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Sample records for palate helical ct

  1. Noncontrast helical CT for ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Boridy, I C; Nikolaidis, P; Kawashima, A; Sandler, C M; Goldman, S M

    1998-01-01

    Noncontrast helical computed tomography (CT) has recently been found to be superior to excretory urography (IVU) in the evaluation of patients with suspected ureterolithiasis. Noncontrast helical CT does not require the use of intravenous contrast material with its associated cost and risk of adverse reactions and can be completed within 5 min, in most cases. Noncontrast CT often detects extraurinary pathology responsible for the patient's symptoms. CT is also more sensitive than IVU in detecting the calculus, regardless of its size, location, and chemical composition. However, confidently differentiating ureteral calculi from phleboliths along the course of the ureter may, at times, be difficult. The "tissue-rim" sign, a rim of soft tissue attenuation around the suspicious calcification, is helpful in making this distinction. Noncontrast CT does not provide physiological information about renal function and the degree of obstruction. A pilot study has suggested a proportional relationship between the extent of perinephric edema and the degree of obstruction. The cost of the examination and the radiation dose delivered to the patient may be higher with CT. Despite these limitations, noncontrast helical CT has quickly become the imaging study of choice in evaluating patients with acute flank pain. PMID:9542010

  2. Windmill artifact in multislice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Hein, Ilmar A.; Chiang, BeShan; Kazama, Masahiro; Mori, Issei

    2003-05-01

    Multi-slice helical CT-systems suffer from windmill artifacts: black/white patterns that spin off of features with high longitudinal gradients. The number of black/white pairs matches the number of slices (detector rows) in the multi-slive detector. The period of spin is the same as the helical pitch. We investigate the cause of the pattern by following the traces of selected voxels through the multi-slive detector array as a function of view position. This forms an "extracted sinogram" which represents the data used to reconstruct the specific voxel. Now we can determine the cause of the artifact by correlating the windmill streak in the image with the extracted data. The investigation shows that inadequate sampling along the longitudinal direction causes the artifact.

  3. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  4. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma: Helical CT Findings and Radiopathologic Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Marco de Lucas, Enrique Pagola, Miguel Angel; Fernandez, Fidel; Lastra, Pedro; Delgado, M. Luisa Ruiz; Sadaba, Pablo; Pinto, Jesus; Ballesteros, Ma Angeles; Ortiz, Antonio

    2004-03-15

    Primary tumors of the heart are extremely rare.Clinical manifestations are nondiagnostic and the patients are often misdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are standard in this diagnostic workup. We report a case of a man with acromegaly, dysphagia, chest pain and weight loss. An invasive cardiac mass was diagnosed by helical-CT. Autopsy demonstrated a B-cell aggressive lymphoma.

  5. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  6. CEnPiT: Helical cardiac CT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bontus, Claas; Koken, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Grass, Michael

    2006-08-15

    Computer tomography (CT) scanners with an increasing number of detector rows offer the potential of shorter scanning times. Nevertheless, the reconstruction problem becomes more challenging, since cone beam artifacts are likely to enter. Here, we consider helical cardiac CT. We analyze how a relationship can be established between exact reconstruction algorithms and the demand to perform a cardiac gating. Utilizing the redundancies requires the consideration of all kinds of Radon planes. For the reconstruction algorithm proposed here, we separate the data into two parts. The first part contains contributions of Radon planes, which are measured with a large number of redundancies. The second part contains the remaining contributions. As it turns out, the second part contributes rather to the low-frequency contents of trans-axial slices. Therefore, we propose to perform a gated back-projection only for the first part, while the second part is back-projected in an ungated way. Data from the complete source trajectory are employed in the reconstruction process in contrary to conventional helical cardiac reconstruction methods. Moreover, all different types of Radon planes are taken into account in the reconstruction, though an ECG-dependent cardiac gating is applied. The reconstruction results, which we present for clinical and simulated data, demonstrate the high potential of CEnPiT for helical cardiac CT with large cone angle systems.

  7. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  8. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-01-01

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube current×rotation time)∕pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning. PMID:19544765

  9. Effect of pitch in multislice spiral/helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Vannier, Michael W.

    1999-09-01

    To understand the effect of pitch on raw data interpolation in multi-slice spiral/helical CT, and provide guidelines for scanner design and protocol optimization. Multi-slice spiral CT is mainly characterized by the three parameters: the number of detector arrays, the detector collimation, and the table increment per X-ray source rotation. The pitch in multi-slice spiral CT is defined as the ratio of the table increment over the detector collimation. In parallel to the current framework for studying longitudinal image resolution, the central fan- beam rays of direct and opposite directions are considered, assuming a narrow cone-beam angle. Generally speaking, sampling in the Radon domain by the direct and opposite central rays is non-uniform along the longitudinal axis. Using a recently developed methodology for quantifying the sensitivity of signal reconstruction from non-uniformly sampled finite points, the effect of pitch on raw data interpolation is analyzed in multi-slice spiral CT. Unlike single-slice spiral CT, in which image quality deceases monotonically as the pitch increases, the sensitivity of raw data interpolation in multi-slice spiral CT increases in an alternating way as the pitch increases, suggesting that image quality does not decrease monotonically in this case. The most favorable pitch can be found from the sensitivity-pitch plot for any given set of multi-slice spiral CT parameters. An example for four-slice spiral CT is provided. The study on the pitch effect using the sensitivity analysis approach reveals the fundamental characteristics of raw data interpolation in multi-slice spiral CT, and gives insights into interaction between pitch and image quality. These results may be valuable for design of multi-slice spiral CT scanners and imaging protocol optimization in clinical applications.

  10. Helical cone beam CT with an asymmetrical detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zamyatin, Alexander A.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Silver, Michael D.

