Science.gov

Sample records for pain tolerance threshold

  1. Determining Pain Detection and Tolerance Thresholds Using an Integrated, Multi-Modal Pain Task Battery

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Justin L.; Okkerse, Pieter; van Amerongen, Guido; Groeneveld, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Human pain models are useful in the assessing the analgesic effect of drugs, providing information about a drug's pharmacology and identify potentially suitable therapeutic populations. The need to use a comprehensive battery of pain models is highlighted by studies whereby only a single pain model, thought to relate to the clinical situation, demonstrates lack of efficacy. No single experimental model can mimic the complex nature of clinical pain. The integrated, multi-modal pain task battery presented here encompasses the electrical stimulation task, pressure stimulation task, cold pressor task, the UVB inflammatory model which includes a thermal task and a paradigm for inhibitory conditioned pain modulation. These human pain models have been tested for predicative validity and reliability both in their own right and in combination, and can be used repeatedly, quickly, in short succession, with minimum burden for the subject and with a modest quantity of equipment. This allows a drug to be fully characterized and profiled for analgesic effect which is especially useful for drugs with a novel or untested mechanism of action. PMID:27166581

  2. Effect of electronic dental anesthesia on pain threshold and pain tolerance levels of human teeth subjected to stimulation with an electric pulp tester.

    PubMed Central

    Gerschman, J. A.; Giebartowski, J.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of electronic dental anesthesia on pain threshold and pain tolerance levels of human teeth subjected to stimulation with an electric pulp tester was evaluated. Subjects (n = 120) were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups (baseline, placebo, square wave, and postsynaptic wave). Symptom-free right-sided maxillary incisor teeth were tested for anesthesia with an electric pulp tester. Electrostimulation significantly increased the pain perception threshold and pain tolerance level with both the square wave and postsynaptic wave. The postsynaptic wave was more effective than the square wave. Presented at the Satellite Symposium on Advances in the Management of Acute and Chronic Facial Pain associated with the 6th World Congress on Pain, Melbourne, Australia, 1990. Images Figure 1 PMID:1811428

  3. Effect of GaAs Laser at 904 nm in the Pain Threshold in Tibia and Tolerance in Deltoid Evaluated by Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luiz G. P.; Sato, Sidney K.; Silveira, Landulfo; Aimbire, Flávio; Moreira, Leonardo M.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2011-08-01

    The use of LLLT in pain relief is a controversial issue in Physiotherapy, with the efficacy of LLLT associated to pain relief still requiring significant study. Objective. This work focuses on the evaluation of the effect of low power GaAs laser at 904 nm in pressure pain threshold and tolerance in tibia and deltoid muscle, respectively. A total of 17 subjects were divided in two groups: active and sham laser. Measurements were taken before and after laser irradiation in healthy individuals using a pressure algometry, first verifying the viability of algometry to evaluate the pain threshold and tolerance inter individuals and comparing the differences of right and left sides in the same patients, and finally evaluating the pain threshold and tolerance before and after a single laser application. Laser energy density was of 4.0 J/cm2 with power density of 137 mW/cm2. Comparing algometry values of active laser group and the sham group, the pain tolerance in the deltoid muscle did not change among groups after laser irradiation, while it was also encountered a statistically significant difference in the pain threshold in tibia when comparing the laser active and sham laser (p<0.05). It was found that the active laser was effective in maintaining the pain threshold in tibia. The effective laser action in raising the pain threshold in tibia upon healthy individuals can suggest that the laser could be applied not only as curative but also with preventive purpose.

  4. Ceruletide increases dose dependently both jejunal motor activity and threshold and tolerance to experimentally induced pain in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Steinringer, H; Schmierer, G; Schneider, C; Winklehner, S; Mittelbach, G; De Paolis, C; Praga, C

    1984-01-01

    The effects of ceruletide on jejunal motility and experimentally induced pain were studied in 16 healthy men, who participated each in four experiments and received in random double blind fashion 5, 10, or 20 micrograms ceruletide intramuscularly or placebo. Jejunal pressures were recorded by three perfused catheters with orifices between 10 and 20 cm aboral of the ligament of Treitz. Ceruletide dose dependently diminished phase I and increased phase II type activity and tended to reduce the number, but not the duration, of activity fronts. The number and amplitude of contractions as well as the area under the curve increased significantly and dose dependently as did threshold and tolerance to electrically and threshold to thermally induced pain. Only mild sedative and other side effects occurred. PMID:6714795

  5. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the "fingers point" of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  6. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the “fingers point” of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  7. Are Indians and females less tolerant to pain? An observational study using a laboratory pain model.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, E; Zailinawati, A H; Lim, A W; Chan, J B; Yap, S H; Hla, Y Y; Kamil, M A; Teng, C L

    2009-06-01

    In Malaysia, it is a common belief among health care workers that females and Indians have lower pain threshold. This experience, although based on anecdotal experience in the healthcare setting, does not allow differentiation between pain tolerance, and pain expression. To determine whether there is a difference in the tolerance to pain between the three main ethnic groups, namely the Malays, Chinese and Indians as well as between males and females. This was a prospective study, using a laboratory pain model (ischaemic pain tolerance) to determine the pain tolerance of 152 IMU medical students. The mean age of the students was 21.8 years (range 18-29 years). All of them were unmarried. The median of ischaemic pain tolerance for Malays, Chinese and Indians were 639s, 695s and 613s respectively (p = 0.779). However, statistically significant difference in ischaemic pain tolerance for males and females Indian students were observed. Possible ethnic difference in pain tolerance in casual observation is not verified by this laboratory pain model. Difference in pain tolerance between genders is shown only for Indians. PMID:20058568

  8. Computer-Delivered Social Norm Message Increases Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pulvers, Kim; Schroeder, Jacquelyn; Limas, Eleuterio F.; Zhu, Shu-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Few experimental studies have been conducted on social determinants of pain tolerance. Purpose This study tests a brief, computer-delivered social norm message for increasing pain tolerance. Methods Healthy young adults (N=260; 44 % Caucasian; 27 % Hispanic) were randomly assigned into a 2 (social norm)×2 (challenge) cold pressor study, stratified by gender. They received standard instructions or standard instructions plus a message that contained artifically elevated information about typical performance of others. Results Those receiving a social norm message displayed significantly higher pain tolerance, F(1, 255)=26.95, p<.001, ηp2=.10 and pain threshold F(1, 244)=9.81, p=.002, ηp2=.04, but comparable pain intensity, p>.05. There were no interactions between condition and gender on any outcome variables, p>.05. Conclusions Social norms can significantly increase pain tolerance, even with a brief verbal message delivered by a video. PMID:24146086

  9. Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, R I M; Baron, Rebecca; Frangou, Anna; Pearce, Eiluned; van Leeuwen, Edwin J C; Stow, Julie; Partridge, Giselle; MacDonald, Ian; Barra, Vincent; van Vugt, Mark

    2012-03-22

    Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested this hypothesis in a series of six experimental studies in both the laboratory (watching videos) and naturalistic contexts (watching stage performances), using change in pain threshold as an assay for endorphin release. The results show that pain thresholds are significantly higher after laughter than in the control condition. This pain-tolerance effect is due to laughter itself and not simply due to a change in positive affect. We suggest that laughter, through an endorphin-mediated opiate effect, may play a crucial role in social bonding. PMID:21920973

  10. Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, R. I. M.; Baron, Rebecca; Frangou, Anna; Pearce, Eiluned; van Leeuwen, Edwin J. C.; Stow, Julie; Partridge, Giselle; MacDonald, Ian; Barra, Vincent; van Vugt, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested this hypothesis in a series of six experimental studies in both the laboratory (watching videos) and naturalistic contexts (watching stage performances), using change in pain threshold as an assay for endorphin release. The results show that pain thresholds are significantly higher after laughter than in the control condition. This pain-tolerance effect is due to laughter itself and not simply due to a change in positive affect. We suggest that laughter, through an endorphin-mediated opiate effect, may play a crucial role in social bonding. PMID:21920973

  11. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimulator. A third investigator injected intravenously saline or naloxone. The subjects and investigators 1 and 3 were blind to all treatment conditions. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the four groups. The AES groups exhibited a statistically significant 18% elevation of pain threshold, whereas the two placebo stimulation groups (PS and PN) remained essentially unchanged. The mean pain threshold increased to more than 23% for group AS, but fell to less than 12% for the subjects in group AN, who were given naloxone. These findings indicate a small but significant elevation of pain threshold by AES, an effect partially blocked by naloxone, suggesting an endogenous opioid system as one mechanism for AES analgesia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8185085

  12. Personality Correlates of Pain Perception and Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukin, Penny R.; Ray, A. Bartow

    1982-01-01

    Explored personality correlates of pain perception and tolerance in a nonmedical sample and setting. Results showed no significant correlations with personality measures and cold-pressor scores, but a significant relationship between pain tolerance and cognitive focus; those who focused on the experimental situation had much shorter tolerance…

  13. Quantum fault-tolerant thresholds for universal concatenated schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    Fault-tolerant quantum computation uses ancillary qubits in order to protect logical data qubits while allowing for the manipulation of the quantum information without severe losses in coherence. While different models for fault-tolerant quantum computation exist, determining the ancillary qubit overhead for competing schemes remains a challenging theoretical problem. In this work, we study the fault-tolerance threshold rates of different models for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. Namely, we provide different threshold rates for the 105-qubit concatenated coding scheme for universal computation without the need for state distillation. We study two error models: adversarial noise and depolarizing noise and provide lower bounds for the threshold in each of these error regimes. Establishing the threshold rates for the concatenated coding scheme will allow for a physical quantum resource comparison between our fault-tolerant universal quantum computation model and the traditional model using magic state distillation.

  14. The role of mood states underlying sex differences in the perception and tolerance of pain.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, John P; Lawler, Casey; Robinson, Richard; Morgan, Michael; Kenworthy-Heinige, Tawni

    2006-09-01

    While sex differences in pain reporting are frequently observed, the reasons underlying these differences remain unclear. The present study examined sex differences in self-report and physiological measures of pain threshold and tolerance following the administration of two laboratory pain-induction tasks. The primary study aim centered on determining whether repeated exposure to such tasks would yield sex differences in terms of pain threshold and tolerance. In addition, it was hypothesized that if such differences did exist, negative mood states might account for changes in pain ratings, threshold, and/or tolerance in subsequent exposure to noxious stimuli. Recruited from a convenience sample, 66 participants (44 female and 22 male) were exposed to both thermal and cold noxious stimuli at three separate times, while psychophysiological and self-report data were collected. Because women outnumbered men 2:1, Fisher z transformations were performed to determine whether the observed associations between mood states and pain ratings differed. We found stronger associations between fatigue and thermal-heat pain ratings for men at their first and third exposure to the pain task compared to women (z = 2.11, P < 0.05; z = 3.14, P < 0.001, respectively). Results indicated that women evidenced greater pain tolerance than men on both a behavioral and physiological level; however, they reported greater pain severity than men. Fatigue was also found to be particularly important to reports of pain severity in men and pain tolerance in response to noxious stimuli for women. Possible pathways in which mood states influenced these endpoints are discussed. PMID:17147596

  15. Pain threshold correlates with functional scores in osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuni, Benita; Wang, Haili; Rickert, Markus; Ewerbeck, Volker; Schiltenwolf, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Pain sensitization may be one of the reasons for persistent pain after technically successful joint replacement. We analyzed how pain sensitization, as measured by quantitative sensory testing, relates preoperatively to joint function in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) scheduled for joint replacement. Patients and methods We included 50 patients with knee OA and 49 with hip OA who were scheduled for joint replacement, and 15 control participants. Hip/knee scores, thermal and pressure detection, and pain thresholds were examined. Results Median pressure pain thresholds were lower in patients than in control subjects: 4.0 (range: 0–10) vs. 7.8 (4–10) (p = 0.003) for the affected knee; 4.5 (2–10) vs. 6.8 (4–10) (p = 0.03) for the affected hip. Lower pressure pain threshold values were found at the affected joint in 26 of the 50 patients with knee OA and in 17 of the 49 patients with hip OA. The American Knee Society score 1 and 2, the Oxford knee score, and functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the pressure pain thresholds in patients with knee OA. Also, Harris hip score and the functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the cold detection threshold in patients with hip OA. Interpretation Quantitative sensory testing appeared to identify patients with sensory changes indicative of mechanisms of central sensitization. These patients may require additional pain treatment in order to profit fully from surgery. There were correlations between the clinical scores and the level of sensitization. PMID:25323797

  16. Lack of effect of chronic dextromethorphan on experimental pain tolerance in methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy A; Ling, Walter; Torrington, Matt A

    2008-09-01

    Good evidence exists to suggest that individuals on opioid maintenance for the treatment of addiction (i.e. methadone) are less tolerant of experimental pain than are matched controls or ex-opioid addicts, a phenomenon theorized to reflect opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Agonist activity at the excitatory ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on dorsal horn neurons has been implicated in the development of both OIH and its putative expression at the clinical level-opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of the NMDA-receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan (DEX), to reverse or treat OIH in methadone-maintenance (MM) patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double-blind conditions, changes in pain threshold and tolerance [cold pressor (CP) and electrical stimulation (ES)] following a 5-week trial of DEX (titrated to 480 mg/day) in comparison with placebo was evaluated in a well-characterized sample of MM patients. The sample (n = 40) was 53% male and ethnically diverse (53% Latino, 28% African American, 10% White, 9% other), with a mean age of 48.0 years (SD = 6.97). Based on t-test analyses, no difference was found between groups on CP pain threshold, CP pain tolerance, ES pain threshold or ES pain tolerance, both pre- and postmedication. Notably, DEX-related changes significantly differed by gender, with women tending to show diminished tolerance for pain with DEX therapy. These results support that chronic high-dose NMDA antagonism does not improve tolerance for pain in MM patients, although a gender effect on DEX response is suggested. PMID:18507735

  17. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katerina V.-A.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  18. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katerina V-A; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  19. Imagined Pain Tolerance Test: An Instrument to Measure American Indians' Perception of Their Tolerance of Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Gary A.

    1981-01-01

    The Imagined Pain Tolerance Test, a paper and pencil test designed to test differences in perceptions between American Indians and non-Indians, appears to have utility as a research instrument. Available from: White Cloud Center, Gaines Hall UOHSC, 840 Southwest Gaines Road, Portland, OR 97201. (Author/CM)

  20. Modification of Electrical Pain Threshold by Voluntary Breathing-Controlled Electrical Stimulation (BreEStim) in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Berliner, Jeffrey C.; Melton, Danielle H.; Li, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain has a distinct sensory and affective (i.e., unpleasantness) component. BreEStim, during which electrical stimulation is delivered during voluntary breathing, has been shown to selectively reduce the affective component of post-amputation phantom pain. The objective was to examine whether BreEStim increases pain threshold such that subjects could have improved tolerance of sensation of painful stimuli. Methods Eleven pain-free healthy subjects (7 males, 4 females) participated in the study. All subjects received BreEStim (100 stimuli) and conventional electrical stimulation (EStim, 100 stimuli) to two acupuncture points (Neiguan and Weiguan) of the dominant hand in a random order. The two different treatments were provided at least three days apart. Painful, but tolerable electrical stimuli were delivered randomly during EStim, but were triggered by effortful inhalation during BreEStim. Measurements of tactile sensation threshold, electrical sensation and electrical pain thresholds, thermal (cold sensation, warm sensation, cold pain and heat pain) thresholds were recorded from the thenar eminence of both hands. These measurements were taken pre-intervention and 10−min post-intervention. Results There was no difference in the pre-intervention baseline measurement of all thresholds between BreEStim and EStim. The electrical pain threshold significantly increased after BreEStim (27.5±6.7% for the dominant hand and 28.5±10.8% for the non-dominant hand, respectively). The electrical pain threshold significantly decreased after EStim (9.1±2.8% for the dominant hand and 10.2±4.6% for the non–dominant hand, respectively) (F[1, 10] = 30.992, p = .00024). There was no statistically significant change in other thresholds after BreEStim and EStim. The intensity of electrical stimuli was progressively increased, but no difference was found between BreEStim and EStim. Conclusion Voluntary breathing controlled electrical stimulation selectively

  1. Lower threshold for adenosine-induced chest pain in patients with angina and normal coronary angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Bo; Sylvén, Christer; Waldenström, Anders

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To investigate whether patients with angina-like chest pain and normal coronary angiograms are more sensitive to adenosine as an inducer of chest pain. Design—Increasing doses of adenosine were given in a single blind study as intravenous bolus injections. Chest pain and the electrocardioǵraphic findings were noted. Patients—Eight patients with anginalike chest pain but no coronary stenoses (group A), nine patients with angina and coronary stenoses (group B), and 16 healthy volunteers (group C). Results—In the absence of ischaemic signs on the electrocardiogram adenosine provoked angina-like pain in all patients in groups A and B. The pain was located in the chest, and its quality and location were described as being no different from the patient's habitual angina. In group C, 14 of 16 subjects reported chest pain. The lowest dose resulting in chest pain was lower in group A (0·9 (0·6) mg) than in group B (3·1 (1·5) mg) (p < 0·005) and in group C (6·2 (3·7) mg) (p < 0·005). The maximum tolerable dose was lower in group A (4·7 (2·1) mg) than in group B (9·2 (3·8) mg) (p < 0·05) and in group C (12·0 (4·1) mg) (p < 0·005). Conclusions—Patients with anginalike chest pain and normal coronary angiograms have a low pain threshold and low tolerance to pain induced by adenosine. PMID:1389759

  2. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of "painful" stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called "pain matrix" regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation. PMID:27489536

  3. Effect of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Allsop, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Swearing produces a pain lessening (hypoalgesic) effect for many people; an emotional response may be the underlying mechanism. In this paper, the role of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance and pain perception is assessed. In a repeated-measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to play for 10 minutes a first-person shooter video game vs a golf video game. Sex differences were explored. After playing the first-person shooter video game, aggressive cognitions, aggressive affect, heart rate, and cold pressor latency were increased, and pain perception was decreased. These data indicate that people become more pain tolerant with raised state aggression and support our theory that raised pain tolerance from swearing occurs via an emotional response. PMID:23045874

  4. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of “painful” stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called “pain matrix” regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation. PMID:27489536

  5. Pain tolerance selectively increased by a sweet-smelling odor.

    PubMed

    Prescott, John; Wilkie, Jenell

    2007-04-01

    The mechanism underlying reported analgesic effects of odors in humans is unclear, although odor hedonics has been implicated. We tested whether odors that are sweet smelling through prior association with tasted sweetness might influence pain by activating the same analgesic mechanisms as sweet tastes. Inhalation of a sweet-smelling odor during a cold-pressor test increased tolerance for pain compared with inhalation of pleasant and unpleasant low-sweetness odors and no odor. There were no significant differences in pain ratings among the odor conditions. These results suggest that smelled sweetness can produce a naturally occurring conditioned increase in pain tolerance. PMID:17470253

  6. Rowers' high: behavioural synchrony is correlated with elevated pain thresholds.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Emma E A; Ejsmond-Frey, Robin; Knight, Nicola; Dunbar, R I M

    2010-02-23

    Physical exercise is known to stimulate the release of endorphins, creating a mild sense of euphoria that has rewarding properties. Using pain tolerance (a conventional non-invasive assay for endorphin release), we show that synchronized training in a college rowing crew creates a heightened endorphin surge compared with a similar training regime carried out alone. This heightened effect from synchronized activity may explain the sense of euphoria experienced during other social activities (such as laughter, music-making and dancing) that are involved in social bonding in humans and possibly other vertebrates. PMID:19755532

  7. High pain sensitivity is distinct from high susceptibility to non-painful sensory input at threshold level.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Springborn, Maria; Croy, Ilona; Kaiser, Jochen; Lötsch, Jörn

    2011-04-01

    Individuals may differ considerably in their sensitivity towards various painful stimuli supporting the notion of a person as stoical or complaining about pain. Molecular and functional imaging research provides support that this may extend also to other sensory qualities. Whether a person can be characterized as possessing a generally high or low sensory acuity is unknown. This was therefore assessed with thresholds to painful and non-painful stimuli, with a focus on chemical stimuli that besides pain may evoke clearly non-painful sensations such as taste or smell. In 36 healthy men and 78 women (ages 18 to 52 years), pain thresholds to chemo-somatosensory (intranasal gaseous CO(2)) and electrical stimuli (cutaneous stimulation) were significantly correlated (ρ(2)=0.2268, p<0.001). Two clusters separated persons with either high (n=72) or low (n=22) pain sensitivity. However, the correlation did not extend to non-painful stimuli of other sensory qualities, i.e., for the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol and gustatory thresholds for sour (citric acid) and salty (NaCl). Similarly, pain clusters showed no differences in thresholds to other stimuli. Moreover, no clustering was obtained for thresholds to both painful and non-painful stimuli together. Thus, individuals could not be characterized as highly sensitive (or insensitive) to all chemical stimuli no matter of evoking pain. This suggests that pain is primarily a singular sensory perception distinct from others such as olfaction or taste. PMID:21291919

  8. Fault-tolerant adaptive FIR filters using variable detection threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. K.; Redinbo, G. R.

    1994-10-01

    Adaptive filters are widely used in many digital signal processing applications, where tap weight of the filters are adjusted by stochastic gradient search methods. Block adaptive filtering techniques, such as block least mean square and block conjugate gradient algorithm, were developed to speed up the convergence as well as improve the tracking capability which are two important factors in designing real-time adaptive filter systems. Even though algorithm-based fault tolerance can be used as a low-cost high level fault-tolerant technique to protect the aforementioned systems from hardware failures with minimal hardware overhead, the issue of choosing a good detection threshold remains a challenging problem. First of all, the systems usually only have limited computational resources, i.e., concurrent error detection and correction is not feasible. Secondly, any prior knowledge of input data is very difficult to get in practical settings. We propose a checksum-based fault detection scheme using two-level variable detection thresholds that is dynamically dependent on the past syndromes. Simulations show that the proposed scheme reduces the possibility of false alarms and has a high degree of fault coverage in adaptive filter systems.

  9. [Effects of nitrogen oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate on pressure pain threshold in humans].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    1997-07-21

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on nociceptive thresholds in man. On two different study days twelve healthy subjects received a stair case infusion of GTN (0.015, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 micrograms/kg/min 20 min each dose) or placebo in a randomized double-blind cross-over design. Before the infusion and after 15 min of infusion on each dose, pressure pain detection- and tolerance thresholds were determined by pressure algometry in three different anatomic regions (finger, a temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue and a temporal region without interposed myofascial tissue). Relative to placebo the three higher GTN doses induced a decrease in both detection- and tolerance-thresholds in the temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue. No such changes were observed in the two other stimulated regions. These results could reflect central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO may provide a more likely explanation. PMID:9245041

  10. Discrepancy between stimulus response and tolerance of pain in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads U.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Ballegaard, Martin; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Høgh, Peter; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2015-01-01

    Background: Affective-motivational and sensory-discriminative aspects of pain were investigated in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy elderly controls using the cold pressor test tolerance and repetitive stimuli of warmth and heat stimuli, evaluating the stimulus-response function. Methods: A case-control design was applied examining 33 patients with mild to moderate AD dementia and 32 healthy controls with the cold pressor test (4°C). Warmth detection threshold (WDT) and heat pain threshold (HPT) were assessed using 5 stimulations. A stimulus-response function was estimated using 4 incrementally increasing suprathreshold heat stimuli. Results: Cold pressor tolerance was lower in patients with AD dementia than in controls (p = 0.027). There were no significant differences between groups regarding WDT and HPT. Significant successive increases in HPT assessments indicated habituation (p < 0.0001), which was similar in the 2 groups (p = 0.85). A mixed model for repeated measures demonstrated that pain rating of suprathreshold stimuli depended on HPT (p = 0.0004) and stimulus intensity (p < 0.0001). Patients with AD dementia had significantly lower increases in pain ratings than controls during suprathreshold stimulation (p = 0.0072). Conclusion: Our results indicate that AD dementia is not associated with a propensity toward development of sensitization or a lack of habituation, suggesting preservation of sensory-discriminative aspects of pain perception. The results further suggest that the attenuated cold pressor pain tolerance may relate to impairment of coping abilities. Paradoxically, we found an attenuated stimulus-response function, compared to controls, suggesting that AD dementia interferes with pain ratings over time, most likely due to memory impairment. PMID:25788560

  11. Corneal Mechanical Thresholds Negatively Associate With Dry Eye and Ocular Pain Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Spierer, Oriel; Felix, Elizabeth R.; McClellan, Allison L.; Parel, Jean Marie; Gonzalez, Alex; Feuer, William J.; Sarantopoulos, Constantine D.; Levitt, Roy C.; Ehrmann, Klaus; Galor, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations between corneal mechanical thresholds and metrics of dry eye. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of individuals seen in the Miami Veterans Affairs eye clinic. The evaluation consisted of questionnaires regarding dry eye symptoms and ocular pain, corneal mechanical detection and pain thresholds, and a comprehensive ocular surface examination. The main outcome measures were correlations between corneal thresholds and signs and symptoms of dry eye and ocular pain. Results A total of 129 subjects participated in the study (mean age 64 ± 10 years). Mechanical detection and pain thresholds on the cornea correlated with age (Spearman's ρ = 0.26, 0.23, respectively; both P < 0.05), implying decreased corneal sensitivity with age. Dry eye symptom severity scores and Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (modified for the eye) scores negatively correlated with corneal detection and pain thresholds (range, r = −0.13 to −0.27, P < 0.05 for values between −0.18 and −0.27), suggesting increased corneal sensitivity in those with more severe ocular complaints. Ocular signs, on the other hand, correlated poorly and nonsignificantly with mechanical detection and pain thresholds on the cornea. A multivariable linear regression model found that both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) score (β = 0.21, SE = 0.03) and corneal pain threshold (β = −0.03, SE = 0.01) were significantly associated with self-reported evoked eye pain (pain to wind, light, temperature) and explained approximately 32% of measurement variability (R = 0.57). Conclusions Mechanical detection and pain thresholds measured on the cornea are correlated with dry eye symptoms and ocular pain. This suggests hypersensitivity within the corneal somatosensory pathways in patients with greater dry eye and ocular pain complaints. PMID:26886896

  12. Pain and pressure pain thresholds in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Anette; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although pain is a significant symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pain is poorly understood in adolescents with CFS. The aim of this study was to explore pain distribution and prevalence, pain intensity and its functional interference in everyday life, as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in adolescents with CFS and compare this with a control group of healthy adolescents (HC). Methods This is a case–control, cross-sectional study on pain including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 HCs, aged 12–18 years. We measured pain frequency, pain severity and pain interference using self-reporting questionnaires. PPT was measured using pressure algometry. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of the Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial. Results Adolescents with CFS had significantly lower PPTs compared with HCs (p<0.001). The Pain Severity Score and the Pain Interference Score were significantly higher in adolescents with CFS compared with HCs (p<0.001). Almost all adolescents with CFS experienced headache, abdominal pain and/or pain in muscles and joints. Moreover, in all sites, the pain intensity levels were significantly higher than in HCs (p<0.001). Conclusions We found a higher prevalence of severe pain among adolescents with CFS and lowered pain thresholds compared with HCs. The mechanisms, however, are still obscure. Large longitudinal population surveys are warranted measuring pain thresholds prior to the onset of CFS. Trial registration number Clinical Trials, NCT01040429; The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25287104

  13. Pain neurophysiology education improves cognitions, pain thresholds, and movement performance in people with chronic whiplash: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Truijen, Steven; Craps, Julie; Van den Keybus, Nick; Paul, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Chronic whiplash is a debilitating condition characterized by increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, maladaptive illness beliefs, inappropriate attitudes, and movement dysfunctions. Previous work in people with chronic low back pain and chronic fatigue syndrome indicates that pain neurophysiology education is able to improve illness beliefs and attitudes as well as movement performance. This single-case study (A-B-C design) with six patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) was aimed at examining whether education about the neurophysiology of pain is accompanied by changes in symptoms, daily functioning, pain beliefs, and behavior. Periods A and C represented assessment periods, while period B consisted of the intervention (pain neurophysiology education). Results showed a significant decrease in kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), the passive coping strategy of resting (Pain Coping Inventory), self-rated disability (Neck Disability Index), and photophobia (WAD Symptom List). At the same time, significantly increased pain pressure thresholds and improved pain-free movement performance (visual analog scale on Neck Extension Test and Brachial Plexus Provocation Test) were established. Although the current results need to be verified in a randomized, controlled trial, they suggest that education about the physiology of pain is able to increase pain thresholds and improve pain behavior and pain-free movement performance in patients with chronic WAD. PMID:21328162

  14. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  15. Sensory detection and pain thresholds in spinal cord injury patients with and without dysesthetic pain, and in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M J; Song, Z K; Schandler, S L; Ho, W H; Vulpe, M

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms involved in dysesthetic pain syndrome (DPS) in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, four groups of 13 subjects each--SCI subjects with DPS, SCI subjects without pain, chronic low back pain subjects, and control subjects--were examined for sensory detection and pain thresholds at forearm, neck, and rostral trunk areas. Results indicated that the SCI pain group had significantly lower pain thresholds at all skin sites, compared to the SCI no-pain and chronic low back pain groups, and at the rostral trunk skin site, compared to the control group. The SCI pain group also showed a lower sensory detection threshold at the rostral trunk skin site than did the SCI no-pain group. Equally important, the SCI no-pain group had detection and pain thresholds significantly higher than those of the control group. The results suggest fundamental differences in somatosensory processing when DPS is or is not a consequence of SCI. PMID:8725646

  16. Tactile sensory and pain thresholds in the face and tongue of subjects asymptomatic for oro-facial pain and headache.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, I; Komiyama, O; Ayuse, T; De Laat, A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the tactile sensory and pain thresholds in the face, tongue, hand and finger of subjects asymptomatic for pain. Sixteen healthy volunteers (eight men and eight women, mean age 35·7 years, range 27-41) participated. Using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, the tactile detection threshold (TDT) and the filament-prick pain detection threshold (FPT) were measured at five sites: on the cheek skin (CS), tongue tip (TT), palm side of the thenar skin (TS), dorsum of the hand (DH) and the finger tip (FT). The difference between the tactile sensory and pain threshold (FPT-TDT) was also calculated. Both for the TDT and FPT, TT and DH had the lowest and highest values, respectively. As for the FPT-TDT, there were no significant differences among the measurement sites. As the difference between FPT and TDT (FPT-TDT) is known to be an important consideration in interpreting QST (quantitative sensory testing) data and can be altered by neuropathology, taking the FPT-TDT as a new parameter in addition to the TDT and FPT separately would be useful for case-control studies on oro-facial pain patients with trigeminal neuralgia, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome/glossodynia. PMID:25041286

  17. Reduced heat pain thresholds after sad-mood induction are associated with changes in thalamic activity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Koschke, Mandy; Leuf, Tanja; Schlösser, Ralf; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Negative affective states influence pain processing in healthy subjects in terms of augmented pain experience. Furthermore, our previous studies revealed that patients with major depressive disorder showed increased heat pain thresholds on the skin. Potential neurofunctional correlates of this finding were located within the fronto-thalamic network. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurofunctional underpinnings of the influence of sad mood upon heat pain processing in healthy subjects. For this purpose, we used a combination of the Velten Mood Induction procedure and a piece of music to induce sad affect. Initially we assessed heat pain threshold after successful induction of sad mood outside the MR scanner in Experiment 1. We found a highly significant reduction in heat pain threshold on the left hand and a trend for the right. In Experiment 2, we applied thermal pain stimuli on the left hand (37, 42, and 45 degrees C) in an MRI scanner. Subjects were scanned twice, one group before and after sad-mood induction and another group before and after neutral-mood induction, respectively. Our main finding was a significant group x mood-induction interaction bilaterally in the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus indicating a BOLD signal increase after sad-mood induction and a BOLD signal decrease in the control group. We present evidence that induced sad affect leads to reduced heat pain thresholds in healthy subjects. This is probably due to altered lateral thalamic activity, which is potentially associated with changed attentional processes. PMID:19027763

  18. Lubiprostone does not Influence Visceral Pain Thresholds in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, William E.; Palsson, Olafur S.; Gangarosa, Lisa; Turner, Marsha; Tucker, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical trials, lubiprostone reduced the severity of abdominal pain. Aims The primary aim was to determine whether lubiprostone raises the threshold for abdominal pain induced by intraluminal balloon distention. A secondary aim was to determine whether changes in pain sensitivity influence clinical pain independently of changes in transit time. Methods Sixty-two patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) participated in an 8-week crossover study. All subjects completed a 14-day baseline ending with a barostat test of pain and urge sensory thresholds. Half, randomly selected, then received 48 ug/day of lubiprostone for 14 days ending with a pain sensitivity test and a Sitzmark test of transit time. This was followed by a 14-day washout and then a crossover to 14 days of placebo with tests of pain sensitivity and transit time. The other half of the subjects received placebo before lubiprostone. All kept symptom diaries. Results Stools were significantly softer when taking lubiprostone compared to placebo (Bristol Stool scores 4.20 vs. 3.44, p<0.001). However, thresholds for pain (17.36 vs. 17.83 mmHg, lubiprostone vs. placebo) and urgency to defecate (14.14 vs. 14.53 mmHg) were not affected by lubiprostone. Transit time was not significantly different between lubiprostone and placebo (51.27 vs. 51.81 hours), and neither pain sensitivity nor transit time was a significant predictor of clinical pain. Conclusions Lubiprostone has no effect on visceral sensory thresholds. The reductions in clinical pain that occur while taking lubiprostone appear to be secondary to changes in stool consistency. PMID:21914041

  19. A Novel Quantitative Pain Assessment Instrument That Provides Means of Comparing Patient’s Pain Magnitude With a Measurement of Their Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lanny L.; Pittsley, Andrew; Becker, Ruth; Young, Allison De

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional pain assessment instruments are subjective in nature. They are limited to subjective reporting of the presence and magnitude of pain. There is no means of validating their response or assessing their pain tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine the potential value of a novel addition to the traditional physical examination concerning a patient’s pain and more importantly their pain tolerance. Methods Extensive preliminary data were collected on 359 consecutive private practice knee patients referable the subject’s pain, including the magnitude, the most pain ever experienced, and their opinion of personal pain tolerance. The novel evaluation included physical testing of a series of small ball drops through a vertical tube from various fixed levels on the index finger and patella. The patient’s response to this impact testing provided quantitative information, from which a comparison was made to their pain opinion and also to that of other patients with similar demographics. Results Nine percent of the patients rated their pain tolerance below the midpoint on the visual analog scale. Seventy-one percent thought they were above the midpoint on the scale in regards to pain tolerance. There were discrepancies in both directions between the subject’s opinion on pain tolerance and their rating of their pain experience to the ball drop testing. Twenty-eight percent of the entire patient group rated themselves above 5 on tolerance, but experienced above the average discomfort compared to other subjects reporting on the finger impact testing. Conclusions This report introduces a novel method for collecting data concerning pain that can be subjected to quantification. The database included quantitative measures providing the opportunity to confirm, validate or refute the patient’s assertions concerning pain magnitude and tolerance. This method is best described as a patient pain profile. It has the potential to give both the

  20. The Fine Tuning of Pain Thresholds: A Sophisticated Double Alarm System

    PubMed Central

    Plaghki, Léon; Decruynaere, Céline; Van Dooren, Paul; Le Bars, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Two distinctive features characterize the way in which sensations including pain, are evoked by heat: (1) a thermal stimulus is always progressive; (2) a painful stimulus activates two different types of nociceptors, connected to peripheral afferent fibers with medium and slow conduction velocities, namely Aδ- and C-fibers. In the light of a recent study in the rat, our objective was to develop an experimental paradigm in humans, based on the joint analysis of the stimulus and the response of the subject, to measure the thermal thresholds and latencies of pain elicited by Aδ- and C-fibers. For comparison, the same approach was applied to the sensation of warmth elicited by thermoreceptors. A CO2 laser beam raised the temperature of the skin filmed by an infrared camera. The subject stopped the beam when he/she perceived pain. The thermal images were analyzed to provide four variables: true thresholds and latencies of pain triggered by heat via Aδ- and C-fibers. The psychophysical threshold of pain triggered by Aδ-fibers was always higher (2.5–3°C) than that triggered by C-fibers. The initial skin temperature did not influence these thresholds. The mean conduction velocities of the corresponding fibers were 13 and 0.8 m/s, respectively. The triggering of pain either by C- or by Aδ-fibers was piloted by several factors including the low/high rate of stimulation, the low/high base temperature of the skin, the short/long peripheral nerve path and some pharmacological manipulations (e.g. Capsaicin). Warming a large skin area increased the pain thresholds. Considering the warmth detection gave a different picture: the threshold was strongly influenced by the initial skin temperature and the subjects detected an average variation of 2.7°C, whatever the initial temperature. This is the first time that thresholds and latencies for pain elicited by both Aδ- and C-fibers from a given body region have been measured in the same experimental run. Such an approach

  1. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  2. Factors influencing pricking pain threshold using a CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Voegelin, M R; Zoppi, M; Meucci, R; Jafrancesco, D; Bartoli, A

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the best experimental conditions in healthy subjects for the measurement of the minimal thermal energy density E1 which induced pricking pain on the volar surface of the left forearm by means of CO2 laser pulses. E1 was measured on a well-defined area, using laser pulses of different durations and constant power P. The dependence of E1 on the stimulus power P, the size A of the radiated area and the surface temperature T(e) were explored. In the first part of the study, these relations were obtained using a computer program, from the calculated spatio-temporal distribution of the skin temperature during, and following, a laser pulse which caused pricking pain. The second part studied a set of subsequent measurements carried out on a group of five healthy trained subjects and agreed only in part with the calculated data. We found that the measurement error on E(t) was less than 10% with P between 1.5 and 3 W, and A between 0.15 and 0.25 cm2, respectively. The influence of sensitization and adaptation phenomena on the measured data was also explored. We also show a rhythmic annual change of T(e) and E1. PMID:12636187

  3. Mental pain and suicide risk: application of the Greek version of the Mental Pain and the Tolerance of Mental Pain scale.

    PubMed

    Soumani, A; Damigos, D; Oulis, P; Masdrakis, V; Ploumpidis, D; Mavreas, V; Konstantakopoulos, G

    2011-01-01

    According to Shneidman's theory, mental pain or "psychache", which refers to an endopsychic painful experience consisted of excessively felt negative feelings, is a key component to the understanding of suicidal behaviour, as to its psychological features. Shneidman himself supported that 'suicide is caused by psychache', more precisely suicide occurs when a person can no longer tolerate this pain. Findings of previous studies have shown that mental pain is an independent predictive factor for suicidal behaviour. In the present study we evaluated the psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Mental Pain Scale (MPS) and the Tolerance for Mental Pain Scale (TMPS) ina non clinical sample consisted of 112 participants (73 female and 39 male). Moreover, we explore the relationships between mental pain, depression, and suicide risk and for the first time the effect of the tolerance for mental pain on depression and suicide risk. We hypothesized that both the level of mental pain and the degree of tolerance for mental pain would predict suicide risk, independently of the level of depression. Both MPS and TMPS appear to have satisfactory to high levels of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity. Suicide risk was correlated to mental pain, tolerance for mental pain, and depression. Multiple regression analysis showed that mental pain and tolerance for mental pain have a significant contribution to suicide risk, independently of depression, confirming our hypothesis.Using an additional multivariate regression with the factors extracted from MPS and TMPS as independent variables, we found that especially 'loss of control' of mental pain and the ability to 'contain the pain' contribute uniquely to suicide risk. Our findings offer support to the hypothesis that mental pain is a clinical entity distinct from depression with a specific and important contribution to the suicide risk.Depression alone is not enough to cause suicide. The

  4. The effect on mechanical pain threshold over human muscles by oral administration of granisetron and diclofenac-sodium.

