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Sample records for palaeoproterozoic ice houses

  1. The use of ice to enrich the environment of pigs housed indoors.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Jose M; Rizzo, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Pigs used in research are often housed in barren environments. The effects of ice as a simple enrichment tool for newly weaned pigs were investigated. Four replicates of 120 pigs were separated into 3 groups. One group was given free access to blocks of ice (ice group), another group had access to Classic Kong toys (Kong group), and a 3rd group did not receive any enrichment (control group). The behavior of each group was observed every 5 min from 08:00 hr to 12:00 hr during 4 consecutive days. Pigs were motivated to explore the ice blocks (4.85%±1.34) over the Classic Kong toys (2.03%±0.59). No differences in other behaviors were found between treatments. Ice is an effective and easy-to-replace enrichment device. Blocks of ice can be used as enrichment devices for pigs housed in research facilities. PMID:25105553

  2. Multiple Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes and excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. P.; Prave, A. R.; Condon, D. J.; Lepland, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Romashkin, A. E.; Medvedev, P. V.; Rychanchik, D. V.

    2015-08-01

    Organic-rich rocks (averaging 2-5% total organic carbon) and positive carbonate-carbon isotope excursions (δ13C > + 5 ‰ and locally much higher, i.e. the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event) are hallmark features of Palaeoproterozoic successions and are assumed to archive a global event of unique environmental conditions following the c. 2.3 Ga Great Oxidation Event. Here we combine new and published geochronology that shows that the main Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes (CBEs) preserved in Russia, Gabon and Australia were temporally discrete depositional events between c. 2.10 and 1.85 Ga. In northwest Russia we can also show that timing of the termination of the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event may have differed by up to 50 Ma between localities, and that Ni mineralisation occurred at c. 1920 Ma. Further, CBEs have traits in common with Mesozoic Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs); both are exceptionally organic-rich relative to encasing strata, associated with contemporaneous igneous activity and marked by organic carbon isotope profiles that exhibit a stepped decrease followed by a stabilisation period and recovery. Although CBE strata are thicker and of greater duration than OAEs (100 s of metres versus metres, ∼106 years versus ∼105 years), their shared characteristics hint at a commonality of cause(s) and feedbacks. This suggests that CBEs represent processes that can be either basin-specific or global in nature and a combination of circumstances that are not unique to the Palaeoproterozoic. Our findings urge circumspection and re-consideration of models that assume CBEs are a Deep Time singularity.

  3. Unlocking the Ice House: Oligocene-Miocene oxygen isotopes, eustasy, and margin erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth G.; Wright, James D.; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    1991-04-01

    Oxygen isotope records and glaciomarine sediments indicate at least an intermittent presence of large continental ice sheets on Antarctica since the earliest Oligocene (circa 35 Ma). The growth and decay of ice sheets during the Oligocene to modern "ice house world" caused glacioeustatic sea level changes. The early Eocene was an ice-free "greenhouse world," but it is not clear if ice sheets existed during the middle to late Eocene "doubt house world." Benthic foraminiferal δ18O records place limits on the history of glaciation, suggesting the presence of ice sheets at least intermittently since the earliest Oligocene. The best indicator of ice growth is a coeval increase in global benthic and western equatorial planktonic δ18O records. Although planktonic isotope records from the western equatorial regions are limited, subtropical planktonic foraminifera may also record such ice volume changes. It is difficult to apply these established principles to the Cenozoic δ18O record because of the lack of adequate data and problems in stratigraphic correlations that obscure isotope events. We improved Oligocene to Miocene correlations of δ18O records and erected eight oxygen isotope zones (Oi1-Oi2, Mi1-Mi6). Benthic foraminiferal δ18O increases which are associated with the bases of Zones Oil (circa 35.8 Ma), Oi2 (circa 32.5 Ma), and Mil (circa 23.5 Ma) can be linked with δ18O increases in subtropical planktonic foraminifera and with intervals of glacial sedimentation on or near Antarctica. Our new correlations of middle Miocene benthic and western equatorial planktonic δ18O records show remarkable agreement in timing and amplitude. We interpret benthic-planktonic covariance to reflect substantial ice volume increases near the bases of Zones Mi2 (circa 16.1 Ma), Mi3 (circa 13.6 Ma), and possibly Mi5 (circa 11.3 Ma). Possible glacioeustatic lowerings are associated with the δ18O increases which culminated with the bases of Zone Mi4 (circa 12.6 Ma) and Mi6 (circa 9

  4. Cyclic carbonates of Phanerozoic carbonate platforms formed under global green-house to ice-house conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.; Al-Tawil, A.A.; Balog, A.; Pope, M.C.; Smith, L.B. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    Carbonate platforms that formed under global green-house conditions (Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician, Early Silurian to Middle Devonian, Triassic and Cretaceous) are characterized by layer-cake cycle stacking patterns, dominance of high frequency precessional cycles with an autocyclic component, widespread tidal flat caps on the shallow platform, and few major sequence bounding unconformities. Sea level fluctuations are small (10 m or so) and dominated by precessional (15 to 24 k.y. periods) and lesser 100 and 400 k.y. eccentricity forcing of climate. At the other extreme, cyclic carbonate platforms that formed under global ice-house conditions with major continental glaciation (Pennsylvanian-Early Permian, Miocene-Holocene), have erosionally capped cycles lacking tidal flat facies except near regional shorelines. Downdip cycles show interlayering of deeper water and shallow water facies. Cycles have a highly shingled distribution on ramps, and layer cake stacking on flat topped platforms. On rimmed platforms, reefal facies may be bundled with aggrading to prograding to downstepping geometries. Sea level fluctuations are large (up to 100 m) and dominated by 100 and possibly 400 k.y. eccentricity forcing of climate, but may also show 40 k.y. forcing. Precessional cycles are rare. Intermediate between these extremes may be high frequency, moderate amplitude cycles of the Late Middle to Late Ordovician and Mississippian which have both disconformable and conformable caps, and lack tidal flat facies except in HSTs or locally in down ramp positions. Sea level fluctuations likely are 20 to 40 m and may relate to obliquity and eccentricity forcing of climate (40 to 400 k.y.).

  5. A Comparison of "Ice-House" (Modern) and "Hot-House" (Maastrichtian) Drainage Systems: the Implications of Large-Scale Changes in the Surface Hydrological Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwick, P. J.; Crossley, R.; Valdes, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    A GIS analysis of modern and Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) drainage systems has been made in order to investigate the potential differences between the surface hydrology of "ice-house" and "hot-house" worlds and how this might be reflected in the geological record. Because of the importance of CO2 concentrations for generating "hot-house" climates this study also has implications for potential future changes in the climate system. For the modern system we have utilized global maps of observed river systems, the Hydro1K digital dataset, observations of freshwater and sediment fluxes from recording stations, and modern day climate models and observations. For the Maastrichtian we have compiled a detailed global paleogeographic map and geological database (based on earlier work by the Paleogeographic Atlas Project, University of Chicago) that has been used to generate a paleo-DEM using the suite of hydrological tools in ArcGIS, complete with reconstructed river systems and drainage basins. This forms the primary boundary condition for a coupled ocean-atmosphere experiment using the HadCM3 model, with atmospheric CO2 set at 4 x pre-industrial levels. The results indicate a Maastrichtian world dominated by high sea surface temperatures (as high as 30-35 C in the tropics), and a consequently greatly enhanced hydrological cycle when compared with the Present. Globally, modeled Maastrichtian precipitation and evaporation are 1.5x that for the Present, with a 2.5x increase in total runoff. These changes are not evenly distributed, either spatially or seasonally, and therefore a detailed consideration of the paleogeography and paleo-drainage is essential, as these changes have a major influence on the distribution of vegetation and freshwater and sediment fluxes. For example, the Maastrichtian Tethyan monsoon, though less intense than noted for other modeled Mesozoic intervals, nonetheless dominates the seasonal distribution of precipitation and runoff over Saharan and

  6. First find of biogenic activity in the Palaeoproterozoic of the Singhbhum craton (E India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loon, A. J. van; Mazumder, R.

    2013-09-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic succession of the Singhbhum craton in E. India was hitherto considered as almost entirely siliciclastic and partly volcanogenic. Here we describe, from the fine-grained, tidally influenced shale facies of the Palaeoproterozoic Chaibasa Formation (2.1-1.6 Ga), a fine, originally more or less horizontal, wavy to strongly undulating (later locally deformed) lamination. Investigation of these laminae shows that they must be ascribed to the accumulation of fine particles on microbial mats that covered a sandy substrate. The structures must therefore be considered as stromatolites, features that are accepted as proof of the presence of micro-organisms, in this case most probably cyanobacteria. The interpretation of biogenic activity is supported by microscopic analysis. It is the first description of traces left by biogenic activity that took place in the Palaeoproterozoic of the Singhbhum craton.

  7. Unlocking the ice house: Oligocene-Miocene oxygen isotopes, eustasy, and margin erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.G. Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY ); Wright, J.D.; Fairbanks, R.G. )

    1991-04-10

    Benthic foraminiferal {delta}{sup 18}O records place limits on the history of glaciation, suggesting the presence of ice sheets at least intermittently since the earliest Oligocene. The best indicator of ice growth is a coeval increase in global benthic and western equatorial planktonic {delta}{sup 18}O records. Although planktonic isotope records from the western equatorial regions are limited, subtropical planktonic foraminifera may also record such ice volume changes. It is difficult to apply these established principles to the Cenozoic {delta}{sup 18}O record because of the lack of adequate data and problems in stratigraphic correlations that obscure isotope events. The authors improved Oligocene to Miocene correlations of {delta}{sup 18}O records and erected eight oxygen isotope zones (Oi1-Oi2, Mi1-Mi6). Benthic foraminiferal {delta}{sup 18}O increases which can be linked with {delta}{sup 18}O increases in subtropical planktonic foraminifera and with intervals of glacial sedimentation on or near Antarctica. These new correlations of middle Miocene benthic and western equatorial planktonic {delta}{sup 18}O records show remarkable agreement in timing and amplitude. They interpret benthic-planktonic covariance to reflect substantial ice volume increases near the bases of Zones Mi2 (circa 16.1 Ma), Mi3 (circa 13.6 Ma), and possibly Mi5 (circa 11.3 Ma). Possible glacioeustatic lowerings are associated with the {delta}{sup 18}O increases which culminated with the bases of Zone Mi4 (circa 12.6 Ma) and Mi6 (circa 9.6 Ma), although low-latitude planktonic {delta}{sup 18}O records are required to test this. These inferred glacioeustatic lowerings can be linked to seismic and rock disconformities.

  8. The Palaeoproterozoic crustal evolution: evidences from granulite-gneiss belts, collisional and accretionary orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, M. V.; Konilov, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic juvenile assemblages were emplaced within two types of mobile belts: (1) high-grade or "granulite-gneiss" belts; (2) low- and medium-grade volcano-sedimentary and volcano-plutonic belts. Type (1) belts resulted from plume-induced heating, magmatism, emergence of riftogenic basins and volcano-tectonic depressions, their filling with rift-type sediments and juvenile but strongly contaminated lavas and ash-flow deposits, high-grade recrystallization of the lower- and mid-crustal assemblages including the filling of the basins and depressions that followed in intraplate and back-arc settings, and final thrusting and exhumation caused by collision-related tectonism. Type (2) belts represent sutures containing MORB- and arc-related assemblages, together with initial rift-related assemblages formed during evolution of the short-lived, mainly Red Sea-type oceans (intracontinental collisional orogens) and systems of oceanic, island-arc and back-arc terranes amalgamated along continent margins (peripheral accretionary orogens). Palaeoproterozoic history can be subdivided into five periods: (1) 2.51-2.44 Ga superplume activity and displacement of Fennoscandia; (2) 2.44-2.0 (2.11) Ga quiescent within-plate development complicated by local plume- and plate tectonics-related processes; (3) a 2.0-1.95 Ga superplume event; (4) 1.95-1.75 (1.71) Ga combined plume- and plate tectonics-related evolution, resulting in the partial disruption of the continental crust, and formation of accretionary orogens along some margins of the supercontinent and rebirth of the supercontinent entity, and (5) < 1,75 Ga post- and anorogenic magmatism and metamorphism. Magmatic and thermal activity during the early Palaeoproterozoic was almost exclusively concentrated within Laurentia (comprising North American and Fennoscandian cratons). In contrast, late Palaeoproterozoic assemblages are distributed within all continents. The simultaneous appearance of within-plate plume

  9. Geochronology of the Palaeoproterozoic Kautokeino Greenstone Belt, Finnmark, Norway, in its Fennoscandian context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingen, Bernard; Solli, Arne; Viola, Giulio; Sverre Sandstad, Jan; Torgersen, Espen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Skår, Øyvind; Nasuti, Aziz

    2016-04-01

    The northeastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield consists of Archaean cratonic blocks alternating with Palaeoproterozoic greenstone belts ranging in age from c. 2500 to 1950 Ma. Traditionally, the greenstones are interpeted as evidence for rifting of the Archaean continent(s) although it remains unclear whether modern-style oceanic lithosphere developed, followed by a Wilson-cycle-type closure during the Svecokarelian orogeny. Existing geological, isotopic and geochronological data show that the exposed basins hosting the greenstones have distinct lithostratigraphies and geological evolutions and are pericontinental rather than oceanic. A diversity of Palaeoproterozoic mafic mantle derived magmatic rocks show a secular increase of Nd value with time, from EpsilonNd =-2 at 2500 Ma (Shalskiy dikes, Onega, Russia) to EpsilonNd =+4.4 at 2090 Ma (Jouttiaapa basalts, Peräpohja, Finland), suggesting that the regional asthenospheric mantle was less depleted than the model MORB-producing depleted mantle before 2090 Ma. In this work, we report new zircon U-Pb geochronological data in 19 samples from Finnmarkvidda, Norway, to constrain the evolution of the Palaeoproterozoic high-strain Kautokeino Greenstone Belt and its relations with the neighbouring felsic Jergul and Ráiseatnu gneiss complexes. The Jergul complex is an Archaean, low heat flow, TTG cratonic bloc of Karelian affinity formed between 2975 ±10 and 2776 ±6 Ma. The Masi formation, at the base of the Kautokeino Greenstone Belt, is a typical Jatulian quartzite unconformably overlying the Archean basement. An albite-magnetite-rich mafic sill, similar to the Haaskalehto intrusion in Finland, provides a minimum age of 2220 ±7 Ma for the deposition of the quartzite. The Likčá and Čáskejas formations represent the main basaltic volcanism. Direct evidence of an oceanic setting or oceanic suture is lacking. A probably synvolcanic gabbro sill gives an age of 2137 ±5 Ma. Published Sm-Nd whole-rock data on

  10. Palaeoproterozoic Indian shield in the global continental assembly: Evidence from the palaeomagnetism of mafic dyke swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, T.; Krishnendu, N. R.; Balasubramonian, G.

    2013-11-01

    Palaeomagnetic study of Palaeoproterozoic mafic dykes in the basement along the margins of the Cuddapah basin, the largest Precambrian sedimentary basin in south India, is presented in detail for a general discussion of Palaeoproterozoic igneous activity in India. The results are compared with all earlier published data on mafic dykes in India and are integrated with recently-published high-precision U-Pb baddeleyite ages to provide a comprehensive account of Palaeoproterozoic igneous activity in India. The analysis consolidates palaeomagnetic poles for six age divisions between 2.45 and 1.85 Ga with robust statistical criteria. Our best estimates of overall mean poles from 241 dykes are situated at (1) λ = 17.7°N; Φ = 106.0°E (A95 = 9.0°; 7N = 24) at c. 2.45 Ga, (2) λ = 7.1°N; Φ = 57.2°E (A95 = 4.5°; N = 69) at c. 2.37 Ga, (3) λ = 41.6°S; Φ = 5.5°E (A95 = 5.1°; N = 34) at c. 2.22 Ga, (4) λ = 4.7°N; Φ = 343.0°E (A95 = 4.4°; N = 31) at 2.18 Ga, (5) λ = 49.2°N; Φ = 332.9°E (A95 = 4.8°; N = 24) at 1.99-1.89 Ga and (6) λ = 73.7°N; Φ = 282.6°E (A95 = 2.9°; N = 39) at 1.86 Ga. The data permit us to construct an apparent polar wander path for the Indian shield for an ~ 600 Ma interval of the Palaeoproterozoic eon (2.45-1.85 Ga). Testing and evaluation of continental reconstructions for this interval, which are mostly based on geological correlations, reveal many inconsistencies. Between 2.45 and 2.37 Ga, the Indian shield was situated at higher latitudes similar to the Yilgarn craton of Australia. It was subsequently located near the equator at 2.22, 2.18, 1.99 and 1.86 Ga. Thus, an India-Australia connection is supported during these times, but a proposed Australia-Kaapvaal link in "Zimvaalbara" and a Dharwar (India)-Slave connection in "Sclavia" or a Superior-Zimbabwe-India connection in "Superia" are inconsistent with Indian data. In addition, the close palaeomagnetic comparison between the Palaeoproterozoic dykes of Dharwar

  11. The Rwenzori Mountains, a Palaeoproterozoic crustal shear belt crossing the Albertine rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Link, K.; Sachau, T.; Passchier, C. W.; Aanyu, K.; Spikings, A.; Harbinson, R.

    2015-04-01

    This contribution discusses the development of the Palaeoproterozoic Buganda-Toro belt in the Rwenzori Mountains and its influence on the western part of the East African Rift System in Uganda. The Buganda-Toro belt is composed of several thick-skinned nappes consisting of Archaean Gneisses and Palaeoproterozoic cover units that are thrusted northwards. The high Rwenzori Mountains are located in the frontal unit of this belt with retrograde greenschist facies gneisses towards the north, which are unconformably overlain by metasediments and amphibolites. Towards the south, the metasediments are overthrust by the next migmatitic gneiss unit that belongs to a crustal-scale nappe. The southwards dipping metasedimentary and volcanic sequence in the high Rwenzori Mountains shows an inverse metamorphic grade with greenschist facies conditions in the north and amphibolite facies conditions in the south. Early D1 deformation structures are overgrown by cordierite, which in turn grows into D2 deformation, representing the major northwards directed thrusting event. We argue that the inverse metamorphic gradient develops because higher grade rocks are exhumed in the footwall of a crustal-scale nappe, whereas the exhumation decreases towards the north away from the nappe leading to a decrease in metamorphic grade. The D2 deformation event is followed by a D3 E-W compression, a D4 with the development of steep shear zones with a NNE-SSW and SSE-NNW trend including the large Nyamwamba shear followed by a local D5 retrograde event and D6 brittle reverse faulting. The Palaeoproterozoic Buganda-Toro belt is relatively stiff and crosses the NNE-SSW running rift system exactly at the node where the highest peaks of the Rwenzori Mountains are situated and where the Lake George rift terminates towards the north. Orientation of brittle and ductile fabrics show some similarities indicating that the cross-cutting Buganda-Toro belt influenced rift propagation and brittle fault development

  12. Age constraints from northwest Russia on the global accumulation of carbon during the Palaeoproterozoic Shunga event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. P.; Condon, D. J.; Prave, A. R.; Lepland, A.; Melezhik, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Shunga event records significant organic-carbon accumulation in sediments correlated between the type-locality in northwest Russia's Onega Basin, the Francevillian series of Gabon, and Indian Palaeoproterozoic sections. The estimated burial of >25 x 10E +10 tonnes of C in the Shunga event is significant and hypotheses have suggested this accumulation as one causal mechanism to the large positive Lomagundi-Jatuli positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of marine carbonates. Conversely, is has been suggested that the Shunga event post-dates the termination (at c. 2060 Ma) of the Lomagundi-Jatuli CIE and the two are not overlapping in time. Discrimination between these competing theories requires precise and accurate chronologies for the stratigraphic successions hosting the proxy records. We present new age constraints from a combination of primary volcanic rocks and sedimentary units recording the Shunga event, from the well preserved Palaeoproterozoic sections in the Pechenga Greenstone Belt (Kola craton) and Onega Paleo Basin (Karelia craton) northwest Russia, to further elucidate the unresolved question of timing between the Shunga event and the Lomagundi-Jatuli CIE. Carbon accumulations of the Shunga event are recorded in the Pilgujärvi Sedimentary Formation of the Pechenga Greenstone Belt. Felsic lava flows and pyroclastic rocks, and mafic pyroclastic rocks, in the Pilgujärvi Volcanic Formation overlying the Pilgujärvi sediments yield zircons with concordant U-Pb ages between c. 1970 and 1903 Ma. In the Pilgujärvi Sedimentary Formation detrital zircons yield a minimum age of c. 1922 Ma, equivalent to a minimum c. 1915 Ma age of detrital zircons in the underlying Kolosjoki Sedimentary Formation. Thrust over the main units of the Pechenga Greenstone Belt is a tectonic melange known as the South Pechenga Zone where zircons from an intermediate volcanic rock yield the first age from this zone at c. 1930 Ma. Samples from the Onega Basin are

  13. Silicate facies iron-formation of the Egbe-Isanlu Palaeoproterozoic schist belt, southwest Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annor, A. E.; Olobaniyi, S. B.; Mücke, A.

    1997-02-01

    Field, petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data on the Egbe-Isanlu Palaeoproterozoic schist belt are presented, high-lighting the main features of a silicate facies iron-formation, which hitherto had been described as a metamorphosed, impure sandstone. The iron-formation is relatively thin (max. 15 m) and concordantly interbedded with schistose, semi-pelitic, amphibolitic and talcose host rocks, with which it shares a common polyphase tectonometamorphic history. The last of these is the Pan-African overprint, during which time the iron-formation was locally silicified. The main constituent minerals are garnet (almandine-spessartine solid solution), amphibole (Mn and Ca bearing grunerite-cummingtonite solid solution), quartz and ilmenite. Magnetite was not observed. Geochemical data show that the iron-formation and metasediments are of different origins. The silicate facies iron-formation of Isanlu belongs to the Algoma-type and was derived by the metamorphism of a volcano-exhalative-sedimentary protolith, probably during Eburnian times.

  14. Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic events in the Orekhov-Pavlograd compressional zone, Ukrainian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    The Orekhov-Pavlograd zone (OPZ) is located between the Mesoarchaean-Neoarchaean Middle Dnieper Province and the Mesoarchaean-Palaeoproterozoic Azov Province in the eastern Ukrainian Shield. The OPZ consists of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic high-grade metamorphic rocks. According U-Pb isotope analyses Archaean methaigneous rocks have age of 3.5-3.3 Ga, and latest AR events dated form both individual grains and metamorphic rims in the tonalite and the granitic vein occurred at about 2.88 Ga ego. Paleoproterozoic zircons from a hornblende granulite have a concordia age of 2.08 Ga [1]. P-T conditions of the 3.5-3.3 Ga processes calculated from the Ti content in zircon are of 730-760°C. Metamorphic event dated as 2.88 Ga is more preserved and detected in some amphibolites after mafic dykes. According to different methods of hornblende-plagioclase geothermometry along with Al- and Ti-geobarometry of hornblende, the amphibolites have formed at temperature of 735-749 °C and pressure of 5.2 to 7.8 kbar. P-T conditions of Paleoproterozoic metamorphic processes have been calculated for a Paleoproterozoic high-Al paragneiss and mafic rocks. On the base of the computer software THERIAK-DOMINO [2], near-isothermal decompression from ca. 8.5 to 6.0 kbar at 650 °C and then to 5.8 kbar at 740 °C has been determined for small irregular garnet grains (grs 4-7% and XMg 0.36-0.37) associated with the same biotite and plagioclase. P-T conditions obtained by means of the P-T pseudosection calculation are identical within errors to those defined by the Grt + Bt + Pl + Ozt geothermometer by [3] and the geobarometer by [4], T = 675 °C and P = 5.6 kbar. Temperature and pressure calculated for assemblage Grt-Pl-Opx-Amph-Ilm-Ru (mafic rock) by using the TWEEQU method shows: 1) high values of pressure and temperature (ca. 7 kbar and 800 °C) are linked with the first metamorphic event with Opx-Cpx assemblage, 2) moderate values (ca. 5 kbar and ca. 600 °C) are referred to the second

  15. Trace-element characteristics of different pyrite types in Mesoarchaean to Palaeoproterozoic placer deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Nikola; Frimmel, Hartwig E.; Lawrie Minter, W. E.; Brätz, Helene

    2010-03-01

    A comparative in situ LA-ICP MS trace-element study on pyrite from three different, variably auriferous, Archaean to Palaeoproterozoic palaeoplacer deposits in the Ouro Fino Syncline (Quadrilátero Ferrífero; Brazil), the Elliot Lake area north of Lake Huron (SE Canada) and several deposits within the Witwatersrand Basin (South Africa) revealed systematic differences between morphologically different pyrite types and between the various palaeoplacer deposits. Especially the Ni and Au concentrations as well as Co/Ni and Mo/Ni ratios were found to be systematically different in detrital compact, detrital porous and post-sedimentary/hydrothermal pyrite grains from different source areas. High Co/Ni ratios and low Au concentrations are typical of post-sedimentary pyrite, which is hydrothermal in origin. In contrast, relatively low Co/Ni ratios and high Au contents characterise detrital porous banded and concentric pyrite grains (Au > 1 ppm), which are syn-sedimentary in origin. In the Elliot Lake area and the Witwatersrand Basin, detrital compact rounded pyrite is characterised by high Co/Ni ratios, which is in agreement with derivation from a hydrothermal source. Low Au concentrations in this pyrite type support the contention of the gold and the pyrite in these deposits coming from different source rocks. In contrast, derivation from an originally diagenetic pyrite is suggested for the detrital compact pyrite in the Ouro Fino Syncline because of low to intermediate Co/Ni ratios. High Au contents may indicate a genetic relationship between pyrite and gold there. Systematic differences exist between the three areas with respect to Au, Ni, Co, Mo and Cu distributions in detrital pyrite, which reflects differences in the provenance. A predominantly mafic/ultramafic source is indicated for the Ouro Fino, a felsic source for the Elliot Lake, and a mixed felsic-mafic provenance for the Witwatersrand pyrite populations. Independently of pyrite type, the higher Au endowment

  16. Textures formed during emplacement and cooling of a Palaeoproterozoic, small-volume rhyolitic sill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Karin; McPhie, Jocelyn

    2003-12-01

    The 52-m-thick rhyolitic sill at Onedin, in northwestern Australia, intruded wet, unconsolidated sediment of the Koongie Park Formation during the Palaeoproterozoic. The sill is composed of five main zones. A thin (1-2 m thick) basal peperitic contact zone with sparse large (<1 cm) amygdales and abundant spherulites, grades up over 1 m into the lower zone. The lower zone is 10 m thick and made up of radiating feldspar laths surrounded by granophyric quartz and feldspar and has less than 5% amygdales. In the overlying middle zone (20 m thick), amygdales increase in abundance from 5% near the base to 20% near the top. This zone is dominated by spherulitic rhyolite. The 18-m-thick upper zone is complex, with alternating, 10-cm-thick layers containing abundant spherulites, lithophysae, amygdales and perlite. Amygdales make up to 40% of the rock. A pumiceous, 2-3-cm-thick layer occurs at the upper contact. Fluidal and blocky peperite marks the 1-2-m-thick upper contact zone. The five zones formed in response to different cooling rates within the sill. The lower zone experienced the slowest cooling rate, whereas the upper and basal contact zones, with abundant glass, cooled rapidly. There is an overall upward increase in the amygdale abundance. In many cases, early-formed bubbles became nucleation sites for lithophysae. Spherical bubbles formed in melt above the glass transition temperature as crystallisation proceeded. Irregularly shaped bubbles formed relatively late in crystalline zones. Textural zones in the rhyolitic sill at Onedin are most similar to those in large-volume rhyolitic lavas, even though it is a small-volume intrusion. This similarity may be related to efficient heat retention beneath covering sediments for the sill, or beneath a thick crust for large-volume lavas. The presence of the crystalline lower zone immediately above the base and a high proportion of crystalline rhyolite, and the lack of autobreccia and sub-vertical flow banding near the top

  17. Interaction of microbial communities with clastic sedimentation during Palaeoproterozoic time — An example from basal Gulcheru Formation, Cuddapah basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Gopal; Shome, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    The siliciclastic basal Gulcheru Formation (˜ 1.8 Ga) of the Proterozoic Cuddapah basin preserves abundance of mat-induced sedimentary structures like old elephant skin, wrinkle structure, kinneyia ripples, palimpsest ripples etc. in the vicinity of Pullivendla town (Kottalu village), Andhra Pradesh, India in a low gradient tidal-flat deposional setting. This is the first report of interaction of microbial communities with clastic sedimentation during Palaeoproterozoic time in Indian Purana stratigraphy and probably from the viewpoint of Global Proterozoic biosedimentation. Various types of cracks on bed-top, hitherto considered as of trace-fossil in origin, may be considered to be formed on exposed surface due to dessication or under water due to synaeresis in presence of microbial communities.

  18. Palaeoproterozoic high-pressure granulite overprint of the Archaean continental crust: evidence for homogeneous crustal thickening (Man Rise, Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitra, Pavel; Kouamelan, Alain N.; Ballèvre, Michel; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    The character of mountain building processes in the Palaeoproterozoic times is subject to much debate. The local observation of Barrovian-type assemblages and high-pressure granulite relics in the Man Rise (Côte d'Ivoire), led some authors to argue that Eburnean (Palaeoproterozoic) reworking of the Archaean basement was achieved by modern-style thrust-dominated tectonics (e.g., Feybesse & Milési, 1994). However, it has been suggested that crustal thickening and subsequent exhumation of high-pressure crustal rocks can be achieved by virtue of homogeneous, fold-dominated deformation of hot crustal domains even in Phanerozoic orogenic belts (e.g., Schulmann et al., 2002; 2008). We describe a mafic granulite of the Kouibli area (Archaean part of the Man Rise, western Ivory Coast) that displays a primary assemblage (M1) containing garnet, diopsidic clinopyroxene, red-brown pargasitic amphibole, plagioclase (andesine), rutile, ilmenite and quartz. This assemblage is associated with a subvertical regional foliation. Symplectites that develop at the expense of the M1 assemblage contain orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, plagioclase (bytownite), green pargasitic amphibole, ilmenite and magnetite (M2). Multiequilibrium thermobarometric calculations and P-T pseudosections calculated with THERMOCALC suggest granulite-facies conditions of ca. 13 kbar, 850°C and <7 kbar, 700-800°C for M1 and M2, respectively. In agreement with the qualitative information obtained from reaction textures and chemical zoning of minerals, this suggests an evolution dominated by decompression accompanied by moderate cooling. A Sm-Nd garnet - whole-rock age of 2.03 Ga determined on this sample indicates that this evolution occurred during the Palaeoproterozoic. We argue that from the geodynamic point of view the observed features are best explained by homogeneous thickening of the margin of the Archaean craton, re-heated and softened due to the accretion of hot, juvenile Palaeoproterozoic crust, as

  19. Garnet granulite xenoliths from the Northern Baltic shield- The underplated lower crust of a palaeoproterozoic large igneous province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kempton, P.D.; Downes, H.; Neymark, L.A.; Wartho, J.A.; Zartman, R.E.; Sharkov, E.V.

    2001-01-01

    Garnet granulite facies xenoliths hosted in Devonian lamprophyres from the Kola Peninsula are interpreted to represent the high-grade metamorphic equivalents of continental flood tholeiites, emplaced into the Baltic Shield Archaean lower crust in early Proterozoic time. Geochronological data and similarities in major and trace element geochemistry suggest that the xenoliths formed during the same plume-related magmatic event that created a widespread Palaeoproterozoic large igneous province (LIP) at 2.4-2.5 Ga. They are, thus, the first samples of the lower crust of a Palaeo-proterozoic LIP to be studied in petrological detail. The suite includes mafic granulites (gar + cpx + rutile ?? plag ?? opx ?? phlog ?? amph), felsic granulites (plag + gar + cpx + rutile ?? qtz ?? Kspar ?? phlog ?? amph) and pyroxenites (?? phlog ?? amph), but mafic garnet granulites predominate. Although some samples are restites, there is no evidence for a predominance of magmatic cumulates, as is common for Phanerozoic lower-crustal xenolith suites. Metasediments are also absent. Phlogopite and/or amphibole occur in xenoliths of all types and are interpreted to be metasomatic in origin. The K-rich metasomatic event occurred at ?????0 Ga, and led to substantial enrichment in Rb, K, LREE/HREE, Th/U, Th/Pb and, to a lesser extent, Nb and Ti. The fluids responsible for this metasomatism were probably derived from a second plume that arrived beneath the region at this time. Evidence for partial melting of mafic crust exists in the presence of migmatitic granulites. The timing of migmatization overlaps that of metasomatism, and it is suggested that migmatization was facilitated by the metasomatism. The metamorphism, metasomatism and migmatization recorded in the Kola granulite xenoliths may be representative of the processes responsible for converting Archaean LIP-generated proto-continents into continental crust.

  20. Genesis of Palaeoproterozoic iron skarns in the Misi region, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiranen, Tero; Mänttäri, Irmeli; Poutiainen, Matti; Oliver, Nicholas H. S.; Miller, Jodie A.

    2005-03-01

    Sodic alteration is widespread in Palaeoproterozoic greenstone and schist belts of the northern Fennoscandian shield. In the Misi region that forms the easternmost part of the Peräpohja schist belt, several small magnetite deposits show intimate spatial relationships with intensely albitised gabbros, raising the possibility that regional sodic alteration released iron, which was subsequently accumulated into deposits. Two of these magnetite deposits, Raajärvi and Puro display a typical paragenesis as follows (from oldest to youngest): (1) diopside, (2) actinolite/tremolite-magnetite ± chlorite, biotite, and (3) serpentine ± hematite, chlorite. Mass balance calculations suggest that significant amounts of Fe, Ca, Mg, K, Cu, V, and Ba were lost, and Na and Si gained during the albitisation of the gabbro, at near-constant Al, Ga, Ti, and Zr. Significant amounts of Si, Ca, Fe, and Na were enriched in the formation of skarn related to magnetite deposits. Fe and V leached from country rocks deposited during the skarn-alteration and formed the vanadium rich iron deposits while Cu passed through the system without significant precipitation due to low sulphur fugasity. Variations in Na, Ca, Mg, K, and Ba contents reflect the composition of the infiltrating fluid during alteration. Conventional heating-freezing measurements and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses of the fluid inclusions related to actinolite/tremolite-magnetite stage alteration indicate that the fluids that caused the alteration and the Fe-mineralisation were complex, oxidised, highly saline H2O ± CO2 fluids that contained high amounts of Na, Ca, K, Fe, and Ba as well as elevated concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Pb. The oxygen isotope thermometry suggest that temperature during the Fe-mineralisation stage was between 390 and 490°C. Calculated δ18Ofluid values of 6.1-9.8‰ SMOW and δ13C values of calcites in the ores and skarns were between -7.7 and 10.9‰ PDB and most likely reflect

  1. Nanoscale petrographic and geochemical insights on the origin of the Palaeoproterozoic stromatolitic phosphorites from Aravalli Supergroup, India.

    PubMed

    Papineau, D; De Gregorio, B; Fearn, S; Kilcoyne, D; McMahon, G; Purohit, R; Fogel, M

    2016-01-01

    Stromatolites composed of apatite occur in post-Lomagundi-Jatuli successions (late Palaeoproterozoic) and suggest the emergence of novel types of biomineralization at that time. The microscopic and nanoscopic petrology of organic matter in stromatolitic phosphorites might provide insights into the suite of diagenetic processes that formed these types of stromatolites. Correlated geochemical micro-analyses of the organic matter could also yield molecular, elemental and isotopic compositions and thus insights into the role of specific micro-organisms among these communities. Here, we report on the occurrence of nanoscopic disseminated organic matter in the Palaeoproterozoic stromatolitic phosphorite from the Aravalli Supergroup of north-west India. Organic petrography by micro-Raman and Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrates syngeneity of the organic matter. Total organic carbon contents of these stromatolitic phosphorite columns are between 0.05 and 3.0 wt% and have a large range of δ(13) Corg values with an average of -18.5‰ (1σ = 4.5‰). δ(15) N values of decarbonated rock powders are between -1.2 and +2.7‰. These isotopic compositions point to the important role of biological N2 -fixation and CO2 -fixation by the pentose phosphate pathway consistent with a population of cyanobacteria. Microscopic spheroidal grains of apatite (MSGA) occur in association with calcite microspar in microbial mats from stromatolite columns and with chert in the core of diagenetic apatite rosettes. Organic matter extracted from the stromatolitic phosphorites contains a range of molecular functional group (e.g. carboxylic acid, alcohol, and aliphatic hydrocarbons) as well as nitrile and nitro groups as determined from C- and N-XANES spectra. The presence of organic nitrogen was independently confirmed by a CN(-) peak detected by ToF-SIMS. Nanoscale petrography and geochemistry allow for a refinement of the formation model for the accretion and phototrophic growth of

  2. Metamorphic record and Thermo-mechanical modelling of lower crust exhumation during the Palaeoproterozoic Eburnean orogeny, West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Ganne, Jerome; Block, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    A thermo-mechanical interpretation of the metamorphic evolution of moderate- to high-pressure volcano-sedimentary rocks (6-8 to >10 Kb) in the Birimian Province (2.2-2.0 Ga) of the West African Craton is explored in terms of burial and exhumation processes. Metamorphic data collected in Burkina Faso, southwest Ghana and eastern Senegal suggest that during the Eburnean orogeny (~2.1 Ga),this Palaeoproterozoic Birimian crust was dominated by moderate apparent geothermal gradients of 20-30°C/km (M2a), that produced greenschist- to amphibolite-facies metamorphic assemblages associated with regional shortening and granitoid intrusions. The M2a gradient is superimposed on a colder thermal regime (M1 : <10-15 °C/km) that produced high-P greenschist- to blueschist-facies metamorphic assemblages, and which most likely recorded the earlier formation of the protolith. The geodynamical origin of M1 is not directly addressed here. Thermo-mechanical two-dimensional numerical models were built in order to test whether late-stage compressional tectonics could generate the exhumation of meta-sediments, collected in Ca0-poor granitoids and which record elevated metamorphic pressures (P> 6-8 Kb). The poor data quality provide limited constraints on the appropriate initial setup conditions, and a number of tests have led us to conceptualize the spatial distribution of a hypothezised succession of volcanic island arcs emplaced on top of CaO rich TTG (Tonalite- Trondjhemite-Granodiorite suites) basement, tectonically paired with sedimentary basins. We postulated therefore the preexistence of wide (about 250 km) and thick flexural sedimentary basins (depth 15 km) in an orogenic mafic crust (about 20 km thick), underplated by a more felsic and lighter layer representing a TTG melange. The numerical results show that a mechanism of burial, heating and exhumation of meta-sediments can occur by simultaneous folding and gravitational instabilities within the broad extent of the basin

  3. Geochemical, microtextural and petrological studies of the Samba prospect in the Zambian Copperbelt basement: a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry Cu deposit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, Sharad; Mirrander Ndhlovu, N.