    2005-10-15

    If a multislice or other area detector is shifted to one side to cover a larger field of view, then the data are truncated on one side. We propose a method to restore the missing data in helical cone-beam acquisitions that uses measured data on the longer side of the asymmetric detector array. The method is based on the idea of complementary rays, which is well known in fan beam geometry; in this paper we extend this concept to the cone-beam case. Different cases of complementary data coverage and dependence on the helical pitch are considered. The proposed method is used in our prototype 16-row CT scanner with an asymmetric detector and a 700 mm field of view. For evaluation we used scanned body phantom data and computer-simulated data. To simulate asymmetric truncation, the full, symmetric datasets were truncated by dropping either 22.5% or 45% from one side of the detector. Reconstructed images from the prototype scanner with the asymmetrical detector show excellent image quality in the extended field of view. The proposed method allows flexible helical pitch selection and can be used with overscan, short-scan, and super-short-scan reconstructions.

  11. 320-Row wide volume CT significantly reduces density heterogeneity observed in the descending aorta: comparisons with 64-row helical CT.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Osamu; Kamiya, Ayano; Tanaka, Yuko; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare density heterogeneity on wide volume (WV) scans with that on helical CT scans. 22 subjects underwent chest CT using 320-WV and 64-helical modes. Density heterogeneity of the descending aorta was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. At qualitative assessment, the heterogeneity was judged to be smaller on WV scans than on helical scans (p<0.0001). Mean changes in aortic density between two contiguous slices were 1.64 HU (3.40%) on WV scans and 2.29 HU (5.19%) on helical scans (p<0.0001). CT density of thoracic organs is more homogeneous and reliable on WV scans than on helical scans. PMID:24210879

  12. Management of Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Palate Utilizing 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, Sankaran; Velugubantla, Raga Geethika; Erva, Swathi; Chennoju, Sai kiran

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland carcinomas are a clinically diverse group of neoplasms with histological patterns overlapping other tumors, thus complicating their diagnosis. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), first described by Masson and Berger in 1924, is a well-recognized salivary gland neoplasm, accounting for 5–10% of all salivary gland tumors. MEC frequently involves the major salivary glands and is rarely seen involving the jaws. The biological behavior of MEC is usually more aggressive with higher nodal and metastatic status at the time of presentation, which notably reduces the survival rate. Hence, early and accurate diagnosis utilizing advanced imaging modalities can reduce its morbidity. The present case is a rare presentation of MEC involving the palate, where (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) was utilized for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25558436

  13. Pelvic congestion syndrome: demonstration and diagnosis by helical CT.

    PubMed

    Desimpelaere, J H; Seynaeve, P C; Hagers, Y M; Appel, B J; Mortelmans, L L

    1999-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common gynaecological complaint, sometimes without any obvious etiology. We report a case of pelvic congestion syndrome, an often overlooked cause of pelvic pain, diagnosed by helical computed tomography. This seems to be an effective and noninvasive imaging modality. PMID:9933685

  14. [Fundamental study of helical scanning CT--evaluation of spatial resolution in the longitudinal axis].

    PubMed

    Anno, H; Katada, K; Tsujioka, K; Ida, Y; Ohashi, I; Takeuchi, A; Koga, S

    1992-11-25

    We evaluated spatial resolution in the longitudinal axis with helical scanning CT using a fourth-generation fast CT scanner. We made a phantom by stringing acrylic balls (65 mm phi x 8 and 9 mm phi x 6). The acquired images were processed by MPR and assessed visually to evaluate axis resolution. With the conventional scanning method, the partial volume effect varied with the starting position, but helical scanning was able to reconstruct high-resolution images using continuous raw data. During helical scanning, axis resolution varied depending on the slice width and sliding speed of the couch top. Even if the sliding speed was kept constant at 4 mm/sec, axis resolution was superior with a slice width of 2 mm than with one of 5 mm. PMID:1465334

  15. Single-slice rebinning method for helical cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Noo, F; Defrise, M; Clackdoyle, R

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, we present reconstruction results from helical cone-beam CT data, obtained using a simple and fast algorithm, which we call the CB-SSRB algorithm. This algorithm combines the single-slice rebinning method of PET imaging with the weighting schemes of spiral CT algorithms. The reconstruction is approximate but can be performed using 2D multislice fan-beam filtered backprojection. The quality of the results is surprisingly good, and far exceeds what one might expect, even when the pitch of the helix is large. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using standard spiral CT reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. PMID:10070801

  16. [The role and place of helical ct for preporative diagnosis of acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Nemsadze, G Sh; Urushadze, O P; Tokhadze, L T; Lomidze, M N; Kipshidze, N N

    2009-09-01

    The goal of our study was to ascertain the role and place of helical CT for preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Our study relied upon the results of helical CT scans of 60 patients, which were diagnosed probable acute appendicitis based upon clinical signs. Of these 60 patients 49 (81,6%) were female, 11 (18,4%) male. For all patients laboratory studies of blood were made, 31 patients were examined by ultrasonography. Among this group the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was verified by CT scan in 41 patients. In the case of 5 patients the scan was equivocal because of smaller amount of omentum; in this subgroup of 5 patients (5% overall) three were given radiocontrast dye, and two (3,3% overall) were not. In 11 (18,3%) cases the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was not verified, and in three cases the diagnosis was incorrect. According to data of our study and intraoperative data analysis, sensitivity of this method approaches 93% and the specificity - 92%, and overall diagnostic accuracy 93%. Helical CT may be stated as diagnostic method of choice in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. It is helpful in clinical decision making, and reducing the amount of false appendectomies. PMID:19801721