    PubMed

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Kopp, Sigvard; Ernberg, Malin

    2005-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that plasma levels of serotonin (5-HT) and intramuscular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) participate in determining the mechanical pain threshold and tolerance level to pressure applied on the skin over healthy muscles. Other studies reported gender differences regarding responses to noxious stimuli. The present study aimed to determine whether the mechanical pain threshold of healthy muscles is influenced by oral administration of 5-HT3 or PGE2-inhibitors and if there are any gender differences in this respect. Ten healthy female subjects and 10 age-matched healthy male subjects participated in the study, which was randomized and double blind with crossover design. Granisetron (5-HT3-antagonist), diclofenac-sodium (PGE2-antagonist) and placebo were administered for 3 days. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded bilaterally with an algometer over certain orofacial, trunk, and limb muscles before and after administration of the antagonists. The PPT over all muscles combined increased after administration of granisetron. There was no change after administration of placebo. The difference between granisetron and placebo was significant for the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles. Diclofenac-sodium did not influence the PPT and there was no difference compared to placebo. Although the basal PPT values were lower in females, the PPT response to granisetron differed significantly between genders only in the tibialis anterior muscle. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that oral administration of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron increased the PPT over healthy trunk and limb muscles but not over orofacial muscles, and that the response in the limb muscles was greater in males. PMID:15661432

  5. The relationship between fibromyalgia and pressure pain threshold in patients with dyspareunia

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Hasan; Terzi, Rabia; Kale, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the number of tender points, pressure pain threshold and presence of fibromyalgia among women with or without dyspareunia. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study included 40 patients with dyspareunia and 30 healthy controls. The participants were asked if they had engaged in sexual intercourse during the previous four weeks, and dyspareunia was rated from 0 to 3 based on the Marinoff Dyspareunia Scale. A pressure algometer (dolorimeter) was used to measure the pressure pain threshold. Fibromyalgia was diagnosed based on the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria. The depression status of the participants was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found with regard to age, body mass index, habits (alcohol use and smoking), educational status and occupational status between the two groups. Total myalgic score, total control score and tender point mean pain threshold were significantly lower in the group with dyspareunia. The number of tender points was significantly higher in patients with dyspareunia. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 14.7±8.4 in the dyspareunia group compared with 11.2±7.1 in the control group. Five (12.5%) of the patients with dyspareunia were diagnosed with fibromyalgia, whereas no patients in the control group were diagnosed with fibromyalgia. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to the presence of fibromyalgia. CONCLUSION: The finding of lower pressure pain thresholds and a higher number of tender points among patients with dyspareunia suggests that these patients may have increased generalized pain thresholds. Additional studies involving a larger number of patients are required to investigate the presence of central mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dyspareunia. PMID:25996766

  6. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/−) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  7. The role of experiential avoidance in acute pain tolerance: a laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Feldner, Matthew T; Hekmat, Hamid; Zvolensky, Michael J; Vowles, Kevin E; Secrist, Zachary; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W

    2006-06-01

    The present investigation examined the role of experiential avoidance in terms of acute pain tolerance and subsequent recovery. Seventy nonclinical participants completed the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and underwent a well-established cold pressor task. Results indicated that individuals reporting higher levels of experiential avoidance had lower pain endurance and tolerance and recovered more slowly from this particular type of aversive event. Consistent with theoretical prediction, these findings suggest that experiential avoidance may play a role in tolerance of acute pain. PMID:15882839

  8. Lagged association between geomagnetic activity and diminished nocturnal pain thresholds in mice.

    PubMed

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2007-10-01

    A wide variety of behaviors in several species has been statistically associated with the natural variations in geomagnetism. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity are associated with pain thresholds, adult mice were exposed to a hotplate paradigm once weekly for 52 weeks during the dark cycle. Planetary A index values from the previous 6 days of a given hotplate session were correlated with the mean response latency for subjects to the thermal stimulus. We found that hotplate latency was significantly (P < 0.05) and inversely correlated (rho = -0.25) with the daily geomagnetic intensity 3 days prior to testing. Therefore, if the geomagnetic activity was greater 3 days before a given hotplate trial, subjects tended to exhibit shorter response latencies, suggesting lower pain thresholds or less analgesia. These results are supported by related experimental findings and suggest that natural variations in geomagnetic intensity may influence nociceptive behaviors in mice. PMID:17657732

  9. Silent disco: dancing in synchrony leads to elevated pain thresholds and social closeness

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Dunbar, Robin I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Moving in synchrony leads to cooperative behaviour and feelings of social closeness, and dance (involving synchronisation to others and music) may cause social bonding, possibly as a consequence of released endorphins. This study uses an experimental paradigm to determine which aspects of synchrony in dance are associated with changes in pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin release) and social bonding between strangers. Those who danced in synchrony experienced elevated pain thresholds, whereas those in the partial and asynchrony conditions experienced no analgesic effects. Similarly, those in the synchrony condition reported being more socially bonded, although they did not perform more cooperatively in an economic game. This experiment suggests that dance encourages social bonding amongst co-actors by stimulating the production of endorphins, but may not make people more altruistic. We conclude that dance may have been an important human behaviour evolved to encourage social closeness between strangers. PMID:27540276

  10. Overcoming pain thresholds with multilevel models—an example using quantitative sensory testing (QST) data

    PubMed Central

    Blankenburg, Markus R.; Süß, Moritz; Zernikow, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of somatosensory function is a cornerstone of research and clinical practice in neurology. Recent initiatives have developed novel protocols for quantitative sensory testing (QST). Application of these methods led to intriguing findings, such as the presence lower pain-thresholds in healthy children compared to healthy adolescents. In this article, we (re-) introduce the basic concepts of signal detection theory (SDT) as a method to investigate such differences in somatosensory function in detail. SDT describes participants’ responses according to two parameters, sensitivity and response-bias. Sensitivity refers to individuals’ ability to discriminate between painful and non-painful stimulations. Response-bias refers to individuals’ criterion for giving a “painful” response. We describe how multilevel models can be used to estimate these parameters and to overcome central critiques of these methods. To provide an example we apply these methods to data from the mechanical pain sensitivity test of the QST protocol. The results show that adolescents are more sensitive to mechanical pain and contradict the idea that younger children simply use more lenient criteria to report pain. Overall, we hope that the wider use of multilevel modeling to describe somatosensory functioning may advance neurology research and practice. PMID:26557435

  11. The pathophysiology of chronic pain--increased sensitivity to low threshold A beta-fibre inputs.

    PubMed

    Woolf, C J; Doubell, T P

    1994-08-01

    Chronic pain is characterized by abnormal sensitivity, which is due to the generation of pain in response to the activation of the low-threshold mechanoreceptive A beta fibres that normally generate innocuous sensations. Three different processes in the spinal cord can account for this dramatic alteration in sensory processing in the somatosensory system: increased excitability, decreased inhibition and structural reorganization. All have been shown to occur and each may contribute separately or together to the wide range of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain disorders. The unravelling of the cellular mechanisms involved both offers the potential for developing novel therapeutic strategies, which reduce functional synaptic plasticity and prevent central atrophic and regenerative responses in injured neurones, and illustrates the capacity of the adult nervous system for maladaptive modification. PMID:7812141

  12. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20-22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  13. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20–22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  14. Influence of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the threshold and pain intensity in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira; Silvestre, Ana Caroline; da Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Gomes, Mariany Ribeiro; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation frequencies in nociception front of a pressure pain threshold and cold in healthy individuals. Methods Twenty healthy subjects were divided into four groups, all of which have gone through all forms of electrical stimulation at different weeks. Assessments were pre and post-therapy, 20 and 60 minutes after stimulation. To evaluate the pressure pain threshold, an algometer was used with one tapered tip, pressing the hypothenar region until voluntary report the word “pain”. Cold pain intensity was assessed by immersion in water at 5°C for 30 seconds; at the end, the subject was asked to quantify the pain intensity on a Visual Analog Scale for Pain. For electrical stimulation, two electrodes were used near the elbow, for 20 minutes, with an intensity strong, but not painful. The frequency was in accordance with the group: 0Hz (placebo); 7Hz; 100Hz; and 255Hz. Results Both for the assessment of pressure pain threshold as the cold pain intensity, there was no significant difference (p>0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on dermatomes C6 to C8 produced no significant change in pressure pain threshold or cold discomfort. PMID:25295453

  15. Latitudinal variation in thermal tolerance thresholds of early life stages of corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, E. S.; Keith, S. A.; Byrne, M.; Schmidt-Roach, S.; Baird, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    Organisms living in habitats characterized by a marked seasonal temperature variation often have a greater thermal tolerance than those living in more stable habitats. To determine the extent to which this hypothesis applies to reef corals, we compared thermal tolerance of the early life stages of five scleractinian species from three locations spanning 17° of latitude along the east coast of Australia. Embryos were exposed to an 8 °C temperature range around the local ambient temperature at the time of spawning. Upper thermal thresholds, defined as the temperature treatment at which the proportion of abnormal embryos or median life span was significantly different to ambient controls, varied predictably among locations. At Lizard Island, the northern-most site with the least annual variation in temperature, the proportion of abnormal embryos increased and life span decreased 2 °C above ambient in the two species tested. At two southern sites, One Tree Island and Lord Howe Island, where annual temperature variation was greater, upper temperature thresholds were generally 4 °C or greater above ambient for both variables in the four species tested. The absolute upper thermal threshold temperature also varied among locations: 30 °C at Lizard Island; 28 °C at One Tree Island; 26 °C at Lord Howe Island. These results support previous work on adult corals demonstrating predictable differences in upper thermal thresholds with latitude. With projected ocean warming, these temperature thresholds will be exceeded in northern locations in the near future, adding to a growing body of evidence indicating that climate change is likely to be more detrimental to low latitude than high latitude corals.

  16. Effect of raised plasma β endorphin concentrations on peripheral pain and angina thresholds in patients with stable angina

    PubMed Central

    Jarmukli, N; Ahn, J; Iranmanesh, A; Russell, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether changes in plasma concentrations of β endorphins alter angina threshold and peripheral pain threshold in patients with stable angina.
DESIGN—Latin square design comparison of angina thresholds by exercise treadmill test and peripheral pain thresholds using a radiant heat source in eight patients with stable angina under control conditions, after stimulation of pituitary β endorphin release by ketoconazole, after suppression of pituitary β endorphin release by dexamethasone, and after blockade of opioid receptors by intravenous naloxone.
RESULTS—An approximately fivefold increase in circulating concentrations of β endorphins was found after administration of ketoconazole (mean (SEM): 13.9 (1.2) v 73.8 (6.2) pg/ml; p < 0.05), which was associated with an increase in peripheral pain threshold to a radiant heat source (time to onset of pain perception 72 (19) v 123 (40) seconds; p < 0.05), but no significant difference in angina threshold. A reduction in circulating concentrations of β endorphins after pretreatment with dexamethasone was statistically non-significant (13.9 (1.2) v 9.0 (1.5) pg/ml; NS) and was not associated with any change in either peripheral pain or angina thresholds. No effects were seen after blockade of opioid receptors by previous administration of intravenous naloxone.
CONCLUSIONS—Increased plasma concentrations of β endorphins alter peripheral pain threshold but not angina threshold in patients with stable angina pectoris.


Keywords: β endorphin; angina; pain PMID:10409537

  17. Evaluation of thermal, pain, and vibration sensation thresholds in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, D; Mayer, P; Gries, F A

    1988-01-01

    Small and large fibre function was studied in 40 non-ketotic, newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetic patients and 48 age-matched controls, using 12 quantitative tests for assessment of cutaneous sensation. Patients were aged 10-39 years and had been treated with insulin for 4-31 days. Thermal discrimination (foot), warm and cold thermal perception (thenar eminence and foot), and heat and cold pain perception thresholds (thenar eminence) were significantly elevated in the patients as compared with the controls (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001). No significant differences in thermal discrimination (thenar), heat and cold pain perception (foot), and metacarpal as well as malleolar vibration perception thresholds were noted between the groups. The rates of abnormalities among the individual tests ranged from 0% to 27.5%, being lowest for vibration perception and highest for thermal perception thresholds after cold stimuli. The results in nine of 12 tests correlated significantly with age, but only two were related to HbA1c. Thus, sensory neural functions transmitted by small fibres, but not those transmitted by large fibres, were impaired in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetics after the correction of initial ketosis and hyperglycaemia. Cooling perception tests were most sensitive in detecting abnormality. An age-related involvement of different small fibre functions was present in these patients. PMID:3236020

  18. [Influence of simulated microgravity on the threshold of pain sensitivity in humans with single dose of ketorolac].

    PubMed

    Baranov, M V; Kovalev, A S; Perfilov, D F; Chernogorov, R V; Repenkova, L G

    2015-01-01

    The data supporting the influence of simulated microgravity effects on pain sensitivity were obtained in the series of experiments involving human. In conditions of antiorthostatic hypokinesia (ANOH) and immersion revealed no reduction in pain sensitivity in the morning, which is typical for normal conditions. Ketorolac has no effect on pain sensitivity, when determining the pain threshold (PT) by method of thermoalgometry. However, the conditions of simulated microgravity substantially alter the pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, increasing the rate of absorption of the drug and reduce its relative bioavailability and retention time in the blood plasma. This may require changes in pain therapy schemes in space flight. PMID:26571803

  19. Fake feedback on pain tolerance impacts proactive versus reactive control strategies.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Davide; Braem, Senne; Pourtois, Gilles; Brass, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that beliefs about one's own ability to execute a task influence task performance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that beliefs about a specific self-control capacity, namely pain tolerance, modulate basic cognitive control processes. Participants received fake comparative social feedback that their ability to tolerate painful stimulations was either very poor or outstanding after which they performed an unrelated go/no-go task. Participants receiving low-tolerance feedback, relative to high-tolerance feedback, were less successful at inhibiting their responses and more influenced by previous trial conditions, as indicated by an increased slowdown following errors and more failed inhibitions following go-trials. These observations demonstrate a shift from a more proactive to a more reactive control mode. This study shows that providing feedback about one's own capacity to control impulsive reactions to painful stimulations directly influences low-level cognitive control dynamics. PMID:27149180

  20. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Melton, Danielle H; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP) after traumatic limb amputation. Methods Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were enrolled. Ten patients had chronic PLP, while the other seven patients had no PLP. Tactile-sensation threshold, cold- and warm-sensation thresholds, cold- and heat-pain thresholds, electrical-sensation threshold (EST), and electrical-pain threshold on the distal residual limb and the symmetrical site on the sound limb were measured in all tested patients. Their thresholds were compared within the PLP and non-PLP group, and between the groups. Results The novel findings included: 1) electrical-pain threshold was only decreased in the sound limb in the PLP group and there was no difference between two limbs in the non-PLP group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with PLP; and 2) EST was increased on the affected limb as compared to the sound limb within the PLP group, but there were no significant differences in EST between the PLP and non-PLP group. There were in general no significant differences in other tested thresholds within the groups and between groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate central sensitization in the patients with PLP after traumatic limb amputation. PMID:25945065

  1. Winter cold-tolerance thresholds in field-grown Miscanthus hybrid rhizomes

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Murilo de Melo; Friesen, Patrick Calvin; Sage, Rowan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cold tolerance of winter-dormant rhizomes was evaluated in diploid, allotriploid, and allotetraploid hybrids of Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus grown in a field setting. Two artificial freezing protocols were tested: one lowered the temperature continuously by 1°C h–1 to the treatment temperature and another lowered the temperature in stages of 24h each to the treatment temperature. Electrolyte leakage and rhizome sprouting assays after the cold treatment assessed plant and tissue viability. Results from the continuous-cooling trial showed that Miscanthus rhizomes from all genotypes tolerated temperatures as low as –6.5 °C; however, the slower, staged-cooling procedure enabled rhizomes from two diploid lines to survive temperatures as low as –14 °C. Allopolyploid genotypes showed no change in the lethal temperature threshold between the continuous and staged-cooling procedure, indicating that they have little ability to acclimate to subzero temperatures. The results demonstrated that rhizomes from diploid Miscanthus lines have superior cold tolerance that could be exploited to improve performance in more productive polyploid lines. With expected levels of soil insulation, low winter air temperatures should not harm rhizomes of tolerant diploid genotypes of Miscanthus in temperate to sub-boreal climates (up to 60°N); however, the observed winter cold in sub-boreal climates could harm rhizomes of existing polyploid varieties of Miscanthus and thus reduce stand performance. PMID:25788733

  2. The growth threshold conjecture: a theoretical framework for understanding T-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Clemente F.; Herrero, Miguel A.; Cuesta, José A.; Acosta, Francisco J.; Fernández-Arias, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses depend on the capacity of T cells to target specific antigens. As similar antigens can be expressed by pathogens and host cells, the question naturally arises of how can T cells discriminate friends from foes. In this work, we suggest that T cells tolerate cells whose proliferation rates remain below a permitted threshold. Our proposal relies on well-established facts about T-cell dynamics during acute infections: T-cell populations are elastic (they expand and contract) and they display inertia (contraction is delayed relative to antigen removal). By modelling inertia and elasticity, we show that tolerance to slow-growing populations can emerge as a population-scale feature of T cells. This result suggests a theoretical framework to understand immune tolerance that goes beyond the self versus non-self dichotomy. It also accounts for currently unexplained observations, such as the paradoxical tolerance to slow-growing pathogens or the presence of self-reactive T cells in the organism. PMID:26587263

  3. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  4. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  5. Extraversion and pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G E

    1975-09-01

    According to Eysenck's (1957, 1960, 1967) theory of personality, extroverts are posited as having higher pain thresholds and greater pain tolerance than introverts. The evidence for these hypothesized relationships is reviewed. Findings appear inconclusive in both cases. Probability pooling (Mosteller & Bush, 1954) is therefore performed, grouping the comparable studies and carrying out overall tests of significance. Results support the hypothesized relationships between extraversion and pain threshold and between extraversion and pain tolerance. Possible reasons why certain studies failed to find these results are discussed. PMID:1182410

  6. Pressure pain thresholds fluctuate with - but do not usefully predict - the clinical course of painful temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Sanders, Anne E.; Ohrbach, Richard; Fillingim, Roger B.; Dubner, Ron; Gracely, Richard H.; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Greenspan, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    Central sensitization elicits pain hypersensitivity and is thought to be causally implicated in painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). This causal inference is based on cross-sectional evidence that people with TMD have greater sensitivity than controls to noxious stimuli. We tested this inference in the OPPERA prospective cohort study of 3,258 adults with no lifetime history of TMD when enrolled (Visit 1). During five years of follow-up, one group labelled “persistent TMD cases” (n=72) developed first-onset TMD by Visit 2 that persisted ≥6 months until Visit 3. Another group labelled “transient TMD cases” (n=75) developed first-onset TMD at Visit 2 which resolved by Visit 3. Randomly sampled “controls” (n=126) remained TMD-free throughout all three visits. At each visit, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured by algometry at 10 cranial and bodily sites. In persistent TMD cases, mean PPTs reduced 43 kPa (P<0.0001) between Visits 1 and 2 and thereafter did not change significantly. In transient TMD cases, mean PPTs reduced 41 kPa (P<0.001) between Visits 1 and 2, and then increased 20 kPa (P<0.001) by Visit 3. These patterns were similar after excluding cranial sites symptomatic for TMD. Importantly, Visit 1 PPTs had no clinically useful prognostic value in predicting first-onset TMD (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, P=0.15). Among first-onset cases, Visit 2 PPTs were modest predictors of persistent TMD (OR=1=.36, P=0.002). In this longitudinal study, PPTs reduced when TMD developed then rebounded when TMD resolved. However, pre-morbid PPTs poorly predicted TMD incidence, countering the hypothesis that they signify mechanisms causing first-onset TMD. PMID:25130428

  7. PECAM-1-regulated signalling thresholds control tolerance in anergic transgenic B-cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mae-Xhum; Hayball, John D; Jackson, Denise E

    2008-03-01

    Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is an immunoglobulin (Ig)-immunoreceptor tyrosine based inhibitory motif (Ig-ITIM) superfamily member that recruits and activates protein-tyrosine phosphatases, predominantly SHP-2 and to a lesser extent, SHP-1. Previously, we have shown that deletion of PECAM-1 results in a hyper-proliferative B-cell phenotype. We wanted to test whether the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, PECAM-1 maintains peripheral tolerance by regulating signalling thresholds of B-cells that control autoantibody production or relaxed negative selection of autoreactive B-cells in bone marrow. In order to address this issue, we utilised the classical model of lysozyme/immunoglobulin transgenic mouse model that defines thresholds for eliminating or inactivating self-reactive B-cells. In this study, we show that breeding of double transgenes: soluble hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and its corresponding high-affinity receptor (HEL-Ig) onto PECAM-1 null background resulted in a spontaneous loss of B-cell tolerance in vivo. The resultant PECAM-1(-/-) Dbl Tg mice displayed elevated levels of anti-HEL immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in the serum compared to PECAM-1+/+ anergic counterparts. Dbl Tg B-cells lacking PECAM-1 showed enhanced B-cell proliferation and calcium flux responses to LPS, IL-4 alone, IgM cross-linking and IL-4 indicating augmentation of antigen-receptor signalling. Thus, PECAM-1 is important in maintaining peripheral tolerance in Dbl Tg B-cells. PMID:17977600

  8. The effects of distraction on exercise and cold pressor tolerance for chronic low back pain sufferers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M H; Petrie, S M

    1997-01-01

    Distraction has been found to be effective for the attenuation of experimental and acute clinical pain but its efficacy for chronic pain management remains unclear. There are even some suggestions that distraction may be a counterproductive strategy for chronic pain sufferers. In this study we found that a word shadowing distraction task increased the ability of a group of 12 female and eight male chronic low back pain (CLBP) sufferers to carry out a brief (maximum 300 s) step-up exercise that temporarily increased their pain (P < 0.05). This 15% increase in exercise time was not accompanied by an increase in reported pain after the exercise. Interestingly, the same distraction task did not increase the cold pressor (CP) tolerance time for the CLBP group but produced a 26% increase in tolerance time for a pain-free control group consisting of nine females and nine males (P < 0.05). Also, performance on the distraction task during the CP was worse for the CLBP group than the controls (P < 0.05). Although these findings should be interpreted cautiously because of the parameters of the experiment, they do suggest that distraction is a potentially useful technique to assist chronic pain sufferers. PMID:9060011

  9. Metformin increases pressure pain threshold in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiałka, Marta; Milewicz, Tomasz; Sztefko, Krystyna; Rogatko, Iwona; Majewska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the strong preclinical rationale, there are only very few data considering the utility of metformin as a potential pain therapeutic in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the association between metformin therapy and pressure pain threshold (PPT) in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We hypothesized that metformin therapy in lean PCOS women increases PPT. Materials and methods Twenty-seven lean PCOS women with free androgen index phenotype >5 and 18 lean healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Fifteen of the PCOS women were randomly assigned to be treated with metformin 1,500 mg daily for 6 months. PPT and plasma β-endorphin levels were measured in all women at the beginning of the study and after 6 months of observation. Results We observed an increase in PPT values measured on deltoid and trapezius muscle in the PCOS with metformin group after 6 months of metformin administration (4.81±0.88 kg/cm2, P<0.001 on deltoid muscle, and 5.71±1.16 kg/cm2 on trapezius muscle). We did not observe any significant changes in PPT values in the PCOS without treatment group and in controls. We did not observe any significant changes in serum β-endorphin levels in any studied groups during the 6-month observation. Conclusion We conclude that metformin therapy increases PPT in lean PCOS women, without affecting plasma β-endorphin concentration. Our results may suggest the potential role of metformin in pain therapy. We propose that larger, randomized studies on metformin impact on pain perception should be performed. PMID:27536069

  10. The body fades away: investigating the effects of transparency of an embodied virtual body on pain threshold and body ownership

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Matteo; Kilteni, Konstantina; Maselli, Antonella; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of “ownership” over an external dummy/virtual body (or body part) has been proven to have both physiological and behavioural consequences. For instance, the vision of an “embodied” dummy or virtual body can modulate pain perception. However, the impact of partial or total invisibility of the body on physiology and behaviour has been hardly explored since it presents obvious difficulties in the real world. In this study we explored how body transparency affects both body ownership and pain threshold. By means of virtual reality, we presented healthy participants with a virtual co-located body with four different levels of transparency, while participants were tested for pain threshold by increasing ramps of heat stimulation. We found that the strength of the body ownership illusion decreases when the body gets more transparent. Nevertheless, in the conditions where the body was semi-transparent, higher levels of ownership over a see-through body resulted in an increased pain sensitivity. Virtual body ownership can be used for the development of pain management interventions. However, we demonstrate that providing invisibility of the body does not increase pain threshold. Therefore, body transparency is not a good strategy to decrease pain in clinical contexts, yet this remains to be tested. PMID:26415748

  11. The body fades away: investigating the effects of transparency of an embodied virtual body on pain threshold and body ownership.

    PubMed

    Martini, Matteo; Kilteni, Konstantina; Maselli, Antonella; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of "ownership" over an external dummy/virtual body (or body part) has been proven to have both physiological and behavioural consequences. For instance, the vision of an "embodied" dummy or virtual body can modulate pain perception. However, the impact of partial or total invisibility of the body on physiology and behaviour has been hardly explored since it presents obvious difficulties in the real world. In this study we explored how body transparency affects both body ownership and pain threshold. By means of virtual reality, we presented healthy participants with a virtual co-located body with four different levels of transparency, while participants were tested for pain threshold by increasing ramps of heat stimulation. We found that the strength of the body ownership illusion decreases when the body gets more transparent. Nevertheless, in the conditions where the body was semi-transparent, higher levels of ownership over a see-through body resulted in an increased pain sensitivity. Virtual body ownership can be used for the development of pain management interventions. However, we demonstrate that providing invisibility of the body does not increase pain threshold. Therefore, body transparency is not a good strategy to decrease pain in clinical contexts, yet this remains to be tested. PMID:26415748

  12. Superconducting quantum circuits at the surface code threshold for fault tolerance.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Veitia, A; Sank, D; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Mutus, J; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Neill, C; O'Malley, P; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Korotkov, A N; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2014-04-24

    A quantum computer can solve hard problems, such as prime factoring, database searching and quantum simulation, at the cost of needing to protect fragile quantum states from error. Quantum error correction provides this protection by distributing a logical state among many physical quantum bits (qubits) by means of quantum entanglement. Superconductivity is a useful phenomenon in this regard, because it allows the construction of large quantum circuits and is compatible with microfabrication. For superconducting qubits, the surface code approach to quantum computing is a natural choice for error correction, because it uses only nearest-neighbour coupling and rapidly cycled entangling gates. The gate fidelity requirements are modest: the per-step fidelity threshold is only about 99 per cent. Here we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in a superconducting multi-qubit processor, achieving an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92 per cent and a two-qubit gate fidelity of up to 99.4 per cent. This places Josephson quantum computing at the fault-tolerance threshold for surface code error correction. Our quantum processor is a first step towards the surface code, using five qubits arranged in a linear array with nearest-neighbour coupling. As a further demonstration, we construct a five-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using the complete circuit and full set of gates. The results demonstrate that Josephson quantum computing is a high-fidelity technology, with a clear path to scaling up to large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum circuits. PMID:24759412

  13. Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Katie E.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in snow cover due to climate change could alter the energetics and physiology of ectothermic animals that overwinter beneath snow, yet how snow cover interacts with physiological thresholds is unknown. We applied numerical simulation of overwintering metabolic rates coupled with field validation to determine the importance of snow cover and freezing to the overwintering lipid consumption of the freeze-tolerant Arctiid caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella. Caterpillars that overwintered above the snow experienced mean temperatures 1.3°C lower than those below snow and consumed 18.36 mg less lipid of a total 68.97-mg reserve. Simulations showed that linear temperature effects on metabolic rate accounted for only 30% of the difference in lipid consumption. When metabolic suppression by freezing was included, 93% of the difference between animals that overwintered above and below snow was explained. Our results were robust to differences in temperature sensitivity of metabolic rate, changes in freezing point, and the magnitude of metabolic suppression by freezing. The majority of the energy savings was caused by the non-continuous reduction in metabolic rate due to freezing, the first example of the importance of temperature thresholds in the lipid use of overwintering insects.

  14. Phase and Sex Effects in Pain Perception: A Critical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goolkasian, Paula

    1985-01-01

    Reviews the literature in pain perception to clarify the influence of sex and menstrual phase on the phenomenon of pain. The appropriateness of the measures of pain threshold, pain tolerance, discrimination accuracy, and of response bias to the study of pain are discussed. (Author)

  15. The Impact of Demand Characteristics on Brief Acceptance- and Control-Based Interventions for Pain Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Bryan; Forsyth, John P.; Maher, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The present analog study compared the effectiveness of an acceptance- and control-based intervention on pain tolerance using a cold pressor task, and is a partial replication and extension of the Hayes, Bissett et al. (Hayes, S. C., Bissett, R.T., Korn, Z., Zettle, R. D., Rosenfarb, I. S., Cooper, L. D., & Grundt, A. M. (1999). "The impact of…

  16. Pressure Pain Thresholds Increase after Preconditioning 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Tonya M.; Witney, Alice G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Objective Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. Method 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Results Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001) with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01). In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05), with no significant effect on pressure pain. Conclusion This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia. PMID:24658333

  17. Evaluation of sensitivity, motor and pain thresholds across the menstrual cycle through medium-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Barbosa, Mariana; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Nunes, Fabiana Roberta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify variations in nervous thresholds in different phases of the menstrual cycle in eumenorrheic women and users of oral contraceptives. METHOD: An observational study was performed including 56 volunteers, consisting of 30 eumenorrheic women who were non-users of oral contraceptives and 26 users of oral contraceptives. An electrical stimulator was employed to assess their nervous thresholds, with pulses applied at a fixed frequency of 2,500 Hz, modulated at 50 Hz, with phase variances of 20 μs, 50 μs and 100 μs. Sensitivity, motor and pain thresholds were evaluated during five menstrual cycle phases: phase 1 - menstrual, phase 2 - follicular, phase 3 - ovulatory, phase 4 - luteal and phase 5 - premenstrual. RESULTS: The results indicated low sensitivity thresholds of 100 μs for non-users of oral contraceptives and 50 μs for oral contraceptive users in phase 5. Low motor thresholds of 20 μs, 50 μs and 100 μs were observed for non-users of oral contraceptives in phase 5, while that of oral contraceptive users was 100 μs. Finally, a low pain threshold of 100 μs was observed in phase 5, but only in the oral contraceptive group. CONCLUSION: Nervous thresholds vary systematically across the phases of the menstrual cycle, with or without the use of oral contraceptives. These variations should be taken into account during research performed in women. PMID:23917651

  18. Codeine increases pain thresholds to copper vapor laser stimuli in extensive but not poor metabolizers of sparteine.

    PubMed

    Sindrup, S H; Brøsen, K; Bjerring, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Larsen, U; Angelo, H R; Gram, L F

    1990-12-01

    The analgesic efficacy and kinetics of a single oral dose of 75 mg codeine was investigated in 12 extensive metabolizers and 12 poor metabolizers of sparteine in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. The cosegregation of the O-demethylation of codeine to morphine with the sparteine oxidation polymorphism was confirmed. Hence morphine could not be detected in the plasma of any of the poor metabolizers, whereas detectable morphine plasma levels were found in 10 of 12 extensive metabolizers. Pain thresholds to laser stimuli were determined before drug intake and 90, 150, and 210 minutes after drug intake. Codeine significantly increased the pricking pain thresholds in the extensive metabolizers (p less than 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in the poor metabolizers. No change in pain thresholds occurred with placebo in any of the two phenotypes. In the extensive metabolizers there was a significant positive correlation between the increase in pain threshold and plasma concentration of codeine. The study supports the hypothesis that morphine formation is essential for achievement of analgesia during codeine treatment. PMID:2249379

  19. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  20. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P < 0.05) and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P < 0.05). No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa); pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P < 0.01). Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  1. Altered pressure pain thresholds and increased wind-up in adult patients with chronic back pain with a history of childhood maltreatment: a quantitative sensory testing study.

    PubMed

    Tesarz, Jonas; Eich, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Gerhardt, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with an increased risk of nonspecific chronic low back pain (nsCLBP). However, the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Therefore, this study considered whether distinct types of CM are accompanied by specific alterations in somatosensory function. A total of 176 subjects with nsCLBP and 27 pain-free controls (PCs) were included. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to categorize patients into 2 groups (abused/neglected vs nonabused/nonneglected) for 5 types of CM (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect). The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was performed to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory function, including detection and pain thresholds, pain sensitivity, and assessments of temporal summation (wind-up). Between 17.7% and 51.4% of subjects with nsCLBP reported CM, depending on the type of CM. Childhood Trauma Questionnaire subscores for emotional and sexual abuse were significantly higher in subjects with nsCLBP than in PCs. Compared with PCs, subjects with CM showed reduced pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), irrespective of the type of CM. Regarding distinct types of CM, subjects with nsCLBP with emotional abuse reported significantly higher wind-up than those without, and sexual abuse was accompanied by enhanced touch sensitivity. Our findings suggest that CM is nonspecifically associated with a decreased PPT in nsCLBP. Emotional abuse apparently leads to enhanced spinal pain summation, and sexual abuse leads to enhanced touch sensitivity. These results emphasize the importance of emotional abuse in nsCLBP and suggest that CM can induce long-term changes in adult somatosensory function. PMID:27075429

  2. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael Philip

    2006-04-01

    Sativex is one of the first cannabis-based medicines to undergo conventional clinical development and to be approved as a prescription medicine. It is an oromucosal spray that allows flexible, individualised dosing. Patients self titrate their overall dose and pattern of dosing according to their response to and tolerance of the medicine. This usually results in the administration of approximately 8-12 sprays/day. Each spray delivers tetrahydrocannabinol 2.7 mg and cannabidiol 2.5 mg, giving an approximate average dose of tetrahydrocannabinol 22-32 mg/day and cannabidiol 20-30 mg/day. Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms. Sativex has been approved for use in neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis in Canada. If ongoing studies replicate the results already observed, further approvals for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and for neuropathic pain are likely. PMID:16553576

  3. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fentanyl pectin nasal spray in patients with breakthrough cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A; Lorenzl, Stefan; Lux, Eberhard A; Voltz, Raymond; Perelman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assessment of analgesic effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of fentanyl pectin nasal spray (FPNS) in the treatment of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP) in routine clinical practice. Methods A prospective, open-label, noninterventional study (4-week observation period, 3 month follow-up) of opioid-tolerant adults with BTcP in 41 pain and palliative care centers in Germany. Standardized BTcP questionnaires and patient diaries were used. Evaluation was made of patient-reported outcomes with respect to “time to first effect”, “time to maximum effect”, BTcP relief, as well as changes in BTcP-related impairment of daily life activities, quality-of-life restrictions, and health care resource utilization. Results A total of 235 patients were recruited of whom 220 completed all questionnaires and reported on 1,569 BTcP episodes. Patients reported a significant reduction of maximum BTcP intensity (11-stage numerical rating scale [0= no pain, 10= worst pain conceivable]) with FPNS (mean ± standard deviation = 2.8±2.3) compared with either that reported at baseline (8.5±1.5), experienced immediately before FPNS application (7.4±1.7), or that achieved with previous BTcP medication (6.0±2.0; P<0.001 for each comparison). In 12.3% of BTcP episodes, onset of pain relief occurred ≤2 minutes and in 48.4% ≤5 minutes; maximum effects were reported within 10 minutes for 37.9% and within 15 minutes for 79.4%. By the end of the study, there had been significant improvements versus baseline in BTcP-related daily life activities (28.3±16.9 vs 53.1±11.9), physical (35.9±8.4 vs 26.8±6.5), and mental quality of life (38.7±8.5 vs 29.9±7.9) (P<0.001 for each comparison vs baseline); in addition, health care resource utilization requirements directly related to BTcP were reduced by 67.5%. FPNS was well tolerated; seven patients (3.2%) experienced eight treatment-emergent adverse events of which none was serious. There were no indicators of misuse or abuse

  4. Associations between Pressure-Pain Threshold, Symptoms, and Radiographic Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Adam P.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Gracely, Richard H.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between generalized evoked pressure pain sensitivity with distal pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and the presence, severity, or number of involved knee/hip joints with radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) or related symptoms. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses come from the second follow-up (2008–11) of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n=1,602). Pressure-pain threshold measurements were averaged over two trials from both the left and right trapezius. Outcomes of radiographic knee and hip OA were both defined by a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2–4 and site-specific symptoms were ascertained at clinical interview. Associations were determine with multiple logistic regression models, and two-way interactions were tested at p<0.05. Results The sample was 67.2% female and 31.0% African American. Participants’ mean age was 67.9 (SD 9.0); mean body mass index was 31.5 (SD 7.1); mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score was 6.5 (SD 7.4); and mean total PPT was 3.6kg (SD 0.7). Significant associations were found between PPT and self-reported knee/hip symptoms. No significant associations were found between PPT and presence, severity, or number of joints with knee and hip rOA without accompanying symptoms. No significant interactions were found with demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion Pressure-pain threshold was significantly associated with self-reported single and multi-joint symptoms. In contrast, after adjustment, PPT measured at the trapezius was not associated with asymptomatic knee or hip rOA. As such, PPT may prove to be a useful indicator of rOA pain processing and of why individuals respond favorably and others do not to treatments targeting rOA. PMID:24643946

  5. An indentation apparatus for evaluating discomfort and pain thresholds in conjunction with mechanical properties of foot tissue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuping; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S; Witana, Channa P; Rodrigo, W D Asanka S

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of human foot tissue in vivo as well as discomfort and pain thresholds are important for various applications. In this study, an apparatus for measuring the discomfort and pain thresholds and the mechanical properties of human tissues is presented. The apparatus employs a stepper motor that controls the indentation speed, as well as a load cell and potentiometer that determine the corresponding reaction force and tissue deformation (displacement), respectively. A LabVIEW program (LabVIEW 8, National Instruments Corporation; Austin, Texas) was developed to control the indentation via a data acquisition card. The apparatus can accommodate indentor displacements up to 35 mm and can impart forces up to 150 N at a controlled indentation speed in the range of 0 to 10 mm/s. Tests showed that the displacement measurement error is <0.17 mm in the nominal range (0.5% in the full scale) and the measurement error of force is <1.6 N in the nominal range (1.1% in the full scale). Experimental results indicate that the apparatus is reliable and flexible for measuring the mechanical properties of foot tissue in vivo in conjunction with pain and discomfort thresholds. PMID:21110259

  6. Site-specific visual feedback reduces pain perception.

    PubMed

    Diers, Martin; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Trojan, Jörg; Drevensek, Annika Mira; Erhardt-Raum, Gertrud; Flor, Herta

    2013-06-01

    One of the most common forms of chronic pain is back pain. Until now, nothing has been known about the influence of visualizing one's own back on pain perception at this site. We tested 18 patients with chronic back pain and 18 healthy controls, by implementing online video feedback of the back during painful pressure and subcutaneous electrical stimuli over the trapezius muscle. Pain threshold and pain tolerance were assessed. Pressure pain stimulation intensity was set to 50% above the pain threshold. Subcutaneous stimulation intensity was set to 70% above the pain threshold. Subjects had to rate pain intensity and unpleasantness after each stimulation block on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Visual feedback of the back reduced perceived pain intensity compared to feedback of the hand in both patients and controls. These findings suggest novel intervention modes for chronic back pain based on visualization of body parts by augmented reality applications. PMID:23582151

  7. Acute pain management in opioid-tolerant patients: a growing challenge.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, C A; Roberts, L J; Somogyi, A A; MacIntyre, P E

    2011-09-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, in parallel with other developed countries, the number of patients prescribed opioids on a long-term basis has grown rapidly over the last decade. The burden of chronic pain is more widely recognised and there has been an increase in the use of opioids for both cancer and non-cancer indications. While the prevalence of illicit opioid use has remained relatively stable, the diversion and abuse of prescription opioids has escalated, as has the number of individuals receiving methadone or buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. As a result, the proportion of opioid-tolerant patients requiring acute pain management has increased, often presenting clinicians with greater challenges than those faced when treating the opioid-naïve. Treatment aims include effective relief of acute pain, prevention of drug withdrawal, assistance with any related social, psychiatric and behavioural issues, and ensuring continuity of long-term care. Pharmacological approaches incorporate the continuation of usual medications (or equivalent), short-term use of sometimes much higher than average doses of additional opioid, and prescription of non-opioid and adjuvant drugs, aiming to improve pain relief and attenuate opioid tolerance and/or opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Discharge planning should commence at an early stage and may involve the use of a 'Reverse Pain Ladder' aiming to limit duration of additional opioid use. Legislative requirements may restrict which drugs can be prescribed at the time of hospital discharge. At all stages, there should be appropriate and regular consultation and liaison with the patient, other treating teams and specialist services. PMID:21970125

  8. Nicotine Deprivation Produces Deficits in Pain Perception that are Moderately Attenuated by Caffeine Consumption.

    PubMed

    Baiamonte, Brandon A; Stickley, Sarah C; Ford, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    During withdrawal, nicotine users experience aversive withdrawal symptoms, such as increased nociceptive processing, which may be responsible for subsequent use. Smokers often consume more caffeine than non-smokers and the combined effects of these two psychoactive drugs result in an enhanced analgesic effect of nicotine. We examined the effects of caffeine (via coffee consumption) and nicotine withdrawal on pain perception in minimally deprived smokers and non-smokers. Pain threshold and pain tolerance were assessed using a radiant heat stimulus before and 30 minutes after caffeine consumption. Nicotine deprivation (2 hrs) produced increases in pain threshold and decreases in pain tolerance representative of hyperalgesia. When smokers are nicotine deprived, caffeine consumption diminished baseline elevations in pain threshold, but had no effect on pain tolerance. These data suggest that caffeine consumption can dampen deficits in sensory discrimination related to pain during nicotine deprivation by reducing pain threshold to levels representative of non-smoking controls. PMID:27120004

  9. Effect of brief mindfulness intervention on tolerance and distress of pain induced by cold-pressor task.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Sisi; Chang, Shaochen; Chen, Wenjun; Si, Mei

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that short-term meditation intervention can lead to greater tolerance and lower pain or distress ratings of experimentally induced pain. However, few attempts have been made to examine the effects of short-term mindfulness-based intervention on the tolerance and distress of pain, when delivered in a therapist-free form. The present research explored the effect of brief mindfulness intervention using pre-recorded instruction on pain experimentally induced by the cold-pressor task. The effects of the mindfulness strategy, the distraction strategy and spontaneous strategy, all through the instructions of pre-recorded voices, were compared. The subjects were drawn from healthy college students and randomly assigned to the aforementioned three groups. Our results showed that compared with using spontaneous strategies, the mindfulness intervention significantly improved the participants' pain tolerance and reduced their immersion distress. The distraction strategy also significantly improved the participants' pain tolerance. However, it did not have a significant effect on the participants' level of distress during the immersion period. Our results suggest that brief mindfulness intervention without a therapist's personal involvement is capable of helping people cope with pain induced by the cold-pressor task. PMID:22961992

  10. Human body impedance and threshold currents for perception and pain for contact hazard analysis in the VLF-MF band

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, I.; Wu, D.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1986-05-01

    The body impedance and threshold currents needed to produce sensations of perception and pain have been measured for 367 human subjects for the frequency range 10 kHz to 3 MHz. A sufficient number of subjects (197 male and 170 female subjects of ages between 18 and 70 years) were utilized in the study to make valid statistical predictions for the general adult population. Various types of contact with metallic electrodes were used to simulate the situation where a human being would be in contact with a large metallic object (car, van, school bus, etc.) in an electromagnetic field in the VLF to MF band. Based on these measurements, it is speculated that the body impedance of a human being is inversely proportional to the body dimensions and the threshold current for perception is directly proportional to the square of the body dimensions. Predictions are made, based on scaling, for the corresponding threshold values for ten-year-old children. The average measured impedance and threshold current values are used to calculate threshold electric fields required to produce sensations of perception and pain in humans in contact with these vehicles. It is concluded from these calculations that many situations can exist in which the present ANSI (American National Standards Institute) recommended standard of 632 V/m for the frequency band 0.3-3 MHz is too high. The usefulness of safety devices like electrical safety shoes and gloves has been evaluated and it is concluded that they offer adequate protection from VLF to MF currents only up to a frequency of 1 MHz and 3 MHz, respectively. The current flowing through the hand of a human in conductive contact with the handle of an ungrounded van is shown to be as high as 879 mA and produces a local SAR in the wrist of about 1045 W/kg.