    2015-04-01

    , including potassic (biotite+sericite+ quartz), propylitic (clinozoisite+chlorite+saussuritized plagioclase), phyllic (sericite+quartz+ pyrite+hydromuscovite/illite) and argillic (kaolinite+chlorite+dolomite) alteration. The clays were identified with XRD. All the rocks show penetrative deformational textures and fabrics. Our textural studies show that phyllic zone pyrite crystals have quartz-rich pressure shadows, and they predate all phases of deformation. Similarly, in the potassic zone, fracture-controlled biotite stringers in particular orientations are deformed, and partly replaced by chlorite, again showing their pre-deformational, pre-metamorphic origin. Copper sulfide-bearing quartz veinlets are deformed. Many of the alteration assemblages containing biotite or sericite have been deformed into crenulated schists, showing that they were formed early in the deformation history. Coupled with the dating of a Samba metavolcanic rock at 1964±12 Ma (Rainaud et al., 2005, JAES, 42, 1-31), we regard the Samba deposit as a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry-type Cu deposit, which has undergone deformation, and retrograde metamorphism of its alteration assemblages, during the Neoproterozoic Lufilian Orogeny, followed by post-tectonic cooling, which occurred throughout the Copperbelt at about 480±20 Ma. Samba, together with the Mkushi deposits, is part of a long-lived (>100 Ma) Palaeoproterozoic porphyry-Cu province in the Zambian Copperbelt basement, and ore genetic theories for the Copperbelt mineralization must now seriously take this into account.

  4. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    Sea ice covers vast areas of the polar oceans, with ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 7 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September to approximately 15 x 10(exp 6) sq km in March and ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km in February to approximately 18 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September. These ice covers have major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and ecosystems of the polar regions, and so as changes occur in them there are potential widespread consequences. Satellite data reveal considerable interannual variability in both polar sea ice covers, and many studies suggest possible connections between the ice and various oscillations within the climate system, such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Antarctic Oscillation, or Southern Annular Mode. Nonetheless, statistically significant long-term trends are also apparent, including overall trends of decreased ice coverage in the Arctic and increased ice coverage in the Antarctic from late 1978 through the end of 2003, with the Antarctic ice increases following marked decreases in the Antarctic ice during the 1970s. For a detailed picture of the seasonally varying ice cover at the start of the 21st century, this chapter includes ice concentration maps for each month of 2001 for both the Arctic and the Antarctic, as well as an overview of what the satellite record has revealed about the two polar ice covers from the 1970s through 2003.

  5. Ancient ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Simon Belt, Guillaume Massé and colleagues rammed their way through sheets of ice, spotting some polar bears on the way, in their attempt to reconstruct Arctic sea-ice records covering thousands of years.

  6. Over Ice

    NASA Video Gallery

    All about NASA's IceBridge P-3B plane and its IceBridge retrofit. Upgraded with 21st century "special modifications", the aircraft is less a cold war relic and more like the Space Agency's Millenni...

  7. Historic Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Reviews some of the efforts of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (SPNEA) to preserve, conserve, and interpret historic houses to the public. Examines the history and some of the specific preservation problems concerning the Beauport Cottage, the Sayward-Wheeler House, and the Gropius House. (MJP)

  8. Evolution of Palaeoproterozoic mafic intrusions located within the thermal aureole of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Canada: Isotopic, geochronological and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevec, Stephen A.; Baadsgaard, Halfdan

    2005-07-01

    Impact cratering and their resultant geological phenomena are recognised as significant factors in the lithological and biologic evolution of the earth. Age-dating of impact events is critical in correlating cause and effects for these catastrophic processes. The Falconbridge and Drury Township (Twp) intrusions were emplaced at the contact between Neoarchaean basement and Palaeoproterozoic volcanosedimentary rocks, and also lie at the southeast and southwest edges of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), within its thermal contact aureole. The Falconbridge Twp intrusion is dated at 2441 ± 3 Ma by U-Pb zircon, with evidence of Archaean inheritance from its host granitoids. Granitoids from the southernmost Abitibi Subprovince are dated here between 2670 ± 11 Ma for an undeformed Algoman granite, and 2696 ± 18 Ma for a foliated granitoid, consistent with existing data from the Abitibi Greenstone Belt and from the Wawa Subprovince. Major and trace element geochemical evidence, common-Pb isotopic compositions, and ɛNd2440 values between 0 and -1 are all consistent with a Palaeoproterozoic origin for the Falconbridge Twp intrusion, and support inclusion in the East Bull Lake-type suite of leucogabbroic plutons and sills. In contrast, the Drury Twp intrusion gives a U-Pb zircon age of 1859 ± 13 Ma, coincident with the date of SIC-emplacement. While the major and trace element compositions are comparable to the Falconbridge data, the Drury displays significant heterogeneity in ɛNd2440, with values ranging from +3.7 to -0.1, and contains more radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. Field, geochemical and isotopic evidence clearly distinguishes this intrusion from constituents of the SIC itself, and indicates that the Drury too is a Palaeoproterozoic intrusion. This requires that apparently unshocked, undeformed magmatic-looking zircon has been grown or reset in a postmagmatic setting. This has significant implications for the identification of mantle-derived magmas and

  9. Why Does Eating Ice Cream Give Me a Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Ice Cream Headaches KidsHealth > For Kids > Ice Cream Headaches Print A A A Text Size ... a bad headache . But don't blame the ice cream — it's not acting alone. The roof of ...

  10. The Fazenda Gavião granodiorite and associated potassic plutons as evidence for Palaeoproterozoic arc-continent collision in the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Felipe G.; Oliveira, Elson P.; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2011-08-01

    Several granitic plutons have intruded the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, São Francisco craton, Brazil, in the time interval 2163-2080 Ma, but their tectonic significance is poorly understood. The Fazenda Gavião granodiorite (FGG) is one of a set of plutons emplaced along the western boundary of the greenstone belt with Archaean migmatite-gneiss basement. The pluton is mostly composed of hornblende granodiorite, occasionally crosscut by syn-plutonic mafic dykes. The FGG is metaluminous, medium- to high-K calc-alkaline with relatively constant silica abundances (SiO2 ˜ 63-66 wt%), high Sr (900-800 ppm) and high Ba (1000-1500 ppm). The associated mafic dykes are ultrapotassic, with high abundances of Ba, Sr, MgO, Ni, Cr, and light rare earth elements, suggesting derivation from partial melts of an enriched mantle source. The FGG originated probably by fractional crystallization from a primitive K-rich mafic magma that interacted with crustal melts. Its zircon U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2106 ± 6 Ma indicates that the FGG is younger than the early (2163-2127 Ma) tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) and calc-alkaline arc plutons of the greenstone belt, and is closely related in time and space with potassic to ultrapotassic plutons (ca. 2110-2105 Ma). The negative ɛNd(t) of FGG and coeval K-rich plutons of the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt contrasts markedly with the positive ɛNd(t) of the older arc plutons, indicating a major change of isotope signatures in granites of the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt with time. This isotope shift may be related to magma contamination with older continental material and/or derivation of the parental potassic magma from enriched lithospheric mantle sources. We suggest that the K-rich plutons were emplaced during or shortly after Palaeoproterozoic arc-continent collision.

  11. Palaeoproterozoic Volcanic Massive Sulphides (VMS) in the Lithuanian crystalline basement: evidences for a back-arc tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Siliauskas, Laurynas

    2014-05-01

    In the southwestern part of the East European Craton (EEC), several events of Palaeoproterozoic volcanic arc magmatic activity were recognized in the concealed crystalline basement. In Lithuania, the TTG suites of 1.89 Ga and 1.86-1.84 Ga were later metamorphosed in amphibolite and granulite facies conditions. Remnants of a volcano-sedimentary sequence metamorphosed in green schist and amphibolite facies conditions were discovered in central and southern Lithuania. In southern Lithuania, the upper part of the Lazdijai 13 (Lz13) drilling (at c. 493 m depth) consists of exhalitic quartz chlorite cherts mixed with andesitic rocks. The rocks are impregnated with magnetite in some places replacing calcite. Most of the magnetite grains are overgrown by a dendritic kovelite, which may have formed while magnetite was still in aqueous surrounding. Other accessory minerals are xenotime, zircon, apatite, Sr-Ba sulphates etc. The cherts are underlain by a metaandesite which volcanic structures were obscured by hydrothermal alteration, i.e. the idiomorphic magnetite crystals and porphyritic plagioclase grains were replaced by clay minerals and quartz or muscovite in many places. Thin metamorphosed mudstone layers turned into garnet, biotite (+/-staurolite) and chlorite schists. The rocks were affected by silicification, chloritization, argilitization and carbonatization. Taking into account the rock composition, micro and macro scale alteration zones and absence of breccia, the whole package resembles an outer part of the VMS stockwork. The lower boundary at 526 m is sharp, marked by a quartz vein, below which lies quartz, biotite (+/- chlorite) bearing schist with minor tremolite (former sandstone). It was intensely affected by silicification, and was enriched in Na, K and Ca. Accessory minerals are monazite, xenotime, apatite and detrital zircon. The schist exhibits fine mineral foliation, and is fine-grained. A 4 m thick granitic vein cuts the rock at 654 m depth, below

  12. 1. Contextual view looking west, showing packing house and Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Contextual view looking west, showing packing house and Union Ice building, which is located to the north of Packing House (right hand side in photo) - College Heights Lemon Packing House, 519-532 West First Street, Claremont, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Battery housing

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, N. G.

    1985-03-19

    The present invention comprises a battery housing suitable for holding a battery which may generate a dangerously high level of internal pressure. The housing includes a receptacle having a vent passage covered by a rupture disc, the rupture disc in turn covered by a diffuser head having a longitudinal bore therein extending from the rupture disc to a blind end, the bore being traversed by at least one lateral passage leading to the exterior of the housing. Upon reaching a predetermined internal pressure level, the rupture disc ruptures and vents the interior of the housing safely to the exterior through the lateral passage.

  14. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  15. Sea ice terminology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    A group of definitions of terms related to sea ice is presented, as well as a graphic representation of late winter ice zonation of the Beaufort Sea Coast. Terms included in the definition list are belt, bergy bit, bight, brash ice, calving, close pack ice, compacting, compact pack ice, concentration, consolidated pack ice, crack, diffuse ice edge, fast ice, fast-ice boundary, fast-ice edge, first-year ice, flaw, flaw lead, floe, flooded ice, fractured, fractured zone, fracturing, glacier, grey ice, grey-white ice, growler, hummock, iceberg, iceberg tongue, ice blink, ice boundary, ice cake, ice edge, ice foot, ice free, ice island, ice shelf, large fracture, lead, medium fracture, multiyear ice, nilas, old ice, open pack ice, open water, pack ice, polar ice, polynya, puddle, rafted ice, rafting, ram, ridge, rotten ice, second-year ice, shearing, shore lead, shore polynya, small fracture, strip, tabular berg, thaw holes, very close pack ice, very open pack ice, water sky, young coastal ice, and young ice.

  16. Rental Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC. Consumer Housing Information Service for Seniors.

    This is one of a series of booklets prepared as a resource for trained Housing Information Volunteers to provide impartial information to older people who have questions of concern about how to find safe, comfortable, affordable housing; how to cut household expenses or use their homes to earn extra income; home maintenance and home improvement;…

  17. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  18. AMERICAN HOUSING SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The American Housing Survey (AHS) collects data on the Nation's housing, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, vacant housing units, household characteristics, income, housing and neighborhood quality, housing costs, equipment and fuels, size of housing unit, a...

  19. Ice detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An ice detector is provided for the determination of the thickness of ice on the outer surface on an object (e.g., aircraft) independently of temperature or the composition of the ice. First capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and temperature gauge are embedded in embedding material located within a hollowed out portion of the outer surface. This embedding material is flush with the outer surface to prevent undesirable drag. The first capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and the temperature gauge are respectively connected to first capacitive measuring circuit, second capacitive measuring circuit, and temperature measuring circuit. The geometry of the first and second capacitive gauges is such that the ratio of the voltage outputs of the first and second capacitance measuring circuits is proportional to the thickness of ice, regardless of ice temperature or composition. This ratio is determined by offset and dividing circuit.

  20. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    potential of 170 VDC. A DC-to-DC converter steps the supply down to 12 VDC for the lights, cameras, and image-data-transmission circuitry. Heat generated by dissipation of electric power in the probe is removed simply by conduction through the probe housing to the visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a potential of 170 VDC. A DC-to-DC converter steps the supply down to 12 VDC for the lights, cameras, and image-datatransmission circuitry. Heat generated by dissipation of electric power in the probe is removed simply by conduction through the probe housing to the visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At thime

  1. Tech House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The members of the Swain family- Dr. Charles "Bill" Swain, wife Elaine, daughter Carol, 17, son "Chuck", 12, and dog Susie have an interesting assignment. They are active participants in an important NASA research program involving the application of space-age technology to home construction. b' Transplanted Floridians, the Swains now reside in NASA's Tech House, loatedat Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Their job is to use and help evaluate the variety of advanced technology systems in Tech House. A contemporary three-bedroom home, Tech House incorporates NASA technology, the latest commercial building techniques and other innovations, all designed to reduce energy and water consumption and to provide new levels of comfort, convenience, security and fire safety. Tech House equipment performed well in initial tests, but a house is not a home until it has people. That's where the Swains come in. NASA wants to see how the various systems work under actual living conditions, to confirm the effectiveness of the innovations or to determine necessary modifications for improvement. The Swains are occupying the house for a year, during which NASA engineers are computer monitoring the equipment and assembling a record of day-to-day performance. . Tech House is a laboratory rather than a mass production prototype, but its many benefits may influence home design and construction. In a period of sharply rising utility costs, widespread adoption of Tech House features could provide large-scale savings to homeowners and potentially enormous national benefit in resources conservation. Most innovations are aerospace spinoffs: Some of the equipment is now commercially available; other systems are expected to be in production within a few years. Around 1980, a Tech House-type of home could be built for $45-50,000 (1 976 dollars). It is estimated that the homeowner would save well over $20,000 (again 1976 dollars) in utility costs over the average mortgage span of 20 years.

  2. Isotope-geochemical Nd-Sr evidence of Palaeoproterozoic plume magmatism in Fennoscandia and mantle-crust interaction on stages of layered intrusions formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Pavel; Bayanova, Tamara; Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy; Steshenko, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandian layered intrusions belong to the pyroxenite-gabbronorite-anorthosite formation and spread on a vast area within the Baltic Shield. Based on isotope U-Pb, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and Re-Os data the duration of this formation can be to 100-130 Ma (2.53-2.40 Ga) [Serov et. al., 2008; Bayanova et. al., 2009]. We have studied rocks of layered PGE-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky, Monchetundra, Burakovsky, Olanga group intrusions and Penikat intrusion. According to recent and new complex Nd-Sr-REE data magma source of the vast majority of these intrusions was a mantle reservoir with unusual characteristics: negative values of ɛNd (from 0 to -4) and ISr = 0.702-0.706, flat spectra of REE (value of (La/Yb)N ~ 1.0-5.8) with positive Eu-anomalies [Bayanova et. al., 2009; Bayanova et. al., 2014]. However, the distribution of REE for ore-bearing gabbronorite intrusions Penikat (Sm-Nd age is 2426 ± 38 Ma [Ekimova et. al., 2011]) has a negative Eu-anomalies. This may be due to the formation of plagioclase and its removal from the magma chamber. One of the aims of isotope geochemical investigations is to establish the contribution of mantle components in the formation of layered intrusions rocks and the degrees of contamination of the magma source by crustal material. To calculate the proportion of mantle component model binary mixture was used [Jahn et. al., 2000]. As the mantle components we used data for CHUR: ɛNd = 0, [Nd] = 1.324 [Palm, O'Neil, 2003] and for crustal components were used host-rocks Nd-data. The proportion of mantle component for the studied intrusions was 77-99%. Also, data were obtained for the Monchetundra dike complex and amphibolized gabbro, for which the proportion of mantle material was 20-40%. For these rocks a significant crustal contamination is most likely. This process resulted in low values of ɛNd, a direct relationship between ɛNd and Nd concentration, and significant differences between the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages. A

  3. White House

    MedlinePlus

    ... Check out the most popular infographics and videos Photos View the photo of the day and other galleries Video Gallery ... your questions or your story with President Obama. Photo of the Day Explore the White House Photo ...

  4. House Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Bette

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the "house" concept architectural design at Albert Lea High School (Minnesota) and how the design addresses the community's 21st Century educational goals. Photos and a floor plan are included. (GR)

  5. 1.99 Ga mafic dykes of the Lewisian Gneiss Complex of Scotland: An upper age limit for the Palaeoproterozoic Loch Maree Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Thomas; Prave, Tony; Spencer, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Mafic dyke swarms are often used as geochronological markers, as they are widespread and emplaced over short timespans. The ca. 2.4 Ga Scourie dyke swarm is one such example that has played a key role in understanding the complex tectonic and metamorphic history of the Lewisian Gneiss Complex of Scotland (LGC), part of the North Atlantic Craton (NAC). The LGC consists of Archean and Palaeoproterozoic terranes that experienced polyphase deformation prior to their assembly at ca. 1.8 Ga. Zircons separated from a doleritic dyke from the Gairloch terrane have yielded a concordant U-Th-Pb age (1,989 +4.3 / -0.99 Ma) using the ID-TIMS method. The doleritic dyke is emplaced in Lewisian gneiss that experienced both granulite and amphibolite-facies metamorphism. Partial recrystallisation and amphibolitisation of the dyke demonstrate that it pre-dates the most recent (Laxfordian) amphibolite-facies metamorphic event. The age obtained from the dyke overlaps the U-Pb age of a previously dated olivine gabbro dyke from the Assynt terrane (1,992 Ma). These combined ages provide strong corroborating evidence for a ca. 2.0 Ga mafic dyke swarm event, distinct from the older ca. 2.4 Ga Scourie dyke event known from elsewhere in the LGC. The existence of a ca. 2.0 Ga mafic dyke swarm provides an upper age limit for the Loch Maree Group (LMG), a Palaeoproterozoic succession of metasediment and metavolcanic rocks that overlie the LGC and which are not cross-cut by the Scourie dykes. This study proposes that a period of crustal extension took place in the region at ca. 2.0 Ga. Later, subduction may have resulted in the accretion of the LMG and the adjacent Ard Gneiss, which has previously been regarded as a magmatic arc. The ca. 1.9 Ga age of the earliest stage of the Laxfordian metamorphic event, which affected the LMG, could therefore mark the onset of collision. This sequence of events can be correlated with other coeval areas of the NAC, including the Nagssugtoqidian mobile belt of

  6. 78 FR 6371 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Europe Limited; Notice of Filing and Order Granting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Clearing House January 25, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (``Act... Limited (``ICE Clear Europe'' or the ``Clearing House'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission... received by the Clearing House in unencumbered, fully cleared and fully available funds in ICE Clear...

  7. Palaeoproterozoic (1.83 Ga) zircons in a Bajocian (169 Ma) granite within a Middle Jurassic ophiolite (Rubiku, central Albania): a challenge for geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryza, Ryszard; Beqiraj, Arjan

    2014-04-01

    Two distinct zircon populations, 1,827 ± 17 and 169 ± 2 Ma in age, have been found in the Rubiku granite dyke in the Middle Jurassic Mirdita ophiolite in central Albania. The old inherited zircons represent a homogeneous population formed during a discrete Palaeoproterozoic, likely magmatic, zircon crystallization event. These older zircons were likely incorporated, in large part, into the granite magma that crystallized broadly at the time of the ophiolite emplacement (around 169 Ma). The limited data available do not allow for the construction of an unequivocal petrogenetic model, though several palaeotectonic scenarios are discussed as possible settings for the granite formation. The models refer to recent findings of old inherited zircons in rocks at recent mid-ocean ridge settings, but also consider likely contributions of crustal materials to primary basic ophiolitic magmas within supra-subduction settings and subsequent accretion/collision circumstances. The presence of old zircons in much younger rocks within ophiolite successions runs counter to geodynamic models of interaction between the oceanic lithosphere and continental crust, but constraining their genesis would require further systematic studies on these old inherited zircons, both in mafic (if present) and in felsic rocks of the ophiolites.

  8. Housing Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Georgann

    1985-01-01

    Building specifications for birdhouses (nesting boxes) are given for 11 species (chickadee, titmouse, nuthatch, Carolina wren, house wren, downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, flicker, bluebird, screech owl, and wood duck) including length, width, depth, entrance diameter, and height above the ground. Pointers for construction, materials, and…

  9. Operation IceBridge: Sea Ice Interlude

    NASA Video Gallery

    Sea ice comes in an array of shapes and sizes and has its own ephemeral beauty. Operation IceBridge studies sea ice at both poles, and also runs across interesting formations en route to other targ...

  10. Breakup of Pack Ice, Antarctic Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Breakup of Pack Ice along the periphery of the Antarctic Ice Shelf (53.5S, 3.0E) produced this mosaic of ice floes off the Antarctic Ice Shelf. Strong offshore winds, probably associated with strong katabatic downdrafts from the interior of the continent, are seen peeling off the edges of the ice shelf into long filamets of sea ice, icebergs, bergy bits and growlers to flow northward into the South Atlantic Ocean. 53.5S, 3.0E

  11. Smart Houses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    GWS takes plans for a new home and subjects them to intensive computerized analysis that does 10,000 calculations relative to expected heat loss and heat gain, then provides specifications designed specifically for each structure as to heating, cooling, ventilation and insulation. As construction progresses, GWS inspects the work of the electrical, plumbing and insulation contractors and installs its own Smart House Radiant Barrier. On completion of the home, GWS technicians use a machine that creates a vacuum in the house and enables computer calculation of the air exchanged, a measure of energy efficiency. Key factor is the radiant barrier, borrowed from the Apollo program. This is an adaptation of a highly effective aluminized heat shield as a radiation barrier holding in or keeping out heat, cold air and water vapor.

  12. Primary Iron- and Manganese-Carbonate Deposition in the Palaeoproterozoic Hotazel Formation, South Africa, and Implications for the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhlanga, X. R.; Tsikos, H.; Boyce, A.; Lyons, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Hotazel Formation in the Transvaal Supergroup of South Africa represents an unusual sequence of banded iron formation interbedded with Mn-rich layers, in the form of three sedimentary cycles. The sequence has been interpreted as the product of cyclic Fe and Mn deposition in a marine environment that post-dated the first major event of atmosphere oxygenation at ~2.3Ga, known as Great Oxidation Event (GOE), despite the fact that geochronological constrains for the Hotazel rocks are still conjectural. The Hotazel deposits are thought to represent the products of anaerobic redox processes involving organic carbon and high-valence Fe/Mn-precursor species in the diagenetic environment; key evidence for such processes is provided by the low δ13C values of Fe- and Mn-rich carbonates contained in the Hotazel rocks (average δ13C: -9.6 per mil), which also typify other BIFs of the world. Here we show that the bulk carbonate fraction of the Hotazel Formation displays characteristically invariant carbon isotope signatures across large portions of the stratigraphy, irrespective of changes in bulk modal mineralogy, carbonate mineral chemistry, bulk Fe/Mn ratio or oxidation state of the rocks. This is inconsistent with traditional diagenetic models and points to a common and isotopically homogeneous source of dissolved carbon for carbonate formation in the Hotazel strata. The possibility emerges that the carbonate fraction in the Hotazel rocks initially precipitated as primary particles out of the ambient oceanic water-column, in response to processes of organic carbon cycling by Fe(III) and possibly Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxide species generated at the photic zone. Such a model precludes major atmosphere and shallow ocean oxygenation as a driver for primary oxide formation at post-GOE times, and suggests that the Hotazel deposits may in fact represent a highly evolved - chemically, isotopically and possibly biologically - marine environment that predated the GOE.

  13. Preliminary Results From a Heavily Instrumented Engine Ice Crystal Icing Test in a Ground Based Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Oliver, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary results from the heavily instrumented ALF502R-5 engine test conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Propulsion Systems Laboratory are discussed. The effects of ice crystal icing on a full scale engine is examined and documented. This same model engine, serial number LF01, was used during the inaugural icing test in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory facility. The uncommanded reduction of thrust (rollback) events experienced by this engine in flight were simulated in the facility. Limited instrumentation was used to detect icing on the LF01 engine. Metal temperatures on the exit guide vanes and outer shroud and the load measurement were the only indicators of ice formation. The current study features a similar engine, serial number LF11, which is instrumented to characterize the cloud entering the engine, detect/characterize ice accretion, and visualize the ice accretion in the region of interest. Data were acquired at key LF01 test points and additional points that explored: icing threshold regions, low altitude, high altitude, spinner heat effects, and the influence of varying the facility and engine parameters. For each condition of interest, data were obtained from some selected variations of ice particle median volumetric diameter, total water content, fan speed, and ambient temperature. For several cases the NASA in-house engine icing risk assessment code was used to find conditions that would lead to a rollback event. This study further helped NASA develop necessary icing diagnostic instrumentation, expand the capabilities of the Propulsion Systems Laboratory, and generate a dataset that will be used to develop and validate in-house icing prediction and risk mitigation computational tools. The ice accretion on the outer shroud region was acquired by internal video cameras. The heavily instrumented engine showed good repeatability of icing responses when compared to the key LF01 test points and during day-to-day operation. Other noticeable

  14. Ice Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  15. A thermo-mechanical numerical scenario aiming at reproducing the metamorphic record of high-P rocks in the Palaeoproterozoic Eburnean orogeny.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Ganne, Jerome; Baratoux, Lenka; Dioh, Edmond; de Andrade, Vincent; Block, Sylvain; Perrouty, Stephane; Jessell, Marc

    2013-04-01

    We test a scenario of the evolution of the Palaeoproterozoic Eburnean event characterising the Birimian Province (2.2-2.0 Ga, Western African Craton). A compilation of field data and petrological modeling indicates that an early thermal regime (M1, <10-15°/km) would have produced high-P greenschist to blueschist metamorphism assemblages, that most likely originated in thick sedimentary basins (depth>=20 km), and which would have formed above an original Birimian oceanic crust (possibly preaccreted forearc-backarcs systems). These assemblages record elevated pressures (P> 6-8 Kb) and are found in the thermal aureoles of CaO-poor granitoids. A second warmer, dominant geothermal gradient M2a (20-30°C/km) is found superimposed on M1, associated to greenschist-amphibolite metamorphic assemblages of moderate- to high-pressure rocks. We suggest that these rocks underwent exhumation processes in close association with continued regional shortening and granitoid intrusions. A thermo-mechanical model is proposed here for the Birimian crust, in which we choose an initial setting of oceanic arc resistant layer underlain by a layer of buoyant granitoids (CaO-rich TTGs). At the center of the model, this layer is itself overlain by a tectonically paired, mechanically weak basin several hundreds of kilometers wide (forearc-backarc system ?). Under applied compression, the model reproduces a mechanism of burial and distributed large-scale folding of this juvenile crust. As the oceanic arc and TTGs layers fold below the overlying hydrated sediments, their hinges deepen and they reach appropriate PT conditions to start melting and transform into a dominantly buoyant (CaO-poor) melt product, of lower viscosity and density (by ~5%). This newly formed material ascends and migrate laterally towards the upper parts of the buckle folds, and then pursues its ascension through the weak overlying sediments, within about 50 Myrs. This spatially periodical and "diapiric" mode of exhumation is

  16. Geochronology of the Baltica crust in the Western Gneiss Region, Norway: Palaeoproterozoic augen gneisses, Sveconorwegian zircon neocrystallization and Caledonian zircon deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røhr, Torkil S.; Bingen, Bernard; Robinson, Peter; Reddy, Steven M.

    2013-04-01

    The Western Gneiss Region, Western Norway, is dominated by Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic felsic crust of Baltica ancestry (Baltican Basement), partly subducted to high- and ultrahigh-pressure (HP-UHP) conditions during the Caledonian (Scandian) orogeny between 415 and 395 Ma. The dominant felsic gneisses, in contrast with mafic rocks, carry little evidence for the HP-UHP history, but were affected by amphibolite-facies reworking during exhumation. LA-ICPMS and SIMS zircon U-Pb data were collected in augen orthogneiss samples to constrain the magmatic and metamorphic geochronology in this crust. Five samples from the eclogite-bearing HP-UHP basement near Molde yield intrusion ages ranging from 1644 +/-6 to 1594 +/-10 Ma. Two samples of the structurally underlying eclogite-free basement yield ages of 1685 ±18 and 1644 +/-13 Ma, and a sample from the infolded Middle Allochthon Risberget Nappe yields an equivalent age of 1676 +/-18 Ma. Two samples of the eclogite-bearing basement contain low Th/U neocrystallized zircon with an age of 950 +/-26 Ma. This zircon provides the northernmost direct evidence for at least amphibolite-facies Sveconorwegian metamorphism in unquestionable Baltican crust, close to the known "Sveconorwegian boundary" in the Western Gneiss Region. The Western Gneiss Region characterized by 1686-1594 Ma magmatism, the Eastern Segment of the Sveconorwegian Orogen characterized by 1795-1640 Ma magmatism, and the Idefjorden terrane hosting the type Gothian active margin magmatism dated between 1659 and 1520 Ma, probably represent three distinct Proterozoic growth zones of Baltica into which Sveconorwegian reworking propagated. Samples of the eclogite-bearing basement lack Scandian neocrystallization of zircon, but show partial recrystallization of zircon. Paired CL and EBSD images indicate that zircon crystals underwent crystal-plastic deformation during the Scandian subduction-exhumation cycle. They illustrate a relationship between crystal

  17. Late Palaeoproterozoic mafic dyking in the Ukrainian Shield of Volgo-Sarmatia caused by rotation during the assembly of supercontinent Columbia (Nuna)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, Svetlana V.; Gintov, Oleg B.; Kurlovich, Dzmitry M.; Lubnina, Nataliya V.; Nilsson, Mimmi K. M.; Orlyuk, Mykhailo I.; Pashkevich, Inna K.; Shumlyanskyy, Leonid V.; Starostenko, Vitaly I.

    2013-08-01

    The Ukrainian Shield comprises the exposed crust of the large Palaeoproterozoic protocraton Volgo-Sarmatia, which together with the Fennoscandian crustal segment constitutes the East European Craton ("Baltica"). Geological and geophysical data indicate that 1.80 to 1.75 Ga mafic dykes related to anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite (AMCG) plutons are widespread within the Ukrainian Shield. We examined their ages, distribution patterns, orientations and compositions in three different crustal blocks (Volyn, Ingul and Azov), and found close spatial relationships with major strike-slip fault systems developed during two phases of extension. The early, 1.80-1.77 Ga, generation of mafic dykes mostly follows NW (330 ± 20°) and more rarely N-S- or E-W-trending faults corresponding to major NE-SW extension (the Submoshorino phase). These dykes contain olivine dolerites, picrites, camptonites, lamprophyres, kimberlites and other rocks belonging to tholeiitic and subalkaline jotunitic series. The compositions of these dykes differ between the host blocks, but all feature upper mantle geochemical signatures such as high contents of Ni and Cr, and positive values of εNd(1800) up to + 2.8. High degrees of REE fractionation indicate deep levels of mantle melting, which is particularly characteristic of the Ingul block as marked by the most extensive and dense mafic dyke swarms. The later, 1.76-1.75 Ga, dyke swarms occur close to the most voluminous AMCG suites of similar age and were emplaced during the second (Korsun) phase of faulting when all the older strike-slip fault zones were reactivated and partly transformed to tensional faults by E-W extension. These dyke swarms mainly trend 030 ± 20°. They are jotunitic and their isotopic signatures indicate a greater participation of crustal sources in the parent melts. The overall transtensional tectonic setting of the mafic dyking associated with the AMCG magmatism in Volgo-Sarmatia was created by convergent tectonics

  18. Palaeoproterozoic tectonic evolution of the Alto Tererê Group, southernmost Amazonian Craton, based on field mapping, zircon dating and rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda Filho, J. V.; Fuck, R. A.; Ruiz, A. S.; Dantas, E. L.; Scandolara, J. E.; Rodrigues, J. B.; Nascimento, N. D. C.

    2016-01-01

    New geochemical and geochronological U-Pb and Sm-Nd data from amphibolites of the Alto Tererê Group, which are of Palaeoproterozoic age, are presented. The amphibolites are exposed in the central-eastern portion of the Rio Apa Block, southern Amazonian Craton, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, and are composed of hornblende, plagioclase, quartz, biotite, cummingtonite and epidote. The amphibolites are subdivided into three lithofacies: (i) thinly banded amphibolites (metabasalts), (ii) coarse- and medium-grained amphibolites with relic subophitic texture (metagabbros), and (iii) amphibolites with relic cumulate texture (metapyroxenites). Chemical data also suggest the subdivision of the amphibolites into three different types. These rocks yield a U-Pb zircon age of 1768 ± 6 Ma and are therefore older than rocks of part of the Rio Apa Complex. Their Sm-Nd model ages range between 2.89 and 1.88 Ga, and their ɛNd (T) values range between -3.40 and + 3.74. Chemical analyses of these rocks indicate SiO2 concentrations between 45.23 and 50.65 wt.%, MgO concentrations between 4.34 and 8.01 wt.%, TiO2 concentrations between 0.91 and 1.74 wt.%, weakly fractionated rare-earth element (REE) patterns with mild depletion in heavy REEs, enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and high-field-strength element (HFSEs), negative Nb, Ta and Co anomalies, positive Ba and Pb anomalies, low Ce concentrations, high Rb/Y ratios and low Th/La and Hf/Sm ratios. These features reflect metasomatism of the mantle wedge produced by sediments from the subducted plate. Various degrees of melting mark the evolution of the parent basic magmas, although subordinate crustal contamination may also have occurred. The geochemical signature of the amphibolites corresponds to that of tholeiitic basalts generated in an extensional back-arc-basin environment. The deposition in the basin apparently ceased during the first episode of compression and deformation at approximately 1.68 Ga, and the main

  19. Faculty Housing Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira

    1982-01-01

    Some of the creative financing programs currently used to provide faculty housing assistance in California and elsewhere in the United States are described. Generally, the programs fall into one of four categories: rental housing, owner housing, mortgage assistance, and housing stipends. Institutions with a comprehensive housing program often have…

  20. Housing the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Anne

    1982-01-01

    Innovative housing designs are needed for the growing number of elderly Americans who suffer because of the limited living options provided by inflexible housing. Creative alternatives include double houses, shared living, intergenerational housing, and adaptable houses. Long-term planning is needed to construct an attractive environment that does…

  1. Scrambled Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This complex area on the side of Europa which faces away from Jupiter shows several types of features which are formed by disruptions of Europa's icy crust. North is to the top of the image, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The prominent wide, dark bands are up to 20 kilometers (12 miles) wide and over 50 kilometers (30 miles) long. They are believed to have formed when Europa's icy crust fractured, separated and filled in with darker, 'dirtier' ice or slush from below. A relatively rare type of feature on Europa is the 15-kilometer-diameter (9.3-mile) impact crater in the lower left corner. The small number of impact craters on Europa's surface is an indication of its relatively young age. A region of chaotic terrain south of this impact crater contains crustal plates which have broken apart and rafted into new positions. Some of these 'ice rafts' are nearly 1 kilometer (about half a mile) across. Other regions of chaotic terrain are visible and indicate heating and disruption of Europa's icy crust from below. The youngest features in this scene are the long, narrow cracks in the ice which cut across all other features. One of these cracks is about 30 kilometers (18 miles) to the right of the impact crater and extends for hundreds of miles from the top to the bottom of the image.

    The image, centered near 23 degrees south latitude and 179 degrees longitude, covers an area about 240 by 215 kilometers (150 by 130 miles) across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 460 meters (500 yards) across. The image was taken as Galileo flew by Europa on March 29, 1998. The image was taken by the onboard solid state imaging system camera from an altitude of 23,000 kilometers (14,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech

  2. Experimental Studies in Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy Peter

    Ice nuclei play a critical role in the formation of precipitation in mixed phase clouds. Modification of IN concentrations can lead to changes in cloud lifetimes and precipitation size. Presented in this study are experimental investigations into ice nuclei in an ongoing effort to reduce the uncertainties that ice nuclei have on cloud processes and climate. This research presents a new version of the cold stage drop freezing assay to investigate the time-dependence of heterogeneous nucleation. The temperature range for the instrument spans from the melting point of water to the homogeneous freezing limit of ˜-38 deg C. Temperature stability for the instrument allowed for experimental operation for up to four days while interrogating the same sample. Up to a one hundred fold increase in the number of analyzed drops was accomplished through an in-house written automated drop freezing detection software package. Combined instrument design improvements allow for the analysis of IN concentrations down to ˜10-8 ice nuclei per picoliter of sample water. A new variant of the multiple-component stochastic model for heterogeneous ice nucleation was used to investigate the time dependence of heterogeneous freezing processes. This was accomplished by analyzing how the changes in the cooling rate can impact the observed nucleation rate. The model employed four material-dependent parameters to accurately capture the observed freezing of water drops containing Arizona Test Dust. The parameters were then used to accurately predict the freezing behavior of the drops in time dependent experiments. The time dependence freezing of a wide range of materials was then investigated. These materials included the minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite, the biological proxy ice nuclei contained within the product Icemax, and flame soot generated from the incomplete combustion of ethylene gas. The time dependence for ice nuclei collected from rainwater samples was also investigated. The

  3. Ice sheet margins and ice shelves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of climate warming on the size of ice sheet margins in polar regions is considered. Particular attention is given to the possibility of a rapid response to warming on the order of tens to hundreds of years. It is found that the early response of the polar regions to climate warming would be an increase in the area of summer melt on the ice sheets and ice shelves. For sufficiently large warming (5-10C) the delayed effects would include the breakup of the ice shelves by an increase in ice drainage rates, particularly from the ice sheets. On the basis of published data for periodic changes in the thickness and melting rates of the marine ice sheets and fjord glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, it is shown that the rate of retreat (or advance) of an ice sheet is primarily determined by: bedrock topography; the basal conditions of the grounded ice sheet; and the ice shelf condition downstream of the grounding line. A program of satellite and ground measurements to monitor the state of ice sheet equilibrium is recommended.