  17. Megavoltage CT in helical tomotherapy - clinical advantages and limitations of special physical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sterzing, Florian; Kalz, Jörn; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Schubert, Kai; Bischof, Marc; Roder, Falk; Debus, Jürgen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-10-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a form of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy that introduces the ring gantry concept into radiation oncology. The system is a combination of a therapeutic linear accelerator and a megavoltage CT-scanner. This work describes the clinical experience with megavoltage CT with 456 patients in more than 11000 fractions. It also provides a review of the current literature of the possibilities and limitations of megavoltage CT. Between July 2006 and October 2008 456 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy and a pretreatment megavoltage CT was performed in 98.1% of the 11821 fractions to perform position control and correction. CT image acquisition was done with 3.5 MV x-rays in the helical tomotherapy machine. MVCT was used for dose recalculations to quantify doses distributions in cases of changing geometry, tumor shrinkage or presence of metal implants. Inverse treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip replacements was performed based upon an MVCT. A mean 3D-correction vector of 7.1mm with a considerable variation was detected and immediately corrected. Mean shifts were lateral 0.9mm (sd 5.0mm), mean longitudinal shift 1.0mm (sd 5.1mm) and mean vertical shift 3.2mm (sd 5.2mm). The MVCT enables imaging of anatomical structures in the presence of dental metal or orthopedic implants. Especially in these cases, dose recomputations can increase the precision of dose calculations. Due to a mean 3d correction vector of more than 7mm and a variation of corrections of more than 5mm daily image-guidance is recommended to achieve a precise dose application. The MVCT shows evident advantages in cases with metal implants but has limitations due to a reduced soft tissue contrast. Compared with megavoltage cone-beam-CT the tomotherapy fan beam CT adds less extra dose fore the patient and has a better soft tissue contrast. PMID:19754210

  18. Cone-angle-dependent generalized weighting scheme for 16-slice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Dong, Yanting; Simoni, Piero; Toth, Thomas; Slack, Christopher L.; Grekowicz, Brian; Seidenschnur, George; Shaughnessy, Charlie

    2002-05-01

    Since the recent introduction of multi-slice helical computed tomography (MHCT), new clinical applications have experienced tremendous growth in recent years. MHCT offers improved volume coverage, faster scan speed, more isotropic spatial resolution, and reduced x-ray tube loading. Similar to the single slice helical CT, the projection data collected in MHCT is inherently inconsistent due to the constant table motion. In addition, cone beam effects in MHCT produce additional complexity and image artifacts. Although the cone angle is quite smaller even for the 16-slice configuration, the impact on image artifacts cannot be ignored. Many reconstruction algorithms have been proposed and investigated recently to combat image artifacts associated with the MHCT data acquisition. In this paper, we propose a cone-angle dependent generalized weighting scheme for 16-slice helical CT that allows the production of MHCT images with only 2D backprojection. The cone-angle dependency of the algorithm suppresses image artifacts due to the cone beam effect and the generalized weighting portion enables interpolation be performed with conjugate samples for the 16-slice helical dataset. With the proposed algorithm, image artifacts are significantly reduced.

  19. WE-G-18A-06: Sinogram Restoration in Helical Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Little, K; Riviere, P La

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend CT sinogram restoration, which has been shown in 2D to reduce noise and to correct for geometric effects and other degradations at a low computational cost, from 2D to a 3D helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: A method for calculating sinogram degradation coefficients for a helical cone-beam geometry was proposed. These values were used to perform penalized-likelihood sinogram restoration on simulated data that were generated from the FORBILD thorax phantom. Sinogram restorations were performed using both a quadratic penalty and the edge-preserving Huber penalty. After sinogram restoration, Fourier-based analytical methods were used to obtain reconstructions. Resolution-variance trade-offs were investigated for several locations within the reconstructions for the purpose of comparing sinogram restoration to no restoration. In order to compare potential differences, reconstructions were performed using different groups of neighbors in the penalty, two analytical reconstruction methods (Katsevich and single-slice rebinning), and differing helical pitches. Results: The resolution-variance properties of reconstructions restored using sinogram restoration with a Huber penalty outperformed those of reconstructions with no restoration. However, the use of a quadratic sinogram restoration penalty did not lead to an improvement over performing no restoration at the outer regions of the phantom. Application of the Huber penalty to neighbors both within a view and across views did not perform as well as only applying the penalty to neighbors within a view. General improvements in resolution-variance properties using sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty were not dependent on the reconstruction method used or the magnitude of the helical pitch. Conclusion: Sinogram restoration for noise and degradation effects for helical cone-beam CT is feasible and should be able to be applied to clinical data. When applied with the edge-preserving Huber penalty

  20. Correction for human head motion in helical x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Sun, T.; Alcheikh, A. R.; Kuncic, Z.; Nuyts, J.; Fulton, R.

    2016-02-01

    Correction for rigid object motion in helical CT can be achieved by reconstructing from a modified source-detector orbit, determined by the object motion during the scan. This ensures that all projections are consistent, but it does not guarantee that the projections are complete in the sense of being sufficient for exact reconstruction. We have previously shown with phantom measurements that motion-corrected helical CT scans can suffer from data-insufficiency, in particular for severe motions and at high pitch. To study whether such data-insufficiency artefacts could also affect the motion-corrected CT images of patients undergoing head CT scans, we used an optical motion tracking system to record the head movements of 10 healthy volunteers while they executed each of the 4 different types of motion (‘no’, slight, moderate and severe) for 60 s. From these data we simulated 354 motion-affected CT scans of a voxelized human head phantom and reconstructed them with and without motion correction. For each simulation, motion-corrected (MC) images were compared with the motion-free reference, by visual inspection and with quantitative similarity metrics. Motion correction improved similarity metrics in all simulations. Of the 270 simulations performed with moderate or less motion, only 2 resulted in visible residual artefacts in the MC images. The maximum range of motion in these simulations would encompass that encountered in the vast majority of clinical scans. With severe motion, residual artefacts were observed in about 60% of the simulations. We also evaluated a new method of mapping local data sufficiency based on the degree to which Tuy’s condition is locally satisfied, and observed that areas with high Tuy values corresponded to the locations of residual artefacts in the MC images. We conclude that our method can provide accurate and artefact-free MC images with most types of head motion likely to be encountered in CT imaging, provided that the motion can

  1. Implementation and evaluation of two helical CT reconstruction algorithms in CIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjak, H.; Costin, M.; Vienne, C.; Kaftandjian, V.