  11. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  12. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  13. The effect of dry needling on pain, pressure pain threshold and disability in patients with a myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Ziaeifar, Maryam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Karimi, Noureddin; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-04-01

    Dry needling (DN) has been used recently by physical therapists as a therapy of choice for patients with myofascial trigger points (TrP). The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of DN in the treatment of TrPs in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. A sample of convenience of 33 patients with TrP in the UT muscle participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard (N = 17) or experimental group (N = 16). The treatment protocol for the standard group consisted of trigger point compression technique (TCT) on MTP, while the patients in the experimental group received DN. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were assessed for both groups before and after the treatment sessions. In addition, the Disability of Arm, Hand, and Shoulder (DASH) was administered. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) revealed a significant improvement in pain, PPT and DASH scores after treatment in the experimental (DN) and standard (TCT) group compared with before treatment (P < 0.05). The ANCOVA revealed significant differences between the DN and TCT groups on the post-measurement VAS score (P = 0.01). There was, however, no significant difference between the two groups on the post-measurement score of the PPT (P = 0.08) and DASH (P = 0.34). DN produces an improvement in pain intensity, PPT and DASH and may be prescribed for subjects with TrP in UT muscles especially when pain relief is the goal of the treatment. PMID:24725800

  14. Salivary Cortisol and Cold Pain Sensitivity in Female Twins

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Kathryn M; Strachan, Eric; Dansie, Elizabeth; Crofford, Leslie J; Buchwald, Dedra; Goldberg, Jack; Poeschla, Brian; Succop, Annemarie; Noonan, Carolyn; Afari, Niloofar

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a dearth of knowledge about the link between cortisol and pain sensitivity. Purpose We examined the association of salivary cortisol with indices of cold pain sensitivity in 198 female twins and explored the role of familial confounding. Methods Three-day saliva samples were collected for cortisol levels and a cold pressor test was used to collect pain ratings and time to threshold and tolerance. Linear regression modeling with generalized estimating equations examined the overall and within-pair associations. Results Lower diurnal variation of cortisol was associated with higher pain ratings at threshold (p = 0.02) and tolerance (p < 0.01). The relationship of diurnal variation with pain ratings at threshold and tolerance was minimally influenced by familial factors (i.e., genetics and common environment). Conclusions Understanding the genetic and non-genetic mechanisms underlying the link between HPA axis dysregulation and pain sensitivity may help to prevent chronic pain development and maintenance. PMID:23955075

  15. Efficacy and Tolerability of Intramuscular Dexketoprofen in Postoperative Pain Management following Hernia Repair Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, P. T.; Porwal, A.; Shinde, J. V.; Erram, S. S.; Kamat, V. V.; Karmarkar, P. S.; Bhagtani, K.; Dhorepatil, S.; Irpatgire, R.; Bhagat, H.; Kolte, S. S.; Shirure, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intramuscular dexketoprofen for postoperative pain in patients undergoing hernia surgery. Methodology. Total 202 patients received single intramuscular injection of dexketoprofen 50 mg or diclofenac 50 mg postoperatively. The pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on VAS at baseline 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. The efficacy parameters were number of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID), and onset and duration of analgesia. Tolerability assessment was done by global evaluation and adverse events in each group. Results. Dexketoprofen showed superior efficacy in terms of number of responders (P = .007), PID at 8 hours (P = .02), and SAPID 0–8 hours (P < .0001). It also showed faster onset of action (42 minutes) and longer duration of action (6.5 hours). The adverse events were comparable in both groups. Conclusion. Single dose of dexketoprofen trometamol 50 mg given intramuscularly provided faster, better, and longer duration of analgesia in postoperative patients of hernia repair surgery than diclofenac 50 mg, with comparable safety. PMID:21716733

  16. Preventive Effects of Forced Exercise against Alcohol-induced Physical Dependency and Reduction of Pain Perception Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Ghaleni, Majid Asadi; Motaghinejad, Ozra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of postabstinence syndrome of alcohol is one of the major strategies of alcoholism treatment. Exercise can be modulated major brain pathways such as a reward system and pain perception centers. The aim of this study was to evaluation the effects of forced exercise in the management of alcohol dependence and pain perception alteration which induced by alcoholism. Methods: 72 adult male rats were divided into 2 major groups: (1) 40 of them was divided into groups of positive control (alcohol dependent) negative control and alcohol dependent groups under treatment by forced exercise, diazepam (0.4 mg/kg) and forced exercise in combination with diazepam and alcohol withdrawal signs, and blood cortisols, were measured in this groups. (2) 32 rats were divided into control, alcohol dependent (without treatment), and alcohol-dependent groups under treatment by forced exercise or indometacin (5 mg/kg) and then pain perception was assessed by using writhing test, tail-flick and hot plate test. Results: Forced exercise, diazepam, and their combinations significantly attenuates withdrawal syndrome to 20 ± 2, 22 ± 1.3 and 16 ± 2 and blood cortisol level to 6.8 ± 1.3,7.9 ± 1.2 and 5.8 ± 1.1, respectively, in comparison with the positive control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). In alcohol dependent animal under treatment by forced exercise, pain response significantly inhibited with 37%, 57% and 38% decreases in writhing test, hot plate, and tail-flick test, respectively, in comparison with alcohol dependent (without treatment) group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggested that forced exercise can be useful as adjunct therapy in alcoholism patient and also can be effective in modulation of pain threshold reduction that was induced by alcohol dependency. PMID:25400889

  17. Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Sharon L.; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B.; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Ruddell, Darren M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90–97 °F; 32.2‒36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide. PMID:24658410

  18. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaegter, Henrik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pain biomarkers are warranted for individualized pain management. Based on different pain modulatory phenotypes, the objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups within patients with nonmalignant chronic pain and to investigate differences in clinical pain and pain hypersensitivity between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 patients with chronic pain to assess pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to 10 repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in cuff pressure pain threshold during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection and heat pain thresholds at clinical painful and nonpainful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM, 4 distinct groups were formed: group 1 (n = 85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP; group 2 (n = 148) had impaired CPM and normal TSP; group 3 (n = 45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP; and group 4 (n = 122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions than the other 3 groups (P < 0.001), indicating that impaired CPM and facilitated TSP play an important role in widespread pain. Groups 1 and 2 compared with group 4 had lower heat pain threshold at nonpainful areas and lower cuff pressure pain tolerance (P < 0.02), indicating that CPM plays a role for widespread hyperalgesia. Moreover, group 1 demonstrated higher clinical pain scores than group 4 (P < 0.05). Although not different between subgroups, patients were profiled on demographics, disability, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. Future research should investigate interventions tailored towards these subgroups. PMID:26963852

  19. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain - a randomised controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Methods Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years) were randomised to a treatment group (TG) or a waiting-list control group (WL). Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR) and maximal pain related to movement (PM) on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), pain diary (PD) data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT), vibration-detection thresholds (VDT), and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were determined at pain-related and control areas. Results Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01). Pain diaries (PD) revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001). There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006) and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006). Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p < 0.05), but were not significant for MDT or VDT. Conclusions A series of five dry cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. Trial

  20. Subgroups based on thermal and pressure pain thresholds in women with chronic whiplash display differences in clinical presentation – an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    Börsbo, Björn; Liedberg, Gunilla M; Wallin, Mia; Gerdle, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the presence of subgroups in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) based on pain thresholds for pressure (PPT), cold (CPT), and heat (HPT) and to compare these subgroups with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. Methods Two groups of female subjects – patients with chronic WAD (n = 28) and healthy controls (CON; n = 29) – were investigated. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) for thermal thresholds and algometry for PPT at four sites in the body (over the trapezius and tibialis anterior bilaterally) were determined. Habitual pain intensities, psychological strain, disability, and health aspects were registered using a questionnaire. Results A cluster analysis based on PPT, CPT, and HPT identified two subgroups of chronic WAD: one sensitive subgroup (s-WAD; n = 21), and one less sensitive subgroup (ls-WAD; n = 6). S-WAD displayed widespread hyperalgesia, whereas ls-WAD had localized hyperalgesia in the neck area, with tendencies to supernormal values in remote areas of the body. Generally, s-WAD had a significantly worse situation than the CON with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. The ls-WAD group was intermediary between s-WAD and CON in these aspects. Conclusion Different explanations, eg, severity of the pain condition per se, etiological factors, and pre-trauma differences in pain sensitivity, may exist for the differences in pain thresholds between the two subgroups. Future research should investigate the role of pain thresholds in the chronic stage to determine the efficacy of treatment interventions. PMID:23166449

  1. Olea Europea-derived phenolic products attenuate antinociceptive morphine tolerance: an innovative strategic approach to treat cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Muscoli, C; Lauro, F; Dagostino, C; D'Agostino, C; Ilari, S; Giancotti, L A; Gliozzi, M; Costa, N; Carresi, C; Musolino, V; Casale, F; Ventrice, D; Oliverio, M; Oliverio, E; Palma, E; Nisticò, S; Nistico', S; Procopio, A; Rizzo, M; Mollace, V

    2014-01-01

    Morphine and related opioid drugs are currently the major drugs for severe pain. Their clinical utility is limited in the management of severe cancer pain due to the rapid development of tolerance. Restoring opioid efficacy is therefore of great clinical importance. A great body of evidence suggests the key role of free radicals and posttranslational modulation in the development of tolerance to the analgesic activity of morphine. Epidemiological studies have shown a relationship between the Mediterranean diet and a reduced incidence of pathologies such as coronary heart disease and cancer. A central hallmark of this diet is the high consumption of virgin olive oil as the main source of fat which contains antioxidant components in the non-saponifiable fraction, including phenolic compounds absent in seed oils. Here, we show that in a rodent model of opiate tolerance, removal of the free radicals with phenolic compounds of olive oil such as hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein reinstates the analgesic action of morphine. Chronic injection of morphine in mice led to the development of tolerance and this was associated with increased nitrotyrosin and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation together with nitration and deactivation of MnSOD in the spinal cord. Removal of free radicals by hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein blocked morphine tolerance by inhibiting nitration and MDA formation and replacing the MnSOD activity. The phenolic fraction of virgin olive oil exerts antioxidant activities in vivo and free radicals generation occurring during chronic morphine administration play a crucial role in the development of opioid tolerance. Our data suggest novel therapeutic approach in the management of chronic cancer pain, in particular for those patients who require long-term opioid treatment for pain relief without development of tolerance. PMID:24750796

  2. There's More Than Catastrophizing in Chronic Pain: Low Frustration Tolerance and Self-Downing Also Predict Mental Health in Chronic Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Suso-Ribera, Carlos; Jornet-Gibert, Montsant; Ribera Canudas, Maria Victoria; McCracken, Lance M; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2016-06-01

    Among the potential range of irrational beliefs that could be used as predictors of physical and mental health, catastrophizing is the process that has received most attention in chronic pain research. Other irrational processes such as demandingness, low frustration tolerance, and self-downing have rarely been studied. The goal of this study was to explore whether this wider range of beliefs is associated with health in chronic pain patients beyond catastrophizing. A total of 492 chronic pain patients completed a measure of irrational beliefs, a measure of physical and mental health, and a numerical rating scale designed to assess pain intensity and interference. Irrational processes were more strongly associated with mental than with physical health. Low frustration tolerance and self-downing were found to be significantly related to mental health even after controlling for the effect of catastrophizing. Processes other than catastrophizing appear to have potentially important relationships with the mental health of people with chronic pain. These results may offer new intervention targets for practitioners. PMID:26995738

  3. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  4. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Postoperative Pain Management in Opioid Tolerant Patients After Spinal Fusions: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ya Deau, Jacques T.; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1–2 level posterior lumbar fusions with segmental instrumentation were randomly assigned to receive ketamine or act as a control. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.2 mg/kg on induction of general anesthesia and then 2 mcg kg−1 hour−1 for the next 24 hours. Patients were extubated in the operating room and within 15 minutes of arriving in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were started on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) hydromorphone without a basal infusion. Patients were assessed for pain (numerical rating scale [NRS]), narcotic use, level of sedation, delirium, and physical therapy milestones until discharge. The ketamine group had significantly less pain during their first postoperative hour in the PACU (NRS 4.8 vs 8.7) and continued to have less pain during the first postoperative day at rest (3.6 vs 5.5) and with physical therapy (5.6 vs 8.0). Three patients in the control group failed PCA pain management and were converted to intravenous ketamine infusions when their pain scores improved. Patients in the ketamine group required less hydromorphone than the control group, but the differences were not significant. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine reduced postoperative pain in narcotic tolerant patients undergoing posterior spine fusions. PMID:18751864

  5. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  6. Evaluation of the analgesic activity and tolerability of aceclofenac in the treatment of post-episiotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Movilia, P G

    1989-01-01

    The activity and tolerability of aceclofenac, a new arylacetic anti-inflammatory drug, was assessed in the treatment of post-episiotomal pain in a controlled double-blind study with paracetamol. Aceclofenac was administered in single 100 mg doses and paracetamol in single 650 mg doses (both drugs in tablet form) to 60 women aged between 18 and 38 years with post-episiotomal pain. They were randomised into two groups of 30 patients. The severity of the pain was assessed by the patients using an analog visual test (Huskisson's test) before treatment and 0.5, 1,2,3,4,5 and 6h after receiving the drug. At the end of the study, the investigator questioned the patients about the evolution of their pain and any side-effects that might have appeared during the 6 h of observation. On the basis of their replies, the investigator evaluated the pain on a semi-quantitative scale of 5 points. The tolerability was assessed on the basis of the appearance of any undesired effects. The patients treated with drug A* showed a progressive and marked reduction of their pain with a significant difference from the baseline score after the second hour of observation (Huskisson's test) and after the first hour (physician's assessment with the 5-point scale), respectively. The antalgic effect of drug B showed a similar evolution over time to drug A but the analgesic efficacy seemed to be much less.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2663407

  7. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Pain Threshold of Laboring Rats and the Expression of Norepinephrine Transporter and α2 Adrenergic Receptor in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shike; Feng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Meili; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To observe the effects of electroacupuncture on pain threshold of laboring rats and the expression of norepinephrine transporter and α2 adrenergic receptor in the central nervous system to determine the mechanism of the analgesic effect of labor. 120 pregnant rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, 4 electroacupuncture groups, and a meperidine group. After interventions, the warm water tail-flick test was used to observe pain threshold. NE levels in serum, NET, and α2AR mRNA and protein expression levels in the central nervous system were measured. No difference in pain threshold was observed between the 6 groups before intervention. After intervention, increased pain thresholds were observed in all groups except the control group with a higher threshold seen in the electroacupuncture groups. Serum NE levels decreased in the electroacupuncture and MP groups. Increases in NET and α2AR expression in the cerebral cortex and decreases in enlarged segments of the spinal cord were seen. Acupuncture increases uptake of NE via cerebral NET and decreases its uptake by spinal NET. The levels of α2AR are also increased and decreased, respectively, in both tissues. This results in a decrease in systemic NE levels and may be the mechanism for its analgesic effects. PMID:27547232

  8. Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Daniel; Launay, Jacques; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Stewart, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Over our evolutionary history, humans have faced the problem of how to create and maintain social bonds in progressively larger groups compared to those of our primate ancestors. Evidence from historical and anthropological records suggests that group music-making might act as a mechanism by which this large-scale social bonding could occur. While previous research has shown effects of music making on social bonds in small group contexts, the question of whether this effect ‘scales up’ to larger groups is particularly important when considering the potential role of music for large-scale social bonding. The current study recruited individuals from a community choir that met in both small (n = 20 – 80) and large (a ‘megachoir’ combining individuals from the smaller subchoirs n = 232) group contexts. Participants gave self-report measures (via a survey) of social bonding and had pain threshold measurements taken (as a proxy for endorphin release) before and after 90 minutes of singing. Results showed that feelings of inclusion, connectivity, positive affect, and measures of endorphin release all increased across singing rehearsals and that the influence of group singing was comparable for pain thresholds in the large versus small group context. Levels of social closeness were found to be greater at pre- and post-levels for the small choir condition. However, the large choir condition experienced a greater change in social closeness as compared to the small condition. The finding that singing together fosters social closeness – even in large contexts where individuals are not known to each other – is consistent with evolutionary accounts that emphasize the role of music in social bonding, particularly in the context of creating larger cohesive groups than other primates are able to manage. PMID:27158219

  9. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuse—illicit drugs as well as prescription drugs—and ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  10. A Novel Magnetic Stimulator Increases Experimental Pain Tolerance in Healthy Volunteers - A Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kortekaas, Rudie; Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; van Wijhe, Marten; Aleman, André; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘complex neural pulse’TM (CNP) is a neuromodulation protocol employing weak pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). A pioneering paper reported an analgesic effect in healthy humans after 30 minutes of CNP-stimulation using three nested whole head coils. We aimed to devise and validate a stimulator with a novel design entailing a multitude of small coils at known anatomical positions on a head cap, to improve applicability. The main hypothesis was that CNP delivery with this novel device would also increase heat pain thresholds. Twenty healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study. Thirty minutes of PEMF (CNP) or sham was applied to the head. After one week the other treatment was given. Before and after each treatment, primary and secondary outcomes were measured. Primary outcome was heat pain threshold (HPT) measured with thermal quantitative sensory testing. Other outcomes were warmth detection threshold, and aspects of cognition, emotion and motor performance. As hypothesized heat pain threshold was significantly increased after the PEMF stimulation. All other outcomes were unaltered by the PEMF but there was a trend level reduction of cognitive performance after PEMF stimulation as measured by the digit-symbol substitution task. Results from this pilot study suggest that our device is able to stimulate the brain and to modulate its function. This is in agreement with previous studies that used similar magnetic field strengths to stimulate the brain. Specifically, pain control may be achieved with PEMF and for this analgesic effect, coil design does not appear to play a dominant role. In addition, the flexible configuration with small coils on a head cap improves clinical applicability. Trial Registration Dutch Cochrane Centre NTR1093 PMID:23620795

  11. Reduction of pain thresholds in fibromyalgia after very low-intensity magnetic stimulation: A double-blinded, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Maestú, Ceferino; Blanco, Manuel; Nevado, Angel; Romero, Julia; Rodríguez-Rubio, Patricia; Galindo, Javier; Lorite, Juan Bautista; de las Morenas, Francisco; Fernández-Argüelles, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to electromagnetic fields has been reported to have analgesic and antinociceptive effects in several organisms. OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of very low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation on symptoms associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in the Sagrado Corazón Hospital, Seville, Spain. Female fibromyalgia patients (22 to 50 years of age) were randomly assigned to either a stimulation group or a sham group. The stimulation group (n=28) was stimulated using 8 Hz pulsed magnetic fields of very low intensity, while the sham group (n=26) underwent the same protocol without stimulation. Pressure pain thresholds before and after stimulation were determined using an algometer during the eight consecutive weekly sessions of the trial. In addition, blood serotonin levels were measured and patients completed questionnaires to monitor symptom evolution. RESULTS: A repeated-measures ANOVA indicated statistically significant improvement in the stimulation group compared with the control group with respect to somatosensory pain thresholds, ability to perform daily activities, perceived chronic pain and sleep quality. While improvement in pain thresholds was apparent after the first stimulation session, improvement in the other three measures occurred after the sixth week. No significant between-group differences were observed in scores of depression, fatigue, severity of headaches or serotonin levels. No adverse side effects were reported in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Very low-intensity magnetic stimulation may represent a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia. PMID:24308025

  12. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  13. The biological activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase in the spinal cord regulates thermal and mechanical pain thresholds after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Laurence; Venard, Christine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2008-04-01

    Identification of cellular targets pertinent for the development of effective therapies against pathological pain constitutes a difficult challenge. We combined several approaches to show that 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR), abundantly expressed in the spinal cord (SC), is a key target, the modulation of which markedly affects nociception. 3alpha-HSOR catalyzes the biosynthesis and oxidation of 3alpha,5alpha-reduced neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP), which stimulates GABA(A) receptors. Intrathecal injection of Provera (pharmacological inhibitor of 3alpha-HSOR activity) in naive rat SC decreased thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds assessed with behavioral methods. In contrast, pain thresholds were dose-dependently increased by 3alpha,5alpha-THP. In animals subjected to sciatic nerve injury-evoked neuropathic pain, molecular and biochemical experiments revealed an up-regulation of 3alpha-HSOR reductive activity in the SC. Enhancement of 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentration in the SC induced analgesia in neuropathic rats while Provera exacerbated their pathological state. Possibilities are opened for chronic pain control with drugs modulating 3alpha-HSOR activity in nerve cells. PMID:18291663

  14. Mice with neuropathic pain exhibit morphine tolerance due to a decrease in the morphine concentration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Kaneta, Mitsumasa; Nagae, Marina; Yuzuhara, Ami; Li, Xin; Suzuki, Haruka; Hanagata, Mika; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Suto, Wataru; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Masukawa, Daiki; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-20

    The chronic administration of morphine to patients with neuropathic pain results in the development of a gradual tolerance to morphine. Although the detailed mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated, one of the known causes is a decrease in μ-opioid receptor function with regard to the active metabolite of morphine, M-6-G(morphine-6-glucuronide), in the ventrotegmental area of the midbrain. In this study, the relationship between the concentration of morphine in the brain and its analgesic effect was examined after the administration of morphine in the presence of neuropathic pain. Morphine was orally administered to mice with neuropathic pain, and the relationship between morphine's analgesic effect and its concentration in the brain was analysed. In addition, the expression levels of the conjugation enzyme, UGT2B (uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase), which has morphine as its substrate, and P-gp, which is a transporter involved in morphine excretion, were examined. In mice with neuropathic pain, the concentration of morphine in the brain was significantly decreased, and a correlation was found between this decrease and the decrease in the analgesic effect. It was considered possible that this decrease in the brain morphine concentration may be due to an increase in the expression level of P-gp in the small intestine and to an increase in the expression level and binding activity of UGT2B in the liver. The results of this study suggest the possibility that a sufficient analgesic effect may not be obtained when morphine is administered in the presence of neuropathic pain due to a decrease in the total amount of morphine and M-6-G that reach the brain. PMID:27102159

  15. Effect of a single 30 min UMTS mobile phone-like exposure on the thermal pain threshold of young healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vecsei, Zsuzsanna; Csathó, Árpád; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2013-10-01

    One of the most frequently investigated effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) on the behavior of complex biological systems is pain sensitivity. Despite the growing body of evidence of EMF-induced changes in pain sensation, there is no currently accepted experimental protocol for such provocation studies for the healthy human population. In the present study, therefore, we tested the effects of third generation Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) RF EMF exposure on the thermal pain threshold (TPT) measured on the surface of the fingers of 20 young adult volunteers. The protocol was initially validated with a topical capsaicin treatment. The exposure time was 30 min and the genuine (or sham) signal was applied to the head through a patch antenna, where RF EMF specific absorption rate (SAR) values were controlled and kept constant at a level of 1.75 W/kg. Data were obtained using randomized, placebo-controlled trials in a double-blind manner. Subjective pain ratings were tested blockwise on a visual analogue rating scale (VAS). Compared to the control and sham conditions, the results provide evidence for intact TPT but a reduced desensitization effect between repeated stimulations within the individual blocks of trials, observable only on the contralateral side for the genuine UMTS exposure. Subjective pain perception (VAS) data indicated marginally decreased overall pain ratings in the genuine exposure condition only. The present results provide pioneering information about human pain sensation in relation to RF EMF exposure and thus may contribute to cover the existing gap between safety research and applied biomedical science targeting the potential biological effects of environmental RF EMFs. PMID:23787775

  16. The effect of culture on pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Harthy, M; Ohrbach, R; Michelotti, A; List, T

    2016-02-01

    Cross-cultural differences in pain sensitivity have been identified in pain-free subjects as well as in chronic pain patients. The aim was to assess the impact of culture on psychophysical measures using mechanical and electrical stimuli in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and pain-free matched controls in three cultures. This case-control study compared 122 female cases of chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) with equal numbers of age- and gender-matched TMD-free controls. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and tolerance (PPTo) were measured over one hand and two masticatory muscles. Electrical perception threshold and electrical pain threshold (EPT) and tolerance (EPTo) were recorded between the thumb and index fingers. Italian females reported significantly lower PPT in the masseter muscle than other cultures (P < 0.001) and in the temporalis muscle than Saudis (P = 0.003). Swedes reported significantly higher PPT in the thenar muscle than other cultures (P = 0.017). Italians reported significantly lower PPTo in all muscles than Swedes (P ≤ 0.006) and in the masseter muscle than Saudis (P < 0.001). Italians reported significantly lower EPTo than other cultures (P = 0.01). Temporomandibular disorder cases, compared to TMD-free controls, reported lower PPT and PPTo in all the three muscles (P < 0.001). This study found cultural differences between groups in the PPT, PPTo and EPTo. Overall, Italian females reported the highest sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical stimulation, while Swedes reported the lowest sensitivity. Mechanical pain thresholds differed more across cultures than did electrical pain thresholds. Cultural factors may influence response to type of pain test. PMID:26371794

  17. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  18. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin alleviates bone cancer pain and morphine tolerance via µ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zongming; Wu, Shaoyong; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhong, Junfeng; Lv, Anqing; Jiao, Jing; Chen, Zhonghua

    2016-04-15

    The current study was to examine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in regulating bone cancer-evoked pain and the tolerance of systemic morphine. Breast sarcocarcinoma Walker 256 cells were implanted into the tibia bone cavity of rats and this evoked significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our results showed that the protein expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1), p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) as well as phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathways were amplified in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord of bone cancer rats compared with control rats. Blocking spinal mTOR by using rapamycin significantly attenuated activities of PI3K signaling pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Additionally, rapamycin enhanced attenuations of protein kinase Cɛ (PKCɛ)/protein kinase A (PKA) induced by morphine and further extended analgesia of morphine via µ-opioid receptor (MOR). Our data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways leading to bone cancer pain, including the activation of mTOR and PI3K and downstream PKCɛ/PKA, and resultant sensitization of MOR. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of bone cancer pain often observed in clinics. PMID:26566757

  19. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to evaluate analgesic activity of Terminalia chebula in healthy human volunteers using a mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Pokuri, Venkata Kishan; Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pingali, Usharani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose (1000 mg) of Terminalia chebula using a mechanical pain model in healthy human volunteers. Material and Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either single oral dose of 2 capsules of T. chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double-blinded manner. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesy meter (Randall–Selitto test) before and 3 h after administration of test drug. The parameters evaluated were pain threshold force and time; pain tolerance force and time. A washout period of 1-week was given for crossover between active drug and placebo. Results: Terminalia chebula significantly increased the mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time, and pain tolerance force and time compared to placebo (P < 0.001). The mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time (20.8% and 21.0%) was increased more than that of pain tolerance force and time (13.4% and 13.4%). No adverse drug reaction was reported with either of the study medications during the study period. Conclusion: T. chebula significantly increased pain threshold and pain tolerance compared to placebo. Both the study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions. PMID:27625480

  20. Structural Health Monitoring: Leveraging Pain in the Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi

    2012-07-01

    Tissue damage, or the perception thereof, is managed through pain experience. The neurobiological process of pain triggers most effective defense mechanisms for our safety. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is also a very similar function, albeit in engineering systems. SHM technology can leverage many aspects of pain mechanisms to progress in several critical areas. Discrimination between features from the undamaged and damaged structures can follow the threshold gate mechanism of the pain perception. Furthermore, the sensing mechanisms can be adaptive to changes by adjusting the threshold as does the pain perception. A distributed sensor network, often advanced by SHM, can be made fault-tolerant and robust by following the perception way of self-organization and redundancy. Data handling in real life is a huge challenge for large-scale SHM. As sensory data of pain is first cleaned, the threshold is then processed through experiential information gathering and use.

  1. Almotriptan: an effective and well-tolerated treatment for migraine pain.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2003-01-01

    The clinical data of almotriptan, the new selective 5-HT(1B/1D) agonist developed for the symptomatic treatment of migraine, are reviewed here. The pharmacokinetic performance of almotriptan is compared with that of other currently available triptans. The dose exhibiting the best efficacy/tolerability ratio of almotriptan is 12.5 mg. Efficacy of this almotriptan dose is comparable to that of the "gold" standard triptan, but with a lower recurrence rate. Gender or the presence of food in the stomach does not influence almotriptan's pharmacokinetic profile, and no relevant interactions of almotriptan with other medications have been reported. The tolerability of almotriptan is similar to that of placebo. Almotriptan's high efficacy together with its excellent tolerability and safety profile confirm this new 5-HT(1B/1D) agonist as a drug of choice for the symptomatic treatment of migraine attacks. PMID:15071618

  2. Parental-reported pain insensitivity in Dup15q.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, Kadi; Lau, Heather; Hedlund, Julie L; Friedman, Daniel; Krushel, Kara; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-02-01

    Parents of children with chromosome 15q duplication syndrome (Dup15q) have anecdotally reported high pain threshold as a feature of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to document parental-reported estimates of the frequency of high pain tolerance and the stimuli that fail to evoke a normal pain response. We sent an online survey to 840 families with children with Dup15q to explore the frequency and clinical manifestations of high pain threshold. There were 216 respondents (25.7%). A high pain threshold was reported in 87% of children at some time. There was a trend (p=0.06) for high pain threshold to be more commonly observed among children with the isodicentric (85.6%) and other genetic variants (95%) than interstitial (69.6%) duplications. There was no association between reports of high pain threshold and reports of an intellectual disability (91% of cases), autism spectrum disorder (83% of cases), or self-injurious behavior (40% of cases). Reports included many dramatic cases such as severe burns, broken bones, and electrical traumas, which were associated with little or no evidence of a painful stimulus. A high pain threshold is reported in other disorders associated with intellectual disability and autism; the underlying mechanism in Dup15q and other disorders remains undefined. PMID:26773682

  3. Effects of naltrexone on electrocutaneous pain in patients with hypertension compared to normotensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Ring, Christopher; France, Christopher R; al'Absi, Mustafa; Edwards, Louisa; McIntyre, David; Carroll, Douglas; Martin, Una

    2008-02-01

    An opioid mechanism may help explain hypertensive hypoalgesia. A double-blind placebo-controlled design compared the effects of opioid blockade (naltrexone) and placebo on electrocutaneous pain threshold, pain tolerance, and retrospective McGill Pain Questionnaire ratings in 35 unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and 28 normotensive individuals. The hypertensives experienced less pain than normotensives during the assessment of their pain tolerance; however, this manifestation of hypertensive hypoalgesia was not moderated by naltrexone. These findings fail to support the hypothesis that essential hypertension is characterised by relative opioid insensitivity. PMID:18031920

  4. Newer generation fentanyl transmucosal products for breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Frank; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Porta-Sales, Josep; Tagarro, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Oral normal-release morphine has long been considered the gold-standard treatment for cancer breakthrough pain. However, its relatively long time to analgesic onset, delay in maximal analgesic effect and prolonged duration of action make it unsuitable for the management of breakthrough pain episodes. These limitations led to the development of an oral transmucosal formulation of the fast-acting opioid fentanyl (oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate [OTFC] lozenge on a plastic handle; Actiq®), which has been shown to produce more rapid and effective pain relief than oral morphine. However, the formulation itself has some limitations. Consequently, investigators have continued to develop other, newer generation, transmucosal formulations of fentanyl to further improve the management of breakthrough pain. Recently, five such compounds (Effentora®/Fentora®, Abstral®, Instanyl®, Breakyl®/OnsolisTM and PecFent®) have been concurrently approved in Europe and/or the US, and have documented efficacy in quickly relieving breakthrough pain episodes. All of the available pivotal efficacy trials of these agents are randomized, double-blind comparisons with placebo. There are no head-to-head trials comparing any of the newer transmucosal formulations with each other. Only one non-pivotal study of intranasal fentanyl spray used a transmucosal preparation as an active comparator. However, that comparator was OTFC, not one of the newer transmucosal products. Close examination of the existing trials assessing these newer transmucosal preparations reveals significant variation in many study parameters, such as patient selection criteria, severity of breakthrough pain episodes, proportions of patients with a neuropathic pain component, titration protocols, choice of the primary endpoints, protocols for repeat dosing and rescue medication, the separation of treated episodes and the extent of the placebo response, all of which may have affected efficacy results. It is therefore

  5. Evaluation of the Analgesic Activity of Standardized Aqueous Extract of Terminalia chebula in Healthy Human Participants Using Hot Air Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pokuri, Venkata Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain affects millions of people worldwide, opioid analgesics have been used for chronic painful conditions. Due to their adverse effects, safer alternatives would be beneficial. Terminalia chebula, with proven analgesic action has been evaluated in the hot air pain model for its analgesic activity. Aim To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose of Terminalia chebula using hot air pain model in healthy human participants. Setting and Design Randomized, Double blind, Placebo controlled, Cross over study. Materials and Methods After taking written informed consent to IEC approved protocol, 12 healthy human participants were randomized to receive either single oral dose of two capsules of Terminalia chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double blinded manner. Thermal pain was assessed using hot air analgesiometer, to deliver thermal pain stimulus. Mean Pain Threshold time and Mean Pain Tolerance time measured in seconds at baseline and 180 minutes post drug. A washout period of two weeks was given for cross-over between the two treatments. Results Terminalia chebula significantly increased mean pain threshold and tolerance time compared to baseline and placebo. Mean pain threshold time increased from 34.06±2.63 seconds to 41.00±2.99 seconds (p<0.001) and mean pain tolerance time increased from 49.67± 3.72 seconds to 57.30±3.07 seconds (p<0.001). The increase in mean percentage change for pain threshold time is 20.42% (p<0.001) and for pain tolerance time is 17.50% (p<0.001). Conclusion In the present study, Terminalia chebula significantly increased Pain Threshold time and Pain Tolerance time compared to Placebo. Study medications were well tolerated. PMID:26155489

  6. A meta-analysis of efficacy and tolerability of buprenorphine for the relief of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Aung, Kyan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize available evidence on the analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine in treating cancer pain and related adverse effects. We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials, assessing the efficacy of buprenorphine, regardless of delivery system. The primary endpoints were patient-reported 'pain intensity' and 'pain relief'. Statistical heterogeneity among included studies was assessed with the I (2) test. The summary relative risk (RR) and 95% CI were derived, if two or more studies reported the similar outcome. Sixteen RCTs (n = 1329) with buprenorphine were included: 8 transdermal (TD), 5 sublingual (SL), 2 intramuscular injection (IM) and 1 subcutaneous infusion (SC) studies; with both SL and IM routes being assessed in one study. Only a few studies reported the same outcome in a similar way, creating difficulty for pooling of the outcome data. Many studies had a high risk of bias. In 2 studies (n = 241), the 'global impression change' was significantly different between TD buprenorphine and the combined placebo and morphine (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.59; I (2): 42%); the 'number-needed-to-treat' (NNT) was 4.9 (95% CI: 3.1-10.9). In 2 studies (n = 331), 'requirement for rescue SL buprenorphine' was comparable between TD buprenorphine and placebo (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.71-2.18; I (2) : 40%). In 2 studies (n = 141), 'incidence of nausea' was less in TD buprenorphine (RR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.2-0.71, I (2): 0%, NNT: 9.3, 5.6-28.5). Due to the small number of participants in a small number of studies, the results of the present review provide insufficient evidence to position adequately the use of buprenorphine in treatment of cancer pain. Large multicenter RCTs that compare TD buprenorphine with standard analgesic treatment is needed to position TD buprenorphine in the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer pain treatment. PMID:24600544

  7. 3-iodothyroacetic acid, a metabolite of thyroid hormone, induces itch and reduces threshold to noxious and to painful heat stimuli in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Annunziatina; De Siena, Gaetano; Resta, Francesco; Masi, Alessio; Musilli, Claudia; Zucchi, Riccardo; Raimondi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Itch is associated with increased sensitization to nociceptive stimuli. We investigated whether 3-iodothyroacetic acid (TA1), by releasing histamine, induces itch and increases sensitization to noxious and painful heat stimuli. Experimental Approach Itch was evaluated after s.c. administration of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Mice threshold to noxious (NHT) and to painful heat stimuli were evaluated by the increasing-temperature hot plate (from 45.5 to 49.5°C) or by the hot plate (51.5°C) test, respectively, 15 min after i.p. injection of TA1 (0.4, 1.32 and 4 μg·kg−1). Itch, NHT and pain threshold evaluation were repeated in mice pretreated with pyrilamine. Itch and NHT were also measured in HDC+/+ and HDC−/− following injection of saline or TA1 (1.32, 4 and 11 μg·kg−1; s.c. and i.p.). pERK1/2 levels were determined by Western blot in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) isolated from CD1 mice 15 min after they received (i.p.): saline, saline and noxious heat stimulus (46.5°C), TA1 (0.1, 0.4, 1.32, 4 μg·kg−1) or TA1 1.32 μg·kg−1 and noxious heat stimulus. Key Results TA1 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1 induced itch and reduced NHT; pyrilamine pretreatment prevented both of these effects. TA1 4 μg·kg−1 (i.p.) reduced pain threshold without inducing itch or modifying NHT. In HDC−/− mice, TA1 failed to induce itch and to reduce NHT. In DRG, pERK1/2 levels were significantly increased by noxious heat stimuli and by TA1 0.1, 0.4 and 1.32 μg·kg−1; i.p. Conclusions and Implications Increased TA1 levels induce itch and an enhanced sensitivity to noxious heat stimuli suggesting that TA1 might represent a potential cause of itch in thyroid diseases. PMID:25439265

  8. Almotriptan is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for migraine pain: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dowson, A J; Massiou, H; Laínez, J M; Cabarrocas, X

    2002-07-01

    Almotriptan is a novel and specific serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonist for the acute treatment of migraine. This randomized, single-dose, double-blind, multicentre, study assessed the efficacy and safety of oral almotriptan (12.5 mg and 25 mg) in patients with migraine, and compared it with the standard treatment (sumatriptan 100 mg) and placebo. A total of 668 patients treated one migraine attack of moderate or severe intensity with study medication. The primary efficacy assessment was migraine pain relief, improvement from severe or moderate pain to mild or no pain, at 2 h after treatment. Response rates, stratified for variation in baseline pain levels, for both almotriptan doses were equivalent to sumatriptan and significantly better than placebo. Other efficacy assessments confirmed the equivalence of the almotriptan groups with the sumatriptan group. Almotriptan 12.5 mg was as well tolerated as placebo (P=0.493) and significantly better tolerated than sumatriptan (P<0.001), in terms of the overall incidence of adverse events. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of adverse events between almotriptan 25 mg and sumatriptan 100 mg (P=0.376). The results from this large clinical study indicate that the new, specific 5-HT1B/1D agonist, almotriptan, is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for migraine pain. PMID:12133045

  9. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Line K.; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  10. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    PubMed

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  11. Is One Trial Sufficient to Obtain Excellent Pressure Pain Threshold Reliability in the Low Back of Asymptomatic Individuals? A Test-Retest Study.

    PubMed

    Balaguier, Romain; Madeleine, Pascal; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of pressure pain threshold (PPT) provides a quantitative value related to the mechanical sensitivity to pain of deep structures. Although excellent reliability of PPT has been reported in numerous anatomical locations, its absolute and relative reliability in the lower back region remains to be determined. Because of the high prevalence of low back pain in the general population and because low back pain is one of the leading causes of disability in industrialized countries, assessing pressure pain thresholds over the low back is particularly of interest. The purpose of this study study was (1) to evaluate the intra- and inter- absolute and relative reliability of PPT within 14 locations covering the low back region of asymptomatic individuals and (2) to determine the number of trial required to ensure reliable PPT measurements. Fifteen asymptomatic subjects were included in this study. PPTs were assessed among 14 anatomical locations in the low back region over two sessions separated by one hour interval. For the two sessions, three PPT assessments were performed on each location. Reliability was assessed computing intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC) for all possible combinations between trials and sessions. Bland-Altman plots were also generated to assess potential bias in the dataset. Relative reliability for both intra- and inter- session was almost perfect with ICC ranged from 0.85 to 0.99. With respect to the intra-session, no statistical difference was reported for ICCs and SEM regardless of the conducted comparisons between trials. Conversely, for inter-session, ICCs and SEM values were significantly larger when two consecutive PPT measurements were used for data analysis. No significant difference was observed for the comparison between two consecutive measurements and three measurements. Excellent relative and absolute reliabilities were reported for both intra

  12. Is One Trial Sufficient to Obtain Excellent Pressure Pain Threshold Reliability in the Low Back of Asymptomatic Individuals? A Test-Retest Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of pressure pain threshold (PPT) provides a quantitative value related to the mechanical sensitivity to pain of deep structures. Although excellent reliability of PPT has been reported in numerous anatomical locations, its absolute and relative reliability in the lower back region remains to be determined. Because of the high prevalence of low back pain in the general population and because low back pain is one of the leading causes of disability in industrialized countries, assessing pressure pain thresholds over the low back is particularly of interest. The purpose of this study study was (1) to evaluate the intra- and inter- absolute and relative reliability of PPT within 14 locations covering the low back region of asymptomatic individuals and (2) to determine the number of trial required to ensure reliable PPT measurements. Fifteen asymptomatic subjects were included in this study. PPTs were assessed among 14 anatomical locations in the low back region over two sessions separated by one hour interval. For the two sessions, three PPT assessments were performed on each location. Reliability was assessed computing intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC) for all possible combinations between trials and sessions. Bland-Altman plots were also generated to assess potential bias in the dataset. Relative reliability for both intra- and inter- session was almost perfect with ICC ranged from 0.85 to 0.99. With respect to the intra-session, no statistical difference was reported for ICCs and SEM regardless of the conducted comparisons between trials. Conversely, for inter-session, ICCs and SEM values were significantly larger when two consecutive PPT measurements were used for data analysis. No significant difference was observed for the comparison between two consecutive measurements and three measurements. Excellent relative and absolute reliabilities were reported for both intra

  13. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  14. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W.; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  15. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  16. Identification of Molecular Fingerprints in Human Heat Pain Thresholds by Use of an Interactive Mixture Model R Toolbox (AdaptGauss).

    PubMed

    Ultsch, Alfred; Thrun, Michael C; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Lötsch, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained during cell experiments, laboratory animal research, or human studies often display a complex distribution. Statistical identification of subgroups in research data poses an analytical challenge. Here were introduce an interactive R-based bioinformatics tool, called "AdaptGauss". It enables a valid identification of a biologically-meaningful multimodal structure in the data by fitting a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to the data. The interface allows a supervised selection of the number of subgroups. This enables the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to adapt more complex GMM than usually observed with a noninteractive approach. Interactively fitting a GMM to heat pain threshold data acquired from human volunteers revealed a distribution pattern with four Gaussian modes located at temperatures of 32.3, 37.2, 41.4, and 45.4 °C. Noninteractive fitting was unable to identify a meaningful data structure. Obtained results are compatible with known activity temperatures of different TRP ion channels suggesting the mechanistic contribution of different heat sensors to the perception of thermal pain. Thus, sophisticated analysis of the modal structure of biomedical data provides a basis for the mechanistic interpretation of the observations. As it may reflect the involvement of different TRP thermosensory ion channels, the analysis provides a starting point for hypothesis-driven laboratory experiments. PMID:26516852

  17. Sex differences and hormonal modulation of deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Richard J.; Ji, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    Women disproportionately suffer from many deep tissue pain conditions. Experimental studies show that women have lower pain thresholds, higher pain ratings and less tolerance to a range of painful stimuli. Most clinical and epidemiological reports suggest female gonadal hormones modulate pain for some, but not all, conditions. Similarly, animal studies support greater nociceptive sensitivity in females in many deep tissue pain models. Gonadal hormones modulate responses in primary afferents, dorsal horn neurons and supraspinal sites, but the direction of modulation is variable. This review will examine sex differences in deep tissue pain in humans and animals focusing on the role of gonadal hormones (mainly estradiol) as an underlying component of the modulation of pain sensitivity. PMID:23872333

  18. Low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic pain in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: an efficacy–tolerability pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Petrò, Emiliano; Ruffini, Elena; Cappuccio, Melania; Guerini, Valeria; Belotti, Gloria; Fascendini, Sara; Licini, Cristina; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study evaluated the efficacy and safety of prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) in older subjects with chronic pain and mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. Methods This was a prospective, observational, open-label study of 45-day duration. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain and naïve to strong opioids were recruited from nursing homes and Alzheimer’s disease centers. OXN-PR was initiated at low doses (5 mg od or bid) and increased to a maximum of 20 mg bid. The primary efficacy endpoint was a pain intensity reduction of ≥30% from baseline (T0) to 15 days after OXN-PR initiation, as assessed by a numerical rating scale or the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale. Other assessments included the Barthel activities of daily living index, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Bowel Function Index, and adverse events. Results The analysis included 53 patients (mean age, 83.0 years; mean Mini-Mental State Examination score, 18.6) with severe pain (median Numerical Rating Scale/Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia 6) and substantial impairment in daily functioning (mean Barthel index, 32.2). The primary endpoint was achieved by 92.4% of patients. OXN-PR significantly reduced mean pain intensity from baseline to study end (numerical rating scale, 6.6±1.0 vs 2.3±1.1, P<0.0001; Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia, 6.9±1.6 vs 0.9±0.8, P<0.0001). Substantial improvements from T0 to T45 in daily functioning (mean Barthel index, 32.2±16.8 vs 53.7±23.9, P<0.0001) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (mean Neuropsychiatric Inventory, 25.5±27.3 vs 8.8±9.0, P<0.0001) were also reported. OXN-PR was well tolerated and did not worsen bowel function. Conclusion In this pilot study, OXN-PR was effective in improving pain and other symptoms associated with dementia, with a favorable safety and tolerability profile. Large-scale trials in people with dementia are needed to improve clinical guidance for the assessment and treatment of pain in

  19. Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic nononcological pain in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Marcassa, Claudio; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Rollone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults. Increasing evidence indicates strong opioids as a valid option for chronic pain management in geriatrics. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone–naloxone (OXN-PR) in patients aged ≥70 years. Methods This open-label prospective study assessed older patients naïve to strong opioids presenting with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Patients were prescribed OXN-PR at an initial dose of 10/5 mg/day for 28 days. In case of insufficient analgesia, the initial daily dose could be increased gradually. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline, assessed by a ten-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at day 28 (T28). Changes in cognitive state, daily functioning, quality of life, constipation, and other adverse events were assessed. Results Of 53 patients enrolled (mean 81.7±6.2 years [range 70–92 years]), 52 (98.1%) completed the 28-day observation. At T28, the primary end point (≥30% reduction in mean pain from baseline in the absence of bowel function deterioration) was achieved in 38 patients (71.7%). OXN-PR significantly relieved pain (NRS score –3.26; P<0.0001), as well as daily need for rescue paracetamol (from 86.8% at baseline to 40.4% at T28; P<0.001), and reduced impact of pain on daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form from 6.2±1.5 to 3.4±2.1; P<0.0001). OXN-PR was also associated with significant improvement in daily functioning (Barthel Index from 53.3±14.1 to 61.3±14.3; P<0.01). No changes were observed in cognitive status and bowel function. OXN-PR was well tolerated; only one patient (1.9%) prematurely withdrew from treatment, due to drowsiness. Conclusion Findings from this open-label prospective study suggest that low-dose OXN-PR may be effective and well tolerated for treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in older patients. Besides its effectiveness, these data indicate that low

  20. Evaluation of a low-threshold/high-tolerance methadone maintenance treatment clinic in saint john, new brunswick, Canada: one year retention rate and illicit drug use.