  4. 111. Photocopied August 1978. FOREBAY AND POWER HOUSE FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Photocopied August 1978. FOREBAY AND POWER HOUSE FROM WEST FOREBAY EMBANKMENT, 1920 OR LATER, NOTICE THAT A GOOD PORTION OF THE GRATING OF THE ICE AND TRASH RACK HAS BEEN REMOVED FOR THE WINTER. ICE TENDED TO FORM ON THE RACK, CLOGGING IT UP AND INHIBITING THE FLOW, THE UNION CARBIDE PLANT IS VISIBLE ON THE FAR RIGHT. (881) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  5. Icing: Accretion, Detection, Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, John J.

    1994-01-01

    The global aircraft industry and its regulatory agencies are currently involved in three major icing efforts: ground icing; advanced technologies for in-flight icing; and tailplane icing. These three major icing topics correspondingly support the three major segments of any aircraft flight profile: takeoff; cruise and hold; and approach and land. This lecture addressess these three topics in the same sequence as they appear in flight, starting with ground deicing, followed by advanced technologies for in-flight ice protection, and ending with tailplane icing.

  6. Does numerical modelling of apparent partial loss Ar/Ar age spectra of hornblende give the correct thermal history of terranes? Insights from the Palaeoproterozoic Lapland-Kola orogen (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, K.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the validity of numerical modelling of hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age spectra obtained from the same sample by step-heating with: 1) a defocused laser on 1.5 mm diameter discs micro-sampled from polished petrographic thin sections with a microscope-mounted drill, and 2) a resistance-heated furnace using handpicked mineral separate. Micro-sampling enables to obtain parts of mineral grains without zoning or included phases from targeted sites. Three samples were analysed: a tonalitic gneiss and a biotite-bearing amphibolite, from the same outcrop-1, and a biotite-free amphibolite from neighbouring outcrop-2. The material is from the Neoarchaean Murmansk terrane in the Palaeoproterozoic Lapland-Kola collisional belt along the northern margin of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield. Hornblendes from the biotite-bearing gneiss and amphibolite (outcrop-1) yielded 40Ar/39Ar age spectra with progressively increasing step ages, whereas the biotite-free amphibole (outcrop-2) gave flat age spectra for both drilled disc and separate. These so-called staircase-type age spectra have been classically interpreted by partial loss of radiogenic argon by diffusion processes during younger thermal reworking. We applied numerical modelling tools (Double-Pulse, MacArgon) based on diffusion theory and that assume thermally activated loss of radiogenic Ar from so-called lower retentive lattice sites by solid-state volume diffusion. Modelling results suggest that staircase-shaped age spectra of our Neoarchaean hornblende are due to argon losses of 40-50% during reheating to 450 ± 25° C in Palaeoproterozoic time, and that flat spectra imply a thermally undisturbed Neoarchaean isotope system. These results would imply that neighbouring samples would have experienced sharply contrasting thermal histories. Hornblende with apparent partial loss age spectra is exclusively obtained from samples in which

  7. Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic gneisses reworked during a Neoproterozoic (Pan-African) high-grade event in the Mozambique belt of East Africa: Structural relationships and zircon ages from the Kidatu area, central Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Kröner, A.; Poller, U.; Sommer, H.; Muhongo, S.; Wingate, M. T. D.

    2006-06-01

    This study presents new zircon ages and Sm-Nd whole-rock isotopic compositions for high-grade gneisses from the Udzungwa Mountain area in the central part of the Mozambique belt, Tanzania. The study area comprises a succession of layered granulite-facies para- and orthogneisses, mostly retrograded to amphibolite-facies. The original intrusive contacts became obscured or severely modified during non-coaxial ductile deformation, and extensive shearing occurred during retrogression. Structures reflecting the early deformational history were mostly obscured when the rocks were transported into the lower crust as documented by severe flattening. Only the fragmented gneisses in the eastern part of the area testify to a brittle regime. Structures in narrow low strain zones that predate the currently observed layering are preserved in rootless isoclinal folds and boudins. Magmatic and detrital zircons from tonalitic to felsic orthogneisses and a metapelite sample were dated using the U-Pb and Pb-Pb evaporation methods and SHRIMP II. Cathodoluminiscence images reveal ubiquitous xenocrystic cores, rimmed by clear, unzoned overgrowth due to high-grade metamorphism. Discordant U-Pb data therefore reflect core-rim relationships, and it was not always possible to obtain precise crystallisation ages. The analyses reveal Neoarchaean, Palaeoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic protolith ages. Nd isotopic systematics yielded strongly negative ɛNd( t) -values and Neoarchaean to Palaeoproterozoic model ages, even for gneisses emplaced in the Neoproterozoic. The trace element distribution suggests upper crustal derivation of the gneisses. Therefore, our study provides evidence that recycling of older crust played a major role during the evolution of the Kidatu area. Neoarchaean rocks are interpreted to represent fragments of the Tanzania craton. Our results, together with those of earlier workers, lead to the conclusion that the central part of the Mozambique belt mainly consists of ancient

  8. Timing the structural events in the Palaeoproterozoic Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane and adjacent Maluwe basin, West African craton, in central-west Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Théveniaut, H.; Botha, P. M. W.; Gyapong, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Maluwe basin, north-adjacent to the Sunyani basin, is the northernmost of the northeast-trending Eburnean volcaniclastic depositories in Ghana. These basins are separated from one another by remnants of Eoeburnean crust, all formed during the evolution of an arc-backarc basins complex in a Palaeoproterozoic intraoceanic environment. The Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane to the northwest, of mostly Eoeburnean crust is fault bounded with the Maluwe basin along the northeast-trending Bolé-Navrongo fault zone. The stratigraphic sequence, which was the key to unravelling the structural evolution of the study area, was established by means of field observations aided by precision SHRIMP geochronology. The quartzitic, pelitic, quartzofeldspathic and granitic gneisses of the Eoeburnean crust (>2150 Ma) experienced complex metamorphic mineral growth and migmatitization, mostly under static crustal conditions and were subjected to several deformation episodes. The foliated mafic and metasedimentary enclaves within the Ifanteyire granite establish deformation to have taken place prior to ˜2195 Ma, while the tectonically emplaced Kuri amphibolites within the 2187-Ma gneissic Gondo granite indicate a stage of rifting followed by collision. Deformation of granite dykes in the Gondo granites at ˜2150 Ma concluded the development of the Eoeburnean orogenic cycle (DEE). The Sawla Suite, contemporaneous with the deposition of the Maluwe Group, intruded the tectonic exhumed Bolé-Nangodi terrane during extension between ˜2137 and 2125 Ma. The rifting separated the Abulembire fragment from the Bolé-Nangodi terrane. During subsequent northwestward subduction of young back-arc basin oceanic crust the volcaniclastic strata of the Maluwe Group and Sawla granitoids were deformed (DE1) under chlorite/sericite greenschist-grade conditions. The NE-trending folds had subhorizontal axes and subvertical axial planes. Simultaneous to the DE1 orogenesis the molasses of the Banda Group was

  9. U-Pb geochronology on detrital zircons from FAR-DEEP cores, Fennoscandian Shield - age constraints for events of the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic transition and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, C.; Martin, A.; Bahlburg, H.; Lepland, A.; Melezhik, V.; Prave, A. R.; Condon, D. J.; Berndt, J.; Kooijman, E.; Far-Deep Scientists

    2010-12-01

    The Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic transition is marked by several environmental events that were important for the evolution of the Earth system and occurred coeval with plate tectonic reorganisations including the break-up of the supercontinent Kenorland. We applied U-Pb-geochronology on detrital zircons by LA-ICP-MS and ID-TIMS to improve age constraints of these events, recorded in the 2.5-2.0 Ga rock successions of the Fennoscandian Shield and including the Huronian glaciation and the Lomagundi-Jatuli positive excursion of δ13C in sedimentary carbonates. The detrital zircons provided ages ranging from 3.5 to 1.9 Ga with dominant age populations in the range of 2.9-2.5 Ga for most samples. Youngest zircon ages from the Seidorechka Sedimentary and Polisarka formations in the Imandra-Varzuga Greenstone Belt and the Neverskrukk Formation in the Pechenga Greenstone Belt constrain, for the first time, the deposition of glacial diamictites on the Fennoscandian Shield to between 2.43 and 2.2 Ga. Similar ages have been reported for glacial deposits in Canada and South Africa, consistent with a global glaciation at that time. The youngest detrital zircon ages derived from the Kuetsjärvi Sedimentary Fm, containing isotopically heavy carbonates, and from the overlying Kolasjoki Sedimentary Fm in the Pechenga Greenstone Belt indicate that deposition of carbonates corresponding to the Lomagundi-Jatuli δ13C excursion took place between 2.3 Ga and 2.06 Ga, in agreement with previous ages from these formations. Detrital zircon populations of c. 2.06 Ga and c. 1.92 Ga characterise the lower and upper parts of the Kolasjoki Sedimentary Fm, respectively. These units are separated by an unconformity of unknown duration, but the age distributions may indicate a significant hiatus because these are considerably younger than the 2.0-1.97 Ga ages reported from the overlying Pilgujärvi Sedimentary and Volcanic fms. Alternatively, the younger cluster of ages may record deformation

  10. The Palaeoproterozoic accretionary crustal growth: implications from new age data on the crystalline basement in Lithuania, NW Belarus and N Poland (the East European Craton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, G.; Bogdanova, S.; Taran, L.; Wiszniewska, J.

    2012-04-01

    A southwestward younging of Palaeoproterozoic terranes in the crystalline basement in the western part of the East European Craton has been recently suggested by numerous isotopic datings (TIMS, SIMS zircon, EPMA monazite and 40Ar/39Ar). Along with geochemical and geophysical data this allows to decipher a multistage accretionary history. In the east, the Belarus-Podlasie Granulite belt (BPG) is dominated by 1.88 Ga dioritic-granodioritic (calc-alkaline) magmatism in Belarus (Claesson et al., 2001). Remnants of c. 1.89 Ga metadiorites, c. 1.90 Ga magmatic zircon cores in c. 1.80 Ga granites (Vejelyte, 2011) in S and E Lithuania and 1.88 Ga metagranodiorites in E Poland (Radzyn area) confirm the c. 1.90 Ga accretion-related magmatism in the BPG and the East Lithuanian domain. Together with the coeval juvenile granitoids in the adjacent Okolovo terrane this indicates the formation of the Lithuanian-Belarus composite terrane at 1.90-1.88 Ga. At c. 1.86-1.84 Ga, abundant gabbro-diorite-granodiorite-granite intrusions were emplaced further southwest in Lithuania, NW Belarus and N Poland. In Lithuana, within the Polish-Lithuanian terrane the TTG suite of deformed and metamorphosed in amphibolite facies calc-alkaline tonalitic, quartz dioritic and dioritic rocks is characteristic for the Randamonys massif. The strongly deformed granitoids in the adjacent NW Belarus, mafic granulites and gneissic granites of igneous origin in central Lithuania, garnet-cordierite bearing granites further north display similar c. 1.84 Ga magmatic age (Motuza et al., 2008). This shows that various tectonic settings including island and continental magmatic arcs were possible. They were accreted to the Lithuanian-Belarus terrane sometime at 1.84-1.81 Ga while voluminous charnockitic magmatism took place in W Lithuania (e.g. Claesson et al., 2001; Vejelyte, 2011). A chain of younger c. 1.83 Ga volcanic arcs was developed in W and S Lithuania and N Poland (Wiszniewska et al., 2005). The

  11. Housing, Design, and Furnishings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a six-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on housing, design, and furnishings. The units cover: (1) the societal aspects of housing (including the relationship between housing and the economy, population trends, and culture-related housing characteristics); (2) family housing…

  12. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. 1. General view, outbuildings. The seed house composed of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view, outbuildings. The seed house composed of the greenhouse, a storeroom (shed), a classroom (over a former ice pit), and a kitchen (over a cellar)-stands on the right. The barn roof is visible at center and the gift shop (former stable) stands on the left (Note the carved stone posts framing the gateway). - John Bartram House & Garden, Greenhouse, 54th Street & LIndbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  15. Sea ice ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Kevin R

    2014-01-01

    Polar sea ice is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth. The liquid brine fraction of the ice matrix is home to a diverse array of organisms, ranging from tiny archaea to larger fish and invertebrates. These organisms can tolerate high brine salinity and low temperature but do best when conditions are milder. Thriving ice algal communities, generally dominated by diatoms, live at the ice/water interface and in recently flooded surface and interior layers, especially during spring, when temperatures begin to rise. Although protists dominate the sea ice biomass, heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant. The sea ice ecosystem provides food for a host of animals, with crustaceans being the most conspicuous. Uneaten organic matter from the ice sinks through the water column and feeds benthic ecosystems. As sea ice extent declines, ice algae likely contribute a shrinking fraction of the total amount of organic matter produced in polar waters. PMID:24015900

  16. Stochastic ice stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution. PMID:27457960

  17. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  18. Measurement of ice thickness (icing) in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Kirby, Mark S. JR.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasonic techniques have been used to measure the formation of ice in flight in an icing wind tunnel with a precision of + or - 0.5 mm. Two icing regimes, humid and dry, are identified. Both natural and artificial conditions are considered. On the basis of ice formation rates obtained by the ultrasound technique and the observed surface conditions, it is found that the heat transfer coefficients are larger in the wind tunnel tests than in actual flight, presumably due to the higher level of turbulence in the wind tunnel tests. Profiles obtained during flight under natural conditions are compared with mechanical-type measurements and with the results of stereographic analysis.

  19. Ice Friction in the Sport of Bobsleigh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Louis

    The primary objective of this work is to examine the effect of the bobsleigh runner profile on ice / runner friction. The work is centered on a computational model (F.A.S.T. 3.2b) which calculates the coefficient of friction between a steel blade and ice. The first step was to analyze runners used in the sport of bobsleigh. This analysis was performed using a handheld rocker gauge, a device used in speed skating. The size of the device was optimized for hockey, short and long track speed skating, and bobsleigh. A number of runners were measured using the gauge and it was found that the portion of the runner contacting the ice generally has a rocker value of (20--50) m. Next, the hardness of athletic ice surfaces was analyzed. The ice hardness was determined by dropping steel balls varying in mass from (8--540) g onto the ice surface, from a height of (0.3--1.2) m, and measuring the diameter of the indentation craters. The ice hardness was found to be P¯(T) = ((--0.6 +/- 0.4) T + 14.7 +/- 2.1) MPa and the elastic recovery of the ice surface was found to be negligible. The F.A.S.T. model was adapted from a speed skate model to calculate the coefficient of friction between a bobsleigh runner and a flat ice surface. The model predicts that maximum velocities are obtained for temperatures between --10 and --20°C, in agreement with observations on the Calgary bobsleigh track. The model for flat ice suggests that the flattest runners produce the lowest coefficient of friction and that the rocker affects friction more than the cross-sectional radius. The coefficient of friction between runners and ice and the drag performance of 2-men bobsleighs were determined from radar speed measurements taken at the Calgary Olympic Oval and at Canada Olympic Park: at the Ice House and on the bobsleigh track during a World Cup competition. The mean coefficient of friction was found to be mu = (5.3 +/- 2.0) x 10--3 and the mean drag performance was CdA = (0.18 +/- 0.02) m2.

  20. 24 CFR 982.609 - Congregate housing: Housing quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Congregate housing: Housing quality standards. 982.609 Section 982.609 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION...

  1. 24 CFR 982.618 - Shared housing: Housing quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shared housing: Housing quality standards. 982.618 Section 982.618 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8...

  2. 24 CFR 982.618 - Shared housing: Housing quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shared housing: Housing quality standards. 982.618 Section 982.618 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8...

  3. 24 CFR 982.618 - Shared housing: Housing quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shared housing: Housing quality standards. 982.618 Section 982.618 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION...

  4. 24 CFR 982.618 - Shared housing: Housing quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shared housing: Housing quality standards. 982.618 Section 982.618 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8...

  5. Definition of squatter housing.

    PubMed

    Gedik, A

    1993-01-01

    One of the most critical urban problems of developing countries is squatter housing. Squatter housing was defined as housing illegally established and roughly constructed. The initial structure was small in size, made of low-quality materials, and built with nominal labor costs on squatter land with a nominal rent. The basic housing unit may be expanded over time. Squatter housing arises out of a variety of circumstances, including an inadequate supply of old depleted formal housing near the central business district. Squatter housing is attractive to migrants and others in low-income and insecure employment. Improvements in squatter housing locations are possible when spatial location problems are not a concern. Policies concerning squatter housing have changed over time. Most government policies accept the inevitability of squatter housing and seek to improve and upgrade housing and public service conditions. The literature on squatter housing spans a variety of forms of housing. The variety of forms was due to the variety of levels of development within countries, changes over time, and changes toward a more permanent population in the labor force rather then temporary migrants. The forms of housing were identified as legal-formal residential housing which excluded slums, residential slums, squatter housing, and other residential housing. Set theory was used to clarify, with explicitness and a minimum of redundancies, 14 different sets. The 14 sets revolved around socioeconomic levels, housing and environmental conditions, construction process, land ownership, zoning regulations, subdivision regulations, and building construction regulations. Legal-formal housing meant legal land ownership and conformity to legal zoning, subdivision, and building construction regulations. Usually housing was of higher quality and construction was according to a time schedule. Slum housing also conformed to legal status and a regular time span for construction, but the

  6. Doped Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Libal, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  7. Greenland Ice Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    Greenland looks like a big pile of snow seen from space using a regular camera. But satellite radar interferometry helps us detect the motion of ice beneath the snow. Ice starts flowing from the fl...

  8. Ice rule correlations in stuffed spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldus, R. J.; Fennell, T.; Deen, P. P.; Ressouche, E.; Lau, G. C.; Cava, R. J.; Bramwell, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    Stuffed spin ice is a chemical variation of a spin ice material like Ho2Ti2O7 in which extra magnetic ions are inserted into the crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that the degree of stuffing has very little effect on the residual entropy in the system, which takes a value very close to the spin ice entropy. We argue, however, that the observation of this entropy does not imply long range coherence of the ice rules, that determine the local spin configurations. We have characterized deviations from the ice rules by means of a polarized neutron diffraction study of a single crystal of Ho2+δTi2-δO7-δ/2 with δ = 0.3. Our results demonstrate that the ice rules in stuffed spin ice are strictly valid only over a relatively short range, and that at longer range stuffed spin ice exhibits some characteristics of a ‘cluster glass’, with a tendency to more conventional ferromagnetic correlations.

  9. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  10. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, David F.; Suciu, Dan F.; Harris, Taryl L.; Ingram, Jani C.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  11. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  12. NEUROENDOCRINE RESPONSES TO SOCIAL REGULATION OF PUBERTY IN THE FEMALE HOUSE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    First estrus is advanced in female house mice exposed to an adult male and delayed in those housed in groups. Experiments were conducted to explore possible mechanisms by which the hypothalamus integrates these puberty regulating social signals. Female ice weaned at 21 d of age w...

  13. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  14. The Antarctic Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radok, Uwe

    1985-01-01

    The International Antarctic Glaciological Project has collected information on the East Antarctic ice sheet since 1969. Analysis of ice cores revealed climatic history, and radar soundings helped map bedrock of the continent. Computer models of the ice sheet and its changes over time will aid in predicting the future. (DH)

  15. Experiments in Ice Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, P. F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments in ice physics that demonstrate the behavior and properties of ice. Show that ice behaves as an ionic conductor in which charge is transferred by the movement of protons, its electrical conductivity is highly temperature-dependent, and its dielectric properties show dramatic variation in the kilohertz range. (Author/GA)

  16. Technology for Ice Rinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Ron Urban's International Ice Shows set up portable ice rinks for touring troupes performing on temporary rinks at amusement parks, sports arenas, dinner theaters, shopping malls and civic centers. Key to enhanced rink portability, fast freezing and maintaining ice consistency is a mat of flexible tubing called ICEMAT, an offshoot of a solar heating system developed by Calmac, Mfg. under contract with Marshall.

  17. Ice Versus Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Olson, Eric A.; Dehm, Janet

    2005-01-01

    During a snow bank exploration, students noticed "ice caves," or pockets, in some of the larger snow banks, usually below darker layers. Most of these caves had many icicles hanging inside. Students offered reasonable explanations of ice cave formation--squirrels, kids, snow blowers--and a few students came close to the true ice cave-formation…

  18. ICI Showcase House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    Building Science Corporation collaborated with ICI Homes in Daytona Beach, FL on a 2008 prototype Showcase House that demonstrates the energy efficiency and durability upgrades that ICI currently promotes through its in-house efficiency program called EFactor.

  19. Student-Initiated Housing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feild, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes a report that describes housing where student groups lease, purchase, or even develop their own living quarters. Considers the birth of the movement, federal student housing programs, and a view to future programs. (Author/DN)

  20. Scale Model Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.

    1997-01-01

    /sec (Mach 0.45). The air turbine and instrumentation are housed inside a fiberglass nacelle. Total and static pressure measurements can be taken around the loop, and velocity and flow angularity measurements can be taken with hot-wire and five-hole probes at specific locations. The Scale Model Icing Research Tunnel (SMIRT) is undergoing checkout tests to determine how its airflow characteristics compare with the IRT. Near-term uses for this scale-model tunnel include determining the aerodynamic effects of replacing the 52-yearold W-shaped heat exchanger with a flat-faced heat exchanger. SMIRT is an integral part of the improvements planned for the IRT because testing the proposed IRT improvements in a scale-model tunnel will lower costs and improve productivity.

  1. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  2. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  3. The Hispanic Housing Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolbeare, Cushing N.; Canales, Judith A.

    This report examines the housing characteristics and needs of Hispanic households in the United States, drawing on information from the 1980 Census and the 1983 Annual Housing Survey. Among the conclusions are the following: (1) housing quality is a major problem for more than one in six Hispanic families; (2) among Hispanic subgroups, Puerto…

  4. Equal Opportunity in Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC.

    This overview of developments in housing opportunities for minorities and women includes an historical review of housing discrimination, its nature, and its effects. Federal legislation and Federal actions which were taken to assure equal housing opportunities for women and minorities are described. Other topic areas addressed include minority…

  5. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  6. Housing: Topic Paper F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    This paper, one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, addresses the issue of housing. Major federal responsibilities are to develop additional housing opportunities for persons with disabilities and to assure that currently available housing is equally open to individuals with…

  7. The Tarascan Indian House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    This lesson plan introduces K-grade three students to Mexican Indian architecture. Students will become familiar with the cultural context of the Indian treasure house; discuss the use of wood as the sole building material; compare the treasure house with present day structures; and create miniature treasure houses using wood materials. (GEA)

  8. Seasat and floating ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Data collected by SEASAT would be useful in developing predictive physical models for the drift and deformation of sea ice, for estimating the heat budget of the polar seas, for the optimum routing of shipping through pack ice areas, for the design of both offshore structures and shipping capable of surviving in heavy pack ice, and for the tracking of large icebergs and ice islands. The instrument package for SEASAT-A is particularly useful for studying sea ice in that the Coherent Imaging Radar (CIR), the Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the Compressed Pulse Radar Altimeter (CPRA) are not limited by the presence of clouds.

  9. Alaska marine ice atlas

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, J.C.; Wise, J.L.; Voelker, R.P.; Schulze, R.H.; Wohl, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive Atlas of Alaska marine ice is presented. It includes information on pack and landfast sea ice and calving tidewater glacier ice. It also gives information on ice and related environmental conditions collected over several years time and indicates the normal and extreme conditions that might be expected in Alaska coastal waters. Much of the information on ice conditions in Alaska coastal waters has emanated from research activities in outer continental shelf regions under assessment for oil and gas exploration and development potential. (DMC)

  10. GIA Ice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachuck, Samuel; Cathles, Larry; Amantov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    Defining the ice load in a way that avoids circularity is perhaps the most difficult aspect of GIA modeling. At any instant of past time the global land-supported ice load must honor the meltwater curve and the known edges of the ice, but within these constraints the ice mass can be swapped to a considerable extent between the various glacial systems and parts of those systems. In our models, ice thickness is controlled by the effective basal shear stress (EBSS). This parameter incorporates the sub-ice lithology (e.g., whether the ice rests on sediment of crystalline rock), the relative local snow accumulation rate, and the local basal shear strength (which presumably depends most strongly on sub-ice temperature). The effective basal shear stress can be fairly easily modified to construct an ice model. The ice model is evaluated by the geological reasonability of its changes in EBSS in space and time, and by how well it matches measured GIA data. The risk that an incorrect earth model can be forced to fit the GIA data by manipulating the ice model (the circularity mentioned above) can be minimized by evaluating the longest wavelength deformations (peripheral bulge behavior) before proceeding to the shorter wavelength deformations (local emergence variations). The poster will describe how we have proceeded in this fashion to develop a framework for interpreting GIA data in Norway. The poster will be augmented by computer software that compares emergence data to models at specific sites in Norway.

  11. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kauffeld, M.; WANG, M. J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  12. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  13. Distinct bacterial assemblages reside at different depths in Arctic multiyear sea ice.

    PubMed

    Hatam, Ido; Charchuk, Rhianna; Lange, Benjamin; Beckers, Justin; Haas, Christian; Lanoil, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial communities in Arctic sea ice play an important role in the regulation of nutrient and energy dynamics in the Arctic Ocean. Sea ice has vertical gradients in temperature, brine salinity and volume, and light and UV levels. Multiyear ice (MYI) has at least two distinct ice layers: old fresh ice with limited permeability, and new saline ice, and may also include a surface melt pond layer. Here, we determine whether bacterial communities (1) differ with ice depth due to strong physical and chemical gradients, (2) are relatively homogenous within a layer, but differ between layers, or (3) do not vary with ice depth. Cores of MYI off northern Ellesmere Island, NU, Canada, were subsectioned in 30-cm intervals, and the bacterial assemblage structure was characterized using 16S rRNA gene pyrotag sequencing. Assemblages clustered into three distinct groups: top (0-30 cm); middle (30-150 cm); and bottom (150-236 cm). These layers correspond to the occurrence of refrozen melt pond ice, at least 2-year-old ice, and newly grown first-year ice at the bottom of the ice sheet, respectively. Thus, MYI houses multiple distinct bacterial assemblages, and in situ conditions appear to play a less important role in structuring microbial assemblages than the age or conditions of the ice at the time of formation. PMID:25041280

  14. Of Ice and Microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Jody

    2006-12-01

    Inuit hunters of the North have long recognized ice as the natural state of water from which life flows on Earth. Although unaware of the microscopic world, they chart changes in properties of ice and water that derive from a succession of microbial inhabitants. Scientific hunters of the West have largely overlooked all but the warmest of ices as dynamic scenes of microbial life, considering the frozen realm to archive life forms instead. Deeply frozen glacial ice on Earth does appear to preserve microbes effectively, but isn't the ocean beneath the geologically dynamic ice of Europa believed too salty? Aren't the subsurface ices of Mars expected to be rich in all manner of mineralogical impurities? Wherever salt and other mineral impurities are sufficiently abundant in Earth ice, the ice contains interior liquid water that can range from nano-layer films on grain surfaces (glacial ice) to a porous network of brine (Arctic winter sea ice down to 20°C). Other recent studies of saline ices have indicated a world of interacting life forms, with viruses infecting bacteria in brines at -12°C (the lowest temperature tested), the domains of Bacteria and Archaea undergoing succession in winter ices (down to -28°C), and evidence that cellular maintenance may go forward incrementally even below the eutectic of seawater (-55°C). Microbes are also known to alter the physical properties of their icy homes by producing exopolymers that further depress the freezing point, either directly or by entraining more salt into the ice. Even the most inhospitable of ices to human hunters may contain interior oases for microbes, in control to some degree of their own space. In considering the habitability of icy worlds beyond Earth, we'd do well to learn more about the evolutionary prowess of microbes in adapting to conditions beyond our warm-blooded imaginations.

  15. Multiwalled ice helixes and ice nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaeil; Wang, Jun; Zeng, X. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report six phases of high-density nano-ice predicted to form within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high pressure. High-density nano-ice self-assembled within smaller-diameter CNT (17,0) exhibits a double-walled helical structure where the outer wall consists of four double-stranded helixes, which resemble a DNA double helix, and the inner wall is a quadruple-stranded helix. Four other double-walled nano-ices, self-assembled respectively in two larger-diameter CNTs (20,0 and 22,0), display tubular structure. Within CNT (24,0), the confined water can freeze spontaneously into a triple-walled helical nano-ice where the outer wall is an 18-stranded helix and the middle and inner walls are hextuple-stranded helixes. PMID:17170136

  16. Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Cotton, Barbara J.; Choo, Yung K.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Pennline, James A.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Slater, John W.; Burke, Kevin M.; Nolan, Gerald J.; Brown, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    SmaggIce version 1.2 is a computer program for preparing and analyzing iced airfoils. It includes interactive tools for (1) measuring ice-shape characteristics, (2) controlled smoothing of ice shapes, (3) curve discretization, (4) generation of artificial ice shapes, and (5) detection and correction of input errors. Measurements of ice shapes are essential for establishing relationships between characteristics of ice and effects of ice on airfoil performance. The shape-smoothing tool helps prepare ice shapes for use with already available grid-generation and computational-fluid-dynamics software for studying the aerodynamic effects of smoothed ice on airfoils. The artificial ice-shape generation tool supports parametric studies since ice-shape parameters can easily be controlled with the artificial ice. In such studies, artificial shapes generated by this program can supplement simulated ice obtained from icing research tunnels and real ice obtained from flight test under icing weather condition. SmaggIce also automatically detects geometry errors such as tangles or duplicate points in the boundary which may be introduced by digitization and provides tools to correct these. By use of interactive tools included in SmaggIce version 1.2, one can easily characterize ice shapes and prepare iced airfoils for grid generation and flow simulations.

  17. Dynamic analysis of a pre-and-post ice impacted blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, G. H.; Reddy, E. S.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of an engine blade are evaluated under pre-and-post ice impact conditions using the NASA in-house computer code BLASIM. The ice impacts the leading edge of the blade causing severe local damage. The local structural response of the blade due to the ice impact is predicted via a transient response analysis by modeling only a local patch around the impact region. After ice impact, the global geometry of the blade is updated using deformations of the local patch and a free vibration analysis is performed. The effects of ice impact location, ice size and ice velocity on the blade mode shapes and natural frequencies are investigated. The results indicate that basic nature of the mode shapes remains unchanged after impact and that the maximum variation in natural frequencies occurs for the twisting mode of the blade.

  18. Centaur boost pump turbine icing investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine if ice formation in the Centaur vehicle liquid oxygen boost pump turbine could prevent rotation of the pump and whether or not this phenomenon could have been the failure mechanism for the Titan/Centaur vehicle TC-1. The investigation consisted of a series of tests done in the LeRC Space Power Chamber Facility to evaluate evaporative cooling behavior patterns in a turbine as a function of the quantity of water trapped in the turbine and as a function of the vehicle ascent pressure profile. It was found that evaporative freezing of water in the turbine housing, due to rapid depressurization within the turbine during vehicle ascent, could result in the formation of ice that would block the turbine and prevent rotation of the boost pump. But for such icing conditions to exist it would be necessary to have significant quantities of water in the turbine and/or its components, and the turbine housing temperature would have to be colder than 40 F at vehicle liftoff.

  19. 75 FR 4100 - Affirmative Fair Housing, Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Multifamily Housing, Affirmative Fair Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Affirmative Fair Housing, Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Multifamily Housing, Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Single Family Housing and Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan... forms to describe their intent for marketing to ensure that they meet the Fair Housing...

  20. Prospecting for Martian Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, S. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bell, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    During high Martian obliquity, ice is stable to lower latitudes than predicted by models of present conditions and observed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (approx. 60 deg N). An ice-rich layer deposited at mid-latitudes could persist to the present day; ablation of the top 1 m of ice leaving a thin insulating cover could account for lack of its detection by GRS. The presence of an ice-layer in the mid-latitudes is suggested by a network of polygons, interpreted as ice-wedge cracks. This study focuses on an exceptional concentration of polygons in Western Utopia (section of Casius quadrangle, roughly 40 deg - 50 deg N, 255 deg - 300 deg W). We attempt to determine the thickness and age of this ice layer through crater-polygons relations.

  1. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  2. Naled ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schohl, G. A.; Ettema, R.

    1986-02-01

    Based on theoretical formulation and dimensional analysis, supported by the results of laboratory experiments, a theory and a detailed description of naled ice growth are presented. The theory, concepts, and data should be of interest to engineers concerned with the effects of naleds (also referred to as aufeis or icings) on engineering works. The growth of a two dimensional, or laterally confined (flume), naled is shown to depend primarily on seven, independent, dimensionless parameters. The early, two dimensional, phase of growth, a naled consists of a mixture of ice and water, or ice-water slush, forming on a frigid base. The influence of two of the three remaining parameters is not felt until after a transition time has passed. The continuing, cyclic process by which slush layers form and eventually freeze results in the ice laminations that are a feature of naled ice.

  3. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  4. Improved poultry house

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of energy and poultry production was explored in three areas: methane production from litter, broiler house insulation, and broiler house HVAC systems. The findings show that while a methane plant would not be popular with individual American poultry producers; the pay back in fuel and fertilizer, if the plant was located in close proximinity to the processing plant, would be favorable. Broiler house insulation has been dramatically improved since the outset of this study. Presently, all new installations in the survey area are the Environmental houses which are fully insulated. HVAC systems have had to keep pace with the introduction of better insulation. The new Environmental houses HVAC systems are fully automated and operating on a positive atmosphere principal. Ammonia and other problems have been kept in check while reducing air changes per house from a high of 7 per hour to as little as 3 per hour.

  5. NASA Tech House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Technology Utilization House, called Tech House, was designed and constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, to demonstrate new technology that is available or will be available in the next several years and how the application of aerospace technology could help advance the homebuilding industry. Solar energy use, energy and water conservation, safety, security, and cost were major considerations in adapting the aerospace technology to the construction of Tech House.

  6. House-Dust Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:21286201

  7. An ice lithography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  8. Ice age paleotopography

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, W.R. )

    1994-07-08

    A gravitationally self-consistent theory of postglacial relative sea level change is used to infer the variation of surface ice and water cover since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results show that LGM ice volume was approximately 35 percent lower than suggested by the CLIMAP reconstruction and the maximum heights of the main Laurentian and Fennoscandian ice complexes are inferred to have been commensurately lower with respect to sea level. Use of these Ice Age boundary conditions in atmospheric general circulation models will yield climates that differ significantly from those previously inferred on the basis of the CLIMAP data set.

  9. An ice lithography instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  10. An ice lithography instrument.

    PubMed

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J A

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  11. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  12. An ice lithography instrument

    PubMed Central

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  13. Arctic Sea Ice Maximum 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice: September 2010 to March 2011: Scientists tracking the annual maximum extent of Arctic sea ice said that 2011 was among the lowest ice extents measured since satellites began ...

  14. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  15. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second

  16. Commercial aviation icing research requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koegeboehn, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    A short range and long range icing research program was proposed. A survey was made to various industry and goverment agencies to obtain their views of needs for commercial aviation ice protection. Through these responsed, other additional data, and Douglas Aircraft icing expertise; an assessment of the state-of-the-art of aircraft icing data and ice protection systems was made. The information was then used to formulate the icing research programs.

  17. Ndebele Inspired Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The house paintings of the South African Ndebele people are more than just an attempt to improve the aesthetics of a community; they are a source of identity and significance for Ndebele women. In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students use the tradition of Ndebele house painting as inspiration for creating their own…

  18. Housing for Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Patricia L.; Schuh, John H.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that housing administrators must develop close cooperation with their institution's graduate school, be sensitive to the needs of international graduate students, and engage in thoughtful deliberation about issues related to domestic partners, health care, spouses, and children. Profiles housing's mission and philosophy, organizational…

  19. Supportive housing and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jade; Cunningham, David; Anderson, Solanna; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Urban centres in the US, Britain and Canada have responded to identified visible 'social problems' such addiction, mental health and homelessness by providing some supportive housing for the urban poor and marginalized. While some critics have questioned what supportive housing specifically entails in terms of the built environment, what remains under explored, though a growing area of concern, is the relationship between surveillance and supportive housing for urban residents identified as having addiction and mental health problems - a gap addressed in this paper. Drawing upon qualitative ethnographic observational data we examine some of the measures of control and coercion that are encroaching into social housing primarily established for poor and marginalized people with addiction and mental health problems in the urban centre of Vancouver, Canada. We witnessed three modes of regulation and control, that vary widely, among the residencies observed: physical surveillance technologies; site-specific modes of coercion; police presence and staff surveillance, which all together impact the everyday lives of residents living in low-income and supportive housing. We argue that supportive housing has the potential to provide its intended commitment - safe and secure affordable housing. However, owing to an (over)emphasis on 'security', the supportive housing we observed were also sites of social control. PMID:27453148

  20. More Than a House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonelli, Richard

    1996-01-01

    For 14 years, Mountain Outreach, a program at Cumberland College (Williamsburg, Kentucky), has enabled college students to participate in community service projects. Recently, 35 students traveled to New Mexico to build a house for a Navajo elder who was unable to obtain adequate housing. Participants discuss their learning experiences and their…

  1. Housing Assistance Efficiency Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Peters, Scott H. [D-CA-52

    2013-07-23

    12/03/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott; Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  3. Academic Airframe Icing Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Mike; Rothmayer, Alric; Thompson, David

    2009-01-01

    2-D ice accretion and aerodynamics reasonably well understood for engineering applications To significantly improve our current capabilities we need to understand 3-D: a) Important ice accretion physics and modeling not well understood in 3-D; and b) Aerodynamics unsteady and 3-D especially near stall. Larger systems issues important and require multidisciplinary team approach

  4. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  5. Fire beneath the ice

    SciTech Connect

    Monastersky, R.

    1993-02-13

    A volcano discovered six years ago by researchers Blankenship and Bell under Antarctica poses questions about a potential climatic catastrophe. The researchers claim that the volcano is still active, erupting occasionally and growing. A circular depression on the surface of the ice sheet has ice flowing into it and is used to provide a portrait of the heat source. The volcano is on a critical transition zone within West Antarctica with fast flowing ice streams directly downhill. Work by Blankenship shows that a soft layer of water-logged sediments called till provide the lubricating layer on the underside of the ice streams. Volcanos may provide the source of this till. The ice streams buffer the thick interior ice from the ocean and no one know what will happen if the ice streams continue to shorten. These researchers believe their results indicate that the stability of West Antarctica ultimately depends less on the current climate than on the location of heat and sediments under the ice and the legacy of past climatic changes.