    2016-02-01

    The large majority of industrial CT systems reconstruct the 3D volume by using an acquisition on a circular trajec-tory. However, when inspecting long objects which are highly anisotropic, this scanning geometry creates severe artifacts in the reconstruction. For this reason, the use of an advanced CT scanning method like helical data acquisition is an efficient way to address this aspect known as the long-object problem. Recently, several analytically exact and quasi-exact inversion formulas for helical cone-beam reconstruction have been proposed. Among them, we identified two algorithms of interest for our case. These algorithms are exact and of filtered back-projection structure. In this work we implemented the filtered-backprojection (FBP) and backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithms of Zou and Pan (2004). For performance evaluation, we present a numerical compari-son of the two selected algorithms with the helical FDK algorithm using both complete (noiseless and noisy) and truncated data generated by CIVA (the simulation platform for non-destructive testing techniques developed at CEA).

  2. Profile of CT scan output dose in axial and helical modes using convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.; Widita, R.; Arif, I.; Dougherty, G.

    2016-03-01

    The profile of the CT scan output dose is crucial for establishing the patient dose profile. The purpose of this study is to investigate the profile of the CT scan output dose in both axial and helical modes using convolution. A single scan output dose profile (SSDP) in the center of a head phantom was measured using a solid-state detector. The multiple scan output dose profile (MSDP) in the axial mode was calculated using convolution between SSDP and delta function, whereas for the helical mode MSDP was calculated using convolution between SSDP and the rectangular function. MSDPs were calculated for a number of scans (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25). The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) for differing numbers of scans was compared to the value of CT dose index (CTDI). Finally, the edge values of MSDP for every scan number were compared to the corresponding MSAD values. MSDPs were successfully generated by using convolution between a SSDP and the appropriate function. We found that CTDI only accurately estimates MSAD when the number of scans was more than 10. We also found that the edge values of the profiles were 42% to 93% lower than that the corresponding MSADs.

  3. Imaging properties of circular and helical interlaced source-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Xi, Yan; Zhao, Jun

    2012-10-01

    We study reconstruction methods and imaging properties of the circular and helical interlaced source-detector array (ISDA) computed tomography (CT) system. The system uses carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission X-ray source arrays and detector arrays. Distributed sources and detectors allow projection data been acquired from different direction by switching on the X-ray sources sequentially, requiring no rotation of gantry or object. Thus the system enables high temporal resolution and eliminates motion artifacts caused by gantry rotation as is common in the conventional CT systems. Interpolation is implemented to patch the absent data in the projection image, and tilted plane Feldkamp type reconstruction algorithm (TPFR) is used to reduce the cone beam artifacts for helical ISDA CT. We analyze the distribution of artifacts in the reconstruction, as well as the influence of the detector array gap and the helix pitch on reconstruction quality. Simulation studies demonstrate that the gap ratio is the key factor on the artifacts due to the gap, and increasing the pitch will reduced gap ratio. Choosing the helix pitch appropriately by getting a balance between cone beam artifacts and gap induced artifacts can get a better reconstruction.

  4. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system for chest diagnosis based on multi-helical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2006-03-01

    Multi-helical CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system. The results of this study indicate that our computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and safety of medical information.

  5. Novel reconstruction algorithm for multiphasic cardiac imaging using multislice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesmeli, Erdogan; Edic, Peter M.; Iatrou, Maria; Pfoh, Armin H.

    2001-06-01

    Cardiac imaging is still a challenge to CT reconstruction algorithms due to the dynamic nature of the heart. We have developed a new reconstruction technique, called the Flexible Algorithm, which achieves high temporal resolution while it is robust to heart-rate variations. The Flexible Algorithm, first, retrospectively tags helical CT views with corresponding cardiac phases obtained from associated EKG. Next, it determines a set of views for each slice, a stack of which covers the entire heart. Subsequently, the algorithm selects an optimum subset of views to achieve the highest temporal resolution for the desired cardiac phase. Finally, it spatiotemporally filters the views in the selected subsets to reconstruct slices. We tested the performance of our algorithm using both a dynamic analytical phantom and clinical data. Preliminary results indicate that the Flexible Algorithm obtains improved spatiotemporal resolution for a large range of heart rates and variations than standard algorithms do. By providing improved image quality at any desired cardiac phase, and robustness to heart rate variations, the Flexible Algorithm enables cardiac applications in CT, including those that benefit from multiphase information.

  6. An unprecedented Ag-pipemidic acid complex with helical structure: Synthesis, structure and interaction with CT-DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Ting; Sun, Jing-Wen; Sha, Jing-Quan; Wu, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Er-Lin; Zheng, Tao-Ye

    2013-08-01

    A new Ag-pipemidic acid complex with helical structure has been prepared and structurally characterized by routine technique. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows that there are the left- and right-handed helical chains constructed by Ag ions and PPA drugs along the b direction. And two types of helical chains are connected into 2D layer by sharing pseudo-tetra-nuclear clusters, which are stabilized by PPA-1 molecules as scaffolds. UV study of the interaction of the complex with CT-DNA shows that the title complex can bind to the CT-DNA and exhibits the higher binding constant (Kb) than free HPPA drugs. Additionally, its competitive study with ethidium bromide and the relatively high KSV value also indicates that complex can bind to DNA for the intercalative binding sites.

  7. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  8. A motion-compensated scheme for helical cone-beam reconstruction in cardiac CT angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Stevendaal, U. van; Berg, J. von; Lorenz, C.; Grass, M.

    2008-07-15

    Since coronary heart disease is one of the main causes of death all over the world, cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging is an application of very high interest in order to verify indications timely. Due to the cardiac motion, electrocardiogram (ECG) gating has to be implemented into the reconstruction of the measured projection data. However, the temporal and spatial resolution is limited due to the mechanical movement of the gantry and due to the fact that a finite angular span of projections has to be acquired for the reconstruction of each voxel. In this article, a motion-compensated reconstruction method for cardiac CT is described, which can be used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio or to suppress motion blurring. Alternatively, it can be translated into an improvement of the temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied to the entire heart in common and to high contrast objects moving with the heart in particular, such as calcified plaques or devices like stents. The method is based on three subsequent steps: As a first step, the projection data acquired in low pitch helical acquisition mode together with the ECG are reconstructed at multiple phase points. As a second step, the motion-vector field is calculated from the reconstructed images in relation to the image in a reference phase. Finally, a motion-compensated reconstruction is carried out for the reference phase using those projections, which cover the cardiac phases for which the motion-vector field has been determined.