    PubMed

    Christie, Timothy K S; Murugesan, Alli; Manzer, Dana; O'Shaughnessey, Michael V; Webster, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To report the one-year retention rate and the prevalence of illicit opioid use and cocaine use in the Low-Threshold/High-Tolerance (LTHT) methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinic located in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. Methods. A description of the LTHT MMT clinic is provided. The one-year retention rate was determined by collecting data on patients who enrolled in the LTHT MMT clinic between August 04, 2009 and August 04, 2010. The prevalence of illicit drug use was determined using a randomly selected retrospective cohort of 84 participants. For each participant the results of six consecutive urine tests for the most recent three months were compared to the results of the first six consecutive urine tests after program entry. Results. The one-year retention rate was 95%, 67% of the cohort achieved abstinence from illicit opioids and an additional 13% abstained from cocaine use. Conclusion. The novel feature of the LTHT MMT clinic is that patients are not denied methadone because of lack of ancillary services. Traditional comprehensive MMT programs invest the majority of financial resources in ancillary services that support the biopsychosocial model, whereas the LTHT approach utilizes a medical model and directs resources at medical management. PMID:24860685

  1. The mirage of impairing drug concentration thresholds: a rationale for zero tolerance per se driving under the influence of drugs laws.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; DuPont, Robert L

    2012-06-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Drivers with measurable quantities of potentially impairing illicit or prescription drugs in their body fluids are multiple times more likely to be involved in motor vehicle crashes than those without such drugs in their bodies. Drug-related impairment, however, cannot be inferred solely on the basis of the presence of drugs in biological fluids. Thus, for more than a quarter century, there has been a search for drug blood concentrations that are the equivalent of the 0.08 g/dL threshold for alcohol-impaired driving in the United States. We suggest that such equivalents are a mirage, and cannot be determined due to variable drug tolerance, lack of consistent relationships between drug blood concentrations and impairment, innumerable drug combinations and multiple other factors. Thus, while the idea of determining impairing drug concentrations is attractive, it is ultimately unattainable, and withholding drugged driving legislation pending the acquisition of such data is tantamount to a plan for inaction with regard to an important and growing public health and safety problem. We propose specific legislation to address alcohol- and drug-impaired driving in the United States. PMID:22582272

  2. Pain Intensity Recognition Rates via Biopotential Feature Patterns with Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, Sascha; Treister, Roi; Werner, Philipp; Traue, Harald C.; Crawcour, Stephen; Andrade, Adriano; Walter, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinically used methods of pain diagnosis do not allow for objective and robust measurement, and physicians must rely on the patient’s report on the pain sensation. Verbal scales, visual analog scales (VAS) or numeric rating scales (NRS) count among the most common tools, which are restricted to patients with normal mental abilities. There also exist instruments for pain assessment in people with verbal and / or cognitive impairments and instruments for pain assessment in people who are sedated and automated ventilated. However, all these diagnostic methods either have limited reliability and validity or are very time-consuming. In contrast, biopotentials can be automatically analyzed with machine learning algorithms to provide a surrogate measure of pain intensity. Methods In this context, we created a database of biopotentials to advance an automated pain recognition system, determine its theoretical testing quality, and optimize its performance. Eighty-five participants were subjected to painful heat stimuli (baseline, pain threshold, two intermediate thresholds, and pain tolerance threshold) under controlled conditions and the signals of electromyography, skin conductance level, and electrocardiography were collected. A total of 159 features were extracted from the mathematical groupings of amplitude, frequency, stationarity, entropy, linearity, variability, and similarity. Results We achieved classification rates of 90.94% for baseline vs. pain tolerance threshold and 79.29% for baseline vs. pain threshold. The most selected pain features stemmed from the amplitude and similarity group and were derived from facial electromyography. Conclusion The machine learning measurement of pain in patients could provide valuable information for a clinical team and thus support the treatment assessment. PMID:26474183

  3. Adult attachment and reports of pain in experimentally-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nicole Emma; Meredith, Pamela Joy; Strong, Jenny

    2011-05-01

    Attachment theory has been proposed as a framework for understanding the development of chronic pain, with evidence supporting the overrepresentation of insecure attachment styles in chronic pain populations and links between insecure attachment and factors known to impact one's ability to cope with pain. The present study sought to extend two earlier studies exploring the relationships between adult attachment and communication of an acute pain experience, in anticipation of providing insight into individual differences in vulnerability in development of chronic pain. It was hypothesised that: (a) fearful attachment would be associated with perceptions of the pain as less intense, and (b) anxious attachment would be associated with lower pain thresholds. A convenience sample of 82 healthy adults completed self-report measures of attachment, neuroticism, and negative affect prior to taking part in a coldpressor pain inducement task. Results demonstrated that fearful attachment was associated with lower levels of pain intensity throughout the coldpressor task. In addition, dismissing attachment was also associated with less intense pain, as well as increased coldpressor endurance (tolerance) in the presence of a known assessor. These associations were retained after controlling for measures of neuroticism, negative affect, age, and social desirability. The results of this study are consistent with the proposition that fearful and dismissing individuals tend to mask their underlying distress caused by the pain experience, potentially leading to difficulties coping with pain over time. PMID:21095633

  4. Preoperative pain mechanisms assessed by cuff algometry are associated with chronic postoperative pain relief after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Chronic postoperative pain after total knee replacement (TKR) in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) implies clinical challenges. Widespread hyperalgesia, facilitated temporal summation of pain (TSP), and impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) have been found in painful KOA. This exploratory study investigated postoperative pain relief 12 months after TKR in 4 subgroups of patients preoperatively profiled by mechanistic quantitative sensory testing. In 103 patients with KOA, pressure pain detection threshold (PDT) and tolerance thresholds (PTT) were assessed at the lower leg using cuff algometry. Temporal summation of pain was measured as an increase in pain intensity scores during 10 repeated (2 seconds intervals) painful cuff stimuli. Conditioned pain modulation was calculated as the relative increase in PDT during painful conditioning stimulation. The grand averages of TSP and CPM were calculated and values below or above were used for subgrouping: facilitated TSP/impaired CPM (group A, N = 16), facilitated TSP/normal CPM (group B, N = 15), normal TSP/impaired CPM (group C, N = 44), and normal TSP/normal CPM (group D, N = 28). Clinical VAS pain intensity scores were collected before and 12 months after TKR surgery and the pain relief calculated. Less pain relief was found in group A (52.0% ± 14.0% pain relief) than in group B (81.1% ± 3.5%, P = 0.023) and group C (79.6% ± 4.4%, P = 0.007), but not group D (69.4% ± 7.9%, P = 0.087). Low preoperative PDT was associated with a less postoperative pain relief (R = -0.222, P = 0.034), whereas TSP or CPM alone showed no associations with postoperative pain relief. This explorative study indicated that patients with osteoarthritis with facilitated TSP together with impaired CPM are more vulnerable to experience less pain relief after TKR. PMID:27331347

  5. Differential effects of two virtual reality interventions: distraction versus pain control.

    PubMed

    Loreto-Quijada, Desirée; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Nieto, Rubén; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Olga; Ferrer-García, Marta; Saldaña, Carmina; Fusté-Escolano, Adela; Liutsko, Liudmila

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that virtual reality (VR) pain distraction is effective at improving pain-related outcomes. However, more research is needed to investigate VR environments with other pain-related goals. The main aim of this study was to compare the differential effects of two VR environments on a set of pain-related and cognitive variables during a cold pressor experiment. One of these environments aimed to distract attention away from pain (VRD), whereas the other was designed to enhance pain control (VRC). Participants were 77 psychology students, who were randomly assigned to one of the following three conditions during the cold pressor experiment: (a) VRD, (b) VRC, or (c) Non-VR (control condition). Data were collected regarding both pain-related variables (intensity, tolerance, threshold, time perception, and pain sensitivity range) and cognitive variables (self-efficacy and catastrophizing). Results showed that in comparison with the control condition, the VRC intervention significantly increased pain tolerance, the pain sensitivity range, and the degree of time underestimation. It also increased self-efficacy in tolerating pain and led to a reduction in reported helplessness. The VRD intervention significantly increased the pain threshold and pain tolerance in comparison with the control condition, but it did not affect any of the cognitive variables. Overall, the intervention designed to enhance control seems to have a greater effect on the cognitive variables assessed. Although these results need to be replicated in further studies, the findings suggest that the VRC intervention has considerable potential in terms of increasing self-efficacy and modifying the negative thoughts that commonly accompany pain problems. PMID:24892197

  6. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  7. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefano; Borghesi, Cristina; Ricciardi, Serena; Giovannoni, Daniele; Fulvi, Alberto; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale) and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4) were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline); 46 (82.1%) patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001), Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002), Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006) and anxiety (P<0.0001) subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003). At study end, 37 (66.0%) patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment. Combination therapy had a good safety profile. Conclusion OXN-PR and pregabalin were safe and highly effective in a real-world setting of severe neuropathic cancer pain, with a high rate of satisfaction, without interference on bowel function. PMID:27445495

  8. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fulranumab, an anti-nerve growth factor antibody, in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Panna; Katz, Nathaniel; Polverejan, Elena; Wang, Steven; Kelly, Kathleen M; Haeussler, Juergen; Thipphawong, John

    2013-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is increased in chronic pain conditions. This study examined analgesic efficacy and safety of fulranumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-NGF antibody, in adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Patients (n=466, intent-to-treat) were randomized to receive, in addition to their current pain therapy, subcutaneous injections in 1 of 6 parallel treatment groups: placebo (n=78), fulranumab 1 mg (n=77) or 3 mg (n=79) every 4 weeks (Q4wk), 3 mg (n=76), 6 mg (n=78), or 10 mg (n=78) every 8 weeks (Q8wk). Primary efficacy results showed that fulranumab significantly reduced the average pain intensity score (P < or = 0.030) from baseline to week 12 compared with placebo in the 3mgQ4wk, 6mgQ8wk, and 10mgQ8wk groups. Secondary efficacy outcomes indicated that significant improvement occurred compared with placebo at week 12 on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscales of pain, stiffness, and physical function (P < 0.040) across all fulranumab groups except 1mgQ4wk, on the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form subscales of pain intensity (P < or = 0.016) and pain interference (P < or = 0.030) in the 3mgQ4wk and 10mgQ8wk groups, and on the Patient Global Assessment score (P < or = 0.040) in the 3mgQ4wk, 6mgQ8wk, and 10mgQ8wk groups. The most common (> or = 5% of patients) treatment-emergent adverse events in overall fulranumab groups during the first 12weeks included paresthesia (7%), headache (5%), and nasopharyngitis (5%). Most neurologic-related treatment-emergent adverse events were mild or moderate and resolved at the end of week 12. Serious adverse events occurred in 3 patients, but they were not neurologically related and resolved before study completion. Fulranumab treatment resulted in statistically significant efficacy in pain measures and physical function versus placebo and was generally well tolerated. PMID:23748114

  9. Effects of coping statements on experimental pain in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Roditi, Daniela; Robinson, Michael E; Litwins, Nola

    2009-01-01

    The present study measured the effects of catastrophizing self-statements and positive coping self-statements on cold pressor-induced pain. Participants were 58 adult chronic pain patients with current facial pain. It was hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to a decrease in pain endurance whereas positive coping would lead to an increase in pain endurance. It was also hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to an increase in peak pain intensity whereas positive coping would lead to a decrease in peak pain intensity. At pretest, participants submerged their nondominant hand in the cold pressor. Pain sensitivity ranges (PSR) were subsequently determined by calculating the difference between tolerance and threshold times. Ratings of peak pain intensity were measured using a pressure sensitive bladder/transducer. Participants underwent random assignment to either a catastrophizing group or a positive coping self-statement group. ANCOVA results revealed that on average, participants employing catastrophizing statements as a coping strategy experienced significantly lower PSR (M = 35.53, SD = 39.71) compared to participants employing positive coping self-statements (M = 73.70, SD = 86.14) when controlling for pretest PSR. Group assignment had no significant influence on peak pain intensity ratings. Thus, our results reveal that manipulation of coping causes changes in pain endurance. PMID:21197299

  10. Elevated Pain Sensitivity in Chronic Pain Patients at Risk for Opioid Misuse

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Robert R.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Michna, Ed; Greenbaum, Seth; Ross, Ed; Jamison, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    This study employed quantitative sensory testing (QST) to evaluate pain responses in chronic spinal pain patients at low risk and high risk for opioid misuse, with risk classification based on scores on the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R). Patients were further sub-grouped according to current use of prescription opioids. Of the 276 chronic pain patients tested, approximately 65% were taking opioids; a median split was used to further categorize these patients as being on lower or higher doses of opioids. The highrisk group (n= 161) reported higher levels of clinical pain, had lower pressure and thermal pain thresholds at multiple body sites, had lower heat pain tolerance, and rated repetitive mechanical stimuli as more painful relative to the low-risk group (n= 115; p’s< .01). In contrast, QST measures did not differ across opioid groups. Multiple linear regression analysis suggested that indices of pain-related distress (i.e., anxiety and catastrophizing about pain) were also predictive of hyperalgesia, particularly in patients taking opioids. Collectively, regardless of opioid status, the high-risk group was hyperalgesic relative to the low-risk group; future opioid treatment studies may benefit from the classification of opioid risk, and the examination of pain sensitivity and other factors that differentiate high- and low-risk groups. PMID:21680252

  11. Effect of spinal monoaminergic neuronal system dysfunction on pain threshold in rats, and the analgesic effect of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Ryuta; Ishida, Mitsuhiro; Asaki, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shinohara, Shunji

    2016-02-26

    Dysfunction in the central serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) systems cause depression and pain. Descending spinal pain modulatory pathways are important in the analgesic mechanisms of antidepressants, particularly serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). While many non-clinical studies have demonstrated the roles of central monoaminergic systems in pain, there is little evidence to illuminate the direct contribution of spinal descending pain modulatory systems independently of depressive-like behavior. To examine the effects of dysfunction of spinal monoaminergic systems on pain sensitivity, we established a rat chronic pain model by administering lumbar-intrathecal reserpine to minimize its influence on brain. Lumbar-intrathecal reserpine evoked persistent mechanical hypersensitivity and corresponding reductions in spinal 5-HT and NE concentrations (from 767.2 to 241.6ng/g and from 455.9 to 41.7ng/g, respectively after reserpine 30nmol). Lumbar-intrathecal reserpine did not deplete brain monoamines or bring about depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. Spinal monoamines depletion-induced pain sensitivity was ameliorated by lumbar-intrathecal administration of the SNRIs (duloxetine and milnacipran) in dose-dependent manners. These suggest that increased pain sensitivity could be induced by dysfunction solely of the descending pain modulatory system, regardless of depressive-like behavior, and lumbar-intrathecal administration of SNRIs could ameliorate the pain sensitivity which might be mediated by affecting the descending pain modulatory system in the spinal cord, not via their antidepressant effects. PMID:26806036

  12. Phase IA Clinical Trial Evaluating the Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Analgesic Efficacy of an Intrathecally Administered Neurotensin A Analogue in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Sang, Christine N; Barnabe, Kate J; Kern, Steven E

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated CGX-1160 in a Phase Ia clinical trial to determine the safety of escalating doses in patients with central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Our secondary objective was to detect a trend toward analgesic efficacy. Four subjects received 3 consecutive escalating doses of CGX-1160 starting at 25 μg/h over 6 hours until 2 consecutive subjects experienced any adverse effect; 2 of the 4 subjects received 2 sequences of 3 consecutive dose escalations. Maximum tolerated dose was defined by the development of diarrhea (900 μg/h over 6 hours). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation. The CSF concentration-versus-time data fit to a biexponential PK model, showing a rapid redistribution phase followed by a significantly slower terminal elimination phase. Incorporating an effect site delay into the model improved the fit to the data (concentration producing 50% of the maximum effect [C50 ], 58.7 ug/mL at the site of drug effect). Maximal reduction from the baseline pain intensity was 63%. In summary, CGX-1160 was generally well tolerated when administered intrathecally at doses up to 1000 μg/h. Peak analgesic effect occurred after the peak intrathecal concentration, indicating the presence of an effect site compartment to the PK model to represent the concentration and effect profiles for this unique compound. PMID:27310326

  13. A meta-analysis on pain sensitivity in self-injury.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J; Thayer, J F; Kaess, M

    2016-06-01

    Individuals engaging in self-injurious behavior (SIB) frequently report absence of pain during acts of SIB. While altered pain sensitivity is discussed as a risk factor for the engagement in SIB, results have been mixed with considerable variance across reported effect sizes, in particular with respect to the effect of co-morbid psychopathology. The present meta-analysis aimed to summarize the current evidence on pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB and to identify covariates of altered pain processing. Three databases were searched without restrictions. Additionally a hand search was performed and reference lists of included studies were checked for potential studies eligible for inclusion. Thirty-two studies were identified after screening 720 abstracts by two independent reviewers. Studies were included if they reported (i) an empirical investigation, in (ii) humans, including a sample of individuals engaging in (iii) SIB and a group of (iv) healthy controls, (v) receiving painful stimulation. Random-effects meta-analysis was performed on three pain-related outcomes (pain threshold, pain tolerance, pain intensity) and several population- and study-level covariates (i.e. age, sex, clinical etiology) were subjected to meta-regression. Meta-analysis revealed significant main effects associated with medium to large effect sizes for all included outcomes. Individuals engaging in SIB show greater pain threshold and tolerance and report less pain intensity compared to healthy controls. Clinical etiology and age are significant covariates of pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB, such that pain threshold is further increased in borderline personality disorder compared to non-suicidal self-injury. Mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26964517

  14. Influence of gender and hemispheric lateralization on heat pain perception in major depression.

    PubMed

    Bär, K J; Greiner, W; Letsch, A; Köbele, R; Sauer, H

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of clinical pain complaints from patients with major depression, as well as increased experimental pain thresholds have been reported. The basis of this phenomenon remains unclear, as well as its relation to medication, clinical recovery, gender and lateralization of hemispheric function. We aimed to further elucidate heat pain perception in depression applying a testing battery including assessment (on both arms) of warmth perception, heat pain perception and heat pain tolerance, and the jaw opening reflex (duration of ES2 component) as a putative indicator of descending pain inhibition. The battery was applied to 20 patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were assessed: on admission (acutely depressed, off-medication), few days after admission (depressed, on medication), and after clinical recovery (mostly on medication), and controls at corresponding intervals. Significant elevated heat pain thresholds were found off and on medication in the acute stage (mainly in women) and after recovery on the right arm only. Elevated heat pain tolerance (on the right arm only) was seen in medicated patients in the acute and recovered stage. Significant prolongation of ES2 duration was only found in acutely depressed patients off medication. While confirming hypalgesia to heat pain in major depression, our findings demonstrate a close relation to gender and strong influence of lateralization after recovery. Altered pain processing at brain stem level might only partially be responsible for the observed finding. PMID:12765857

  15. Injection-associated pain in femoral arteriography: A European multicenter study comparing safety, tolerability, and efficacy of iodixanol and iopromide

    SciTech Connect

    Justesen, Per; Downes, Mark; Grynne, Birthe Hougens; Lang, Hanne; Rasch, Wenche; Seim, Eva

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate injection-associated pain, safety, and efficacy with the isotonic contrast medium iodixanol (Visipaque 270 mg I/ml) compared with iopromide (Ultravist 300 mg I/ml) in femoral arteriography. Methods. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group clinical investigation was carried out in 54 hospitals in Europe. Of the patients evaluated, 1225 received iodixanol and 1227 iopromide in conventional and/or digital subtraction angiography. Results. The iodixanol group reported statistically significantly less injection-associated pain (0.9%) than the iopromide group (9.5%) (p<0.001). Further, 4.1% in the iodixanol group experienced pain and/or severe heat sensation vs 19.8% in the iopromide group (p<0.001). In the iodixanol group, 1.8% of the patients experienced contrast-related adverse events vs 2.4% in the iopromide group (p=NS). Overall diagnostic information was optimal for 94.1% in the iodixanol group and 95.3% in the iopromide group (p=NS). Conclusions. Iodixanol 270 mg I/ml causes significantly less injection-associated pain during femoral arteriography and is as safe and efficatious as iopromide 300 mg I/ml.

  16. Efficacy of long-term milnacipran treatment in patients meeting different thresholds of clinically relevant pain relief: subgroup analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled withdrawal study

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Philip J; Clauw, Daniel J; Trugman, Joel M; Palmer, Robert H; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia patients from a long-term, open-label study of milnacipran (50–200 mg/day) were eligible to participate in a 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled withdrawal study. The withdrawal study evaluated loss of therapeutic response in patients who achieved ≥50% pain improvements after receiving up to 3.25 years of milnacipran. This post-hoc analysis investigated whether patients who met lower thresholds of pain improvement also experienced worsening of fibromyalgia symptoms upon treatment withdrawal. Method Among patients who received milnacipran ≥100 mg/day during the long-term study, three subgroups were identified based on percentage of pain reduction at randomization: ≥50% (protocol-defined “responders”; n=150); ≥30% to <50% (patients with clinically meaningful pain improvement; n=61); and <30% (n=110). Efficacy assessments included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR), 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey Physical Component Summary (SF-36 PCS), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results In the ≥30 to <50% subgroup, significant worsening in pain was detected after treatment withdrawal. The difference between placebo and milnacipran in mean VAS score changes for this subgroup (+9.0, P<0.05) was similar to the difference in protocol-defined responders (+9.4, P<0.05). In the <30% subgroup, no worsening in pain was observed in either treatment arm. However, patients in this subgroup experienced significant worsening in FIQR scores after treatment withdrawal (placebo, +6.9; milnacipran, −2.8; P<0.001), as well as worsening in SF-36 PCS and BDI scores. Conclusion Patients who experienced ≥30% to <50% pain reduction with long-term milnacipran had significant worsening of fibromyalgia symptoms after treatment withdrawal. These results suggest that the conventional ≥30% pain responder cutoff may be adequate to demonstrate efficacy in randomized withdrawal studies of fibromyalgia

  17. Antinociceptive effects of palatable sweet ingesta on human responsivity to pressure pain.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M E; Holder, M D

    1997-02-01

    Palatable sweet ingestion produces a morphine-like analgesia in both rats and human infants (2-5). To determine whether palatable sweet ingesta induces antinociception in human adults, 60 university students (30 men, 30 women) were exposed to a pressure algometer both before and after consuming either a sweet soft drink, filtered tap water, or nothing (Experiment 1). Pain responsivity was assessed with four pain measures: threshold, tolerance, and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of intensity and unpleasantness. Results showed that women who consumed either soft drink or water reported increased pain tolerance and VAS ratings at posttreatment compared with those receiving nothing. However, differences between groups were not found for men. Moreover, compared to men, women reported lower pain thresholds and tolerances and rated the pain as more intense. In Experiment 2, 40 women consumed either nothing or foods that they rated previously as palatable (chocolate-chip cookies), unpalatable (black olives), or neutral (rice cakes). Women who consumed the palatable sweet food showed increased pain tolerance compared with those receiving the unpalatable food, the neutral food, or nothing. These data constitute the first demonstration that "palatability-induced antinociception" (PIA) can occur in human adults. PMID:9035263

  18. Presence, involvement and efficacy of a virtual reality intervention on pain.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Maldonado, Jose; Gutierrez-Martinez, Olga; Loreto, Desiree; Peñaloza, Claudia; Nieto, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We explored the impact of an interactive VR environment on pain cognitions (in vivo catastrophizing and pain self-efficacy) and pain-related measures: pain threshold, pain tolerance, Pain Sensitivity Range (PSR), pain intensity and time estimation in a sample of healthy students. Sense of presence is essential to conduct a psychological treatment; if patients are not able to involve themselves in a virtual world they cannot experience relevant emotions, and the desired processes that are necessary for most psychological treatments will not occur. However, some authors argue that presence must be distinguished from the degree of engagement, involvement in the portrayed environment. The results obtained in our study are consistent with this view, since the Involvement scale of the IPQ did not correlate with any of the measures related with the treatment's efficacy. PMID:20543278

  19. A Quantitative Review of Ethnic Group Differences in Experimental Pain Response: Do Biology, Psychology and Culture Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Williams, Ameenah K.K.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Pain is a subjectively complex and universal experience. We examine research investigating ethnic group differences in experimental pain response, and factors contributing to group differences. Method We conducted a systematic literature review and analysis of studies using experimental pain stimuli to assess pain sensitivity across multiple ethnic groups. Our search covered the period from 1944-2011, and utilized the PUBMED bibliographic database; a reference source containing over 17 million citations. We calculated effect sizes, identified ethnic/racial group categories, pain stimuli and measures, and examined findings regarding biopsychosociocultural factors contributing to ethnic/racial group differences. Results We found 472 studies investigating ethnic group differences and pain. Twenty-six of these met our review inclusion criteria of investigating ethnic group differences in experimental pain. The majority of studies included comparisons between African Americans (AA) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). There were consistently moderate to large effect sizes for pain tolerance across multiple stimulus modalities; African Americans demonstrated lower pain tolerance. For pain threshold, findings were generally in the same direction, but effect sizes were small to moderate across ethnic groups. Limited data were available for suprathreshold pain ratings. A subset of studies comparing NHW and other ethnic groups showed a variable range of effect sizes for pain threshold and tolerance. Conclusion There are potentially important ethnic/racial group differences in experimental pain perception. Elucidating ethnic group differences, has translational merit for culturally-competent clinical care and for addressing and reducing pain treatment disparities among ethnically/racially diverse groups. PMID:22390201

  20. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain. PMID:16734514

  1. Pain sensitivity and opioid analgesia: a pharmacogenomic twin study.

    PubMed

    Angst, Martin S; Phillips, Nicholas G; Drover, David R; Tingle, Martha; Ray, Amrita; Swan, Gary E; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Clark, J David

    2012-07-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone medication for the management of moderate to severe pain. Unfortunately, vast inter-individual differences in dose requirements complicate their effective and safe clinical use. Mechanisms underlying such differences are incompletely understood, are likely multifactorial, and include genetic and environmental contributions. While accumulating evidence suggests that variants of several genes account for some of the observed response variance, the relative contribution of these factors remains unknown. This study used a twin paradigm to provide a global estimate of the genetic and environmental contributions to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid effects. Eighty one monozygotic and 31 dizygotic twin pairs successfully underwent a computer-controlled infusion with the μ-opioid agonist alfentanil in a single occasion, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study design. Pain sensitivity and analgesic effects were assessed with experimental heat and cold pressor pain models along with important covariates including demographic factors, depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Significant heritability was detected for cold pressor pain tolerance and opioid-mediated elevations in heat and cold pressor pain thresholds. Genetic effects accounted for 12-60% of the observed response variance. Significant familial effects accounting for 24-32% of observed variance were detected for heat and cold pressor pain thresholds and opioid-mediated elevation in cold pressor pain tolerance. Significant covariates included age, gender, race, education, and anxiety. Results provide a strong rationale for more detailed molecular genetic studies to elucidate mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid responses. Such studies will require careful consideration of the studied pain phenotype. PMID:22444188

  2. Pain evoked by polymodal stimulation of hand veins in humans.

    PubMed

    Arndt, J O; Klement, W

    1991-01-01

    1. To explore the function of the sensory innervation of veins in humans we used a psychophysical approach to study painful and non-painful sensations by applying polymodal stimuli (electrical, stretch, cold/heat and osmotic) inside vascularly isolated hand vein segments before and after blockade of either venous or cutaneous afferents. 2. All modes of stimulation elicited pain, which showed only slight adaptation during 10 min of maintained stimulation. Pain increased monotonically with stimulus intensity between threshold and the maximally tolerable pain. 3. The exponents of the power functions of the pain magnitude-stimulus strength relations for five stimulus modes ranged between 2.5 and 3.3 but did not significantly differ from one another (P = 0.3). 4. Pain evoked by all stimuli was reported to be of similar quality, i.e. sharp, aching and unpleasant; it was accompanied by non-painful sensations (skin movements on stretching, warm and cold sensation with intravenous thermal stimulation) unless the skin above the stimulated vein segment was numbed with benzocaine ointment. 5. Pain could no longer be evoked in the presence of 0.4-0.8% procaine within the stimulated vein segment. 6. These observations are consistent with the view that veins are invested with polymodal nociceptors only, which in all likelihood are connected with thinly myelinated afferents of the A delta group. 7. The vascularly isolated vein segment may open a new avenue for pain research in humans. PMID:1804973

  3. Pain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  4. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  5. Efficacy and tolerability studies evaluating a sleep aid and analgesic combination of naproxen sodium and diphenhydramine in the dental impaction pain model in subjects with induced transient insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S; Laurora, I; Wang, Y; Venkataraman, P; An, R; Roth, T

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of novel combination naproxen sodium (NS) and diphenhydramine (DPH) in subjects with postoperative dental pain along with transient insomnia induced by 5 h sleep phase advance. The present studies aimed to demonstrate the added benefit and optimal dosages of the combination product over individual ingredients alone in improving sleep and pain. Methods Each of the two studies was a two-centre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy trial. In the first study, subjects were randomised into one of the following treatment arms: NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 220 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. In the second study, subjects received either NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. The co-primary end-points in both studies were wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency (SL) measured by actigraphy. Other secondary sleep and pain end-points were also assessed. Results The intent-to-treat population included 712 and 267 subjects from studies one and two, respectively. In the first study, only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination showed significant improvements in both WASO vs. NS alone (−70.3 min p = 0.0002) and SL vs. DPH alone (25.50 and 41.50 min respectively, p < 0.0001). In the second study, the NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg combination failed to show any significant improvements vs. either component alone. Conclusions Only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination demonstrated improvement in both sleep latency vs. DPH 50 mg and sleep maintenance (WASO) vs. NS 440 mg. There were no serious or unexpected adverse events reported in either study. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01280591 (study 1); NCT01495858 (study 2) PMID:25996289

  6. Evidence for threshold effects of 25-hydroxyvitamin D on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in black and white obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, John D; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; Streeten, Elizabeth; Ryan, Alice S; Goldberg, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    We identified normal vs. abnormal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations by examining the relation of 25(OH)D to non-bone-related measures (plasma glucose, insulin resistance, lipids, blood pressure, fitness, obesity, and regional adiposity) and asking whether there is a 25(OH)D concentration above and below which the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome changes. We examined the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome by race to see whether race-specific normal ranges are needed, and we examined the role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in modulating the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome. In a cross-sectional study of 239 overweight and obese, sedentary postmenopausal women without diabetes (83 black, 156 white), outcome measures included plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), IGF-1, parathyroid hormone (PTH), aerobic fitness, body composition, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat, and blood pressure. We identified threshold effects in the association between 25(OH)D and these variables using piecewise linear regressions. We found that 25(OH)D was inversely related to fasting glucose, fasting and 2-h insulin, HOMA-IR, visceral abdominal fat, percentage fat, PTH, and triglycerides. Evidence for a threshold effect of 25(OH)D was found for 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. There was no evidence suggesting the need for race-specific normal 25(OH)D concentrations. IGF-1 modulated the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome but only below, and not above, a threshold 25(OH)D concentration. Our findings suggest a threshold effect of 25(OH)D on glucose-insulin metabolism such that 25(OH)D ≥ ∼26 μg/L (65.0 pmol/L) supports normal glucose homeostasis and that the same cut point defining normal 25(OH)D concentration can be used in black and white women. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01798030. PMID:24717362

  7. Evidence for Threshold Effects of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Black and White Obese Postmenopausal Women12

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, John D.; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; Streeten, Elizabeth; Ryan, Alice S.; Goldberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    We identified normal vs. abnormal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations by examining the relation of 25(OH)D to non-bone–related measures (plasma glucose, insulin resistance, lipids, blood pressure, fitness, obesity, and regional adiposity) and asking whether there is a 25(OH)D concentration above and below which the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome changes. We examined the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome by race to see whether race-specific normal ranges are needed, and we examined the role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in modulating the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome. In a cross-sectional study of 239 overweight and obese, sedentary postmenopausal women without diabetes (83 black, 156 white), outcome measures included plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), IGF-1, parathyroid hormone (PTH), aerobic fitness, body composition, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat, and blood pressure. We identified threshold effects in the association between 25(OH)D and these variables using piecewise linear regressions. We found that 25(OH)D was inversely related to fasting glucose, fasting and 2-h insulin, HOMA-IR, visceral abdominal fat, percentage fat, PTH, and triglycerides. Evidence for a threshold effect of 25(OH)D was found for 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. There was no evidence suggesting the need for race-specific normal 25(OH)D concentrations. IGF-1 modulated the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome but only below, and not above, a threshold 25(OH)D concentration. Our findings suggest a threshold effect of 25(OH)D on glucose–insulin metabolism such that 25(OH)D ≥ ∼26 μg/L (65.0 pmol/L) supports normal glucose homeostasis and that the same cut point defining normal 25(OH)D concentration can be used in black and white women. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01798030. PMID:24717362

  8. The Relationship Between Neck Pain and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Kajaks, Tara; MacDermid, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a significant societal burden due to its high prevalence and healthcare costs. While physical activity can help to manage other forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain, little data exists on the relationship between physical activity and neck pain. The purpose of this study was to compare physical activity levels between individuals with neck pain and healthy controls, and then to relate disability, fear of movement, and pain sensitivity measures to physical activity levels in each of the two participant groups. 21 participants were recruited for each of the two participant groups (n = 42). Data collection included the use of the Neck Disability Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, electrocutaneous (Neurometer® CPT) and pressure stimulation (JTech algometer) for quantitative sensory testing, and 5 days of subjective (Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity) and objective (BioTrainer II) measurements of physical activity. Analysis of Variance and Pearson’s Correlation were used to determine if differences and relationships exist between dependent variables both within and between groups. The results show that individuals with mild neck pain and healthy controls do not differ in subjectively and objectively measured physical activity. While participants with neck pain reported higher neck disability and fear of movement, these factors did not significantly relate to physical activity levels. Perceived activity level was related to pain threshold and tolerance at local neck muscles sites (C2 paraspinal muscle and upper trapezius muscle), whereas measured activity was related to generalized pain sensitivity, as measured at the tibialis anterior muscle site. PMID:24133553

  9. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  10. Swearing as a response to pain.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Atkins, John; Kingston, Andrew

    2009-08-01

    Although a common pain response, whether swearing alters individuals' experience of pain has not been investigated. This study investigated whether swearing affects cold-pressor pain tolerance (the ability to withstand immersing the hand in icy water), pain perception and heart rate. In a repeated measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to repeat a swear word versus a neutral word. In addition, sex differences and the roles of pain catastrophising, fear of pain and trait anxiety were explored. Swearing increased pain tolerance, increased heart rate and decreased perceived pain compared with not swearing. However, swearing did not increase pain tolerance in males with a tendency to catastrophise. The observed pain-lessening (hypoalgesic) effect may occur because swearing induces a fight-or-flight response and nullifies the link between fear of pain and pain perception. PMID:19590391

  11. Pain Sensitivity in Adolescent Males with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Testing for Associations with Conduct Disorder and Callous and Unemotional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Northover, Clare; Thapar, Anita; Langley, Kate; van Goozen, Stephanie HM

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced processing and experience of aversive emotional cues is a common component of theories on the development and persistence of aggression and antisocial behaviour. Yet physical pain, arguably the most basic aversive cue, has attracted comparatively little attention. Methods This study measured pain sensitivity and physiological response to painful stimuli (skin conductance level, SCL) in adolescent boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 183), who are at high risk for antisocial behaviour. We compared boys with ADHD with and without a comorbid diagnosis of Conduct Disorder (CD) on pain sensitivity, and examined patterns of association between pain measures, on the one hand, and problem severity and callous and unemotional (CU) traits, on the other. Results Boys with comorbid CD exhibited a higher pain threshold and tolerance than boys with ADHD alone, but the groups did not differ in physiology at the time the pain threshold and tolerance were reported. Regression analyses showed that ADHD problem severity positively predicted pain sensitivity, whereas levels of CU traits negatively predicted pain sensitivity. Conclusions These findings on physical pain processing extend evidence of impairments in aversive cue processing among those at risk of antisocial behaviour. The study highlights the importance of considering comorbidity and heterogeneity of disorders when developing interventions. The current findings could be used to identify subgroups within those with ADHD who might be less responsive to interventions that use corrective feedback to obtain behaviour change. PMID:26225935

  12. Unusual responses to electrocutaneous stimulation in refractory cervicobrachial pain: clues to a neuropathic pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, J F; Cohen, M L

    1992-01-01

    Refractory cervicobrachial pain (RCBP) is a common syndrome of uncertain pathogenesis, frequently seen in an occupational context. It is characterised by widespread neck, shoulder girdle and arm pain, often of dysaesthetic quality including burning, associated with paraesthesiae, impaired perception of touch, allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia. Despite these clinical features, the syndrome has not attracted investigation with other than standard neurophysiological tests. Electrocutaneous electrical stimulation (ECS), following a well-described and validated method, was chosen as a tool to investigate the nociceptive status in RCBP. A commercially available calibrate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) machine was used to determine perception threshold and pain tolerance with respect to the amplitude of current and duration of pulse. Fifteen patients with typical RCBP and ten normal volunteers were studied. The response profiles obtained were reproducible over time in both patients and controls and were able clearly to distinguish between affected and non-affected limbs. The perception threshold and pain tolerance in the unaffected limbs of patients did not differ from those in normal subjects. In the affected limbs there was reduction in pain tolerance, invariably accompanied by spread of sensation and persistence of dysaesthesiae, both induced by ECS. These results define the limbs affected by RCBP as regions of secondary hyperalgesia at the clinical level. It is suggested that neural dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of RCBP, although a confident distinction between peripheral and central processes cannot be made on the basis of these findings, which call for further investigation. PMID:1458699

  13. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls - a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. PMID:27022298

  14. The effect of visual stimulation via the eyeglass display and the perception of pain.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Ng, Jacobus K F; Chung, Joanne W Y; Wong, Thomas K S

    2002-02-01

    Hospitalization involves anxiety and pain for many people. Unfamiliar hospital settings, various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and the sight and sounds of medical procedures exacerbate pain and anxiety. By blocking off the anxiety-inducing sights and sounds of the hospital surroundings and creating a pleasant environment, an eyeglass display might be able to change the sensation and perception of pain. In this randomized, controlled, crossover study, 72 healthy university student volunteers were asked to wear a light-weight eyeglass that projected a feeling of watching a 52-inch television screen at 6 1/2 feet in distance while pain was produced by a modified tourniquet technique. Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in a V-session or B-session first, with subsequent cross-over. In a V-session, subjects were instructed to wear the eyeglass and watch the soundless display of natural scenery during the inflation. In a B-session, the eyeglass that subjects wore would project a static blank screen. During V-sessions, there was a significant increase in pain threshold (p < 0.001) and pain tolerance (p < 0.001). The degree of immersion was positively correlated with improvement in pain threshold, whereas the anxiety level was negatively correlated with improvement in pain threshold. These findings have implications for using visual stimulation as a positive adjunct to other methods of pain relief and for different pain conditions. This study was considered to be the pioneer use of visual stimulation in the local Chinese community as an adjunct to pain relief. PMID:11990976

  15. The Effect of Pressure Pain Sensitivity and Patient Factors on Self-Reported Pain-Disability in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C.; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Triano, John J.; Galea, Victoria; Gross, Anita R.

