprofen for postoperative pain in patients undergoing hernia surgery. Methodology. Total 202 patients received single intramuscular injection of dexketoprofen 50 mg or diclofenac 50 mg postoperatively. The pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on VAS at baseline 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. The efficacy parameters were number of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID), and onset and duration of analgesia. Tolerability assessment was done by global evaluation and adverse events in each group. Results. Dexketoprofen showed superior efficacy in terms of number of responders (P = .007), PID at 8 hours (P = .02), and SAPID 0–8 hours (P < .0001). It also showed faster onset of action (42 minutes) and longer duration of action (6.5 hours). The adverse events were comparable in both groups. Conclusion. Single dose of dexketoprofen trometamol 50 mg given intramuscularly provided faster, better, and longer duration of analgesia in postoperative patients of hernia repair surgery than diclofenac 50 mg, with comparable safety. PMID:21716733

  16. Preventive Effects of Forced Exercise against Alcohol-induced Physical Dependency and Reduction of Pain Perception Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Ghaleni, Majid Asadi; Motaghinejad, Ozra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of postabstinence syndrome of alcohol is one of the major strategies of alcoholism treatment. Exercise can be modulated major brain pathways such as a reward system and pain perception centers. The aim of this study was to evaluation the effects of forced exercise in the management of alcohol dependence and pain perception alteration which induced by alcoholism. Methods: 72 adult male rats were divided into 2 major groups: (1) 40 of them was divided into groups of positive control (alcohol dependent) negative control and alcohol dependent groups under treatment by forced exercise, diazepam (0.4 mg/kg) and forced exercise in combination with diazepam and alcohol withdrawal signs, and blood cortisols, were measured in this groups. (2) 32 rats were divided into control, alcohol dependent (without treatment), and alcohol-dependent groups under treatment by forced exercise or indometacin (5 mg/kg) and then pain perception was assessed by using writhing test, tail-flick and hot plate test. Results: Forced exercise, diazepam, and their combinations significantly attenuates withdrawal syndrome to 20 ± 2, 22 ± 1.3 and 16 ± 2 and blood cortisol level to 6.8 ± 1.3,7.9 ± 1.2 and 5.8 ± 1.1, respectively, in comparison with the positive control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). In alcohol dependent animal under treatment by forced exercise, pain response significantly inhibited with 37%, 57% and 38% decreases in writhing test, hot plate, and tail-flick test, respectively, in comparison with alcohol dependent (without treatment) group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggested that forced exercise can be useful as adjunct therapy in alcoholism patient and also can be effective in modulation of pain threshold reduction that was induced by alcohol dependency. PMID:25400889

  17. Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Sharon L.; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B.; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Ruddell, Darren M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90–97 °F; 32.2‒36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide. PMID:24658410

  18. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaegter, Henrik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pain biomarkers are warranted for individualized pain management. Based on different pain modulatory phenotypes, the objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups within patients with nonmalignant chronic pain and to investigate differences in clinical pain and pain hypersensitivity between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 patients with chronic pain to assess pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to 10 repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in cuff pressure pain threshold during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection and heat pain thresholds at clinical painful and nonpainful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM, 4 distinct groups were formed: group 1 (n = 85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP; group 2 (n = 148) had impaired CPM and normal TSP; group 3 (n = 45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP; and group 4 (n = 122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions than the other 3 groups (P < 0.001), indicating that impaired CPM and facilitated TSP play an important role in widespread pain. Groups 1 and 2 compared with group 4 had lower heat pain threshold at nonpainful areas and lower cuff pressure pain tolerance (P < 0.02), indicating that CPM plays a role for widespread hyperalgesia. Moreover, group 1 demonstrated higher clinical pain scores than group 4 (P < 0.05). Although not different between subgroups, patients were profiled on demographics, disability, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. Future research should investigate interventions tailored towards these subgroups. PMID:26963852

  19. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain - a randomised controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Methods Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years) were randomised to a treatment group (TG) or a waiting-list control group (WL). Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR) and maximal pain related to movement (PM) on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), pain diary (PD) data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT), vibration-detection thresholds (VDT), and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were determined at pain-related and control areas. Results Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01). Pain diaries (PD) revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001). There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006) and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006). Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p < 0.05), but were not significant for MDT or VDT. Conclusions A series of five dry cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. Trial

  20. Subgroups based on thermal and pressure pain thresholds in women with chronic whiplash display differences in clinical presentation – an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    Börsbo, Björn; Liedberg, Gunilla M; Wallin, Mia; Gerdle, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the presence of subgroups in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) based on pain thresholds for pressure (PPT), cold (CPT), and heat (HPT) and to compare these subgroups with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. Methods Two groups of female subjects – patients with chronic WAD (n = 28) and healthy controls (CON; n = 29) – were investigated. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) for thermal thresholds and algometry for PPT at four sites in the body (over the trapezius and tibialis anterior bilaterally) were determined. Habitual pain intensities, psychological strain, disability, and health aspects were registered using a questionnaire. Results A cluster analysis based on PPT, CPT, and HPT identified two subgroups of chronic WAD: one sensitive subgroup (s-WAD; n = 21), and one less sensitive subgroup (ls-WAD; n = 6). S-WAD displayed widespread hyperalgesia, whereas ls-WAD had localized hyperalgesia in the neck area, with tendencies to supernormal values in remote areas of the body. Generally, s-WAD had a significantly worse situation than the CON with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. The ls-WAD group was intermediary between s-WAD and CON in these aspects. Conclusion Different explanations, eg, severity of the pain condition per se, etiological factors, and pre-trauma differences in pain sensitivity, may exist for the differences in pain thresholds between the two subgroups. Future research should investigate the role of pain thresholds in the chronic stage to determine the efficacy of treatment interventions. PMID:23166449

  1. Olea Europea-derived phenolic products attenuate antinociceptive morphine tolerance: an innovative strategic approach to treat cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Muscoli, C; Lauro, F; Dagostino, C; D'Agostino, C; Ilari, S; Giancotti, L A; Gliozzi, M; Costa, N; Carresi, C; Musolino, V; Casale, F; Ventrice, D; Oliverio, M; Oliverio, E; Palma, E; Nisticò, S; Nistico', S; Procopio, A; Rizzo, M; Mollace, V

    2014-01-01

    Morphine and related opioid drugs are currently the major drugs for severe pain. Their clinical utility is limited in the management of severe cancer pain due to the rapid development of tolerance. Restoring opioid efficacy is therefore of great clinical importance. A great body of evidence suggests the key role of free radicals and posttranslational modulation in the development of tolerance to the analgesic activity of morphine. Epidemiological studies have shown a relationship between the Mediterranean diet and a reduced incidence of pathologies such as coronary heart disease and cancer. A central hallmark of this diet is the high consumption of virgin olive oil as the main source of fat which contains antioxidant components in the non-saponifiable fraction, including phenolic compounds absent in seed oils. Here, we show that in a rodent model of opiate tolerance, removal of the free radicals with phenolic compounds of olive oil such as hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein reinstates the analgesic action of morphine. Chronic injection of morphine in mice led to the development of tolerance and this was associated with increased nitrotyrosin and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation together with nitration and deactivation of MnSOD in the spinal cord. Removal of free radicals by hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein blocked morphine tolerance by inhibiting nitration and MDA formation and replacing the MnSOD activity. The phenolic fraction of virgin olive oil exerts antioxidant activities in vivo and free radicals generation occurring during chronic morphine administration play a crucial role in the development of opioid tolerance. Our data suggest novel therapeutic approach in the management of chronic cancer pain, in particular for those patients who require long-term opioid treatment for pain relief without development of tolerance. PMID:24750796

  2. There's More Than Catastrophizing in Chronic Pain: Low Frustration Tolerance and Self-Downing Also Predict Mental Health in Chronic Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Suso-Ribera, Carlos; Jornet-Gibert, Montsant; Ribera Canudas, Maria Victoria; McCracken, Lance M; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2016-06-01

    Among the potential range of irrational beliefs that could be used as predictors of physical and mental health, catastrophizing is the process that has received most attention in chronic pain research. Other irrational processes such as demandingness, low frustration tolerance, and self-downing have rarely been studied. The goal of this study was to explore whether this wider range of beliefs is associated with health in chronic pain patients beyond catastrophizing. A total of 492 chronic pain patients completed a measure of irrational beliefs, a measure of physical and mental health, and a numerical rating scale designed to assess pain intensity and interference. Irrational processes were more strongly associated with mental than with physical health. Low frustration tolerance and self-downing were found to be significantly related to mental health even after controlling for the effect of catastrophizing. Processes other than catastrophizing appear to have potentially important relationships with the mental health of people with chronic pain. These results may offer new intervention targets for practitioners. PMID:26995738

  3. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  4. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Postoperative Pain Management in Opioid Tolerant Patients After Spinal Fusions: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ya Deau, Jacques T.; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1–2 level posterior lumbar fusions with segmental instrumentation were randomly assigned to receive ketamine or act as a control. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.2 mg/kg on induction of general anesthesia and then 2 mcg kg−1 hour−1 for the next 24 hours. Patients were extubated in the operating room and within 15 minutes of arriving in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were started on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) hydromorphone without a basal infusion. Patients were assessed for pain (numerical rating scale [NRS]), narcotic use, level of sedation, delirium, and physical therapy milestones until discharge. The ketamine group had significantly less pain during their first postoperative hour in the PACU (NRS 4.8 vs 8.7) and continued to have less pain during the first postoperative day at rest (3.6 vs 5.5) and with physical therapy (5.6 vs 8.0). Three patients in the control group failed PCA pain management and were converted to intravenous ketamine infusions when their pain scores improved. Patients in the ketamine group required less hydromorphone than the control group, but the differences were not significant. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine reduced postoperative pain in narcotic tolerant patients undergoing posterior spine fusions. PMID:18751864

  5. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  6. Evaluation of the analgesic activity and tolerability of aceclofenac in the treatment of post-episiotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Movilia, P G

    1989-01-01

    The activity and tolerability of aceclofenac, a new arylacetic anti-inflammatory drug, was assessed in the treatment of post-episiotomal pain in a controlled double-blind study with paracetamol. Aceclofenac was administered in single 100 mg doses and paracetamol in single 650 mg doses (both drugs in tablet form) to 60 women aged between 18 and 38 years with post-episiotomal pain. They were randomised into two groups of 30 patients. The severity of the pain was assessed by the patients using an analog visual test (Huskisson's test) before treatment and 0.5, 1,2,3,4,5 and 6h after receiving the drug. At the end of the study, the investigator questioned the patients about the evolution of their pain and any side-effects that might have appeared during the 6 h of observation. On the basis of their replies, the investigator evaluated the pain on a semi-quantitative scale of 5 points. The tolerability was assessed on the basis of the appearance of any undesired effects. The patients treated with drug A* showed a progressive and marked reduction of their pain with a significant difference from the baseline score after the second hour of observation (Huskisson's test) and after the first hour (physician's assessment with the 5-point scale), respectively. The antalgic effect of drug B showed a similar evolution over time to drug A but the analgesic efficacy seemed to be much less.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2663407

  7. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Pain Threshold of Laboring Rats and the Expression of Norepinephrine Transporter and α2 Adrenergic Receptor in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shike; Feng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Meili; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To observe the effects of electroacupuncture on pain threshold of laboring rats and the expression of norepinephrine transporter and α2 adrenergic receptor in the central nervous system to determine the mechanism of the analgesic effect of labor. 120 pregnant rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, 4 electroacupuncture groups, and a meperidine group. After interventions, the warm water tail-flick test was used to observe pain threshold. NE levels in serum, NET, and α2AR mRNA and protein expression levels in the central nervous system were measured. No difference in pain threshold was observed between the 6 groups before intervention. After intervention, increased pain thresholds were observed in all groups except the control group with a higher threshold seen in the electroacupuncture groups. Serum NE levels decreased in the electroacupuncture and MP groups. Increases in NET and α2AR expression in the cerebral cortex and decreases in enlarged segments of the spinal cord were seen. Acupuncture increases uptake of NE via cerebral NET and decreases its uptake by spinal NET. The levels of α2AR are also increased and decreased, respectively, in both tissues. This results in a decrease in systemic NE levels and may be the mechanism for its analgesic effects. PMID:27547232

  8. Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Daniel; Launay, Jacques; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Stewart, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Over our evolutionary history, humans have faced the problem of how to create and maintain social bonds in progressively larger groups compared to those of our primate ancestors. Evidence from historical and anthropological records suggests that group music-making might act as a mechanism by which this large-scale social bonding could occur. While previous research has shown effects of music making on social bonds in small group contexts, the question of whether this effect ‘scales up’ to larger groups is particularly important when considering the potential role of music for large-scale social bonding. The current study recruited individuals from a community choir that met in both small (n = 20 – 80) and large (a ‘megachoir’ combining individuals from the smaller subchoirs n = 232) group contexts. Participants gave self-report measures (via a survey) of social bonding and had pain threshold measurements taken (as a proxy for endorphin release) before and after 90 minutes of singing. Results showed that feelings of inclusion, connectivity, positive affect, and measures of endorphin release all increased across singing rehearsals and that the influence of group singing was comparable for pain thresholds in the large versus small group context. Levels of social closeness were found to be greater at pre- and post-levels for the small choir condition. However, the large choir condition experienced a greater change in social closeness as compared to the small condition. The finding that singing together fosters social closeness – even in large contexts where individuals are not known to each other – is consistent with evolutionary accounts that emphasize the role of music in social bonding, particularly in the context of creating larger cohesive groups than other primates are able to manage. PMID:27158219

  9. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuse—illicit drugs as well as prescription drugs—and ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  10. A Novel Magnetic Stimulator Increases Experimental Pain Tolerance in Healthy Volunteers - A Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kortekaas, Rudie; Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; van Wijhe, Marten; Aleman, André; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘complex neural pulse’TM (CNP) is a neuromodulation protocol employing weak pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). A pioneering paper reported an analgesic effect in healthy humans after 30 minutes of CNP-stimulation using three nested whole head coils. We aimed to devise and validate a stimulator with a novel design entailing a multitude of small coils at known anatomical positions on a head cap, to improve applicability. The main hypothesis was that CNP delivery with this novel device would also increase heat pain thresholds. Twenty healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study. Thirty minutes of PEMF (CNP) or sham was applied to the head. After one week the other treatment was given. Before and after each treatment, primary and secondary outcomes were measured. Primary outcome was heat pain threshold (HPT) measured with thermal quantitative sensory testing. Other outcomes were warmth detection threshold, and aspects of cognition, emotion and motor performance. As hypothesized heat pain threshold was significantly increased after the PEMF stimulation. All other outcomes were unaltered by the PEMF but there was a trend level reduction of cognitive performance after PEMF stimulation as measured by the digit-symbol substitution task. Results from this pilot study suggest that our device is able to stimulate the brain and to modulate its function. This is in agreement with previous studies that used similar magnetic field strengths to stimulate the brain. Specifically, pain control may be achieved with PEMF and for this analgesic effect, coil design does not appear to play a dominant role. In addition, the flexible configuration with small coils on a head cap improves clinical applicability. Trial Registration Dutch Cochrane Centre NTR1093 PMID:23620795

  11. Reduction of pain thresholds in fibromyalgia after very low-intensity magnetic stimulation: A double-blinded, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Maestú, Ceferino; Blanco, Manuel; Nevado, Angel; Romero, Julia; Rodríguez-Rubio, Patricia; Galindo, Javier; Lorite, Juan Bautista; de las Morenas, Francisco; Fernández-Argüelles, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to electromagnetic fields has been reported to have analgesic and antinociceptive effects in several organisms. OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of very low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation on symptoms associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in the Sagrado Corazón Hospital, Seville, Spain. Female fibromyalgia patients (22 to 50 years of age) were randomly assigned to either a stimulation group or a sham group. The stimulation group (n=28) was stimulated using 8 Hz pulsed magnetic fields of very low intensity, while the sham group (n=26) underwent the same protocol without stimulation. Pressure pain thresholds before and after stimulation were determined using an algometer during the eight consecutive weekly sessions of the trial. In addition, blood serotonin levels were measured and patients completed questionnaires to monitor symptom evolution. RESULTS: A repeated-measures ANOVA indicated statistically significant improvement in the stimulation group compared with the control group with respect to somatosensory pain thresholds, ability to perform daily activities, perceived chronic pain and sleep quality. While improvement in pain thresholds was apparent after the first stimulation session, improvement in the other three measures occurred after the sixth week. No significant between-group differences were observed in scores of depression, fatigue, severity of headaches or serotonin levels. No adverse side effects were reported in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Very low-intensity magnetic stimulation may represent a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia. PMID:24308025