  9. Regularized iterative weighted filtered backprojection for helical cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Sunnegårdh, Johan; Danielsson, Per-Erik

    2008-09-01

    Contemporary reconstruction methods employed for clinical helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT) are analytical (noniterative) but mathematically nonexact, i.e., the reconstructed image contains so called cone-beam artifacts, especially for higher cone angles. Besides cone artifacts, these methods also suffer from windmill artifacts: alternating dark and bright regions creating spiral-like patterns occurring in the vicinity of high z-direction derivatives. In this article, the authors examine the possibility to suppress cone and windmill artifacts by means of iterative application of nonexact three-dimensional filtered backprojection, where the analytical part of the reconstruction brings about accelerated convergence. Specifically, they base their investigations on the weighted filtered backprojection method [Stierstorfer et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, 2209-2218 (2004)]. Enhancement of high frequencies and amplification of noise is a common but unwanted side effect in many acceleration attempts. They have employed linear regularization to avoid these effects and to improve the convergence properties of the iterative scheme. Artifacts and noise, as well as spatial resolution in terms of modulation transfer functions and slice sensitivity profiles have been measured. The results show that for cone angles up to +/-2.78 degrees, cone artifacts are suppressed and windmill artifacts are alleviated within three iterations. Furthermore, regularization parameters controlling spatial resolution can be tuned so that image quality in terms of spatial resolution and noise is preserved. Simulations with higher number of iterations and long objects (exceeding the measured region) verify that the size of the reconstructible region is not reduced, and that the regularization greatly improves the convergence properties of the iterative scheme. Taking these results into account, and the possibilities to extend the proposed method with more accurate modeling of the acquisition

  10. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Alan J.; Vora, Nayana; Suh, Steve; Liu, An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V{sub 45} {sub Gy}, V{sub 30} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way.

  11. Effect of lateral target motion on image registration accuracy in CT-guided helical tomotherapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Medwig, J; Gaede, S; Battista, J J; Yartsev, S

    2010-06-01

    Optimisation of imaging modes for kilovoltage CT (kVCT) used for treatment planning and megavoltage CT (MVCT) image guidance used in ungated helical tomotherapy was investigated for laterally moving targets. Computed tomography images of the QUASAR Respiratory Motion Phantom were acquired without target motion and for lateral motion of the target, with 2-cm peak-to-peak amplitude and a period of 4 s. Reference kVCT images were obtained using a 16-slice CT scanner in standard fast helical CT mode, untagged average CT mode and various post-processed 4D-CT modes (0% phase, average and maximum intensity projection). Three sets of MVCT images with different inter-slice spacings of were obtained on a Hi-Art tomotherapy system with the phantom displaced by a known offset position. Eight radiation therapists performed co-registration of MVCT obtained with 2-, 4- and 6-mm slice spacing and kVCT studies independently for all 15 CT imaging combinations. In the investigated case, the untagged average kVCT and 4-mm slice spacing for the MVCT yielded more accurate registration in the transverse plane. The average residual uncertainty of this combination of imaging procedures was 0.61 +/- 0.16 mm in the longitudinal direction, 0.45 +/- 0.14 mm in the anterior-posterior direction and insignificant in the lateral direction. Manual registration of MVCT-kVCT study pairs is necessary to account for a target in significant lateral motion with respect to bony structures. PMID:20598016

  12. Noise Reduction for Low-Dose Single-Slice Helical CT Sinograms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-01-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) has several advantages over conventional step-and-shoot CT for imaging a relatively large object, especially for dynamic studies. However, HCT may increase X-ray exposure significantly. This work aims to reduce the radiation by lowering X-ray tube current (mA) and filtering low-mA (or dose) sinogram noise of HCT. The noise reduction method is based on three observations on HCT: (1) the axial sampling of HCT projections is nearly continuous as detection system rotates; (2) the noise distribution in sinogram space is nearly a Gaussian after system calibration (including logarithmic transform); and (3) the relationship between the calibrated data mean and variance can be expressed as an exponential functional across the field-of-view. Based on the second and third observations, a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) solution is an optimal choice, where the weight is given by the mean-variance relationship. The first observation encourages the use of Karhunen-Loève (KL) transform along the axial direction because of the associated correlation. In the KL domain, the eigenvalue of each principal component and the derived data variance provide the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information, resulting in a SNR-adaptive noise reduction. The KL-PWLS noise-reduction method was implemented analytically for efficient restoration of large volume HCT sinograms. Simulation studies showed a noticeable improvement, in terms of image quality and defect detectability, of the proposed noise-reduction method over the Ordered-Subsets Expectation-Maximization reconstruction and the conventional low-pass noise filtering with optimal cutoff frequency and/or other filter parameters. PMID:16932806

  13. Age-related differences in image quality of prospectively ECG-triggered axial and helical scans for coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Takase, Makoto; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Yamashita, Haruyo; Uno, Kenji; Aoki, Shigeki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the underlying reasons for the occurrence of misalignment artifacts in prospectively ECG-triggered axial coronary CT angiography scans. In this study we analyzed 56 consecutive patients scanned in axial mode and 66 consecutive patients scanned in helical mode. Predictors for the occurrence of misalignment artifacts were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis for those patients scanned in the axial mode; advanced age was identified as the sole independent predictor (odds ratio: 1.088; 95 % CI: 1.012-1.170; p = 0.0228). In a comparison with the patients scanned in the helical mode, the image quality score for patients aged 65 years or older was significantly higher in helical mode than in axial mode (2.6 ± 0.5 and 2.4 ± 0.7, respectively; p = 0.0313). Misalignment artifacts in the image are more common in the elderly than in younger. Helical mode should be preferred in this older patient population to allow for good diagnostic image quality. PMID:26984733

  14. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  15. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  16. CAD system for the assistance of a comparative reading for lung cancer using retrospective helical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Takuya; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Mori, Kiyoshi; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2001-07-01

    The objective of our study is to develop a new computer- aided diagnosis (CAD) system to support effectually the comparative reading using serial helical CT images for lung cancer screening without using the film display. The placement of pulmonary shadows between the serial helical CT images is sometimes different to change the size and the shape of lung by inspired air. We analyzed the motion of the pulmonary structure using the serial cases of 17 pairs, which are different in the inspired air. This algorithm consists of the extraction process of region of interest such as the lung, heart and blood vessels region using thresholding and fuzzy c-means method, and the comparison process of each region in serial CT images using template matching. We validated the efficiency of this algorithm by application to image of 60 subjects. The algorithm could compare the slice images correctly in most combinations with respect to physician's point of view. The experimental results of the proposed algorithm indicate that our CAD system without using the film display is useful to increase the efficiency of the mass screening process.