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to estimate the extent to which pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and patient factors predict pain-related disability in patients with neck pain (NP), and to determine if PPS differs by gender. Forty-four participants with a moderate level of chronic NP were recruited for this cross sectional study. All participants were asked to complete self-reported assessments of pain, disability and comorbidity and then underwent PPS testing at 4-selected body locations. Pearson`s r w was computed to explore relationships between the PPS measures and the self-reported assessments. Regression models were built to identify predictors of pain and disability. An independent sample t-test was done to identify gender-related differences in PPS, pain-disability and comorbidity. In this study, greater PPS (threshold and tolerance) was significantly correlated to lower pain-disability (r = -.30 to -.53, p≤0.05). Age was not correlated with pain or disability but comorbidity was (r= 0.42-.43, p≤0.01). PPS at the 4-selected body locations was able to explain neck disability (R2=25-28%). Comorbidity was the strongest predictor of neck disability (R2 =30%) and pain (R2=25%). Significant mean differences for gender were found in PPS, disability and comorbidity, but not in pain intensity or rating. This study suggests that PPS may play a role in outcome measures of pain and disability but between-subject comparisons should consider gender and comorbidity issues. PMID:25320651

  16. Effect of a nitric oxide donor (glyceryl trinitrate) on nociceptive thresholds in man.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    1996-05-01

    Several animal studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in central and peripheral modulation of nociception. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) exerts its physiological actions via donation of NO. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of this NO donor on nociceptive thresholds in man. On two different study days separated by at least a week 12 healthy subjects received a staircase infusion of GTN (0.015, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 micrograms/kg/min, 20 min each dose) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Before the infusion and after 15 min of infusion on each dose, pressure pain detection and tolerance thresholds were determined by pressure algometry (Somomedic AB, Sweden) in three different anatomic regions (finger, a temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue and a temporal region without interposed myofascial tissue). Relative to placebo, the three higher GTN doses induced a decrease in both detection and tolerance thresholds in the temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue (p = 0.003 detection and p = 0.002 tolerance thresholds, Friedman). No such changes were observed in the other two stimulated regions. These results could reflect central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, we regard convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO as a more likely explanation of our findings. PMID:8734768

  17. [Chronic pain and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Berker, Ender; Dinçer, Nilay

    2005-04-01

    The perception and interpretation of pain is the end point of an interaction of cognitive, cultural, and environmental factors and this complex interaction effects the pain response and quality of life of each person which shows that pain perception and the verbal and behavioral response shows variations and is specific for each patient. Chronic pain can be due to Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Neuropathic Pain (NP) where the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are being revealed or it can be chronic low back pain (CLBP) where pain persists in spite of healing of tissue and no underlying pathologic mechanism can be defected. Central sensitization, inhibition of descending pain inhibitory systems, functional changes in autonomic nervous system amd neurotransmitter as well as changes in stress response system are factors contributing to the initiation and maintenance of pain and cognitive, behavioral factors are also important contributors in chronic pain. Biopsychosocial and biomedical mechanisms should be assessed in the rehabilitation interventions. The aims of rehabilitation in chronic pain are to increase activity tolerance, functional capacity and to decrease socio-economic loads. The targets of activity should be physical, functional and social. Psychologic based programs as cognitive-behavioral techniques and operant conditioning are also valid procedures in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Rehabilitation should be multidisciplinary and of long-term targeted to valid out-come for success. PMID:15977088

  18. Attentional bias modification and pain: The role of sensory and affective stimuli.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jemma; Sharpe, Louise; Colagiuri, Ben

    2016-08-01

    There is growing evidence to support attentional bias modification (ABM) techniques such as the modified dot-probe task within the pain literature. Such techniques can help to inform theoretical models of pain by identifying the causal role of attentional bias constructs. The aim of this research was to explore the effects of dot-probe ABM that trains individuals towards (+) or away from (-) sensory (S) and affective (A) pain words, on attentional biases, interpretation biases, and pain outcomes. Healthy undergraduate students (N = 106) completed questionnaires, an attentional bias dot-probe task, and an interpretation bias task before and after ABM, one of four ABM versions that differed in training direction (S+A+, S-A+, S+A-, S-A-), and pain outcomes using the cold pressor task. Those trained towards affective pain words were found to have a greater pain threshold but also greater distress at tolerance. However, mechanisms of change could not be established, as ABM did not affect attentional or interpretation bias, even though changes in attentional bias were associated with pain outcomes. These findings provide partial support for the threat interpretation model and highlight the utility of affective pain ABM, although further investigation of causal mechanisms is warranted. PMID:27327608

  19. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  20. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls – a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant’s hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual’s self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. PMID:27022298

  1. Treatment of myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Bean, Matthew C; Heckman, Thomas W; Jayaseelan, Dhinu; Moats, Nick; Nava, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The objective of this article was to perform a narrative review regarding the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome and to provide clinicians with treatment recommendations. This paper reviews the efficacy of various myofascial pain syndrome treatment modalities, including pharmacological therapy, injection-based therapies and physical therapy interventions. Outcomes evaluated included pain (visual analog scale), pain pressure threshold and range of motion. The evidence found significant benefit with multiple treatments, including diclofenac patch, thiocolchicoside and lidocaine patches. Trigger point injections, ischemic compression therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, spray and stretch, and myofascial release were also efficacious. The authors recommend focusing on treating underlying pathologies, including spinal conditions, postural abnormalities and underlying behavioral issues. To achieve maximum pain reduction and improve function, we recommend physicians approach myofascial pain syndrome with a multimodal plan, which includes a combination of pharmacologic therapies, various physical therapeutic modalities and injection therapies. PMID:24645933

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of a hydrocodone extended-release tablet formulated with abuse-deterrence technology for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in patients with osteoarthritis or low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Martin E; Laudadio, Charles; Yang, Ronghua; Narayana, Arvind; Malamut, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of hydrocodone extended release (ER) developed with abuse-deterrence technology to provide sustained pain relief and limit effects of alcohol and tablet manipulation on drug release. Eligible patients with chronic moderate-to-severe low back or osteoarthritis pain were titrated to an analgesic dose of hydrocodone ER (15–90 mg) and randomized to placebo or hydrocodone ER every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 12 in weekly average pain intensity (API; 0=no pain, 10=worst pain imaginable). Secondary measures included percentage of patients with >33% and >50% increases from baseline in weekly API, change from baseline in weekly worst pain intensity, supplemental opioid usage, aberrant drug-use behaviors, and adverse events. Overall, 294 patients were randomized and received ≥1 dose of placebo (n=148) or hydrocodone ER (n=146). Weekly API did not differ significantly between hydrocodone ER and placebo at week 12 (P=0.134); although, in post hoc analyses, the change in weekly API was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER when excluding the lowest dose (15 mg; least squares mean, −0.20 vs 0.40; P=0.032). Significantly more patients had >33% and >50% increase in weekly API with placebo (P<0.05), and mean weekly worst pain intensity was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER at week 12 (P=0.026). Supplemental medication usage was higher with placebo (86%) than hydrocodone ER (79%). Incidence of aberrant drug-use behaviors was low, and adverse events were similar between groups. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, although results support the effectiveness of this hydrocodone ER formulation in managing chronic low back or osteoarthritis pain. Use of the hydrocodone ER 15-mg dose, a robust placebo response, and use of supplemental analgesics, particularly in the placebo group, may have limited detection of a statistically significant

  3. Manipulating the Placebo Response in Experimental Pain by Altering Doctor’s Performance Style

    PubMed Central

    Czerniak, Efrat; Biegon, Anat; Ziv, Amitai; Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Weiser, Mark; Alon, Uri; Citron, Atay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performance is paramount in traditional healing rituals. From a Western perspective, such performative behavior can be understood principally as inducing patients’ faith in the performer’s supernatural healing powers and effecting positive changes through the same mechanisms attributed to the placebo response, which is defined as improvement of clinical outcome in individuals receiving inactive treatment. Here we examined the possibility of using theatrical performance tools, including stage directions and scripting, to reproducibly manipulate the style and content of a simulated doctor–patient encounter and influence the placebo response in experimental pain. Methods: A total of 122 healthy volunteers (18–45 years, 76 men) exposed to experimental pain (the cold pressor test) were assessed for pain threshold and tolerance before and after receiving a placebo cream from a “doctor” impersonated by a trained actor. The actor alternated between two distinct scripts and stage directions, i.e., performance styles created by a theater director/playwright, one emulating a standard doctor–patient encounter (scenario A) and the other emphasizing attentiveness and strong suggestion, elements also present in ritual healing (scenario B). The placebo response size was calculated as the %difference in pain threshold and tolerance after exposure relative to baseline. In addition, subjects demonstrating a ≥30% increase in pain threshold or tolerance relative to baseline were defined as responders. Each encounter was videotaped in its entirety. Results: Inspection of the videotapes confirmed the reproducibility and consistency of the distinct scenarios enacted by the “doctor”-performer. Furthermore, scenario B resulted in a significant increase in pain threshold relative to scenario A. Interestingly, this increase derived from the placebo responder subgroup; as shown by two-way analysis of variance (performance style, F = 4.30; p = 0.040; η2 = 0

  4. Widespread pain in chronic epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Pienimäki, Tuomo; Siira, Pertti; Vanharanta, Heikki

    2011-10-01

    We studied the associations of widespread pain with other pain and functional measures among patients with chronic epicondylitis. A total of 190 patients (66% females) participated in the study; with a mean age 43.7, mean duration of symptoms 48weeks, chronic lateral (n=160) and medial (n=30) epicondylitis. We analysed clinical status, grip strength and cubital pain thresholds and interviewed pain and disability, leisure time physical activity, strenuous hobby activities for arms, duration of symptoms, other systemic and upper extremity disorders, arm operations, and work ability. The location of pain was analysed using a whole-body pain drawing, categorized into three groups; the highest of which was classified as widespread pain. A total of 85 patients (45%) reported widespread pain. It was highly associated with female gender, high pain scores, decreased grip strength and pain thresholds (p<0.001 for all), with increased number of positive manual tests, low level of hobby strain for arms and physical activity, long duration of symptoms, and sick leave (p for all <0.05). It was also related to upper extremity disorders and arm surgery, but not with operated epicondylitis, other systemic diseases, workload or work ability. In addition, 39% of patients without other disease reported widespread pain. Widespread pain is common in chronic epicondylitis with and without other diseases, and is related to high pain scores, decreased function of the arm, long duration of symptoms, sick leave, and with a low level of physical activity. PMID:21565536

  5. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD. PMID:26713424

  6. Efficacy and Tolerability of Conventional Nimesulide Versus Beta-Cyclodextrin Nimesulide in Patients with Pain After Surgical Dental Extraction: A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Mildred; Seijas, Alberto; Yibirín, Maria González

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pain following extraction of an impacted third molar is widely used to assess analgesic efficacy, especially that of a single dose of a drug. The analgesic activity of conventional nimesulide (CN) has been documented in a variety of types of acute and chronic pain. Beta-cyclodextrin nimesulide (BN) is a new formulation in which nimesulide is included in a cyclodextrin molecule, which increases its solubility in water and its dilution rate, allowing extended, rapid absorption of the drug. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a single dose of BN compared with CN in patients with pain following extraction of an impacted third molar. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy study conducted at 3 dentistry centers in Venezuela. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups. One group received a single dose of BN (400-mg tablet, equivalent to 100 mg of nimesulide); the other group received a single dose of CN (100-mg tablet). Both groups also received a placebo. The efficacy variables were (1) pain intensity (PI), assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at the following times: 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after drug administration; (2) time to first measurable difference in PI from baseline (PID) (PID ≥1 cm on the VAS; ie, the beginning of analgesic action); (3) maximum PID (max PID); (4) sum of PIDs in the 12-hour observation period; (5) pain relief (PR), as rated on a 5-point scale; (6) maximum PR; and (7) sum of the PR scores in the 12-hour observation period (ie, total PR). For the tolerability analysis, all adverse events (AEs) were to be recorded, and the investigators were to assess whether each AE was drug related. Results: Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 62 patients (40 women, 22 men; mean [SD] age, 20.1 [5.9] years) were assessed; 35 were treated with BN and 27 with CN. PI reduction was more rapid and greater

  7. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  8. Cholecystokinin and Pain*

    PubMed Central

    McRoberts, Jay W.

    1986-01-01

    The recent discovery that cholecystokinin (CCK) is present in the nervous system has prompted studies that have nearly proven its neurotransmitter status. Pain modulation appears to be a major effect of CCK and proglumide, its antagonist. CCK's inhibitory effect and proglumide's potentiating effect on opiate analgesia may have clinical application; proglumide's inhibitory effect on opiate tolerance may help in management of chronic pain. More research is required before the CCK/opiate interaction can be exploited on a large scale to relieve pain. PMID:2872841

  9. Clinical and Evoked Pain, Personality Traits, and Emotional States: Can Familial Confounding Explain the Associations?

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Elizabeth; Succop, Annemarie; Chopko, Laura; Afari, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pain is a complex phenomenon influenced by context and person-specific factors. Affective dimensions of pain involve both enduring personality traits and fleeting emotional states. We examined how personality traits and emotional states are linked with clinical and evoked pain in a twin sample. Methods 99 female twin pairs were evaluated for clinical and evoked pain using the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and dolorimetry, and completed the 120-item International Personality Item Pool (IPIP), the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), and ratings of stress and mood. Using a co-twin control design we examined a) the relationship of personality traits and emotional states with clinical and evoked pain, and b) whether genetics and common environment (i.e. familial factors) may account for the associations. Results Neuroticism was associated with the sensory component of the MPQ; this relationship was not confounded by familial factors. None of the emotional state measures was associated with the MPQ. PANAS Negative Affect was associated with lower evoked pressure pain threshold and tolerance; these associations were confounded by familial factors. There were no associations between IPIP traits and evoked pain. Conclusions A relationship exists between neuroticism and clinical pain that is not confounded by familial factors. There is no similar relationship between negative emotional states and clinical pain. In contrast, the relationship between negative emotional states and evoked pain is strong while the relationship with enduring personality traits is weak. The relationship between negative emotional states and evoked pain appears to be non-causal and due to familial factors. PMID:25311873

  10. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  11. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ... If your doctor recommends an over-the-counter pain reliever, read and follow the instructions on the box. ...

  12. Postamputation pain: studies on mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone

    2012-10-01

    Amputation is followed by both painful and non-painful phantom phenomena in a large number of amputees. Non-painful phantom sensations rarely pose any clinical problem, but 60-80% of all amputees also experience painful sensations (i.e. phantom pain) located to the missing limb. The severity of phantom pain usually decreases with time, but severe pain persists in 5-10% of patients. Pain in the residual limb (i.e. stump pain) is another consequence of amputation. Both stump and phantom pain can be very difficult to treat. Treatment guidelines used for other neuropathic pain conditions are probably the best approximation, especially for the treatment of stump pain. The aim of the present doctoral thesis was to explore some of the mechanisms underlying pain after amputation. Ten studies were carried out (I-X). My PhD thesis from 1998 dealt with pain before the amputation and showed that preamputation pain increases the risk of phantom pain after amputation (I). A perioperative epidural blockade, however, did not reduce the incidence of pain or abnormal sensory phenomena after amputation (II, III). The importance of sensitization before amputation for the subsequent development of pain is supported by study IV, in which pressure pain thresholds obtained at the limb before amputation were inversely related to stump and phantom pain after 1 week. Afferent input from the periphery is likely to contribute to postamputation pain as sodium channels were upregulated in human neuromas (VI), although neuroma removal did not always alleviate phantom pain (V). Sensitization of neurons in the spinal cord also seems to be involved in pain after amputation as phantom pain was reduced by ketamine, an NMDA-receptor antagonist. Another NMDA-receptor antagonist, memantine, and gabapentin, a drug working by binding to the δ2α-subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, had no effect on phantom pain (VII-IX). Supraspinal factors are also important for pain after amputation as

  13. [Pain and opioids].

    PubMed

    Murányi, Marianna; Radák, Zsolt

    2008-12-14

    Noxious stimuli cause pain to protect the body from harmful situations and attract attention to pathophysiologic changes of the body. Specific receptors of pain (nociceptors) can be found all over our body. Pain initiates protecting mechanisms such as vegetative and motor reflexes, and emotional, behavioral changes. However, chronic pain is practically useless and leads to psychopathological changes. There are several ways to relieve pain including non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents, opioids, neurosurgical and non-invasive methods. Central and peripheral effects of opioids can be realized through opioid receptors of the central and the enteric nervous system. In the central nervous system, they can inhibit the perception of pain or change the emotional reactions. Opioids are indicated in postoperative pain, neuropathic pain and cancer. However, the use of opioids has severe side-effects such as breathing depression and the development of tolerance and dependence which do not make opioids optimal painkillers. There are several laboratories in Hungary and abroad working on the design of optimal pain relievers. Furthermore, the euphoric effects of opioids lead to abuse which makes the research important on the mechanisms of opioid addiction. Taken together, opioid research, the design of new compounds and the exploration of the mechanisms of opiate addiction are very important. PMID:19073443

  14. Nociception, pain, negative moods and behavior selection

    PubMed Central

    Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury; while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior; and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms; and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: The limbic brain imparting risk, while mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats. PMID:26247858

  15. Does acute intraoral pain alter cutaneous sensibility?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, P; Ekblom, A; Lindblom, U; Marchettini, P

    1988-01-01

    Cutaneous sensibility was tested in eight patients suffering from acute postoperative intraoral pain. Tactile-, cold-, warm-, and heat-pain thresholds as well as reaction time to cold pulses were unaffected by the presence of pain. However, reaction time to warm pulses was increased in the painful area on the day of pain compared to a non-painful state. The findings are discussed in relation to (1) functional convergence of different sensory fibres on central neurons (2) the phenomenon of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and (3) secondary hyperalgesia. The observed effect of clinical pain on the warm pathway could be explained as an intrasegmental noxious inhibitory effect. PMID:3216205

  16. The role of beta-arrestin2 in the severity of antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence induced by different opioid pain therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Raehal, Kirsten M.; Bohn, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    Ligands acting at the same receptor can differentially activate distinct signal transduction pathways, which in turn, can have diverse functional consequences. Further, receptors expressed in different tissues may utilize intracellular signaling proteins in response to a ligand differently as well. The mu opioid receptor (MOR), which mediates many of the pharmacological actions of opiate therapeutics, is also subject to differential signaling in response to diverse agonists. To study the effect of diverse agonists on MOR signaling, we examined the effects of chronic opiate treatment on two distinct physiological endpoints, antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence, in mice lacking the intracellular regulatory molecule, βarrestin2. While βarrestin2 knockout (βarr2-KO) mice do not become tolerant to the antinociceptive effects of chronic morphine in a hot plate test, tolerance develops to the same degree in both wild type and βarr2-KO mice following chronic infusion with methadone, fentanyl, and oxycodone. Studies here also assess the severity of withdrawal signs precipitated by naloxone following chronic infusions at three different doses of each opiate agonist. While there are no differences in withdrawal responses between genotypes at the highest dose of morphine tested (48 mg/kg/day), the βarr2-KO mice display several less severe withdrawal responses when the infusion dose is lowered (12 or 24 mg/kg/day). Chronic infusion of methadone, fentanyl, and oxycodone all lead to equivalent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal responses in both genotypes at all doses tested. These results lend further evidence that distinct agonists can differentially impact on opioid-mediated responses in vivo in a βarrestin2-dependent manner. PMID:20713067

  17. Positive Traits Linked to Less Pain through Lower Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Pulvers, Kim; Carrillo, Janet; Merchant, Gina; Thomas, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between positive traits, pain catastrophizing, and pain perceptions. We hypothesized that pain catastrophizing would mediate the relationship between positive traits and pain. First, participants (n = 114) completed the Trait Hope Scale, the Life Orientation Test- Revised, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Participants then completed the experimental pain stimulus, a cold pressor task, by submerging their hand in a circulating water bath (0º Celsius) for as long as tolerable. Immediately following the task, participants completed the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ-SF). Pearson correlation found associations between hope and pain catastrophizing (r = −.41, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.20, p < .05). Optimism was significantly associated with pain catastrophizing (r = −.44, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.19, p < .05). Bootstrapping, a non-parametric resampling procedure, tested for mediation and supported our hypothesis that pain catastrophizing mediated the relationship between positive traits and MPQ-SF pain report. To our knowledge, this investigation is the first to establish that the protective link between positive traits and experimental pain operates through lower pain catastrophizing. PMID:22199416

  18. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial of Cannabis Cigarettes in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas; Tsodikov, Alexander; Millman, Jeanna; Bentley, Heather; Gouaux, Ben; Fishman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA) report that no sound scientific studies support the medicinal use of cannabis. Despite this lack of scientific validation, many patients routinely use “medical marijuana,” and in many cases this use is for pain related to nerve injury. We conducted a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of smoking cannabis for neuropathic pain. Thirty-eight patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for smoking either high-dose (7%), low-dose (3.5%), or placebo cannabis. In addition to the primary outcome of pain intensity, secondary outcome measures included evoked pain using heat-pain threshold, sensitivity to light touch, psychoactive side effects, and neuropsychological performance. A mixed linear model demonstrated an analgesic response to smoking cannabis. No effect on evoked pain was seen. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, with some acute cognitive effects, particularly with memory, at higher doses. PMID:18403272

  19. Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states

    PubMed Central

    Little, Joshua W.; Ford, Amanda; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M.; Chen, Zhoumou; Janes, Kali; Doyle, Timothy; Xie, Jennifer; Luongo, Livio; Tosh, Dillip K.; Maione, Sabatino; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a global burden that promotes disability and unnecessary suffering. To date, efficacious treatment of chronic pain has not been achieved. Thus, new therapeutic targets are needed. Here, we demonstrate that increasing endogenous adenosine levels through selective adenosine kinase inhibition produces powerful analgesic effects in rodent models of experimental neuropathic pain through the A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR, now known as ADORA3) signalling pathway. Similar results were obtained by the administration of a novel and highly selective A3AR agonist. These effects were prevented by blockade of spinal and supraspinal A3AR, lost in A3AR knock-out mice, and independent of opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms. A3AR activation also relieved non-evoked spontaneous pain behaviours without promoting analgesic tolerance or inherent reward. Further examination revealed that A3AR activation reduced spinal cord pain processing by decreasing the excitability of spinal wide dynamic range neurons and producing supraspinal inhibition of spinal nociception through activation of serotonergic and noradrenergic bulbospinal circuits. Critically, engaging the A3AR mechanism did not alter nociceptive thresholds in non-neuropathy animals and therefore produced selective alleviation of persistent neuropathic pain states. These studies reveal A3AR activation by adenosine as an endogenous anti-nociceptive pathway and support the development of A3AR agonists as novel therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25414036

  20. Habituation to Experimentally Induced Electrical Pain during Voluntary-Breathing Controlled Electrical Stimulation (BreEStim)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Hu, Tracy; Beran, Maria A.; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Painful peripheral electrical stimulation to acupuncture points was found to cause sensitization if delivered randomly (EStim), but induced habituation if triggered by voluntary breathing (BreEStim). The objective was to systematically compare the effectiveness of BreEStim and EStim and to investigate the possible mechanisms mediating the habituation effect of BreEStim. Methods Eleven pain-free, healthy subjects (6 males, 5 females) participated in the study. Each subject received the BreEStim and EStim treatments in a random order at least three days apart. Both treatments consisted of 120 painful but tolerable stimuli to the ulnar nerve at the elbow on the dominant arm. BreEStim was triggered by voluntary breathing while EStim was delivered randomly. Electrical sensation threshold (EST) and electrical pain threshold (EPT) were measured from the thenar and hypothenar eminences on both hands at pre-intervention and 10-minutes post-intervention. Results There was no difference in the pre-intervention baseline measurement of EST and EPT between BreEStim and EStim. BreEStim increased EPT in all tested sites on both hands, while EStim increased EPT in the dominant hypothenar eminence distal to the stimulating site and had no effect on EPT in other sites. There was no difference in the intensity of electrical stimulation between EStim and BreEStim. Conclusion Our findings support the important role human voluntary breathing plays in the systemic habituation effect of BreEStim to peripheral painful electrical stimulation. PMID:25153077

  1. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  2. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  3. Prediction of pain in orthodontic patients based on preoperative pain assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Baoyu; Ren, Manman; Lin, Feiou; Yao, Linjie

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether pretreatment assessment of experimental pain can predict the level of pain after archwire placement. Methods One hundred and twenty-one general university students seeking orthodontic treatment were enrolled in this study. A cold pressor test was performed to estimate the pain tolerance of subjects before treatment. Self-reported pain intensity was calculated using a 10 cm visual analog scale during the 7 days after treatment. The relationship between pain tolerance and orthodontic pain was analyzed using Spearman’s correlation analysis. Results The maximum mean level of pain intensity occurred at 24 hours after bonding (53.31±16.13) and fell to normal levels at day 7. Spearman’s correlation analysis found a moderate positive association between preoperative pain tolerance and self-reported pain after archwire placement (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in pain intensity between male and female patients at any time point (P>0.05). Conclusion A simple and noninvasive preoperative sensory test (the cold pressor test) was useful in predicting the risk of developing unbearable pain in patients after archwire placement. Self-reported pain after archwire placement decreased as individual pain tolerance increased. PMID:27042019

  4. Potential neurobiological benefits of exercise in chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scioli-Salter, Erica; Forman, Daniel E; Otis, John D; Tun, Carlos; Allsup, Kelly; Marx, Christine E; Hauger, Richard L; Shipherd, Jillian C; Higgins, Diana; Tyzik, Anna; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the effects of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma neuropeptide Y (NPY), allopregnanolone and pregnanolone (ALLO), cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and their association with pain sensitivity. Medication-free trauma-exposed participants were either healthy (n = 7) or experiencing comorbid chronic pain/posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n = 5). Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) during exercise testing was used to characterize cardiorespiratory fitness. Peak VO2 correlated with baseline and peak NPY levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.05 and r = 0.69, p < 0.05, respectively), as well as exercise-induced changes in ALLO (r = 0.89, p < 0.001) and peak ALLO levels (r = 0.71, p < 0.01). NPY levels at the peak of exercise correlated with pain threshold 30 min after exercise (r = 0.65, p < 0.05), while exercise-induced increases in ALLO correlated with pain tolerance 30 min after exercise (r = 0.64, p < 0.05). In contrast, exercise-induced changes in cortisol and DHEA levels were inversely correlated with pain tolerance after exercise (r = -0.69, p < 0.05 and r = -0.58, p < 0.05, respectively). These data suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with higher plasma NPY levels and increased ALLO responses to exercise, which in turn relate to pain sensitivity. Future work will examine whether progressive exercise training increases cardiorespiratory fitness in association with increases in NPY and ALLO and reductions in pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients with PTSD. PMID:27006290

  5. Sleep and pain sensitivity in adults.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Lallukka, Tea; Petrie, Keith J; Steingrímsdóttir, Ólöf Anna; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2015-08-01

    Sleep problems and pain are major public health concerns, but the nature of the association between the 2 conditions is inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether a range of sleep measures is associated with experimental increased pain sensitivity. A cross-sectional large population-based study from 2007 to 2008, the Tromsø 6 study, provided data from 10,412 participants (age: mean [SD], 58 [13] years; 54% women). Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep onset latency (SOL), and sleep efficiency, as well as frequency and severity of insomnia. The main outcome measure was pain sensitivity tests, including assessment of cold-pressor pain tolerance. We found that all sleep parameters, except sleep duration, were significantly associated with reduced pain tolerance. Both the frequency and severity of insomnia, in addition to SOL and sleep efficiency, were associated with pain sensitivity in a dose-response manner. Adjusting for demographics and psychological distress reduced the strengths of the hazard ratios, but most associations remained significant in the fully adjusted models. There was also a synergistic interaction effect on pain tolerance when combining insomnia and chronic pain. We conclude that sleep problems significantly increase the risk for reduced pain tolerance. Because comorbid sleep problems and pain have been linked to elevated disability, the need to improve sleep among patients with chronic pain, and vice versa, should be an important agenda for future research. PMID:25915149

  6. Dopamine and Pain Sensitivity: Neither Sulpiride nor Acute Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Depletion Have Effects on Thermal Pain Sensations in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Susanne; Ceko, Marta; Louis-Foster, Mytsumi; Elfassy, Nathaniel M.; Leyton, Marco; Shir, Yoram; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Based on animal studies and some indirect clinical evidence, dopamine has been suggested to have anti-nociceptive effects. Here, we investigated directly the effects of increased and decreased availability of extracellular dopamine on pain perception in healthy volunteers. In Study 1, participants ingested, in separate sessions, a placebo and a low dose of the centrally acting D2-receptor antagonist sulpiride, intended to increase synaptic dopamine via predominant pre-synaptic blockade. No effects were seen on thermal pain thresholds, tolerance, or temporal summation. Study 2 used the acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD) method to transiently decrease dopamine availability. In one session participants ingested a mixture that depletes the dopamine amino acid precursors, phenylalanine and tyrosine. In the other session they ingested a nutritionally balanced control mixture. APTD led to a small mood-lowering response following aversive thermal stimulation, but had no effects on the perception of cold, warm, or pain stimuli. In both studies the experimental manipulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission was successful as indicated by manipulation checks. The results contradict proposals that dopamine has direct anti-nociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. Based on dopamine’s well-known role in reward processing, we hypothesize that also in the context of pain, dopamine acts on stimulus salience and might play a role in the initiation of avoidance behavior rather than having direct antinociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. PMID:24236199

  7. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS), and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg) were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals) of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls) were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS. PMID:19925683

  8. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  9. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  10. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  11. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  12. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  13. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  14. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  15. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  16. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  17. Viewing the body modulates both pain sensations and pain responses.

    PubMed

    Beck, Brianna; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Viewing the body can influence pain perception, even when vision is non-informative about the noxious stimulus. Prior studies used either continuous pain rating scales or pain detection thresholds, which cannot distinguish whether viewing the body changes the discriminability of noxious heat intensities or merely shifts reported pain levels. In Experiment 1, participants discriminated two intensities of heat-pain stimulation. Noxious stimuli were delivered to the hand in darkness immediately after participants viewed either their own hand or a non-body object appearing in the same location. The visual condition varied randomly between trials. Discriminability of the noxious heat intensities (d') was lower after viewing the hand than after viewing the object, indicating that viewing the hand reduced the information about stimulus intensity available within the nociceptive system. In Experiment 2, the hand and the object were presented in separate blocks of trials. Viewing the hand shifted perceived pain levels irrespective of actual stimulus intensity, biasing responses toward 'high pain' judgments. In Experiment 3, participants saw the noxious stimulus as it approached and touched their hand or the object. Seeing the pain-inducing event counteracted the reduction in discriminability found when viewing the hand alone. These findings show that viewing the body can affect both perceptual processing of pain and responses to pain, depending on the visual context. Many factors modulate pain; our study highlights the importance of distinguishing modulations of perceptual processing from modulations of response bias. PMID:26884131

  18. Algometry with a clothes peg compared to an electronic pressure algometer: a randomized cross-sectional study in pain patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity of the central nervous system is widely present in pain patients and recognized as one of the determinants of chronic pain and disability. Electronic pressure algometry is often used to explore aspects of central hypersensitivity. We hypothesized that a simple pain provocation test with a clothes peg provides information on pain sensitivity that compares meaningfully to that obtained by a well-established electronic pressure algometer. "Clinically meaningful" was defined as a medium (r = 0.3-0.5) or high (r > 0.5) correlation coefficient according to Cohen's conventions. Methods We tested 157 in-patients with different pain types. A calibrated clothes peg was applied for 10 seconds and patients rated the pain intensity on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. Pressure pain detection threshold (PPdt) and pressure pain tolerance threshold (PPtt) were measured with a standard electronic algometer. Both methods were performed on both middle fingers and ear lobes. In a subgroup of 47 patients repeatability (test-retest reliability) was calculated. Results Clothes peg values correlated with PPdt values for finger testing with r = -0.54 and for earlobe testing with r = -0.55 (all p-values < 0.001). Clothes peg values also correlated with PPtt values for finger testing with r = -0.55 (p < 0.001). Test-retest reliability (repeatability) showed equally stable results for clothes peg algometry and the electronic algometer (all r-values > 0.89, all p-values < 0.001). Conclusions Information on pain sensitivity provided by a calibrated clothes peg and an established algometer correlate at a clinically meaningful level. PMID:21787399

  19. Intrathecal ziconotide: a review of its use in patients with chronic pain refractory to other systemic or intrathecal analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt(®)) is a synthetic conopeptide analgesic that acts by selectively antagonizing N-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Intrathecal ziconotide is the only non-opioid intrathecal analgesic that is FDA-approved for use in patients with treatment-refractory, chronic pain. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide was demonstrated in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in patients with treatment-refractory noncancer-related pain or cancer- or AIDS-related pain. Across trials, ziconotide recipients had significantly greater reductions in pain intensity during ziconotide treatment than those receiving placebo (primary endpoint). At the end of the titration period, approximately one-sixth to one-third of patients with noncancer chronic pain and one-half with cancer- or AIDS-related pain who received ziconotide reached a pain response threshold (≥30 % reduction in the pain intensity score). In ziconotide responders, analgesic effects were enduring, with some patients continuing treatment over extended periods. Across trials, the chief tolerability concerns in ziconotide recipients during the titration phase and during extended treatment were related to CNS adverse events. These were mostly of mild to moderate intensity, although serious adverse events were commonly attributed to ziconotide treatment, especially in trials with rapid ziconotide titration and that permitted higher dosages. In general, clinically important non-CNS adverse events were infrequent, and during the ziconotide titration phase, relatively few patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. Ongoing research will assess various strategies for selecting patients for ziconotide treatment and for enhancing its efficacy and tolerability. At the present time, intrathecal ziconotide provides a treatment option for patients with severe, unremitting pain who have failed to respond to other intensive analgesic regimens. PMID:23999971

  20. Can personality traits and gender predict the response to morphine? An experimental cold pain study.

    PubMed

    Pud, Dorit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Rogowski, Zeev; Adler, Rivka; Eisenberg, Elon

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the possible role of personality traits, in accordance with Cloninger's theory, and gender, in the variability of responsiveness to opioids. Specifically, it was intended to test whether or not the three personality dimensions - harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence (RD) and novelty seeking (NS) - as suggested by Cloninger, can predict inter-personal differences in responsiveness to morphine after exposure to experimental cold pain. Thirty-four healthy volunteers (15 females, 19 males) were given the cold pressor test (CPT). Pain threshold, tolerance, and magnitude (VAS) were measured before and after (six measures, 30 min apart) the administration of either 0.5 mg/kg oral morphine sulphate (n=21) or 0.33 mg/kg oral active placebo (diphenhydramine) (n=13) in a randomized, double blind design. Assessment of the three personality traits, according to Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, was performed before the CPT. A high HA score (but not RD, NS, or baseline values of the three pain parameters) predicted a significantly larger pain relief following the administration of morphine sulphate (but not of the placebo). Women exhibited a larger response in response to both treatments, as indicated by a significantly increased threshold and tolerance following morphine sulphate as well as significantly increased tolerance and decreased magnitude following placebo administration. The present study confirms the existence of individual differences in response to analgesic treatment. It suggests that high HA personality trait is associated with better responsiveness to morphine treatment, and that females respond better than men to both morphine and placebo. PMID:16310713

  1. Electronic gaming as pain distraction.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Eleanor; Trevena, Judy; Swain, Nic

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether active distraction reduces participants' experience of pain more than passive distraction during a cold pressor task. In the first experiment, 60 participants were asked to submerge their hand in cold (2°C) water for as long as they could tolerate. They did this with no distraction, and then with active (electronic gaming system) and passive (television) distraction, in randomly assigned order. Tolerance time, pain intensity ratings and task absorption ratings were measured for each condition. A second experiment attempted to control for participants' expectations about the effects of distraction on pain. Forty participants underwent the same experimental procedure, but were given verbal suggestions about the effects of distraction by the experimenter before each distraction condition. Participants in both experiments had a significantly higher pain tolerance and reported less pain with the active distraction compared with passive or no distraction. Participants reported being more absorbed, and were significantly more willing to do the task again when they had the active distraction compared with both passive distraction and no distraction. They also had more enjoyment, less anxiety and greater reduction in pain with active distraction than with passive distraction. There was no effect of suggestion. These experiments offer further support for the use of electronic games as a method of pain control. PMID:21369538

  2. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  3. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  4. Ion channel therapeutics for pain

    PubMed Central

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  5. Cognitive-emotional sensitization contributes to wind-up-like pain in phantom limb pain patients.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Nikolajsen, Lone; Christensen, Bente; Egsgaard, Line Lindhart; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Svensson, Peter; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral mechanisms are known to play a role in phantom pain following limb amputation, and more recently it has been suggested that central mechanisms may also be of importance. Some patients seem to have a psychological sensitivity that predisposes them to react with pain catastrophizing after amputation of a limb, and this coping style may contribute to increased facilitation, impaired modulation of nociceptive signals, or both. To investigate how pain catastrophizing, independently of anxiety and depression, may contribute to phantom limb pain and to alterations in pain processing twenty-four upper-limb amputees with various levels of phantom limb pain were included in the study. Patients' level of pain catastrophizing, anxiety and depression was assessed and they went through quantitative sensory testing (QST) of thresholds (mechanical and thermal) and wind-up-like pain (brush and pinprick). Catastrophizing accounted for 35% of the variance in phantom limb pain (p=0.001) independently of anxiety and depression. Catastrophizing was also positively associated with wind-up-like pain in non-medicated patients (p=0.015), but not to pain thresholds. These findings suggest that cognitive-emotional sensitization contributes to the altered nociceptive processing seen in phantom limb pain patients. The possible interactions between pain catastrophizing, wind-up-like pain, and peripheral input in generating and maintaining phantom limb pain are discussed. PMID:21067864

  6. Central Hypersensitivity in Chronic Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Paul, Tracy; Chae, John; Wilson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the association of hemiplegic shoulder pain with central hypersensitivity through pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) at healthy, distant tissues. Design This study is a cross-sectional study. A total of 40 patients (n=20 hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP), n=20 stroke without HSP) were enrolled in this study. Pressure-pain thresholds were measured at the affected deltoid and contralateral deltoid and tibialis anterior using a handheld algometer. Differences in PPTs were analyzed by Wilcoxon Rank Sum test and with linear regression analysis controlling for gender, a known confounder of PPTs. Results Subjects with hemiplegic shoulder pain had lower local PPTs than stroke control subjects when comparing the painful to dominant shoulders and comparing the non-painful shoulder and tibialis anterior to the non-dominant side controls. Similarly, those with hemiplegic shoulder pain had lower PPTs when comparing to controls in contralesional-to-contralesional comparisons as well as ipsilesional-to-ipsilesional comparisons. Conclusions Subjects with hemiplegic shoulder pain have lower local and distal PPTs than subjects without hemiplegic shoulder pain. Our study suggests that chronic shoulder pain may be associated with widespread central hypersensitivity, which has been previously found to be associated with other chronic pain syndromes. This further understanding can then help develop better treatment options for those with this hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:23255268

  7. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  8. Pain Characteristics after Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Bum; Kang, Kyeongjin; Song, Mi Kyung; Seok, Suhyun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) causes various types of postoperative pain, and the pain pattern has not been evaluated in detail to date. This prospective observational study investigated the types of postoperative pain, intensity in the course of time, and pain characteristics during the first postoperative 72 hr after TLH. Methods. Sixty four female patients undergoing TLH were enrolled, which finally 50 patients were included for the data analyses. The locations of pain included overall pain, abdominal visceral and incisional pains, shoulder pain, and perineal pain. Assessments were made at rest and in motion, and pain level was scored with the use of the 100 mm visual analog scale. The pain was assessed at baseline, and at postoperative 30 min, 1 hr, 3 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, 48 hr, and 72 hr. Results. Overall, visceral, and incisional pains were most intense on the day of operation and then decreased following surgery. In contrast, shoulder pain gradually increased, peaking at postoperative 24 hr. Shoulder pain developed in 90% of all patients (44/50). It was not more aggravated in motion than at rest, in comparison with other pains, and right shoulder pain was more severe than left shoulder pain (p=0.006). In addition, the preoperative exercise habit of patients increased the threshold of shoulder pain. Most patients (46/50) had perineal pain, which was more severe than abdominal pain in approximately 30% of patients (17/50). Conclusion. Pain after TLH showed considerably different duration, severity, and characteristics, compared with other laparoscopic procedures. Shoulder pain was most intense at postoperative 24 hr, and the intensity was associated with the prior exercise habit of patients and the high level of analgesic request. PMID:27499688

  9. 40 CFR 180.2010 - Threshold of regulation determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Threshold of regulation determinations. 180.2010 Section 180.2010 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Pesticide Chemicals Not Requiring a Tolerance or an Exemption...

  10. 40 CFR 180.2010 - Threshold of regulation determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Threshold of regulation determinations. 180.2010 Section 180.2010 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Pesticide Chemicals Not Requiring a Tolerance or an Exemption...

  11. Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Anna M.; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M.; Montoya, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

  12. Oral opioid use alters DNIC but not cold pain perception in patients with chronic pain - new perspective of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kerstin Carlin; Eisenberg, Elon; Haddad, May; Pud, Dorit

    2008-10-15

    Opioids can elicit unexpected changes in pain sensitivity, known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of this study was to explore whether OIH exists in patients with chronic pain treated with oral opioids (OP) versus non-opioid (NOP) analgesics. The sensitivity to cold pain and the magnitude of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) were evaluated in 73 OP and 37 NOP treated patients. Pain threshold, intensity and tolerance in response to the cold pressor (1 degrees C) were measured. DNIC was tested by co-administrating conditioned heat stimulation (47 degrees C) to the left forearm and a conditioning stimulation of 12 degrees C for 30s to the right hand. The results showed no differences between the two groups in any of the cold pain measures. In contrast, the magnitude of DNIC was significantly larger in the NOP than in the OP treated patients (p=0.003). A gender based analysis showed a significant difference in DNIC between OP and NOP treated men only. However, a mixed model ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of treatment (OP versus NOP) (F=5.928, p=0.017) rather than gender on DNIC. A regression analysis showed that opioid dosage and treatment duration had a significant negative effect on the magnitude of DNIC in OP treated men (beta=-2.175, p=0.036 and beta=-2.061, p=0.047, respectively). In conclusion, oral opioids usage for the treatment of chronic pain does not result in abnormal sensitivity to cold pain, but seems to alter pain modulation. The use of 'advanced' psychophysics tests such as evaluation of DNIC can help understanding the phenomenon of OIH. PMID:18583047

  13. Pain Experience and Perception in the Obese Subject Systematic Review (Revised Version).

    PubMed

    Torensma, Bart; Thomassen, Irene; van Velzen, Monique; In 't Veld, Bastiaan Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Pain is an integral part of life and has an important protective function. Pain perception has been shown to differ between subjects and changes with gender, race, and culture. In addition, it has been suggested that obesity influences pain perception and that obesity can be a risk factor for increased pain thresholds. The aim of this systematic review was to examine pain thresholds in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. The electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, and EMBASE were searched using combinations of terms for obese, pain measurement, visual analog scale, quantitative sensory testing, and pain perception. Studies without comparison as well as cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. The search was conducted without restrictions on language or date of publication. From a total of 1818 identified studies, seven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, whereby only one study tested the pain threshold difference between obese and non-obese and also before and after body weight loss surgery. Two studies showed a lower pain threshold and four studies a higher pain threshold in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. Two studies showed no difference in pain threshold before and after substantial body weight loss due to surgery. Weight loss after surgery was not identified as a factor for higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. In view of the heterogeneity of the studies, the variability of the subjects and differences in methodological quality, a meta-analysis could not be performed. From the available literature, there is a tendency towards higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. Neither substantial weight loss, nor gender, were factors explaining difference in threshold. Future randomized, controlled trials should explore demographic variables that could influence pain perception or pain thresholds in obese individuals, and multimodal pain testing is

  14. Pain: history, culture and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ahmad; Raza, Fauzia; Khan, Iqbal Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Pain, one of the universals of existence, has a long and venerable history, its origin initially attributed to godly punishment for disbelievers; and, with improved understanding, to physical and psycho-social factors. "Pain is emotion or sensation?" has been a debatable issue. Razes developed pleasure-pain theory, founded on the theories of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus. Descartes' Dualism shifted the centre of pain from the heart to the brain but negated the psychological contribution to its pathogenesis. Gate Control Theory, fascinated with the idea of "neurological gates", highlighted the important role of the brain in dealing with the messages received. The International Association of the Study of Pain, in 1979, coined a definition of pain which is currently in use and was last updated on 6th October 2014. Its validity has been challenged and a new definition has been suggested. Whereas the experience is personalized, immeasurable and unsharable, different cultural groups react differently to pain from relative tolerance to over-reaction. Gender and ethnic differences in the perception of pain are well proven and the effects of various religious beliefs adequately scored. Despite extensive research over centuries, understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from optimal. Untiring efforts to identify a paincentre in the brain have been futile. Had it been possible, millions of pain sufferers would have been relieved of their physical agony and mental anguish by the prick of needle. PMID:26203543

  15. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  16. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  17. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  18. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  19. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  20. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  1. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or bone changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain ...