  12. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  13. The biological activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase in the spinal cord regulates thermal and mechanical pain thresholds after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Laurence; Venard, Christine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2008-04-01

    Identification of cellular targets pertinent for the development of effective therapies against pathological pain constitutes a difficult challenge. We combined several approaches to show that 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR), abundantly expressed in the spinal cord (SC), is a key target, the modulation of which markedly affects nociception. 3alpha-HSOR catalyzes the biosynthesis and oxidation of 3alpha,5alpha-reduced neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP), which stimulates GABA(A) receptors. Intrathecal injection of Provera (pharmacological inhibitor of 3alpha-HSOR activity) in naive rat SC decreased thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds assessed with behavioral methods. In contrast, pain thresholds were dose-dependently increased by 3alpha,5alpha-THP. In animals subjected to sciatic nerve injury-evoked neuropathic pain, molecular and biochemical experiments revealed an up-regulation of 3alpha-HSOR reductive activity in the SC. Enhancement of 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentration in the SC induced analgesia in neuropathic rats while Provera exacerbated their pathological state. Possibilities are opened for chronic pain control with drugs modulating 3alpha-HSOR activity in nerve cells. PMID:18291663

  14. Mice with neuropathic pain exhibit morphine tolerance due to a decrease in the morphine concentration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Kaneta, Mitsumasa; Nagae, Marina; Yuzuhara, Ami; Li, Xin; Suzuki, Haruka; Hanagata, Mika; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Suto, Wataru; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Masukawa, Daiki; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-20

    The chronic administration of morphine to patients with neuropathic pain results in the development of a gradual tolerance to morphine. Although the detailed mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated, one of the known causes is a decrease in μ-opioid receptor function with regard to the active metabolite of morphine, M-6-G(morphine-6-glucuronide), in the ventrotegmental area of the midbrain. In this study, the relationship between the concentration of morphine in the brain and its analgesic effect was examined after the administration of morphine in the presence of neuropathic pain. Morphine was orally administered to mice with neuropathic pain, and the relationship between morphine's analgesic effect and its concentration in the brain was analysed. In addition, the expression levels of the conjugation enzyme, UGT2B (uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase), which has morphine as its substrate, and P-gp, which is a transporter involved in morphine excretion, were examined. In mice with neuropathic pain, the concentration of morphine in the brain was significantly decreased, and a correlation was found between this decrease and the decrease in the analgesic effect. It was considered possible that this decrease in the brain morphine concentration may be due to an increase in the expression level of P-gp in the small intestine and to an increase in the expression level and binding activity of UGT2B in the liver. The results of this study suggest the possibility that a sufficient analgesic effect may not be obtained when morphine is administered in the presence of neuropathic pain due to a decrease in the total amount of morphine and M-6-G that reach the brain. PMID:27102159

  15. The effect of culture on pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Harthy, M; Ohrbach, R; Michelotti, A; List, T

    2016-02-01

    Cross-cultural differences in pain sensitivity have been identified in pain-free subjects as well as in chronic pain patients. The aim was to assess the impact of culture on psychophysical measures using mechanical and electrical stimuli in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and pain-free matched controls in three cultures. This case-control study compared 122 female cases of chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) with equal numbers of age- and gender-matched TMD-free controls. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and tolerance (PPTo) were measured over one hand and two masticatory muscles. Electrical perception threshold and electrical pain threshold (EPT) and tolerance (EPTo) were recorded between the thumb and index fingers. Italian females reported significantly lower PPT in the masseter muscle than other cultures (P < 0.001) and in the temporalis muscle than Saudis (P = 0.003). Swedes reported significantly higher PPT in the thenar muscle than other cultures (P = 0.017). Italians reported significantly lower PPTo in all muscles than Swedes (P ≤ 0.006) and in the masseter muscle than Saudis (P < 0.001). Italians reported significantly lower EPTo than other cultures (P = 0.01). Temporomandibular disorder cases, compared to TMD-free controls, reported lower PPT and PPTo in all the three muscles (P < 0.001). This study found cultural differences between groups in the PPT, PPTo and EPTo. Overall, Italian females reported the highest sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical stimulation, while Swedes reported the lowest sensitivity. Mechanical pain thresholds differed more across cultures than did electrical pain thresholds. Cultural factors may influence response to type of pain test. PMID:26371794

  16. Effect of a single 30 min UMTS mobile phone-like exposure on the thermal pain threshold of young healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vecsei, Zsuzsanna; Csathó, Árpád; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2013-10-01

    One of the most frequently investigated effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) on the behavior of complex biological systems is pain sensitivity. Despite the growing body of evidence of EMF-induced changes in pain sensation, there is no currently accepted experimental protocol for such provocation studies for the healthy human population. In the present study, therefore, we tested the effects of third generation Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) RF EMF exposure on the thermal pain threshold (TPT) measured on the surface of the fingers of 20 young adult volunteers. The protocol was initially validated with a topical capsaicin treatment. The exposure time was 30 min and the genuine (or sham) signal was applied to the head through a patch antenna, where RF EMF specific absorption rate (SAR) values were controlled and kept constant at a level of 1.75 W/kg. Data were obtained using randomized, placebo-controlled trials in a double-blind manner. Subjective pain ratings were tested blockwise on a visual analogue rating scale (VAS). Compared to the control and sham conditions, the results provide evidence for intact TPT but a reduced desensitization effect between repeated stimulations within the individual blocks of trials, observable only on the contralateral side for the genuine UMTS exposure. Subjective pain perception (VAS) data indicated marginally decreased overall pain ratings in the genuine exposure condition only. The present results provide pioneering information about human pain sensation in relation to RF EMF exposure and thus may contribute to cover the existing gap between safety research and applied biomedical science targeting the potential biological effects of environmental RF EMFs. PMID:23787775

  17. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  18. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin alleviates bone cancer pain and morphine tolerance via µ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zongming; Wu, Shaoyong; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhong, Junfeng; Lv, Anqing; Jiao, Jing; Chen, Zhonghua

    2016-04-15

    The current study was to examine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in regulating bone cancer-evoked pain and the tolerance of systemic morphine. Breast sarcocarcinoma Walker 256 cells were implanted into the tibia bone cavity of rats and this evoked significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our results showed that the protein expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1), p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) as well as phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathways were amplified in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord of bone cancer rats compared with control rats. Blocking spinal mTOR by using rapamycin significantly attenuated activities of PI3K signaling pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Additionally, rapamycin enhanced attenuations of protein kinase Cɛ (PKCɛ)/protein kinase A (PKA) induced by morphine and further extended analgesia of morphine via µ-opioid receptor (MOR). Our data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways leading to bone cancer pain, including the activation of mTOR and PI3K and downstream PKCɛ/PKA, and resultant sensitization of MOR. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of bone cancer pain often observed in clinics. PMID:26566757

  19. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to evaluate analgesic activity of Terminalia chebula in healthy human volunteers using a mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Pokuri, Venkata Kishan; Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pingali, Usharani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose (1000 mg) of Terminalia chebula using a mechanical pain model in healthy human volunteers. Material and Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either single oral dose of 2 capsules of T. chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double-blinded manner. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesy meter (Randall–Selitto test) before and 3 h after administration of test drug. The parameters evaluated were pain threshold force and time; pain tolerance force and time. A washout period of 1-week was given for crossover between active drug and placebo. Results: Terminalia chebula significantly increased the mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time, and pain tolerance force and time compared to placebo (P < 0.001). The mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time (20.8% and 21.0%) was increased more than that of pain tolerance force and time (13.4% and 13.4%). No adverse drug reaction was reported with either of the study medications during the study period. Conclusion: T. chebula significantly increased pain threshold and pain tolerance compared to placebo. Both the study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions. PMID:27625480

  20. Structural Health Monitoring: Leveraging Pain in the Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi

    2012-07-01

    Tissue damage, or the perception thereof, is managed through pain experience. The neurobiological process of pain triggers most effective defense mechanisms for our safety. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is also a very similar function, albeit in engineering systems. SHM technology can leverage many aspects of pain mechanisms to progress in several critical areas. Discrimination between features from the undamaged and damaged structures can follow the threshold gate mechanism of the pain perception. Furthermore, the sensing mechanisms can be adaptive to changes by adjusting the threshold as does the pain perception. A distributed sensor network, often advanced by SHM, can be made fault-tolerant and robust by following the perception way of self-organization and redundancy. Data handling in real life is a huge challenge for large-scale SHM. As sensory data of pain is first cleaned, the threshold is then processed through experiential information gathering and use.

  1. Almotriptan: an effective and well-tolerated treatment for migraine pain.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2003-01-01

    The clinical data of almotriptan, the new selective 5-HT(1B/1D) agonist developed for the symptomatic treatment of migraine, are reviewed here. The pharmacokinetic performance of almotriptan is compared with that of other currently available triptans. The dose exhibiting the best efficacy/tolerability ratio of almotriptan is 12.5 mg. Efficacy of this almotriptan dose is comparable to that of the "gold" standard triptan, but with a lower recurrence rate. Gender or the presence of food in the stomach does not influence almotriptan's pharmacokinetic profile, and no relevant interactions of almotriptan with other medications have been reported. The tolerability of almotriptan is similar to that of placebo. Almotriptan's high efficacy together with its excellent tolerability and safety profile confirm this new 5-HT(1B/1D) agonist as a drug of choice for the symptomatic treatment of migraine attacks. PMID:15071618

  2. Parental-reported pain insensitivity in Dup15q.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, Kadi; Lau, Heather; Hedlund, Julie L; Friedman, Daniel; Krushel, Kara; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-02-01

    Parents of children with chromosome 15q duplication syndrome (Dup15q) have anecdotally reported high pain threshold as a feature of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to document parental-reported estimates of the frequency of high pain tolerance and the stimuli that fail to evoke a normal pain response. We sent an online survey to 840 families with children with Dup15q to explore the frequency and clinical manifestations of high pain threshold. There were 216 respondents (25.7%). A high pain threshold was reported in 87% of children at some time. There was a trend (p=0.06) for high pain threshold to be more commonly observed among children with the isodicentric (85.6%) and other genetic variants (95%) than interstitial (69.6%) duplications. There was no association between reports of high pain threshold and reports of an intellectual disability (91% of cases), autism spectrum disorder (83% of cases), or self-injurious behavior (40% of cases). Reports included many dramatic cases such as severe burns, broken bones, and electrical traumas, which were associated with little or no evidence of a painful stimulus. A high pain threshold is reported in other disorders associated with intellectual disability and autism; the underlying mechanism in Dup15q and other disorders remains undefined. PMID:26773682

  3. Effects of naltrexone on electrocutaneous pain in patients with hypertension compared to normotensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Ring, Christopher; France, Christopher R; al'Absi, Mustafa; Edwards, Louisa; McIntyre, David; Carroll, Douglas; Martin, Una

    2008-02-01

    An opioid mechanism may help explain hypertensive hypoalgesia. A double-blind placebo-controlled design compared the effects of opioid blockade (naltrexone) and placebo on electrocutaneous pain threshold, pain tolerance, and retrospective McGill Pain Questionnaire ratings in 35 unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and 28 normotensive individuals. The hypertensives experienced less pain than normotensives during the assessment of their pain tolerance; however, this manifestation of hypertensive hypoalgesia was not moderated by naltrexone. These findings fail to support the hypothesis that essential hypertension is characterised by relative opioid insensitivity. PMID:18031920

  4. Newer generation fentanyl transmucosal products for breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Frank; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Porta-Sales, Josep; Tagarro, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Oral normal-release morphine has long been considered the gold-standard treatment for cancer breakthrough pain. However, its relatively long time to analgesic onset, delay in maximal analgesic effect and prolonged duration of action make it unsuitable for the management of breakthrough pain episodes. These limitations led to the development of an oral transmucosal formulation of the fast-acting opioid fentanyl (oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate [OTFC] lozenge on a plastic handle; Actiq®), which has been shown to produce more rapid and effective pain relief than oral morphine. However, the formulation itself has some limitations. Consequently, investigators have continued to develop other, newer generation, transmucosal formulations of fentanyl to further improve the management of breakthrough pain. Recently, five such compounds (Effentora®/Fentora®, Abstral®, Instanyl®, Breakyl®/OnsolisTM and PecFent®) have been concurrently approved in Europe and/or the US, and have documented efficacy in quickly relieving breakthrough pain episodes. All of the available pivotal efficacy trials of these agents are randomized, double-blind comparisons with placebo. There are no head-to-head trials comparing any of the newer transmucosal formulations with each other. Only one non-pivotal study of intranasal fentanyl spray used a transmucosal preparation as an active comparator. However, that comparator was OTFC, not one of the newer transmucosal products. Close examination of the existing trials assessing these newer transmucosal preparations reveals significant variation in many study parameters, such as patient selection criteria, severity of breakthrough pain episodes, proportions of patients with a neuropathic pain component, titration protocols, choice of the primary endpoints, protocols for repeat dosing and rescue medication, the separation of treated episodes and the extent of the placebo response, all of which may have affected efficacy results. It is therefore

  5. Evaluation of the Analgesic Activity of Standardized Aqueous Extract of Terminalia chebula in Healthy Human Participants Using Hot Air Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pokuri, Venkata Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain affects millions of people worldwide, opioid analgesics have been used for chronic painful conditions. Due to their adverse effects, safer alternatives would be beneficial. Terminalia chebula, with proven analgesic action has been evaluated in the hot air pain model for its analgesic activity. Aim To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose of Terminalia chebula using hot air pain model in healthy human participants. Setting and Design Randomized, Double blind, Placebo controlled, Cross over study. Materials and Methods After taking written informed consent to IEC approved protocol, 12 healthy human participants were randomized to receive either single oral dose of two capsules of Terminalia chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double blinded manner. Thermal pain was assessed using hot air analgesiometer, to deliver thermal pain stimulus. Mean Pain Threshold time and Mean Pain Tolerance time measured in seconds at baseline and 180 minutes post drug. A washout period of two weeks was given for cross-over between the two treatments. Results Terminalia chebula significantly increased mean pain threshold and tolerance time compared to baseline and placebo. Mean pain threshold time increased from 34.06±2.63 seconds to 41.00±2.99 seconds (p<0.001) and mean pain tolerance time increased from 49.67± 3.72 seconds to 57.30±3.07 seconds (p<0.001). The increase in mean percentage change for pain threshold time is 20.42% (p<0.001) and for pain tolerance time is 17.50% (p<0.001). Conclusion In the present study, Terminalia chebula significantly increased Pain Threshold time and Pain Tolerance time compared to Placebo. Study medications were well tolerated. PMID:26155489

  6. A meta-analysis of efficacy and tolerability of buprenorphine for the relief of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Aung, Kyan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize available evidence on the analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine in treating cancer pain and related adverse effects. We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials, assessing the efficacy of buprenorphine, regardless of delivery system. The primary endpoints were patient-reported 'pain intensity' and 'pain relief'. Statistical heterogeneity among included studies was assessed with the I (2) test. The summary relative risk (RR) and 95% CI were derived, if two or more studies reported the similar outcome. Sixteen RCTs (n = 1329) with buprenorphine were included: 8 transdermal (TD), 5 sublingual (SL), 2 intramuscular injection (IM) and 1 subcutaneous infusion (SC) studies; with both SL and IM routes being assessed in one study. Only a few studies reported the same outcome in a similar way, creating difficulty for pooling of the outcome data. Many studies had a high risk of bias. In 2 studies (n = 241), the 'global impression change' was significantly different between TD buprenorphine and the combined placebo and morphine (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.59; I (2): 42%); the 'number-needed-to-treat' (NNT) was 4.9 (95% CI: 3.1-10.9). In 2 studies (n = 331), 'requirement for rescue SL buprenorphine' was comparable between TD buprenorphine and placebo (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.71-2.18; I (2) : 40%). In 2 studies (n = 141), 'incidence of nausea' was less in TD buprenorphine (RR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.2-0.71, I (2): 0%, NNT: 9.3, 5.6-28.5). Due to the small number of participants in a small number of studies, the results of the present review provide insufficient evidence to position adequately the use of buprenorphine in treatment of cancer pain. Large multicenter RCTs that compare TD buprenorphine with standard analgesic treatment is needed to position TD buprenorphine in the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer pain treatment. PMID:24600544