  6. Larsen B Ice Shelf

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... ice shelf and the rough crevasses of glaciers appear orange. In contrast to the spectral composite, which provides information on ... surfaces appear brighter on their illuminated faces, the orange color in the multi-angle composite suggests a macroscopically rough ice ...

  7. Ice forming experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.

    1982-01-01

    A low gravity experiment to assess the effect of the presence of supercooled cloud droplets on the diffusional growth rate of ice crystals is described. The theoretical work and the feasibility studies are summarized. The nucleation of ice crystals in supercooled clouds is also discussed.

  8. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  9. Amery Ice Shelf

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Amery Ice Shelf's "Loose Tooth" Gets Looser     View Larger Image The Amery Ice Shelf is an important dynamic system responsible for draining about 16% of ... glaciers. Mass loss from the system occurs through basal melting and iceberg calving. These images from the Multi-angle Imaging ...

  10. Rheology of glacier ice.

    PubMed

    Jezek, K C; Alley, R B; Thomas, R H

    1985-03-15

    A new method for calculating the stress field in bounded ice shelves is used to compare strain rate and deviatoric stress on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The analysis shows that strain rate (per second) increases as the third power of deviatoric stress (in newtons per square meter), with a constant of proportionality equal to 2.3 x 10(-25). PMID:17793768

  11. Boltless Seal for Electronic Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawe, R. H.; Evans, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Spring clips seal housings for electronic circuitry, preventing electromagnetic interference from entering or leaving housings. Clips also keep dust out of housing. Since no bolts are used, housing can be opened quickly; unlike bolts, clips can be used on thin-walled housing. Seal was developed for an X-band array amplifier.

  12. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  13. Overview of LIMEX'87 ice observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, Frank D.; Holt, Benjamin; Argus, Susan A. Digby; Collins, Michael J.; Livingstone, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Ice observations, results, and conclusions are summarized for the March 1987 Labrador Ice Margin Experiment (LIMEX'87), an international oceanographic study conducted in the pack ice of the Grand Banks area off the coast of Newfoundland. Included are the ice extent, floe size and thickness, ice kinematics and rheology, ice microwave properties, oceanic properties under the ice, and penetration of swell into the ice.

  14. 1. HOUSE, VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SUMMER KITCHEN AND SMOKE HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. HOUSE, VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SUMMER KITCHEN AND SMOKE HOUSE ARE IN THE BACKGROUND - Kiel Farmstead, House, East side State Route 4, one half mile south of U.S. Route 64, Mascoutah, St. Clair County, IL

  15. 4. Storage building, outhouse, oil house, keeper's house and light ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Storage building, outhouse, oil house, keeper's house and light tower, view southwest, northeast sides (southeast and northeast sides of keeper's house) - Petit Manan Light Station, 2.5 miles south of Petit Manan Point, Milbridge, Washington County, ME

  16. SMILES ice cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MilláN, L.; Read, W.; Kasai, Y.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N.; Mendrok, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sano, T.; Shiotani, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor and clouds play an important role in Earth's climate, but knowledge of them, in particular diurnal variation in deep convective clouds, is limited. An essential variable to understand them is cloud ice water content. The Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS) samples the atmosphere at different local times allowing the study of diurnal variability of atmospheric parameters. We describe a new ice cloud data set consisting of partial Ice Water Path and Ice Water Content. Preliminary comparisons with EOS-MLS, CloudSat-CPR and CALIOP-CALIPSO are presented. Then, the diurnal variation over land and over open ocean for partial ice water path is reported. Over land, a pronounced diurnal variation peaking strongly in the afternoon/early evening was found. Over the open ocean, little temporal dependence was encountered. This data set is publicly available for download in HDF5 format.

  17. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  18. Polarimetric road ice detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Krista

    This thesis investigated the science behind polarimetric road ice detection systems. Laboratory Mueller matrix measurements of a simulated road under differing surface conditions were collected searching for a discriminatory polarization property. These Mueller matrices were decomposed into depolarization, diattenuation, and retardance. Individual sample surface polarization properties were then calculated from these three unique matrices and compared. Specular and off-specular reflection responses of each sample were collected. Four polarization properties stood out for having high separation between dry and iced measurements: Depolarization Index, Linear Diattenuation, Linear Polarizance, and Linear Retardance. Through our investigation polarimetric ice detection is possible. Continued research of the polarization properties of road ice can result in the development of a road ice detection system. Proposed deployment methods of such a system have been outlined following the analysis of the data collected in this experiment.

  19. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  20. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  1. Climate science: Ice streams waned as ice sheets shrank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briner, Jason P.

    2016-02-01

    It emerges that ice discharge from a major ice sheet did not increase rapidly at the end of the most recent ice age. The finding points to steady, not catastrophic, ice-sheet loss and sea-level rise on millennial timescales. See Letter p.322

  2. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

    2005-03-08

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  3. Icing Cloud Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Robert F.; Oldenburg, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The icing research tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center underwent a major rehabilitation in 1999, necessitating recalibration of the icing clouds. This report describes the methods used in the recalibration, including the procedure used to establish a uniform icing cloud and the use of a standard icing blade technique for measurement of liquid water content. The instruments and methods used to perform the droplet size calibration are also described. The liquid water content/droplet size operating envelopes of the icing tunnel are shown for a range of airspeeds and compared to the FAA icing certification criteria. The capabilities of the IRT to produce large droplet icing clouds is also detailed.

  4. Analysis of iced wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Chen, H. H.; Kaups, K.; Schimke, S.; Shin, J.

    1992-01-01

    A method for computing ice shapes along the leading edge of a wing and a method for predicting its aerodynamic performance degradation due to icing is described. Ice shapes are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code which was developed for airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered ice wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  5. Skylab floating ice experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Ramseier, R. O.; Weaver, R. J.; Weeks, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Coupling of the aircraft data with the ground truth observations proved to be highly successful with interesting results being obtained with IR and SLAR passive microwave techniques, and standard photography. Of particular interest were the results of the PMIS system which operated at 10.69 GHz with both vertical and horizontal polarizations. This was the first time that dual polarized images were obtained from floating ice. In both sea and lake ice, it was possible to distinguish a wide variety of thin ice types because of their large differences in brightness temperatures. It was found that the higher brightness temperature was invariably obtained in the vertically polarized mode, and as the age of the ice increases the brightness temperature increases in both polarizations. Associated with this change in age, the difference in temperature was observed as the different polarizations decreased. It appears that the horizontally polarized data is the most sensitive to variations in ice type for both fresh water and sea ice. The study also showed the great amount of information on ice surface roughness and deformation patterns that can be obtained from X-band SLAR observations.

  6. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  7. Generation of Palaeoproterozoic tonalites and associated high-K granites in southwestern Tanzania by partial melting of underplated mafic crust in an intracontinental setting: Constraints from geochemical and isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manya, Shukrani; Maboko, Makenya A. H.

    2016-09-01

    The southwestern part of the 2.0-1.8 Ga Palaeoproterozoic Usagaran Belt in the Njombe area of SW Tanzania is intruded by two types of synchronous granitic rocks with different chemical and petrological characteristics. The first type consists of hornblende-rich tonalites that have major element compositions similar to those of Archaean TTG but differ significantly in their trace element composition. The tonalites are spatially and closely associated with felsic, high-K, I-type granites, some of which are gneissic and/or aplitic. U-Pb zircon geochronology shows that the emplacement of tonalites at 1887 ± 11 Ma was largely contemporaneous with emplacement of high-K granitic gneisses at 1877 ± 15 Ma and aplitic granites at 1857 ± 19 Ma. The data also reveal the presence of Archaean crust of 2648 ± 25 Ma in the zircon cores of some samples in the otherwise Palaeoproterozoic terrane. The tonalites are characterized by MgO contents of 1.60-4.11 wt.% at a SiO2 range of 58.1-67.9 wt.%, the Mg# of 34-55, lower Sr contents (220-462 ppm) and less fractionated REE patterns (La/YbCN = 3.55-12.9) compared to Archaean TTG (Sr > 500 ppm, La/YbCN > 20). These features, coupled with the εNd (1887 Ma) values of + 0.37 to - 0.66 as well as the associated mafic enclaves are suggestive of derivation of the tonalites by low pressure (below the garnet stability) partial melting of a mantle-derived mafic underplate that was subsequently contaminated with small amounts of pre-existing igneous crustal rocks. The evolved nature of the high-K granites (MgO = 0.20-1.30 wt.%, SiO2 = 65.5-73.9 wt.%, Mg# = 25-42, εNd = - 3.20 to - 4.75) coupled with old TDM ages which are 200-1000 Ma older than their emplacement age requires a higher degree of assimilation of older crustal material by the magma derived from partial melting of the underplated mafic crust which was subsequently followed by crystal fractionation involving plagioclase, pyroxene and amphibole. The close spatial and temporal

  8. Dynamic analysis of a pre-and-post ice impacted blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, G. H.; Reddy, E. S.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of an engine blade are evaluated under pre-and-post ice impact conditions using the NASA in-house computer code BLASIM. The ice impacts the leading edge of the blade causing severe local damage. The local structural response of the blade due to the ice impact is predicted via a transient response analysis by modeling only a local patch around the impact region. After ice impact, the global geometry of the blade is updated using deformations of the local patch and a free vibration analysis is performed. The effects of ice impact location, size and ice velocity on the blade mode shapes and natural frequencies are investigated. The results indicate that basic nature of the mode shapes remains unchanged after impact and that the maximum variation in natural frequencies occurs for the twisting mode of the blade.

  9. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  10. Strength of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    In order to model the evolution and current state of Callisto and Ganymede (Jupiter's two largest moons), which are similar in mass, density, temperature, and apparent composition (about 75% ice by volume) but different in appearance, we are studying the flow properties of ice under extreme conditions. With our new testing apparatus, we have determined that ice is very much weaker at low temperatures (below 160 K) than had been believed. This finding partially explains some of the unusual features found on these Jovian moons, although many questions are still being investigated.

  11. An ice shelf breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Fahnestock, M.

    1996-02-09

    Glaciers and ice sheets are controlled by the climate and must change if the conditions that led to their current configurations are changing. These ice masses exist at the interface between the atmosphere, which provides sustaining snowfall and thermal regulation, and the land, which provides a stable base and in many cases the elevation required to reach suitably cold conditions. Ice sheets and glaciers are distributed around the globe and can serve as potential indicators of past climate variability and current climatic trends. 9 refs.

  12. Ice nucleation terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; DeMott, P.; Möhler, O.; Whale, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  13. Observing Radiative Properties of a Thinner, Seasonal Arctic Ice Pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, S. R.; Nicolaus, M.; Granskog, M.; Gerland, S.; Wang, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic is coming to be dominated by young ice, much of it seasonal. Many of our observations of the radiative properties of sea ice come from drifting stations on thick, multi-year ice. To better understand the Arctic climate system in a warmer world, we need more data about the radiative properties and their seasonal and spatial variability on thinner, younger ice. Since this younger ice is not always thick enough to support lengthy drifting stations, there is a need for new technologies to help us get optical measurements on seasonal ice. One challenge is obtaining seasonal data on ice that is too weak to support even a ship-based camp, and especially to have these observations extend well into the melt season. For these situations, we have developed a spectral radiation monitoring buoy that can be deployed during a one-day ice station, and that can then autonomously observe the spectral albedo and transmittance of the sea ice, transmitting all data in near real time by satellite, until the buoy melts out. Similar installations at manned or regularly visited sites have provided good data, with surprisingly few data-quality problems due to frost, precipitation, or tilting. The buoys consist of 3 spectral radiometers, covering wavelengths 350 to 800 nm, and a datalogger with an Irridium modem. The datalogger and necessary batteries are inside a sealed housing which is frozen into a hole drilled in the ice. Arms extend from both the top and bottom of the housing, holding sensors that measure incident, reflected, and transmitted spectra. The under-ice radiometer is equipped with a bioshutter to avoid algal growth on the sensor. They will be deployed alongside ice mass balance buoys, providing data about the physical development of the ice and snow, as well as position. While the buoys provide an excellent record of diurnal, synoptic, and seasonal variability, they are fixed to one location in the ice, so other methods are still needed for measuring the spatial

  14. Ice Stream Dynamics during Deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, C.; Margold, M.; Clark, C.

    2014-12-01

    Ice streams can rapidly drain large sectors of ice sheet interiors. At present, they account for approximately 50% and 90% of the mass loss from Greenland and Antarctica, respectively, but there are concerns over recent increases in ice discharge. This has been linked to atmospheric and oceanic warming, but the longer-term implications for ice sheet deglaciation are less clear. A key question is whether the activity of ice streams is predictably linked to climate-driven ice sheet mass balance, or whether their activity might accelerate deglaciation. To explore this, we analyse ice streaming during deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) from ~18 to ~7 ka. Following a recent mapping inventory, we bracket the timing of >100 ice streams using published ice margin chronologies. At the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), ice streams formed a drainage network similar to modern ice sheets. Numerous ice streams were located in topographic troughs and likely operated for thousands of years from the LGM. These drained the marine-based sectors of the northern and eastern margins of the ice sheet until ~11 ka and show a degree of spatial self-organisation. Other ice streams operated on much shorter time-scales and turned on and off, perhaps in as little as a few hundred years. These include large ice streams that switched positions over sedimentary bedrock at the western and southern terrestrial margins until ~13 ka. As the LIS retreated onto its low-relief and predominantly crystalline bedrock interior (after ~11 ka), a smaller number of large ice streams operated that were very wide (50-100 km), and have no modern analogue. Overall, the number of ice streams decreased during deglaciation and they drained a smaller proportion of the ice sheet margin: 30% at the LGM (similar to present-day Antarctica), 15% at 12 ka, and 12% at 10 ka. We use simple scaling relationships to estimate the mass loss delivered by ice streams and examine their role during deglaciation.

  15. Climate Data Records (CDRs) for Ice Motion and Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschudi, M. A.; Fowler, C.; Maslanik, J. A.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Climate Data Records (CDRs) for remotely-sensed Arctic sea ice motion and sea ice age are under development by our group at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The ice motion product, archived at NSIDC, has a considerable history of use, while sea ice age is a relatively new product. Our technique to estimate sea ice motion utilizes images from SSM/I, as well as SMMR and the series of AVHRR sensors to estimate the daily motion of ice parcels. This method is augmented by incorporating ice motion observations from the network of drifting buoys deployed as part of the International Arctic Buoy Program. Our technique to calculate ice age relies on following the actual age of the ice for each ice parcel, categorizing the parcel as first-year ice, second-year, ice, etc. based on how many summer melt seasons the ice parcel survives. Both of these research-grade products have been interpolated onto 25x25 km grid points spanning the entire Arctic Ocean using the Equal-Area Scalable Earth (EASE) grid. Datasets generated from this program have shown that the Arctic ice cover has experienced a significant (> 70%) decline in multiyear ice over the last 20 years, leaving a younger ice cover in 2011. By comparing ice age derived by the Lagrangian tracking method to ice thickness estimated by Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data, it is observed that ice age is linearly related to ice thickness, up to an age of 10 years. Therefore, the shift in dominance of multiyear ice to first-year ice relates to a significant thinning of the ice. This thinning is estimated to correspond to a 40% reduction in ice volume in the last 20 years. An ancillary dataset (APP-X) produced by the University of Wisconsin, Madison has been combined with the ice motion product to monitor the properties of the sea ice parcels tracked by the ice motion product. This dataset includes ice surface and 2-meter air temperature, albedo, downwelling shortwave

  16. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  17. Advances in ice mechanics - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.S.; Hallam, S.D.; Maatanen, M.; Sinha, N.K.; Sodhi, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the interaction of icebergs with offshore platforms. Topics considered at the symposium included advances in ice mechanics in the United Kingdom, ice mechanics in Finland, recent advances in ice mechanics in Canada, advances in sea ice mechanics in the USA, foundations, monitoring, hazards, risk assessment, and deformation.

  18. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  19. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  20. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  1. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  2. Ice interaction with offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cammaert, A.B.; Muggeridge, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Oil platforms and other offshore structures being built in the arctic regions must be able to withstand icebergs, ice islands, and pack ice. This reference explain the effect ice has on offshore structures and demonstrates design and construction methods that allow such structures to survive in harsh, ice-ridden environments. It analyzes the characteristics of sea ice as well as dynamic ice forces on structures. Techniques for ice modeling and field testing facilitate the design and construction of sturdy, offshore constructions. Computer programs included.

  3. Future Arctic sea ice extent: less in summer but more in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann-Campe, Kathrin; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    Arctic sea ice property distributions and their variability are of great interest to various groups. For example the Barents and Kara Sea and the area off the western coast of Greenland are deemed to be especially important for oil and gas extraction over the next few decades. We analyse the development of arctic sea ice with the focus on these regions within the ACCESS (Arctic Climate Change, Economics and Society) project. They are mostly covered by relatively thin single-year ice in winter and few or none ice in summer due to melting and sea ice transport. The change of these properties under the influence of increasing green house gases until 2040 is part of our analysis. Within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) more than 30 global climate GCMs (general circulation models) provide sea ice parameters for historical simulations and possible future warming scenarios. A comparison of the historical simulations with satellite-derived sea ice fields is used to identify the range of GCM sea ice distribution and variability. The winter sea ice edge was situated in the southern Barents Sea during 1979-2005. For this time period, several CMIP5 models overestimate the ice coverage in the Barents Sea and thus overestimate the seasonal variability. We use a cost function approach to filter out the six best-performing GCMs in terms of sea ice concentration in the selected regions. The variability between the so filtered GCMs is still large: (i) The model variability is shown by the fact that all six models agree on decreasing mean sea ice thickness until 2040. However, they do not agree on the strength of the decrease. (ii) The strength of the natural variability varies with the models. (iii) There is no clear distinction between the two future scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5, which differ in the amount of green house gas emissions. The mean sea ice thickness seems to develop independently of this strength in the scenarios. However strong the

  4. Housing Characteristics, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-14

    This report on energy consumption in the residential sector covers the following topics: housing trends 1980--1990, new housing trends, availability and usage of natural gas by households, changes in appliance usage (refrigerators, entertainment appliances, cooking appliances, convenience appliances), age of major household appliances and equipment, household energy conservation activities, demand-side management programs, and a portrait of households using solar or wood as a source of energy.

  5. Housing in Los Angeles: Affordable Housing for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Blue Ribbon Committee for Affordable Housing, CA.

    A 1988 mayoral committee assessed the seriousness of Los Angeles (California) housing problems and found that the city's housing efforts were sufficient in the 1960s, when the Federal Government took primary responsibility for housing and the average wage was adequate to support the cost of the average house or apartment. However, the following…

  6. 2. Keeper's house, light tower and oil house, view north, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Keeper's house, light tower and oil house, view north, south and east sides of keeper's house, south side of tower and oil house - Owl's Head Light Station, Off State Highway 73 just east of Rockland on Owl's Head Bay, Owls Head, Knox County, ME

  7. 91. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SCRAP HOUSE AND CAST HOUSE, BUILDINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SCRAP HOUSE AND CAST HOUSE, BUILDINGS 101 AND 72; BUILDING 101 IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH HOUSED SCRAP METAL CLEANING AND PROCESSING FACILITIES; BUILDING 72 AT RIGHT CENTER HOUSED MELTING FURNACES AND CONTINUOUS CASTING MACHINERY - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  8. 1. General view, twoandahalf story house at left. (The house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view, two-and-a-half story house at left. (The house next door is George McCraig House, HABS No. PA-1593). Photocopied from December 1957 photograph on file at Philadelphia Historical Commission - Henry Elwell House, 812 South Front Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 12. Fuel house and fog signal house, view northeast, southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Fuel house and fog signal house, view northeast, southwest side of fuel house, west and south sides of fog signal house - Cape Elizabeth Light Station, Near Two Lights State Park at end of Two Lights Road, off State Highway 77, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, ME

  10. 7. Keeper's house, fog signal house and light tower, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Keeper's house, fog signal house and light tower, view north northeast, west and south sides of keeper's house and tower, southwest and southeast sides of fog signal house - West Quoddy Head Light Station, At eastern tip of West Quaddy Head, Lubec, Washington County, ME

  11. 3. Bell house, light tower and keeper's house, view west, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Bell house, light tower and keeper's house, view west, southeast side and northeast front of bell house, southeast sides of tower and keeper's house - Burnt Coat Harbor Light Station, At Hackamock Head on Swan's Island opposite Harbor Island at entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Hancock County, ME

  12. Housing and child health.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, Michael; Baten, Ahmareen; Rosenthal, David G; Hoshino, Risa; Tohn, Ellen; Jacobs, David E

    2013-09-01

    The connection between housing and health is well established. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the child's home, such as cleanliness, moisture, pests, noise, accessibility, injury risks, and other forms of housing environmental quality, all have the potential to influence multiple aspects of the health and development of children. Basic sanitation, reduced household crowding, other improvements in housing and expanded, and improved housing regulations have led to advances in children's health. For example, lead poisoning prevention policies have profoundly reduced childhood lead exposure in the United States. This and many other successes highlight the health benefits for families, particularly children, by targeting interventions that reduce or eliminate harmful exposures in the home. Additionally, parental mental health problems, food insecurity, domestic violence, and the presence of guns in children's homes all are largely experienced by children in their homes, which are not as yet considered part of the Healthy Homes agenda. There is a large movement and now a regulatory structure being put in place for healthy housing, which is becoming closely wedded with environmental health, public health, and the practice of pediatrics. The importance of homes in children's lives, history of healthy homes, asthma, and exposures to lead, carbon monoxide, secondhand/thirdhand smoke, radon, allergy triggers is discussed, as well as how changes in ambient temperature, increased humidity, poor ventilation, water quality, infectious diseases, housing structure, guns, electronic media, family structure, and domestic violence all affect children's health. PMID:23953987

  13. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  14. Ross Ice Shelf

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... funded by the National Science Foundation, several penguin colonies near the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica have not been able to ... affected include one of Antarctica's most populous Adelie penguin colonies, as well as a small colony of Emperor penguins. These ...

  15. Ice age terminations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S; Denton, George H; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-01

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2. PMID:19815769

  16. Ice Age Terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-01

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2.

  17. Molecules on ice

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, D.C.

    1996-03-15

    The ozone hole that forms in the spring months over the Antarctic is thought to be produced through a network of chemical reactions catalyzed by the surfaces of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A reaction between chlorine reservoir molecules, such as HCl + ClONO{sub 2} > HNO{sub 3} + Cl{sub 2}, is kinetically forbidden in the gas phase but proceeds quickly on the surface of ice and produces Cl{sub 2} molecules that are photodissociated by sunlight to yield the Cl atoms that destroy ozone. This destructive chain of events begins when HCl molecules stick to the ice crystals, and the mechanism for this crucial sticking process has been the subject of much debate. Recent work describes a mechanism that explains how HCl sticks to ice. This article goes on to detail research focusing surface reactions in stratospheric chemistry. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  19. Ice reconnaissance by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Strome, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the significant milestones in the use of satellites for snow and ice monitoring. The feasibility of such monitoring was demonstrated by the Tiros 2 satellite in 1961. Nimbus 1 showed that breaks in the sea ice can be easily monitored during continuous nighttime conditions; Nimbus 3 showed the practicality of delineating regions of active melting of ice and snow in temperate areas. Landsat data have been found to be particularly useful for monitoring and studying glaciers and their attendant surface features. Ice concentration can be determined with reasonable accuracy from a sequence of electronically scanned microwave radiomenter images made aboard Nimbus 5. In the future we can expect improved sensors and spacecraft systems with longer operating lives.

  20. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  1. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  2. Antarctic stratospheric ice crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J. ); Toon, O.B.; Pueschel, R.F.; Snetsinger, K.G. ) Verma, S. )

    1989-11-30

    Ice crystals were replicated over the Palmer Peninsula at approximately 72{degree}S on six occasions during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The sampling altitude was between 12.5 and 18.5 km (45-65 thousand ft pressure altitude) with the temperature between 190 and 201 K. The atmosphere was subsaturated with respect to ice in all cases. The collected crystals were predominantly solid and hollow columns. The largest crystals were sampled at lower altitudes where the potential temperature was below 400 K. While the crystals were larger than anticipated, their low concentration results in a total surface area that is less than one tenth of the total aerosol surface area. The large ice crystals may play an important role in the observed stratospheric dehydration processes through sedimentation. Evidence of scavenging of submicron particles further suggests that the ice crystals may be effective in the removal of stratospheric chemicals.

  3. Layered kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  4. Evolution of crystal fabric: Ice-Age ice versus Holocene ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J. H.; Pettit, E. C.

    2009-12-01

    Ice-Age ice has smaller crystals and higher concentrations of impurities than Holocene ice; these properties cause it to develop a more strongly-aligned crystal-orientation fabric. In many regions of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, the Ice-Age ice is now at depth and its flow properties may dominate the ice flow patterns, particularly where sliding is minimal. We use a fabric evolution model, based on that developed by Thorsteinsson (2002), to explore the evolution of Ice-Age ice fabric along particle paths for ice within Taylor Glacier, a cold-based outlet glacier of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The bulk of the ice within Taylor Glacier consists of Ice-Age and older ice because the Holocene ice has ablated away (there is no Holocene ice remaining within 25km of the terminus, Aciego, 2007). We initialize the evolving fabric based on fabric measurements from Taylor Dome where available (DiPrinzio, 2003) and other ice core records. We compare model results with thin-section data from shallow cores taken near the terminus. As expected, crystal alignment strengthens along the ice particle path. Due to lateral shearing along valley walls and the ice cliffs (terminal ice cliffs are cold in winter and present a resistance to flow), a tilted single maximum is common near the terminus. The highly-aligned fabric of Ice-Age ice is significantly softer than Holocene ice in simple shear parallel to the bed, this softness not only results in faster flow rates for glaciers and ice sheets such as Taylor, but creates a climate-flow-fabric feedback loop through concentrating ice-sheet flow within the Ice-Age ice. Thorsteinsson, T. (2002), Fabric development with nearest-neighbor interaction and dynamic recrystallization, J. Geophys. Res., 107(B1), 2014, doi:10.1029/2001JB000244. S.M. Aciego, K.M. Cuffey, J.L. Kavanaugh, D.L. Morse, J.P. Severinghaus, Pleistocene ice and paleo-strain rates at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, Quaternary Research, Volume 68, Issue 3, November 2007

  5. GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the Guard House and Barracks, and South Fire House in relation to nearby roads, railroad tracks, and the piers). Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. P.W. Drawing No. C-1899, approved 1941; file no. 930-C-1. Scale one inch to forty feet. 72 cn x 97 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  6. Ice sheets. Volume loss from Antarctic ice shelves is accelerating.

    PubMed

    Paolo, Fernando S; Fricker, Helen A; Padman, Laurie

    2015-04-17

    The floating ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic Ice Sheet restrain the grounded ice-sheet flow. Thinning of an ice shelf reduces this effect, leading to an increase in ice discharge to the ocean. Using 18 years of continuous satellite radar altimeter observations, we have computed decadal-scale changes in ice-shelf thickness around the Antarctic continent. Overall, average ice-shelf volume change accelerated from negligible loss at 25 ± 64 cubic kilometers per year for 1994-2003 to rapid loss of 310 ± 74 cubic kilometers per year for 2003-2012. West Antarctic losses increased by ~70% in the past decade, and earlier volume gain by East Antarctic ice shelves ceased. In the Amundsen and Bellingshausen regions, some ice shelves have lost up to 18% of their thickness in less than two decades. PMID:25814064

  7. Ice-shell purification of ice-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig J; Basu, Koli; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-affinity purification is a simple and efficient method of purifying to homogeneity both natural and recombinant ice-binding proteins. The purification involves the incorporation of ice-binding proteins into slowly-growing ice and the exclusion of other proteins and solutes. In previous approaches, the ice was grown around a hollow brass finger through which coolant was circulated. We describe here an easily-constructed apparatus that employs ice affinity purification that not only shortens the time for purification from 1-2 days to 1-2 h, but also enhances yield and purity. In this apparatus, the surface area for the separation was increased by extracting the ice-binding proteins into an ice-shell formed inside a rotating round-bottom flask partially submerged in a sub-zero bath. In principle, any ice-binding compound can be recovered from liquid solution, and the method is readily scalable. PMID:27025155

  8. The Relationship Between the Temperature in the HIMURO Type Cooling Storage House and Cooling Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiyama, Masayoshi

    Snow and ice are the cold heat energy resources in snowy country. They are supplied during every winter seasons and free from environmental pollution. In the previous paper, the author had proposed a design method of the cold storage house for agricultural products cooled by the cold heat source of natural snow /ice in the winter. This type cold storage house has been called as HIMURO type storage house and has been used widely in snowy country. As there are some cases that the storing products are changed or much products are temporarily stored than the initial thermal capacity, in this paper, the author investigated the temperature in the storing room of the HIMURO type storage house. The non-dimensional room temperature, which was expressed by the two non-dimensional parameters, was used and discussed to clear the effects on the temperature by many parameters.

  9. Ice Flow in the North East Greenland Ice Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, Ian; Kwok, Ron; Fahnestock, M.; MacAyeal, Doug

    1999-01-01

    Early observations with ERS-1 SAR image data revealed a large ice stream in North East Greenland (Fahnestock 1993). The ice stream has a number of the characteristics of the more closely studied ice streams in Antarctica, including its large size and gross geometry. The onset of rapid flow close to the ice divide and the evolution of its flow pattern, however, make this ice stream unique. These features can be seen in the balance velocities for the ice stream (Joughin 1997) and its outlets. The ice stream is identifiable for more than 700 km, making it much longer than any other flow feature in Greenland. Our research goals are to gain a greater understanding of the ice flow in the northeast Greenland ice stream and its outlet glaciers in order to assess their impact on the past, present, and future mass balance of the ice sheet. We will accomplish these goals using a combination of remotely sensed data and ice sheet models. We are using satellite radar interferometry data to produce a complete maps of velocity and topography over the entire ice stream. We are in the process of developing methods to use these data in conjunction with existing ice sheet models similar to those that have been used to improve understanding of the mechanics of flow in Antarctic ice streams.

  10. Sea Ice Friction: The Effect of Ice Rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scourfield, S.; Sammonds, P. R.; Lishman, B.; Riska, K.; Marchenko, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Ice deformation processes in the Arctic often generate ice rubble, and situations arise where ice fragments of varying size separate sea ice floes. While the shear forces between sea ice floes in direct contact with each other are controlled by ice-ice friction, what is not known is how the slip of the floes is affected by the presence of rubble between the sliding surfaces. We present the result of field experiments undertaken on fjord ice in Svea, Svalbard, which investigated the velocity and hold time dependence of sea ice friction involving ice gouge. Average air temperature for the duration of time in which experiments were run was -12.4°C, and the thickness of the level fjord ice was 70 cm. A double-direct-shear experiment was done on floating sea ice in the field, with the addition of rubble ice between the sliding surfaces. This was achieved by moving a floating ice block through a channel of open water whilst subjected to normal loading, which was transferred through regions of ice rubble on both sides of the mobile block. The ice rubble regions were 30 cm deep and 50 cm wide. The displacement of the block and the force needed to move the block were measured. The rate dependence of friction was investigated for speeds of 10-3 to 10-2 ms-1. To investigate the state dependence of friction, slide-hold-slide (SHS) tests were conducted for hold times ranging from 1 second to 18 hours. When comparing the results from these experiments with a model for ice friction presented by Schulson and Fortt (2013), similar behaviour is seen at low hold times, where the peak coefficient of friction has a linear relationship with the logarithm of hold time. This is not the case for long hold times, however, and we attribute this to thermal consolidation of the ice rubble region.

  11. Enhanced Sea Ice Concentration and Ice Temperature Algorithms for AMSR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Manning, Will; Gersten, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Accurate quantification of sea ice concentration and ice temperature from satellite passive microwave data is important because they provide the only long term, spatially detailed and consistent data set needed to study the climatology of the polar regions. Sea ice concentration data are used to derive large-scale daily ice extents that are utilized in trend analysis of the global sea ice cover. They are also used to quantify the amount of open water and thin ice in polynya and divergence regions which together with ice temperatures are in turn needed to estimate vertical heat and salinity fluxes in these regions. Sea ice concentrations have been derived from the NASA Team and Bootstrap algorithms while a separate technique for deriving ice temperature has been reported. An integrated technique that will utilizes most of the channels of AMSR (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer) has been developed. The technique uses data from the 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels at vertical polarization obtain an initial estimate of sea ice concentration and ice temperature. The derived ice temperature is then utilized to estimate the emissivities for the corresponding observations at all the other channels. A procedure for calculating the ice concentration similar to the Bootstrap technique is then used but with variables being emissivities instead of brightness temperatures to minimizes errors associated with spatial changes in ice temperatures within the ice pack. Comparative studies of ice concentration results with those from other algorithms, including the original Bootstrap algorithm and those from high resolution satellite visible and infrared data will be presented. Also, results from a simulation study that demonstrates the effectiveness of the technique in correcting for spatial variations in ice temperatures will be shown. The ice temperature results are likewise compared with satellite infrared and buoy data with the latter adjusted to account for the effects of the snow

  12. Arctic Summer Ice Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the flux of heat and freshwater resulting from sea ice melt in the polar seas. The approach taken is to examine the decay of sea ice in the summer months primarily through the use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The improved understanding of the dynamics of the melt process can be usefully combined with ice thermodynamic and upper ocean models to form more complete models of ice melt. Models indicate that more heat is absorbed in the upper ocean when the ice cover is composed of smaller rather than larger floes and when there is more open water. Over the course of the summer, floes disintegrate by physical forcing and heating, melting into smaller and smaller sizes. By measuring the change in distribution of floes together with open water over a summer period, we can make estimates of the amount of heating by region and time. In a climatic sense, these studies are intended to improve the understanding of the Arctic heat budget which can then be eventually incorporated into improved global climate models. This work has two focus areas. The first is examining the detailed effect of storms on floe size and open water. A strong Arctic low pressure storm has been shown to loosen up the pack ice, increase the open water concentration well into the pack ice, and change the distribution of floes toward fewer and smaller floes. This suggests episodic melting and the increased importance of horizontal (lateral) melt during storms. The second focus area is related to an extensive ship-based experiment that recently took place in the Arctic called Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA). An icebreaker was placed purposely into the older pack ice north of Alaska in September 1997. The ship served as the base for experimenters who deployed extensive instrumentation to measure the atmosphere, ocean, and ice during a one-year period. My experiment will be to derive similar measurements (floe size, open

  13. Ice dynamics at the mouth of ice stream B, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R. A.; Stephenson, S. N.; Macayeal, D. R.; Shabtaie, S.

    1987-01-01

    Data collected in the region of the mouth of ice stream B, West Antarctica, during three field seasons are presented. The physical characteristics of the mouth of ice stream B are described, and the dynamics in the vicinity of the DNB network are discussed. The dynamics of ice stream B from DNB to the grounding line is briefly considered, and a force analysis of the grounding line region is made. The results demonstrate that the dynamic situation of the region at the mouth of ice stream B is distinctly different from either the greater portion of the ice stream upstream or the Ross ice shelf downstream.

  14. Ice deformation near SHEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, R. W.

    2002-10-01

    The deformation rate of sea ice is a key parameter for determining the evolution of the ice thickness distribution. It determines the rate of new ice formation through opening and the rate of ridging through closing and shear. An extensive suite of ground-based and satellite-based measurements of ice motion is used to construct a daily time series of the ice velocity and deformation in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ice camp that is suitable for forcing a model of the ice thickness distribution. The velocity is interpolated to a square grid that remains centered on the camp, has a spacing of 25 km, is 400 km on a side, and is determined for a 371-day period from 2 October 1997 to 7 October 1998. Velocity measurements from buoys, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI), and Radarsat Geophysical Processing System (RGPS) are merged using optimal interpolation and a Kalman filter approach. The deformation rate is taken directly from the RGPS measurements when available. The daily total deformation rate measured on a scale of 100 km near the camp averaged 2.21% d-1, and the standard deviation was 1.78% d-1. The divergence was positive in the early winter and negative through most of the spring and summer. There were two major opening/closing events, one in January and one at the end of July. The net divergence over the year was very near zero. The vorticity indicated a net rotation of 87° over the year, with the winter showing strong anticyclonic turning and the summer showing strong cyclonic turning.

  15. Nucleation of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The freezing of water into ice is a ubiquitous transformation in nature, yet the microscopic mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice has not yet been elucidated. One of the reasons is that nucleation happens in time scales that are too fast for an experimental characterization and two slow for a systematic study with atomistic simulations. In this work we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic model of water mW[1] to shed light into the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice and its relationship to the thermodynamics of supercooled water. Cooling of bulk water produces either crystalline ice or low- density amorphous ice (LDA) depending on the quenching rate. We find that ice crystallization occurs faster at temperatures close to the liquid-liquid transition, defined as the point of maximum inflection of the density with respect to the temperature. At the liquid-liquid transition, the time scale of nucleation becomes comparable to the time scale of relaxation within the liquid phase, determining --effectively- the end of the metastable liquid state. Our results imply that no ultraviscous liquid water can exist at temperatures just above the much disputed glass transition of water. We discuss how the scenario is changed when water is in confinement, and the relationship of the mechanism of ice nucleation to that of other liquids that present the same phase behavior, silicon [2] and germanium [3]. [4pt] [1] Molinero, V. & Moore, E. B. Water modeled as an intermediate element between carbon and silicon. Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2008). Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cgi- bin/abstract.cgi/jpcbfk/asap/abs/jp805227c.html [0pt] [2] Molinero, V., Sastry, S. & Angell, C. A. Tuning of tetrahedrality in a silicon potential yields a series of monatomic (metal-like) glass formers of very high fragility. Physical Review Letters 97, 075701 (2006).