  2. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is ... injure the tendons on the outside of the elbow. This condition is commonly called tennis elbow . Golfers ...

  3. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  4. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... water or other clear fluids. You may have sports drinks in small amounts. People with diabetes must ... pain occur? For example, after meals or during menstruation? What makes the pain worse? For example, eating, ...

  5. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  6. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  7. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  8. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, including your heart, lungs, esophagus, muscles, ribs, tendons, or nerves. Pain may also spread to ... often occurs with fast breathing Inflammation where the ribs join the breast bone or sternum ( costochondritis ) Shingles , ...

  9. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them. PMID:27045524

  10. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  11. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    Face pain may be dull and throbbing or an intense, stabbing discomfort in the face or forehead. It can occur in one or ... Pain that starts in the face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in the body. ...

  12. Pain perception development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Simons, Sinno H P; Tibboel, Dick

    2006-08-01

    Newborn infants are not small adults. The pharmacokinetics and dynamics of analgesic drugs are immature at birth. Volumes of distribution, drug clearances, side-effects and drug efficacy all differ in newborns as compared to adults. Interestingly, these parameters develop before birth and during the postnatal period, reaching adult values after a period of months or years. This means that clinicians should anticipate on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) changes in newborns with increasing post-conceptual age. The ability to perceive pain might also be immature at birth. Lower pain thresholds due to the absence of inhibitory descending spinothalamic fibers and a not yet fully developed cortical pain memory system are points of interest for our understanding of differences in pain perception in the newborn infant. Although this is a relatively unexplored area of research in humans, we will discuss the maturation and development of neonatal pain experience and perception in this paper. PMID:16621747

  13. Can coadministration of oxycodone and morphine produce analgesic synergy in humans? An experimental cold pain study

    PubMed Central

    Grach, Michael; Massalha, Wattan; Pud, Dorit; Adler, Rivka; Eisenberg, Elon

    2004-01-01

    Aims The coadministration of subantinociceptive doses of oxycodone with morphine has recently been shown to result in a synergistic antinociceptive effect in rats. The present study was aimed to investigate the possibility that coadministration of morphine and oxycodone can produce a similar synergistic effect in humans exposed to an experimental model of cold pressor test (CPT). Methods The enriched enrolment design was used to exclude ‘stoic’ and ‘placebo responders’ in a single-blind fashion. ‘Nonstoic’, placebo ‘nonresponder’ female volunteers (n = 30) were randomly assigned to receive 0.5 mg kg−1 oral morphine sulphate, 0.5 mg kg−1 oral oxycodone hydrochloride, and the combination of 0.25 mg kg−1 morphine sulphate with 0.25 mg kg−1 oxycodone hydrochloride, 1 week apart from each other, in a double-blind crossover design. Latency to pain onset (threshold), pain intensity (VAS), and pain tolerance (time until removal of the hand from the water) were measured six times over a 3-h period, subsequent to the administration of each medication, and were used to assess their antinociceptive effect. Results The combination produced a significantly higher effect on latency to pain onset than that of morphine alone [difference in mean postbaseline value 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48, 3.9; P = 0.01] but the effect was nonsignificantly smaller that that of oxycodone alone. Similarly, the effect of the combination on pain tolerance was significantly larger than that of morphine alone (combination difference 8.4; 95% CI 2.5, 14.3; P = 0.007), whereas oxycodone alone caused a nonsignificantly larger effect than that of the combination treatment. Comparisons of pain magnitude failed to show any significant differences between the three treatments. Conclusions These results indicate that at the doses tested, morphine and oxycodone do not produce synergistic antinociceptive effects in healthy humans exposed to the CPT. PMID:15327582

  14. Management of pain in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2005-03-01

    The elderly are often untreated or undertreated for pain. Barriers to effective management include challenges to proper assessment of pain; underreporting on the part of patients; atypical manifestations of pain in the elderly; a need for increased appreciation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of aging; and misconceptions about tolerance and addiction to opioids. Physicians can effectively manage pain in the elderly by understanding different types of pain (nociceptive and neuropathic), and appropriate use of nonopioid, opioid, and adjuvant medications. Opioids have become more widely accepted for treating older adults who have persistent pain, but their use requires physicians have an understanding of prevention and management of side effects, opioid titration and withdrawal, and careful monitoring. Placebo use is unwarranted and unethical. Nonpharmacologic approaches to pain management are essential and include osteopathic manipulative treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and spiritual interventions. The holistic and interdisciplinary approach of osteopathic medicine offers an approach that can optimize effective pain management in older adults. PMID:18154193

  15. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  16. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  17. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  18. Sex differences in experimental measures of pain sensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bulls, Hailey W; Freeman, Emily L; Anderson, Austen JB; Robbins, Meredith T; Ness, Timothy J; Goodin, Burel R

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased pain sensitivity and disruption of endogenous pain inhibitory processes may account, at least in part, for the greater prevalence and severity of chronic pain in women compared to men. However, previous studies addressing this topic have produced mixed findings. This study examined sex differences in pain sensitivity and inhibition using quantitative sensory testing (QST), while also considering the influence of other important factors such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=24) each completed a QST battery. This battery included an ischemic pain task (IPT) that used a submaximal effort tourniquet procedure as well as a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) procedure for the assessment of endogenous pain inhibition. Prior to QST, participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Analyses revealed significant sex differences for the ischemic pain task and the conditioned pain modulation procedure, such that women tolerated the ischemic pain for a shorter amount of time and demonstrated less pain inhibition compared with men. This remained true even when accounting for sex differences in depressive symptoms and sleep quality. The results of this study suggest that women may be more pain sensitive and possess less-efficient endogenous pain inhibitory capacity compared with men. Whether interventions that decrease pain sensitivity and enhance pain inhibition in women ultimately improve their clinical pain outcomes is an area of research that deserves additional attention in the future. PMID:26170713

  19. [Evoked cortical somatosensory potentials in painful cervicobrachial radicular syndromes].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Marks, E; Miszczak, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors determined the subjective, objective and maximal pain threshold by means of electrical stimulation in two groups of subjects. Group I comprised healthy subjects, group II patients with right-sided radicular cervicobrachial pains. The method applied by the authors for objective determination of pain threshold with evoked cortical somatosensory potential differentiated both groups which suggests its practical usefulness in clinical practice and expertise. PMID:683429

  20. Pain following hysterectomy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that different surgical procedures like amputation, thoracotomy, inguinal herniotomy, and mastectomy are associated with a risk of developing chronic postsurgical pain. Hysterectomy is the most frequent gynecological procedure with an annual frequency of 5000 hysterectomies for a benign indication in Denmark, but is has not previously been documented in detail to what extent this procedure leads to chronic pain. The aim of this PhD thesis was therefore to describe the epidemiology, type of pain, risk factors, and predictive factors associated with chronic pain after hysterectomy for a benign indication. The thesis includes four papers, of which one is based on a questionnaire study, two are based on a prospective clinical study, and one is a review of chronic pain after hysterectomy. The questionnaire paper included 1135 women one year after hysterectomy. A postal questionnaire about pain before and after hysterectomy was combined with data from the Danish Hysterectomy Database. Chronic postoperative pain was described by 32%, and the identified risk factors were preoperative pelvic pain, previous cesarean section, other pain problems and pain as an indication for hysterectomy. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a decreased risk of having pain after one year. The type of surgery (i.e. abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy) did not influence chronic pain. The prospective paper included 90 women referred for a hysterectomy on benign indication. The tests were performed before, on day 1, and 4 months after surgery and included questionnaires about pain, coping, and quality of life together with quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds. Seventeen percent had pain after 4 months, and the risk factors were preoperative pain problems elsewhere and a high intensity of acute postoperative pain. Type of surgery was not a risk factor. Preoperative brush-evoked allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, and vaginal pain threshold were associated with a high

  1. Social Modeling Influences on Pain Experience and Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Kenneth D.

    The impact of exposure to social models displaying variably tolerant pain behaviour on observers' expressions of pain is examined. Findings indicate substantial effects on verbal reports of pain, avoidance behaviour, psychophysiological indices, power function parameters, and sensory decision theory indices. Discussion centers on how social models…

  2. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders. PMID:24447510

  3. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve pain from diabetes Read More "Chronic Pain" Articles Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and ...

  4. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  5. Autoantibody pain.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  6. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  7. Facial pain.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B

    2009-07-01

    Facial pain is a debilitating disorder if left untreated. Too often, patients are labeled as having psychopathology when face pain etiology is unclear. These patients are categorized as "atypical," "idiopathic," or "psychogenic." Cases of facial pain involving neuropathic, neurovascular, musculoskeletal, as well as intracranial and extracranial systems will be reviewed. Peripheral and central mechanisms associated with these disorders are used to provide an update of these frequently seen clinical issues. PMID:19590376

  8. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  9. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  10. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  11. Heritability of Pain Catastrophizing and Associations with Experimental Pain Outcomes: A Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Zina; Strachan, Eric; Sullivan, Michael; Vervoort, Tine; Avery, Ally R.; Afari, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    The current study employed a twin paradigm to examine the genetic and environmental contributions to pain catastrophizing as well as the observed association between pain catastrophizing and cold pressor task (CPT) outcomes. Male and female monozygotic (n=206) and dizygotic twins (n=194) from the University of Washington Twin Registry completed a measure of pain catastrophizing and performed a CPT challenge. As expected, pain catastrophizing emerged as a significant predictor of several CPT outcomes, including cold pressor immersion tolerance, pain tolerance, and delayed pain rating. The heritability estimate for pain catastrophizing was found to be 37% with the remaining 63% of variance attributable to unique environmental influence. Additionally, the observed associations between pain catastrophizing and CPT outcomes were not found attributable to shared genetics or environmental exposure, suggesting a direct relationship between catastrophizing and experimental pain outcomes. This study is the first to examine the heritability of pain catastrophizing and potential processes by which pain catastrophizing is related to experimental pain response. PMID:25599234

  12. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  13. Pain insensitivity syndrome misinterpreted as inflicted burns.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; Baartmans, Martin G A; Vos, Paul; Dokter, Jan; White, Tonya; Tibboel, Dick

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of a 10-year-old child with severe burns that were misinterpreted as inflicted burns. Because of multiple injuries since early life, the family was under suspicion of child abuse and therefore under supervision of the Child Care Board for 2 years before the boy was burned. Because the boy incurred the burns without feeling pain, we conducted a thorough medical examination and laboratory testing, evaluated detection and pain thresholds, and used MRI to study brain morphology and brain activation patterns during pain between this patient and 3 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. We found elevated detection and pain thresholds and lower brain activation during pain in the patient compared with the healthy controls and reference values. The patient received the diagnosis of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV on the basis of clinical findings and the laboratory testing, complemented with the altered pain and detection thresholds and MRI findings. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV is a very rare congenital pain insensitivity syndrome characterized by the absence of pain and temperature sensation combined with oral mutilation due to unawareness, fractures, and anhidrosis caused by abnormalities in the peripheral nerves. Health care workers should be aware of the potential presence of this disease to prevent false accusations of child abuse. PMID:24733875

  14. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  15. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  16. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  17. Experimental pain induced by electrical and thermal stimulation of the skin in healthy man: sensitivity to 75 and 150 mg diclofenac sodium in comparison with 60 mg codeine and placebo.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Steinringer, H; Schneider, S; Mittelbach, G; Winklehner, S; Gaupmann, G

    1986-01-01

    Models with experimentally induced pain in healthy man might be useful for the screening for analgesic effects of new drugs. Experimental pain models have been shown to discriminate reliably between the effects of opioid analgesics and placebo but their sensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents is disputed. This study investigated whether it would be possible by using electrically and thermally induced cutaneous pain to discriminate reliably the effects of single oral doses of 75 and 150 mg diclofenac sodium on the one hand and 60 mg codeine on the other from those of placebo. Forty-eight healthy subjects participated each in four experiments in which they received, in random double-blind fashion, each of the treatments. Every experiment comprised eight series of measurements, two before and six after drug administration, carried out at 30 min intervals. Diclofenac sodium produced significant dose-related increases of threshold and tolerance to electrically and threshold to thermally induced pain. Codeine 60 mg was significantly superior to placebo in all pain measures. Its analgesic effects were stronger than those of diclofenac 75 mg but weaker than those of diclofenac 150 mg. Neither 150 mg nor 75 mg diclofenac caused more side effects than placebo, whereas codeine 60 mg elicited a high frequency of side effects. No severe adverse effects occurred after any one treatment. The results suggest that both electrically and thermally induced cutaneous pain are well suited to evaluate analgesic effects not only of opioids but also of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:3947505

  18. A Comparison of Two Pain Scales in the Assessment of Dental Pain in East Delhi Children

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita

    2012-01-01

    Pain is the most common symptom of oral diseases. Pain perception in children is highly variable and unreliable due to poor communication. Therefore we designed a study to compare pain measurement techniques, that is, visual analogue scale (VAS) and Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFPS) among Delhi children aged 3 to 14 years undergoing dental extraction. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 180 patients aged 3 to 14 years who had undergone dental extraction. Children were assessed for their pain sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) and Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFPS ). Result and Conclusion. Pain threshold tends to decline, and the self-management of pain becomes more effective with increasing age. Genderwise result shows that communication ability of boys and girls is similar in all age groups. PMID:22461986

  19. Acute psychosocial stress reduces pain modulation capabilities in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Anecdotes on the ability of individuals to continue to function under stressful conditions despite injuries causing excruciating pain suggest that acute stress may induce analgesia. However, studies exploring the effect of acute experimental stress on pain perception show inconsistent results, possibly due to methodological differences. Our aim was to systematically study the effect of acute stress on pain perception using static and dynamic, state-of-the-art pain measurements. Participants were 29 healthy men who underwent the measurement of heat-pain threshold, heat-pain intolerance, temporal summation of pain, and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Testing was conducted before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), inducing acute psychosocial stress. Stress levels were evaluated using perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction. Although pain threshold and pain intolerance were unaffected by stress, an increase in temporal summation of pain and a decrease in CPM were observed. These changes were significantly more robust among individuals with stronger reaction to stress ("high responders"), with a significant correlation between the perception of stress and the performance in the pain measurements. We conclude that acute psychosocial stress seems not to affect the sensitivity to pain, however, it significantly reduces the ability to modulate pain in a dose-response manner. Considering the diverse effects of stress in this and other studies, it appears that the type of stress and the magnitude of its appraisal determine its interactions with the pain system. PMID:25250721

  20. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics. PMID:26172555

  1. Pain inhibition by endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Przewłocki, R; Labuz, D; Mika, J; Przewłocka, B; Tomboly, C; Toth, G

    1999-01-01

    Spinal analgesic effects of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were studied during acute, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain in rats chronically implanted with intrathecal cannulas. Endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 (2.5-10 micrograms i.t.), as well as their analogues, increased the tail-flick and the paw pressure latencies. In a model of inflammatory pain, the formalin-induced behavior was attenuated by endomorphins; however, the effect studied was not dose-dependent and was less pronounced in comparison with that evoked by morphine. On the other hand, in rats with a sciatic nerve injury (crush), endomorphins antagonized allodynia in a dose-dependent manner, whereas morphine was found to be ineffective in a similar dose range. Endomorphins also exhibited an antinociceptive potency in rats tolerant to morphine. In conclusion, our results show a powerful analgesic action of endomorphins at the spinal level. The most interesting finding is a strong effect of endomorphins in neuropathic pain, which opens up a possibility of using these compounds in pain therapy. PMID:10676444

  2. Changes in self-perceived role identity modulate pain perception.

    PubMed

    Kut, Elvan; Schaffner, Nils; Wittwer, Amrei; Candia, Victor; Brockmann, Meike; Storck, Claudio; Folkers, Gerd

    2007-09-01

    Pain is an experience including physiological and psychological factors. We assume that emotions may be elicited and increased through self-perceived role identity and that change of role identity alters quality and intensity of pain perception. We used role-play strategies to assess whether pain can be better tolerated whenever, in an unavoidable and unpleasant context, role identity confers pain a meaningful and thus suitable character. We induced antithetic roles in 21 actors who received heat stimuli on their arms before and after role-play conditions. Pain tolerance, skin conductance and voice signals were measured. Pain tolerance increased for heroes/heroines and decreased for faint-hearts. Men showed higher pain tolerance. Heroes/heroines evaluated heat stimuli as more intense. Faint-hearts found pain stimuli more affectively loaded at lower temperatures. Women showed higher pain ratings. Hence, self-perception influences pain perception. Role-play strategies may be of value for new pain management strategies. PMID:17521808

  3. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  4. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  5. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  6. Modality and sex differences in pain sensitivity during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Karshikoff, B; Lekander, M; Soop, A; Lindstedt, F; Ingvar, M; Kosek, E; Olgart Höglund, C; Axelsson, J

    2015-05-01

    Systemic inflammation can induce pain hypersensitivity in animal and human experimental models, and has been proposed to be central in clinical pain conditions. Women are overrepresented in many chronic pain conditions, but experimental studies on sex differences in pain regulation during systemic inflammation are still scarce. In two randomized and double blind placebo controlled experiments, we used low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an experimental model of systemic inflammation. The first study employed 0.8ng/kg LPS in a within-subject design of 8 individuals (1 woman), and the second study 0.6ng/kg LPS in a between-subject design of 52 participants (29 women). We investigated the effect on (a) pressure, heat, and cold pain thresholds, (b) suprathreshold noxious heat and cold sensitivity, and (c) conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and differences between men and women. LPS induced significantly lower pressure pain thresholds as compared to placebo (mean change with the 0.8ng/kg dose being -64±30kPa P=.04; with the 0.6ng/kg dose -58±55kPa, P<.01, compared to before injection), whereas heat and cold pain thresholds remained unaffected (P's>.70). Suprathreshold noxious pain was not affected by LPS in men (P's⩾.15). However, LPS made women rated suprathreshold noxious heat stimuli as more painful (P=.01), and showed a tendency to rate noxious cold pain as more painful (P=.06) as compared to placebo. Furthermore, LPS impaired conditioned pain modulation, a measure of endogenous pain inhibition, but this effect was also restricted to women (P<.01, for men P=.27). Pain sensitivity correlated positively with plasma IL-6 and IL-8 levels. The results show that inflammation more strongly affects deep pain, rather than cutaneous pain, and suggest that women's pain perception and modulation is more sensitive to immune activation than men's. PMID:25486090

  7. Dyadic analysis of child and parent trait and state pain catastrophizing in the process of children's pain communication.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Chambers, Christine T; Chorney, Jill; Fernandez, Conrad V; McGrath, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    When explored separately, child and parent catastrophic thoughts about child pain show robust negative relations with child pain. The objective of this study was to conduct a dyadic analysis to elucidate intrapersonal and interpersonal influences of child and parent pain catastrophizing on aspects of pain communication, including observed behaviours and perceptions of child pain. A community sample of 171 dyads including children aged 8 to 12 years (89 girls) and parents (135 mothers) rated pain catastrophizing (trait and state versions) and child pain intensity and unpleasantness following a cold pressor task. Child pain tolerance was also assessed. Parent-child interactions during the cold pressor task were coded for parent attending, nonattending, and other talk, and child symptom complaints and other talk. Data were analyzed using the actor-partner interdependence model and hierarchical multiple regressions. Children reporting higher state pain catastrophizing had greater symptom complaints regardless of level of parent state pain catastrophizing. Children reporting low state pain catastrophizing had similar high levels of symptom complaints, but only when parents reported high state pain catastrophizing. Higher child and parent state and/or trait pain catastrophizing predicted their own ratings of higher child pain intensity and unpleasantness, with child state pain catastrophizing additionally predicting parent ratings. Higher pain tolerance was predicted by older child age and lower child state pain catastrophizing. These newly identified interpersonal effects highlight the relevance of the social context to children's pain expressions and parent perceptions of child pain. Both child and parent pain catastrophizing warrant consideration when managing child pain. PMID:26713422

  8. Opioids for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Deyo, Richard A; Von Korff, Michael; Duhrkoop, David

    2015-01-01

    Back pain affects most adults, causes disability for some, and is a common reason for seeking healthcare. In the United States, opioid prescription for low back pain has increased, and opioids are now the most commonly prescribed drug class. More than half of regular opioid users report back pain. Rates of opioid prescribing in the US and Canada are two to three times higher than in most European countries. The analgesic efficacy of opioids for acute back pain is inferred from evidence in other acute pain conditions. Opioids do not seem to expedite return to work in injured workers or improve functional outcomes of acute back pain in primary care. For chronic back pain, systematic reviews find scant evidence of efficacy. Randomized controlled trials have high dropout rates, brief duration (four months or less), and highly selected patients. Opioids seem to have short term analgesic efficacy for chronic back pain, but benefits for function are less clear. The magnitude of pain relief across chronic non-cancer pain conditions is about 30%. Given the brevity of randomized controlled trials, the long term effectiveness and safety of opioids are unknown. Loss of long term efficacy could result from drug tolerance and emergence of hyperalgesia. Complications of opioid use include addiction and overdose related mortality, which have risen in parallel with prescription rates. Common short term side effects are constipation, nausea, sedation, and increased risk of falls and fractures. Longer term side effects may include depression and sexual dysfunction. Screening for high risk patients, treatment agreements, and urine testing have not reduced overall rates of opioid prescribing, misuse, or overdose. Newer strategies for reducing risks include more selective prescription of opioids and lower doses; use of prescription monitoring programs; avoidance of co-prescription with sedative hypnotics; and reformulations that make drugs more difficult to snort, smoke, or inject. PMID

  9. [Spiritual pain].

    PubMed

    Sato, Satoru

    2011-09-01

    We defined a spiritual pain as feelings of failure and regret at end-of-life, followed by hopelessness and worthlessness in patient's own life. In Japanese, spiritual pain should be assessed in patient's dignity, psycho-social factor, and prognostic stage, not only in religious context. And patient's spirituality should be supported with providing pain and symptom relief based on human relationships. "Sterbebegleitung" is a German proverb, introduced by Alfons Deeken, and seemed to be a suggestive word for such hope-recovering relationships. PMID:21950035

  10. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  11. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  12. Research on laser induced pain effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Wang, J. R.; Li, Y. C.; Yang, Z. F.

    2010-11-01

    To study 1.06μm laser causing pain in human skin. The skin of human dorsum hand was irradiated by a Nd: YAG laser. The energy of each pulse and whether the subjects felt a painful sensation after each stimulus were recorded. The pain threshold was defined as the laser dose at which the subjects reported a painful sensation to 50% of stimulus deliveries. The pain thresholds were determined under 3 different beam diameter and pulse duration conditions. The influence of skin temperature on the pain caused by laser stimulus was also explored. As the temperature of skin was about 30°C, the pain thresholds were 394mJ/mm2, 36.4mJ/mm2 and 8.92mJ/mm2 respectively under the stimulating condition of 1.20mm beam diameter and 85μs pulse duration, 1.20mm beam diameter and 20ns pulse duration and 2.56mm beam diameter and 20ns pulse duration. Under the first condition, when skin temperature was 25°C and radiant exposure was 383mJ/mm2, the probability of laser stimulus causing pain was 16.7%; when skin temperature was 39°C and radiant exposure was 361mJ/mm2, the probability was 56.7%. The threshold of 1.06μm laser stimulus causing pain decreases with decreasing pulse duration, increasing beam diameter and skin temperature.

  13. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Am I at ... Health: Back Pain . There are different types of back pain. Back pain can be acute or chronic. It ...

  14. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  15. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  16. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  17. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  18. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  19. Feeling pain

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... protective mechanism, alerting it to potential or actual damage to the body’s tissues. In the example of ... the pain receptors in the skin detect tissue damage from the bee sting. Then, the peripheral nerves ...

  20. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  1. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  2. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  3. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  4. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... The shoulder is the most movable joint in the human body. A group of 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or ...

  5. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  6. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  7. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  8. Relationship of 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism with Various Factors of Pain Processing: Subjective Experience, Motor Responsiveness and Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Miriam; Hennig, Jürgen; Karmann, Anna J.; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Although serotonin is known to play an important role in pain processing, the relationship between the polymorphism in 5-HTTLPR and pain processing is not well understood. To examine the relationship more comprehensively, various factors of pain processing having putative associations with 5-HT functioning were studied, namely the subjective pain experience (pain threshold, rating of experimental pain), catastrophizing about pain (Pain Catastrophizing Scale = PCS) and motor responsiveness (facial expression of pain). In 60 female and 67 male participants, heat pain stimuli were applied by a contact thermode to assess pain thresholds, supra-threshold ratings and a composite score of pain-relevant facial responses. Participants also completed the PCS and were grouped based on their 5-HTTLPR genotype (bi-allelic evaluation) into a group with s-allele carriers (ss, sl) and a second group without (ll). S-allele carriers proved to have lower pain thresholds and higher PCS scores. These two positive findings were unrelated to each other. No other difference between genotype groups became significant. In all analyses, “age” and “gender” were controlled for. In s-allele carriers the subjective pain experience and the tendency to catastrophize about pain was enhanced, suggesting that the s-allele might be a risk factor for the development and maintenance of pain. This risk factor seems to act via two independent routes, namely via the sensory processes of subjective pain experiences and via the booster effects of pain catastrophizing. PMID:27043930

  9. Relationship of 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism with Various Factors of Pain Processing: Subjective Experience, Motor Responsiveness and Catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Miriam; Hennig, Jürgen; Karmann, Anna J; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Although serotonin is known to play an important role in pain processing, the relationship between the polymorphism in 5-HTTLPR and pain processing is not well understood. To examine the relationship more comprehensively, various factors of pain processing having putative associations with 5-HT functioning were studied, namely the subjective pain experience (pain threshold, rating of experimental pain), catastrophizing about pain (Pain Catastrophizing Scale = PCS) and motor responsiveness (facial expression of pain). In 60 female and 67 male participants, heat pain stimuli were applied by a contact thermode to assess pain thresholds, supra-threshold ratings and a composite score of pain-relevant facial responses. Participants also completed the PCS and were grouped based on their 5-HTTLPR genotype (bi-allelic evaluation) into a group with s-allele carriers (ss, sl) and a second group without (ll). S-allele carriers proved to have lower pain thresholds and higher PCS scores. These two positive findings were unrelated to each other. No other difference between genotype groups became significant. In all analyses, "age" and "gender" were controlled for. In s-allele carriers the subjective pain experience and the tendency to catastrophize about pain was enhanced, suggesting that the s-allele might be a risk factor for the development and maintenance of pain. This risk factor seems to act via two independent routes, namely via the sensory processes of subjective pain experiences and via the booster effects of pain catastrophizing. PMID:27043930

  10. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  11. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  12. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  13. A randomized, double-blind, positive-controlled, 3-way cross-over human experimental pain study of a TRPV1 antagonist (V116517) in healthy volunteers and comparison with preclinical profile.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Harris, Steve; Whiteside, Garth T; Hummel, Michele; Knappenberger, Terri; OʼKeefe, Sarah; Kapil, Ram; Kyle, Don

    2016-09-01

    This experimental, translational, experimental pain, single-center, randomized, double-blind, single-dose, 3-treatment, 3-period cross-over proof-of-concept volunteer trial studied the efficacy of a novel TRPV1 antagonist (V116517) on capsaicin- and UV-B-induced hyperalgesia. Heat and pressure pain thresholds, von Frey stimulus-response functions, and neurogenic inflammation were assessed together with safety. Each treatment period was 4 days. The 3 single oral treatments were 300 mg V116517, 400 mg celecoxib (a COX-2 inhibitor), and placebo. The heat pain detection and tolerance thresholds were increased significantly (P < 0.0001) by V116517. Heat pain detection and tolerance thresholds showed significantly less capsaicin hyperalgesia after V116517 (P = 0.004 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Celecoxib reduced UV-B-provoked pressure pain sensitization (P = 0.01). Laser Doppler flowmetry and erythema index after UV-B were significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced by celecoxib. Stimulus-response function in capsaicin-treated areas showed significant differences between both celecoxib and placebo and between V116517 and placebo. The body temperature showed no change, and no side effects were reported for any of the treatments. The TRPV1 antagonists and the COX-2 inhibitor showed different antihyperalgesic profiles indicating different clinical targets. In addition, the preclinical profile of V116517 in rat models of UV-B and capsaicin-induced hypersensitivity was compared with the human experimental data and overall demonstrated an alignment between 2 of the 3 end points tested. The TRPV1 antagonist showed a potent antihyperalgesic action without changing the body temperature but heat analgesia may be a potential safety issue. PMID:27168361

  14. Yield threshold decision framework

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Younker, L.W.; Hannon, W.J.

    1989-08-17

    The USA is developing a decision analysis framework for evaluating the relative value of lower yield thresholds and related verification policies. The framework facilitates systematic analysis of the major issues in the yield threshold decision. The framework can be used to evaluate options proposed either in the inter-agency process or in the negotiations. In addition, the framework can measure the importance of uncertainties and alternative judgments, and thereby determine the advantages of additional research. Since the model is explicit and quantitative, it provides a rational, defensible approach for reaching important treaty and verification decisions. 9 figs.

  15. Economic Insecurity Increases Physical Pain.

    PubMed

    Chou, Eileen Y; Parmar, Bidhan L; Galinsky, Adam D

    2016-04-01

    The past decade has seen a rise in both economic insecurity and frequency of physical pain. The current research reveals a causal connection between these two growing and consequential social trends. In five studies, we found that economic insecurity produced physical pain and reduced pain tolerance. In a sixth study, with data from 33,720 geographically diverse households across the United States, economic insecurity predicted consumption of over-the-counter painkillers. The link between economic insecurity and physical pain emerged when people experienced the insecurity personally (unemployment), when they were in an insecure context (they were informed that their state had a relatively high level of unemployment), and when they contemplated past and future economic insecurity. Using both experimental-causal-chain and measurement-of-mediation approaches, we also established that the psychological experience of lacking control helped generate the causal link from economic insecurity to physical pain. Meta-analyses including all of our studies testing the link from economic insecurity to physical pain revealed that this link is reliable. Overall, the findings show that it physically hurts to be economically insecure. PMID:26893293

  16. Witnessing hateful people in pain modulates brain activity in regions associated with physical pain and reward

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Glenn R.; Sobhani, Mona; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    How does witnessing a hateful person in pain compare to witnessing a likable person in pain? The current study compared the brain bases for how we perceive likable people in pain with those of viewing hateful people in pain. While social bonds are built through sharing the plight and pain of others in the name of empathy, viewing a hateful person in pain also has many potential ramifications. In this functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study, Caucasian Jewish male participants viewed videos of (1) disliked, hateful, anti-Semitic individuals, and (2) liked, non-hateful, tolerant individuals in pain. The results showed that, compared with viewing liked people, viewing hateful people in pain elicited increased responses in regions associated with observation of physical pain (the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the somatosensory cortex), reward processing (the striatum), and frontal regions associated with emotion regulation. Functional connectivity analyses revealed connections between seed regions in the left ACC and right insular cortex with reward regions, the amygdala, and frontal regions associated with emotion regulation. These data indicate that regions of the brain active while viewing someone in pain may be more active in response to the danger or threat posed by witnessing the pain of a hateful individual more so than the desire to empathize with a likable person's pain. PMID:24167496

  17. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights. PMID:8051515

  18. Religious Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue looks at three issues of religious tolerance. The first article examines a case recently decided by the United States Supreme Court on student-led prayers at school events. The second article explores the persecution suffered by members of the Mormon religion during the 19th century. The final article looks at Martin Luther and…

  19. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  20. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  1. Managing Opioid-Tolerant Patients in the Perioperative Surgical Home.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, John T; Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2016-06-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is important to decrease perioperative morbidity and improve patient satisfaction. Opioids are associated with potential adverse events that may lead to significant risk. Uncontrolled pain is a risk factor in the transformation of acute pain to chronic pain. Balancing these issues can be especially challenging in opioid-tolerant patients undergoing surgery, for whom rapidly escalating opioid doses in an effort to control pain can be associated with increased complications. In the perioperative surgical home model, anesthesiologists are positioned to coordinate a comprehensive perioperative analgesic plan that begins with the preoperative assessment and continues through discharge. PMID:27208711

  2. Central pain: clinical and physiological characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study the clinical and pathophysiological features of central pain due to damage to the CNS. METHODS--156 patients (mostly with ischaemic strokes, some with infarct after subarachnoid haemorrhage and other cerebral conditions; one with bulbar and others with spinal pathology) with central pain have been investigated clinically and varying numbers instrumentally with respect to quantitative somatosensory perception thresholds and autonomic function. RESULTS--Pain onset was immediate in a minority; and from a week or two up to six years in > 60%. For those with supraspinal ischaemic lesions, the median age of onset was 59; dominant and non-dominant sides were equally affected. Two thirds of the patients had allodynia, including a previously undescribed movement allodynia apparently triggered from group I afferents. Most patients exhibited autonomic instability in that their pain was increased by physical and emotional stress and alleviated by relaxation; cutaneous blood flow and sweating may also be affected. Pain occurred within a larger area of differential sensory deficit. The critical deficit seems to be for thermal and pinprick sensations, which were more pronounced in areas of greatest than in areas of least pain; whereas low threshold mechanoceptive functions, if affected, did not vary between areas of greatest and least pain. Skinfold pinch (tissue damage) pain thresholds were only slightly affected in supraspinal cases, but greatly increased in patients with spinal lesions; thermal (heat) pain did not show this dissociation. CONCLUSION--The pathogenetic hypothesis which seems best to fit the findings is that there is up regulation or down regulation of receptors for transmitters, possibly mainly noradrenergic, over time. PMID:8676164

  3. Evaluation of mechanical and thermal nociception as objective tools to measure painful and nonpainful lameness phases in multiparous sows.

    PubMed

    Mohling, C M; Johnson, A K; Coetzee, J F; Karriker, L A; Stalder, K J; Abell, C E; Tyler, H D; Millman, S T

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify pain sensitivity differences using mechanical nociception threshold (MNT) and thermal nociception threshold (TNT) tests when sows were in painful and nonpainful transient lameness phases. A total of 24 mixed parity crossbred sows (220.15 ± 21.23 kg) were utilized for the MNT test, and a total of 12 sows (211.41 ± 20.21 kg) were utilized for the TNT test. On induction day (D0), all sows were anesthetized and injected with Amphotericin B (10mg/mL) in the distal interphalangeal joint space in both claws of one randomly selected hind limb to induce transient lameness. Three days were compared: (1) D-1 (sound phase, defined as 1 d before induction), (2) D+1 (most lame phase, defined as 1 d after induction), and (3) D+6 (resolution phase, defined as 6 d after induction). After completion of the first round, sows were given a 7-d rest period and then the procedures were repeated with lameness induced in the contralateral hind limb. During the MNT test, pressure was applied perpendicularly to 3 landmarks in a randomized sequence for each sow: 1) middle of cannon on the hind limb (cannon), 2) 1 cm above the coronary band on the medial hind claw (medial claw), and 3) 1 cm above the coronary band on the lateral hind claw (lateral claw). During the TNT test, a radiant heat stimulus was directed 1 cm above the coronary band. The data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with sow as the experimental unit. Differences were analyzed between sound and lame limbs on each day. For the MNT test, pressure tolerated by the lame limb decreased for every landmark (P < 0.05) when comparing D-1 and D+1. The sound limb tolerated more pressure on D+1 and D+6 than on baseline D-1 (P < 0.05). Thermal stimulation tolerated by the sound limb did not change over the 3 d (P > 0.05). However, the sows tolerated less heat stimulation on their lame limb on D+1 compared to D-1 levels (P < 0.05). Both MNT and TNT tests indicated greater pain

  4. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  5. Experimental Pain and Opioid Analgesia in Volunteers at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Doufas, Anthony G.; Tian, Lu; Padrez, Kevin A.; Suwanprathes, Puntarica; Cardell, James A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Panousis, Periklis

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. Methods After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml), an μ-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. Results Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA) were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO2, P = 0.0440; IGFBP-1, P = 0.0013). Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1β, P = 0.0218; TNF-α, P = 0.0276). Conclusions Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1) was associated with hypoalgesia and

  6. D-serine in the midbrain periaqueductal gray contributes to morphine tolerance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Sun, Mengjie; Li, Youyan

    2016-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor plays a critical role in morphine tolerance. D-serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, participates in many physiological and pathophysiological processes via regulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. The purinergic P2X7 receptor activation can induce the D-serine release in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the role of the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray D-serine in the mechanism of morphine tolerance in rats. The development of morphine tolerance was induced in normal adult male Sprague–Dawley rats through subcutaneous injection of morphine (10 mg/kg). The analgesic effect of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was assessed by measuring mechanical withdrawal thresholds in rats with an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. The D-serine concentration and serine racemase expression levels in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray were evaluated through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. The effects of intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of the D-serine degrading enzyme D-amino acid oxidase and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor on chronic morphine-treated rats were also explored. Results We found that repeated morphine administrations decreased the antinociceptive potency of morphine evidenced by the percent changes in mechanical pain threshold in rats. By contrast, the D-serine contents and the expression levels of the serine racemase protein were upregulated in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray in morphine-tolerant rats. The development of morphine tolerance was markedly alleviated by intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of D-amino acid oxidase or antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor. Conclusions Our data indicate that the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine is partially

  7. Measurement of the laser exposure levels for burn threshold in biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Laufer, G.; Joachims, H.Z.; Eliachar, I.; Mordechovitz, D.

    1984-08-01

    Experiments for the evaluation of the laser energy density required to induce burn threshold in biological tissue are presented. The results are compared with a theoretical model. The values obtained for soft tissue are higher than the pain threshold and the safety standards for the maximum permissible exposure. This is due to the different nature of injury associated with the surgical process.

  8. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  9. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  10. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is sudden and sharp You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting

  11. Pressure-induced referred pain is expanded by persistent soreness.

    PubMed

    Doménech-García, V; Palsson, T S; Herrero, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2016-05-01

    Several chronic pain conditions are accompanied with enlarged referred pain areas. This study investigated a novel method for assessing referred pain. In 20 healthy subjects, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded and pressure stimuli (120% PPT) were applied bilaterally for 5 and 60 seconds at the infraspinatus muscle to induce local and referred pain. Moreover, PPTs were measured bilaterally at the shoulder, neck, and leg before, during, and after hypertonic saline-induced referred pain in the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The pressure and saline-induced pain areas were assessed on drawings. Subsequently, delayed onset muscle soreness was induced using eccentric exercise of the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The day-1 assessments were repeated the following day (day 2). Suprathreshold pressure stimulations and saline injections into the infraspinatus muscle caused referred pain to the frontal aspect of the shoulder/arm in all subjects. The 60-second pressure stimulation caused larger referred pain areas compared with the 5-second stimulation (P < 0.01). Compared with pressure stimulation, the saline-induced referred pain area was larger (P < 0.02). After saline-induced pain, the PPTs at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced (P < 0.05), and the 5-second pressure-induced referred pain area was larger than baseline. Pressure pain thresholds at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced at day 2 in the delayed onset muscle soreness side (P < 0.05). Compared with day 1, larger pressure and saline-induced referred pain areas were observed on day 2 (P < 0.05). Referred pain to the shoulder/arm was consistently induced and enlarged after 1 day of muscle soreness, indicating that the referred pain area may be a sensitive biomarker for sensitization of the pain system. PMID:26808146

  12. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Schachtel, B P; Cooper, S A; Gatoulis, S C

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011. PMID:26603742

  13. Mechanical pain sensitivity and the severity of chronic neck pain and disability are not modulated across the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Balter, JE; Molner, JL; Kohrt, WM; Maluf, KS

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of neck pain among women, menstrual effects on regional pain outcomes have not been investigated in this clinical population. This study evaluated menstrual effects on mechanical pain sensitivity (Pressure Pain Threshold; PPT), neck pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale; NPRS) and neck-related disability (Neck Disability Index; NDI) in 22 normally menstruating (NM) and 17 hormonal contraceptive (HC) users with chronic neck pain. Sex hormones, PPT, and NDI were measured during the early follicular (F1), late follicular (F2), and luteal (L) menstrual phases. Daily NPRS scores were recorded in an online symptom diary and averaged within each phase. Estradiol and progesterone increased only for NM women in F2 and L, respectively. Phase effects on PPT (η2=0.003), NDI (η2=0.003), and NPRS (η2=0.016) for NM women were small, and did not differ from the HC group (p≥0.386). Averaged across the menstrual cycle, PPT scores explained 29% of the variance in NPRS scores for NM women, but were not associated with NDI scores in either group. Results indicate that that magnitude of menstrual effects on mechanical pain sensitivity, and the severity of neck pain and disability do not exceed thresholds of clinically detectable change in women with chronic neck pain. PERSPECTIVE Fluctuations in evoked and clinical pain outcomes across the menstrual cycle do not appear to be of sufficient magnitude to impact clinical decision-making for women with chronic neck pain. PMID:24021578

  14. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  15. Elaborating on threshold concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account for both the important and the problematic characteristics of TCs in terms of the Knowledge/Strategies/Mental Models Framework defined in previous work.

  16. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10), and perceived analgesic needs (0–10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = −0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2 = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2 = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  17. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  18. Pain Sensitivity and Observer Perception of Pain in Individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Allely, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed literature investigating the relationship between pain expression and perception of pain in individuals with ASD is sparse. The aim of the present systematic PRIMSA review was twofold: first, to see what evidence there is for the widely held belief that individuals with ASD are insensitive to pain or have a high pain threshold in the peer-reviewed literature and, second, to examine whether individuals with ASD react or express pain differently. Fifteen studies investigating pain in individuals with ASD were identified. The case studies all reported pain insensitivity in individuals with ASD. However, the majority of the ten experimental studies reviewed indicate that the idea that individuals with ASD are pain insensitive needs to be challenged. The findings also highlight the strong possibility that not all children with ASD express their physical discomfort in the same way as a neurotypical child would (i.e., cry, moan, seek comfort, etc.) which may lead caregivers and the medical profession to interpret this as pain insensitivity or incorrectly lead them to believe that the child is in no pain. These results have important implications for the assessment and management of pain in children with ASD. PMID:23843740

  19. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... related activities for a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost ... when did the pain begin? When in your menstrual cycle do you experience the pain? Is the pain ...

  20. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  1. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  2. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Award Recipients Strong Evidence Still Lacking on Medical Marijuana for Pain Fibromyalgia Has Central Nervous System Origins ... Mayday Fund American Pain Society Offers Guidance on Medical Marijuana for Pain Study Shows Pain Often Improves in ...

  3. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  4. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture - pain relief; Hypnosis - pain relief; Guided imagery - pain relief ... you repeat a positive statement over and over. Hypnosis may help relieve pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia ...