  7. 3-iodothyroacetic acid, a metabolite of thyroid hormone, induces itch and reduces threshold to noxious and to painful heat stimuli in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Annunziatina; De Siena, Gaetano; Resta, Francesco; Masi, Alessio; Musilli, Claudia; Zucchi, Riccardo; Raimondi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Itch is associated with increased sensitization to nociceptive stimuli. We investigated whether 3-iodothyroacetic acid (TA1), by releasing histamine, induces itch and increases sensitization to noxious and painful heat stimuli. Experimental Approach Itch was evaluated after s.c. administration of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Mice threshold to noxious (NHT) and to painful heat stimuli were evaluated by the increasing-temperature hot plate (from 45.5 to 49.5°C) or by the hot plate (51.5°C) test, respectively, 15 min after i.p. injection of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Itch, NHT and pain threshold evaluation were repeated in mice pretreated with pyrilamine. Itch and NHT were also measured in HDC+/+ and HDC−/− following injection of saline or TA1 (1.32, 4 and 11 μg·kg−1; s.c. and i.p.). pERK1/2 levels were determined by Western blot in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) isolated from CD1 mice 15 min after they received (i.p.): saline, saline and noxious heat stimulus (46.5°C), TA1 (0.1, 0.4, 1.32, 4 μg·kg−1) or TA1 1.32 μg·kg−1 and noxious heat stimulus. Key Results TA1 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1 induced itch and reduced NHT; pyrilamine pretreatment prevented both of these effects. TA1 4 μg·kg−1 (i.p.) reduced pain threshold without inducing itch or modifying NHT. In HDC−/− mice, TA1 failed to induce itch and to reduce NHT. In DRG, pERK1/2 levels were significantly increased by noxious heat stimuli and by TA1 0.1, 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1; i.p. Conclusions and Implications Increased TA1 levels induce itch and an enhanced sensitivity to noxious heat stimuli suggesting that TA1 might represent a potential cause of itch in thyroid diseases. PMID:25439265

  8. Almotriptan is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for migraine pain: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dowson, A J; Massiou, H; Laínez, J M; Cabarrocas, X

    2002-07-01

    Almotriptan is a novel and specific serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonist for the acute treatment of migraine. This randomized, single-dose, double-blind, multicentre, study assessed the efficacy and safety of oral almotriptan (12.5 mg and 25 mg) in patients with migraine, and compared it with the standard treatment (sumatriptan 100 mg) and placebo. A total of 668 patients treated one migraine attack of moderate or severe intensity with study medication. The primary efficacy assessment was migraine pain relief, improvement from severe or moderate pain to mild or no pain, at 2 h after treatment. Response rates, stratified for variation in baseline pain levels, for both almotriptan doses were equivalent to sumatriptan and significantly better than placebo. Other efficacy assessments confirmed the equivalence of the almotriptan groups with the sumatriptan group. Almotriptan 12.5 mg was as well tolerated as placebo (P=0.493) and significantly better tolerated than sumatriptan (P<0.001), in terms of the overall incidence of adverse events. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of adverse events between almotriptan 25 mg and sumatriptan 100 mg (P=0.376). The results from this large clinical study indicate that the new, specific 5-HT1B/1D agonist, almotriptan, is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for migraine pain. PMID:12133045

  9. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    PubMed

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  10. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Line K.; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  11. Is One Trial Sufficient to Obtain Excellent Pressure Pain Threshold Reliability in the Low Back of Asymptomatic Individuals? A Test-Retest Study.

    PubMed

    Balaguier, Romain; Madeleine, Pascal; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of pressure pain threshold (PPT) provides a quantitative value related to the mechanical sensitivity to pain of deep structures. Although excellent reliability of PPT has been reported in numerous anatomical locations, its absolute and relative reliability in the lower back region remains to be determined. Because of the high prevalence of low back pain in the general population and because low back pain is one of the leading causes of disability in industrialized countries, assessing pressure pain thresholds over the low back is particularly of interest. The purpose of this study study was (1) to evaluate the intra- and inter- absolute and relative reliability of PPT within 14 locations covering the low back region of asymptomatic individuals and (2) to determine the number of trial required to ensure reliable PPT measurements. Fifteen asymptomatic subjects were included in this study. PPTs were assessed among 14 anatomical locations in the low back region over two sessions separated by one hour interval. For the two sessions, three PPT assessments were performed on each location. Reliability was assessed computing intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC) for all possible combinations between trials and sessions. Bland-Altman plots were also generated to assess potential bias in the dataset. Relative reliability for both intra- and inter- session was almost perfect with ICC ranged from 0.85 to 0.99. With respect to the intra-session, no statistical difference was reported for ICCs and SEM regardless of the conducted comparisons between trials. Conversely, for inter-session, ICCs and SEM values were significantly larger when two consecutive PPT measurements were used for data analysis. No significant difference was observed for the comparison between two consecutive measurements and three measurements. Excellent relative and absolute reliabilities were reported for both intra

  12. Is One Trial Sufficient to Obtain Excellent Pressure Pain Threshold Reliability in the Low Back of Asymptomatic Individuals? A Test-Retest Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of pressure pain threshold (PPT) provides a quantitative value related to the mechanical sensitivity to pain of deep structures. Although excellent reliability of PPT has been reported in numerous anatomical locations, its absolute and relative reliability in the lower back region remains to be determined. Because of the high prevalence of low back pain in the general population and because low back pain is one of the leading causes of disability in industrialized countries, assessing pressure pain thresholds over the low back is particularly of interest. The purpose of this study study was (1) to evaluate the intra- and inter- absolute and relative reliability of PPT within 14 locations covering the low back region of asymptomatic individuals and (2) to determine the number of trial required to ensure reliable PPT measurements. Fifteen asymptomatic subjects were included in this study. PPTs were assessed among 14 anatomical locations in the low back region over two sessions separated by one hour interval. For the two sessions, three PPT assessments were performed on each location. Reliability was assessed computing intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC) for all possible combinations between trials and sessions. Bland-Altman plots were also generated to assess potential bias in the dataset. Relative reliability for both intra- and inter- session was almost perfect with ICC ranged from 0.85 to 0.99. With respect to the intra-session, no statistical difference was reported for ICCs and SEM regardless of the conducted comparisons between trials. Conversely, for inter-session, ICCs and SEM values were significantly larger when two consecutive PPT measurements were used for data analysis. No significant difference was observed for the comparison between two consecutive measurements and three measurements. Excellent relative and absolute reliabilities were reported for both intra

  13. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  14. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W.; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  15. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  16. Identification of Molecular Fingerprints in Human Heat Pain Thresholds by Use of an Interactive Mixture Model R Toolbox (AdaptGauss).

    PubMed

    Ultsch, Alfred; Thrun, Michael C; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Lötsch, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained during cell experiments, laboratory animal research, or human studies often display a complex distribution. Statistical identification of subgroups in research data poses an analytical challenge. Here were introduce an interactive R-based bioinformatics tool, called "AdaptGauss". It enables a valid identification of a biologically-meaningful multimodal structure in the data by fitting a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to the data. The interface allows a supervised selection of the number of subgroups. This enables the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to adapt more complex GMM than usually observed with a noninteractive approach. Interactively fitting a GMM to heat pain threshold data acquired from human volunteers revealed a distribution pattern with four Gaussian modes located at temperatures of 32.3, 37.2, 41.4, and 45.4 °C. Noninteractive fitting was unable to identify a meaningful data structure. Obtained results are compatible with known activity temperatures of different TRP ion channels suggesting the mechanistic contribution of different heat sensors to the perception of thermal pain. Thus, sophisticated analysis of the modal structure of biomedical data provides a basis for the mechanistic interpretation of the observations. As it may reflect the involvement of different TRP thermosensory ion channels, the analysis provides a starting point for hypothesis-driven laboratory experiments. PMID:26516852

  17. Sex differences and hormonal modulation of deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Richard J.; Ji, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    Women disproportionately suffer from many deep tissue pain conditions. Experimental studies show that women have lower pain thresholds, higher pain ratings and less tolerance to a range of painful stimuli. Most clinical and epidemiological reports suggest female gonadal hormones modulate pain for some, but not all, conditions. Similarly, animal studies support greater nociceptive sensitivity in females in many deep tissue pain models. Gonadal hormones modulate responses in primary afferents, dorsal horn neurons and supraspinal sites, but the direction of modulation is variable. This review will examine sex differences in deep tissue pain in humans and animals focusing on the role of gonadal hormones (mainly estradiol) as an underlying component of the modulation of pain sensitivity. PMID:23872333

  18. Low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic pain in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: an efficacy–tolerability pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Petrò, Emiliano; Ruffini, Elena; Cappuccio, Melania; Guerini, Valeria; Belotti, Gloria; Fascendini, Sara; Licini, Cristina; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study evaluated the efficacy and safety of prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) in older subjects with chronic pain and mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. Methods This was a prospective, observational, open-label study of 45-day duration. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain and naïve to strong opioids were recruited from nursing homes and Alzheimer’s disease centers. OXN-PR was initiated at low doses (5 mg od or bid) and increased to a maximum of 20 mg bid. The primary efficacy endpoint was a pain intensity reduction of ≥30% from baseline (T0) to 15 days after OXN-PR initiation, as assessed by a numerical rating scale or the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale. Other assessments included the Barthel activities of daily living index, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Bowel Function Index, and adverse events. Results The analysis included 53 patients (mean age, 83.0 years; mean Mini-Mental State Examination score, 18.6) with severe pain (median Numerical Rating Scale/Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia 6) and substantial impairment in daily functioning (mean Barthel index, 32.2). The primary endpoint was achieved by 92.4% of patients. OXN-PR significantly reduced mean pain intensity from baseline to study end (numerical rating scale, 6.6±1.0 vs 2.3±1.1, P<0.0001; Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia, 6.9±1.6 vs 0.9±0.8, P<0.0001). Substantial improvements from T0 to T45 in daily functioning (mean Barthel index, 32.2±16.8 vs 53.7±23.9, P<0.0001) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (mean Neuropsychiatric Inventory, 25.5±27.3 vs 8.8±9.0, P<0.0001) were also reported. OXN-PR was well tolerated and did not worsen bowel function. Conclusion In this pilot study, OXN-PR was effective in improving pain and other symptoms associated with dementia, with a favorable safety and tolerability profile. Large-scale trials in people with dementia are needed to improve clinical guidance for the assessment and treatment of pain in

  19. Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic nononcological pain in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Marcassa, Claudio; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Rollone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults. Increasing evidence indicates strong opioids as a valid option for chronic pain management in geriatrics. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone–naloxone (OXN-PR) in patients aged ≥70 years. Methods This open-label prospective study assessed older patients naïve to strong opioids presenting with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Patients were prescribed OXN-PR at an initial dose of 10/5 mg/day for 28 days. In case of insufficient analgesia, the initial daily dose could be increased gradually. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline, assessed by a ten-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at day 28 (T28). Changes in cognitive state, daily functioning, quality of life, constipation, and other adverse events were assessed. Results Of 53 patients enrolled (mean 81.7±6.2 years [range 70–92 years]), 52 (98.1%) completed the 28-day observation. At T28, the primary end point (≥30% reduction in mean pain from baseline in the absence of bowel function deterioration) was achieved in 38 patients (71.7%). OXN-PR significantly relieved pain (NRS score –3.26; P<0.0001), as well as daily need for rescue paracetamol (from 86.8% at baseline to 40.4% at T28; P<0.001), and reduced impact of pain on daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form from 6.2±1.5 to 3.4±2.1; P<0.0001). OXN-PR was also associated with significant improvement in daily functioning (Barthel Index from 53.3±14.1 to 61.3±14.3; P<0.01). No changes were observed in cognitive status and bowel function. OXN-PR was well tolerated; only one patient (1.9%) prematurely withdrew from treatment, due to drowsiness. Conclusion Findings from this open-label prospective study suggest that low-dose OXN-PR may be effective and well tolerated for treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in older patients. Besides its effectiveness, these data indicate that low

  20. Pain Intensity Recognition Rates via Biopotential Feature Patterns with Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, Sascha; Treister, Roi; Werner, Philipp; Traue, Harald C.; Crawcour, Stephen; Andrade, Adriano; Walter, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinically used methods of pain diagnosis do not allow for objective and robust measurement, and physicians must rely on the patient’s report on the pain sensation. Verbal scales, visual analog scales (VAS) or numeric rating scales (NRS) count among the most common tools, which are restricted to patients with normal mental abilities. There also exist instruments for pain assessment in people with verbal and / or cognitive impairments and instruments for pain assessment in people who are sedated and automated ventilated. However, all these diagnostic methods either have limited reliability and validity or are very time-consuming. In contrast, biopotentials can be automatically analyzed with machine learning algorithms to provide a surrogate measure of pain intensity. Methods In this context, we created a database of biopotentials to advance an automated pain recognition system, determine its theoretical testing quality, and optimize its performance. Eighty-five participants were subjected to painful heat stimuli (baseline, pain threshold, two intermediate thresholds, and pain tolerance threshold) under controlled conditions and the signals of electromyography, skin conductance level, and electrocardiography were collected. A total of 159 features were extracted from the mathematical groupings of amplitude, frequency, stationarity, entropy, linearity, variability, and similarity. Results We achieved classification rates of 90.94% for baseline vs. pain tolerance threshold and 79.29% for baseline vs. pain threshold. The most selected pain features stemmed from the amplitude and similarity group and were derived from facial electromyography. Conclusion The machine learning measurement of pain in patients could provide valuable information for a clinical team and thus support the treatment assessment. PMID:26474183

  1. The mirage of impairing drug concentration thresholds: a rationale for zero tolerance per se driving under the influence of drugs laws.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; DuPont, Robert L

    2012-06-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Drivers with measurable quantities of potentially impairing illicit or prescription drugs in their body fluids are multiple times more likely to be involved in motor vehicle crashes than those without such drugs in their bodies. Drug-related impairment, however, cannot be inferred solely on the basis of the presence of drugs in biological fluids. Thus, for more than a quarter century, there has been a search for drug blood concentrations that are the equivalent of the 0.08 g/dL threshold for alcohol-impaired driving in the United States. We suggest that such equivalents are a mirage, and cannot be determined due to variable drug tolerance, lack of consistent relationships between drug blood concentrations and impairment, innumerable drug combinations and multiple other factors. Thus, while the idea of determining impairing drug concentrations is attractive, it is ultimately unattainable, and withholding drugged driving legislation pending the acquisition of such data is tantamount to a plan for inaction with regard to an important and growing public health and safety problem. We propose specific legislation to address alcohol- and drug-impaired driving in the United States. PMID:22582272

  2. Evaluation of a low-threshold/high-tolerance methadone maintenance treatment clinic in saint john, new brunswick, Canada: one year retention rate and illicit drug use.