  17. Using Helical CT to Predict Stone Fragility in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, James C. Jr.; Zarse, Chad A.; Jackson, Molly E.; McAteer, James A.; Lingeman, James E.

    2007-04-05

    Great variability exists in the response of urinary stones to SWL, and this is true even for stones composed of the same mineral. Efforts have been made to predict stone fragility to shock waves using computed tomography (CT) patient images, but most work to date has focused on the use of stone CT number (i.e., Hounsfield units). This is an easy number to measure on a patient stone, but its value depends on a number of factors, including the relationship of the size of the stone to me resolution (i.e., the slicewidth) of the CT scan. Studies that have shown a relationship between stone CT number and failure in SWL are reviewed, and all are shown to suffer from error due to stone size, which was not accounted for in the use of Hounsfield unit values. Preliminary data are then presented for a study of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, in which stone structure-rather than simple CT number values-is shown to correlate with fragility to shock waves. COM stones that were observed to have structure by micro CT (e.g., voids, apatite regions, unusual shapes) broke to completion in about half the number of shock waves required for COM stones that were observed to be homogeneous in structure by CT. This result suggests another direction for the use of CT in predicting success of SWL: the use of CT to view stone structure, rather than simply measuring stone CT number. Viewing stone structure by CT requires the use of different viewing windows than those typically used for examining patient scans, but much research to date indicates that stone structure can be observed in the clinical setting. Future clinical studies will need to be done to verify the relationship between stone structure observed by CT and stone fragility in SWL.

  18. A three-dimensional-weighted cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction in volumetric CT-helical scanning.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Nilsen, Roy A; Dutta, Sandeep; Samsonov, Dmitry; Hagiwara, Akira

    2006-02-21

    Based on the structure of the original helical FDK algorithm, a three-dimensional (3D)-weighted cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithm is proposed for image reconstruction in volumetric CT under helical source trajectory. In addition to its dependence on view and fan angles, the 3D weighting utilizes the cone angle dependency of a ray to improve reconstruction accuracy. The 3D weighting is ray-dependent and the underlying mechanism is to give a favourable weight to the ray with the smaller cone angle out of a pair of conjugate rays but an unfavourable weight to the ray with the larger cone angle out of the conjugate ray pair. The proposed 3D-weighted helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm is implemented in the cone-parallel geometry that can improve noise uniformity and image generation speed significantly. Under the cone-parallel geometry, the filtering is naturally carried out along the tangential direction of the helical source trajectory. By exploring the 3D weighting's dependence on cone angle, the proposed helical 3D-weighted CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm can provide significantly improved reconstruction accuracy at moderate cone angle and high helical pitches. The 3D-weighted CB-FBP algorithm is experimentally evaluated by computer-simulated phantoms and phantoms scanned by a diagnostic volumetric CT system with a detector dimension of 64 x 0.625 mm over various helical pitches. The computer simulation study shows that the 3D weighting enables the proposed algorithm to reach reconstruction accuracy comparable to that of exact CB reconstruction algorithms, such as the Katsevich algorithm, under a moderate cone angle (4 degrees) and various helical pitches. Meanwhile, the experimental evaluation using the phantoms scanned by a volumetric CT system shows that the spatial resolution along the z-direction and noise characteristics of the proposed 3D-weighted helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm are maintained very well in comparison to the FDK

  19. A three-dimensional statistical approach to improved image quality for multislice helical CT.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Sauer, Ken D; Bouman, Charles A; Hsieh, Jiang

    2007-11-01

    Multislice helical computed tomography scanning offers the advantages of faster acquisition and wide organ coverage for routine clinical diagnostic purposes. However, image reconstruction is faced with the challenges of three-dimensional cone-beam geometry, data completeness issues, and low dosage. Of all available reconstruction methods, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they provide the flexibility of accurate physical noise modeling and geometric system description. In this paper, we present the application of Bayesian iterative algorithms to real 3D multislice helical data to demonstrate significant image quality improvement over conventional techniques. We also introduce a novel prior distribution designed to provide flexibility in its parameters to fine-tune image quality. Specifically, enhanced image resolution and lower noise have been achieved, concurrently with the reduction of helical cone-beam artifacts, as demonstrated by phantom studies. Clinical results also illustrate the capabilities of the algorithm on real patient data. Although computational load remains a significant challenge for practical development, superior image quality combined with advancements in computing technology make IR techniques a legitimate candidate for future clinical applications. PMID:18072519

  20. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  1. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, H; Guo, M; Lee, K; Li, R; Xing, L; Gao, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

  2. Fuzzy Clustering Applied to ROI Detection in Helical Thoracic CT Scans with a New Proposal and Variants.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alfonso; Rey, Alberto; Boveda, Carmen; Arcay, Bernardino; Sanjurjo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The detection of pulmonary nodules is one of the most studied problems in the field of medical image analysis due to the great difficulty in the early detection of such nodules and their social impact. The traditional approach involves the development of a multistage CAD system capable of informing the radiologist of the presence or absence of nodules. One stage in such systems is the detection of ROI (regions of interest) that may be nodules in order to reduce the space of the problem. This paper evaluates fuzzy clustering algorithms that employ different classification strategies to achieve this goal. After characterising these algorithms, the authors propose a new algorithm and different variations to improve the results obtained initially. Finally it is shown as the most recent developments in fuzzy clustering are able to detect regions that may be nodules in CT studies. The algorithms were evaluated using helical thoracic CT scans obtained from the database of the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium). PMID:27517049