  16. Domotics Project Housing Block

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated. PMID:27223285

  17. Domotics Project Housing Block.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated. PMID:27223285

  18. Ice stream activity scaled to ice sheet volume during Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, C R; Margold, M; Clark, C D; Tarasov, L

    2016-02-18

    The contribution of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets to sea level has increased in recent decades, largely owing to the thinning and retreat of outlet glaciers and ice streams. This dynamic loss is a serious concern, with some modelling studies suggesting that the collapse of a major ice sheet could be imminent or potentially underway in West Antarctica, but others predicting a more limited response. A major problem is that observations used to initialize and calibrate models typically span only a few decades, and, at the ice-sheet scale, it is unclear how the entire drainage network of ice streams evolves over longer timescales. This represents one of the largest sources of uncertainty when predicting the contributions of ice sheets to sea-level rise. A key question is whether ice streams might increase and sustain rates of mass loss over centuries or millennia, beyond those expected for a given ocean-climate forcing. Here we reconstruct the activity of 117 ice streams that operated at various times during deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (from about 22,000 to 7,000 years ago) and show that as they activated and deactivated in different locations, their overall number decreased, they occupied a progressively smaller percentage of the ice sheet perimeter and their total discharge decreased. The underlying geology and topography clearly influenced ice stream activity, but--at the ice-sheet scale--their drainage network adjusted and was linked to changes in ice sheet volume. It is unclear whether these findings can be directly translated to modern ice sheets. However, contrary to the view that sees ice streams as unstable entities that can accelerate ice-sheet deglaciation, we conclude that ice streams exerted progressively less influence on ice sheet mass balance during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. PMID:26887494

  19. Platelet ice distribution in Antarctic sea ice and its implications for ocean - ice shelf interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhorne, P.; Hughes, K. G.; Gough, A. J.; Smith, I.; Williams, M.; Robinson, N. J.; Stevens, C. L.; Rack, W.; Price, D.; Leonard, G. H.; Mohoney, A. R.; Haas, C.; Haskell, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Ice shelf basal melting freshens and cools the fluid in the ice shelf-ocean boundary layer, producing Ice Shelf Water (ISW). The potential temperature of ISW is below the surface freezing point. Antarctic sea ice that has been affected by supercooled Ice Shelf Water (ISW) has a unique crystallographic structure and is called platelet ice. We have synthesized platelet ice observations to construct a continent-wide map of the winter presence of ISW at the ocean surface. Where suitable observations exist, oceanic heat fluxes are derived from sub-ice platelet layer measurements and these are shown in the figure. They demonstrate that in some regions of coastal Antarctica, supercooled ISW drives a negative oceanic heat flux of approximately -30 Wm-2 that persists for several months during winter. This heat flux from the sea ice to the ocean significantly increases the sea ice thickness close to an ice shelf. In other regions, particularly where the thinning of ice shelves is believed to be greatest, platelet ice is not observed. The most extensive dataset, which includes our new results, dates back to 1902 and extends north of the combined Ross and McMurdo Ice Shelf front in the southern Ross Sea. Here the surface water is held just below its freezing point as it enters McMurdo Sound from beneath the McMurdo Ice Shelf. Despite a more recent decrease in ocean salinity consistent with observations in the south-western Ross Sea, there has been no detectable change in the volume or temperature of this supercooled ISW under sea ice since the early twentieth century. The inclusion of platelet ice into first year sea ice is an annual process. Hence it will respond immediately to changes in the sub-ice shelf circulation pattern and its export of supercooled water, emphasizing the urgent need for careful, Antarctic-wide monitoring.

  20. Quantification of Ice Accretions for Icing Scaling Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Anderson, David N.

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of ice accretion characteristics is an integral part of aircraft icing research. It is often necessary to compare an ice accretion obtained from a flight test or numerical simulation to one produced in an icing wind tunnel or for validation of an icing scaling method. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by overlaying two-dimensional tracings of ice accretion shapes. This paper addresses the basic question of how to compare ice accretions using more quantitative methods. For simplicity, geometric characteristics of the ice accretions are used for the comparison. One method evaluated is a direct comparison of the percent differences of the geometric measurements. The second method inputs these measurements into a fuzzy inference system to obtain a single measure of the goodness of the comparison. The procedures are demonstrated by comparing ice shapes obtained in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center during recent icing scaling tests. The results demonstrate that this type of analysis is useful in quantifying the similarity of ice accretion shapes and that the procedures should be further developed by expanding the analysis to additional icing data sets.

  1. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  2. Light driven microflow in ice

    SciTech Connect

    Weinert, Franz M.; Wuehr, Max; Braun, Dieter

    2009-03-16

    We optically pump water through micrometer thin ice sheets. The ice is locally moved with speeds exceeding 5 cm/s by repetitive melting and freezing, which occurs around a moving infrared laser spot. The minimal channel width is 10 {mu}m. The diffusion limitation of ice allows for fast spatial biomolecule control without predefined channels, valves, or external pumps. Dye molecules are pumped across an ice-ice interface, showing the possibility of microfluidic applications. Pumping in ice is three orders of magnitude faster than the previously shown for thermoviscous pumping in water.

  3. Mysteries at Ice Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Samuel C., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Michael Faraday noted that ``two pieces of thawing ice, if put together, adhere and become one...the effect will take place in air, or in water, or in vacuo." Why? He proposed that ``a particle of water, which could retain the liquid state whilst touching ice only on one side, could not retain the liquid state if it were touched by ice on both sides."footnote M. Faraday, Proc. Roy. Soc. London 10, 440 (1860) The existence of special properties at interfaces of ice is generally agreed and has important environmental consequences.(J. G. Dash, H. Fu, and J. S. Wettlaufer, Rep. Prog. Phys. 58), 115 (1995) Why do different experiments infer different properties for this layer? Impurities and electric fields at the interfaces may be responsible for some of the variations in experimental results.footnote V. F. Petrenko, U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Report 94-22 (1994) Some background on the physical properties of ice will be discussed, including recent force microscopy measurements done at the University of Washington.footnote C.R. Slaughterbeck, E.W. Kukes, B. Pittenger, D.J. Cook, P.C. Williams, V.L. Eden, S.C. Fain, Jr., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. (in press) Supported by NSF Grant DMR-91-19701.

  4. Data archaeology at ICES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Harry D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the function of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), both past and present, in particular in the context of its interest in compiling oceanographic data sets. Details are provided of the procedures it adopted to ensure adequate internationally collaborative marine investigations during the first part of the century, such as how it provided a forum for action by its member states, how it coordinated and published the results of scientific programs, and how it provided a foundation, through scientists employed in the ICES Office, for the establishment of the original oceanographic marine databases and associated products, and the scientific interpretation of the results. The growth and expansion of this area of ICES activity is then traced, taking into account the changing conditions for oceanographic data management resulting from the establishment of the National Data Centres, as well as the World Data Centres for Oceanography, which were created to meet the needs of the International Geophysical Year (IGY). Finally, there is a discussion of the way in which the very existence of ICES has proved to be a valuable source of old data, some of which have not yet been digitized, but which can be readily retrieved because they have been very carefully documented throughout the years. Lessons from this activity are noted, and suggestions are made on how the past experiences of ICES can be utilized to ensure the availability of marine data to present and future generations of scientists.

  5. Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Warmer surface temperatures over just a few months in the Antarctic can splinter an ice shelf and prime it for a major collapse, NASA and university scientists report in the latest issue of the Journal of Glaciology. Using satellite images of tell-tale melt water on the ice surface and a sophisticated computer simulation of the motions and forces within an ice shelf, the scientists demonstrated that added pressure from surface water filling crevasses can crack the ice entirely through. The process can be expected to become more widespread if Antarctic summer temperatures increase. This true-color image from Landsat 7, acquired on February 21, 2000, shows pools of melt water on the surface of the Larsen Ice Shelf, and drifting icebergs that have split from the shelf. The upper image is an overview of the shelf's edge, while the lower image is displayed at full resolution of 30 meters (98 feet) per pixel. The labeled pond in the lower image measures roughly 1.6 by 1.6 km (1.0 x 1.0 miles). Full text of Press Release More Images and Animations Image courtesy Landsat 7 Science Team and NASA GSFC

  6. Hidden asymmetry of ice.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Mikhail V

    2014-11-26

    Ice is a very complex and fundamentally important solid. In the present article, we review a new property of the hydrogen-bonded network in ice structures: an explicit nonequivalence of some antipodal configurations with the opposite direction of all hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). This asymmetry is most pronounced for the structures with considerable deviation of the H-bond network from the tetrahedral coordination. That is why we have investigated in detail four-coordinated ice nanostructures with no outer "dangling" hydrogen atoms, namely, ice bilayers and ice nanotubes consisting of stacked n-membered rings. The reason for this H-bonding asymmetry is a fundamental nonequivalence of the arrangements of water molecules in some antipodal configurations with the opposite direction of all H-bonds. For these configurations, the overall pictures of deviations of the hydrogen bonds from linearity are qualitatively different. We consider the reversal of all H-bonds as an additional nongeometric operation of symmetry, more precisely antisymmetry. It is not easy to find the explicit breaking of the symmetry of hydrogen bonding (H-symmetry) in the variety of all configurations. Therefore, this asymmetry may be named hidden. PMID:24905908

  7. Seafloor Control on Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Rigor, I. G.; Hall, D. K.; Neumann, G.

    2011-01-01

    The seafloor has a profound role in Arctic sea ice formation and seasonal evolution. Ocean bathymetry controls the distribution and mixing of warm and cold waters, which may originate from different sources, thereby dictating the pattern of sea ice on the ocean surface. Sea ice dynamics, forced by surface winds, are also guided by seafloor features in preferential directions. Here, satellite mapping of sea ice together with buoy measurements are used to reveal the bathymetric control on sea ice growth and dynamics. Bathymetric effects on sea ice formation are clearly observed in the conformation between sea ice patterns and bathymetric characteristics in the peripheral seas. Beyond local features, bathymetric control appears over extensive ice-prone regions across the Arctic Ocean. The large-scale conformation between bathymetry and patterns of different synoptic sea ice classes, including seasonal and perennial sea ice, is identified. An implication of the bathymetric influence is that the maximum extent of the total sea ice cover is relatively stable, as observed by scatterometer data in the decade of the 2000s, while the minimum ice extent has decreased drastically. Because of the geologic control, the sea ice cover can expand only as far as it reaches the seashore, the continental shelf break, or other pronounced bathymetric features in the peripheral seas. Since the seafloor does not change significantly for decades or centuries, sea ice patterns can be recurrent around certain bathymetric features, which, once identified, may help improve short-term forecast and seasonal outlook of the sea ice cover. Moreover, the seafloor can indirectly influence cloud cover by its control on sea ice distribution, which differentially modulates the latent heat flux through ice covered and open water areas.

  8. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  9. Microbial abundance in surface ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Stibal, Marek; Gözdereliler, Erkin; Cameron, Karen A.; Box, Jason E.; Stevens, Ian T.; Gokul, Jarishma K.; Schostag, Morten; Zarsky, Jakub D.; Edwards, Arwyn; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring microbial abundance in glacier ice and identifying its controls is essential for a better understanding and quantification of biogeochemical processes in glacial ecosystems. However, cell enumeration of glacier ice samples is challenging due to typically low cell numbers and the presence of interfering mineral particles. We quantified for the first time the abundance of microbial cells in surface ice from geographically distinct sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), using three enumeration methods: epifluorescence microscopy (EFM), flow cytometry (FCM), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). In addition, we reviewed published data on microbial abundance in glacier ice and tested the three methods on artificial ice samples of realistic cell (102–107 cells ml−1) and mineral particle (0.1–100 mg ml−1) concentrations, simulating a range of glacial ice types, from clean subsurface ice to surface ice to sediment-laden basal ice. We then used multivariate statistical analysis to identify factors responsible for the variation in microbial abundance on the ice sheet. EFM gave the most accurate and reproducible results of the tested methodologies, and was therefore selected as the most suitable technique for cell enumeration of ice containing dust. Cell numbers in surface ice samples, determined by EFM, ranged from ~ 2 × 103 to ~ 2 × 106 cells ml−1 while dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2 mg ml−1. The lowest abundances were found in ice sampled from the accumulation area of the ice sheet and in samples affected by fresh snow; these samples may be considered as a reference point of the cell abundance of precipitants that are deposited on the ice sheet surface. Dust content was the most significant variable to explain the variation in the abundance data, which suggests a direct association between deposited dust particles and cells and/or by their provision of limited nutrients to microbial communities on the GrIS. PMID:25852678

  10. Ice Pick Headache.

    PubMed

    Chua, Abigail L; Nahas, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    Ice pick headache, also called idiopathic or primary stabbing headache, is a unique headache type associated with ultra-brief stabs of pain, most commonly in the frontal or temporal area. It occurs predominantly in women and is estimated to affect 2-35 % of the population. Unlike other headache types of short duration, such as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT), ice pick headache is not associated with any cranial autonomic symptoms but has been known to occur with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and dizziness. It exists in two forms: primary and secondary, with examples of secondary causes being herpes zoster meningoencephalitis, meningiomas, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. Ice pick headache is one of the "indomethacin responsive headaches," but up to 35 % of patients fail to show significant benefit with that treatment. Other treatment options include gabapentin, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, melatonin, and external hand warming. PMID:27038969

  11. Rheology of planetary ices

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    1996-04-24

    The brittle and ductile rheology of ices of water, ammonia, methane, and other volatiles, in combination with rock particles and each other, have a primary influence of the evolution and ongoing tectonics of icy moons of the outer solar system. Laboratory experiments help constrain the rheology of solar system ices. Standard experimental techniques can be used because the physical conditions under which most solar system ices exist are within reach of conventional rock mechanics testing machines, adapted to the low subsolidus temperatures of the materials in question. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of a decade-long experimental deformation program and to provide some background in deformation physics in order to lend some appreciation to the application of these measurements to the planetary setting.

  12. Space Shuttle ice nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Estimates are made showing that, as a consequence of rocket activity in the earth's upper atmosphere in the Shuttle era, average ice nuclei concentrations in the upper atmosphere could increase by a factor of two, and that an aluminum dust layer weighing up to 1000 tons might eventually form in the lower atmosphere. The concentrations of Space Shuttle ice nuclei (SSIN) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere were estimated by taking into account the composition of the particles, the extent of surface poisoning, and the size of the particles. Calculated stratospheric size distributions at 20 km with Space Shuttle particulate injection, calculated SSIN concentrations at 10 and 20 km altitude corresponding to different water vapor/ice supersaturations, and predicted SSIN concentrations in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere are shown.

  13. Waterway Ice Thickness Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ship on the opposite page is a U. S. Steel Corporation tanker cruising through the ice-covered waters of the Great Lakes in the dead of winter. The ship's crew is able to navigate safely by plotting courses through open water or thin ice, a technique made possible by a multi-agency technology demonstration program in which NASA is a leading participant. Traditionally, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System is closed to shipping for more than three months of winter season because of ice blockage, particularly fluctuations in the thickness and location of ice cover due to storms, wind, currents and variable temperatures. Shippers have long sought a system of navigation that would allow year-round operation on the Lakes and produce enormous economic and fuel conservation benefits. Interrupted operations require that industrial firms stockpile materials to carry them through the impassable months, which is costly. Alternatively, they must haul cargos by more expensive overland transportation. Studies estimate the economic benefits of year-round Great Lakes shipping in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually and fuel consumption savings in the tens of millions of gallons. Under Project Icewarn, NASA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration collaborated in development and demonstration of a system that permits safe year-round operations. It employs airborne radars, satellite communications relay and facsimile transmission to provide shippers and ships' masters up-to-date ice charts. Lewis Research Center contributed an accurate methods of measuring ice thickness by means of a special "short-pulse" type of radar. In a three-year demonstration program, Coast Guard aircraft equipped with Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) flew over the Great Lakes three or four times a week. The SLAR, which can penetrate clouds, provided large area readings of the type and distribution of ice cover. The information was supplemented by short

  14. The Great Ice Age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ray, Louis L.

    1992-01-01

    The Great Ice Age, a recent chapter in the Earth's history, was a period of recurring widespread glaciations. During the Pleistocene Epoch of the geologic time scale, which began about a million or more years ago, mountain glaciers formed on all continents, the icecaps of Antarctica and Greenland were more extensive and thicker than today, and vast glaciers, in places as much as several thousand feet thick, spread across northern North America and Eurasia. So extensive were these glaciers that almost a third of the present land surface of the Earth was intermittently covered by ice. Even today remnants of the great glaciers cover almost a tenth of the land, indicating that conditions somewhat similar to those which produced the Great Ice Age are still operating in polar and subpolar climates.

  15. Microwave ice accretion meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magenheim, Bertram (Inventor); Rocks, James K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system for indicating ice thickness and rate of ice thickness growth on surfaces is disclosed. The region to be monitored for ice accretion is provided with a resonant surface waveguide which is mounted flush, below the surface being monitored. A controlled oscillator provides microwave energy via a feed point at a controllable frequency. A detector is coupled to the surface waveguide and is responsive to electrical energy. A measuring device indicates the frequency deviation of the controlled oscillator from a quiescent frequency. A control means is provided to control the frequency of oscillation of the controlled oscillator. In a first, open-loop embodiment, the control means is a shaft operated by an operator. In a second, closed-loop embodiment, the control means is a processor which effects automatic control.

  16. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  17. The mass balance of the ice plain of Ice Stream B and Crary Ice Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The region in the mouth of Ice Stream B (the ice plain) and that in the vicinity of Crary Ice Rise are experiencing large and rapid changes. Based on velocity, ice thickness, and accumulation rate data, the patterns of net mass balance in these regions were calculated. Net mass balance, or the rate of ice thickness change, was calculated as the residual of all mass fluxes into and out of subregions (or boxes). Net mass balance provides a measure of the state of health of the ice sheet and clues to the current dynamics.

  18. Hugoniot of water ice

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, E.S.

    1984-01-19

    Hugoniot data for water ice are available for pressures ranging from about 150 MPa to about 50 GPa from initial states near 260 K. Limited data on porous ice (snow) at the same initial temperatures are available from 3.5 to 38 GPa and initial densities of 600 and 350 Mg/m/sup 3/. Above about 5 GPa, the data are fairly well-fit by a linear relation between shock and particle velocity: D(km/s) = 1.79 + 1.42u. However, a quadratic form fits the data better: D(km/s) = 1.32 + 1.68u - 0.035u/sup 2/. At lower stresses the velocity is a very complicated function of particle velocity due to elastic propagation, yielding and several possible phase changes. The Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of ice at these temperatures is about 180 +- 20 MPa with the elastic waves travelling at about 3900 m/s. The mean stress at the HEL is 115 +- 14 MPa. Comparison with strength measurements at lower strain rate indicates that failure at the HEL probably involves fracture and is almost independent of both temperature and strain rate. Ice V has been reported at about 600 MPa, and ice VI at 1.9 GPa and possibly at 3.7 GPa. Transition to ice III probably commences at the HEL at 200 MPa. Relations between volume, enthalpy and internal energy indicate that states below about 1 GPa maintain their shear strength even after undergoing complete transition to a high pressure phase. Time-resolved stress measurements indicate that equilibrium is achieved in about three microseconds for a 695 MPa shock. Melting is definitely complete below 10 GPa.

  19. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  20. Spatial complexity of ice flow across the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Felix S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Fast-flowing ice streams carry ice from the interior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet towards the coast. Understanding how ice-stream tributaries operate and how networks of them evolve is essential for developing reliable models of the ice sheet’s response to climate change. A particular challenge is to unravel the spatial complexity of flow within and across tributary networks. Here I define a measure of planimetric flow convergence, which can be calculated from satellite measurements of the ice sheet’s surface velocity, to explore this complexity. The convergence map of Antarctica clarifies how tributaries draw ice from its interior. The map also reveals curvilinear zones of convergence along lateral shear margins of streaming, and abundant ripples associated with nonlinear ice rheology and changes in bed topography and friction. Convergence on ice-stream tributaries and their feeding zones is uneven and interspersed with divergence. For individual drainage basins, as well as the ice sheet as a whole, fast flow cannot converge or diverge as much as slow flow. I therefore deduce that flow in the ice-stream networks is subject to mechanical regulation that limits flow-orthonormal strain rates. These findings provide targets for ice-sheet simulations and motivate more research into the origin and dynamics of tributarization.

  1. Large Ice Discharge From the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to measure the ice discharge of the Greenland Ice Sheet close to the grounding line and/or calving front, and compare the results with mass accumulation and ablation in the interior to estimate the ice sheet mass balance.

  2. Ice Accretions and Icing Effects for Modern Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Icing tests were conducted to document ice shapes formed on three different two-dimensional airfoils and to study the effects of the accreted ice on aerodynamic performance. The models tested were representative of airfoil designs in current use for each of the commercial transport, business jet, and general aviation categories of aircraft. The models were subjected to a range of icing conditions in an icing wind tunnel. The conditions were selected primarily from the Federal Aviation Administration's Federal Aviation Regulations 25 Appendix C atmospheric icing conditions. A few large droplet icing conditions were included. To verify the aerodynamic performance measurements, molds were made of selected ice shapes formed in the icing tunnel. Castings of the ice were made from the molds and placed on a model in a dry, low-turbulence wind tunnel where precision aerodynamic performance measurements were made. Documentation of all the ice shapes and the aerodynamic performance measurements made during the icing tunnel tests is included in this report. Results from the dry, low-turbulence wind tunnel tests are also presented.

  3. IceCube Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the status of the kilometer-scale neutrino detector IceCube and its low energy upgrade Deep Core and review its scientific potential for particle physics. We subsequently appraise IceCube's potential for revealing the enigmatic sources of cosmic rays. After all, this aspiration set the scale of the instrument. While only a smoking gun is missing for the case that the Galactic component of the cosmic ray spectrum originates in supernova remnants, the origin of the extragalactic component remains as inscrutable as ever. We speculate on the role of the nearby active galaxies Centaurus A and M87.

  4. Aircraft icing research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Shaw, R. J.; Olsen, W. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Research activity is described for: ice protection systems, icing instrumentation, experimental methods, analytical modeling for the above, and in flight research. The renewed interest in aircraft icing has come about because of the new need for All-Weather Helicopters and General Aviation aircraft. Because of increased fuel costs, tomorrow's Commercial Transport aircraft will also require new types of ice protection systems and better estimates of the aeropenalties caused by ice on unprotected surfaces. The physics of aircraft icing is very similar to the icing that occurs on ground structures and structures at sea; all involve droplets that freeze on the surfaces because of the cold air. Therefore all icing research groups will benefit greatly by sharing their research information.

  5. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libál, A.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  6. Mapping Ice with Airborne Lasers

    NASA Video Gallery

    Determining whether polar ice quantities are growing or shrinking requires accurate and detailed measurements, year over year. To help make those measurements, IceBridge mission aircraft fire 3,000...

  7. NASA's rotorcraft icing research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Reinmann, John J.; Miller, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the NASA aircraft icing research program is to develop and make available icing technology to support the needs and requirements of industry for all weather aircraft designs. While a majority of the technology being developed is viewed to be generic (i.e., appropriate to all vehicle classes), vehicle specific emphasis is being placed on the helicopter due to its unique icing problems. In particular, some of the considerations for rotorcraft icing are indicated. The NASA icing research program emphasizes technology development in two key areas: ice protection concepts and icing simulation (analytical and experimental). The NASA research efforts related to rotorcraft icing in these two technology areas will be reviewed.

  8. 2013 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    After an unusually cold summer in the northernmost latitudes, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual minimum summer extent for 2013 on Sept. 13, the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice ...

  9. Haunted by Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeece, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Two fourth-grade teachers presented the idea of using the author's art class to inspire the students to write creatively. The theme of scary stories needed an art project to match. The author immediately had a favorite lesson in mind. By putting a small twist on one of her standard "Frank Lloyd Wright House" projects, scary plans began to take…

  10. The Children's House

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peller, Lili E.

    2013-01-01

    Lili Peller's "The Children's House" essay begins where Maria Montessori left off in her description of space articulations. Peller does not name Montessori specifically as she always had a desire to become independent in her own right as a neo-Freudian child analyst. But the Haus Der Kinder founded in summer of 1922 suggests a total…

  11. Student Housing Cost Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Univ. Residential Building System.

    Target costs for the University Residential Building System (URBS) Project of the University of California are presented. Findings depict the effectiveness of building design and material applications and should be useful in guiding future student housing design work, whether the design utilizes the URBS system or not. Ten recently constructed…

  12. Doll's House Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2009-01-01

    School physics rarely stands still for long. Environmental physics is now an option in some post-16 courses in England. The physics of environments, and in particular the built environment, offers a recognizable context in which to see the applications of physics at work. This article considers how a model doll's house might be used to help…

  13. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  14. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  15. 1. Keeper's house, light tower and boat house, view southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house, light tower and boat house, view southwest, northeast and northwest sides - Pumpkin Island Light Station, Pumpkin Island, at northern end of Eggemoggin Beach, off northwest end of Little Deer Island, Eggemoggin, Hancock County, ME

  16. 2. Oil house, fog signal house and light tower, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oil house, fog signal house and light tower, view southwest, east and north sides - Great Duck Island Light Station, At southern tip of Great Duck Island southeast of Bass Harbor & northeast of Frenchboro, Frenchboro, Hancock County, ME

  17. 1. Relationship of chicken house, claim house, residence, east tool ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Relationship of chicken house, claim house, residence, east tool shed, garage, and barn to overall farmstead site, looking north - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  18. 10. Relationship of residence, claim house, chicken house, west tool ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Relationship of residence, claim house, chicken house, west tool shed, and east tool shed to each other and immediate surroundings, looking west - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  19. 5. Relationship of chicken house, privy, claim house, and residence ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Relationship of chicken house, privy, claim house, and residence to each other and immediate surroundings, looking northeast - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  20. Pump house adjacent to the superintendent's house at the west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pump house adjacent to the superintendent's house at the west end of the complex near Highway 101. Detail of Holloshaft pump. View to the south. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  1. 1. Keeper's house, light tower and bell house, view northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house, light tower and bell house, view northeast, northwest and southwest sides - Burnt Coat Harbor Light Station, At Hackamock Head on Swan's Island opposite Harbor Island at entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Hancock County, ME

  2. 5. Shed, keeper's house, boathouse, light tower and oil house, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Shed, keeper's house, boathouse, light tower and oil house, view southeast, northwest and southwest sides - Goat Island Light Station, Goat Island, next to entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, just south of Trott Island, Cape Porpoise, York County, ME

  3. 2. Keeper's house, light tower and bell house, view east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Keeper's house, light tower and bell house, view east, west and south sides - Bass Harbor Head Light Station, At southwest tip of Mount Desert Island off State Route 102, Bass Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  4. SUMMER KITCHEN AND SMOKE HOUSE AND HOUSE, VIEW TO WEST/ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SUMMER KITCHEN AND SMOKE HOUSE AND HOUSE, VIEW TO WEST/ SOUTHWEST - Kiel Farmstead, Summer Kitchen & Smokehouse, East side State Route 4, one half mile south of U.S. Route 64, Mascoutah, St. Clair County, IL

  5. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE GENERATING HOUSE SHOWING THE 'HOUSE GENERATOR' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE GENERATING HOUSE SHOWING THE 'HOUSE GENERATOR' AND GOVERNOR ASSEMBLY. - Wilson Dam & Hydroelectric Plant, Spanning Tennessee River at Wilson Dam Road (Route 133), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  6. 24 CFR 1006.210 - Housing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing services. 1006.210 Section 1006.210 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK...

  7. 24 CFR 248.147 - Housing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing standards. 248.147 Section 248.147 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  8. 24 CFR 1715.27 - Fair housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fair housing. 1715.27 Section 1715.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  9. 24 CFR 248.147 - Housing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Housing standards. 248.147 Section 248.147 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  10. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream as affected by ice structuring proteins from winter wheat grass.

    PubMed

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2006-01-01

    Ice recrystallization in quiescently frozen sucrose solutions that contained some of the ingredients commonly found in ice cream and in ice cream manufactured under commercial conditions, with or without ice structuring proteins (ISP) from cold-acclimated winter wheat grass extract (AWWE), was assessed by bright field microscopy. In sucrose solutions, critical differences in moisture content, viscosity, ionic strength, and other properties derived from the presence of other ingredients (skim milk powder, corn syrup solids, locust bean gum) caused a reduction in ice crystal growth. Significant ISP activity in retarding ice crystal growth was observed in all solutions (44% for the most complex mix) containing 0.13% total protein from AWWE. In heat-shocked ice cream, ice recrystallization rates were significantly reduced 40 and 46% with the addition of 0.0025 and 0.0037% total protein from AWWE. The ISP activity in ice cream was not hindered by its inclusion in mix prior to pasteurization. A synergistic effect between ISP and stabilizer was observed, as ISP activity was reduced in the absence of stabilizer in ice cream formulations. A remarkably smoother texture for ice creams containing ISP after heat-shock storage was evident by sensory evaluation. The efficiency of ISP from AWWE in controlling ice crystal growth in ice cream has been demonstrated. PMID:16357267

  11. Turbulence modeling in aircraft icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    The Icing and Cryogenic Technology Branch develops computational tools which predict ice growth on aircraft surfaces and uses existing CFD technology to evaluate the aerodynamic changes associated with such accretions. Surface roughness, transition location, and laminar, transition, or turbulent convective heat transfer all influence the ice growth process on aircraft surfaces. Turbulence modeling is a critical element within the computational tools used for both ice shape prediction and for performance degradation evaluation.

  12. MODIS Snow and Ice Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorthoy K.; Hoser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Daily, global snow cover maps, and sea ice cover and sea ice surface temperature (IST) maps are derived from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), are available at no cost through the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Included on this CD-ROM are samples of the MODIS snow and ice products. In addition, an animation, done by the Scientific Visualization studio at Goddard Space Flight Center, is also included.

  13. Polygonal cracks in the seasonal semi-translucent CO2 ice layer in Martian polar areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Pommerol, Antoine; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.; Thomas, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we use morphological and numerical methods to test the hypothesis that seasonally formed fracture patterns in the Martian polar regions result from the brittle failure of seasonal CO2 slab ice. The observations by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) of polar regions of Mars show very narrow dark elongated linear patterns that are observed during some periods of time in spring, disappear in summer and re-appear again in the following spring. They are repeatedly formed in the same areas but they do not repeat the exact pattern from year to year. This leads to the conclusion that they are cracks formed in the seasonal ice layer. Some of models of seasonal surface processes rely on the existence of a transparent form of CO2 ice, so-called slab ice. For the creation of the observed cracks the ice is required to be a continuous media, not an agglomeration of relatively separate particles like a firn. The best explanation for our observations is a slab ice with relatively high transparency in the visible wavelength range. This transparency allows a solid state green-house effect to act underneath the ice sheet raising the pressure by sublimation from below. The trapped gas creates overpressure and the ice sheet breaks at some point creating the observed cracks. We show that the times when the cracks appear are in agreement with the model calculation, providing one more piece of evidence that CO2 slab ice covers polar areas in spring.

  14. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF CARRIAGE HOUSE SHOWING RELATIONSHIP TO MILK HOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF CARRIAGE HOUSE SHOWING RELATIONSHIP TO MILK HOUSE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. (The carriage house was built by William B. Engle at the end of the 19th century, with carriage storage on the ground floor and a workshop above. Later, his son, Ralph Engle, used the ground floor as a car garage.) - Engle Farm, Carriage House, 89 South Ebey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  15. THE TOWER HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. The tower house provided a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE TOWER HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. The tower house provided a water tank on the second floor that gravity fed water to the Kineth house and farm buildings. The one-story addition to the west of the tower provided workshop space. The hog shed is seen on the left of the image and the concrete foundation of the upright silo is in the foreground on the right. - Kineth Farm, Tower House, 19162 State Route 20, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  16. Constant Temperature Storage House Heated by the Respiration Heat of Agricultural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiyama, Masayoshi; Takegata, Kiyohide; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Kawamoto, Syuroh; Ohno, Syozi

    HIMURO type storage house, cooled by natural snow/ice, has been practically applied by means of its good storing condition and of the easy handling. As this type storage house is constructed by enough insulation structure, it can been used not only for a cool house in the summer but also a constant temperature storage house in the winter. In this paper, the authors suggested that the HIMURO type storage house might be used as the constant temperature house in the severe cold winter season after the theoretical investigation on the thermal characteristics of it. In general, the conventional type constant temperature storage house is heated by heater throughout storing period, that of this paper is self heated by the respiration heat of agricultural products stored in this house, so the house proposed in this paper look forward to smaller heat addition than that of conventional house. The practical experiment was performed to verify the theoretical investigation and to observe the storing condition of the product and we obtained enough results.

  17. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  18. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  19. Interest-Based Curriculum for House Care Services: House Cares.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natchitoches Parish School Board, LA.

    The 11-unit curriculum guide for house care services, a Federally sponsored project, is designed to help students identify interests and develop skills associated with house care services. Two introductory units deal with the world of work and the total area of house care services. The following unit topics are: sanitation and safety; equipment;…

  20. Conditions for bubble elongation in cold ice-sheet ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, R.B.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Highly elongated bubbles are sometimes observed in ice-sheet ice. Elongation is favored by rapid ice deformation, and opposed by diffusive processes. We use simple models to show that vapor transport dominates diffusion except possibly very close to the melting point, and that latent-heat effects are insignificant. Elongation is favored by larger bubbles at pore close-off, but is nearly independent of bubble compression below close-off. The simple presence of highly elongated bubbles indicates only that a critical ice-strain rate has been exceeded for significant time, and provides no information on possible disruption of stratigraphic continuity by ice deformation.

  1. Icing Sensor Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward; Kok, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft icing is a serious safety problem for the general aviation and some commuter transport airplanes. There has been tremendous growth in the commuter aviation industry in the last few years, Since these type of aircraft generally operate at lower altitudes they consequently spend a far greater proportion of their time operating in icing conditions. For the past thirty years airborne and ground based facilities have relied primarily on two types of cloud physics instrumentation to measure the characteristics of icing clouds: hot wire liquid water content probes and laser based particle sizing probes for the measurement of water droplet size. The instrumentation is severely limited by the technology that was developed during the 1970's and is quite large in size. The goal of this research is to develop one instrument with a wide bandwidth, better response time, higher resolution, user selectability, and small and lightweight. NASA Glenn Research Center, Droplet Measurement Technology, and Meteorology Society of Canada have developed a collaborative effort to develop such an instrument. This paper describes the development and test results of the prototype Icing Sensor Probe.

  2. The little ice age

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Little Ice Age, a period of glacier expansion in alpine regions that began sometime between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and lasted until late in the nineteenth century, was recorded not only in glacial features dated by geologic techniques but also in historical documents such as field sketches, land values, and weather records, especially in the Alps. Indirect evidence of its impact in other parts of the world includes the records of sea-ice extent near Iceland and Greenland, the fate of the Viking settlements in Greenland, and many other suggestions that the climate was colder in the recent past than it is today. Jean Grove's book is an authoritative, superbly documented, and excellently written summary of the abundant evidence of climatic change during the last few centuries in the context of broader climatic variations of the last 10,000 years. This summary provides a much-needed perspective for considering the magnitude and frequency of natural climatic variations in the past, given predictions for the future. In the final chapter, Grove notes that natural climatic variations, including another minor ice age, might be expected in the future but at the end of the Little Ice Age coincided with the increased burning of fossil fuels during the industralization of Europe and North America. This coincidence does indeed suggest that modern scientists already have had a significant impact on the global climate.

  3. Castles of Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lied, Nils

    Intended for students aged 11 to 13 years, this is the true story of an Antarctic exploration as told by one of the participants. In 1956, he and two companions, along with a team of huskies started from the Australian base at Mawson, Antarctica and journeyed across the sea ice to locate the Douglas Islands and fix them on the map. The story tells…

  4. Europa Ice Rafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This high resolution image shows the ice-rich crust of Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter. Seen here are crustal plates ranging up to 13 kilometers (8 miles) across, which have been broken apart and 'rafted' into new positions, superficially resembling the disruption of pack-ice on polar seas during spring thaws on Earth. The size and geometry of these features suggest that motion was enabled by ice-crusted water or soft ice close to the surface at the time of disruption.

    The area shown is about 34 kilometers by 42 kilometers (21 miles by 26 miles), centered at 9.4 degrees north latitude, 274 degrees west longitude, and the resolution is 54 meters (59 yards). This picture was taken by the Solid State Imaging system on board the Galileo spacecraft on February 20, 1997, from a distance of 5,340 kilometers (3,320 miles) during the spacecraft's close flyby of Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  5. Waves on Ice

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Waves on White: Ice or Clouds?     View ... captured this image showing a wavy pattern in a field of white. At most other latitudes, such wavy patterns would likely indicate ... are yellow; dark blue shows confidently clear areas, while light blue indicates clear with lower confidence. The ASCM works particularly ...

  6. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  7. Lens window simplifies TDL housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. M.; Rowland, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Lens window seal in tunable-diode-laser housing replaces plan parallel window. Lens seals housing and acts as optical-output coupler, thus eliminating need for additional reimaging or collimating optics.

  8. Ice Roughness in Short Duration SLD Icing Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Reed, Dana; Vargas, Mario; Kreeger, Richard E.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Ice accretion codes depend on models of roughness parameters to account for the enhanced heat transfer during the ice accretion process. While mitigating supercooled large droplet (SLD or Appendix O) icing is a significant concern for manufacturers seeking future vehicle certification due to the pending regulation, historical ice roughness studies have been performed using Appendix C icing clouds which exhibit mean volumetric diameters (MVD) much smaller than SLD clouds. Further, the historical studies of roughness focused on extracting parametric representations of ice roughness using multiple images of roughness elements. In this study, the ice roughness developed on a 21-in. NACA 0012 at 0deg angle of attack exposed to short duration SLD icing events was measured in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The MVD's used in the study ranged from 100 micrometer to 200 micrometers, in a 67 m/s flow, with liquid water contents of either 0.6 gm/cubic meters or 0.75 gm/cubic meters. The ice surfaces were measured using a Romer Absolute Arm laser scanning system. The roughness associated with each surface point cloud was measured using the two-dimensional self-organizing map approach developed by McClain and Kreeger (2013) resulting in statistical descriptions of the ice roughness.