    PubMed

    Christie, Timothy K S; Murugesan, Alli; Manzer, Dana; O'Shaughnessey, Michael V; Webster, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To report the one-year retention rate and the prevalence of illicit opioid use and cocaine use in the Low-Threshold/High-Tolerance (LTHT) methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinic located in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. Methods. A description of the LTHT MMT clinic is provided. The one-year retention rate was determined by collecting data on patients who enrolled in the LTHT MMT clinic between August 04, 2009 and August 04, 2010. The prevalence of illicit drug use was determined using a randomly selected retrospective cohort of 84 participants. For each participant the results of six consecutive urine tests for the most recent three months were compared to the results of the first six consecutive urine tests after program entry. Results. The one-year retention rate was 95%, 67% of the cohort achieved abstinence from illicit opioids and an additional 13% abstained from cocaine use. Conclusion. The novel feature of the LTHT MMT clinic is that patients are not denied methadone because of lack of ancillary services. Traditional comprehensive MMT programs invest the majority of financial resources in ancillary services that support the biopsychosocial model, whereas the LTHT approach utilizes a medical model and directs resources at medical management. PMID:24860685

  3. Adult attachment and reports of pain in experimentally-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nicole Emma; Meredith, Pamela Joy; Strong, Jenny

    2011-05-01

    Attachment theory has been proposed as a framework for understanding the development of chronic pain, with evidence supporting the overrepresentation of insecure attachment styles in chronic pain populations and links between insecure attachment and factors known to impact one's ability to cope with pain. The present study sought to extend two earlier studies exploring the relationships between adult attachment and communication of an acute pain experience, in anticipation of providing insight into individual differences in vulnerability in development of chronic pain. It was hypothesised that: (a) fearful attachment would be associated with perceptions of the pain as less intense, and (b) anxious attachment would be associated with lower pain thresholds. A convenience sample of 82 healthy adults completed self-report measures of attachment, neuroticism, and negative affect prior to taking part in a coldpressor pain inducement task. Results demonstrated that fearful attachment was associated with lower levels of pain intensity throughout the coldpressor task. In addition, dismissing attachment was also associated with less intense pain, as well as increased coldpressor endurance (tolerance) in the presence of a known assessor. These associations were retained after controlling for measures of neuroticism, negative affect, age, and social desirability. The results of this study are consistent with the proposition that fearful and dismissing individuals tend to mask their underlying distress caused by the pain experience, potentially leading to difficulties coping with pain over time. PMID:21095633

  4. Preoperative pain mechanisms assessed by cuff algometry are associated with chronic postoperative pain relief after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Chronic postoperative pain after total knee replacement (TKR) in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) implies clinical challenges. Widespread hyperalgesia, facilitated temporal summation of pain (TSP), and impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) have been found in painful KOA. This exploratory study investigated postoperative pain relief 12 months after TKR in 4 subgroups of patients preoperatively profiled by mechanistic quantitative sensory testing. In 103 patients with KOA, pressure pain detection threshold (PDT) and tolerance thresholds (PTT) were assessed at the lower leg using cuff algometry. Temporal summation of pain was measured as an increase in pain intensity scores during 10 repeated (2 seconds intervals) painful cuff stimuli. Conditioned pain modulation was calculated as the relative increase in PDT during painful conditioning stimulation. The grand averages of TSP and CPM were calculated and values below or above were used for subgrouping: facilitated TSP/impaired CPM (group A, N = 16), facilitated TSP/normal CPM (group B, N = 15), normal TSP/impaired CPM (group C, N = 44), and normal TSP/normal CPM (group D, N = 28). Clinical VAS pain intensity scores were collected before and 12 months after TKR surgery and the pain relief calculated. Less pain relief was found in group A (52.0% ± 14.0% pain relief) than in group B (81.1% ± 3.5%, P = 0.023) and group C (79.6% ± 4.4%, P = 0.007), but not group D (69.4% ± 7.9%, P = 0.087). Low preoperative PDT was associated with a less postoperative pain relief (R = -0.222, P = 0.034), whereas TSP or CPM alone showed no associations with postoperative pain relief. This explorative study indicated that patients with osteoarthritis with facilitated TSP together with impaired CPM are more vulnerable to experience less pain relief after TKR. PMID:27331347

  5. Differential effects of two virtual reality interventions: distraction versus pain control.

    PubMed

    Loreto-Quijada, Desirée; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Nieto, Rubén; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Olga; Ferrer-García, Marta; Saldaña, Carmina; Fusté-Escolano, Adela; Liutsko, Liudmila

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that virtual reality (VR) pain distraction is effective at improving pain-related outcomes. However, more research is needed to investigate VR environments with other pain-related goals. The main aim of this study was to compare the differential effects of two VR environments on a set of pain-related and cognitive variables during a cold pressor experiment. One of these environments aimed to distract attention away from pain (VRD), whereas the other was designed to enhance pain control (VRC). Participants were 77 psychology students, who were randomly assigned to one of the following three conditions during the cold pressor experiment: (a) VRD, (b) VRC, or (c) Non-VR (control condition). Data were collected regarding both pain-related variables (intensity, tolerance, threshold, time perception, and pain sensitivity range) and cognitive variables (self-efficacy and catastrophizing). Results showed that in comparison with the control condition, the VRC intervention significantly increased pain tolerance, the pain sensitivity range, and the degree of time underestimation. It also increased self-efficacy in tolerating pain and led to a reduction in reported helplessness. The VRD intervention significantly increased the pain threshold and pain tolerance in comparison with the control condition, but it did not affect any of the cognitive variables. Overall, the intervention designed to enhance control seems to have a greater effect on the cognitive variables assessed. Although these results need to be replicated in further studies, the findings suggest that the VRC intervention has considerable potential in terms of increasing self-efficacy and modifying the negative thoughts that commonly accompany pain problems. PMID:24892197

  6. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  7. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fulranumab, an anti-nerve growth factor antibody, in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Panna; Katz, Nathaniel; Polverejan, Elena; Wang, Steven; Kelly, Kathleen M; Haeussler, Juergen; Thipphawong, John

    2013-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is increased in chronic pain conditions. This study examined analgesic efficacy and safety of fulranumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-NGF antibody, in adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Patients (n=466, intent-to-treat) were randomized to receive, in addition to their current pain therapy, subcutaneous injections in 1 of 6 parallel treatment groups: placebo (n=78), fulranumab 1 mg (n=77) or 3 mg (n=79) every 4 weeks (Q4wk), 3 mg (n=76), 6 mg (n=78), or 10 mg (n=78) every 8 weeks (Q8wk). Primary efficacy results showed that fulranumab significantly reduced the average pain intensity score (P < or = 0.030) from baseline to week 12 compared with placebo in the 3mgQ4wk, 6mgQ8wk, and 10mgQ8wk groups. Secondary efficacy outcomes indicated that significant improvement occurred compared with placebo at week 12 on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscales of pain, stiffness, and physical function (P < 0.040) across all fulranumab groups except 1mgQ4wk, on the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form subscales of pain intensity (P < or = 0.016) and pain interference (P < or = 0.030) in the 3mgQ4wk and 10mgQ8wk groups, and on the Patient Global Assessment score (P < or = 0.040) in the 3mgQ4wk, 6mgQ8wk, and 10mgQ8wk groups. The most common (> or = 5% of patients) treatment-emergent adverse events in overall fulranumab groups during the first 12weeks included paresthesia (7%), headache (5%), and nasopharyngitis (5%). Most neurologic-related treatment-emergent adverse events were mild or moderate and resolved at the end of week 12. Serious adverse events occurred in 3 patients, but they were not neurologically related and resolved before study completion. Fulranumab treatment resulted in statistically significant efficacy in pain measures and physical function versus placebo and was generally well tolerated. PMID:23748114

  8. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefano; Borghesi, Cristina; Ricciardi, Serena; Giovannoni, Daniele; Fulvi, Alberto; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale) and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4) were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline); 46 (82.1%) patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001), Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002), Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006) and anxiety (P<0.0001) subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003). At study end, 37 (66.0%) patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment. Combination therapy had a good safety profile. Conclusion OXN-PR and pregabalin were safe and highly effective in a real-world setting of severe neuropathic cancer pain, with a high rate of satisfaction, without interference on bowel function. PMID:27445495

  9. Effects of coping statements on experimental pain in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Roditi, Daniela; Robinson, Michael E; Litwins, Nola

    2009-01-01

    The present study measured the effects of catastrophizing self-statements and positive coping self-statements on cold pressor-induced pain. Participants were 58 adult chronic pain patients with current facial pain. It was hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to a decrease in pain endurance whereas positive coping would lead to an increase in pain endurance. It was also hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to an increase in peak pain intensity whereas positive coping would lead to a decrease in peak pain intensity. At pretest, participants submerged their nondominant hand in the cold pressor. Pain sensitivity ranges (PSR) were subsequently determined by calculating the difference between tolerance and threshold times. Ratings of peak pain intensity were measured using a pressure sensitive bladder/transducer. Participants underwent random assignment to either a catastrophizing group or a positive coping self-statement group. ANCOVA results revealed that on average, participants employing catastrophizing statements as a coping strategy experienced significantly lower PSR (M = 35.53, SD = 39.71) compared to participants employing positive coping self-statements (M = 73.70, SD = 86.14) when controlling for pretest PSR. Group assignment had no significant influence on peak pain intensity ratings. Thus, our results reveal that manipulation of coping causes changes in pain endurance. PMID:21197299

  10. Elevated Pain Sensitivity in Chronic Pain Patients at Risk for Opioid Misuse

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Robert R.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Michna, Ed; Greenbaum, Seth; Ross, Ed; Jamison, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    This study employed quantitative sensory testing (QST) to evaluate pain responses in chronic spinal pain patients at low risk and high risk for opioid misuse, with risk classification based on scores on the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R). Patients were further sub-grouped according to current use of prescription opioids. Of the 276 chronic pain patients tested, approximately 65% were taking opioids; a median split was used to further categorize these patients as being on lower or higher doses of opioids. The highrisk group (n= 161) reported higher levels of clinical pain, had lower pressure and thermal pain thresholds at multiple body sites, had lower heat pain tolerance, and rated repetitive mechanical stimuli as more painful relative to the low-risk group (n= 115; p’s< .01). In contrast, QST measures did not differ across opioid groups. Multiple linear regression analysis suggested that indices of pain-related distress (i.e., anxiety and catastrophizing about pain) were also predictive of hyperalgesia, particularly in patients taking opioids. Collectively, regardless of opioid status, the high-risk group was hyperalgesic relative to the low-risk group; future opioid treatment studies may benefit from the classification of opioid risk, and the examination of pain sensitivity and other factors that differentiate high- and low-risk groups. PMID:21680252

  11. Effect of spinal monoaminergic neuronal system dysfunction on pain threshold in rats, and the analgesic effect of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Ryuta; Ishida, Mitsuhiro; Asaki, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shinohara, Shunji

    2016-02-26

    Dysfunction in the central serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) systems cause depression and pain. Descending spinal pain modulatory pathways are important in the analgesic mechanisms of antidepressants, particularly serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). While many non-clinical studies have demonstrated the roles of central monoaminergic systems in pain, there is little evidence to illuminate the direct contribution of spinal descending pain modulatory systems independently of depressive-like behavior. To examine the effects of dysfunction of spinal monoaminergic systems on pain sensitivity, we established a rat chronic pain model by administering lumbar-intrathecal reserpine to minimize its influence on brain. Lumbar-intrathecal reserpine evoked persistent mechanical hypersensitivity and corresponding reductions in spinal 5-HT and NE concentrations (from 767.2 to 241.6ng/g and from 455.9 to 41.7ng/g, respectively after reserpine 30nmol). Lumbar-intrathecal reserpine did not deplete brain monoamines or bring about depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. Spinal monoamines depletion-induced pain sensitivity was ameliorated by lumbar-intrathecal administration of the SNRIs (duloxetine and milnacipran) in dose-dependent manners. These suggest that increased pain sensitivity could be induced by dysfunction solely of the descending pain modulatory system, regardless of depressive-like behavior, and lumbar-intrathecal administration of SNRIs could ameliorate the pain sensitivity which might be mediated by affecting the descending pain modulatory system in the spinal cord, not via their antidepressant effects. PMID:26806036

  12. Phase IA Clinical Trial Evaluating the Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Analgesic Efficacy of an Intrathecally Administered Neurotensin A Analogue in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Sang, Christine N; Barnabe, Kate J; Kern, Steven E

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated CGX-1160 in a Phase Ia clinical trial to determine the safety of escalating doses in patients with central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Our secondary objective was to detect a trend toward analgesic efficacy. Four subjects received 3 consecutive escalating doses of CGX-1160 starting at 25 μg/h over 6 hours until 2 consecutive subjects experienced any adverse effect; 2 of the 4 subjects received 2 sequences of 3 consecutive dose escalations. Maximum tolerated dose was defined by the development of diarrhea (900 μg/h over 6 hours). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation. The CSF concentration-versus-time data fit to a biexponential PK model, showing a rapid redistribution phase followed by a significantly slower terminal elimination phase. Incorporating an effect site delay into the model improved the fit to the data (concentration producing 50% of the maximum effect [C50 ], 58.7 ug/mL at the site of drug effect). Maximal reduction from the baseline pain intensity was 63%. In summary, CGX-1160 was generally well tolerated when administered intrathecally at doses up to 1000 μg/h. Peak analgesic effect occurred after the peak intrathecal concentration, indicating the presence of an effect site compartment to the PK model to represent the concentration and effect profiles for this unique compound. PMID:27310326

  13. A meta-analysis on pain sensitivity in self-injury.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J; Thayer, J F; Kaess, M

    2016-06-01

    Individuals engaging in self-injurious behavior (SIB) frequently report absence of pain during acts of SIB. While altered pain sensitivity is discussed as a risk factor for the engagement in SIB, results have been mixed with considerable variance across reported effect sizes, in particular with respect to the effect of co-morbid psychopathology. The present meta-analysis aimed to summarize the current evidence on pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB and to identify covariates of altered pain processing. Three databases were searched without restrictions. Additionally a hand search was performed and reference lists of included studies were checked for potential studies eligible for inclusion. Thirty-two studies were identified after screening 720 abstracts by two independent reviewers. Studies were included if they reported (i) an empirical investigation, in (ii) humans, including a sample of individuals engaging in (iii) SIB and a group of (iv) healthy controls, (v) receiving painful stimulation. Random-effects meta-analysis was performed on three pain-related outcomes (pain threshold, pain tolerance, pain intensity) and several population- and study-level covariates (i.e. age, sex, clinical etiology) were subjected to meta-regression. Meta-analysis revealed significant main effects associated with medium to large effect sizes for all included outcomes. Individuals engaging in SIB show greater pain threshold and tolerance and report less pain intensity compared to healthy controls. Clinical etiology and age are significant covariates of pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB, such that pain threshold is further increased in borderline personality disorder compared to non-suicidal self-injury. Mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26964517

  14. Influence of gender and hemispheric lateralization on heat pain perception in major depression.

    PubMed

    Bär, K J; Greiner, W; Letsch, A; Köbele, R; Sauer, H

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of clinical pain complaints from patients with major depression, as well as increased experimental pain thresholds have been reported. The basis of this phenomenon remains unclear, as well as its relation to medication, clinical recovery, gender and lateralization of hemispheric function. We aimed to further elucidate heat pain perception in depression applying a testing battery including assessment (on both arms) of warmth perception, heat pain perception and heat pain tolerance, and the jaw opening reflex (duration of ES2 component) as a putative indicator of descending pain inhibition. The battery was applied to 20 patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were assessed: on admission (acutely depressed, off-medication), few days after admission (depressed, on medication), and after clinical recovery (mostly on medication), and controls at corresponding intervals. Significant elevated heat pain thresholds were found off and on medication in the acute stage (mainly in women) and after recovery on the right arm only. Elevated heat pain tolerance (on the right arm only) was seen in medicated patients in the acute and recovered stage. Significant prolongation of ES2 duration was only found in acutely depressed patients off medication. While confirming hypalgesia to heat pain in major depression, our findings demonstrate a close relation to gender and strong influence of lateralization after recovery. Altered pain processing at brain stem level might only partially be responsible for the observed finding. PMID:12765857

  15. Injection-associated pain in femoral arteriography: A European multicenter study comparing safety, tolerability, and efficacy of iodixanol and iopromide

    SciTech Connect

    Justesen, Per; Downes, Mark; Grynne, Birthe Hougens; Lang, Hanne; Rasch, Wenche; Seim, Eva

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate injection-associated pain, safety, and efficacy with the isotonic contrast medium iodixanol (Visipaque 270 mg I/ml) compared with iopromide (Ultravist 300 mg I/ml) in femoral arteriography. Methods. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group clinical investigation was carried out in 54 hospitals in Europe. Of the patients evaluated, 1225 received iodixanol and 1227 iopromide in conventional and/or digital subtraction angiography. Results. The iodixanol group reported statistically significantly less injection-associated pain (0.9%) than the iopromide group (9.5%) (p<0.001). Further, 4.1% in the iodixanol group experienced pain and/or severe heat sensation vs 19.8% in the iopromide group (p<0.001). In the iodixanol group, 1.8% of the patients experienced contrast-related adverse events vs 2.4% in the iopromide group (p=NS). Overall diagnostic information was optimal for 94.1% in the iodixanol group and 95.3% in the iopromide group (p=NS). Conclusions. Iodixanol 270 mg I/ml causes significantly less injection-associated pain during femoral arteriography and is as safe and efficatious as iopromide 300 mg I/ml.