  5. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACPA Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  6. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  7. Rheumatic pains of previously undiagnosed diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Q; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S; Rajala, U; Uusimäki, A; Kivelä, S L

    1995-01-01

    To identify the early diabetic musculoskeletal symptoms of previously undiagnosed diabetic subjects, a case-control study was carried out. The cases and controls were recruited from a population aged 55 years. Questions concerning the symptoms were asked before the 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). The results show that pain in the right hand was the most prominent symptom among the diabetic women. Pains in the left hand and the shoulders in the diabetic women and pains in the right knee and the right hip joint in the diabetic men tended to be more prevalent than the corresponding symptoms in the controls. The highest prevalence of most musculoskeletal pains occurred in the highest tertile of 2-h OGTT values among women. The conclusion is that the hand pain is closely associated with the development of diabetes and may give clues to an early diagnosis of diabetes in a middle-aged population. PMID:7481588

  8. Distinct quantitative sensory testing profiles in nonspecific chronic back pain subjects with and without psychological trauma.

    PubMed

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Eich, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Psychological trauma is associated with an increased risk for chronification of nonspecific chronic back pain (nsCLBP) independent of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanisms underlying the role of psychological trauma in nsCLBP are less clear than in PTSD. Therefore, this study considered whether psychological trauma exposure (TE) is accompanied by specific alterations in pain perception. The study included 56 participants with nsCLBP and TE (nsCLBP-TE), 93 participants with nsCLBP without TE (nsCLBP-W-TE), and 31 pain-free controls. All participants underwent a thorough clinical evaluation. The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was used to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory functions in painful (back) and non-painful areas (hand). The protocol consisted of thermal and mechanical detection as well as pain thresholds, vibration thresholds, and pain sensitivity to sharp and blunt mechanical stimuli. Psychological trauma was validated by structured clinical interview. Trauma-associated symptom severity, anxiety, and depressive symptomatology were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Differences in somatosensory function were seen only for pressure pain thresholds. Compared with controls, nsCLBP-TE revealed hyperalgesia generalized in space with lower thresholds in painful and non-painful areas, whereas nsCLBP-W-TE demonstrated localized alterations with decreased thresholds only in the pain-affected area of the back (P ≤ 0.006). Our findings suggest an augmented central pain processing in nsCLBP-TE (alterations in painful and non-painful areas), whereas nsCLBP-W-TE show only local changes (alterations only in the painful area) suggesting regional sensitization processes. This finding might explain why TE without PTSD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic pain. PMID:25790450

  9. Pregabalin in post traumatic neuropathic pain: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sinha, Vijay Prakash; Pal, U. S.; Yadav, Sharad C.; Singh, Maneesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the effectiveness of pregablin in management of post traumatic peripheral nerve injury facial pain not responding to other medication like analgesics. Pregabalin was well tolerated. The most common adverse effects were dizziness and tiredness. PMID:23251069

  10. Mechanism of boron tolerance in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Iftikhar; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    Boron (B) is toxic to living cells at levels above a certain threshold. We isolated several B-tolerant bacterial strains from soil samples and studied them for possible mechanisms of B tolerance. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and comparative phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolates belong to the following 6 genera: Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, Lysinibacillus, Algoriphagus, Gracilibacillus, and Bacillus. These isolates exhibited B-tolerance levels of 80, 100, 150, 300, 450, and 450 mmol/L, respectively, whilst maintaining a significantly lower intracellular B concentration than in the medium. Statistical analysis showed a negative correlation between the protoplasmic B concentration and the degree of tolerance to a high external B concentration. The kinetic assays suggest that the high B efflux and (or) exclusion are the tolerance mechanisms against a high external B concentration in the isolated bacteria. PMID:20130690

  11. A Novel Psychovisual Threshold on Large DCT for Image Compression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A psychovisual experiment prescribes the quantization values in image compression. The quantization process is used as a threshold of the human visual system tolerance to reduce the amount of encoded transform coefficients. It is very challenging to generate an optimal quantization value based on the contribution of the transform coefficient at each frequency order. The psychovisual threshold represents the sensitivity of the human visual perception at each frequency order to the image reconstruction. An ideal contribution of the transform at each frequency order will be the primitive of the psychovisual threshold in image compression. This research study proposes a psychovisual threshold on the large discrete cosine transform (DCT) image block which will be used to automatically generate the much needed quantization tables. The proposed psychovisual threshold will be used to prescribe the quantization values at each frequency order. The psychovisual threshold on the large image block provides significant improvement in the quality of output images. The experimental results on large quantization tables from psychovisual threshold produce largely free artifacts in the visual output image. Besides, the experimental results show that the concept of psychovisual threshold produces better quality image at the higher compression rate than JPEG image compression. PMID:25874257

  12. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  13. Thresholds for Universal Concatenated Quantum Codes.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Quantum error correction and fault tolerance make it possible to perform quantum computations in the presence of imprecision and imperfections of realistic devices. An important question is to find the noise rate at which errors can be arbitrarily suppressed. By concatenating the 7-qubit Steane and 15-qubit Reed-Muller codes, the 105-qubit code enables a universal set of fault-tolerant gates despite not all of them being transversal. Importantly, the cnot gate remains transversal in both codes, and as such has increased error protection relative to the other single qubit logical gates. We show that while the level-1 pseudothreshold for the concatenated scheme is limited by the logical Hadamard gate, the error suppression of the logical cnot gates allows for the asymptotic threshold to increase by orders of magnitude at higher levels. We establish a lower bound of 1.28×10^{-3} for the asymptotic threshold of this code, which is competitive with known concatenated models and does not rely on ancillary magic state preparation for universal computation. PMID:27419549

  14. Thresholds for Universal Concatenated Quantum Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Quantum error correction and fault tolerance make it possible to perform quantum computations in the presence of imprecision and imperfections of realistic devices. An important question is to find the noise rate at which errors can be arbitrarily suppressed. By concatenating the 7-qubit Steane and 15-qubit Reed-Muller codes, the 105-qubit code enables a universal set of fault-tolerant gates despite not all of them being transversal. Importantly, the cnot gate remains transversal in both codes, and as such has increased error protection relative to the other single qubit logical gates. We show that while the level-1 pseudothreshold for the concatenated scheme is limited by the logical Hadamard gate, the error suppression of the logical cnot gates allows for the asymptotic threshold to increase by orders of magnitude at higher levels. We establish a lower bound of 1.28 ×10-3 for the asymptotic threshold of this code, which is competitive with known concatenated models and does not rely on ancillary magic state preparation for universal computation.

  15. Pain analgesia among adolescent self-injurers.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jeffrey J; Michel, Bethany D; Franklin, Joseph C; Hooley, Jill M; Nock, Matthew K

    2014-12-30

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) involves self-inflicted physical harm, many self-injurers report feeling little or no pain during the act. Here we test: (1) whether the pain analgesia effects observed among adult self-injurers are also present among adolescents, and (2) three potential explanatory models proposing that habituation, dissociation, and/or self-criticism help explain the association between NSSI and pain analgesia among adolescents. Participants were 79 adolescents (12-19 years) recruited from the community who took part in a laboratory-based pain study. Results revealed that adolescent self-injurers have a higher pain threshold and greater pain endurance than non-injurers. Statistical mediation models revealed that the habituation and dissociation models were not supported; however, a self-critical style does mediate the association between NSSI and pain analgesia. The present findings extend earlier work by highlighting that a self-critical style may help to explain why self-injurers exhibit pain analgesia. Specifically, the tendency to experience self-critical thoughts in response to stressful events may represent a third variable that increases the likelihood of both NSSI and pain analgesia. Prospective experimental studies are needed to replicate and tease apart the direction of these associations, and may provide valuable leads in the development of effective treatments for this dangerous behavior problem. PMID:25172611

  16. Neurobiology of pain in children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Alberto; Loizzo, Stefano; Capasso, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of pain in the newborn and the infant is difficult because pain is mainly a subjective phenomenon. Until a few years ago, several myths persisted. First, the myth that children, especially infants, do not feel pain the way adults do, therefore there is no untoward consequences for them. Second, lack of assessment and reassessment for the presence of pain. Third, misunderstanding of how to conceptualise and quantify a subjective experience. Fourth, lack of knowledge of pain treatment. Fifth, the notion that addressing pain in children takes too much time and effort, in ultimate analysis resulting in wasting time. Sixth, fears of hidden -and not easy to diagnose or prevent- adverse effects of analgesic medications, including respiratory depression and addiction. Finally, from a conceptual point of view, high thresholds of pain in neonates and infants were considered to be present by natural character, and useful in protecting infant from pain during birth and transit through the narrow vaginal channel.The present review is focused on the description of different theories on the pain pathogenesis in children. PMID:19543535

  17. [Need of risk reevaluation in morphine dependence in pain patients].

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Luu, M; Koskas-Sergent, A S; Doubrere, J F

    1992-11-01

    It is commonly recognized than opioids analgesics have an major place in the treatment of pain. In spite of guidelines, opioids drugs remain underutilized in chronic cancer pain and acute severe pain. Among the possible factors, involved in the insufficient use of opioids drugs, is the fear (opiophoby) of physicians, nurses, patients and family to induce or to maintain an addiction. This review examines the potential of iatrogenic addiction. We will examined the place of morphine-like drugs in the treatment of severe acute pain and chronic cancer pain, the definition of dependency in pain patients, the assessment of the dependency potential in patients treated for pain. Available studies indicate that iatrogenic addiction is quite scarce and that the risk for a major tolerance is very small. Further studies will be necessary, since opioids analgesics may also be useful in some non-cancer chronic pain. PMID:1363796

  18. Understanding pain, part 2: pain management.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Helen

    This article is the second in a two-part series which explores pain and its management from a physiological perspective. Nurses play an important role in assessing and managing pain. Effective pain management by nurses requires them to have an understanding of the biological basis of the pain interventions which may be used to control pain. This article emphasizes the importance of pain assessment as a precursor for effective pain management and explores the biological basis of pain interventions which contribute to pain control. The role of non-pharmacological approaches in alleviating pain and their actions which contribute to pain relief are explored. The three main types of pharmaceutical agents used, non-opioids, opioids and adjuvant drugs, are introduced and their mechanisms of actions discussed. PMID:16224328

  19. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  20. Pediatric Pain, Predictive Inference, and Sensitivity Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Coping style and effects of counseling intervention on pain tolerance was studied for 61 elementary school students through immersion of hands in cold water. Bayesian predictive inference tools are able to distinguish between subject characteristics and manipulable treatments. Sensitivity analysis strengthens the certainty of conclusions about…

  1. Intensity Thresholds for Aerobic Exercise–Induced Hypoalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Naugle, Kelly M.; Naugle, Keith E.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Samuels, Brian; Riley, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite many studies investigating exercise-induced hypoalgesia, there is limited understanding of the optimal intensity of aerobic exercise in producing hypoalgesic effects across different types of pain stimuli. Given that not all individuals are willing or capable of engaging in high intensity aerobic exercise, whether moderate intensity aerobic exercise is associated with a hypoalgesic response and whether this response generalizes to multiple pain induction techniques needs to be substantiated. Purpose This study’s purpose is to test for differences in the magnitude of pressure and heat pain modulation induced by moderate (MAE) and vigorous (VAE) intensity aerobic exercise. Methods Twelve healthy young males and 15 females completed one training session and three testing sessions consisting of 25 minutes of either 1) stationary cycling at 70% heart rate reserve (HRR), 2) stationary cycling at 50% HRR, or 3) quiet rest (control). Pain testing was conducted on both forearms prior to and immediately following each condition and included the following tests: pressure pain thresholds (PPT), suprathreshold pressure pain test, static continuous heat test, and repetitive pulse heat pain test. Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted on each pain measure. Results VAE and MAE reduced pain ratings during static continuous heat stimuli and repetitive heat pulse stimuli, with VAE producing larger effects. VAE also increased PPTs, while neither exercise influenced suprathreshold pressure pain ratings. Conclusion These results suggest that MAE is capable of producing a hypoalgesic effect using continuous and repetitive pulse heat stimuli. However, a dose-response effect was evident as VAE produced larger effects than MAE. PMID:24002342

  2. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fábio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; Özçakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  3. Pain in People with Learning Disabilities in Residential Settings--The Need for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacroft, Monica; Dodd, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This audit investigated residential staff beliefs around pain thresholds and strategies they adopt to recognise and manage pain in people with learning disabilities across Surrey. A structured interview was constructed to elicit information. Results demonstrated that pain is not being effectively recognised or managed by residential staff in…

  4. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  5. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  6. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  7. Application of Pain Quantitative Analysis Device for Assessment of Postoperative Pain after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Nagura, Issei; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Takase, Fumiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kokubu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The PainVision™ system was recently developed for quantitative pain assessment. Here, we used this system to evaluate the effect of plexus brachialis block on postoperative pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods : Fifty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. First 26 cases received no plexus brachialis block (control group), and the next 29 cases received the plexus brachialis block before surgery (block group). Patients completed the visual analog scale at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after surgery, and the intensity of postoperative pain was assessed with PainVision™ at 16 hours. The postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents was also recorded. Results : The pain intensity at 16 hours after surgery assessed by PainVision™ was significantly lower in the block group than in the control group (block, 252.0 ± 47.8, control, 489.0 ± 89.1, P < 0.05). However, there were no differences in the VAS values at 16 hours between the 2 groups (block, 4.3 ± 0.6, control, 5.7 ± 0.4, P = N.S.). The pain intensity and VAS at 16 hours after surgery were highly correlated (r = 0.59, P = 0.006 in the block group and r = 0.62, P = 0.003 in the control group). The effect size of the assessment by PainVision™ was bigger than that of VAS (r=0.31 in VAS and 0.51 in Pain vision). Conclusion : The PainVision™ system could be useful to evaluate postoperative pain because it enables the quantification and comparison of pain intensity independent of individual pain thresholds. PMID:26157522

  8. Acceptance- versus Change-Based Pain Management: The Role of Psychological Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacker, Kara J.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Kounios, John

    2012-01-01

    This study compared two theoretically opposed strategies for acute pain management: an acceptance-based and a change-based approach. These two strategies were compared in a within-subjects design using the cold pressor test as an acute pain induction method. Participants completed a baseline pain tolerance assessment followed by one of the two…

  9. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  10. Naturally occurring muscle pain during exercise: assessment and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Cook, D B; O'Connor, P J; Eubanks, S A; Smith, J C; Lee, M

    1997-08-01

    The objectives were: (i) to present a method for assessing muscle pain during exercise, (ii) to provide reliability and validity data in support of the measurement tool, (iii) to test whether leg muscle pain threshold during exercise was related to a commonly used measure of pain threshold pain during test, (iv) to examine the relationship between pain and exertion ratings, (v) to test whether leg muscle pain is related to performance, and (vi) to test whether a large dose of aspirin would delay leg muscle pain threshold and/or reduce pain ratings during exercise. In study 1, seven females and seven males completed three 1-min cycling bouts at three different randomly ordered power outputs. Pain was assessed using a 10-point pain scale. High intraclass correlations (R from 0.88 to 0.98) indicated that pain intensity could be rated reliably using the scale. In study 2, 11 college-aged males (age 21.3 +/- 1.3 yr) performed a ramped (24 W.min-1) maximal cycle ergometry test. A button was depressed when leg muscle pain threshold was reached. Pain threshold occurred near 50% of maximal capacity: 50.3 (+/- 12.9% Wmax), 48.6 (+/- 14.8% VO2max), and 55.8 (+/- 12.9% RPEmax). Pain intensity ratings obtained following pain threshold were positively accelerating function of the relative exercise intensity. Volitional exhaustion was associated with pain ratings of 8.2 (+/- 2.5), a value most closely associated with the verbal anchor "very strong pain." In study 3, participants completed the same maximal exercise test as in study 2 as well as leg cycling at 60 rpm for 8 s at four randomly ordered power outputs (100, 150, 200, and 250 W) on a separate day. Pain and RPE ratings were significantly lower during the 8-s bouts compared to those obtained at the same power outputs during the maximal cycle test. The results suggest that noxious metabolites of muscle contraction play a role in leg muscle pain during exercise. In study 4, moderately active male subjects (N = 19) completed

  11. Physicians Experience with and Expectations of the Safety and Tolerability of WHO-Step III Opioids for Chronic (Low) Back Pain: Post Hoc Analysis of Data from a German Cross-Sectional Physician Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A.; Eberhardt, Alice; Mueller-Schwefe, Gerhard H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe physicians' daily life experience with WHO-step III opioids in the treatment of chronic (low) back pain (CLBP). Methods. Post hoc analysis of data from a cross-sectional online survey with 4.283 Germany physicians. Results. With a reported median use in 17% of affected patients, WHO-step III opioids play a minor role in treatment of CLBP in daily practice associated with a broad spectrum of positive and negative effects. If prescribed, potent opioids were reported to show clinically relevant effects (such as ≥50% pain relief) in approximately 3 of 4 patients (median 72%). Analgesic effects reported are frequently related with adverse events (AEs). Only 20% of patients were reported to remain free of any AE. Most frequently reported AE was constipation (50%), also graded highest for AE-related daily life restrictions (median 46%). Specific AE countermeasures were reported to be necessary in approximately half of patients (median 45%); nevertheless AE-related premature discontinuation rates reported were high (median 22%). Fentanyl/morphine were the most/least prevalently prescribed potent opioids mentioned (median 20 versus 8%). Conclusion. Overall, use of WHO-step III opioids for CLBP is low. AEs, especially constipation, are commonly reported and interfere significantly with analgesic effects in daily practice. Nevertheless, beneficial effects outweigh related AEs in most patients with CLBP. PMID:26568890

  12. Stress-Induced Pain: A Target for the Development of Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Although current therapeutics provide relief from acute pain, drugs used for treatment of chronic pain are typically less efficacious and limited by adverse side effects, including tolerance, addiction, and gastrointestinal upset. Thus, there is a significant need for novel therapies for the treatment of chronic pain. In concert with chronic pain, persistent stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic pain disorders. Stress exacerbation of chronic pain suggests that centrally acting drugs targeting the pain- and stress-responsive brain regions represent a valid target for the development of novel therapeutics. This review provides an overview of how stress modulates spinal and central pain pathways, identifies key neurotransmitters and receptors within these pathways, and highlights their potential as novel targets for therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25194019

  13. Factors affecting mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Andrew M; Ranheim, Birgit; Fosse, Torunn K; Hild, Sophie; Nordgreen, Janicke; Moe, Randi O; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the stability and repeatability of measures of mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets and to examine potentially confounding factors when using a hand held algometer. Study design Descriptive, prospective cohort. Animals Forty-four piglets from four litters, weighing 4.6 ± 1.0 kg (mean ± SD) at 2 weeks of age. Methods Mechanical thresholds were measured twice on each of 2 days during the first and second week of life. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design to test the effects of behavior prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, and repetition within day. The effect of body weight and the interaction between piglet weight and behaviour were also tested. Piglet was entered into the model as a random effect as an additional test of repeatability. The effect of repeated testing was used to test the stability of measures. Pearson correlations between repeated measures were used to test the repeatability of measures. Variance component analysis was used to describe the variability in the data. Results Variance component analysis indicated that piglet explained only 17% of the variance in the data. All variables in the model (behaviour prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, repetition within day, body weight, the interaction between body weight and behaviour, piglet identity) except sex had a significant effect (p < 0.04 for all). Correlations between repeated measures increased from the first to the second week. Conclusions and Clinical relevance Repeatability was acceptable only during the second week of testing and measures changed with repeated testing and increased with increasing piglet weight, indicating that time (age) and animal body weight should be taken into account when measuring mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets. Mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds can be used both for testing the efficacy of anaesthetics and analgesics, and for assessing hyperalgesia in chronic pain states in research and

  14. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  15. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  16. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and burn pain.

    PubMed

    Holtman, Joseph R; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of pain produced during the management of burn injury has been an ongoing problem for physicians caring for these patients. The main therapeutic option for analgesia has been the repeated and prolonged use of opioids. The adverse effects of opioids are well known but the long term use of opioids which produces tolerance with accompanying dose escalation and dependence is most problematic. Another potentially important consequence of opioid exposure that sometimes masks as tolerance is that of opioid induced hyperalgesia. This syndrome is manifest as enhanced pain, sensitivity and loss of analgesic efficacy in patients treated with opioids who actually become sensitized to painful stimuli. This article focuses on the treatment of burn pain and how current analgesic therapies with opioids may cause hyperalgesia and affect the adequacy of treatment for burn pain. This article also provides possible modalities to help therapeutically manage these patients and considers future analgesic strategies which may help to improve pain management in this complicated patient population. PMID:23143613

  17. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  18. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  19. Chronic intraoral pain--assessment of diagnostic methods and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Pigg, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis was to broaden our knowledge of chronic intraoral pain. The research questions were: What methods can be used to differentiate inflammatory, odontogenic tooth pain from pain that presents as toothache but is non-odontogenic in origin? What is the prognosis of chronic tooth pain of non-odontogenic origin, and which factors affect the prognosis? Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a relatively rare but severe and chronic pain condition affecting the dentoalveolar region. Recent research indicates that the origin is peripheral nerve damage: neuropathic pain. The condition presents as tooth pain and is challenging to dentists because it is difficult to distinguish from ordinary toothache due to inflammation or infection. AO is of interest to the pain community because it shares many characteristics with other chronic pain conditions, and pain perpetuation mechanisms are likely to be similar. An AO diagnosis is made after a comprehensive examination and assessment of patients' self-reported characteristics: the pain history. Traditional dental diagnostic methods do not appear to suffice, since many patients report repeated care-seeking and numerous treatment efforts with little or no pain relief. Developing methods that are useful in the clinical setting is a prerequisite for a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment decisions. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is used to assess sensory function on skin when nerve damage or disease is suspected. A variety of stimuli has been used to examine the perception of, for example, touch, temperature (painful and non-painful), vibration, pinprick pain, and pressure pain. To detect sensory abnormalities and nerve damage in the oral cavity, the same methods may be possible to use. Study I examined properties of thermal thresholds in and around the mouth in 30 pain-free subjects: the influence of measurement location and stimulation area size on threshold levels, and time variability of thresholds

  20. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  1. The effect of repeated intramuscular alfentanil injections on experimental pain and abuse liability indices in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D. Andrew; Smith, Michael T.; Bigelow, George E.; Moaddel, Ruin; Venkata, S.L. Vatem; Strain, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli following repeated opioid exposures, has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies. However, there is no accepted, prospective model of OIH following repeated opioid exposures currently available in humans. This study assessed a potential prospective OIH model. Methods Double-blind intramuscular (IM) injections of a short-acting opioid, (alfentanil 15 mcg/kg; N=8) were compared to active placebo (diphenhydramine 25 mg; N=3) on cold and pressure pain testing and standard abuse liability measures in eight 10-hour sessions (1 injection/session) over 4–5 weeks in healthy pain-free males. Decreases from session baseline pain threshold (PThr) and tolerance (PTol) were calculated to represent hyperalgesia, and were assessed both within and across sessions. Results Mean decreases in cold PTol were seen in the alfentanil group at 180 minutes (−3.8 seconds, +/−26.5) and 480 minutes (−1.63 seconds, +/−31.5) after drug administration. There was a trend for differences between conditions on cold PThr hyperalgesia but not for pressure PThr. Alfentanil participants had greater mean ratings on LIKING and HIGH visual analog scales at peak effects (30 minutes), but these scores did not change across sessions. Discussion Repeated alfentanil exposures over 4–5 weeks resulted in within session decreases in cold pain tolerance from baseline but these differences were not substantially different from diphenhydramine controls. The results did not support the phenomenon of OIH in this model, although definitive conclusions regarding the existence of OIH in humans likely requires a larger sample size or an alternative model. PMID:23446076

  2. Descending pain modulation and chronification of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Morimura, Kozo; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic pain is an important public health problem that negatively impacts quality of life of affected individuals and exacts an enormous socio-economic cost. Currently available therapeutics provide inadequate management of pain in many patients. Acute pain states generally resolve in most patients. However, for reasons that are poorly understood, in some individuals, acute pain can transform to a chronic state. Our understanding of the risk factors that underlie the development of chronic pain is limited. Recent studies have suggested an important contribution of dysfunction in descending pain modulatory circuits to pain ‘chronification’. Human studies provide insights into possible endogenous and exogenous factors that may promote the conversion of pain into a chronic condition. Recent findings Descending pain modulatory systems have been studied and characterized in animal models. Human brain imaging techniques, deep brain stimulation and the mechanisms of action of drugs that are effective in the treatment of pain confirm the clinical relevance of top-down pain modulatory circuits. Growing evidence supports the concept that chronic pain is associated with a dysregulation in descending pain modulation. Disruption of the balance of descending modulatory circuits to favour facilitation may promote and maintain chronic pain. Recent findings suggest that diminished descending inhibition is likely to be an important element in determining whether pain may become chronic. This view is consistent with the clinical success of drugs that enhance spinal noradrenergic activity, such as serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), in the treatment of chronic pain states. Consistent with this concept, a robust descending inhibitory system may be normally engaged to protect against the development of chronic pain. Imaging studies show that higher cortical and subcortical centres that govern emotional, motivational and cognitive processes

  3. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  4. Optogenetic and chemogenetic strategies for sustained inhibition of pain

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shrivats M.; Vesuna, Sam; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Huynh, Karen; Young, Stephanie; Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Gorini, Christopher J.; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially targeted, genetically-specific strategies for sustained inhibition of nociceptors may help transform pain science and clinical management. Previous optogenetic strategies to inhibit pain have required constant illumination, and chemogenetic approaches in the periphery have not been shown to inhibit pain. Here, we show that the step-function inhibitory channelrhodopsin, SwiChR, can be used to persistently inhibit pain for long periods of time through infrequent transdermally delivered light pulses, reducing required light exposure by >98% and resolving a long-standing limitation in optogenetic inhibition. We demonstrate that the viral expression of the hM4D receptor in small-diameter primary afferent nociceptor enables chemogenetic inhibition of mechanical and thermal nociception thresholds. Finally, we develop optoPAIN, an optogenetic platform to non-invasively assess changes in pain sensitivity, and use this technique to examine pharmacological and chemogenetic inhibition of pain. PMID:27484850

  5. Regional soft tissue pains: alias myofascial pain?

    PubMed

    Tunks, E; Crook, J

    1999-06-01

    This chapter deals with four main questions: what is the evidence that 'myofascial pain' syndromes exist?; what is the evidence that the myofascial pain concept is clinically useful?; what is the evidence that managing patients in terms of the myofascial pain diagnosis confers benefits?; and what is the evidence-based management of myofascial pain? The purpose of a diagnosis is to provide boundaries around subgroups of illness in a population since each subgroup presumably has a different mechanism, natural history, prognosis, course and response to treatment. The current literature is divided in its conceptual approach to the problem of regional musculoskeletal pain. Some authors regard myofascial pain as being distinct from regional musculoskeletal pain while others regard these as synonymous. A postulated theory of the pathophysiology of myofascial pain is discussed. This contrasts with a view that regional myofascial pain represents a non-specific localized pain arising from multiple regional, systemic and psychosocial factors. In order to consider myofascial pain as a distinct diagnosis, it would be necessary to resolve reliability issues in the identification of its critical diagnostic features. Beyond reliability issues, there are also problems of sensitivity and specificity--i.e. of the patient population that it identifies--which must be resolved if controlled trials are to be conducted. The clinical usefulness of the myofascial pain diagnosis is considered with regard to what is believed about the course of healing, the determinants of disability, the course of regional versus widespread musculoskeletal pain, the relationship of musculoskeletal injury to pain, and the evidence-based management of musculoskeletal pain. An epidemiological perspective is proposed with regard to regional musculoskeletal pain. This allows for the identification of operationally defined strata of regional musculoskeletal pain and permits studies in course, prognosis and

  6. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  7. Cancer-related pain management in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Cipta, Andre M; Pietras, Christopher J; Weiss, Timothy E; Strouse, Thomas B

    2015-10-01

    Uncontrolled pain is one of the most feared and debilitating symptoms among cancer patients, and many suffer unnecessarily from suboptimal pain control. Cancer-related pain is often multidimensional and can affect all aspects of a patient's life. Hence, achieving adequate pain relief among cancer patients involves a proper assessment of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical pain issues, matched with an individualized treatment plan involving pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and procedural therapies when appropriate. Providing effective pain relief can help ease the overall burden of disease among oncology patients while helping them tolerate cancer-directed therapies and achieve the most optimal quality of life throughout all phases of the disease continuum. In this review, the authors will discuss the syndromes, assessment of, and treatment for cancer-related pain in the outpatient setting. PMID:26862909

  8. Pain perception and hypnosis: findings from recent functional neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Ferracuti, Stefano; Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Caltagirone, Saverio Simone; Savoja, Valeria; Piacentino, Daria; Callovini, Gemma; Manfredi, Giovanni; Sani, Gabriele; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hypnosis modulates pain perception and tolerance by affecting cortical and subcortical activity in brain regions involved in these processes. By reviewing functional neuroimaging studies focusing on pain perception under hypnosis, the authors aimed to identify brain activation-deactivation patterns occurring in hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Different changes in brain functionality occurred throughout all components of the pain network and other brain areas. The anterior cingulate cortex appears to be central in modulating pain circuitry activity under hypnosis. Most studies also showed that the neural functions of the prefrontal, insular, and somatosensory cortices are consistently modified during hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Functional neuroimaging studies support the clinical use of hypnosis in the management of pain conditions. PMID:25719519

  9. A randomized controlled trial of a nurse-administered educational intervention for improving cancer pain management in ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Yates, Patsy; Edwards, Helen; Nash, Robyn; Aranda, Sanchia; Purdie, David; Najman, Jake; Skerman, Helen; Walsh, Anne

    2004-05-01

    The persistence of negative attitudes towards cancer pain and its treatment suggests there is scope for identifying more effective pain education strategies. This randomized controlled trial involving 189 ambulatory cancer patients evaluated an educational intervention that aimed to optimize patients' ability to manage pain. One week post-intervention, patients receiving the pain management intervention (PMI) had a significantly greater increase in self-reported pain knowledge, perceived control over pain, and number of pain treatments recommended. Intervention group patients also demonstrated a greater reduction in willingness to tolerate pain, concerns about addiction and side effects, being a "good" patient, and tolerance to pain relieving medication. The results suggest that targeted educational interventions that utilize individualized instructional techniques may alter cancer patient attitudes, which can potentially act as barriers to effective pain management. PMID:15140463

  10. Intracerebroventricular opioids for intractable pain

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    When pain is refractory to systemic opioid and non-opioid analgesic therapy and palliative chemoradiation or ablative or stimulant neurosurgical procedures are not possible, palliative treatment becomes limited, particularly if the patient wishes to be at home at the end of life. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of morphine in the home setting might be presented as an option. The present article reviews the basic and clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety of ICV administration of opioids. Information was gathered from various bibliographic sources, including PubMed and others, and summarized and evaluated to assess the efficacy and safety of ICV opioids for pain relief. Results from ICV infusion of morphine into terminally ill patients refractory to other pain treatments have been reported since the early 1980s. Good efficacy has been achieved for the vast majority of patients, without serious development of analgesic tolerance. There have also been a low incidence of adverse effects, such as constipation and respiratory depression, and a significant retention of alertness associated with this route of administration. Intracerebroventricular infusion of opioid analgesics thus appears to be a safe and effective therapy for the palliative treatment of refractory pain. PMID:22295988

  11. Neuroplastic Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Painful Symptoms Reduction in Chronic Hepatitis C: A Phase II Randomized, Double Blind, Sham Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brietzke, Aline P.; Rozisky, Joanna R.; Dussan-Sarria, Jairo A.; Deitos, Alicia; Laste, Gabriela; Hoppe, Priscila F. T.; Muller, Suzana; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mário R.; de Amorim, Rivadavio F. B.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pegylated Interferon Alpha (Peg-IFN) in combination with other drugs is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection (HCV) and is related to severe painful symptoms. The aim of this study was access the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in controlling the painful symptoms related to Peg-IFN side effects. Materials and Methods: In this phase II double-blind trial, twenty eight (n = 28) HCV subjects were randomized to receive either 5 consecutive days of active tDCS (n = 14) or sham (n = 14) during 5 consecutive days with anodal stimulation over the primary motor cortex region using 2 mA for 20 min. The primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) pain and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels. Secondary outcomes were the pressure-pain threshold (PPT), the Brazilian Profile of Chronic Pain: Screen (B-PCP:S), and drug analgesics use. Results: tDCS reduced the VAS scores (P < 0.003), with a mean pain drop of 56% (p < 0.001). Furthermore, tDCS was able to enhance BDNF levels (p < 0.01). The mean increase was 37.48% in the active group. Finally, tDCS raised PPT (p < 0.001) and reduced the B-PCP:S scores and analgesic use (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Five sessions of tDCS were effective in reducing the painful symptoms in HCV patients undergoing Peg-IFN treatment. These findings support the efficacy of tDCS as a promising therapeutic tool to improve the tolerance of the side effects related to the use of Peg-IFN. Future larger studies (phase III and IV trials) are needed to confirm the clinical use of the therapeutic effects of tDCS in such condition. Trial registration: Brazilian Human Health Regulator for Research with the approval number CAAE 07802012.0.0000.5327. PMID:26793047

  12. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  13. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  14. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... focuses on their pain as well as their perception of its severity. Pain that becomes chronic also ... that stimulating the nervous system can modify the perception of pain. Early studies of TENS suggested that ...

  15. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness, our very lives. Pain is a complex perception that differs enormously among individual patients, even those ... that the two peptides are involved in the perception of pain sensations, especially moderate-to-severe pain. ...

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  17. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter means you can buy them ... and tell your provider. If you are taking pain relievers for more than a week, tell your provider. ...

  18. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  19. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  20. 'Hip' pain.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Josef; Gursche, Angelika

    2003-02-01

    'Hip' pain is usually located in the groin, upper thigh or buttock and is a common complaint. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular femoral head necrosis and apophyseal avulsion are the most common diagnoses in childhood and adolescents. Strains and fractures are common in sport-active adults. Osteoarthritis occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma may result in femoral head fracture or typical muscle and tendon sprains and bursitis. Septic or inflammatory arthritis can occur at every age. Septic arthritis, fractures and acute epiphyseal slipping are real emergency cases. Congenital dysplasia of the hip joint may lead to labral tears and early osteoarthritis. The most important hip problems in children, adolescents, adult and older people are discussed; these problems originate from intra-articular disorders and the surrounding extra-articular soft tissues. Medical history, clinical examination and additional tests, including imaging, will be demonstrated. Principles of treatment are given for specific disorders. PMID:12659822

  1. A preliminary study on how hypohydration affects pain perception.

    PubMed

    Bear, Tracey; Philipp, Michael; Hill, Stephen; Mündel, Toby

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is a prevalent health issue with one in five people suffering from some form of chronic pain, with loss of productivity and medical costs of chronic pain considerable. However, the treatment of pain can be difficult, as pain perception is complex and can be affected by factors other than tissue damage. This study investigated the effect of hypohydration (mild, voluntary dehydration from ∼24 h of limiting fluid intake, mimicking someone drinking less than usual) on a person's pain perception. Seventeen healthy males (age 27 ± 5 years) visited the laboratory on three occasions, once as a familiarization and then twice again while either euhydrated (urine specific gravity: 1.008 ± 0.005) or hypohydrated (urine specific gravity: 1.024 ± 0.003, and -1.4 ± 0.9% body mass). Each visit, they performed a cold pressor test, where their feet were placed in cold water (0-3°C) for a maximum of 4 min. Measures of hydration status, pain sensitivity, pain threshold, and catastrophization were taken. We found that hypohydration predicted increased pain sensitivity (β = 0.43), trait pain catastrophizing, and baseline pain sensitivity (β = 0.37 and 0.47, respectively). These results are consistent with previous research, and suggest that a person's hydration status may be an important factor in their perception of acute pain. PMID:26785699

  2. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  3. Hairpin Vortex Regeneration Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Maharjan, Rijan

    2015-11-01

    A free surface water channel is used to study hairpin vortex formation created by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer. Particle image velocimetry is used to calculate the circulation of the primary hairpin vortex head which is found to monotonically decrease in strength with downstream distance. When a secondary hairpin vortex is formed upstream of the primary vortex, the circulation strength of the head is comparable to the strength of the primary head at the time of regeneration. However, the legs of the primary vortex strengthen up to the moment the secondary hairpin is generated. Although the peak circulation in the legs is not directly correlated to the strength of the original elongated ring vortex, when the circulation is scaled with the injection momentum ratio it is linearly related to scaled injection time. It is proposed that the injection momentum ratio and nondimensionalized injection time based on the wall normal penetration time can be used to identify threshold conditions which produce a secondary vortex. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET- 1040236.

  4. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  5. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  6. Orofacial pain: a primer.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S

    2013-07-01

    Orofacial pain refers to pain associated with the soft and hard tissues of the head, face, and neck. It is a common experience in the population that has profound sociologic effects and impact on quality of life. New scientific evidence is constantly providing insight into the cause and pathophysiology of orofacial pain including temporomandibular disorders, cranial neuralgias, persistent idiopathic facial pains, headache, and dental pain. An evidence-based approach to the management of orofacial pain is imperative for the general clinician. This article reviews the basics of pain epidemiology and neurophysiology and sets the stage for in-depth discussions of various painful conditions of the head and neck. PMID:23809298

  7. [Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerance of BPAA gel in 48 patients with extra-articular rheumatic diseases and in 52 patients with osteoarthritis in the painful phase. Open non-comparative study].

    PubMed

    Maloberti, M R; Ferrero, M P; Rossi, G; Pepe, C A

    1989-09-15

    An open trial was carried out in 100 outpatients suffering from osteoarthritis (52 subjects) or extra-articular rheumatic disorders (48 subjects). Treatment consisted in topical application 3 times daily of an experimental product, BPAA gel, with 3% of active substance, for 2 weeks. During treatment the use of steroidal and non-steroidal analgesic and antiinflammatory agents or of any other drug apt to interfere with the parameters of evaluation was carefully avoided. Patients cooperated actively in subjective evaluation of pain parameters (Visual Analogue Self-rating Scale) which was used to integrate objective evaluation. Treatment response was very favorable, the drug proving effective in 83% and fairly effective in 5.7% of patients with osteoarthritis (total 88.7%). The corresponding figures for patients with extra-articular rheumatic disorders were 83.4% and 6.2% (total 89.0%). No local or systemic side-effects were observed in any of the 100 patients, nor did laboratory tests reveal any untoward actions of the drug. PMID:2530026

  8. Tetrodotoxin suppresses thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat full thickness thermal injury pain model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Petz, Lawrence N; Korz, Walter; Wong, Donald; Clifford, John L

    2015-10-21

    Burn injuries have been identified as the primary cause of injury in 5% of U.S. military personnel evacuated from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Severe burn-associated pain is typically treated with opioids such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone. Side effects of opioids include respiratory depression, cardiac depression, decrease in motor and cognitive function, as well as the development of hyperalgesia, tolerance and dependence. These effects have led us to search for novel analgesics for the treatment of burn-associated pain in wounded combat service members. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker currently in clinical trials as an analgesic. A phase 3 clinical trial for cancer-related pain has been completed and phase 3 clinical trials on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are planned. It has also been shown in mice to inhibit the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. TTX was originally identified as a neurotoxin in marine animals but has now been shown to be safe in humans at therapeutic doses. The antinociceptive effects of TTX are thought to be due to inhibition of Na(+) ion influx required for initiation and conduction of nociceptive impulses. One TTX sensitive sodium channel, Nav1.7, has been shown to be essential in lowering the heat pain threshold after burn injuries. To date, the analgesic effect of TTX has not been tested in burn-associated pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a full thickness thermal injury on the right hind paw. TTX (8 μg/kg) was administered once a day systemically by subcutaneous injection beginning 3 days post thermal injury and continued through 7 days post thermal injury. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were assessed 60 and 120 min post injection on each day of TTX treatment. TTX significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia at all days tested and had a less robust, but statistically significant suppressive effect on mechanical

  9. A SCN10A SNP biases human pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guangyou; Han, Chongyang; Wang, Qingli; Guo, Shanna; Zhang, Yuhao; Ying, Ying; Huang, Penghao; Zhang, Li; Macala, Lawrence; Shah, Palak; Zhang, Mi; Li, Ningbo; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Zhang, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nav1.8 sodium channels, encoded by SCN10A, are preferentially expressed in nociceptive neurons and play an important role in human pain. Although rare gain-of-function variants in SCN10A have been identified in individuals with painful peripheral neuropathies, whether more common variants in SCN10A can have an effect at the channel level and at the dorsal root ganglion, neuronal level leading to a pain disorder or an altered normal pain threshold has not been determined. Results: Candidate single nucleotide polymorphism association approach together with experimental pain testing in human subjects was used to explore possible common SCN10A missense variants that might affect human pain sensitivity. We demonstrated an association between rs6795970 (G > A; p.Ala1073Val) and higher thresholds for mechanical pain in a discovery cohort (496 subjects) and confirmed it in a larger replication cohort (1005 female subjects). Functional assessments showed that although the minor allele shifts channel activation by −4.3 mV, a proexcitatory attribute, it accelerates inactivation, an antiexcitatory attribute, with the net effect being reduced repetitive firing of dorsal root ganglion neurons, consistent with lower mechanical pain sensitivity. Conclusions: At the association and mechanistic levels, the SCN10A single nucleotide polymorphism rs6795970 biases human pain sensitivity. PMID:27590072

  10. Effect of experimental chewing on masticatory muscle pain onset

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; SILVA, Rafael dos Santos; de ARAUJO, Carlos dos Reis Pereira; ROSSETI, Leylha Maria N.; YASSUDA, Shigueharu; da SILVA, Renato Oliveira Ferreira; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a chewing exercise on pain intensity and pressurepain threshold in patients with myofascial pain. Methods Twenty-nine consecutive women diagnosed with myofascial pain (MFP) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria comprised the experimental group and 15 healthy age-matched female were used as controls. Subjects were asked to chew a gum stick for 9 min and to stay at rest for another 9 min afterwards. Pain intensity was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS) every 3 min. At 0, 9 and 18 min, the pressure-pain threshold (PPT) was measured bilaterally on the masseter and the anterior, medium, and posterior temporalis muscles. Results Patients with myofascial pain reported increase (76%) and no change (24%) on the pain intensity measured with the VAS. A reduction of the PPT at all muscular sites after the exercise and a non-significant recovery after rest were also observed. Conclusion The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. there are at least two subtypes of patients with myofascial pain that respond differently to experimental chewing; 2. the chewing protocol had an adequate discriminative ability in distinguishing patients with myofascial pain from healthy controls. PMID:21437467

  11. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family. PMID:12285009

  12. Trigeminal neuralgia: unilateral episodic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-06-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare cause of episodic unilateral facial pain and often in the initial presentation dental causes need to be eliminated, as it frequently presents in the lower trigeminal divisions. The pain description is characteristic of electric shock-like pain that is light-touch provoked, paroxysmal, and occurring daily; the condition can go into remission for weeks or months, however. The first-line drug is either carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine and has to be started in low doses. Over 70% of patients will initially obtain immediate relief. If efficacy or tolerability becomes a problem, then referral to a secondary care specialist should be made. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can determine if there is a symptomatic cause and whether surgery is indicated. Surgical options provide longest pain relief periods. Patients need to be given information about all treatment options so they can make a decision about treatment. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 4, © Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be viewed via the Web site: www.paineurope.com , at which health professionals can find links to the original articles and request copies of the quarterly publication and access additional pain education and pain management resources. PMID:26095494

  13. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    PubMed

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain. PMID:26373552

  14. Fentanyl sublingual spray for breakthrough pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2013-06-01

    Breakthrough pain is a transient exacerbation of pain that occurs either spontaneously, or in relation to a specific predictable or unpredictable trigger, despite relatively stable and adequately controlled background pain. Typically, breakthrough pain has a fast onset and short duration, and a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Normal-release oral opioids are the traditional pharmacological approach for patients who are receiving an around the clock opioid regimen; however, their onset and duration of action may not be suitable for treating many breakthrough pains. Efforts to provide nonparenteral opioid formulations that could provide more rapid, and more effective, relief of breakthrough pain have led to the development of transmucosal opioid formulations including fentanyl sublingual spray (FSLS). This is a formulation of fentanyl available in doses of 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 μg strengths approved for the management of breakthrough pain in adult cancer patients already receiving and who are tolerant to opioid therapy for their underlying persistent cancer pain. Published pharmacokinetic, efficacy, tolerability, and safety data suggest that FSLS has a valuable role to play in the symptomatic pharmacological management of breakthrough pain. The effective dose of FSLS is determined by titration according to the needs of the individual patient. PMID:25135032

  15. Somatosensory findings in patients with spinal cord injury and central dysaesthesia pain.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, P K; Jørum, E; Stenehjem, A E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether central pain in patients with spinal cord injury is only dependent on the lesioning of spinothalamic pathways. METHODS: In sixteen patients with spinal cord injury and central dysaesthesia pain, somatosensory abnormalities in painful denervated skin areas were compared with somatosensory findings in normal skin areas as well as in non-painful denervated skin areas. RESULTS: The threshold values for detection of thermal (heat, cold, heat pain, or cold pain) and tactile stimulation were significantly changed in denervated skin areas although there were no significant differences in the threshold values between painful and non-painful denervated skin areas. The reductions of sensations of touch, vibration, joint position, and two point discrimination in painful and non-painful denervated skin areas were not significantly different. Allodynia (pain caused by non-noxious stimulation) and wind up-like pain (pain caused by repeatedly pricking the skin) were significantly more common in painful than non-painful denervated skin areas. CONCLUSIONS: Because pain and thermal sensory perception are primarily mediated to the brain via spinothalamic pathways, whereas the sensations of touch, vibration and joint position are primarily mediated by dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathways, the results indicate that central pain is not only dependent on the lesioning of either dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathways or spinothalamic pathways. The findings of abnormal evoked pain (allodynia and wind up-like pain) may be consistent with the experimental findings of hyperexcitability in nociceptive spinothalamic tract neurons, that may be involved in the pathogenesis of central pain. Images PMID:8774406

  16. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  17. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  18. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  20. Threshold selection for regional peaks-over-threshold data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin; Jongbloed, Geurt; Adri Buishand, T.