  9. Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  10. Sea ice radiative forcing, sea ice area, and climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Cvijanovic, Ivana

    2014-05-01

    Changes in sea ice cover affect climate sensitivity by modifying albedo and surface heat flux exchange, which in turn affect the absorbed solar radiation at the surface as well as cloud cover, atmospheric water content and poleward atmospheric heat transport. Here, we use a configuration of the Community Earth System Model 1.0.4 with a slab ocean model and a thermodynamic-dynamic sea ice model to investigate the overall net effect of feedbacks associated with the sea ice loss. We analyze the strength of the overall sea ice feedback in terms of two factors: the sensitivity of sea ice area to changes in temperature, and the sensitivity of sea ice radiative forcing to changes in sea ice area. In this model configuration, sea ice area decreases by ~3 × 1012 m2 per K of global warming, while the effective global radiative forcing per square meter of sea ice loss is ~0.1 × 10-12 W m-2. The product of these two terms (~0.3 W m-2 K-1) approximately equals the difference in climate feedback parameter found in simulations with sea ice response (1.05 W m-2 K-1) and simulations without sea ice response (1.31 W m-2 K-1 or 1.35 W m-2 K-1, depending on the method used to disable changes in sea ice cover). Thus, we find that in our model simulations, sea ice response accounts for about 20% to 22% of the climate sensitivity to an imposed change in radiative forcing. In our model, the additional radiative forcing resulting from a loss of all sea ice in the 'pre-industrial' state is comparable to but somewhat less than the radiative forcing from a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content.

  11. Sea Ice Radiative Forcing, Sea Ice Area, and Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Cvijanovic, I.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in sea ice cover affect climate sensitivity by modifying albedo and surface heat flux exchange, which in turn affect the absorbed solar radiation at the surface as well as cloud cover, atmospheric water content and poleward atmospheric heat transport. Here, we use a configuration of the Community Earth System Model 1.0.4 with a slab ocean model and a thermodynamic-dynamic sea ice model to investigate the overall net effect of feedbacks associated with the sea ice loss. We analyze the strength of the overall sea ice feedback in terms of two factors: the sensitivity of sea ice area to changes in temperature, and the sensitivity of sea ice radiative forcing to changes in sea ice area. In this model configuration, sea ice area decreases by ~3 × 1012 m2 per K of global warming, while the effective global radiative forcing per unit area of sea ice loss is ~0.1 × 10-12 W m-2. The product of these two terms (~0.3 W m-2 K-1) approximately equals the difference in climate feedback parameter found in simulations with sea ice response (1.05 W m-2 K-1) and simulations without sea ice response (1.31 W m-2 K-1 or 1.35 W m-2 K-1, depending on the method used to disable the changes in sea ice cover). Thus, we find that in our model simulations, sea ice response accounts for about 20% to 22% of the climate sensitivity to an imposed change in radiative forcing. In our model, the additional radiative forcing resulting from a loss of all sea-ice in the "pre-industrial" state is comparable to but somewhat less than the radiative forcing from a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content.

  12. THE SPITZER ICE LEGACY: ICE EVOLUTION FROM CORES TO PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Van den Broek, Saskia; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Evans, Neal J.

    2011-10-20

    Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d Legacy ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 3}OH:NH{sub 3}:CH{sub 4}:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H{sub 2}O of CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, and the component of CO{sub 2} mixed with H{sub 2}O typically vary by <25%, indicative of co-formation with H{sub 2}O. In contrast, some CO and CO{sub 2} ice components, XCN, and CH{sub 3}OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN{sup -} identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are constrained by comparing ice inventories toward different types of protostars and background stars, through ice mapping, analysis of cloud-to-cloud variations, and ice (anti-)correlations. Based on the analysis, the first ice formation phase is driven by hydrogenation of atoms, which results in an H{sub 2}O-dominated ice. At later prestellar times, CO freezes out and variations in CO freezeout levels and the subsequent CO-based chemistry can explain most of the observed ice abundance variations. The last important ice evolution stage is thermal and UV processing around protostars, resulting in CO desorption, ice segregation, and the formation of complex organic molecules. The distribution of cometary ice abundances is consistent with the idea that most cometary ices have a protostellar origin.

  13. Literacy Mediation in Neighbourhood Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between staff in Neighbourhood Houses, and the socially and educationally disadvantaged community members who visit Neighbourhood Houses, have been viewed through many lenses, including community development, social support, caring and compassion. This paper looks at Neighbourhood Houses as sites of pedagogical practice. More…

  14. College and University Apartment Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey-Powell, Deborah, Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to update housing professionals on the current issues and future trends facing college and university apartment operations in the 21st century. Its chapters are: (1) "The History of Apartment Housing" (Rena Buchan); (2) "Research in Apartment Housing" (Donald Whalen); (3) "Community Services and Programming: A Search…

  15. Housing for Migrant Agricultural Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, J. W.; And Others

    Intended to assist the producer in meeting the housing regulations of Federal, state, and local governments for migratory workers and thereby to attract better labor through adequate housing, this agricultural handbook contains discussions of the migrant-labor situation; regulations and standards; general housing considerations (i.e., length of…

  16. Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for "Icing Effects" and "Ice Accretion" Simulations on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung; Vickerman, Mary; Lee, Ki D.; Thompson, David S.

    2000-01-01

    There are two distinct icing-related problems for airfoils that can be simulated. One is predicting the effects of ice on the aerodynamic performance of airfoils when ice geometry is known ("icing effects" study). The other is simulating ice accretion under specified icing conditions ("ice accretion" simulation). This paper will address development of two different software packages for two-dimensional geometry preparation and grid generation for both "icing effects" and "ice accretion" studies.

  17. When are antifreeze proteins in solution essential for ice growth inhibition?

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2015-06-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a widespread class of proteins that bind to ice and facilitate the survival of organisms under freezing conditions. AFPs have enormous potential in applications that require control over ice growth. However, the nature of the binding interaction between AFPs and ice remains the subject of debate. Using a microfluidics system developed in-house we previously showed that hyperactive AFP from the Tenebrio molitor beetle, TmAFP, remains bound to an ice crystal surface after exchanging the solution surrounding the ice crystal to an AFP-free solution. Furthermore, these surface-adsorbed TmAFP molecules sufficed to prevent ice growth. These experiments provided compelling evidence for the irreversible binding of hyperactive AFPs to ice. Here, we tested a moderately active type III AFP (AFPIII) from a fish in a similar microfluidics system. We found, in solution exchange experiments that the AFPIIIs were also irreversibly bound to the ice crystals. However, some crystals displayed "burst" growth during the solution exchange. AFPIII, like other moderately active fish AFPs, is unable to bind to the basal plane of an ice crystal. We showed that although moderate AFPs bound to ice irreversibly, moderate AFPs in solution were needed to inhibit ice growth from the bipyramidal crystal tips. Instead of binding to the basal plane, these AFPs minimized the basal face size by stabilizing other crystal planes that converge to form the crystal tips. Furthermore, when access of solution to the basal plane was physically blocked by the microfluidics device walls, we observed enhancement of the antifreeze activity. These findings provide direct evidence that the weak point of ice growth inhibition by fish AFPs is the basal plane, whereas insect AFPs, which can bind to the basal plane, are able to inhibit its growth and thereby increase antifreeze activity. PMID:25946514

  18. Antarctic Data at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitzell, K.; Bohlander, J. A.; Bauer, R. J.; Scambos, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) archives and distributes data related to the Earth’s cryosphere. The center has a unique and extensive archive of data related to Antarctica, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of Polar Programs, and various NASA projects. This poster will highlight some of our newest and most significant data holdings for Antarctic ice and climate research. Antarctic data at NSIDC include: -New P.I.-contributed data sets from the Antarctic Glaciological Data Center (AGDC), an NSF-funded data archive facility at NSIDC. AGDC has been active for 12 years, and houses data sets from over 150 researchers, spanning all types of research in the Antarctic. -MODIS Mosaic of Antarctica (MOA) 2009 was released in fall of 2010. This is a 125 meter, resolution-enhanced seamless mosaic of Antarctica, compiled from over 250 MODIS images acquired between 20 November 2008 and 01 March 2009. It provides a uniquely clear and detailed view of the continent's subtle ice flow and surface features. The new version offers the opportunity for change detection (ice flow, iceberg calving events, changes in ice flow and wind features) in the five years between early 2009 and an identically processed mosaic assembled in 2004. -NASA’s “Making Earth Science Data Records for Use in Research Environments” (MEaSUREs) provides ice velocity data for all of Antarctica, derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture radar (InSAR) analysis. We will show the access and browse software to be used for MEaSURES/Antarctic Ice Velocity, called the Antarctic Cryosphere Access Portal (A-CAP).

  19. Supportive housing in Brooklyn.

    PubMed

    Burke, Natasha

    2005-01-01

    Since 1977, Saint Vincent Catholic Medical Centers of New York City has been creating and maintaining supportive housing offerings for at-risk populations, such as individuals with HIV/AIDS, those with substance abuse challenges, and the mentally ill. By providing a continuum of medical and social services, the organization aims to help residents stabilize and rebuild their lives. Saint Vincent sees empowerment as a key step toward helping individuals maintain their health, re-enter the community, seek employment, and pursue other goals. Some of the supportive services Saint Vincent offers in its housing communities are care coordination, counseling, peer support networks, self-help groups, leisure activities, help with finances, and referrals to community agencies offering other resources. Recognizing the importance of job training and assistance, the system also offers a unique program in which mentally ill individuals are able to work in a recycling center or office cleaning business, both of which are owned by Saint Vincent. PMID:15807066

  20. Housing characteristics 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.

  1. House bat management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenhall, Arthur Merwin

    1982-01-01

    The soundest long-term solution for the management of bats that enter buildings and cause a nuisance problem or present a public health hazard is by batproofing the structure. Chemical toxicants do not solve house bat problems and may create worse ones. This manual describes batproofing techniques that will provide effective and acceptable alternatives for dealing with house bat problems and hazards. Recent declines in bat populations and greater appreciation of the ecological importance of bats have identified the need for sound management strategies that will encourage bat conservation while protecting human health and solving nuisance problems. One of the best deterrents against house bats is to improve the energy efficiency of the structure since bats may enter holes through which heat is lost. Heat conservation methods used for batproofing will also be eligible for Federal residential energy tax credits. The manual should be useful to homeowners, public health officials, physicians, veterinarians, conservationists, and others interested or concerned about bat interactions with humans.

  2. Analytical ice shape predictions for flight in natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Brian M.; Riley, James T.

    1988-01-01

    LEWICE is an analytical ice prediction code that has been evaluated against icing tunnel data, but on a more limited basis against flight data. Ice shapes predicted by LEWICE is compared with experimental ice shapes accreted on the NASA Lewis Icing Research Aircraft. The flight data selected for comparison includes liquid water content recorded using a hot wire device and droplet distribution data from a laser spectrometer; the ice shape is recorded using stereo photography. The main findings are as follows: (1) An equivalent sand grain roughness correlation different from that used for LEWICE tunnel comparisons must be employed to obtain satisfactory results for flight; (2) Using this correlation and making no other changes in the code, the comparisons to ice shapes accreted in flight are in general as good as the comparisons to ice shapes accreted in the tunnel (as in the case of tunnel ice shapes, agreement is least reliable for large glaze ice shapes at high angles of attack); (3) In some cases comparisons can be somewhat improved by utilizing the code so as to take account of the variation of parameters such as liquid water content, which may vary significantly in flight.

  3. Environmental Health Disparities in Housing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The physical infrastructure and housing make human interaction possible and provide shelter. How well that infrastructure performs and which groups it serves have important implications for social equity and health. Populations in inadequate housing are more likely to have environmental diseases and injuries. Substantial disparities in housing have remained largely unchanged. Approximately 2.6 million (7.5%) non-Hispanic Blacks and 5.9 million Whites (2.8%) live in substandard housing. Segregation, lack of housing mobility, and homelessness are all associated with adverse health outcomes. Yet the experience with childhood lead poisoning in the United States has shown that housing-related disparities can be reduced. Effective interventions should be implemented to reduce environmental health disparities related to housing. PMID:21551378

  4. ICE encounter operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanelli, N.; Morris, D.

    1986-01-01

    The operations encompassing the International Cometary Explorer's (ICE) encounter with the Comet Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985 are documented. The ICE mission presented new challenges for the Deep Space Network (DSN) 64 meter subnetwork. Because of poor telemetry link margin predicted for Giacobini-Zinner (GZ) encounter, supplemental support by the Japanese Institute for Space and Astronautical Sciences 64-meter antenna at Usuda, Japan and the 305-meter Arecibo Radio Observatory in Puerto Rico was required. To improve the 64 meter subnetwork telemetry performance the following were also implemented: (1) Real time antenna array of 64 meter and 34 meter at a single complex and the required performance testing; and (2) Nonreal time antenna array of two complexes was implemented as a backup in the event of ground or spacecraft failure.

  5. Ross ice shelf vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, P. D.; Diez, A.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Wiens, D. A.; Aster, R. C.; Nyblade, A.

    2015-09-01

    Broadband seismic stations were deployed across the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) in November 2014 to study ocean gravity wave-induced vibrations. Initial data from three stations 100 km from the RIS front and within 10 km of each other show both dispersed infragravity (IG) wave and ocean swell-generated signals resulting from waves that originate in the North Pacific. Spectral levels from 0.001 to 10 Hz have the highest accelerations in the IG band (0.0025-0.03 Hz). Polarization analyses indicate complex frequency-dependent particle motions, with energy in several frequency bands having distinctly different propagation characteristics. The dominant IG band signals exhibit predominantly horizontal propagation from the north. Particle motion analyses indicate retrograde elliptical particle motions in the IG band, consistent with these signals propagating as Rayleigh-Lamb (flexural) waves in the ice shelf/water cavity system that are excited by ocean wave interactions nearer the shelf front.

  6. Water Ice on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Roush, Ted L.; Owen, Tobias C.; Schmitt, Bernard; Quirico, Eric; Geballe, Thomas R.; deBergh, Catherine; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; DalleOre, Cristina M.; Doute, Sylvain

    1999-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic detection of H2O ice on Triton, evidenced by the broad absorptions in the near infrared at 1.55 and 2.04 micron. The detection on Triton confirms earlier preliminary studies (D. P. Cruikshank, R. H. Brown, and R. N. Clark, Icarus 58, 293-305, 1984). The spectra support the contention that H2O ice on Triton is in a crystalline (cubic or hexagonal) phase. Our spectra (1.87-2.5 micron) taken over an interval of nearly 3.5 years do not show any significant changes that might relate to reports of changes in Triton's spectral reflectance (B. Buratti, M. D. Hicks, and R. L. Newburn, Jr., Nature 397, 219, 1999), or in Triton's volatile inventory (J. L. Elliot et al., Nature 393, 765-767, 1998).

  7. Structure of Ice VI.

    PubMed

    Kamb, B

    1965-10-01

    Ice VI, a high-pressure form of density 1.31 g cm-(3), has a tetragonal cell of dimensions a = 6.27 A, c = 5.79 A, space group P4(2)/nmc, each cell containing ten water molecules. The structure is built up of hydrogen-bonded chdins of water molecules that are analogs of the tectosilicate chains out of which the fibrous zeolites are constructed. The chains in ice VI are linked laterally to one another to form an open, zeolite-like framework. The cavities in this framework are filled with a second framework identical with the first. The two frameworks interpenetrate but do not interconnect, and the complete structure can thus be considered a "self-clathrate." This structural feature is a natural way to achieve high density in tetrahedrally linked framework structures. PMID:17787274

  8. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  9. Europa Ice Floes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa, as seen in this image taken June 27, 1996 by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, displays features in some areas resembling ice floes seen in Earth's polar seas. Europa, about the size of Earth's moon, has an icy crust that has been severely fractured, as indicated by the dark linear, curved, and wedged-shaped bands seen here. These fractures have broken the crust into plates as large as 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) across. Areas between the plates are filled with material that was probably icy slush contaminated with rocky debris. Some individual plates were separated and rotated into new positions. Europa's density indicates that it has a shell of water ice thicker than 100 kilometers (about 60 miles), parts of which could be liquid. Currently, water ice could extend from the surface down to the rocky interior, but the features seen in this image suggest that motion of the disrupted icy plates was lubricated by soft ice or liquid water below the surface at the time of disruption. This image covers part of the equatorial zone of Europa and was taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) by the Solid-state Imaging Subsystem on the Galileo spacecraft. North is to the right and the sun is nearly directly overhead. The area shown is about 510 by 989 kilometers (310-by-600 miles), and the smallest visible feature is about 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) across.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http:// www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  10. Europa's Broken Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa, as seen in this image taken June 27, 1996 by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, displays features in some areas resembling ice floes seen in Earth's polar seas. Europa, about the size of Earth's moon, has an icy crust that has been severely fractured, as indicated by the dark linear, curved, and wedged-shaped bands seen here. These fractures have broken the crust into plates as large as 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) across. Areas between the plates are filled with material that was probably icy slush contaminated with rocky debris. Some individual plates were separated and rotated into new positions. Europa's density indicates that it has a shell of water ice as thick as 100 kilometers (about 60 miles), parts of which could be liquid. Currently, water ice could extend from the surface down to the rocky interior, but the features seen in this image suggest that motion of the disrupted icy plates was lubricated by soft ice or liquid water below the surface at the time of disruption. This image covers part of the equatorial zone of Europa and was taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) by the solid-state imager camera on the Galileo spacecraft. North is to the right and the sun is nearly directly overhead. The area shown is about 360 by 770 kilometers (220-by-475 miles or about the size of Nebraska), and the smallest visible feature is about 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) across. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  11. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  12. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003

    This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.

    Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.

    In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.

    Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  13. The Joy of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAyeal, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    The effectiveness of cryospheric science in addressing its main purpose (predicting and assessing response to climate change) is powerfully, but intangibly enhanced by the mysterious nature and the remote locations of ice and snow phenomena. Study of the cryosphere, in essence, depends as much on the universal human desire to satisfy curiosity as it does on the fact that cryospheric science informs humanity about the consequences of the environmental changes now clearly visible in all realms of the cryosphere. In my presentation, I shall consider the study of ice-shelf dynamics and stability, and shall draw on the perspective of my 37 years of involvement in this small, but important corner of glaciology, to show where curiosity has, and continues to be, a major driver of understanding. Joyful moments within the development of ice-shelf glaciology include examples where complete misunderstandings and blind alleys have ironically led to unexpected insight into how related phenomena operate, including: the flow of ice streams, the role of sticky spots, styles and drivers of iceberg calving, tidewater glacier terminus behavior, the source mechanisms and interpretations of cryospheric related seismic signals, and the dynamics of iceberg-drift-steering ocean circulation in basins separated by mid-ocean ridges. The familiar joke, "Why did the man who lost his keys on a dark night only search underneath the streetlamp?", is apt for cryospheric science--but with a perverse twist: We cryospheric scientists are more akin to the man who is driven to also grope for the key in the darkness because of the chance that in addition to the key, the car that the key will start might also be found somewhere beyond the glow of the streetlamp.

  14. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Ice anaesthesia in procedural dermatology.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shreya; Lowe, Patricia; Fischer, Gayle; Lim, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents findings from a survey of Australian dermatologists who were questioned about their preferred pain control methods when carrying out injectable procedures. We also present, what is to the best of our knowledge, the first proof-of-concept experiment exploring the relationship between ice-to-skin contact time and skin surface temperature, using both ice wrapped in latex and ice wrapped in aluminium foil. Of 79 dermatologists 32 responded to the survey (41% response rate): 31 (97%) injected botulinum toxin type A (BTA) for dynamic lines, 26 (81%) injected BTA for hyperhidrosis, and 24 (75%) injected skin fillers. Ice anaesthesia was the most common method of pain control (75%) followed by use of topical anaesthesia (50%) such as EMLA, compound agents and lignocaine 4%. Ice wrapped in latex or latex-like material was the most common ice packaging used by those surveyed and the median ice-to-skin contact time was 10 s. The ice experiment results indicated that ice wrapped with aluminium foil was equivalent to ice wrapped in latex for short contact times (< 20 s), but more effective at reducing skin temperature with longer contact times (> 20 s). These findings will be of relevance to cosmetic and paediatric dermatologists or any area of procedural medicine where effective non-injectable pain control is required. PMID:23617804

  16. Subsonic Aircraft Safety Icing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Reveley, Mary S.; Evans, Joni K.; Barrientos, Francesca A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project is one of four projects within the agency s Aviation Safety Program (AvSafe) in the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The IRAC Project, which was redesigned in the first half of 2007, conducts research to advance the state of the art in aircraft control design tools and techniques. A "Key Decision Point" was established for fiscal year 2007 with the following expected outcomes: document the most currently available statistical/prognostic data associated with icing for subsonic transport, summarize reports by subject matter experts in icing research on current knowledge of icing effects on control parameters and establish future requirements for icing research for subsonic transports including the appropriate alignment. This study contains: (1) statistical analyses of accident and incident data conducted by NASA researchers for this "Key Decision Point", (2) an examination of icing in other recent statistically based studies, (3) a summary of aviation safety priority lists that have been developed by various subject-matter experts, including the significance of aircraft icing research in these lists and (4) suggested future requirements for NASA icing research. The review of several studies by subject-matter experts was summarized into four high-priority icing research areas. Based on the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project goals and objectives, the IRAC project was encouraged to conduct work in all of the high-priority icing research areas that were identified, with the exception of the developing of methods to sense and document actual icing conditions.

  17. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  18. 12 CFR 1281.15 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... GOALS Housing Goals § 1281.15 Housing plans. (a) Housing plan requirement. If the Director determines... feasible, the Director may require the Bank to submit a housing plan for approval by the Director. (b) Nature of plan. If the Director requires a housing plan, the housing plan shall: (1) Be feasible; (2)...

  19. 12 CFR 1281.15 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... GOALS Housing Goals § 1281.15 Housing plans. (a) Housing plan requirement. If the Director determines... feasible, the Director may require the Bank to submit a housing plan for approval by the Director. (b) Nature of plan. If the Director requires a housing plan, the housing plan shall: (1) Be feasible; (2)...

  20. 12 CFR 1281.15 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... GOALS Housing Goals § 1281.15 Housing plans. (a) Housing plan requirement. If the Director determines... feasible, the Director may require the Bank to submit a housing plan for approval by the Director. (b) Nature of plan. If the Director requires a housing plan, the housing plan shall: (1) Be feasible; (2)...

  1. 24 CFR 1006.210 - Housing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.210 Housing services. NHHBG funds... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Housing services. 1006.210 Section 1006.210 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  2. 24 CFR 1006.210 - Housing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.210 Housing services. NHHBG funds... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Housing services. 1006.210 Section 1006.210 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  3. 24 CFR 1006.210 - Housing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.210 Housing services. NHHBG funds... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing services. 1006.210 Section 1006.210 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  4. 24 CFR 1006.210 - Housing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.210 Housing services. NHHBG funds... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Housing services. 1006.210 Section 1006.210 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  5. 24 CFR 983.52 - Housing type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing type. 983.52 Section 983.52 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  6. 24 CFR 9.155 - Housing adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing adjustments. 9.155 Section 9.155 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT § 9.155 Housing adjustments. (a) The agency...

  7. 24 CFR 982.352 - Eligible housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eligible housing. 982.352 Section 982.352 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8 TENANT BASED ASSISTANCE:...

  8. 24 CFR 9.155 - Housing adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing adjustments. 9.155 Section 9.155 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT § 9.155 Housing adjustments. (a) The agency...

  9. Effetively trapping air or lqiud water for anti-icing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun

    2014-03-01

    Icing on solid surfaces leads to operational difficulties and high maintenance efforts for power networks, aircrafts, ships, ground transportation vehicles and house-hold refrigerators, to name but a few. In extreme cases, icing on surfaces causes disastrous events such as crash of aircrafts and collapse of power networks, which result in severe economic impact and large loss of life. This talk is focused on the fundamentals of the ice formation and adhesion of ice with solid substrates aiming for fighting against icing on solid surfaces. When the supercooling is low, it would be possible to remove supercooled liquid water from the solid surfaces before freezing occurs. To achieve this, we design and constructed surfaces that can trap the air at the subfreezing temperature thus condensed water microdroplets could be spontaneously removed after the coalescence. When the supercooling is high, icing on surfaces occurs spontaniously. In this case, we constructed coatings on which aqueous lubricating layer could be trapped, thus the ice adhesion on the coating is so low that the ice formed atop could be removed by a wind action or its own gravity.

  10. House to house, shelter to shelter: experiences of black women seeking housing after leaving abusive relationships.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patty R; Laughon, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Locating safe and affordable housing is a vital step for women who decide to leave their abuser. Without housing, many women, particularly those who live in poverty, are forced to remain in abusive relationships, accept inadequate or unsafe housing, or become homeless (Menard, 2001; Moses, 2010). Women who choose to leave their abusers are faced with multiple barriers in establishing their independence such as limited financial resources, mental illness, and the lack of affordable housing (Botein & Hetling, 2010), putting them at risk of revictimization. This pilot study explores the narratives of Black mothers currently residing at an emergency intimate partner violence shelter to discover their experiences in seeking housing after leaving abusive relationships with a focus on housing instability and mental health. Utilizing a qualitative descriptive design, four major themes emerged: (a) unstable/insecure housing over time, (b) limited support, PMID:25996432

  11. An Overview of NASA Engine Ice-Crystal Icing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Ice accretions that have formed inside gas turbine engines as a result of flight in clouds of high concentrations of ice crystals in the atmosphere have recently been identified as an aviation safety hazard. NASA s Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has made plans to conduct research in this area to address the hazard. This paper gives an overview of NASA s engine ice-crystal icing research project plans. Included are the rationale, approach, and details of various aspects of NASA s research.

  12. Floating ice-algal aggregates below melting arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A; Hudson, Stephen R; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H H; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  13. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Hayashi, Kanetoshi

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  14. Floating Ice-Algal Aggregates below Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K.; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H. H.; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  15. Sulphur bacteria mediated formation of Palaeoproterozoic phosphorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosu, Lauri; Lepland, Aivo; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2014-05-01

    Modern phosphorite formation is typically associated with high productivity in upwelling areas where apatite (Ca-phosphate) precipitation is mediated by sulphur oxidising bacteria [1]. They inhabit the oxic/anoxic interface within the upper few centimetres of sediment column, accumulating phosphate in their cells under oxic conditions and releasing it rapidly when conditions become anoxic. Sulphur bacteria are known to live in close association with a consortium of anaerobic methane oxidising archaea and syntrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria. Paleoproterozoic, c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation in Karelia, Russia contains several P-rich intervals in the upper part of 1500 m thick succession of organic-rich sedimentary rocks interlayered with mafic tuffs and lavas. Apatite in these P-rich intervals forms impure laminae, lenses and round-oval nodules which diameters typically range from 300 to 1000 μm. Individual apatite particles in P-rich laminae and nodules commonly occur as cylinders that are 1-8 μm long and have diameters of 0.5-4 μm. Cross-sections of best preserved cylindrical apatite particles reveal a thin outer rim whereas the internal parts consist of small anhedral elongated crystallites, intergrown with carbonaceous material. During recrystallization the outer rim thickens towards interior and cylinders may attain hexagonal crystal habit, but their size and shape remains largely unchanged [2]. The sizes of Zaonega nodules are similar to giant sulphide-oxidising bacteria known from modern and ancient settings [3, 4]. Individual apatite cylinders and aggregates have shapes and sizes similar to the methanotrophic archaea that inhabit microbial mats in modern seep/vent areas where they operate in close associations with sulphur-oxidising microbial communities [5]. Seep/vent influence during the Zaonega phosphogenesis is indicated by variable, though positive Eu anomaly, expected in magmatically active sedimentary environment experiencing several lava flows. Moreover, P-rich intervals in the Zaonega Formation are found in organic-rich sediments exhibiting strongly negative δ13Corg values (-37 to -34 per mil) which is interpreted to reflect the methanotrophic biomass. We conclude that modern-style phosphogenesis, mediated by sulphide-oxidising bacteria living in consortium with methanotrophs, was established at least 2 Ga ago. [1] Schulz and Schulz (2005) Science 307, 416-418 [2] Lepland, Joosu, Kirsimäe, Prave, Romashkin, Črne, Martin, Fallick, Somelar, Üpraus, Mänd, Roberts, van Zuilen, Wirth, Schreiber (2014) Nature geoscience 7, 20-24 [3] Bailey, Joye, Kalanetra, Flood, and Corsetti (2007) Nature 445, 198-201 [4] Schulz, Brinkhoff, Ferdelman, Marine, Teske and Jorgensen (1999) Science 284, 493-495 [5] Knittel, Losekann, Boetius, Kort and Amann (2005) Applied and Environmental Microbiology 71, 467-479.

  16. Housing quality, housing instability, and maternal mental health.

    PubMed

    Suglia, Shakira Franco; Duarte, Cristiane S; Sandel, Megan T

    2011-12-01

    Poor housing conditions and residential instability have been associated with distress among women; however, this association could be the result of other social factors related to housing, such as intimate partner violence (IPV) and economic hardship. We examined associations of housing conditions and instability with maternal depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) while accounting for IPV and economic hardship in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,104). In the third study wave, interviewers rated indoor housing quality, including housing deterioration (e.g., peeling paint and holes in floor) and housing disarray (e.g., dark, crowded, and noisy). Mothers reported whether they had moved more than twice in the past two years, an indicator of housing instability. A screening for depression and GAD was obtained from questions derived from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short Form in the second and third study waves. IPV and economic hardship were assessed through questionnaire. In this sample, 16% of women were classified as having probable depression and 5% as having probable GAD. In adjusted analyses, mothers experiencing housing disarray (odds ratio [OR], 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0, 1.7]) and instability (OR, 1.4 [95% CI, 1.2, 2.3]) were more likely to screen positive for depression. In addition, those experiencing housing instability were more likely to screen positive for GAD (OR 1.9 [95% CI, 1.2, 3.0]) even after adjusting for other social factors. No associations were noted between housing deterioration and maternal mental health. Similar associations were noted when incident cases of probable depression and GAD were examined. Housing instability and disarray, but not deterioration, are associated with screening positive for depression and generalized anxiety among women regardless of other social stressors present in their lives. Housing could potentially present a point of intervention to prevent

  17. Proceedings of the Airframe Icing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Ron O. (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has a long history of working with its partners towards the understanding of ice accretion formation and its associated degradation of aerodynamic performance. The June 9, 2009, Airframe Icing Workshop held at GRC provided an opportunity to examine the current NASA airframe icing research program and to dialogue on remaining and emerging airframe icing issues and research with the external community. Some of the airframe icing gaps identified included, but are not limited to, ice accretion simulation enhancements, three-dimensional benchmark icing database development, three-dimensional iced aerodynamics modeling, and technology development for a smart icing system.

  18. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  19. Microwave emission characteristics of sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, A. T.; Poe, G.

    1972-01-01

    A general classification is presented for sea ice brightness temperatures with categories of high and low emission, corresponding to young and weathered sea ice, respectively. A sea ice emission model was developed which allows variations of ice salinity and temperature in directions perpendicular to the ice surface.

  20. Fram Strait sea ice outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G. F.; Pang, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    We summarize 24 years of ice export estimates and examine, over a 9-year record, the associated variability in the time-varying upward-looking sonar (ULS) thickness distributions of the Fram Strait. A more thorough assessment of the PMW (passive microwave) ice motion with 5 years of synthetic aperture radar (SAR)observations shows the uncertainties to be consistent with that found by Kwok and Rothrock [1999], giving greater confidence to the record of ice flux calculations.

  1. PSL Icing Facility Upgrade Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Dicki, Dennis J.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) was recently upgraded to perform engine inlet ice crystal testing in an altitude environment. The system installed 10 spray bars in the inlet plenum for ice crystal generation using 222 spray nozzles. As an altitude test chamber, the PSL is capable of simulating icing events at altitude in a groundtest facility. The system was designed to operate at altitudes from 4,000 to 40,000 ft at Mach numbers up to 0.8M and inlet total temperatures from -60 to +15 degF. This paper and presentation will be part of a series of presentations on PSL Icing and will cover the development of the icing capability through design, developmental testing, installation, initial calibration, and validation engine testing. Information will be presented on the design criteria and process, spray bar developmental testing at Cox and Co., system capabilities, and initial calibration and engine validation test. The PSL icing system was designed to provide NASA and the icing community with a facility that could be used for research studies of engine icing by duplicating in-flight events in a controlled ground-test facility. With the system and the altitude chamber we can produce flight conditions and cloud environments to simulate those encountered in flight. The icing system can be controlled to set various cloud uniformities, droplet median volumetric diameter (MVD), and icing water content (IWC) through a wide variety of conditions. The PSL chamber can set altitudes, Mach numbers, and temperatures of interest to the icing community and also has the instrumentation capability of measuring engine performance during icing testing. PSL last year completed the calibration and initial engine validation of the facility utilizing a Honeywell ALF502-R5 engine and has duplicated in-flight roll back conditions experienced during flight testing. This paper will summarize the modifications and buildup of the facility to accomplish these tests.

  2. Ice-shelf channel evolution in Antarctic ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Reinhard; Berger, Sophie; Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Ice shelves buttress the continental ice flux and facilitate ice--ocean interactions. They are often intersected by longitudinally elongated channels in which basal melting is significantly enhanced. Recent studies highlighted that this type of channelized melting impacts the buttressing strength of ice shelves and hence imprints the mass flux from the Antarctic continent. Here, the channel evolution is investigated from a glaciological perspective, using a full Stokes model and geophysical data from three consecutive field seasons on Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS), Antarctica. The RBIS contains numerous channels, incising the ice shelf by more than half the ice thickness. The modeling confirms (1) that basal melting as a feasible mechanism for the channel creation, albeit channels may also advect without melting for many tens of kilometers. The mere existence of channels is not a sufficient criteria to infer channelized melting at that location; (2) channels can be out of hydrostatic equilibrium depending on their width and the upstream melt history. This implies that inverting surface elevation for ice thickness in those areas is erroneous. Corresponding observational evidence for the channels at RBIS is presented by comparing the hydrostatic-ice thickness from GPS measurements with the ice thickness measured by ground-penetrating radar; (3) the simulations show that channelized melting imprints the flowfield characteristically, and can cause enhanced horizontal shearing across channels. This is exemplified for a channel at RBIS where the velocity anomaly is found in different sets of satellite-derived surface velocities, as well as in ground-based GPS measurements. This opens up the possibility to classify channelized melting from space, an important step towards incorporating these effects in ice--ocean models.

  3. Characterization of Ice Roughness From Simulated Icing Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Shin, Jaiwon

    1997-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the size of roughness elements on ice accreted on models in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were made in a previous study. Only limited data from that study have been published, but included were the roughness element height, diameter and spacing. In the present study, the height and spacing data were found to correlate with the element diameter, and the diameter was found to be a function primarily of the non-dimensional parameters freezing fraction and accumulation parameter. The width of the smooth zone which forms at the leading edge of the model was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. Although preliminary, the success of these correlations suggests that it may be possible to develop simple relationships between ice roughness and icing conditions for use in ice-accretion-prediction codes. These codes now require an ice-roughness estimate to determine convective heat transfer. Studies using a 7.6-cm-diameter cylinder and a 53.3-cm-chord NACA 0012 airfoil were also performed in which a 1/2-min icing spray at an initial set of conditions was followed by a 9-1/2-min spray at a second set of conditions. The resulting ice shape was compared with that from a full 10-min spray at the second set of conditions. The initial ice accumulation appeared to have no effect on the final ice shape. From this result, it would appear the accreting ice is affected very little by the initial roughness or shape features.

  4. 24 CFR 982.617 - Shared housing: Rent and voucher housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shared housing: Rent and voucher housing assistance payment. 982.617 Section 982.617 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  5. 24 CFR 982.608 - Congregate housing: Voucher housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Congregate housing: Voucher housing assistance payment. 982.608 Section 982.608 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  6. Anatomy of a Smart house

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, L.

    1988-07-01

    The author describes the Gas Laboratory House in Bowie, MD. It is being built as a SMART HOUSE. This means it will contain a whole-house control system made up of communication chips, computer programs and microprocessor-based controllers. A single cable carries signals from the chips to many different types of appliances. Flexible gas piping forms a ''circulatory system'' that makes the house completely compatible with natural gas appliances. The SMART HOUSE is fully programmable so that appliances can be told when to turn on and off. It can also have a zoned space-conditioning system, allowing sections of the house to be heated or cooled independently. The authors explains how the system works and the project's development schedule.

  7. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, K.N.

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  8. Sea ice/climate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives were to determine and analyze the annual cycle of sea ice extents in the Arctic Ocean and peripheral seas and bays over the period 1973 to 1986, looking in particular for any long term trends; to examine the relationship between local sea ice covers and the surrounding atmosphere and ocean; and to examine sea ice as a potential early indicator of climate change. The work involves creating regional and hemispheric time series of sea ice variables from satellite passive microwave data and analyzing these through various intercomparisons amongst themselves and with oceanographic and atmospheric fields.

  9. Preventing Ice Before it Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the late 1990s, a team of engineers at Ames Research Center invented an anti-icing fluid to keep ice from building up on airplane wings. Ice on wings can be a serious safety hazard, especially during takeoff, when a sheet of ice the thickness of a compact disc can reduce lift by 25 percent or more. The typical approach to clearing off the ice is to use a deicing solution once the ice has built up. The fluid created by the Ames team, though, when applied to a dry surface, prevents the ice from even forming a surface bond, which saves deicing time and money, while also preventing excessive use of chemical solvents. If, however, the solution is not applied before ice forms, it also serves as a traditional deicing formula. The formula contains propylene glycol, which has a very low freezing point, and a thickener, which helps the fluid adhere to the surface. Ice gathers on top of the formula, and then it can be wiped off with little effort. This thickening agent, a pseudo-plastic, sprays on as a liquid, like lemonade, gels like a lemon sherbet, turns back to a liquid when wiped, and then gels again into its sherbet consistency when left to solidify. The sherbet-gel stage is especially important when the formula is sprayed onto a vertical or steeped surface, as it clings better than a liquid would.

  10. Private Housing or Alternative Financing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Nick

    1999-01-01

    Explores the history of privatizing university housing and some current financing options, including use of developer and private foundations. Examples of successful alternative financing methods are highlighted. (GR)

  11. Evolution of ice-shelf channels in Antarctic ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, R.

    2015-03-01

    Ice shelves buttress the continental ice flux and mediate ice-ocean interactions. They are often traversed by channels in which basal melting is enhanced, impacting ice-shelf stability. Here, channel evolution is investigated using a transient, three-dimensional full Stokes model and geophysical data collected on Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS), Antarctica. The modeling confirms basal melting as a feasible mechanism for channel creation, although channels may also advect without melting for many tens of kilometers. Channels can be out of hydrostatic equilibrium depending on their width and the upstream melt history. Inverting surface elevation for ice thickness in those areas is erroneous and corresponding observational evidence is presented at RBIS by comparing the hydrostatically inverted ice thickness with radar measurements. The model shows that channelized melting imprints the flowfield characteristically, which can result in enhanced horizontal shearing across channels. This is exemplified for a channel at RBIS using observed surface velocities and opens up the possibility to classify channelized melting from space, an important step towards incorporating these effects in ice-ocean models.