  16. Efficacy of long-term milnacipran treatment in patients meeting different thresholds of clinically relevant pain relief: subgroup analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled withdrawal study

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Philip J; Clauw, Daniel J; Trugman, Joel M; Palmer, Robert H; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia patients from a long-term, open-label study of milnacipran (50–200 mg/day) were eligible to participate in a 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled withdrawal study. The withdrawal study evaluated loss of therapeutic response in patients who achieved ≥50% pain improvements after receiving up to 3.25 years of milnacipran. This post-hoc analysis investigated whether patients who met lower thresholds of pain improvement also experienced worsening of fibromyalgia symptoms upon treatment withdrawal. Method Among patients who received milnacipran ≥100 mg/day during the long-term study, three subgroups were identified based on percentage of pain reduction at randomization: ≥50% (protocol-defined “responders”; n=150); ≥30% to <50% (patients with clinically meaningful pain improvement; n=61); and <30% (n=110). Efficacy assessments included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR), 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey Physical Component Summary (SF-36 PCS), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results In the ≥30 to <50% subgroup, significant worsening in pain was detected after treatment withdrawal. The difference between placebo and milnacipran in mean VAS score changes for this subgroup (+9.0, P<0.05) was similar to the difference in protocol-defined responders (+9.4, P<0.05). In the <30% subgroup, no worsening in pain was observed in either treatment arm. However, patients in this subgroup experienced significant worsening in FIQR scores after treatment withdrawal (placebo, +6.9; milnacipran, −2.8; P<0.001), as well as worsening in SF-36 PCS and BDI scores. Conclusion Patients who experienced ≥30% to <50% pain reduction with long-term milnacipran had significant worsening of fibromyalgia symptoms after treatment withdrawal. These results suggest that the conventional ≥30% pain responder cutoff may be adequate to demonstrate efficacy in randomized withdrawal studies of fibromyalgia

  17. Antinociceptive effects of palatable sweet ingesta on human responsivity to pressure pain.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M E; Holder, M D

    1997-02-01

    Palatable sweet ingestion produces a morphine-like analgesia in both rats and human infants (2-5). To determine whether palatable sweet ingesta induces antinociception in human adults, 60 university students (30 men, 30 women) were exposed to a pressure algometer both before and after consuming either a sweet soft drink, filtered tap water, or nothing (Experiment 1). Pain responsivity was assessed with four pain measures: threshold, tolerance, and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of intensity and unpleasantness. Results showed that women who consumed either soft drink or water reported increased pain tolerance and VAS ratings at posttreatment compared with those receiving nothing. However, differences between groups were not found for men. Moreover, compared to men, women reported lower pain thresholds and tolerances and rated the pain as more intense. In Experiment 2, 40 women consumed either nothing or foods that they rated previously as palatable (chocolate-chip cookies), unpalatable (black olives), or neutral (rice cakes). Women who consumed the palatable sweet food showed increased pain tolerance compared with those receiving the unpalatable food, the neutral food, or nothing. These data constitute the first demonstration that "palatability-induced antinociception" (PIA) can occur in human adults. PMID:9035263

  18. Presence, involvement and efficacy of a virtual reality intervention on pain.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Maldonado, Jose; Gutierrez-Martinez, Olga; Loreto, Desiree; Peñaloza, Claudia; Nieto, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We explored the impact of an interactive VR environment on pain cognitions (in vivo catastrophizing and pain self-efficacy) and pain-related measures: pain threshold, pain tolerance, Pain Sensitivity Range (PSR), pain intensity and time estimation in a sample of healthy students. Sense of presence is essential to conduct a psychological treatment; if patients are not able to involve themselves in a virtual world they cannot experience relevant emotions, and the desired processes that are necessary for most psychological treatments will not occur. However, some authors argue that presence must be distinguished from the degree of engagement, involvement in the portrayed environment. The results obtained in our study are consistent with this view, since the Involvement scale of the IPQ did not correlate with any of the measures related with the treatment's efficacy. PMID:20543278

  19. A Quantitative Review of Ethnic Group Differences in Experimental Pain Response: Do Biology, Psychology and Culture Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Williams, Ameenah K.K.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Pain is a subjectively complex and universal experience. We examine research investigating ethnic group differences in experimental pain response, and factors contributing to group differences. Method We conducted a systematic literature review and analysis of studies using experimental pain stimuli to assess pain sensitivity across multiple ethnic groups. Our search covered the period from 1944-2011, and utilized the PUBMED bibliographic database; a reference source containing over 17 million citations. We calculated effect sizes, identified ethnic/racial group categories, pain stimuli and measures, and examined findings regarding biopsychosociocultural factors contributing to ethnic/racial group differences. Results We found 472 studies investigating ethnic group differences and pain. Twenty-six of these met our review inclusion criteria of investigating ethnic group differences in experimental pain. The majority of studies included comparisons between African Americans (AA) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). There were consistently moderate to large effect sizes for pain tolerance across multiple stimulus modalities; African Americans demonstrated lower pain tolerance. For pain threshold, findings were generally in the same direction, but effect sizes were small to moderate across ethnic groups. Limited data were available for suprathreshold pain ratings. A subset of studies comparing NHW and other ethnic groups showed a variable range of effect sizes for pain threshold and tolerance. Conclusion There are potentially important ethnic/racial group differences in experimental pain perception. Elucidating ethnic group differences, has translational merit for culturally-competent clinical care and for addressing and reducing pain treatment disparities among ethnically/racially diverse groups. PMID:22390201

  20. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain. PMID:16734514

  1. Pain sensitivity and opioid analgesia: a pharmacogenomic twin study.

    PubMed

    Angst, Martin S; Phillips, Nicholas G; Drover, David R; Tingle, Martha; Ray, Amrita; Swan, Gary E; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Clark, J David

    2012-07-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone medication for the management of moderate to severe pain. Unfortunately, vast inter-individual differences in dose requirements complicate their effective and safe clinical use. Mechanisms underlying such differences are incompletely understood, are likely multifactorial, and include genetic and environmental contributions. While accumulating evidence suggests that variants of several genes account for some of the observed response variance, the relative contribution of these factors remains unknown. This study used a twin paradigm to provide a global estimate of the genetic and environmental contributions to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid effects. Eighty one monozygotic and 31 dizygotic twin pairs successfully underwent a computer-controlled infusion with the μ-opioid agonist alfentanil in a single occasion, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study design. Pain sensitivity and analgesic effects were assessed with experimental heat and cold pressor pain models along with important covariates including demographic factors, depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Significant heritability was detected for cold pressor pain tolerance and opioid-mediated elevations in heat and cold pressor pain thresholds. Genetic effects accounted for 12-60% of the observed response variance. Significant familial effects accounting for 24-32% of observed variance were detected for heat and cold pressor pain thresholds and opioid-mediated elevation in cold pressor pain tolerance. Significant covariates included age, gender, race, education, and anxiety. Results provide a strong rationale for more detailed molecular genetic studies to elucidate mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid responses. Such studies will require careful consideration of the studied pain phenotype. PMID:22444188

  2. Pain evoked by polymodal stimulation of hand veins in humans.

    PubMed

    Arndt, J O; Klement, W

    1991-01-01

    1. To explore the function of the sensory innervation of veins in humans we used a psychophysical approach to study painful and non-painful sensations by applying polymodal stimuli (electrical, stretch, cold/heat and osmotic) inside vascularly isolated hand vein segments before and after blockade of either venous or cutaneous afferents. 2. All modes of stimulation elicited pain, which showed only slight adaptation during 10 min of maintained stimulation. Pain increased monotonically with stimulus intensity between threshold and the maximally tolerable pain. 3. The exponents of the power functions of the pain magnitude-stimulus strength relations for five stimulus modes ranged between 2.5 and 3.3 but did not significantly differ from one another (P = 0.3). 4. Pain evoked by all stimuli was reported to be of similar quality, i.e. sharp, aching and unpleasant; it was accompanied by non-painful sensations (skin movements on stretching, warm and cold sensation with intravenous thermal stimulation) unless the skin above the stimulated vein segment was numbed with benzocaine ointment. 5. Pain could no longer be evoked in the presence of 0.4-0.8% procaine within the stimulated vein segment. 6. These observations are consistent with the view that veins are invested with polymodal nociceptors only, which in all likelihood are connected with thinly myelinated afferents of the A delta group. 7. The vascularly isolated vein segment may open a new avenue for pain research in humans. PMID:1804973

  3. Pain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  4. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  5. Efficacy and tolerability studies evaluating a sleep aid and analgesic combination of naproxen sodium and diphenhydramine in the dental impaction pain model in subjects with induced transient insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S; Laurora, I; Wang, Y; Venkataraman, P; An, R; Roth, T

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of novel combination naproxen sodium (NS) and diphenhydramine (DPH) in subjects with postoperative dental pain along with transient insomnia induced by 5 h sleep phase advance. The present studies aimed to demonstrate the added benefit and optimal dosages of the combination product over individual ingredients alone in improving sleep and pain. Methods Each of the two studies was a two-centre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy trial. In the first study, subjects were randomised into one of the following treatment arms: NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 220 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. In the second study, subjects received either NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. The co-primary end-points in both studies were wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency (SL) measured by actigraphy. Other secondary sleep and pain end-points were also assessed. Results The intent-to-treat population included 712 and 267 subjects from studies one and two, respectively. In the first study, only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination showed significant improvements in both WASO vs. NS alone (−70.3 min p = 0.0002) and SL vs. DPH alone (25.50 and 41.50 min respectively, p < 0.0001). In the second study, the NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg combination failed to show any significant improvements vs. either component alone. Conclusions Only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination demonstrated improvement in both sleep latency vs. DPH 50 mg and sleep maintenance (WASO) vs. NS 440 mg. There were no serious or unexpected adverse events reported in either study. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01280591 (study 1); NCT01495858 (study 2) PMID:25996289

  6. Evidence for threshold effects of 25-hydroxyvitamin D on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in black and white obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, John D; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; Streeten, Elizabeth; Ryan, Alice S; Goldberg, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    We identified normal vs. abnormal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations by examining the relation of 25(OH)D to non-bone-related measures (plasma glucose, insulin resistance, lipids, blood pressure, fitness, obesity, and regional adiposity) and asking whether there is a 25(OH)D concentration above and below which the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome changes. We examined the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome by race to see whether race-specific normal ranges are needed, and we examined the role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in modulating the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome. In a cross-sectional study of 239 overweight and obese, sedentary postmenopausal women without diabetes (83 black, 156 white), outcome measures included plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), IGF-1, parathyroid hormone (PTH), aerobic fitness, body composition, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat, and blood pressure. We identified threshold effects in the association between 25(OH)D and these variables using piecewise linear regressions. We found that 25(OH)D was inversely related to fasting glucose, fasting and 2-h insulin, HOMA-IR, visceral abdominal fat, percentage fat, PTH, and triglycerides. Evidence for a threshold effect of 25(OH)D was found for 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. There was no evidence suggesting the need for race-specific normal 25(OH)D concentrations. IGF-1 modulated the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome but only below, and not above, a threshold 25(OH)D concentration. Our findings suggest a threshold effect of 25(OH)D on glucose-insulin metabolism such that 25(OH)D ≥ ∼26 μg/L (65.0 pmol/L) supports normal glucose homeostasis and that the same cut point defining normal 25(OH)D concentration can be used in black and white women. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01798030. PMID:24717362

  7. Evidence for Threshold Effects of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Black and White Obese Postmenopausal Women12

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, John D.; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; Streeten, Elizabeth; Ryan, Alice S.; Goldberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    We identified normal vs. abnormal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations by examining the relation of 25(OH)D to non-bone–related measures (plasma glucose, insulin resistance, lipids, blood pressure, fitness, obesity, and regional adiposity) and asking whether there is a 25(OH)D concentration above and below which the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome changes. We examined the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome by race to see whether race-specific normal ranges are needed, and we examined the role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in modulating the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome. In a cross-sectional study of 239 overweight and obese, sedentary postmenopausal women without diabetes (83 black, 156 white), outcome measures included plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), IGF-1, parathyroid hormone (PTH), aerobic fitness, body composition, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat, and blood pressure. We identified threshold effects in the association between 25(OH)D and these variables using piecewise linear regressions. We found that 25(OH)D was inversely related to fasting glucose, fasting and 2-h insulin, HOMA-IR, visceral abdominal fat, percentage fat, PTH, and triglycerides. Evidence for a threshold effect of 25(OH)D was found for 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. There was no evidence suggesting the need for race-specific normal 25(OH)D concentrations. IGF-1 modulated the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome but only below, and not above, a threshold 25(OH)D concentration. Our findings suggest a threshold effect of 25(OH)D on glucose–insulin metabolism such that 25(OH)D ≥ ∼26 μg/L (65.0 pmol/L) supports normal glucose homeostasis and that the same cut point defining normal 25(OH)D concentration can be used in black and white women. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01798030. PMID:24717362

  8. The Relationship Between Neck Pain and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Kajaks, Tara; MacDermid, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a significant societal burden due to its high prevalence and healthcare costs. While physical activity can help to manage other forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain, little data exists on the relationship between physical activity and neck pain. The purpose of this study was to compare physical activity levels between individuals with neck pain and healthy controls, and then to relate disability, fear of movement, and pain sensitivity measures to physical activity levels in each of the two participant groups. 21 participants were recruited for each of the two participant groups (n = 42). Data collection included the use of the Neck Disability Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, electrocutaneous (Neurometer® CPT) and pressure stimulation (JTech algometer) for quantitative sensory testing, and 5 days of subjective (Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity) and objective (BioTrainer II) measurements of physical activity. Analysis of Variance and Pearson’s Correlation were used to determine if differences and relationships exist between dependent variables both within and between groups. The results show that individuals with mild neck pain and healthy controls do not differ in subjectively and objectively measured physical activity. While participants with neck pain reported higher neck disability and fear of movement, these factors did not significantly relate to physical activity levels. Perceived activity level was related to pain threshold and tolerance at local neck muscles sites (C2 paraspinal muscle and upper trapezius muscle), whereas measured activity was related to generalized pain sensitivity, as measured at the tibialis anterior muscle site. PMID:24133553

  9. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  10. Swearing as a response to pain.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Atkins, John; Kingston, Andrew

    2009-08-01

    Although a common pain response, whether swearing alters individuals' experience of pain has not been investigated. This study investigated whether swearing affects cold-pressor pain tolerance (the ability to withstand immersing the hand in icy water), pain perception and heart rate. In a repeated measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to repeat a swear word versus a neutral word. In addition, sex differences and the roles of pain catastrophising, fear of pain and trait anxiety were explored. Swearing increased pain tolerance, increased heart rate and decreased perceived pain compared with not swearing. However, swearing did not increase pain tolerance in males with a tendency to catastrophise. The observed pain-lessening (hypoalgesic) effect may occur because swearing induces a fight-or-flight response and nullifies the link between fear of pain and pain perception. PMID:19590391

  11. Pain Sensitivity in Adolescent Males with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Testing for Associations with Conduct Disorder and Callous and Unemotional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Northover, Clare; Thapar, Anita; Langley, Kate; van Goozen, Stephanie HM

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced processing and experience of aversive emotional cues is a common component of theories on the development and persistence of aggression and antisocial behaviour. Yet physical pain, arguably the most basic aversive cue, has attracted comparatively little attention. Methods This study measured pain sensitivity and physiological response to painful stimuli (skin conductance level, SCL) in adolescent boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 183), who are at high risk for antisocial behaviour. We compared boys with ADHD with and without a comorbid diagnosis of Conduct Disorder (CD) on pain sensitivity, and examined patterns of association between pain measures, on the one hand, and problem severity and callous and unemotional (CU) traits, on the other. Results Boys with comorbid CD exhibited a higher pain threshold and tolerance than boys with ADHD alone, but the groups did not differ in physiology at the time the pain threshold and tolerance were reported. Regression analyses showed that ADHD problem severity positively predicted pain sensitivity, whereas levels of CU traits negatively predicted pain sensitivity. Conclusions These findings on physical pain processing extend evidence of impairments in aversive cue processing among those at risk of antisocial behaviour. The study highlights the importance of considering comorbidity and heterogeneity of disorders when developing interventions. The current findings could be used to identify subgroups within those with ADHD who might be less responsive to interventions that use corrective feedback to obtain behaviour change. PMID:26225935

  12. Unusual responses to electrocutaneous stimulation in refractory cervicobrachial pain: clues to a neuropathic pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, J F; Cohen, M L