  3. A projection-driven pre-correction technique for iterative reconstruction of helical cone-beam cardiac CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Synho; Liang, Zhuangli; Karl, William Clem; Brady, Thomas; Pien, Homer

    2008-03-01

    Modern CT systems have advanced at a dramatic rate. Algebraic iterative reconstruction techniques have shown promising and desirable image characteristics, but are seldom used due to their high computational cost for complete reconstruction of large volumetric datasets. In many cases, however, interest in high resolution reconstructions is restricted to smaller regions of interest within the complete volume. In this paper we present an implementation of a simple and practical method to produce iterative reconstructions of reduced-sized ROI from 3D helical tomographic data. We use the observation that the conventional filtered back-projection reconstruction is generally of high quality throughout the entire volume to predict the contributions to ROI-related projections arising from volumes outside the ROI. These predictions are then used to pre-correct the data to produce a tomographic inversion problem of substantially reduced size and memory demands. Our work expands on those of other researchers who have observed similar potential computational gains by exploiting FBP results. We demonstrate our approach using cardiac CT cone-beam imaging, illustrating our results with both ex vivo and in vivo multi-cycle EKG-gated examples.

  4. Fuzzy Clustering Applied to ROI Detection in Helical Thoracic CT Scans with a New Proposal and Variants

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Alfonso; Boveda, Carmen; Arcay, Bernardino; Sanjurjo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The detection of pulmonary nodules is one of the most studied problems in the field of medical image analysis due to the great difficulty in the early detection of such nodules and their social impact. The traditional approach involves the development of a multistage CAD system capable of informing the radiologist of the presence or absence of nodules. One stage in such systems is the detection of ROI (regions of interest) that may be nodules in order to reduce the space of the problem. This paper evaluates fuzzy clustering algorithms that employ different classification strategies to achieve this goal. After characterising these algorithms, the authors propose a new algorithm and different variations to improve the results obtained initially. Finally it is shown as the most recent developments in fuzzy clustering are able to detect regions that may be nodules in CT studies. The algorithms were evaluated using helical thoracic CT scans obtained from the database of the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium). PMID:27517049

  5. TH-C-18A-11: Investigating the Minimum Scan Parameters Required to Generate Free-Breathing Fast-Helical CT Scans Without Motion-Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; Neylon, J; Dou, T; Jani, S; Lamb, J; Low, D; Tan, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A recently proposed 4D-CT protocol uses deformable registration of free-breathing fast-helical CT scans to generate a breathing motion model. In order to allow accurate registration, free-breathing images are required to be free of doubling-artifacts, which arise when tissue motion is greater than scan speed. This work identifies the minimum scanner parameters required to successfully generate free-breathing fast-helical scans without doubling-artifacts. Methods: 10 patients were imaged under free breathing conditions 25 times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low dose fast helical protocol. A high temporal resolution (0.1s) 4D-CT was generated using a patient specific motion model and patient breathing waveforms, and used as the input for a scanner simulation. Forward projections were calculated using helical cone-beam geometry (800 projections per rotation) and a GPU accelerated reconstruction algorithm was implemented. Various CT scanner detector widths and rotation times were simulated, and verified using a motion phantom. Doubling-artifacts were quantified in patient images using structural similarity maps to determine the similarity between axial slices. Results: Increasing amounts of doubling-artifacts were observed with increasing rotation times > 0.2s for 16×1mm slice scan geometry. No significant increase in doubling artifacts was observed for 64×1mm slice scan geometry up to 1.0s rotation time although blurring artifacts were observed >0.6s. Using a 16×1mm slice scan geometry, a rotation time of less than 0.3s (53mm/s scan speed) would be required to produce images of similar quality to a 64×1mm slice scan geometry. Conclusion: The current generation of 16 slice CT scanners, which are present in most Radiation Oncology departments, are not capable of generating free-breathing sorting-artifact-free images in the majority of patients. The next generation of CT scanners should be capable of at least 53mm/s scan speed

  6. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  7. Palatal myoclonus

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing Alternative Names Palatal tremor References Jankovic J. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, eds. ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Mouth Disorders Movement Disorders Multiple Sclerosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  8. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    Cleft palate; Craniofacial defect ... way to the base of the nose. A cleft palate can be on 1 or both sides of ... nose, and palate confirms a cleft lip or cleft palate. Medical tests may be done to rule out ...

  9. NOTE: Optimization of megavoltage CT scan registration settings for thoracic cases on helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the settings that provide optimum registration accuracy when registering megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies acquired on tomotherapy with planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) studies of patients with lung cancer. For each experiment, the systematic difference between the actual and planned positions of the thorax phantom was determined by setting the phantom up at the planning isocenter, generating and registering an MVCT study. The phantom was translated by 5 or 10 mm, MVCT scanned, and registration was performed again. A root-mean-square equation that calculated the residual error of the registration based on the known shift and systematic difference was used to assess the accuracy of the registration process. The phantom study results for 18 combinations of different MVCT/kVCT registration options are presented and compared to clinical registration data from 17 lung cancer patients. MVCT studies acquired with coarse (6 mm), normal (4 mm) and fine (2 mm) slice spacings could all be registered with similar residual errors. No specific combination of resolution and fusion selection technique resulted in a lower residual error. A scan length of 6 cm with any slice spacing registered with the full image fusion selection technique and fine resolution will result in a low residual error most of the time. On average, large corrections made manually by clinicians to the automatic registration values are infrequent. Small manual corrections within the residual error averages of the registration process occur, but their impact on the average patient position is small. Registrations using the full image fusion selection technique and fine resolution of 6 cm MVCT scans with coarse slices have a low residual error, and this strategy can be clinically used for lung cancer patients treated on tomotherapy. Automatic registration values are accurate on average, and a quick verification on a sagittal MVCT slice should be enough to detect registration outliers.