  12. Evolution of ice-shelf channels in Antarctic ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, R.

    2015-06-01

    Ice shelves buttress the continental ice flux and mediate ice-ocean interactions. They are often traversed by channels in which basal melting is enhanced, impacting ice-shelf stability. Here, channel evolution is investigated using a transient, three-dimensional full Stokes model and geophysical data collected on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS), Antarctica. The modeling confirms basal melting as a feasible mechanism for channel creation, although channels may also advect without melting for many tens of kilometers. Channels can be out of hydrostatic equilibrium depending on their width and the upstream melt history. Inverting surface elevation for ice thickness using hydrostatic equilibrium in those areas is erroneous, and corresponding observational evidence is presented at RBIS by comparing the hydrostatically inverted ice thickness with radar measurements. The model shows that channelized melting imprints the flow field characteristically, which can result in enhanced horizontal shearing across channels. This is exemplified for a channel at RBIS using observed surface velocities and opens up the possibility to classify channelized melting from space, an important step towards incorporating these effects in ice-ocean models.

  13. Delicious ice cream, why does salt thaw ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2016-04-01

    During winter, we use to spread salt to thaw ice on the streets. In a physics show, one can be almost sure that after showing this effect, the answer to what happens to temperature will be "it increases". But no! It goes down, in such amount that one can complement the show by producing hand-made ice creams [1].

  14. Monitoring Fram Strait sea ice outflow and thin ice thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose to: 1) use sequential SAR maps to monitor the profile of sea ice motion through Fram Strait over the period 2003 throught 2005; and 2) explore the potential of using L-band polarimetric data to determine the thickness of thin ice over the same region.

  15. Instrument for Aircraft-Icing and Cloud-Physics Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilie, Lyle; Bouley, Dan; Sivo, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows a compact, rugged, simple sensor head that is part of an instrumentation system for making measurements to characterize the severity of aircraft-icing conditions and/or to perform research on cloud physics. The quantities that are calculated from measurement data acquired by this system and that are used to quantify the severity of icing conditions include sizes of cloud water drops, cloud liquid water content (LWC), cloud ice water content (IWC), and cloud total water content (TWC). The sensor head is mounted on the outside of an aircraft, positioned and oriented to intercept the ambient airflow. The sensor head consists of an open housing that is heated in a controlled manner to keep it free of ice and that contains four hot-wire elements. The hot-wire sensing elements have different shapes and sizes and, therefore, exhibit different measurement efficiencies with respect to droplet size and water phase (liquid, frozen, or mixed). Three of the hot-wire sensing elements are oriented across the airflow so as to intercept incoming cloud water. For each of these elements, the LWC or TWC affects the power required to maintain a constant temperature in the presence of cloud water.

  16. Arctic Sea Ice Predictability and the Sea Ice Prediction Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Drastic reductions in Arctic sea ice cover have increased the demand for Arctic sea ice predictions by a range of stakeholders, including local communities, resource managers, industry and the public. The science of sea-ice prediction has been challenged to keep up with these developments. Efforts such as the SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook (SIO; http://www.arcus.org/sipn/sea-ice-outlook) and the Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook have provided a forum for the international sea-ice prediction and observing community to explore and compare different approaches. The SIO, originally organized by the Study of Environmental Change (SEARCH), is now managed by the new Sea Ice Prediction Network (SIPN), which is building a collaborative network of scientists and stakeholders to improve arctic sea ice prediction. The SIO synthesizes predictions from a variety of methods, including heuristic and from a statistical and/or dynamical model. In a recent study, SIO data from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed. The analysis revealed that in some years the predictions were very successful, in other years they were not. Years that were anomalous compared to the long-term trend have proven more difficult to predict, regardless of which method was employed. This year, in response to feedback from users and contributors to the SIO, several enhancements have been made to the SIO reports. One is to encourage contributors to provide spatial probability maps of sea ice cover in September and the first day each location becomes ice-free; these are an example of subseasonal to seasonal, local-scale predictions. Another enhancement is a separate analysis of the modeling contributions. In the June 2014 SIO report, 10 of 28 outlooks were produced from models that explicitly simulate sea ice from dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice models. Half of the models included fully-coupled (atmosphere, ice, and ocean) models that additionally employ data assimilation. Both of these subsets (models and coupled models with data

  17. Multi-year Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Video Gallery

    The most visible change in the Arctic region in recent years has been the rapid decline of the perennial ice cover. The perennial ice is the portion of the sea ice floating on the surface of the oc...

  18. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  19. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-19

    [1] Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (-0.06 Wm-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm-2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 ± 0.10 Wm-2 (1σ uncertainty). Finally, this represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of -1.6 Wm-2.

  20. 1. Oil house, keeper's house, Southern Light Tower and Northern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oil house, keeper's house, Southern Light Tower and Northern Light Tower, view northwest, south and east sides - Kennebec River Light Station, South side of Doubling Point Road, off State Highway 127, 1.8 miles south of U.S. Route 1, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  1. Housing in America 1985/86. Current Housing Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Housing Report, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of data, collected in 1985 and 1986, is presented in this first biennial report that deals with U.S. housing and the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of its occupants. The U.S. Census American Housing Survey of 1985 is the primary database for the report, which provides an excellent resource for teacher background…

  2. PHOTO OF THE BOAT HOUSE, GATE HOUSE, UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTO OF THE BOAT HOUSE, GATE HOUSE, UPSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAYS LOOKING EAST; WATER INTAKE AND LOG BOOMS ARE SEEN ON RESERVOIR. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  3. Subsidized Housing, Public Housing, and Adolescent Violence and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Tamara G. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the separate relationships of public housing residence and subsidized housing residence to adolescent health risk behavior. Data include 2,530 adolescents aged 14 to 19 who were children of the National the Longitudinal Study of Youth. The author used stratified propensity methods to compare the behaviors of each…

  4. Housing Norms, Housing Satisfaction and the Propensity to Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Earl W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Normative housing deficits are introduced into an analysis of the propensity to move as intervening variables between socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and satisfaction. The findings support the use of residential satisfaction and normative housing deficits as predictors of the propensity to move. (Author)

  5. Proposed modifications to ice accretion/icing scaling theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, Alan J.

    1988-01-01

    The difficulty of conducting full-scale icing tests has long been appreciated. Testing in an icing wind tunnel has been undertaken for decades. While aircraft size and speeds have increased, tunnel facilities have not, thus making subscale geometric tests a necessity. Scaling laws governing these tests are almost exclusively based on analysis performed over 30 years ago and have not been rigorously validated. The following work reviews past scaling analyses and suggests revision to these analyses based on recent experimental observation. It is also suggested, based on the analysis contained herein, that current ice accretion predictive technologies, such as LEWICE when utilized in the glaze ice accretion regime, may need upgrading to more accurately estimate the rate of ice build-up on aerodynamic surfaces.

  6. Residual entropy of ice nanotubes and ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, Mikhail V.

    2013-02-01

    A relatively simple algorithm is presented for the complete enumeration of all H-bond networks in finite fragments of ice nanotubes and ice layers with periodic boundary conditions. This algorithm is based on the well-known transfer matrix method and it includes a convenient procedure for calculation of the elements of transfer matrices themselves. To facilitate this, it is necessary to specify only very small local matrices of sizes 2×2 or 4×4. We present exhaustive statistics of H-bonds arrangements for finite-size zigzag- and armchair-like ice nanotubes, for the fragments of hexagonal monolayer and bilayer and also for ice nanotubes consisting of stacked n-membered rings. Using the new algorithm, we have also calculated the specific residual entropy for the infinite two-dimensional lattices. The agreement with the well-known solution for a square ice model demonstrates the reliability of the obtained results.

  7. Development of a Measure of Housing and Housing Services.

    PubMed

    Clark, Colleen; Young, M Scott; Teague, Gregory; Rynearson-Moody, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Housing Program Measure (HPM) was designed to document critical elements of a range of housing program types and associated services. Qualitative methods, including literature review and open-ended interviews, were used to determine pertinent HPM domains and to develop the pool of items. The measure was pre-tested, and reliability and validity analyses were applied to revise and strengthen the measure. The resulting measure furthers homelessness research by providing a tool that can be used to define housing and housing services interventions across diverse projects and disciplines, to facilitate program management by matching housing resources to the needs of homeless individuals, and to support model development by measuring progress to goals. PMID:26643528

  8. Using ice-penetrating radars to date ice-rise formation and Late Holocene ice-sheet retreat in the Ronne Ice Shelf region, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Hindmarsh, Richard; King, Edward; Corr, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    The history of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the region currently occupied by the Ronne Ice Shelf is poorly known. This reflects a lack of accessible recently deglaciated surfaces, which prohibits conventional paleo glaciological techniques that can provide evidence of past ice-sheet extent and retreat, for example ocean coring or exposure-dating of geological material. We use a glaciological technique, Raymond Effect Dating, to constrain the retreat of the ice sheet through the Ronne Ice Shelf region. During two Antarctic field seasons, we used a pulse-echo ice-penetrating radar to image the base and internal stratigraphy of four ice rises - areas of grounded ice containing ice divides. Towing the radar with skidoos, we conducted over 2000 km of surveys on the Skytrain, Korff, Henry and Fowler Ice Rises and the ice shelf between them. We also used a step-frequency radar called pRES to measure the vertical ice flow in the vicinity of each ice divide. Isochronal ice layers imaged during the surveys deforming in a predictable way with ice flow, meaning that their shape contains information about past ice flow. Directly beneath ice divides the downward motion of the ice is impeded by an ice-dynamical phenomenon called the Raymond Effect. This causes layers beneath the divides to form 'Raymond Arches' that grow over time. We will present the data and simulate the growth of the Raymond Arches using our pRES-measured vertical ice velocities and date the onset of ice-divide flow at each ice rise by comparing the size of simulated arches to the arches imaged during our radar surveys. We consider the main sources of uncertainty associated with these ice-rise formation dates and discuss what they can tell us about the retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet through this region during the last few thousand years.

  9. The NASA aircraft icing research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Reinmann, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the NASA aircraft icing research program is to develop and make available to industry icing technology to support the needs and requirements for all-weather aircraft designs. Research is being done for both fixed wing and rotary wing applications. The NASA program emphasizes technology development in two areas, advanced ice protection concepts and icing simulation. Reviewed here are the computer code development/validation, icing wind tunnel testing, and icing flight testing efforts.

  10. Arctic sea-ice ridges—Safe heavens for sea-ice fauna during periods of extreme ice melt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradinger, Rolf; Bluhm, Bodil; Iken, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The abundances and distribution of metazoan within-ice meiofauna (13 stations) and under-ice fauna (12 stations) were investigated in level sea ice and sea-ice ridges in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Canada Basin in June/July 2005 using a combination of ice coring and SCUBA diving. Ice meiofauna abundance was estimated based on live counts in the bottom 30 cm of level sea ice based on triplicate ice core sampling at each location, and in individual ice chunks from ridges at four locations. Under-ice amphipods were counted in situ in replicate ( N=24-65 per station) 0.25 m 2 quadrats using SCUBA to a maximum water depth of 12 m. In level sea ice, the most abundant ice meiofauna groups were Turbellaria (46%), Nematoda (35%), and Harpacticoida (19%), with overall low abundances per station that ranged from 0.0 to 10.9 ind l -1 (median 0.8 ind l -1). In level ice, low ice algal pigment concentrations (<0.1-15.8 μg Chl a l -1), low brine salinities (1.8-21.7) and flushing from the melting sea ice likely explain the low ice meiofauna concentrations. Higher abundances of Turbellaria, Nematoda and Harpacticoida also were observed in pressure ridges (0-200 ind l -1, median 40 ind l -1), although values were highly variable and only medians of Turbellaria were significantly higher in ridge ice than in level ice. Median abundances of under-ice amphipods at all ice types (level ice, various ice ridge structures) ranged from 8 to 114 ind m -2 per station and mainly consisted of Apherusa glacialis (87%), Onisimus spp. (7%) and Gammarus wilkitzkii (6%). Highest amphipod abundances were observed in pressure ridges at depths >3 m where abundances were up to 42-fold higher compared with level ice. We propose that the summer ice melt impacted meiofauna and under-ice amphipod abundance and distribution through (a) flushing, and (b) enhanced salinity stress at thinner level sea ice (less than 3 m thickness). We further suggest that pressure ridges, which extend into deeper, high

  11. High pressure ices

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Andreas; Ashcroft, N. W.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2012-01-01

    H2O will be more resistant to metallization than previously thought. From computational evolutionary structure searches, we find a sequence of new stable and meta-stable structures for the ground state of ice in the 1–5 TPa (10 to 50 Mbar) regime, in the static approximation. The previously proposed Pbcm structure is superseded by a Pmc21 phase at p = 930 GPa, followed by a predicted transition to a P21 crystal structure at p = 1.3 TPa. This phase, featuring higher coordination at O and H, is stable over a wide pressure range, reaching 4.8 TPa. We analyze carefully the geometrical changes in the calculated structures, especially the buckling at the H in O-H-O motifs. All structures are insulating—chemistry burns a deep and (with pressure increase) lasting hole in the density of states near the highest occupied electronic levels of what might be component metallic lattices. Metallization of ice in our calculations occurs only near 4.8 TPa, where the metallic C2/m phase becomes most stable. In this regime, zero-point energies much larger than typical enthalpy differences suggest possible melting of the H sublattice, or even the entire crystal. PMID:22207625

  12. The physics of ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Chris

    2003-05-01

    Almost everybody likes ice cream, so it can provide an excellent vehicle for discussing and demonstrating a variety of physical phenomena, such as Newton's law of cooling, Boyle's law and the relationship between microstructure and macroscopic properties (e.g. Young's modulus). Furthermore, a demonstration of freezing point depression can be used to make ice cream in the classroom!

  13. Arctic Sea Ice, Summer 2014

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of daily Arctic sea ice extent in summer 2014, from March 21, 2014 to Sept. 17, 2014 – when the ice appeared to reach it’s minimum extent for the year. It’s the sixth lowest minimum se...

  14. Recrystallization Diagram for Polar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikusat, Ilka; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Faria, Sérgio H.

    2014-05-01

    Ice is the most frequent mineral on the Earth's surface, however experiences conditions comparable to silicate minerals at high metamorphic grades. In all natural conditions ice is a hot material with homologous temperatures between 0.9 and 0.7 at least. Under such circumstances recrystallization plays a decisive role in governing the state and thus the behaviour of the material. This has been recognized and interpreted in many ice cores in the last decades (Faria et al. in press a) assigning recrystallization regimes to ice sheet depth ranges. This assignment made use of microstructure observations (mainly grain size) and estimated boundary conditions (temperature and stress/strain amounts) which change systematically with depth. To generalize the use of recrystallization regimes we decouple their occurrence from the ice sheet depth information and connect them directly to the activators and causes: strain rate and temperature (Faria et al. in press b). References: Faria, S. H.; Weikusat, I. & Azuma, N. The Microstructure of Polar Ice. Part I: Highlights from ice core research. Journal of Structural Geology , in press a, DOI: 10.1016/j.jsg.2013.09.010 Faria, S. H.; Weikusat, I. & Azuma, N. The Microstructure of Polar Ice. Part II: State of the Art .Journal of Structural Geology , in press b, DOI: 10.1016/j.jsg.2013.11.003

  15. Recent Advances in the LEWICE Icing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Addy, Gene; Struk, Peter; Bartkus, Tadas

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe two recent modifications to the Glenn ICE software. First, a capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been modified based on recent experimental data. Modifications have been made to the ice particle bouncing and erosion model. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to ice crystal ice accretions performed in the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). Second, modifications were made to the run back model based on data and observations from thermal scaling tests performed in the NRC Altitude Icing Tunnel.

  16. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  17. Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, Nicole; Hunke, Elizabeth; Elliott, Scott; Turner, Adrian

    2012-06-18

    Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

  18. Tropical tropopause ice clouds: A new approach to answer the mystery of low crystal numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, Peter; Krämer, Martina

    2013-04-01

    Water vapour is the most important natural green house gas. However, in the stratosphere an increase in water vapour would possibly result in a net cooling of the earth-atmosphere system. The major entrance pathway of trace substances into the stratosphere is the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). The TTL water vapor budget, and thus the exchange between troposphere and stratosphere, depends crucially on the occurrence and properties of ice clouds in this cold region (T < 200 K). New observations indicate that very low ice crystal numbers frequently occur in the TTL. This phenomenon is not yet understood and is not compatible with the idea that homogeneous freezing of solution droplets is the major pathway of ice formation. These low ice number concentrations are consistent with observed persistent high ice supersaturations inside cold TTL cirrus clouds, which in turn control the exchange of water vapor with the stratosphere. Here, we reproduce in-situ measurements of frequencies of occurrence of ice crystal concentrations by extensive model simulations, driven by the special dynamical conditions in the TTL, namely the superposition of slow large-scale updrafts with high-frequency short waves. The simulations show that about 80% of the observed incidences of low ice crystal concentrations can be explained by 'classical' homogeneous ice nucleation in the very slow updrafts (< 1cm/s), about 19% stem from heterogeneous freezing, while the remaining of about 1% originates from homogeneous freezing in slightly faster updrafts (> 1cm/s). The mechanism limiting the ice crystal production from homogeneous freezing in an environment full of gravity waves is that freezing events are stalled -due to the shortness of the gravity waves- before a higher number concentration of ice crystals can be formed.

  19. Environmental information from ice cores

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, R.J. )

    1992-02-01

    Information from snow and ice core studies which is useful for documenting the interplay between the climate and the chemistry of the natural atmosphere is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the formation and interpretation of the ice records for the present conditions and the data obtained from the analysis of the Vostok ice core. It is concluded that the deep ice core data provide precise information on the ice-age environmental conditions. When polar temperatures were approximately 10 C lower than now, atmospheric CO2 and CH4 contents were factors of 2 and 4 lower, respectively, than the present conditions. At this time, sea salt and overall crustal dust depositions were significantly higher. According to modifications in source intensity and transport of gaseous precursors the biogeochemical cycles of S and N were also disturbed. 91 refs.

  20. Dynamic Crush Characterization of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2006-01-01

    During the space shuttle return-to-flight preparations following the Columbia accident, finite element models were needed that could predict the threshold of critical damage to the orbiter's wing leading edge from ice debris impacts. Hence, an experimental program was initiated to provide crushing data from impacted ice for use in dynamic finite element material models. A high-speed drop tower was configured to capture force time histories of ice cylinders for impacts up to approximately 100 ft/s. At low velocity, the force-time history depended heavily on the internal crystalline structure of the ice. However, for velocities of 100 ft/s and above, the ice fractured on impact, behaved more like a fluid, and the subsequent force-time history curves were much less dependent on the internal crystalline structure.

  1. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  2. Segmentation in Urban Housing Markets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnare, Ann B.; Struyk, Raymond J.

    1976-01-01

    In this study, the hypothesis that urban housing markets are segmented, in the sense that significantly different prices per unit of housing services exist contemporaneously in spatially or structurally defined markets, is tested. A main conclusion is that the market is working fairly efficiently to eliminate price premiums and discounts.…

  3. Nonprofit Housing and Neighborhood Spillovers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellen, Ingrid Gould; Voicu, Ioan

    2006-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations play a critical role in U.S. housing policy, a role typically justified by the claim that their housing investments produce significant neighbor-hood spillover benefits. However, little work has actually been done to measure these impacts on neighborhoods. This paper compares the neighborhood spillover effects of…

  4. New Trends in Student Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David; Wesse, David; Stickney, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the influence of residence halls in supporting a college's admissions and recruiting process for attracting highly qualified students. It explores the trends in student housing needs and how a school can meet those needs, and examines possible funding solutions for dormitory renovations. Recommendations for developing housing strategies…

  5. The Philosophy of University Housing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines a stated philosophy of university housing and the philosophy's effect on the facilitation of the personal and intellectual growth of students residing in the residence halls and the development of a sense of community. This particular philosophy governs the housing operations at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.…

  6. The House Plan at Cypress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Daniel G.

    A House system is planned for Cypress Junior College, California, for an expected enrollment of 12,000. This idea of a residence hall where students live and work together may be organized around a major field (science, engineering, arts) or for a deliberate interdisciplinary mix. Usually a House plan brings living and learning together to…

  7. Urban Decline and Durable Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Gyourko, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Urban decline is not the mirror image of growth, and durable housing is the primary reason the nature of decline is so different. This paper presents a model of urban decline with durable housing and verifies these implications of the model: (1) city growth rates are skewed so that cities grow more quickly than they decline; (2) urban decline is…

  8. Housing Uncertainty and Childhood Impatience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anil, Bulent; Jordan, Jeffrey L.; Zahirovic-Herbert, Velma

    2011-01-01

    The study demonstrates a direct link between housing uncertainty and children's time preferences, or patience. We show that students who face housing uncertainties through mortgage foreclosures and eviction learn impatient behavior and are therefore at greater risk of making poor intertemporal choices such as dropping out of school. We find that…

  9. Consumer Controlled Housing. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarnulis, Edward, Ed.; Lakin, K. Charlie, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" reports on consumer-controlled housing for persons with developmental disabilities, and explores housing and service options that empower individuals with disabilities to live their lives with independence, privacy, and freedom of choice. It includes an excerpt from the Association for Retarded Citizens position statement on…

  10. Housing for Moderate Income Households.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannigan, Vincent M.; Meeks, Carol B.

    1991-01-01

    Describes equity leasing, a program that enables people to acquire housing without an up-front investment but with an incentive to maintain and improve the property. Under this proposal, lessees would acquire a leasehold interest in a house and own the right to use the property for a continuously extended lease term. (JOW)

  11. Welcome to the House System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    Searching for ways to help students feel more connected to one another and to the school community as a whole, a junior high school implemented the social house approach. Social houses divide students into multiple social units, rather than into separate academic entities. Each unit has its own identity and theme.The different groups mix during…

  12. Smart Houses and Uncomfortable Homes.

    PubMed

    Alm, Norman; Arnott, John

    2015-01-01

    In order for smart houses to achieve acceptance from potential beneficiaries they will need to match the users' expectation that their house is also their home, with the sense of privacy and control that this implies. Designers of this technology will need to be aware of findings in this regard from fields such as architecture and design ethnography. PMID:26294466

  13. The importance of large scale sea ice drift and ice type distribution on ice extent in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwegmann, S.; Haas, C.; Timmermann, R.; Gerdes, R.; Lemke, P.

    2009-12-01

    In austral winter large parts of Antarctic Seas are covered by sea ice. This modifies the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between ocean and atmosphere. The knowledge of ice extent and its variability is necessary for an adequate simulation of those fluxes and thus for climate modelling. The goal of this study is the observation of interannual and seasonal ice extent variations and their underlying causes. Variability is analysed by using monthly means of microwave and scatterometer satellite data. Results are correlated with ice drift variations calculated from a Finite Element Sea ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) and with satellite derived sea ice drift products to determine the dependency of ice extent on sea ice drift. An additional cause for changing ice extent could be the variability of ice type distribution, i.e. the contribution of first and second year ice to the total ice covered area. These ice types are determined on monthly time scales from scatterometer satellite data. Ice class distribution and sea ice drift variability are compared with the characteristics and variability of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) to evaluate the relative importance of different sea ice parameters for shaping Weddell Sea ice extent and its variability.

  14. 20 CFR 654.404 - Housing site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing site. 654.404 Section 654.404 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Housing Standards § 654.404 Housing site. (a) Housing sites shall be well drained...

  15. 24 CFR 81.22 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Housing plans. 81.22 Section 81.22... LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (FREDDIE MAC) Housing Goals § 81.22 Housing plans. (a) If the Secretary... Secretary shall require the GSE to submit a housing plan for approval by the Secretary. (b) Nature of...

  16. 12 CFR 1281.15 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Housing plans. 1281.15 Section 1281.15 Banks... GOALS Housing Goals § 1281.15 Housing plans. (a) Housing plan requirement. If the Director determines... feasible, the Director may require the Bank to submit a housing plan for approval by the Director....

  17. 24 CFR 81.22 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Housing plans. 81.22 Section 81.22... LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (FREDDIE MAC) Housing Goals § 81.22 Housing plans. (a) If the Secretary... Secretary shall require the GSE to submit a housing plan for approval by the Secretary. (b) Nature of...

  18. 24 CFR 81.22 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing plans. 81.22 Section 81.22... LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (FREDDIE MAC) Housing Goals § 81.22 Housing plans. (a) If the Secretary... Secretary shall require the GSE to submit a housing plan for approval by the Secretary. (b) Nature of...

  19. 45 CFR 605.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Housing. 605.45 Section 605.45 Public Welfare... § 605.45 Housing. (a) Housing provided by the recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students shall provide comparable, convenient, and accessible housing to handicapped students...

  20. 24 CFR 8.33 - Housing adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing adjustments. 8.33 Section 8.33 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION BASED ON HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  1. 24 CFR 3.405 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing. 3.405 Section 3.405 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 3.405 Housing. (a)...

  2. 38 CFR 18.445 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Housing. 18.445 Section....445 Housing. (a) Housing provided by a recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students shall provide comparable, convenient, and accessible housing to qualified...

  3. 34 CFR 104.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Housing. 104.45 Section 104.45 Education Regulations of... Postsecondary Education § 104.45 Housing. (a) Housing provided by the recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students shall provide comparable, convenient, and accessible housing...

  4. 20 CFR 654.407 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing. 654.407 Section 654.407 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Housing Standards § 654.407 Housing. (a) Housing shall be structurally sound, in...

  5. 24 CFR 3.405 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing. 3.405 Section 3.405 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 3.405 Housing. (a)...

  6. 24 CFR 8.33 - Housing adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing adjustments. 8.33 Section 8.33 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION BASED ON HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  7. New Fluid Prevents Railway Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Through a licensing agreement between NASA's Ames Research Center and Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc. (MIS), two MIS products have been enhanced with NASA's anti-icing fluid technology. MIS offers the new fluid in two commercial products, the Zero Gravity(TM) Third Rail Anti-Icer/Deicer and the Ice Free Switch(R). Using NASA's fluid technology, these products form a protective-coating barrier that prevents the buildup of ice and snow. Applying the fluid to the railway components prior to ice or snowstorm works as an anti-icing fluid, remaining in place to melt precipitation as it hits the surface. It also functions as a deicing fluid. If applied to an already frozen switch or rail, it will quickly melt the ice, free the frozen parts, and then remain in place to prevent refreezing. Additional benefits include the ability to cling to vertical rail surfaces and resist the effects of rain and wind. With the Ice Free Switch, it takes only five minutes to treat the switch by spraying, brushing, or pouring on the product. Ice Free Switch requires as little as one gallon per switch whereas other deicing fluids require five to ten gallons of liquid to effectively melt ice. Zero Gravity serves the same anti-icing/deicing purposes but applies fluid to the third rail through a system that is easily installed onto mass transit cars. A tank of fluid and a dispensing system are placed underneath the train car and the fluid is applied as the train runs its route.

  8. Farmworker Housing Quality and Health.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Jacobs, Ilene J; Ruiz, Virginia

    2015-11-01

    On 11 November 2014, Farmworker Housing Quality and Health: A Transdisciplinary Conference was convened to draw together experts from the variety of disciplines who contribute to research and practice focused on farmworker housing and health in order to delineate current knowledge and propose next steps. The conference addressed three specific aims: (1) to consolidate current knowledge on characteristics and quality of housing provided for farmworkers; (2) to delineate pertinent directions and areas for farmworker housing health and safety research and policy; and (3) to facilitate the development of working groups to support the implementation of research, education, and engineering projects to improve farmworker housing. This article provides an overview of the conference. PMID:26378156

  9. Study of ice accretion on icing wind tunnel components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, J. E.; Olsen, W.

    1986-01-01

    In a closed loop icing wind tunnel the icing cloud is simulated by introducing tiny water droplets through an array of nozzles upstream of the test section. This cloud will form ice on all tunnel components (e.g., turning vanes, inlet guide vanes, fan blades, and the heat exchanger) as the cloud flows around the tunnel. These components must have the capacity to handle their icing loads without causing significant tunnel performance degradation during the course of an evening's run. To aid in the design of these components for the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT) at NASA Lewis Research Center the existing Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) is used to measure icing characteristics of the IRT's components. The results from the IRT are scaled to the AWT to account for the AWT's larger components and higher velocities. The results show that from 90 to 45 percent of the total spray cloud froze out on the heat exchanger. Furthermore, the first set of turning vanes downstream of the test section, the FOD screen and the fan blades show significant ice formation. The scaling shows that the same results would occur in the AWT.

  10. The IceProd (IceCube Production) Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Vélez, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    IceProd is a data processing and management framework developed by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory for processing of Monte Carlo simulations and data. IceProd runs as a separate layer on top of middleware or cluster job schedulers and can take advantage of a variety of computing resources including grids such as EGI, OSG, and NorduGrid as well as local clusters running batch systems like HT Condor, PBS, and SGE. This is accomplished by a set of dedicated daemons which process job submission in a coordinated fashion through the use of middleware plug-ins that serve to abstract the details of job submission and job management. IceProd can also manage complex workflow DAGs across distributed computing grids in order to optimize usage of resources. We describe several aspects of IceProd's design and it's applications in collaborative computing environments. We also briefly discuss design aspects of a second generation IceProd, currently being tested in IceCube.

  11. Ice thickness in the Northwest Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Christian; Howell, Stephen E. L.

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the feasibility of commercial shipping in the ice-prone Northwest Passage (NWP) has attracted a lot of attention. However, very little ice thickness information actually exists. We present results of the first ever airborne electromagnetic ice thickness surveys over the NWP carried out in April and May 2011 and 2015 over first-year and multiyear ice. These show modal thicknesses between 1.8 and 2.0 m in all regions. Mean thicknesses over 3 m and thick, deformed ice were observed over some multiyear ice regimes shown to originate from the Arctic Ocean. Thick ice features more than 100 m wide and thicker than 4 m occurred frequently. Results indicate that even in today's climate, ice conditions must still be considered severe. These results have important implications for the prediction of ice breakup and summer ice conditions, and the assessment of sea ice hazards during the summer shipping season.

  12. Antarctic ice rise formation, evolution, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Antarctic ice rises originate from the contact between ice shelves and one of the numerous topographic highs emerging from the edge of the continental shelf. While investigations of the Raymond effect indicate their millennial-scale stability, little is known about their formation and their role in ice shelf stability. Here we present for the first time the simulation of an ice rise using the BISICLES model. The numerical results successfully reproduce several field-observable features, such as the substantial thinning downstream of the ice rise and the successive formation of a promontory and ice rise with stable radial ice flow center, showing that ice rises are formed during the ice sheet deglaciation. We quantify the ice rise buttressing effect, found to be mostly transient, delaying grounding line retreat significantly but resulting in comparable steady state positions. We demonstrate that ice rises are key in controlling simulations of Antarctic deglaciation.

  13. NASA's program on icing research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, John J.; Shaw, Robert J.; Ranaudo, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's program in aircraft icing research and technology is reviewed. The program relies heavily on computer codes and modern applied physics technology in seeking icing solutions on a finer scale than those offered in earlier programs. Three major goals of this program are to offer new approaches to ice protection, to improve our ability to model the response of an aircraft to an icing encounter, and to provide improved techniques and facilities for ground and flight testing. This paper reviews the following program elements: (1) new approaches to ice protection; (2) numerical codes for deicer analysis; (3) measurement and prediction of ice accretion and its effect on aircraft and aircraft components; (4) special wind tunnel test techniques for rotorcraft icing; (5) improvements of icing wind tunnels and research aircraft; (6) ground de-icing fluids used in winter operation; (7) fundamental studies in icing; and (8) droplet sizing instruments for icing clouds.

  14. Aircraft Ice Accretion Due to Large-Droplet Icing Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of aircraft icing due to clouds consisting of individual droplets 10 times larger than those normally found in icing conditions are being carried out by members of the NASA Lewis Research Center's Icing Technology Branch. When encountered by an aircraft in freezing conditions, clouds consisting of large water droplets have a significantly different effect than those with normal droplets. A large-water-droplet cloud has been suggested as the cause of a commuter airplane accident in the late fall of 1994. As a result, studies of what happens to aircraft flying in these rare, but potentially very hazardous, conditions have been reemphasized.

  15. Ice thickness measurement system for the icing research tunnel calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Theresa L.; Dearmon, John M.

    1993-01-01

    To measure icing patterns across a test section of the Icing Research Tunnel, an automated rotating bar measurement system was developed at NASA LeRC. In comparison with the previously used manual measurement system, this system provides a number of improvements: increased accuracy and repeatability, increased number of data points, reduced tunnel operating time, and improved documentation. The automated system uses a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) to measure ice accretion. This instrument is driven along the bar by means of an intelligent stepper motor which also controls data recording. This paper describes the rotating bar calibration measurement system.

  16. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  17. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Role of Ice Streams in Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, A.; Schoof, C.; Tziperman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Ice streams are regions of fast flow within ice sheets that can exhibit variability on time scales ranging from years to millennia. Observations and model reconstructions indicate that ice streams likely played a major role in the most recent deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The variability of these ice streams may have dictated the spatiotemporal progression of deglaciation, as some ice sheet domes may have been more sensitive to dynamic changes in ice stream activity. We analyze the behavior of both idealized and realistic ice sheet configurations to determine the role of ice streams in setting ice sheet steady states and the spatiotemporal sequence of deglacial transitions. We also examine the way in which climate feedbacks could have amplified the response of ice streams to Milankovitch forcing, thereby initiating ice sheet collapse. We use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM), by itself and coupled to an energy balance atmospheric model. The presence of ice streams dramatically alters steady-state ice sheet configurations, allowing for the existence of thin, widely extended margins. There is a marked transition from binge-purge-like ice stream variability (that is believed to have occurred as part of Heinrich events during the last glacial period) to steady ice stream flow as climate (temperature, precipitation) is varied over a range corresponding to glacial variability. This qualitative transition in ice sheet dynamics amplifies small changes in external forcing (e.g. Milankovitch cycles) sufficiently to activate strong climate feedbacks. We discuss how the reorganization of ice sheet configuration, through changes in ice sheet extent and elevation, may favor certain climate feedbacks (e.g. ice-albedo and lapse rate feedbacks). We also relate these analyses to observations of Laurentide deglaciation and discuss implications for the future of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  19. Regelation and ice segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    Macroscopic processes can have an important effect on the state of regolith water. The two primary mechanisms responsible for the formation of segregated ice on Earth, thermally induced regelation and hydraulic fracturing, are reviewed while their potential importance on Mars is examined. While regelation is the dominant terrestrial process, it requires a warmer and wetter environment than currently exists on Mars. In this respect, the conditions required for hydraulic fracturing are less demanding. In assessing its potential importance on Mars, it is noted that hydraulic fracturing can produce a localized zone of high pressure water that could readily disrupt an overburden of frozen ground. Such a process, it is concluded, may have triggered the release of groundwater that led to the formation of the major outflow channels.

  20. South Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-337, 21 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 'swiss cheese' pattern of frozen carbon dioxide on the south polar residual cap. Observation of these materials over two Mars years has revealed that the scarps that bound the mesas and small buttes are retreating-the carbon dioxide ice is subliming away-at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per Mars year in some places. The picture covers an area about 900 m (about 900 yards) wide near 87.1oS, 93.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  1. Life in the Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Wainwright, N. R.; Grasby, S. E.; Harvey, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    The current Martian surface environment is extremely hostile to any known form of life. The combination of subfreezing temperature, low atmospheric pressure and high ultraviolet flux, combined with desiccated and possibly oxidizing soil, could destroy even the hardiest microorganisms. The Viking biology experiments are generally interpreted to indicate that the surface of Mars is currently devoid of life and organic molecules at the part-per-billion level. Speculation on the possibility of extant or preserved microbial life on Mars thus centers on refuges in some manner protected from the current surface environment, either in space or time. Terrestrial analogs include hydrothermal systems, lakes, caves and subsurface aquifers as well as more clement conditions in the distant past. We are examining the evidence for microbiology in Earth's glaciated polar regions as analogs to the polar caps of Mars. This research concerns the detection of microorganisms or their preserved remains at the surface and within polar glacial ice.

  2. Breaking the Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Electro-Expulsive Separation System, a low power electro-thermal deicer, was invented by Leonard A. Haslim from the Ames Research Center, who was named 1988 NASA Inventor of the Year for his work. Sold under license by Dataproducts New England, Inc., it consists of an elastic, rubber-like deicer boot on the wing's leading edge with copper ribbons embedded in it. Conductors are separated by slits in between and parallel to the ribbons. When the system is switched on, a bank of capacitors in the power supply discharges into the conductors which induces the conductor pairs to repel each other. This results in a powerful force causing the slit voids to expand explosively, removing ice on the wing. EESS is more flexible, more effective, and easier to maintain than previous systems. Potential ship, bridge and industrial applications are under study.

  3. Supporting Ice Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, T.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Fowler, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change research, and glaciology in particular, has increasingly embraced seismology in recent years. The NSF supported IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center is working with researchers to develop the unique instruments and techniques for collecting data in this challenging environment. Global concern with sea level change along with strategic interests of the US government and other nations is driving a large investment in glaciological climate research. A number of groups have demonstrated new seismologically-derived constraints on glaciological conditions and processes. Environmental challenges include remote and precarious locations, necessitating robust yet quickly deployable seismic stations and long periods of autonomous operation. Temperature extremes and the possibility of immersion from large annual snow loads, resulting in a deployment surface that can vary from 50 feet of snow cover to bare ice with large melt pools in a single season are additional major challenges. There is also an urgency created by studies indicating that the high latitude continental ice sheets are metastable and that behavior is changing now. Scientists are presently commonly utilizing adaptations of available instrumentation designed for low latitude and milder field conditions as appropriate, but seek better, more capable, and more flexible solutions, including integration of environmental sensors and real-time data telemetry and station control as some of these experiments evolve into a monitoring effort. Seismic instrumentation is only produced by a small number of companies and, innovation for new instruments takes time and requires substantial investment. While pursuing longer-term innovation funding strategies, we are also adapting current instrumentation paradigms to glaciological use (e.g., by leveraging the cold instrument development for research in Antarctica during the IPY). We are also encouraging industrial partners to respond to these demands and challenges with

  4. The Future of the American Housing Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Betty Jo

    1983-01-01

    Provides a profile of the population to be housed at the beginning of the twenty-first century, an analysis of predictions by housing futurists, and near-term forecasts for the housing product and process. (JOW)

  5. Drug user settings: a crack house typology.

    PubMed

    Geter, R S

    1994-06-01

    Both lay persons and members of the scientific community have come to view the inner-city crack house as a facility where drug dealers and crack addicts sell, buy, and use crack cocaine. It is suggested in this article that the term "crack house" be unbundled into four more meaningful terms based on the physical conditions of the house, its functionality, and the social relationships that it supports. Two typologies are proposed. The first separates drug houses into four general categories: (1) Crack House, (2) Cop House, (3) Drug House III, and (4) Drug House IV. The second typology categorizes the Crack House into four types: (A) the Party House, (B) the Hit House, (C) the Smoke House, and (D) the Bandominium. Each of these types is explored in detail. PMID:7960297

  6. 24 CFR 8.25 - Public housing and multi-family Indian housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public housing and multi-family... ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Program Accessibility § 8.25 Public housing and multi-family Indian housing. (a) Development and alteration of public housing and multi-family...