    1992-01-01

    Refractory cervicobrachial pain (RCBP) is a common syndrome of uncertain pathogenesis, frequently seen in an occupational context. It is characterised by widespread neck, shoulder girdle and arm pain, often of dysaesthetic quality including burning, associated with paraesthesiae, impaired perception of touch, allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia. Despite these clinical features, the syndrome has not attracted investigation with other than standard neurophysiological tests. Electrocutaneous electrical stimulation (ECS), following a well-described and validated method, was chosen as a tool to investigate the nociceptive status in RCBP. A commercially available calibrate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) machine was used to determine perception threshold and pain tolerance with respect to the amplitude of current and duration of pulse. Fifteen patients with typical RCBP and ten normal volunteers were studied. The response profiles obtained were reproducible over time in both patients and controls and were able clearly to distinguish between affected and non-affected limbs. The perception threshold and pain tolerance in the unaffected limbs of patients did not differ from those in normal subjects. In the affected limbs there was reduction in pain tolerance, invariably accompanied by spread of sensation and persistence of dysaesthesiae, both induced by ECS. These results define the limbs affected by RCBP as regions of secondary hyperalgesia at the clinical level. It is suggested that neural dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of RCBP, although a confident distinction between peripheral and central processes cannot be made on the basis of these findings, which call for further investigation. PMID:1458699

  13. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls - a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. PMID:27022298

  14. The effect of visual stimulation via the eyeglass display and the perception of pain.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Ng, Jacobus K F; Chung, Joanne W Y; Wong, Thomas K S

    2002-02-01

    Hospitalization involves anxiety and pain for many people. Unfamiliar hospital settings, various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and the sight and sounds of medical procedures exacerbate pain and anxiety. By blocking off the anxiety-inducing sights and sounds of the hospital surroundings and creating a pleasant environment, an eyeglass display might be able to change the sensation and perception of pain. In this randomized, controlled, crossover study, 72 healthy university student volunteers were asked to wear a light-weight eyeglass that projected a feeling of watching a 52-inch television screen at 6 1/2 feet in distance while pain was produced by a modified tourniquet technique. Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in a V-session or B-session first, with subsequent cross-over. In a V-session, subjects were instructed to wear the eyeglass and watch the soundless display of natural scenery during the inflation. In a B-session, the eyeglass that subjects wore would project a static blank screen. During V-sessions, there was a significant increase in pain threshold (p < 0.001) and pain tolerance (p < 0.001). The degree of immersion was positively correlated with improvement in pain threshold, whereas the anxiety level was negatively correlated with improvement in pain threshold. These findings have implications for using visual stimulation as a positive adjunct to other methods of pain relief and for different pain conditions. This study was considered to be the pioneer use of visual stimulation in the local Chinese community as an adjunct to pain relief. PMID:11990976

  15. The Effect of Pressure Pain Sensitivity and Patient Factors on Self-Reported Pain-Disability in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C.; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Triano, John J.; Galea, Victoria; Gross, Anita R.

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to estimate the extent to which pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and patient factors predict pain-related disability in patients with neck pain (NP), and to determine if PPS differs by gender. Forty-four participants with a moderate level of chronic NP were recruited for this cross sectional study. All participants were asked to complete self-reported assessments of pain, disability and comorbidity and then underwent PPS testing at 4-selected body locations. Pearson`s r w was computed to explore relationships between the PPS measures and the self-reported assessments. Regression models were built to identify predictors of pain and disability. An independent sample t-test was done to identify gender-related differences in PPS, pain-disability and comorbidity. In this study, greater PPS (threshold and tolerance) was significantly correlated to lower pain-disability (r = -.30 to -.53, p≤0.05). Age was not correlated with pain or disability but comorbidity was (r= 0.42-.43, p≤0.01). PPS at the 4-selected body locations was able to explain neck disability (R2=25-28%). Comorbidity was the strongest predictor of neck disability (R2 =30%) and pain (R2=25%). Significant mean differences for gender were found in PPS, disability and comorbidity, but not in pain intensity or rating. This study suggests that PPS may play a role in outcome measures of pain and disability but between-subject comparisons should consider gender and comorbidity issues. PMID:25320651

  16. Effect of a nitric oxide donor (glyceryl trinitrate) on nociceptive thresholds in man.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    1996-05-01

    Several animal studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in central and peripheral modulation of nociception. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) exerts its physiological actions via donation of NO. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of this NO donor on nociceptive thresholds in man. On two different study days separated by at least a week 12 healthy subjects received a staircase infusion of GTN (0.015, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 micrograms/kg/min, 20 min each dose) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Before the infusion and after 15 min of infusion on each dose, pressure pain detection and tolerance thresholds were determined by pressure algometry (Somomedic AB, Sweden) in three different anatomic regions (finger, a temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue and a temporal region without interposed myofascial tissue). Relative to placebo, the three higher GTN doses induced a decrease in both detection and tolerance thresholds in the temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue (p = 0.003 detection and p = 0.002 tolerance thresholds, Friedman). No such changes were observed in the other two stimulated regions. These results could reflect central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, we regard convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO as a more likely explanation of our findings. PMID:8734768

  17. [Chronic pain and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Berker, Ender; Dinçer, Nilay

    2005-04-01

    The perception and interpretation of pain is the end point of an interaction of cognitive, cultural, and environmental factors and this complex interaction effects the pain response and quality of life of each person which shows that pain perception and the verbal and behavioral response shows variations and is specific for each patient. Chronic pain can be due to Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Neuropathic Pain (NP) where the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are being revealed or it can be chronic low back pain (CLBP) where pain persists in spite of healing of tissue and no underlying pathologic mechanism can be defected. Central sensitization, inhibition of descending pain inhibitory systems, functional changes in autonomic nervous system amd neurotransmitter as well as changes in stress response system are factors contributing to the initiation and maintenance of pain and cognitive, behavioral factors are also important contributors in chronic pain. Biopsychosocial and biomedical mechanisms should be assessed in the rehabilitation interventions. The aims of rehabilitation in chronic pain are to increase activity tolerance, functional capacity and to decrease socio-economic loads. The targets of activity should be physical, functional and social. Psychologic based programs as cognitive-behavioral techniques and operant conditioning are also valid procedures in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Rehabilitation should be multidisciplinary and of long-term targeted to valid out-come for success. PMID:15977088

  18. Attentional bias modification and pain: The role of sensory and affective stimuli.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jemma; Sharpe, Louise; Colagiuri, Ben

    2016-08-01

    There is growing evidence to support attentional bias modification (ABM) techniques such as the modified dot-probe task within the pain literature. Such techniques can help to inform theoretical models of pain by identifying the causal role of attentional bias constructs. The aim of this research was to explore the effects of dot-probe ABM that trains individuals towards (+) or away from (-) sensory (S) and affective (A) pain words, on attentional biases, interpretation biases, and pain outcomes. Healthy undergraduate students (N = 106) completed questionnaires, an attentional bias dot-probe task, and an interpretation bias task before and after ABM, one of four ABM versions that differed in training direction (S+A+, S-A+, S+A-, S-A-), and pain outcomes using the cold pressor task. Those trained towards affective pain words were found to have a greater pain threshold but also greater distress at tolerance. However, mechanisms of change could not be established, as ABM did not affect attentional or interpretation bias, even though changes in attentional bias were associated with pain outcomes. These findings provide partial support for the threat interpretation model and highlight the utility of affective pain ABM, although further investigation of causal mechanisms is warranted. PMID:27327608

  19. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  20. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls – a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant’s hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual’s self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. PMID:27022298

  1. Treatment of myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Bean, Matthew C; Heckman, Thomas W; Jayaseelan, Dhinu; Moats, Nick; Nava, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The objective of this article was to perform a narrative review regarding the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome and to provide clinicians with treatment recommendations. This paper reviews the efficacy of various myofascial pain syndrome treatment modalities, including pharmacological therapy, injection-based therapies and physical therapy interventions. Outcomes evaluated included pain (visual analog scale), pain pressure threshold and range of motion. The evidence found significant benefit with multiple treatments, including diclofenac patch, thiocolchicoside and lidocaine patches. Trigger point injections, ischemic compression therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, spray and stretch, and myofascial release were also efficacious. The authors recommend focusing on treating underlying pathologies, including spinal conditions, postural abnormalities and underlying behavioral issues. To achieve maximum pain reduction and improve function, we recommend physicians approach myofascial pain syndrome with a multimodal plan, which includes a combination of pharmacologic therapies, various physical therapeutic modalities and injection therapies. PMID:24645933

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of a hydrocodone extended-release tablet formulated with abuse-deterrence technology for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in patients with osteoarthritis or low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Martin E; Laudadio, Charles; Yang, Ronghua; Narayana, Arvind; Malamut, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of hydrocodone extended release (ER) developed with abuse-deterrence technology to provide sustained pain relief and limit effects of alcohol and tablet manipulation on drug release. Eligible patients with chronic moderate-to-severe low back or osteoarthritis pain were titrated to an analgesic dose of hydrocodone ER (15–90 mg) and randomized to placebo or hydrocodone ER every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 12 in weekly average pain intensity (API; 0=no pain, 10=worst pain imaginable). Secondary measures included percentage of patients with >33% and >50% increases from baseline in weekly API, change from baseline in weekly worst pain intensity, supplemental opioid usage, aberrant drug-use behaviors, and adverse events. Overall, 294 patients were randomized and received ≥1 dose of placebo (n=148) or hydrocodone ER (n=146). Weekly API did not differ significantly between hydrocodone ER and placebo at week 12 (P=0.134); although, in post hoc analyses, the change in weekly API was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER when excluding the lowest dose (15 mg; least squares mean, −0.20 vs 0.40; P=0.032). Significantly more patients had >33% and >50% increase in weekly API with placebo (P<0.05), and mean weekly worst pain intensity was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER at week 12 (P=0.026). Supplemental medication usage was higher with placebo (86%) than hydrocodone ER (79%). Incidence of aberrant drug-use behaviors was low, and adverse events were similar between groups. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, although results support the effectiveness of this hydrocodone ER formulation in managing chronic low back or osteoarthritis pain. Use of the hydrocodone ER 15-mg dose, a robust placebo response, and use of supplemental analgesics, particularly in the placebo group, may have limited detection of a statistically significant

  3. Manipulating the Placebo Response in Experimental Pain by Altering Doctor’s Performance Style

    PubMed Central

    Czerniak, Efrat; Biegon, Anat; Ziv, Amitai; Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Weiser, Mark; Alon, Uri; Citron, Atay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performance is paramount in traditional healing rituals. From a Western perspective, such performative behavior can be understood principally as inducing patients’ faith in the performer’s supernatural healing powers and effecting positive changes through the same mechanisms attributed to the placebo response, which is defined as improvement of clinical outcome in individuals receiving inactive treatment. Here we examined the possibility of using theatrical performance tools, including stage directions and scripting, to reproducibly manipulate the style and content of a simulated doctor–patient encounter and influence the placebo response in experimental pain. Methods: A total of 122 healthy volunteers (18–45 years, 76 men) exposed to experimental pain (the cold pressor test) were assessed for pain threshold and tolerance before and after receiving a placebo cream from a “doctor” impersonated by a trained actor. The actor alternated between two distinct scripts and stage directions, i.e., performance styles created by a theater director/playwright, one emulating a standard doctor–patient encounter (scenario A) and the other emphasizing attentiveness and strong suggestion, elements also present in ritual healing (scenario B). The placebo response size was calculated as the %difference in pain threshold and tolerance after exposure relative to baseline. In addition, subjects demonstrating a ≥30% increase in pain threshold or tolerance relative to baseline were defined as responders. Each encounter was videotaped in its entirety. Results: Inspection of the videotapes confirmed the reproducibility and consistency of the distinct scenarios enacted by the “doctor”-performer. Furthermore, scenario B resulted in a significant increase in pain threshold relative to scenario A. Interestingly, this increase derived from the placebo responder subgroup; as shown by two-way analysis of variance (performance style, F = 4.30; p = 0.040; η2 = 0

  4. Widespread pain in chronic epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Pienimäki, Tuomo; Siira, Pertti; Vanharanta, Heikki

    2011-10-01

    We studied the associations of widespread pain with other pain and functional measures among patients with chronic epicondylitis. A total of 190 patients (66% females) participated in the study; with a mean age 43.7, mean duration of symptoms 48weeks, chronic lateral (n=160) and medial (n=30) epicondylitis. We analysed clinical status, grip strength and cubital pain thresholds and interviewed pain and disability, leisure time physical activity, strenuous hobby activities for arms, duration of symptoms, other systemic and upper extremity disorders, arm operations, and work ability. The location of pain was analysed using a whole-body pain drawing, categorized into three groups; the highest of which was classified as widespread pain. A total of 85 patients (45%) reported widespread pain. It was highly associated with female gender, high pain scores, decreased grip strength and pain thresholds (p<0.001 for all), with increased number of positive manual tests, low level of hobby strain for arms and physical activity, long duration of symptoms, and sick leave (p for all <0.05). It was also related to upper extremity disorders and arm surgery, but not with operated epicondylitis, other systemic diseases, workload or work ability. In addition, 39% of patients without other disease reported widespread pain. Widespread pain is common in chronic epicondylitis with and without other diseases, and is related to high pain scores, decreased function of the arm, long duration of symptoms, sick leave, and with a low level of physical activity. PMID:21565536

  5. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD. PMID:26713424

  6. Efficacy and Tolerability of Conventional Nimesulide Versus Beta-Cyclodextrin Nimesulide in Patients with Pain After Surgical Dental Extraction: A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Mildred; Seijas, Alberto; Yibirín, Maria González

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pain following extraction of an impacted third molar is widely used to assess analgesic efficacy, especially that of a single dose of a drug. The analgesic activity of conventional nimesulide (CN) has been documented in a variety of types of acute and chronic pain. Beta-cyclodextrin nimesulide (BN) is a new formulation in which nimesulide is included in a cyclodextrin molecule, which increases its solubility in water and its dilution rate, allowing extended, rapid absorption of the drug. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a single dose of BN compared with CN in patients with pain following extraction of an impacted third molar. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy study conducted at 3 dentistry centers in Venezuela. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups. One group received a single dose of BN (400-mg tablet, equivalent to 100 mg of nimesulide); the other group received a single dose of CN (100-mg tablet). Both groups also received a placebo. The efficacy variables were (1) pain intensity (PI), assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at the following times: 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after drug administration; (2) time to first measurable difference in PI from baseline (PID) (PID ≥1 cm on the VAS; ie, the beginning of analgesic action); (3) maximum PID (max PID); (4) sum of PIDs in the 12-hour observation period; (5) pain relief (PR), as rated on a 5-point scale; (6) maximum PR; and (7) sum of the PR scores in the 12-hour observation period (ie, total PR). For the tolerability analysis, all adverse events (AEs) were to be recorded, and the investigators were to assess whether each AE was drug related. Results: Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 62 patients (40 women, 22 men; mean [SD] age, 20.1 [5.9] years) were assessed; 35 were treated with BN and 27 with CN. PI reduction was more rapid and greater

  7. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  8. Cholecystokinin and Pain*

    PubMed Central

    McRoberts, Jay W.

    1986-01-01

    The recent discovery that cholecystokinin (CCK) is present in the nervous system has prompted studies that have nearly proven its neurotransmitter status. Pain modulation appears to be a major effect of CCK and proglumide, its antagonist. CCK's inhibitory effect and proglumide's potentiating effect on opiate analgesia may have clinical application; proglumide's inhibitory effect on opiate tolerance may help in management of chronic pain. More research is required before the CCK/opiate interaction can be exploited on a large scale to relieve pain. PMID:2872841

  9. Clinical and Evoked Pain, Personality Traits, and Emotional States: Can Familial Confounding Explain the Associations?

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Elizabeth; Succop, Annemarie; Chopko, Laura; Afari, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pain is a complex phenomenon influenced by context and person-specific factors. Affective dimensions of pain involve both enduring personality traits and fleeting emotional states. We examined how personality traits and emotional states are linked with clinical and evoked pain in a twin sample. Methods 99 female twin pairs were evaluated for clinical and evoked pain using the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and dolorimetry, and completed the 120-item International Personality Item Pool (IPIP), the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), and ratings of stress and mood. Using a co-twin control design we examined a) the relationship of personality traits and emotional states with clinical and evoked pain, and b) whether genetics and common environment (i.e. familial factors) may account for the associations. Results Neuroticism was associated with the sensory component of the MPQ; this relationship was not confounded by familial factors. None of the emotional state measures was associated with the MPQ. PANAS Negative Affect was associated with lower evoked pressure pain threshold and tolerance; these associations were confounded by familial factors. There were no associations between IPIP traits and evoked pain. Conclusions A relationship exists between neuroticism and clinical pain that is not confounded by familial factors. There is no similar relationship between negative emotional states and clinical pain. In contrast, the relationship between negative emotional states and evoked pain is strong while the relationship with enduring personality traits is weak. The relationship between negative emotional states and evoked pain appears to be non-causal and due to familial factors. PMID:25311873

  10. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ... If your doctor recommends an over-the-counter pain reliever, read and follow the instructions on the box. ...