    2016-04-01

    A hurdle in the peaks-over-threshold approach for analyzing extreme values is the selection of the threshold. A method is developed to reduce this obstacle in the presence of multiple, similar data samples. This is for instance the case in many environmental applications. The idea is to combine threshold selection methods into a regional method. Regionalized versions of the threshold stability and the mean excess plot are presented as graphical tools for threshold selection. Moreover, quantitative approaches based on the bootstrap distribution of the spatially averaged Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling test statistics are introduced. It is demonstrated that the proposed regional method leads to an increased sensitivity for too low thresholds, compared to methods that do not take into account the regional information. The approach can be used for a wide range of univariate threshold selection methods. We test the methods using simulated data and present an application to rainfall data from the Dutch water board Vallei en Veluwe.

  1. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016). PMID:27349540

  2. Aceclofenac and paracetamol in episiotomal pain.

    PubMed

    Yscla, A

    1988-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy and safety of a single oral dose of 100 mg of aceclofenac was compared in a double-blind study with a single dose of 650 mg of paracetamol in patients with severe episiotomal pain. The patients were questioned after 30 min and then at hourly intervals for 6 h after medication. A standard format (Huskisson's test) was used to investigate the intensity of the pain throughout the study. The statistically significant results show that the analgesic effect of aceclofenac is superior to that of paracetamol. The tolerance of both compounds is excellent. PMID:3071451

  3. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Back pain often goes away on its own over several weeks. In some people, back pain persists. It may not go away completely or ... at times. Medicines can also help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter ...

  4. Thai perspectives on pain.

    PubMed

    Mongkhonthawornchai, Siriporn; Sangchart, Bumpenchit; Sornboon, Ariya; Chantarasiri, Jongkolnee

    2013-09-01

    This qualitative research aimed to study the meaning, the characteristics, and the dimensions of pain from a Thai point of view. It was conducted under the research project on the development of the quality of pain management for people in the hospital. The subjects were 62 patients, experiencing pain and receiving treatment in 4 hospitals in northeast Thailand. Data were analyzed through content analysis. The findings included: 1) concept from experience of pain, perceived pain as suffering physically and psychologically, 2) different characteristics between acute and chronic pain, 3) four levels of pain intensity: mild, moderate, high and severe, 4) pain effects on four dimensions: physical, psychological, behavioral and societal (family-social-economy), 5) two factors related to pain: alleviating factor and predisposing factor, and 6) pain management relies on beliefs, culture and religion i.e. good deeds in Buddhism affected six dimensions: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, treatment seeking and asking health personnel for help. The results of the present study revealed the influence of culture beliefs on the meaning of pain, pain characteristics, and the effects of pain as well as pain management in terms of cultural contexts. The findings may be implemented for the development of pain assessment and the model development of pain management more appropriately according to cultural contexts. PMID:24386747

  5. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  6. Integrated Approach for Pain Management in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Geroin, Christian; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Bruno, Veronica; Smania, Nicola; Tinazzi, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Pain, one of the most frequent nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), is recognized as an important component of the illness that adversely affects patient quality of life. The aims of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the clinical assessment and to provide a detailed overview of the evidence-based pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to treating pain. Results of a literature search include studies investigating pain/sensory abnormalities in PD. The effects of levodopa administration, deep brain stimulation (DBS), pallidotomy, spinal cord stimulation, rehabilitation, and complementary/alternative medicine are reviewed critically. PD patients have altered pain and sensory thresholds; levodopa and DBS improve pain and change sensory abnormalities toward normal levels through antinociceptive and/or modulatory effects that remain unknown. A wide range of nonpharmacologic approaches require further investigation. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in managing pain syndromes in PD. PMID:26879763

  7. Pain and sex hormones: a review of current understanding.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Adrian J; Lissounov, Alexei; Knezevic, Ivana; Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-05-01

    Multiple epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an increased prevalence for women in several chronic pain disorders. Clinical and experimental investigations have consistently demonstrated sex-specific differences in pain sensitivity and pain threshold. Even though the underlying mechanisms responsible for these differences have not yet been elucidated, the logical possibility of gonadal hormone influence on nociceptive processing has garnered recent attention. In this review, we evaluated the complex literature regarding gonadal hormones and their influence on pain perception. We reviewed the numerous functions of gonadal hormones, discussed the influence of these hormones on several common chronic pain syndromes (migraine, tension and cluster headaches, fibromyalgia, temporomandibular syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and back pain, among others), and have attempted to draw conclusions from the available data. PMID:26983893

  8. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed. PMID:23030540

  9. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  10. Pain assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Leith, B A

    1999-09-01

    Little research is currently available related to pain management by neuroscience nurses. However, due to concerns about the potential for altering neurological status, some neurosurgery patients may not receive optimal pain management. This paper describes findings from a pain related survey which was distributed during the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses June 1998 national conference. The survey was intended to assess Canadian neuroscience nurses pain management knowledge and to explore pain management techniques after intracranial surgery. While 60% of respondents answered four pain assessment and management case study related questions correctly, some respondents rated pain differently when it was expressed by a smiling or grimacing patient. The most common methods for pain control after intracranial surgery included intermittent codeine and/or morphine, often by intramuscular injection. Findings from this study suggest that some neuroscience nurses require further education about pain management and that many patients do not receive optimal pain management after intracranial surgery. PMID:10732518

  11. Evidence of Increased Non-Verbal Behavioral Signs of Pain in Adults with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Chronic Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Harper, Vicki N.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Breau, Lynn M.; Bodfish, James W.

    2009-01-01

    The role of pain in relation to self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with intellectual disabilities is not well understood. Some models of SIB are based on altered endogenous opioid system activity which could result in elevated pain thresholds. In this study, non-verbal behavioral signs indicative of pain as measured by the…

  12. Effectiveness of Self-Hypnosis on the Relief of Experimental Dental Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of self-hypnosis on pain perception. Pain thresholds were measured, and a targeted, standardized pain stimulus was created by electrical stimulation of the dental pulp of an upper anterior tooth. Pain stimulus was rated by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain threshold under self-hypnosis was higher (57.1 ± 17.1) than without hypnotic intervention (39.5 ± 11.8) (p < .001). Pain was rated lower on the VAS with self-hypnosis (4.0 ± 3.8) than in the basal condition without self-hypnosis (7.1 ± 2.7) (p < .001). Self-hypnosis can be used in clinical practice as an adjunct to the gold standard of local anesthesia for pain management, as well as an alternative in individual cases. PMID:26894422

  13. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  14. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Background Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Methods Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Results Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p < 0.0001), despite all participants reporting analgesic use. Functional MRI analysis showed increased activation in the thalamus, cingulate, frontal and somatosensory cortex in the hand OA group but not in controls (thresholded at p < 0.05). Regions of activation were mapped to Brodmann areas 3, 4, 6, 9, 13, 22, 24 and 44. Activated regions found in our study are recognised higher brain pain processing centres implicated in central sensitisation. Conclusions People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies. PMID:24294351

  15. Orthodoxy, recalcitrance and in-between: describing variation in seed storage characteristics using threshold responses to water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tolerance of desiccation is typically described by a threshold or low-water-content-limit to survival. This convention provides fairly good distinction between orthodox and recalcitrant seeds, which show thresholds of less than about 0.07 and greater than about 0.2 g H2O g dw-1, respectively. Thresh...

  16. A human experimental model of episodic pain.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi; Negro, Francesco; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-12-01

    An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused significantly increased cutaneous blood flow around the site of the stimulation. Axon flare reflex and blood flow reached a plateau on day one in all the subjects and no significant changes between the days were observed. The results showed that the effect of the electrical stimulations changed over the five days; pain potentiation was induced on the first day (significant increase in the verbal pain ratings during the 45 min stimulation) but not on any of the subsequent days. After five days of subsequent pain induction, the global field power showed a significant reduction in P2 amplitude in the late stage (200-370 ms, in the central-parietal area). In conclusion, the results suggest that in healthy individuals this model of episodic pain produces a rapid adaptation after day one and that generates significant SEP changes at day five. PMID:25128903

  17. Inflammatory pain in experimental burns in man.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, J L

    2000-06-01

    -sensitive A delta- and C-fibre nociceptors, whereas blisters may be used to assess edema formation and the degree of injury. Hyperalgesia is induced immediately by the burns and lasts about 24 h dependent on the intensity of the heat stimulus. The burns heal without sequela. A study of the reproducibility of pain assessments in the burn model has shown that measures based on repeated measurements were significantly more reproducible than measures based on single time points. Further, within-day reproducibility was better than between-day reproducibility. Within-day variations of heat pain responses to 45 degrees C and 47 degrees C were smaller than that of pain responses to 43 degrees C, suggesting that assessments using clearly painful stimuli may be more reproducible. A methodological study also demonstrated that habituation to experimental pain developed as the study proceeded. Habituation is common in experimental pain models, and dividing analgesics and placebo evenly between the study days is one way of eliminating the effects of habituation. The use of simultaneous right-left comparisons represents the ideal design when possible. The burn model has been a valuable tool in the study of pain mechanisms. Hyperalgesia to heat in the burned area (primary hyperalgesia) is mediated by sensitisation of C-fibre mechano-heat-sensitive (CMH) nociceptors and A delta-fibre mechano-heat-sensitive (AMH) nociceptors of type I in hairy skin. A contribution from sensitised CNS neurones is likely, and the sensitisation of nociceptors is confined to the injured area. The presence of hyperalgesia to heat in normal skin surrounding a burn (secondary hyperalgesia) has been demonstrated in several studies, but the pain threshold may be unaltered. The mechanisms for primary hyperalgesia to mechanical stimuli may be both peripheral and central, but the importance of peripheral mechanisms is unclear and central mechanisms may account for mechanical hyperalgesia in both the primary and th PMID

  18. Comparison of acceptance and distraction strategies in coping with experimentally induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Hazel; Stewart, Ian; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; McGuire, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Background This study compared an acceptance-based strategy with a control-based strategy (distraction) in terms of the ability of participants to tolerate a painful stimulus, across two experiments. In addition, participants were either actively encouraged, or not, to link pain tolerance with pursuit of valued goals to examine the impact of pursuing a personally meaningful goal or value on the extent to which pain will be tolerated. Methods Participants in experiment 1 (n=41) and experiment 2 (n=52) were equally assigned to acceptance or distraction protocols. Further, half the participants in each group generated examples from their own lives in which they had pursued a valued objective, while the other half did not. In experiment 2, the values focus was enhanced to examine the impact on pain tolerance. Results There were no significant differences overall between the acceptance and distraction groups on pain tolerance in either experiment. However, in experiment 2, individuals classified as accepting in terms of general coping style and who were assigned to the acceptance strategy showed significantly better pain tolerance than accepting individuals who were in the distraction condition. Across both experiments, those with strong goal-driven values in both protocols were more tolerant of pain. Participants appeared to have more difficulty adhering to acceptance than to distraction as a strategy. Conclusion Acceptance may be associated with better tolerance of pain, but may also be more difficult to operationalize than distraction in experimental studies. Matching coping style and coping strategy may be most effective, and enhancement of goal-driven values may assist in pain coping. PMID:25834464

  19. Low threshold primary afferent drive onto GABAergic interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Claire A.; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition in the spinal cord dorsal horn is crucial for maintaining separation of touch and pain modalities. Disruption of this inhibition results in allodynia, allowing low threshold drive onto pain and temperature sensitive projection neurons. This low threshold excitatory pathway is normally under strong inhibition. We hypothesized that superficial dorsal horn inhibitory neurons, which would be ideally located to suppress low threshold drive onto projection neurons in a feedforward manner, are driven by low threshold input. In addition, because disinhibition-induced allodynia shares some features with the immature dorsal horn such as elevated sensitivity to low threshold input, we also questioned whether low threshold drive onto inhibitory neurons changes during postnatal maturation. To investigate these questions, slices were made at different ages from transgenic mice with EGFP expression in GABAergic neurons and whole cell recordings were made from these fluorescent neurons. Evoked synaptic activity was measured in response to electrical stimulation of the dorsal root. We demonstrate that Aβ fibers activate a significant proportion of superficial dorsal horn GABAergic neurons. This occurs with similar excitatory synaptic drive throughout postnatal maturation, but with a greater prevalence at younger ages. These GABAergic neurons are well situated to contribute to suppressing low threshold activation of output projection neurons. In addition, the majority of these GABAergic neurons also had convergent input from high threshold fibers, suggesting that this novel subclass of GABAergic neurons is important for gating innocuous as well as noxious information. PMID:19158295

  20. A comparison of two methods for measuring thermal thresholds in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D; Abraham, R; Reid, G

    1989-01-01

    Thermal thresholds can be measured psychophysically using either the method of limits or a forced-choice method. We have compared the two methods in 367 diabetic patients, 128 with symptomatic neuropathy. The Sensortek method was chosen for the forced-choice device, the Somedic modification of the Marstock method for a method of limits. Cooling and heat pain thresholds were also measured using the Marstock method. Somedic thermal thresholds increase with age in normal subjects, but not to a clinically significant degree. In diabetics Marstock warm threshold increased by 0.8 degrees C/decade, Sensortek by 0.1 degrees C/decade. Both methods had a high coefficient of variation in normal subjects (Sensortek 29%, Marstock warm 14%, cool 42%). The prevalence of abnormal thresholds was similar for both methods (28-32%), though Marstock heat pain thresholds were less frequently abnormal (18%). Only 15-18% of patients had abnormal results in both tests. Sensortek thresholds were significantly lower on repeat testing, and all thresholds were higher in symptomatic patients. Both methods are suitable for clinical thermal testing, though the method of limits is quicker. In screening studies the choice of a suitable apparatus need not be determined by the psychophysical basis of the test. PMID:2795077

  1. Peripheral endothelin A receptor antagonism attenuates carcinoma-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian L; Pickering, Victoria; Liu, Stanley; Quang, Phuong; Dolan, John; Connelly, S Thaddeus; Jordan, Richard C K

    2007-05-01

    In this study we investigated the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and its peripheral receptor (ET-A) in carcinoma-induced pain in a mouse cancer pain model. Tumors were induced in the hind paw of female mice by local injection of cells derived from a human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Significant pain, as indicated by reduction in withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, began at four days after SCC inoculation and lasted to 28 days, the last day of measurement. Intra-tumor expression of both ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 protein were significantly upregulated compared to normal tissue, and local administration of the ET-A receptor selective antagonist, BQ-123 (100 microM) significantly elevated withdrawal thresholds, indicating the induction of an antinociceptive effect. These findings support the suggestion that ET-1 and ET-A receptors contribute to the severity of carcinoma-induced soft tissue cancer pain. PMID:16807013

  2. Assessment of psychological pain in major depressive episodes.

    PubMed

    Mee, Steven; Bunney, Blynn G; Bunney, William E; Hetrick, William; Potkin, Steven G; Reist, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    Severe psychological or mental pain is defined as an experience of unbearable torment which can be associated with a psychiatric illness (e.g., major depressive disorder) or a tragic loss such as the death of a child. A brief self-rating scale (Mee-Bunney Psychological Pain Assessment Scale [MBPPAS]) was developed to assess the intensity of psychological pain. The scale was used to measure psychological pain in 73 major depressive episode (MDE) patients and 96 non-psychiatric controls. In addition to the MBPPAS, all subjects completed four additional instruments: Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Known-groups, content and convergent validity, and internal reliability of the scale were established. MDE and control subjects were ranked according to MBPPAS scores. A threshold was set at 32 representing 0.5 SD above the mean for MDEs. MDE subjects above the threshold of 32 had significantly higher SBQ scores than those below. A significant linear correlation between psychological pain and SBQ suicidality scores was observed. This is the first study to contrast psychological pain in controls and patients with MDE. Our results suggest that psychological pain is a useful and unique construct in patients with MDE that can be reliably assessed and may aid in the evaluation of suicidal risk. PMID:21831397

  3. Do ventilated neonates require pain management?

    PubMed

    Hall, R Whit; Boyle, Elaine; Young, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a stressful experience in neonates resulting in changes in neuroendocrine parameters, pain scores, and physiologic responses. Assisted ventilation in neonates is presumed to be associated with chronic repetitive pain, which in turn is associated with adverse long-term sequelae. Reasons to routinely sedate ventilated neonates include improved ventilator synchrony, improved pulmonary function, and decreased neuroendocrine responses, including cortisol, beta-endorphine, and catecholamines. Reasons not to treat include the well-known adverse side effects of pain medication, especially the opiates, including hypotension from morphine, chest wall rigidity from fentanyl, and tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal from both opiates and benzodiazepines. Additionally, adverse effects such as death and IVH are not improved with preemptive treatment. Chronic pain assessment is poorly validated and difficult to assess in this population, and most studies have evaluated only acute pain scores. If patients are treated, opiates are the most common class of drugs, with morphine the most well studied. Fentanyl may be advantageous in hypotensive, younger neonates because it has fewer cardiovascular effects. The benzodiazepines, midazolam and lorazepam, have been used in ventilated neonates, but midazolam has been associated with adverse effects in one small study so concern remains regarding its use. Significant gaps in our knowledge exist, especially in regard to long-term effects of treatment, or lack thereof, and in the assessment of the chronic pain associated with assisted ventilation. PMID:17905183

  4. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  5. Sweet Taste and Menthol Increase Cough Reflex Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Dalton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  6. Sweet taste and menthol increase cough reflex thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S; Dalton, Pamela

    2012-06-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  7. History of pain theories.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun

    2011-10-01

    The concept of pain has remained a topic of long debate since its emergence in ancient times. The initial ideas of pain were formulated in both the East and the West before 1800. Since 1800, due to the development of experimental sciences, different theories of pain have emerged and become central topics of debate. However, the existing theories of pain may be appropriate for the interpretation of some aspects of pain, but are not yet comprehensive. The history of pain problems is as long as that of human beings; however, the understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from sufficient. Thus, intensive research is required. This historical review mainly focuses on the development of pain theories and the fundamental discoveries in this field. Other historical events associated with pain therapies and remedies are beyond the scope of this review. PMID:21934730

  8. The problem of pain.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Keith; Martelli, Michael F

    2004-01-01

    Pain problems, especially posttraumatic headache, are very common following head trauma. Pain may be the most significant problem, more disabling than any brain or other injuries, and interfering with aspects of cognition or other function. However, posttraumatic headache and most other chronic posttraumatic pain problems remain poorly understood. This article reviews fundamental issues that should be considered in understanding the nature of chronic pain including the distinction between acute and chronic pain; neurobiological distinctions between the lateral and medial pain system; nociceptive versus neuropathic or other central pain; sensitization effects; the widely accepted view of chronic pain as a multidimensional subjective experience involving sensory, motivational-affective and cognitive-behavioral components; the problem of mind-body dualism; the role of psychosocial factors in the onset, maintenance, exacerbation or severity of pain; plus issues of response bias and malingering. PMID:14732827

  9. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern. PMID:6710192

  10. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described. PMID:27518134

  11. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  12. [Muscle-skeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Vygonskaya, M V; Filatova, E G

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the most complicated aspects of low back pain. The differences between specific and nonspecific low back pain using the "red flags" system is highlighted. The authors consider the causes of pain chronification (the "yellow flags" system) and the necessity of using a biopsychosocial model. Main pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic muscle/skeletal pain are considered and the possible involvement of several mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic pain as well as the use of complex therapy is discussed. The high efficacy and safety of ketorolac in treatment of nonspecific muscle/skeletal pain is demonstrated. PMID:27042717

  13. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  14. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  15. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  16. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  17. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Harrison, E. Katherine; Menon, David K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9A gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks), and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice. PMID:26676151

  18. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  19. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  20. Normothermic central hypovolemia tolerance reflects hyperthermic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that those who are highly tolerant to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) while normothermic are also highly tolerant to this challenge while hyperthermic. Methods Sixty pairs of normothermic and hyperthermic LBNP tests to pre-syncope were evaluated. LBNP tolerance was quantified via the cumulative stress index (CSI), which is calculated as the sum of the product of the LBNP level and the duration of each level until test termination (i.e., 20 mmHg × 3 min + 30 mmHg × 3 min, etc.). CSI was compared between normothermic and hyperthermic trials. Internal and skin temperatures, heart rate, and arterial pressure were measured throughout. Results Hyperthermia reduced (P<0.001) CSI from 997 ± 437 to 303 ± 213 mmHg min. There was a positive correlation between normothermic and hyperthermic LBNP tolerance (R2 = 0.38; P<0.001). As a secondary analysis, the 20 trials with the highest LBNP tolerance while normothermic were identified (indicated as the HIGH group; CSI 1,467 ± 356 mmHg min), as were the 20 trials with the lowest normothermic tolerance (indicated as the LOW group; CSI 565 ± 166 mmHg min; P<0.001 between groups). While hyperthermia unanimously reduced CSI in both HIGH and LOW groups, in this hyperthermic condition CSI was ~threefold higher in the HIGH group (474 ± 226 mmHg min) relative to the LOW group (160 ± 115 mmHg min; P<0.001). Conclusions LBNP tolerance while hyperthermic is related to normothermic tolerance and, associated with this finding, those who have a high LBNP tolerance while normothermic remain relatively tolerant when hyperthermic. PMID:24700256

  1. Damage thresholds for terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; McQuade, Jill; Vincelette, Rebecca; Ibey, Bennet; Payne, Jason; Thomas, Robert; Roach, W. P.; Roth, Caleb L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2010-02-01

    Several international organizations establish minimum safety standards to ensure that workers and the general population are protected against adverse health effects associated with electromagnetic radiation. Suitable standards are typically defined using published experimental data. To date, few experimental studies have been conducted at Terahertz (THz) frequencies, and as a result, current THz standards have been defined using extrapolated estimates from neighboring spectral regions. In this study, we used computational modeling and experimental approaches to determine tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies. For the computational modeling efforts, we used the Arrhenius damage integral to predict damage-thresholds. We determined thresholds experimentally for both long (minutes) and short (seconds) THz exposures. For the long exposure studies, we used an in-house molecular gas THz laser (υ= 1.89 THz, 189.92 mW/cm2, 10 minutes) and excised porcine skin. For the short exposure studies, we used the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Laboratory (υ= 0.1-1.0 THz, 2.0-14.0 mW/cm2, 2 seconds) and wet chamois cloths. Thresholds were determined using conventional damage score determination and probit analysis techniques, and tissue temperatures were measured using infrared thermographic techniques. We found that the FEL was ideal for tissue damage studies, while our in-house THz source was not suitable to determine tissue damage thresholds. Using experimental data, the tissue damage threshold (ED50) was determined to be 7.16 W/cm2. This value was in well agreement with that predicted using our computational models. We hope that knowledge of tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies helps to ensure the safe use of THz radiation.

  2. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  3. Complaining about chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kugelmann, R

    1999-12-01

    This paper examines how a group of working class people describes and experiences chronic pain. This hermeneutical-phenomenological study concentrates on the lived body of pain from three perspectives, drawing on interviews with 14 people who were attending a pain management program. First I consider the terms in which pain is circumscribed in the narratives, stories told in the context of learning to manage pain. These terms are polarities, ways of specifying and legitimating pain in relation to "mind" and "body." Pain, in the discursive polarities that define it, is the private property of an individual, who must in some fashion prove that pain exists in an objective manner. The speaker, in this discourse, stands as the one responsible for the production of pain. In the second part, the analysis turns to what this discourse reveals about pain as a lived body phenomenon. Here the analysis centers upon the torment of having to inhabit the intolerable, upon how pain unmakes the lifeworld of the sufferer, and how, simultaneously, people make pain. The place of pain is the body, as body-in-place. The place of pain is at the boundaries of human dwelling, a kind of non-place, expressed metaphorically as "prison" or "homelessness." Finally, after these considerations of how pain is described, in part three, I turn to the act of "saying" pain, that is, to the narratives as addressed to someone else. The participants were not simply dispensing information; they were saying something to me. The narratives had the form of complaints. The form of the narratives, in the context of the pain program, was a quasi-legal call to rectify wrongs. PMID:10574237

  4. A life of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Berkley, Karen J

    2005-10-15

    volume voiding thresholds if the bladder. These cross-system effects, which likely involve CNS mechanisms, likely also underlie co-occurrence of painful clinical conditions. Research continues on details of these mechanisms and their relevance for clinical diagnosis and therapy. None of this work could have been done without collegial support of colleagues and technical staff at Florida State University. PMID:16139851

  5. [Pain from AIDS (adult)].

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, D

    1997-10-01

    Pain, a major handicapping factor for HIV patients, has been underestimated and insufficiently treated. The pain may have various origins, including the virus itself, antiviral or anticancer treatments, secondary infections or their treatments, or unrelated intercurrent infection. Just as in the general population, three types of pain may be distinguished: nociceptive, neuropathic, and idiopathic. The lesions capable of producing nociceptive pain are numerous in HIV patients. The most common etiologies are oropharyngeal, gastrointestinal, and rheumatic. Neurological complications are among the most frequently encountered in the course of HIV infection, and some may cause typical neuropathic pain. Such pain may be secondary to a central lesion, as in cerebral toxoplasmosis, but usually is related to a peripheral effect. The principal etiologies of peripheral neuropathic pain are HIV neuropathies, postherpetic neuralgia, toxic neuropathies secondary to antiviral treatment, and diabetic neuropathies. Pain management should be part of the treatment of HIV complications. In the absence of a validated protocol for treatment of HIV-related pain, the guidelines for cancer pain management developed by the World Health Organization can be used as a starting point for nociceptive pain. Dosage and administration should be individually adjusted. Treatment of neuropathic pain is based primarily on tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Nonpharmaceutical interventions such as transcutaneous electric stimulation, hypnosis, and acupuncture may also be useful. Evaluation and management of psychological factors should be an integral part of treatment, as in all patients with chronic pain. PMID:12348806

  6. Racial differences in the physical and psychosocial health among black and white women with chronic pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ndao-Brumblay, S. Khady; Green, Carmen R.

    2005-01-01

    Gender-based differences in pain epidemiology, pain threshold, attitudes toward pain management, coping styles and social roles are well described, yet little is known about the chronic pain experience in women or the role race plays. A retrospective analysis of self-reported data using a secondary clinical database was performed to elucidate the relationship between race and pain severity, depression, physical disability, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as affective distress in women with chronic pain. White (n=1,088) and black (n=104) adult women were compared based on their responses to the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Pain Disability Index, Posttraumatic Chronic Pain Test and items from the West-Haven Yale Multidisciplinary Pain Inventory. After accounting for sociodemographic, medical, psychological and physical confounders, there was no significant race effect for pain severity or affective distress. However, black women with chronic pain experience more physical impairments than white women with chronic pain (beta = 4.622; p<0.005). Except for the family/home responsibilities, similar differences were found on all PDI subscales. We also found that disability mediates the race-depression relationship such that black women are comparatively more vulnerable to depression as a result of higher disability. Due to the economic, social and emotional impact that disability has on women with chronic pain and their families, these findings have significant implications for chronic pain research as well as its management in black women. PMID:16353658

  7. Tolerance of probiotics and prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Marteau, Philippe; Seksik, Philippe

    2004-07-01

    The clinical efficacy of probiotics and prebiotics has been proved in several clinical settings. The authors review their proved or potential side effects. Probiotics as living microorganisms may theoretically be responsible for 4 types of side effects in susceptible individuals: infections, deleterious metabolic activities, excessive immune stimulation, and gene transfer. Very few cases of infection have been observed. These occurred mainly in very sick patients who received probiotic drugs because of severe medical conditions. Prebiotics exert an osmotic effect in the intestinal lumen and are fermented in the colon. They may induce gaseousness and bloating. Abdominal pain and diarrhea only occur with large doses. An increase in gastroesophageal reflux has recently been associated with large daily doses. Tolerance depends on the dose and individual sensitivity factors (probably the presence of irritable bowel syndrome or gastroesophageal reflux), and may be an adaptation to chronic consumption. PMID:15220662

  8. Efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan in controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ninan T

    2005-01-01

    Seven triptans are now available for the acute treatment of migraine. While all of these agents have been shown to be safe and more or less well tolerated, they differ in ways that are clinically relevant to individual patients. Almotriptan has been investigated in approximately 3,500 patients enrolled in short-term clinical trials and 1,500 patients enrolled in long-term open-label trials. In a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled almotriptan trials (n = 2,294), treatment with almotriptan 12.5 mg results in a 2-hour pain-relief rate of 63.7% and a 2-hour pain-free rate of 36.4%. Almotriptan is associated with a rapid onset of action, with 30-min pain-relief and pain-free rates significantly better than placebo (p < 0.05). Direct comparator studies show the efficacy of almotriptan 12.5 mg to be comparable to that of sumatriptan but almotriptan is associated with superior tolerability. Trials assessing the efficacy of almotriptan over multiple attacks show that this agent is associated with a consistent and persistent response, not differing from the first to the last attack, an important property for a medication used to treat a chronic condition such as migraine. Early intervention with almotriptan enhances the activity of this agent. Treatment of mild pain with almotriptan has resulted in 2-hour pain-free rates of 84 and 77% and a sustained pain-free rate of 67%. Early treatment (within 1 h) of moderate to severe headaches with almotriptan also improves outcomes. In conclusion, clinical trials and post hoc analyses of such trials have shown almotriptan to be effective and well tolerated for the acute treatment of migraine. Its placebo-like tolerability makes it a good choice for early intervention, a strategy associated with better patient outcomes. PMID:15920335

  9. Zero Tolerance in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henault, Cherry

    2001-01-01

    Questions the effectiveness of the widespread use of zero-tolerance policies enacted by school boards to punish students who violate weapon and drug rules. Suggests that enforcement of zero-tolerance policies has not been equitable. Reviews proposal for alternative to zero tolerance. (PKP)

  10. Imaging studies in patients with spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate an a priori threshold for advanced imaging in patients with spinal pain. Design Patients with spinal pain in any region for 6 to 52 weeks were assessed to determine if radiologic studies beyond x-ray scans were indicated, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide bone scans. An a priori threshold was set before MRI, CT, or bone scans would be considered. Those who did not have MRI, CT, or bone scans ordered were followed for at least 1 year to determine if any of them went on to be diagnosed with a more serious spinal disorder (eg, infection, fracture, spondylitis, tumour, neurologic compression). Setting Four large primary care clinics in Edmonton, Alta. Participants A total of 1003 consecutively presenting patients with symptoms suspected to be related to the spine (for a duration of generally 6 to 52 weeks) who had not already undergone advanced imaging and did not have a diagnosis of nonbenign back pain. Main outcome measures Number of cases of nonbenign spinal disorder in participants who underwent advanced imaging and participants who did not undergo advanced imaging (ie, did not have any red flags). Results There were 399 women (39.8%) and 604 men (60.2%). The mean (SD) age of the group was 47.2 (14.6) years. The mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 15.1 (8.6) weeks. Of the 1003 participants, 110 met an a priori threshold for undergoing at least 1 of MRI, CT, or bone scan. In these 110 participants, there were newly diagnosed cases of radiculopathy (n = 12), including a case of cauda equina syndrome; spondyloarthropathy (n = 6); occult fracture (n = 2); solitary metastasis (n = 1); epidural lipomatosis (n = 1); osteomyelitis (n = 1), and retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1), each of which was considered likely to be the cause of the patient’s spinal symptoms. The remaining 893 participants were followed for at least 1 year and none showed evidence of a nonbenign cause of his or her

  11. Back pain and sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000519.htm Back pain and sports To use the sharing features on ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Back Injuries Back Pain Sports Injuries Sports Safety Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  12. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, and may be best treated with physical therapy without taking any medicine at all. Pain can ... medicine and non-medicine strategies. Treatments such as physical therapy, massage, heat and/or cold packs, exercise, and ...

  13. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by abnormal conditions such as endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Unless one of these potentially serious conditions is present, the treatment for painful periods is pain relief. If a ...

  14. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  15. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  16. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Search: header Home About PC Symposia & Meetings NIH Pain Programs Funding Opportunities Conferences & Seminars Federal Pain Activities News & Health Info Recent News Congratulations to 2016 Mitchell Max Awardee, Dr. Ditre Asst. ...

  17. Lower Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Get plenty of rest and use an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve pain. If your pain is ... or a HERNIATED DISK. Apply heat, use an anti-inflammatory medicine and get rest. If you don't ...

  18. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007489.htm Pain medications - narcotics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are ...

  19. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  20. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is good to prepare yourself for natural childbirth. Natural Childbirth The pain felt during childbirth is different for every woman. Some women choose natural childbirth, or giving birth without medicine for pain. ...

  1. Phytotherapy for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2009-06-01

    Pain is considered the third most common healthcare problem disabling more individuals than heart disease and cancer together. Although pharmacological pain management offers a significant relief in several pain-related diseases, many patients turn to its supplementation with complementary and alternative medicine. Botanicals used in pain therapy can contribute to restoring the quality of life to a patient and may effect and enhance conventional pain management. Herbal analgesic use in several pain-related diseases such as rheumatologic diseases, back pain, cancer, diabetic peripheral neuropathy and migraine will be discussed. In addition, this review describes botanicals with known analgesic activity for which randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing their efficacy in different pain-related diseases have been published and which have been recently evaluated in many systematic reviews with well-described methodology. PMID:19649334

  2. Pain in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients’ quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  3. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... as ice, mild painkillers, physical therapy, and proper exercises. Most of the time, back pain will get ... prevent getting back pain again. Stretching and strengthening exercises are important. But, starting these exercises too soon ...

  4. Neuropathic pain in cancer.

    PubMed

    Urch, C E; Dickenson, A H

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic pain in cancer arises following injury to peripheral or central neurons, in a similar manner to such pain arising from a non-cancer injury. Much of our knowledge of neuropathic pain is based on peripheral originating events with little known about central neuropathic pain. This article explores some of the similarities and differences between cancer and non-cancer-related neuropathic pain. The neural pathways, ion channels, receptors and neurotransmitters that potentially can be altered in both neuropathies are the same; however the nature of the injury, the timing, repeated injuries and the co-existence of simultaneous non-neuropathic pain states lead to potential unique constellations of neuroreceptor and neurotransmitter expression in the context of cancer pain. This in turn may lead to different clinical presentation of pain sensations and potentially lead to specific treatment options. PMID:18492553

  5. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  6. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  7. A longitudinal study of pain, personality, and brain plasticity following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Katz, Joel; Davis, Karen D

    2016-03-01

    We do not know precisely why pain develops and becomes chronic after peripheral nerve injury (PNI), but it is likely due to biological and psychological factors. Here, we tested the hypotheses that (1) high Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores at the time of injury and repair are associated with pain and cold sensitivity after 1-year recovery and (2) insula gray matter changes reflect the course of injury and improvements over time. Ten patients with complete median and/or ulnar nerve transections and surgical repair were tested ∼3 weeks after surgical nerve repair (time 1) and ∼1 year later for 6 of the 10 patients (time 2). Patients and 10 age-/sex-matched healthy controls completed questionnaires that assessed pain (patients) and personality and underwent quantitative sensory testing and 3T MRI to assess cortical thickness. In patients, pain intensity and neuropathic pain correlated with pain catastrophizing. Time 1 pain catastrophizing trended toward predicting cold pain thresholds at time 2, and at time 1 cortical thickness of the right insula was reduced. At time 2, chronic pain was related to the time 1 pain-PCS relationship and cold sensitivity, pain catastrophizing correlated with cold pain threshold, and insula thickness reversed to control levels. This study highlights the interplay between personality, sensory function, and pain in patients following PNI and repair. The PCS-pain association suggests that a focus on affective or negative components of pain could render patients vulnerable to chronic pain. Cold sensitivity and structural insula changes may reflect altered thermosensory or sensorimotor awareness representations. PMID:26588697

  8. Posttonsillectomy pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sutters, Kimberly A; Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-02-01

    Tonsillectomy, used to treat a variety of pediatric disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, peritonsillar cellulitis or abscesses, and very frequent throat infection, is known to produce nausea, vomiting, and prolonged, moderate-to-severe pain. The authors review the causes of posttonsillectomy pain, current findings on the efficacy of various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in pain management, recommendations for patient and family teaching regarding pain management, and best practices for improving medication adherence. PMID:24445532

  9. Pain Management for Children during Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vasquenza, Kelly; Ruble, Kathy; Chen, Allen; Billett, Carol; Kozlowski, Lori; Atwater, Sara; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Pain management for children during bone marrow and stem cell transplantation is a significant clinical challenge for the health care team. Pain management strategies vary by institution. This paper reports on the use of a pediatric pain management service and patient-and caregiver-controlled analgesia for children undergoing transplant. This 2-year retrospective chart review examined the pain management practices and outcomes of children undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants in a large urban teaching hospital during 2008 and 2009. We concluded that patient- and caregiver-controlled analgesia is a well-tolerated modality for pain control during hospitalization for transplantation at this institution. PMID:25267531

  10. Pain assessment: the cornerstone to optimal pain management

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Pain assessment is critical to optimal pain management interventions. While pain is a highly subjective experience, its management necessitates objective standards of care. The WILDA approach to pain assessment—focusing on words to describe pain, intensity, location, duration, and aggravating or alleviating factors—offers a concise template for assessment in patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:16389388

  11. Neutrino floor at ultralow threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-05-01

    By lowering their energy threshold, direct dark matter searches can reach the neutrino floor with experimental technology that is now in development. The 7Be flux can be detected with ˜10 eV nuclear recoil energy threshold and 50 kg/yr exposure. The p e p flux can be detected with ˜3 ton/yr exposure, and the first detection of the CNO flux is possible with similar exposure. The p p flux can be detected with threshold of ˜eV and only ˜ kg /yr exposure. These can be the first pure neutral current measurements of the low-energy solar neutrino flux. Measuring this flux is important for low mass dark matter searches and for understanding the solar interior.

  12. Back Pain Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain and Depression Preventing Travel Aches and Strains Back Pain Facts and Statistics Although doctors of chiropractic (DCs) ... time. 1 A few interesting facts about back pain: Low back pain is the single leading cause of disability ...

  13. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is a perception that signals the individual that tissue damage has ... in the body that are involved in the perception of pain are called "nociception." Basic and clinical ...

  14. Taking narcotics for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lumbar pain - chronic - narcotics; Pain - back - chronic - narcotics; Chronic back pain - low - narcotics ... Opioids compared to placebo or other treatments for chronic low-back pain: an update of the Cochrane Review. Spine . 2014;( ...

  15. Exteroceptive silent period of masseter muscle activity evoked by electrical mental nerve stimulation: relation to non-pain and pain sensations.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Zichner, V; Niederberger, U

    1996-01-01

    Exteroceptive silent periods (ESPs) of masseter muscle activity evoked by electrical stimulation of the mental nerve were studied over a large range of prepain intensities and at pain threshold in 44 normal subjects. Seven levels of stimulus intensity, based on individual sensory and pain thresholds, were applied and the relationship between ESPs, stimulus intensity and perception, as manifested by the subjective verbal response, was investigated. The analysis revealed that the occurrence of ESPs was not related to the stimulus intensity at the pain threshold. There were individually different patterns of progressive response to increasing current intensities within the pre-pain range in many cases. On the other hand, almost half of all the subjects investigated showed no or only occasional ESPs. In view of this variability the concept of ESPs being a nociceptive behavioural response has to be questioned. PMID:8936454

  16. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  17. Growing Pains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Joints affected by more serious diseases are swollen, red, tender, or warm — the joints of kids having growing pains look normal. Although growing pains often strike in late afternoon or early evening before bed, pain can sometimes wake a sleeping child. The ...

  18. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  19. "Infectious" Transplantation Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shixin; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Pope, Heather; Elliott, James; Kioussis, Dimitris; Davies, Joanna; Waldmann, Herman

    1993-02-01

    The maintenance of transplantation tolerance induced in adult mice after short-term treatment with nonlytic monoclonal antibodies to CD4 and CD8 was investigated. CD4^+ T cells from tolerant mice disabled naive lymphocytes so that they too could not reject the graft. The naive lymphocytes that had been so disabled also became tolerant and, in turn, developed the capacity to specifically disable other naive lymphocytes. This process of "infectious" tolerance explains why no further immunosuppression was needed to maintain long-term transplantation tolerance.

  20. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the