  7. 24 CFR 8.25 - Public housing and multi-family Indian housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public housing and multi-family... ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Program Accessibility § 8.25 Public housing and multi-family Indian housing. (a) Development and alteration of public housing and multi-family...

  8. 24 CFR 8.25 - Public housing and multi-family Indian housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public housing and multi-family... ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Program Accessibility § 8.25 Public housing and multi-family Indian housing. (a) Development and alteration of public housing and multi-family...

  9. 24 CFR 982.608 - Congregate housing: Voucher housing assistance payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Congregate housing: Voucher housing assistance payment. 982.608 Section 982.608 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT...

  10. Frequency response of ice streams

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. Rosie; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Arthern, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Changes at the grounding line of ice streams have consequences for inland ice dynamics and hence sea level. Despite substantial evidence documenting upstream propagation of frontal change, the mechanisms by which these changes are transmitted inland are not well understood. In this vein, the frequency response of an idealized ice stream to periodic forcing in the downstream strain rate is examined for basally and laterally resisted ice streams using a one-dimensional, linearized membrane stress approximation. This reveals two distinct behavioural branches, which we find to correspond to different mechanisms of upstream velocity and thickness propagation, depending on the forcing frequency. At low frequencies (centennial to millennial periods), slope and thickness covary hundreds of kilometres inland, and the shallow-ice approximation is sufficient to explain upstream propagation, which occurs through changes in grounding-line flow and geometry. At high frequencies (decadal to sub-decadal periods), penetration distances are tens of kilometres; while velocity adjusts rapidly to such forcing, thickness varies little and upstream propagation occurs through the direct transmission of membrane stresses. Propagation properties vary significantly between 29 Antarctic ice streams considered. A square-wave function in frontal stress is explored by summing frequency solutions, simulating some aspects of the dynamical response to sudden ice-shelf change. PMID:23197934

  11. Icing Encounter Duration Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to investigate how aerodynamic performance degradation progresses with time throughout an exposure to icing conditions. It is one of the first documented studies of the effects of ice contamination on aerodynamic performance at various points in time throughout an icing encounter. Both a 1.5 and 6 ft chord, two-dimensional, NACA-23012 airfoils were subjected to icing conditions in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for varying lengths of time. At the end of each run, lift, drag, and pitching moment measurements were made. Measurements with the 1.5 ft chord model showed that maximum lift and pitching moment degraded more rapidly early in the exposure and degraded more slowly as time progressed. Drag for the 1.5 ft chord model degraded more linearly with time, although drag for very short exposure durations was slightly higher than expected. Only drag measurements were made with the 6 ft chord airfoil. Here, drag for the long exposures was higher than expected. Novel comparison of drag measurements versus an icing scaling parameter, accumulation parameter times collection efficiency was used to compare the data from the two different size model. The comparisons provided a means of assessing the level of fidelity needed for accurate icing simulation.

  12. Frequency response of ice streams.

    PubMed

    Williams, C Rosie; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Arthern, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Changes at the grounding line of ice streams have consequences for inland ice dynamics and hence sea level. Despite substantial evidence documenting upstream propagation of frontal change, the mechanisms by which these changes are transmitted inland are not well understood. In this vein, the frequency response of an idealized ice stream to periodic forcing in the downstream strain rate is examined for basally and laterally resisted ice streams using a one-dimensional, linearized membrane stress approximation. This reveals two distinct behavioural branches, which we find to correspond to different mechanisms of upstream velocity and thickness propagation, depending on the forcing frequency. At low frequencies (centennial to millennial periods), slope and thickness covary hundreds of kilometres inland, and the shallow-ice approximation is sufficient to explain upstream propagation, which occurs through changes in grounding-line flow and geometry. At high frequencies (decadal to sub-decadal periods), penetration distances are tens of kilometres; while velocity adjusts rapidly to such forcing, thickness varies little and upstream propagation occurs through the direct transmission of membrane stresses. Propagation properties vary significantly between 29 Antarctic ice streams considered. A square-wave function in frontal stress is explored by summing frequency solutions, simulating some aspects of the dynamical response to sudden ice-shelf change. PMID:23197934

  13. Observed platelet ice distributions in Antarctic sea ice: An index for ocean-ice shelf heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhorne, P. J.; Hughes, K. G.; Gough, A. J.; Smith, I. J.; Williams, M. J. M.; Robinson, N. J.; Stevens, C. L.; Rack, W.; Price, D.; Leonard, G. H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Haas, C.; Haskell, T. G.

    2015-07-01

    Antarctic sea ice that has been affected by supercooled Ice Shelf Water (ISW) has a unique crystallographic structure and is called platelet ice. In this paper we synthesize platelet ice observations to construct a continent-wide map of the winter presence of ISW at the ocean surface. The observations demonstrate that, in some regions of coastal Antarctica, supercooled ISW drives a negative oceanic heat flux of -30 Wm-2 that persists for several months during winter, significantly affecting sea ice thickness. In other regions, particularly where the thinning of ice shelves is believed to be greatest, platelet ice is not observed. Our new data set includes the longest ice-ocean record for Antarctica, which dates back to 1902 near the McMurdo Ice Shelf. These historical data indicate that, over the past 100 years, any change in the volume of very cold surface outflow from this ice shelf is less than the uncertainties in the measurements.

  14. Housing authority of Baltimore City-Public Housing Energy Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, T. S. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The NASA/Baltimore Applications Project operating at the Goddard Space Flight Center was called upon by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City to consider the problems of providing low cost public housing because of increased energy costs and suggest methods for correction and alleviation. The first step chosen was to elicit as many different options for solution as possible through means of a Public Housing Energy Workshop held in Easton, Md. in September 1980. A final role for the Workshop was a listing and qualifying of each alternative as to its suitability and cost. Specific areas were examined by three panels: (1) Systems, (2) Conservation and Motivation, and (3) Fuels. Each panel was made up of persons from differing but appropriate backgrounds; membership was not restricted to housing people alone. A summary of their deliberations is given - it will be used as a stepping stone to further selection and implementation of alternatives.

  15. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  16. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  17. Ice formation in amorphous cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czihak, C.; Müller, M.; Schober, H.; Vogl, G.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the formation of ice in wet amorphous cellulose in the temperature range of 190 K⩽T⩽280 K. Due to voids and pores in the cellulose film, water molecules are able to form crystalline aggregates. Beyond that, water is able to penetrate between cellulose chains where it can adsorb to hydroxyl side groups. From diffraction data we suggest an aggregation of low-density amorphous (lda) ice at cellulose surfaces. The formation of lda ice shows a clear temperature dependence which will be discussed together with recent inelastic neutron scattering results.

  18. 24 CFR 906.24 - Protections available to non-purchasing residents of housing other than public housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-purchasing residents of housing other than public housing. 906.24 Section 906.24 Housing and Urban... FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING... housing other than public housing. Residents of non-public housing that would be displaced by...

  19. 24 CFR 906.24 - Protections available to non-purchasing residents of housing other than public housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-purchasing residents of housing other than public housing. 906.24 Section 906.24 Housing and Urban... FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING... housing other than public housing. Residents of non-public housing that would be displaced by...

  20. 24 CFR 906.24 - Protections available to non-purchasing residents of housing other than public housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-purchasing residents of housing other than public housing. 906.24 Section 906.24 Housing and Urban... FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING... housing other than public housing. Residents of non-public housing that would be displaced by...

  1. Modeling Wave-Ice Interactions in the Marginal Ice Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Shi, Fengyan; Bateman, Sam; Veeramony, Jay; Calantoni, Joe

    2015-04-01

    The small-scale (O(m)) interactions between waves and ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) are investigated with a coupled model system. Waves are simulated with the non-hydrostatic finite-volume model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012) and ice floes are represented as bonded collections of smaller particles with the discrete element system LIGGGHTS (Kloss et al., 2012). The physics of fluid and ice are recreated as authentically as possible, to allow the coupled system to supplement and/or substitute for more costly and demanding field experiments. The presentation will first describe the development and validation of the coupled system, then discuss the results of a series of virtual experiments in which ice floe and wave characteristics are varied to examine their effects on energy dissipation, MIZ floe size distribution, and ice pack retreat rates. Although Wadhams et al. (1986) suggest that only a small portion (roughly 10%) of wave energy entering the MIZ is reflected, dissipation mechanisms for the remaining energy have yet to be delineated or measured. The virtual experiments are designed to focus on specific properties and processes - such as floe size and shape, collision and fracturing events, and variations in wave climate - and measure their relative roles the transfer of energy and momentum from waves to ice. Questions to be examined include: How is energy dissipated by ice floe collisions, fracturing, and drag, and how significant is the wave attenuation associated with each process? Do specific wave/floe length scale ratios cause greater wave attenuation? How does ice material strength affect the rate of wave energy loss? The coupled system will ultimately be used to test and improve upon wave-ice parameterizations for large-scale climate models. References: >Kloss, C., C. Goniva, A. Hager, S. Amberger, and S. Pirker (2012). Models, algorithms and validation for opensource DEM and CFD-DEM. Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics 12(2/3), 140-152. >Ma, G

  2. ICE911 Research: Preserving and Rebuilding Reflective Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.; Venkatesh, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a localized surface albedo modification technique that shows promise as a method to increase reflective multi-year ice using floating materials, chosen so as to have low subsidiary environmental impact. It is now well-known that multi-year reflective ice has diminished rapidly in the Arctic over the past 3 decades and this plays a part in the continuing rapid decrease of summer-time ice. As summer-time bright ice disappears, the Arctic is losing its ability to reflect summer insolation, and this has widespread climatic effects, as well as a direct effect on sea level rise, as oceans heat and once-land-based ice melts into the sea. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over six Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small man-made lake in Minnesota, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. The materials can float and can be made to minimize effects on marine habitat and species. The instrumentation is designed to be deployed in harsh and remote locations. Localized snow and ice preservation, and reductions in water heating, have been quantified in small-scale testing. We have continued to refine our material and deployment approaches, and we have had laboratory confirmation by NASA. In the field, the materials were successfully deployed to shield underlying snow and ice from melting; applications of granular materials remained stable in the face of local wind and storms. We are evaluating the effects of snow and ice preservation for protection of infrastructure and habitat stabilization, and we are concurrently developing our techniques to aid in water conservation. Localized albedo modification options such as those being studied in this work may act to preserve ice, glaciers, permafrost and seasonal snow areas, and perhaps aid natural ice formation processes. If this method is deployed on a large enough scale, it could conceivably

  3. Ice911 Research: Preserving and Rebuilding Multi-Year Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.

    2013-12-01

    A localized surface albedo modification technique is being developed that shows promise as a method to increase multi-year ice using reflective floating materials, chosen so as to have low subsidiary environmental impact. Multi-year ice has diminished rapidly in the Arctic over the past 3 decades (Riihela et al, Nature Climate Change, August 4, 2013) and this plays a part in the continuing rapid decrease of summer-time ice. As summer-time ice disappears, the Arctic is losing its ability to act as the earth's refrigeration system, and this has widespread climatic effects, as well as a direct effect on sea level rise, as oceans heat, and once-land-based ice melts into the sea. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over five Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small man-made lake in Minnesota, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. The materials can float and can be made to minimize effects on marine habitat and species. The instrumentation is designed to be deployed in harsh and remote locations. Localized snow and ice preservation, and reductions in water heating, have been quantified in small-scale testing. Climate modeling is underway to analyze the effects of this method of surface albedo modification in key areas on the rate of oceanic and atmospheric temperature rise. We are also evaluating the effects of snow and ice preservation for protection of infrastructure and habitat stabilization. This paper will also discuss a possible reduction of sea level rise with an eye to quantification of cost/benefit. The most recent season's experimentation on a man-made private lake in Minnesota saw further evolution in the material and deployment approach. The materials were successfully deployed to shield underlying snow and ice from melting; applications of granular materials remained stable in the face of local wind and storms. Localized albedo

  4. 14 CFR 25.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... applicant seeks certification for flight in icing conditions, the airplane must be able to safely operate in the continuous maximum and intermittent maximum icing conditions of appendix C. To establish this— (a... verify the ice protection analysis, to check for icing anomalies, and to demonstrate that the...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... applicant seeks certification for flight in icing conditions, the airplane must be able to safely operate in the continuous maximum and intermittent maximum icing conditions of appendix C. To establish this— (a... verify the ice protection analysis, to check for icing anomalies, and to demonstrate that the...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... applicant seeks certification for flight in icing conditions, the airplane must be able to safely operate in the continuous maximum and intermittent maximum icing conditions of appendix C. To establish this— (a... verify the ice protection analysis, to check for icing anomalies, and to demonstrate that the...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... applicant seeks certification for flight in icing conditions, the airplane must be able to safely operate in the continuous maximum and intermittent maximum icing conditions of appendix C. To establish this— (a... verify the ice protection analysis, to check for icing anomalies, and to demonstrate that the...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... applicant seeks certification for flight in icing conditions, the airplane must be able to safely operate in the continuous maximum and intermittent maximum icing conditions of appendix C. To establish this— (a... verify the ice protection analysis, to check for icing anomalies, and to demonstrate that the...

  9. Everyday Engineering: Should Ice Be Cubed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard H.; Everett, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    While ice is usually referred to as ice cubes, indeed, most are not really cubes at all. In this 5E learning-cycle lesson, students will investigate different shapes of ice and how shape affects the speed of melting and the rate of cooling a glass of water. Students will compare three different shapes of ice with the same volume but different…

  10. Ices on the surface of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Roush, Ted L.; Owen, Tobias C.; Geballe, Thomas R.; De Bergh, Catherine; Schmitt, Bernard; Brown, Robert H.; Bartholomew, Mary J.

    1993-01-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of Triton reveals ices of nitrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, of which nitrogen is the dominant component. Carbon dioxide ice may be spatially segregated from the other more volatile ices, covering about 10 percent of Triton's surface. The absence of ices of other hydrocarbons and nitriles challenges existing models of methane and nitrogen photochemistry on Triton.

  11. Ices on the surface of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Owen, T. C.; Geballe, T. R.; de Bergh, C.; Schmitt, B.; Brown, R. H.; Bartholomew, M. J.

    1993-08-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of Triton reveals ices of nitrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, of which nitrogen is the dominant component. Carbon dioxide ice may be spatially segregated from the other more volatile ices, covering about 10 percent of Triton's surface. The absence of ices of other hydrocarbons and nitriles challenges existing models of methane and nitrogen photochemistry on Triton.

  12. Airframe Icing Research Gaps: NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark

    2009-01-01

    qCurrent Airframe Icing Technology Gaps: Development of a full 3D ice accretion simulation model. Development of an improved simulation model for SLD conditions. CFD modeling of stall behavior for ice-contaminated wings/tails. Computational methods for simulation of stability and control parameters. Analysis of thermal ice protection system performance. Quantification of 3D ice shape geometric characteristics Development of accurate ground-based simulation of SLD conditions. Development of scaling methods for SLD conditions. Development of advanced diagnostic techniques for assessment of tunnel cloud conditions. Identification of critical ice shapes for aerodynamic performance degradation. Aerodynamic scaling issues associated with testing scale model ice shape geometries. Development of altitude scaling methods for thermal ice protections systems. Development of accurate parameter identification methods. Measurement of stability and control parameters for an ice-contaminated swept wing aircraft. Creation of control law modifications to prevent loss of control during icing encounters. 3D ice shape geometries. Collection efficiency data for ice shape geometries. SLD ice shape data, in-flight and ground-based, for simulation verification. Aerodynamic performance data for 3D geometries and various icing conditions. Stability and control parameter data for iced aircraft configurations. Thermal ice protection system data for simulation validation.

  13. 14 CFR 29.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to determine the adequacy of the ice protection system: (1) Laboratory dry air or simulated icing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ice protection. 29.1419 Section 29.1419... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1419 Ice protection. (a) To...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to determine the adequacy of the ice protection system: (1) Laboratory dry air or simulated icing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ice protection. 29.1419 Section 29.1419... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1419 Ice protection. (a) To...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to determine the adequacy of the ice protection system: (1) Laboratory dry air or simulated icing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ice protection. 29.1419 Section 29.1419... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1419 Ice protection. (a) To...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... components or models of the components. (2) Flight dry air tests of the ice protection system as a whole, or... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ice protection. 23.1419 Section 23.1419... Ice protection. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired, compliance with...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... components or models of the components. (2) Flight dry air tests of the ice protection system as a whole, or... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ice protection. 23.1419 Section 23.1419... Ice protection. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired, compliance with...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1419 - Ice protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to determine the adequacy of the ice protection system: (1) Laboratory dry air or simulated icing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ice protection. 29.1419 Section 29.1419... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1419 Ice protection. (a) To...

  19. The NASA aircraft icing research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Reinmann, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the NASA aircraft icing research program is to develop and make available to industry icing technology to support the needs and requirements for all weather aircraft designs. Research is being done for both fixed and rotary wing applications. The NASA program emphasizes technology development in two key areas: advanced ice protection concepts and icing simulation (analytical and experimental). The computer code development/validation, icing wind tunnel testing, and icing flight testing efforts which were conducted to support the icing technology development are reviewed.

  20. Transmission line icing measurement on photogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Ma, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijin; Du, Hao; Luo, Hong; Mao, Xianyin; Tang, Min; Liu, Yawen

    2015-12-01

    Icing thickness parameter is the basic data for power sector to make decision for icing accident prevention. In this paper, a transmission line icing measurement method is proposed. It used the photogrammetry method to realize icing parameters measurement through the integration of high resolution camera, laser range finder and inertial measurement unit. Compared with traditional icing measurement method, this method is flexible and is the effective supplement of the fixed icing detection terminal. And its high accuracy measurement guarantees the reliability of the icing thickness parameters.

  1. Ice mechanics and risks to offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, T.J.O.

    1988-01-01

    This volume brings together the results of all salient research development in ice engineering, from smaller scale to full size tests on ice strength and ice mechanics which is essential criteria for the design of safe, cost effective structures. Much of the data has been released from confidential industry files and thus allows, for the first time, a full appraisal of the subject. Contents include - Types and Distribution of Ice, Mechanical Properties, Measurements of Ice-Structure Interaction, and Analysis of Ice Failure and Design Ice Loads. This work is completed with a full literary review and subject index.

  2. Loss of sea ice in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Perovich, Donald K; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A

    2009-01-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover is in decline. The areal extent of the ice cover has been decreasing for the past few decades at an accelerating rate. Evidence also points to a decrease in sea ice thickness and a reduction in the amount of thicker perennial sea ice. A general global warming trend has made the ice cover more vulnerable to natural fluctuations in atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The observed reduction in Arctic sea ice is a consequence of both thermodynamic and dynamic processes, including such factors as preconditioning of the ice cover, overall warming trends, changes in cloud coverage, shifts in atmospheric circulation patterns, increased export of older ice out of the Arctic, advection of ocean heat from the Pacific and North Atlantic, enhanced solar heating of the ocean, and the ice-albedo feedback. The diminishing Arctic sea ice is creating social, political, economic, and ecological challenges. PMID:21141043

  3. Overview of Icing Research at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    The aviation industry continues to deal with icing-related incidents and accidents on a regular basis. Air traffic continues to increase, placing more aircraft in adverse icing conditions more frequently and for longer periods. Icing conditions once considered rare or of little consequence, such as super-cooled large droplet icing or high altitude ice crystals, have emerged as major concerns for modern aviation. Because of this, there is a need to better understand the atmospheric environment, the fundamental mechanisms and characteristics of ice growth, and the aerodynamic effects due to icing, as well as how best to protect these aircraft. The icing branch at NASA Glenn continues to develop icing simulation methods and engineering tools to address current aviation safety issues in airframe, engine and rotorcraft icing.

  4. Holocene accumulation and ice flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T. J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-05-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 kyr of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 km from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20% lower than modern at 9.2 kyr before present (B.P.), increased by 40% from 9.2 to 2.3 kyr B.P., and decreased by at least 10% over the past 2 kyr B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 km of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  5. HOUSINGS AND MOUNTINGS FOR CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-08-16

    A protective housing for a gas centrifuge comprises a slidable connection between flanges and framework portions for absorbing rotational energy in case of bursting of the rotor and a sealing means for sealing the rotor chamber.

  6. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  7. The House that NASA Built

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Tech House, located at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, is a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined to produce an energy-efficient home. Advanced technology offers savings to the family in utility costs and energy conservation. Solar panels on the roof of tech house provide the principal energy saving. They capture the sun's rays to heat water in pipes that run through the solar collectors. The heated water is then stored in a large, well insulated underground tank. A heat exchanger extracts beat from the water and blows it through ducts to warm the house. Tech House is well insulated for energy savings. The principal insulation is fireproof Tripolymer foam which is sprayed onto walls and ceilings in thicknesses up to six inches.

  8. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content House Committee on Veterans Affairs Search form Search Main menu About Chair History and Jurisdiction History of the CHOB Internship Opportunities Membership Rules and Publications Hearings Archived ...

  9. National Center for Healthy Housing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Housing Videos Lead Links Listervs Share NCHH's Flood Cleanup Guide with a Friend Today Several locations ... rains on Saturday, July 30, resulting in flash flood conditions and damage. The town of Ellicott City ...

  10. Boron nitride housing cools transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron nitride ceramic heat sink cools transistors in r-f transmitter and receiver circuits. Heat dissipated by the transistor is conducted by the boron nitride housing to the metal chassis on which it is mounted.

  11. Melting of ice under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schwegler, Eric; Sharma, Manu; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2008-01-01

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10–50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 and 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above ≈45 Gpa, there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve because of the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid before melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid. PMID:18809909

  12. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  13. Fram Strait sea ice outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G. F.; Pang, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    We summarize 24 years (1978??2) of ice export estimates and examine, over a 9-year record, the associated variability in the time-varying upward-looking sonar (ULS) thickness distributions of the Fram Strait.

  14. Method of forming clathrate ice

    DOEpatents

    Hino, Toshiyuki; Gorski, Anthony J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  15. Radiative properties of ice clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.L.; Koracin, D.; Carter, E.

    1996-04-01

    A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius. Rather, is uses the size distribution parameters directly, and explicitly considers the ice particle shapes. There are three fundamental features which characterize this treatment: (1) the ice path radiation experiences as it travels through an ice crystal is parameterized, (2) only determines the amount of radiation scattered and absorbed, and (3) as in other treatments, the projected area of the size distribution is conserved. The first two features are unique to this treatment, since it does not convert the ice particles into equivalent volume or area spheres in order to apply Mie theory.

  16. Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeh, N.

    1984-01-01

    Mass balance equation for glaciers; areal distribution and ice volumes; estimates of actual mass balance; loss by calving of icebergs; hydrological budget for Greenland; and temporal variations of Greenland mass balance are examined.

  17. Method of forming calthrate ice

    DOEpatents

    Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

    1985-09-30

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  18. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum, 2015

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the evolution of the Arctic sea ice cover from its wintertime maximum extent, which was reached on Feb. 25, 2015, and was the lowest on record, to its apparent yearly minimum, ...

  19. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  20. Epistemology of Ice Sheet Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waibel, M. S.; Hulbe, C. L.; Johnson, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    Recent change in the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets is observed as surface lowering accompanied by speed up of the ice. One of two types of perturbation is usually invoked to account for these changes, unbalanced forces at either the bed or at the marine margin of the ice sheet. The former is linked to change in meltwater at the bed while the latter is linked to a change in the temperature of the ocean near the margin. Observational data have been used together with numerical models to reproduce both cases. What we ask here is whether or not there is anything distinctive in the observed patterns of change that warrants preferring one type of perturbation over the other. That is, our interest is epistemological: is there anything distinctive in the pattern of ice sheet response to environmental forcing that allows the correct forcing to be identified using observational data? We hypothesize that specific changes in ice dynamics—perturbation at the bed or at the margin—lead to unique patterns of change in ice sheet flow, and thus geometry. For example, ocean warming may have its largest expression close to the coast and then propagate into the interior on time and spatial scales set by the material properties of the ice and various boundary conditions. Other perturbations may yield different patterns. The hypothesis is tested using an ice sheet model and a set of simple perturbations that represent environmental changes that might drive ice sheet change. We use surface lowering (ice thinning) as our indicator of change and conduct an EOF analysis to identify modes in that time dependent field. If leading modes derived from different perturbation experiments are distinguishable, the null hypothesis—that there is nothing diagnostic in the observed changes—is rejected and we conclude that observed patterns of change in ice sheets may be used to identify underlying causes for that change. This, in turn, would yield normal mode "finger prints" for

  1. Housing Characteristics, 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-14

    This report on energy consumption in the residential sector covers the following topics: housing trends 1980--1990, new housing trends, availability and usage of natural gas by households, changes in appliance usage (refrigerators, entertainment appliances, cooking appliances, convenience appliances), age of major household appliances and equipment, household energy conservation activities, demand-side management programs, and a portrait of households using solar or wood as a source of energy.

  2. Ice Detection and Mitigation Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambino, Richard J. (Inventor); Gouldstone, Christopher (Inventor); Gutleber, Jonathan (Inventor); Hubble, David (Inventor); Trelewicz, Jason (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for deicing an aerostructure includes driving a sensing current through a heater element coated to an aerostructure, the heater element having a resistance that is temperature dependent. A resistance of the heater element is monitored. It is determined whether there is icing at the heater element using the monitored resistance of the heater element. A melting current is driven through the heater element when it is determined that there is icing at the heater element.

  3. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mark R.; Scott, Henry P.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and, likely, vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mol percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 32.89 ± 0.19 GPa and 625 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- ionic impurities into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 295 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded a bulk modulus (KT0), its pressure derivative (KT0‧), and zero pressure volume (V0) of 24.7 ± 0.9 GPa, 4.44 ± 0.09, and 39.2 ± 0.2 Å3, respectively. The impurity-laden ice was found to be 6-8% denser than ice VII formed from pure H2O. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a PVT equation of state was obtained. The melting curve of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was estimated by fitting experimental data up to 10.2 ± 0.4 GPa, where melting occurred at 625 K, to the Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve of this impurity-laden ice is systematically depressed relative to that of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. A portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Our data illustrate ice VII can incorporate significant concentrations of K+ and Cl- and increasing the possibility of deep-sourced and solute-rich plumes in moderate to large sized H2O

  4. On the nature of the dirty ice at the bottom of the GISP2 ice core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, Michael L.; Burgess, Edward; Alley, Richard B.; Barnett, Bruce; Clow, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    We present data on the triple Ar isotope composition in trapped gas from clean, stratigraphically disturbed ice between 2800 and 3040m depth in the GISP2 ice core, and from basal dirty ice from 3040 to 3053m depth. We also present data for the abundance and isotopic composition of O2 and N2, and abundance of Ar, in the basal dirty ice. The Ar/N2 ratio of dirty basal ice, the heavy isotope enrichment (reflecting gravitational fractionation), and the total gas content all indicate that the gases in basal dirty ice originate from the assimilation of clean ice of the overlying glacier, which comprises most of the ice in the dirty bottom layer. O2 is partly to completely depleted in basal ice, reflecting active metabolism. The gravitationally corrected ratio of 40Ar/38Ar, which decreases with age in the global atmosphere, is compatible with an age of 100-250ka for clean disturbed ice. In basal ice, 40Ar is present in excess due to injection of radiogenic 40Ar produced in the underlying continental crust. The weak depth gradient of 40Ar in the dirty basal ice, and the distribution of dirt, indicate mixing within the basal ice, while various published lines of evidence indicate mixing within the overlying clean, disturbed ice. Excess CH4, which reaches thousands of ppm in basal dirty ice at GRIP, is virtually absent in overlying clean disturbed ice, demonstrating that mixing of dirty basal ice into the overlying clean ice, if it occurs at all, is very slow. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the mixing rate of clean ice into dirty ice is sufficient to maintain a steady thickness of dirty ice against thinning from the mean ice flow. The dirty ice appears to consist of two or more basal components in addition to clean glacial ice. A small amount of soil or permafrost, plus preglacial snow, lake or ground ice could explain the observations.

  5. Ice ridging and ice drift in southern Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada, during winter storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsenberg, S. J.; van der Baaren, A.; Peterson, I. K.

    During February and March 2004, satellite-tracked ice beacons and helicopter-borne sensors collected ice-drift and ice-thickness data from the southern Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada, to study the region's ice-thickness evolution and ice-drift behavior in response to winter storms. Three northeasterly storms passed through the area during the observation period, pushing the pack ice against the north shore of Prince Edward Island. The resulting severe ice deformation caused major changes in the ice-thickness distribution of two pack-ice areas tracked by ice beacons that survived the storms. The ice drift ranged from 1.4% to 2.9% of the wind speed during free ice-drift conditions, decreasing to 0% when the pack ice compacted against the shoreline. Most of the thinner ice deformed first, increasing the mean ice thickness over 6-8 km line sections around the beacons from 0.6 and 0.3 m before the storms to 1.9 and 2.0 m after the storms. The ice-thickness increases can be accounted for by the reduced pack-ice area due to ice ridging. Over the next 4 weeks, deformation continued and the mean ice thickness around the beacons increased to 2.8 m, well in excess of the maximum undeformed possible ice growth of 65 cm. Ice charts captured the ice thickness of undeformed and composite ice floes but did not capture the ice volume in ice-rubble fields.

  6. On the nature of the dirty ice at the bottom of the GISP2 ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael L.; Burgess, Edward; Alley, Richard B.; Barnett, Bruce; Clow, Gary D.

    2010-11-01

    We present data on the triple Ar isotope composition in trapped gas from clean, stratigraphically disturbed ice between 2800 and 3040 m depth in the GISP2 ice core, and from basal dirty ice from 3040 to 3053 m depth. We also present data for the abundance and isotopic composition of O 2 and N 2, and abundance of Ar, in the basal dirty ice. The Ar/N 2 ratio of dirty basal ice, the heavy isotope enrichment (reflecting gravitational fractionation), and the total gas content all indicate that the gases in basal dirty ice originate from the assimilation of clean ice of the overlying glacier, which comprises most of the ice in the dirty bottom layer. O 2 is partly to completely depleted in basal ice, reflecting active metabolism. The gravitationally corrected ratio of 40Ar/ 38Ar, which decreases with age in the global atmosphere, is compatible with an age of 100-250 ka for clean disturbed ice. In basal ice, 40Ar is present in excess due to injection of radiogenic 40Ar produced in the underlying continental crust. The weak depth gradient of 40Ar in the dirty basal ice, and the distribution of dirt, indicate mixing within the basal ice, while various published lines of evidence indicate mixing within the overlying clean, disturbed ice. Excess CH 4, which reaches thousands of ppm in basal dirty ice at GRIP, is virtually absent in overlying clean disturbed ice, demonstrating that mixing of dirty basal ice into the overlying clean ice, if it occurs at all, is very slow. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the mixing rate of clean ice into dirty ice is sufficient to maintain a steady thickness of dirty ice against thinning from the mean ice flow. The dirty ice appears to consist of two or more basal components in addition to clean glacial ice. A small amount of soil or permafrost, plus preglacial snow, lake or ground ice could explain the observations.

  7. Structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Tamsin L.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Brukhno, Andrey V.; Anwar, Jamshed; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2012-01-01

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. At ambient conditions, ice is considered to exist in two crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that ice that crystallizes homogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I. Stacking disorder and stacking faults have been reported earlier for metastable ice I, but only for ice crystallizing in mesopores and in samples recrystallized from high-pressure ice phases rather than in water droplets. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the physical and thermodynamic properties of this metastable ice as a function of the nature and extent of stacking disorder using well-characterized samples. PMID:22232652

  8. Extraction of Ice Sheet Layers from Two Intersected Radar Echograms Near Neem Ice Core in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, S.; Muller, J.-P.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of snow and ice over time result in ice sheet layers. These can be remotely sensed where there is a contrast in electromagnetic properties, which reflect variations of the ice density, acidity and fabric orientation. Internal ice layers are assumed to be isochronous, deep beneath the ice surface, and parallel to the direction of ice flow. The distribution of internal layers is related to ice sheet dynamics, such as the basal melt rate, basal elevation variation and changes in ice flow mode, which are important parameters to model the ice sheet. Radar echo sounder is an effective instrument used to study the sedimentology of the Earth and planets. Ice Penetrating Radar (IPR) is specific kind of radar echo sounder, which extends studies of ice sheets from surface to subsurface to deep internal ice sheets depending on the frequency utilised. In this study, we examine a study site where folded ice occurs in the internal ice sheet south of the North Greenland Eemian ice drilling (NEEM) station, where two intersected radar echograms acquired by the Multi-channel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) employed in the NASA's Operation IceBridge (OIB) mission imaged this folded ice. We propose a slice processing flow based on a Radon Transform to trace and extract these two sets of curved ice sheet layers, which can then be viewed in 3-D, demonstrating the 3-D structure of the ice folds.

  9. An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Mark S.; Hansman, R. John

    1988-01-01

    Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of + or - 0.5 mm; in addition, the ultrasonic signal characteristics may be used to detect the presence of liquid on the ice surface and hence discern wet and dry ice growth behavior. Ice growth was measured on the stagnation line of a cylinder exposed to artificial icing conditions in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), and similarly for a cylinder exposed in flight to natural icing conditions. Ice thickness was observed to increase approximately linearly with exposure time during the initial icing period. The ice accretion rate was found to vary with cloud temperature during wet ice growth, and liquid runback from the stagnation region was inferred. A steady-state energy balance model for the icing surface was used to compare heat transfer characteristics for IRT and natural icing conditions. Ultrasonic measurements of wet and dry ice growth observed in the IRT and in flight were compared with icing regimes predicted by a series of heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer magnitude was generally inferred to be higher for the IRT than for the natural icing conditions encountered in flight. An apparent variation in the heat transfer magnitude was also observed for flights conducted through different natural icing-cloud formations.

  10. Development of 3D Ice Accretion Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Sills, Robert; Pifer, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    Icing wind tunnels are designed to simulate in-flight icing environments. The chief product of such facilities is the ice accretion that forms on various test articles. Documentation of the resulting ice accretion key piece of data in icing-wind-tunnel tests. Number of currently used options for documenting ice accretion in icing-wind-tunnel testing.

  11. Where the Ice Ends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03636 Where the Ice Ends

    This image shows the margin of the south polar cap. The polar layers are prominently shown against the rocky surroundings.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 71.7S, Longitude 142.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Disturbed basal ice seen in radio echo images coincide with zones of big interlocking ice crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Panton, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Improvement of the depth sounding radio echo sounding (RES) over Antarctica and Greenland Ice Sheet has made it possible to map the near basal layers that have not been 'seen' earlier due to the very high demand of attenuation needed to reach through more than 3000m of ice. The RES internal reflectors show that the near basal ice at many locations has disturbed layering. At the locations where ice cores reach the bedrock both in Greenland and Antarctica studies of the ice crystal size and orientation show that the near basal ice has big and interlocking ice crystals which suggests the ice is not actively deforming. These observations challenge the often used constitutive equations like Glens flow law in ice sheet modelling. A discussion of the impact of the RES findings on ice sheet modeling and the quest to find the oldest ice in Antarctic based on the anisotropy of the basal ice will follow.

  13. Strong coupling among Antarctic ice shelves, ocean circulation and sea ice in a global sea-ice - ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The thermodynamic effects of Antarctic ice shelf interaction with ocean circulation are investigated using a global, high-resolution, isopycnal ocean-circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. The model uses NASA MERRA Reanalysis from 1992 to 2011 as atmospheric forcing. The simulated long-period variability of ice-shelf melting/freezing rates differ across geographic locations. The ice shelves in Antarctic Peninsula, Amundsen and Bellingshausen sea embayments and the Amery Ice Shelf experience an increase in melting starting from 2005. This increase in melting is due to an increase in the subsurface (100-500 m) ocean heat content in the embayments of these ice shelves, which is caused by an increase in sea-ice concentration after 2005, and consequent reduction of the heat loss to the atmosphere. Our simulations provide a strong evidence for a coupling between ocean circulation, sea ice and ice shelves.

  14. 12 CFR 1282.21 - Housing plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Housing plans. 1282.21 Section 1282.21 Banks... MISSION Housing Goals § 1282.21 Housing plans. (a) General. If the Director determines that an Enterprise... Enterprise to submit a housing plan for approval by the Director. (b) Nature of plan. If the...

  15. 7 CFR 3560.104 - Fair housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fair housing. 3560.104 Section 3560.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Borrower Management and Operations Responsibilities § 3560.104 Fair housing. (a) General....

  16. 7 CFR 3560.104 - Fair housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fair housing. 3560.104 Section 3560.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Borrower Management and Operations Responsibilities § 3560.104 Fair housing. (a) General....

  17. 22 CFR 146.405 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing. 146.405 Section 146.405 Foreign... Activities Prohibited § 146.405 Housing. (a) Generally. A recipient shall not, on the basis of sex, apply... benefits related to housing, except as provided in this section (including housing provided only to...

  18. 10 CFR 1042.405 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Housing. 1042.405 Section 1042.405 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Activities Prohibited § 1042.405 Housing. (a) Generally. A recipient shall not, on the basis of sex, apply... benefits related to housing, except as provided in this section (including housing provided only to...

  19. 24 CFR 982.619 - Cooperative housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cooperative housing. 982.619 Section 982.619 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  20. 22 CFR 142.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing. 142.45 Section 142.45 Foreign... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 142.45 Housing. (a) Housing provided by the recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students shall...