  11. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  12. Postamputation pain: studies on mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone

    2012-10-01

    Amputation is followed by both painful and non-painful phantom phenomena in a large number of amputees. Non-painful phantom sensations rarely pose any clinical problem, but 60-80% of all amputees also experience painful sensations (i.e. phantom pain) located to the missing limb. The severity of phantom pain usually decreases with time, but severe pain persists in 5-10% of patients. Pain in the residual limb (i.e. stump pain) is another consequence of amputation. Both stump and phantom pain can be very difficult to treat. Treatment guidelines used for other neuropathic pain conditions are probably the best approximation, especially for the treatment of stump pain. The aim of the present doctoral thesis was to explore some of the mechanisms underlying pain after amputation. Ten studies were carried out (I-X). My PhD thesis from 1998 dealt with pain before the amputation and showed that preamputation pain increases the risk of phantom pain after amputation (I). A perioperative epidural blockade, however, did not reduce the incidence of pain or abnormal sensory phenomena after amputation (II, III). The importance of sensitization before amputation for the subsequent development of pain is supported by study IV, in which pressure pain thresholds obtained at the limb before amputation were inversely related to stump and phantom pain after 1 week. Afferent input from the periphery is likely to contribute to postamputation pain as sodium channels were upregulated in human neuromas (VI), although neuroma removal did not always alleviate phantom pain (V). Sensitization of neurons in the spinal cord also seems to be involved in pain after amputation as phantom pain was reduced by ketamine, an NMDA-receptor antagonist. Another NMDA-receptor antagonist, memantine, and gabapentin, a drug working by binding to the δ2α-subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, had no effect on phantom pain (VII-IX). Supraspinal factors are also important for pain after amputation as

  13. [Pain and opioids].

    PubMed

    Murányi, Marianna; Radák, Zsolt

    2008-12-14

    Noxious stimuli cause pain to protect the body from harmful situations and attract attention to pathophysiologic changes of the body. Specific receptors of pain (nociceptors) can be found all over our body. Pain initiates protecting mechanisms such as vegetative and motor reflexes, and emotional, behavioral changes. However, chronic pain is practically useless and leads to psychopathological changes. There are several ways to relieve pain including non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents, opioids, neurosurgical and non-invasive methods. Central and peripheral effects of opioids can be realized through opioid receptors of the central and the enteric nervous system. In the central nervous system, they can inhibit the perception of pain or change the emotional reactions. Opioids are indicated in postoperative pain, neuropathic pain and cancer. However, the use of opioids has severe side-effects such as breathing depression and the development of tolerance and dependence which do not make opioids optimal painkillers. There are several laboratories in Hungary and abroad working on the design of optimal pain relievers. Furthermore, the euphoric effects of opioids lead to abuse which makes the research important on the mechanisms of opioid addiction. Taken together, opioid research, the design of new compounds and the exploration of the mechanisms of opiate addiction are very important. PMID:19073443

  14. Nociception, pain, negative moods and behavior selection

    PubMed Central

    Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury; while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior; and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms; and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: The limbic brain imparting risk, while mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats. PMID:26247858

  15. Does acute intraoral pain alter cutaneous sensibility?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, P; Ekblom, A; Lindblom, U; Marchettini, P

    1988-01-01

    Cutaneous sensibility was tested in eight patients suffering from acute postoperative intraoral pain. Tactile-, cold-, warm-, and heat-pain thresholds as well as reaction time to cold pulses were unaffected by the presence of pain. However, reaction time to warm pulses was increased in the painful area on the day of pain compared to a non-painful state. The findings are discussed in relation to (1) functional convergence of different sensory fibres on central neurons (2) the phenomenon of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and (3) secondary hyperalgesia. The observed effect of clinical pain on the warm pathway could be explained as an intrasegmental noxious inhibitory effect. PMID:3216205

  16. The role of beta-arrestin2 in the severity of antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence induced by different opioid pain therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Raehal, Kirsten M.; Bohn, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    Ligands acting at the same receptor can differentially activate distinct signal transduction pathways, which in turn, can have diverse functional consequences. Further, receptors expressed in different tissues may utilize intracellular signaling proteins in response to a ligand differently as well. The mu opioid receptor (MOR), which mediates many of the pharmacological actions of opiate therapeutics, is also subject to differential signaling in response to diverse agonists. To study the effect of diverse agonists on MOR signaling, we examined the effects of chronic opiate treatment on two distinct physiological endpoints, antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence, in mice lacking the intracellular regulatory molecule, βarrestin2. While βarrestin2 knockout (βarr2-KO) mice do not become tolerant to the antinociceptive effects of chronic morphine in a hot plate test, tolerance develops to the same degree in both wild type and βarr2-KO mice following chronic infusion with methadone, fentanyl, and oxycodone. Studies here also assess the severity of withdrawal signs precipitated by naloxone following chronic infusions at three different doses of each opiate agonist. While there are no differences in withdrawal responses between genotypes at the highest dose of morphine tested (48 mg/kg/day), the βarr2-KO mice display several less severe withdrawal responses when the infusion dose is lowered (12 or 24 mg/kg/day). Chronic infusion of methadone, fentanyl, and oxycodone all lead to equivalent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal responses in both genotypes at all doses tested. These results lend further evidence that distinct agonists can differentially impact on opioid-mediated responses in vivo in a βarrestin2-dependent manner. PMID:20713067

  17. Positive Traits Linked to Less Pain through Lower Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Pulvers, Kim; Carrillo, Janet; Merchant, Gina; Thomas, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between positive traits, pain catastrophizing, and pain perceptions. We hypothesized that pain catastrophizing would mediate the relationship between positive traits and pain. First, participants (n = 114) completed the Trait Hope Scale, the Life Orientation Test- Revised, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Participants then completed the experimental pain stimulus, a cold pressor task, by submerging their hand in a circulating water bath (0º Celsius) for as long as tolerable. Immediately following the task, participants completed the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ-SF). Pearson correlation found associations between hope and pain catastrophizing (r = −.41, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.20, p < .05). Optimism was significantly associated with pain catastrophizing (r = −.44, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.19, p < .05). Bootstrapping, a non-parametric resampling procedure, tested for mediation and supported our hypothesis that pain catastrophizing mediated the relationship between positive traits and MPQ-SF pain report. To our knowledge, this investigation is the first to establish that the protective link between positive traits and experimental pain operates through lower pain catastrophizing. PMID:22199416

  18. Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states

    PubMed Central

    Little, Joshua W.; Ford, Amanda; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M.; Chen, Zhoumou; Janes, Kali; Doyle, Timothy; Xie, Jennifer; Luongo, Livio; Tosh, Dillip K.; Maione, Sabatino; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a global burden that promotes disability and unnecessary suffering. To date, efficacious treatment of chronic pain has not been achieved. Thus, new therapeutic targets are needed. Here, we demonstrate that increasing endogenous adenosine levels through selective adenosine kinase inhibition produces powerful analgesic effects in rodent models of experimental neuropathic pain through the A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR, now known as ADORA3) signalling pathway. Similar results were obtained by the administration of a novel and highly selective A3AR agonist. These effects were prevented by blockade of spinal and supraspinal A3AR, lost in A3AR knock-out mice, and independent of opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms. A3AR activation also relieved non-evoked spontaneous pain behaviours without promoting analgesic tolerance or inherent reward. Further examination revealed that A3AR activation reduced spinal cord pain processing by decreasing the excitability of spinal wide dynamic range neurons and producing supraspinal inhibition of spinal nociception through activation of serotonergic and noradrenergic bulbospinal circuits. Critically, engaging the A3AR mechanism did not alter nociceptive thresholds in non-neuropathy animals and therefore produced selective alleviation of persistent neuropathic pain states. These studies reveal A3AR activation by adenosine as an endogenous anti-nociceptive pathway and support the development of A3AR agonists as novel therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25414036

  19. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial of Cannabis Cigarettes in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas; Tsodikov, Alexander; Millman, Jeanna; Bentley, Heather; Gouaux, Ben; Fishman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA) report that no sound scientific studies support the medicinal use of cannabis. Despite this lack of scientific validation, many patients routinely use “medical marijuana,” and in many cases this use is for pain related to nerve injury. We conducted a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of smoking cannabis for neuropathic pain. Thirty-eight patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for smoking either high-dose (7%), low-dose (3.5%), or placebo cannabis. In addition to the primary outcome of pain intensity, secondary outcome measures included evoked pain using heat-pain threshold, sensitivity to light touch, psychoactive side effects, and neuropsychological performance. A mixed linear model demonstrated an analgesic response to smoking cannabis. No effect on evoked pain was seen. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, with some acute cognitive effects, particularly with memory, at higher doses. PMID:18403272

  20. Habituation to Experimentally Induced Electrical Pain during Voluntary-Breathing Controlled Electrical Stimulation (BreEStim)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Hu, Tracy; Beran, Maria A.; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Painful peripheral electrical stimulation to acupuncture points was found to cause sensitization if delivered randomly (EStim), but induced habituation if triggered by voluntary breathing (BreEStim). The objective was to systematically compare the effectiveness of BreEStim and EStim and to investigate the possible mechanisms mediating the habituation effect of BreEStim. Methods Eleven pain-free, healthy subjects (6 males, 5 females) participated in the study. Each subject received the BreEStim and EStim treatments in a random order at least three days apart. Both treatments consisted of 120 painful but tolerable stimuli to the ulnar nerve at the elbow on the dominant arm. BreEStim was triggered by voluntary breathing while EStim was delivered randomly. Electrical sensation threshold (EST) and electrical pain threshold (EPT) were measured from the thenar and hypothenar eminences on both hands at pre-intervention and 10-minutes post-intervention. Results There was no difference in the pre-intervention baseline measurement of EST and EPT between BreEStim and EStim. BreEStim increased EPT in all tested sites on both hands, while EStim increased EPT in the dominant hypothenar eminence distal to the stimulating site and had no effect on EPT in other sites. There was no difference in the intensity of electrical stimulation between EStim and BreEStim. Conclusion Our findings support the important role human voluntary breathing plays in the systemic habituation effect of BreEStim to peripheral painful electrical stimulation. PMID:25153077

  1. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  2. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  3. Prediction of pain in orthodontic patients based on preoperative pain assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Baoyu; Ren, Manman; Lin, Feiou; Yao, Linjie

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether pretreatment assessment of experimental pain can predict the level of pain after archwire placement. Methods One hundred and twenty-one general university students seeking orthodontic treatment were enrolled in this study. A cold pressor test was performed to estimate the pain tolerance of subjects before treatment. Self-reported pain intensity was calculated using a 10 cm visual analog scale during the 7 days after treatment. The relationship between pain tolerance and orthodontic pain was analyzed using Spearman’s correlation analysis. Results The maximum mean level of pain intensity occurred at 24 hours after bonding (53.31±16.13) and fell to normal levels at day 7. Spearman’s correlation analysis found a moderate positive association between preoperative pain tolerance and self-reported pain after archwire placement (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in pain intensity between male and female patients at any time point (P>0.05). Conclusion A simple and noninvasive preoperative sensory test (the cold pressor test) was useful in predicting the risk of developing unbearable pain in patients after archwire placement. Self-reported pain after archwire placement decreased as individual pain tolerance increased. PMID:27042019

  4. Potential neurobiological benefits of exercise in chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scioli-Salter, Erica; Forman, Daniel E; Otis, John D; Tun, Carlos; Allsup, Kelly; Marx, Christine E; Hauger, Richard L; Shipherd, Jillian C; Higgins, Diana; Tyzik, Anna; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the effects of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma neuropeptide Y (NPY), allopregnanolone and pregnanolone (ALLO), cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and their association with pain sensitivity. Medication-free trauma-exposed participants were either healthy (n = 7) or experiencing comorbid chronic pain/posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n = 5). Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) during exercise testing was used to characterize cardiorespiratory fitness. Peak VO2 correlated with baseline and peak NPY levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.05 and r = 0.69, p < 0.05, respectively), as well as exercise-induced changes in ALLO (r = 0.89, p < 0.001) and peak ALLO levels (r = 0.71, p < 0.01). NPY levels at the peak of exercise correlated with pain threshold 30 min after exercise (r = 0.65, p < 0.05), while exercise-induced increases in ALLO correlated with pain tolerance 30 min after exercise (r = 0.64, p < 0.05). In contrast, exercise-induced changes in cortisol and DHEA levels were inversely correlated with pain tolerance after exercise (r = -0.69, p < 0.05 and r = -0.58, p < 0.05, respectively). These data suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with higher plasma NPY levels and increased ALLO responses to exercise, which in turn relate to pain sensitivity. Future work will examine whether progressive exercise training increases cardiorespiratory fitness in association with increases in NPY and ALLO and reductions in pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients with PTSD. PMID:27006290

  5. Sleep and pain sensitivity in adults.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Lallukka, Tea; Petrie, Keith J; Steingrímsdóttir, Ólöf Anna; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2015-08-01

    Sleep problems and pain are major public health concerns, but the nature of the association between the 2 conditions is inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether a range of sleep measures is associated with experimental increased pain sensitivity. A cross-sectional large population-based study from 2007 to 2008, the Tromsø 6 study, provided data from 10,412 participants (age: mean [SD], 58 [13] years; 54% women). Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep onset latency (SOL), and sleep efficiency, as well as frequency and severity of insomnia. The main outcome measure was pain sensitivity tests, including assessment of cold-pressor pain tolerance. We found that all sleep parameters, except sleep duration, were significantly associated with reduced pain tolerance. Both the frequency and severity of insomnia, in addition to SOL and sleep efficiency, were associated with pain sensitivity in a dose-response manner. Adjusting for demographics and psychological distress reduced the strengths of the hazard ratios, but most associations remained significant in the fully adjusted models. There was also a synergistic interaction effect on pain tolerance when combining insomnia and chronic pain. We conclude that sleep problems significantly increase the risk for reduced pain tolerance. Because comorbid sleep problems and pain have been linked to elevated disability, the need to improve sleep among patients with chronic pain, and vice versa, should be an important agenda for future research. PMID:25915149

  6. Dopamine and Pain Sensitivity: Neither Sulpiride nor Acute Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Depletion Have Effects on Thermal Pain Sensations in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Susanne; Ceko, Marta; Louis-Foster, Mytsumi; Elfassy, Nathaniel M.; Leyton, Marco; Shir, Yoram; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Based on animal studies and some indirect clinical evidence, dopamine has been suggested to have anti-nociceptive effects. Here, we investigated directly the effects of increased and decreased availability of extracellular dopamine on pain perception in healthy volunteers. In Study 1, participants ingested, in separate sessions, a placebo and a low dose of the centrally acting D2-receptor antagonist sulpiride, intended to increase synaptic dopamine via predominant pre-synaptic blockade. No effects were seen on thermal pain thresholds, tolerance, or temporal summation. Study 2 used the acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD) method to transiently decrease dopamine availability. In one session participants ingested a mixture that depletes the dopamine amino acid precursors, phenylalanine and tyrosine. In the other session they ingested a nutritionally balanced control mixture. APTD led to a small mood-lowering response following aversive thermal stimulation, but had no effects on the perception of cold, warm, or pain stimuli. In both studies the experimental manipulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission was successful as indicated by manipulation checks. The results contradict proposals that dopamine has direct anti-nociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. Based on dopamine’s well-known role in reward processing, we hypothesize that also in the context of pain, dopamine acts on stimulus salience and might play a role in the initiation of avoidance behavior rather than having direct antinociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. PMID:24236199

  7. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS), and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg) were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals) of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls) were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS. PMID:19925683

  8. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  9. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  10. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  11. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  12. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  13. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  14. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  15. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  16. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  17. Viewing the body modulates both pain sensations and pain responses.

    PubMed

    Beck, Brianna; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Viewing the body can influence pain perception, even when vision is non-informative about the noxious stimulus. Prior studies used either continuous pain rating scales or pain detection thresholds, which cannot distinguish whether viewing the body changes the discriminability of noxious heat intensities or merely shifts reported pain levels. In Experiment 1, participants discriminated two intensities of heat-pain stimulation. Noxious stimuli were delivered to the hand in darkness immediately after participants viewed either their own hand or a non-body object appearing in the same location. The visual condition varied randomly between trials. Discriminability of the noxious heat intensities (d') was lower after viewing the hand than after viewing the object, indicating that viewing the hand reduced the information about stimulus intensity available within the nociceptive system. In Experiment 2, the hand and the object were presented in separate blocks of trials. Viewing the hand shifted perceived pain levels irrespective of actual stimulus intensity, biasing responses toward 'high pain' judgments. In Experiment 3, participants saw the noxious stimulus as it approached and touched their hand or the object. Seeing the pain-inducing event counteracted the reduction in discriminability found when viewing the hand alone. These findings show that viewing the body can affect both perceptual processing of pain and responses to pain, depending on the visual context. Many factors modulate pain; our study highlights the importance of distinguishing modulations of perceptual processing from modulations of response bias. PMID:26884131

  18. Algometry with a clothes peg compared to an electronic pressure algometer: a randomized cross-sectional study in pain patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity of the central nervous system is widely present in pain patients and recognized as one of the determinants of chronic pain and disability. Electronic pressure algometry is often used to explore aspects of central hypersensitivity. We hypothesized that a simple pain provocation test with a clothes peg provides information on pain sensitivity that compares meaningfully to that obtained by a well-established electronic pressure algometer. "Clinically meaningful" was defined as a medium (r = 0.3-0.5) or high (r > 0.5) correlation coefficient according to Cohen's conventions. Methods We tested 157 in-patients with different pain types. A calibrated clothes peg was applied for 10 seconds and patients rated the pain intensity on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. Pressure pain detection threshold (PPdt) and pressure pain tolerance threshold (PPtt) were measured with a standard electronic algometer. Both methods were performed on both middle fingers and ear lobes. In a subgroup of 47 patients repeatability (test-retest reliability) was calculated. Results Clothes peg values correlated with PPdt values for finger testing with r = -0.54 and for earlobe testing with r = -0.55 (all p-values < 0.001). Clothes peg values also correlated with PPtt values for finger testing with r = -0.55 (p < 0.001). Test-retest reliability (repeatability) showed equally stable results for clothes peg algometry and the electronic algometer (all r-values > 0.89, all p-values < 0.001). Conclusions Information on pain sensitivity provided by a calibrated clothes peg and an established algometer correlate at a clinically meaningful level. PMID:21787399

  19. Intrathecal ziconotide: a review of its use in patients with chronic pain refractory to other systemic or intrathecal analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt(®)) is a synthetic conopeptide analgesic that acts by selectively antagonizing N-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Intrathecal ziconotide is the only non-opioid intrathecal analgesic that is FDA-approved for use in patients with treatment-refractory, chronic pain. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide was demonstrated in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in patients with treatment-refractory noncancer-related pain or cancer- or AIDS-related pain. Across trials, ziconotide recipients had significantly greater reductions in pain intensity during ziconotide treatment than those receiving placebo (primary endpoint). At the end of the titration period, approximately one-sixth to one-third of patients with noncancer chronic pain and one-half with cancer- or AIDS-related pain who received ziconotide reached a pain response threshold (≥30 % reduction in the pain intensity score). In ziconotide responders, analgesic effects were enduring, with some patients continuing treatment over extended periods. Across trials, the chief tolerability concerns in ziconotide recipients during the titration phase and during extended treatment were related to CNS adverse events. These were mostly of mild to moderate intensity, although serious adverse events were commonly attributed to ziconotide treatment, especially in trials with rapid ziconotide titration and that permitted higher dosages. In general, clinically important non-CNS adverse events were infrequent, and during the ziconotide titration phase, relatively few patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. Ongoing research will assess various strategies for selecting patients for ziconotide treatment and for enhancing its efficacy and tolerability. At the present time, intrathecal ziconotide provides a treatment option for patients with severe, unremitting pain who have failed to respond to other intensive analgesic regimens. PMID:23999971

  20. Can personality traits and gender predict the response to morphine? An experimental cold pain study.

    PubMed

    Pud, Dorit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Rogowski, Zeev; Adler, Rivka; Eisenberg, Elon

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the possible role of personality traits, in accordance with Cloninger's theory, and gender, in the variability of responsiveness to opioids. Specifically, it was intended to test whether or not the three personality dimensions - harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence (RD) and novelty seeking (NS) - as suggested by Cloninger, can predict inter-personal differences in responsiveness to morphine after exposure to experimental cold pain. Thirty-four healthy volunteers (15 females, 19 males) were given the cold pressor test (CPT). Pain threshold, tolerance, and magnitude (VAS) were measured before and after (six measures, 30 min apart) the administration of either 0.5 mg/kg oral morphine sulphate (n=21) or 0.33 mg/kg oral active placebo (diphenhydramine) (n=13) in a randomized, double blind design. Assessment of the three personality traits, according to Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, was performed before the CPT. A high HA score (but not RD, NS, or baseline values of the three pain parameters) predicted a significantly larger pain relief following the administration of morphine sulphate (but not of the placebo). Women exhibited a larger response in response to both treatments, as indicated by a significantly increased threshold and tolerance following morphine sulphate as well as significantly increased tolerance and decreased magnitude following placebo administration. The present study confirms the existence of individual differences in response to analgesic treatment. It suggests that high HA personality trait is associated with better responsiveness to morphine treatment, and that females respond better than men to both morphine and placebo. PMID:16310713

  1. Electronic gaming as pain distraction.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Eleanor; Trevena, Judy; Swain, Nic

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether active distraction reduces participants' experience of pain more than passive distraction during a cold pressor task. In the first experiment, 60 participants were asked to submerge their hand in cold (2°C) water for as long as they could tolerate. They did this with no distraction, and then with active (electronic gaming system) and passive (television) distraction, in randomly assigned order. Tolerance time, pain intensity ratings and task absorption ratings were measured for each condition. A second experiment attempted to control for participants' expectations about the effects of distraction on pain. Forty participants underwent the same experimental procedure, but were given verbal suggestions about the effects of distraction by the experimenter before each distraction condition. Participants in both experiments had a significantly higher pain tolerance and reported less pain with the active distraction compared with passive or no distraction. Participants reported being more absorbed, and were significantly more willing to do the task again when they had the active distraction compared with both passive distraction and no distraction. They also had more enjoyment, less anxiety and greater reduction in pain with active distraction than with passive distraction. There was no effect of suggestion. These experiments offer further support for the use of electronic games as a method of pain control. PMID:21369538

  2. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  3. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  4. Ion channel therapeutics for pain

    PubMed Central

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  5. Cognitive-emotional sensitization contributes to wind-up-like pain in phantom limb pain patients.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Nikolajsen, Lone; Christensen, Bente; Egsgaard, Line Lindhart; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Svensson, Peter; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral mechanisms are known to play a role in phantom pain following limb amputation, and more recently it has been suggested that central mechanisms may also be of importance. Some patients seem to have a psychological sensitivity that predisposes them to react with pain catastrophizing after amputation of a limb, and this coping style may contribute to increased facilitation, impaired modulation of nociceptive signals, or both. To investigate how pain catastrophizing, independently of anxiety and depression, may contribute to phantom limb pain and to alterations in pain processing twenty-four upper-limb amputees with various levels of phantom limb pain were included in the study. Patients' level of pain catastrophizing, anxiety and depression was assessed and they went through quantitative sensory testing (QST) of thresholds (mechanical and thermal) and wind-up-like pain (brush and pinprick). Catastrophizing accounted for 35% of the variance in phantom limb pain (p=0.001) independently of anxiety and depression. Catastrophizing was also positively associated with wind-up-like pain in non-medicated patients (p=0.015), but not to pain thresholds. These findings suggest that cognitive-emotional sensitization contributes to the altered nociceptive processing seen in phantom limb pain patients. The possible interactions between pain catastrophizing, wind-up-like pain, and peripheral input in generating and maintaining phantom limb pain are discussed. PMID:21067864

  6. Central Hypersensitivity in Chronic Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Paul, Tracy; Chae, John; Wilson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the association of hemiplegic shoulder pain with central hypersensitivity through pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) at healthy, distant tissues. Design This study is a cross-sectional study. A total of 40 patients (n=20 hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP), n=20 stroke without HSP) were enrolled in this study. Pressure-pain thresholds were measured at the affected deltoid and contralateral deltoid and tibialis anterior using a handheld algometer. Differences in PPTs were analyzed by Wilcoxon Rank Sum test and with linear regression analysis controlling for gender, a known confounder of PPTs. Results Subjects with hemiplegic shoulder pain had lower local PPTs than stroke control subjects when comparing the painful to dominant shoulders and comparing the non-painful shoulder and tibialis anterior to the non-dominant side controls. Similarly, those with hemiplegic shoulder pain had lower PPTs when comparing to controls in contralesional-to-contralesional comparisons as well as ipsilesional-to-ipsilesional comparisons. Conclusions Subjects with hemiplegic shoulder pain have lower local and distal PPTs than subjects without hemiplegic shoulder pain. Our study suggests that chronic shoulder pain may be associated with widespread central hypersensitivity, which has been previously found to be associated with other chronic pain syndromes. This further understanding can then help develop better treatment options for those with this hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:23255268

  7. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  8. Pain Characteristics after Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Bum; Kang, Kyeongjin; Song, Mi Kyung; Seok, Suhyun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) causes various types of postoperative pain, and the pain pattern has not been evaluated in detail to date. This prospective observational study investigated the types of postoperative pain, intensity in the course of time, and pain characteristics during the first postoperative 72 hr after TLH. Methods. Sixty four female patients undergoing TLH were enrolled, which finally 50 patients were included for the data analyses. The locations of pain included overall pain, abdominal visceral and incisional pains, shoulder pain, and perineal pain. Assessments were made at rest and in motion, and pain level was scored with the use of the 100 mm visual analog scale. The pain was assessed at baseline, and at postoperative 30 min, 1 hr, 3 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, 48 hr, and 72 hr. Results. Overall, visceral, and incisional pains were most intense on the day of operation and then decreased following surgery. In contrast, shoulder pain gradually increased, peaking at postoperative 24 hr. Shoulder pain developed in 90% of all patients (44/50). It was not more aggravated in motion than at rest, in comparison with other pains, and right shoulder pain was more severe than left shoulder pain (p=0.006). In addition, the preoperative exercise habit of patients increased the threshold of shoulder pain. Most patients (46/50) had perineal pain, which was more severe than abdominal pain in approximately 30% of patients (17/50). Conclusion. Pain after TLH showed considerably different duration, severity, and characteristics, compared with other laparoscopic procedures. Shoulder pain was most intense at postoperative 24 hr, and the intensity was associated with the prior exercise habit of patients and the high level of analgesic request. PMID:27499688

  9. Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Anna M.; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M.; Montoya, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

  10. 40 CFR 180.2010 - Threshold of regulation determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Threshold of regulation determinations. 180.2010 Section 180.2010 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Pesticide Chemicals Not Requiring a Tolerance or an Exemption...

  11. 40 CFR 180.2010 - Threshold of regulation determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Threshold of regulation determinations. 180.2010 Section 180.2010 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Pesticide Chemicals Not Requiring a Tolerance or an Exemption...

  12. Oral opioid use alters DNIC but not cold pain perception in patients with chronic pain - new perspective of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kerstin Carlin; Eisenberg, Elon; Haddad, May; Pud, Dorit

    2008-10-15

    Opioids can elicit unexpected changes in pain sensitivity, known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of this study was to explore whether OIH exists in patients with chronic pain treated with oral opioids (OP) versus non-opioid (NOP) analgesics. The sensitivity to cold pain and the magnitude of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) were evaluated in 73 OP and 37 NOP treated patients. Pain threshold, intensity and tolerance in response to the cold pressor (1 degrees C) were measured. DNIC was tested by co-administrating conditioned heat stimulation (47 degrees C) to the left forearm and a conditioning stimulation of 12 degrees C for 30s to the right hand. The results showed no differences between the two groups in any of the cold pain measures. In contrast, the magnitude of DNIC was significantly larger in the NOP than in the OP treated patients (p=0.003). A gender based analysis showed a significant difference in DNIC between OP and NOP treated men only. However, a mixed model ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of treatment (OP versus NOP) (F=5.928, p=0.017) rather than gender on DNIC. A regression analysis showed that opioid dosage and treatment duration had a significant negative effect on the magnitude of DNIC in OP treated men (beta=-2.175, p=0.036 and beta=-2.061, p=0.047, respectively). In conclusion, oral opioids usage for the treatment of chronic pain does not result in abnormal sensitivity to cold pain, but seems to alter pain modulation. The use of 'advanced' psychophysics tests such as evaluation of DNIC can help understanding the phenomenon of OIH. PMID:18583047

  13. Pain Experience and Perception in the Obese Subject Systematic Review (Revised Version).

    PubMed

    Torensma, Bart; Thomassen, Irene; van Velzen, Monique; In 't Veld, Bastiaan Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Pain is an integral part of life and has an important protective function. Pain perception has been shown to differ between subjects and changes with gender, race, and culture. In addition, it has been suggested that obesity influences pain perception and that obesity can be a risk factor for increased pain thresholds. The aim of this systematic review was to examine pain thresholds in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. The electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, and EMBASE were searched using combinations of terms for obese, pain measurement, visual analog scale, quantitative sensory testing, and pain perception. Studies without comparison as well as cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. The search was conducted without restrictions on language or date of publication. From a total of 1818 identified studies, seven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, whereby only one study tested the pain threshold difference between obese and non-obese and also before and after body weight loss surgery. Two studies showed a lower pain threshold and four studies a higher pain threshold in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. Two studies showed no difference in pain threshold before and after substantial body weight loss due to surgery. Weight loss after surgery was not identified as a factor for higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. In view of the heterogeneity of the studies, the variability of the subjects and differences in methodological quality, a meta-analysis could not be performed. From the available literature, there is a tendency towards higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. Neither substantial weight loss, nor gender, were factors explaining difference in threshold. Future randomized, controlled trials should explore demographic variables that could influence pain perception or pain thresholds in obese individuals, and multimodal pain testing is

  14. Pain: history, culture and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ahmad; Raza, Fauzia; Khan, Iqbal Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Pain, one of the universals of existence, has a long and venerable history, its origin initially attributed to godly punishment for disbelievers; and, with improved understanding, to physical and psycho-social factors. "Pain is emotion or sensation?" has been a debatable issue. Razes developed pleasure-pain theory, founded on the theories of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus. Descartes' Dualism shifted the centre of pain from the heart to the brain but negated the psychological contribution to its pathogenesis. Gate Control Theory, fascinated with the idea of "neurological gates", highlighted the important role of the brain in dealing with the messages received. The International Association of the Study of Pain, in 1979, coined a definition of pain which is currently in use and was last updated on 6th October 2014. Its validity has been challenged and a new definition has been suggested. Whereas the experience is personalized, immeasurable and unsharable, different cultural groups react differently to pain from relative tolerance to over-reaction. Gender and ethnic differences in the perception of pain are well proven and the effects of various religious beliefs adequately scored. Despite extensive research over centuries, understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from optimal. Untiring efforts to identify a paincentre in the brain have been futile. Had it been possible, millions of pain sufferers would have been relieved of their physical agony and mental anguish by the prick of needle. PMID:26203543

  15. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  16. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, including your heart, lungs, esophagus, muscles, ribs, tendons, or nerves. Pain may also spread to ... often occurs with fast breathing Inflammation where the ribs join the breast bone or sternum ( costochondritis ) Shingles , ...

  17. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  18. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  19. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or bone changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain ...

  20. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is ... injure the tendons on the outside of the elbow. This condition is commonly called tennis elbow . Golfers ...

  1. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  2. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... water or other clear fluids. You may have sports drinks in small amounts. People with diabetes must ... pain occur? For example, after meals or during menstruation? What makes the pain worse? For example, eating, ...

  3. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  4. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  5. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  6. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  7. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  8. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  9. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them. PMID:27045524

  10. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176