  10. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  11. The role of the central L- or D-Pro residue on structure and mode of action of a cell-selective alpha-helical IsCT-derived antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shin Saeng; Kim, Yangmee; Park, Yoonkyung; Kim, Jae Il; Park, Il-Seon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, Song Yub

    2005-09-01

    IsCT-P (ILKKIWKPIKKLF-NH2) is a novel alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide with bacterial cell selectivity designed from a scorpion-derived peptide IsCT. To investigate the role of L- or D-Pro kink on the structure and the mode of action of a short alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide with bacterial cell selectivity, we synthesized IsCT-p, in which D-Pro is substituted for L-Pro8 of IsCT-P. CD spectra revealed that IsCT-P adopted a typical alpha-helical structure in various membrane-mimicking conditions, whereas IsCT-p showed a random structure. This result indicated that D-Pro in the central position of a short alpha-helical peptide provides more remarkable structural flexibility than L-Pro. Despite its higher antibacterial activity, IsCT-p was much less effective at inducing dye leakage in the negatively charged liposome mimicking bacterial membrane and induced no or little membrane potential depolarization of Staphylococcus aureus. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that IsCT-p penetrated the bacterial cell membrane and accumulated in the cytoplasm, whereas IsCT-P remained outside or on the cell membrane. These results suggested that the major target of IsCT-P and IsCT-p is the bacterial membranes and intracellular components, respectively. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the central D-Pro kink in alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides plays an important role in penetrating bacterial membrane as well as bacterial cell selectivity. PMID:16040002

  12. TH-E-17A-02: High-Pitch and Sparse-View Helical 4D CT Via Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, M; Nam, H; Li, R; Xing, L; Gao, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: 4D CT is routinely performed during radiation therapy treatment planning of thoracic and abdominal cancers. Compared with the cine mode, the helical mode is advantageous in temporal resolution. However, a low pitch (∼0.1) for 4D CT imaging is often required instead of the standard pitch (∼1) for static imaging, since standard image reconstruction based on analytic method requires the low-pitch scanning in order to satisfy the data sufficient condition when reconstructing each temporal frame individually. In comparison, the flexible iterative method enables the reconstruction of all temporal frames simultaneously, so that the image similarity among frames can be utilized to possibly perform high-pitch and sparse-view helical 4D CT imaging. The purpose of this work is to investigate such an exciting possibility for faster imaging with lower dose. Methods: A key for highpitch and sparse-view helical 4D CT imaging is the simultaneous reconstruction of all temporal frames using the prior that temporal frames are continuous along the temporal direction. In this work, such a prior is regularized through the sparsity transform based on spatiotemporal tensor framelet (TF) as a multilevel and high-order extension of total variation transform. Moreover, GPU-based fast parallel computing of X-ray transform and its adjoint together with split Bregman method is utilized for solving the 4D image reconstruction problem efficiently and accurately. Results: The simulation studies based on 4D NCAT phantoms were performed with various pitches (i.e., 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1) and sparse views (i.e., 400 views per rotation instead of standard >2000 views per rotation), using 3D iterative individual reconstruction method based on 3D TF and 4D iterative simultaneous reconstruction method based on 4D TF respectively. Conclusion: The proposed TF-based simultaneous 4D image reconstruction method enables high-pitch and sparse-view helical 4D CT with lower dose and faster speed.

  13. Cleft palate - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cleft palate ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cleft palate : Cleft Palate Foundation -- www.cleftline.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1210.asp ...

  14. Palatal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Bansal, Shuchi

    2014-01-01

    Palatal ulcers are a common presentation and can be conveniently divided into developmental and acquired causes, the latter of which is subdivided into acute and chronic causes. Most commonly seen dermatologic causes have associated skin manifestations. Acute and multiple ulcers are usually infectious or drug induced in origin. Recurrent ulcers are largely dominated by aphthosis, while chronic ulcers are seen in immunocompromised patients and can occasionally be malignant. It is essential to involve the oral and maxillofacial surgeons early in the therapeutic management to tackle the inevitable complications that may ensue in the chronic cases. PMID:25441477

  15. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.

  16. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that affect the upper lip and the roof of the mouth. ... There are many causes of cleft lip and palate. Problems with genes ... viruses, or other toxins can all cause these birth defects. ...

  17. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate KidsHealth > For Kids > Cleft Lip ... to the back of your mouth. What's a Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate? The word cleft means a ...

  18. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear infections, hearing loss, and problems with their teeth. Often, surgery can close the lip and palate. Cleft lip surgery is usually done before age 12 months, and cleft palate surgery is done ...

  19. Cleft Palate Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a list of 2016 funded research projects. Cleft Palate Foundation 1504 East Franklin Street, Suite 102 Chapel ... to order bottles Order CPF publications © Copyright 2014 Cleft Palate Foundation. Website by Mixer Creative Follow us on ...

  20. Utility of megavoltage fan-beam CT for treatment planning in a head-and-neck cancer patient with extensive dental fillings undergoing helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Claus; Liu, Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L; Ryu, Janice K; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a "cheese" phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  1. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  2. Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom

  3. CT angiography of neonates and infants: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated 320-MDCT and ungated helical 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Siddharth P; Golriz, Farahnaz; Atweh, Lamya A; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric CT angiography (CTA) performed with a 320-MDCT scanner compared with the radiation dose and image quality of ungated helical CTA performed with a 64-MDCT scanner. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An experience with CTA for cardiovascular indications in neonates and infants 0-6 months old was retrospectively assessed. Radiation doses and quantitative and qualitative image quality scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 320-MDCT scanner and volumetric target mode prospective ECG gating plus iterative reconstruction (target mode) were compared with the doses and scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 64-MDCT scanner and ungated helical scanning plus filtered back projection reconstruction (ungated mode). All target mode studies were performed during free breathing. Seven ungated CTA examinations (25%) were performed with general endotracheal anesthesia. The findings of 17 preoperative CTA examinations performed in target mode were also compared with surgical reports for evaluation of diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS. All studies performed with target mode technique were diagnostic for the main clinical indication. Effective doses were significantly lower in the target mode group (0.51 ± 0.19 mSv) compared with the ungated mode group (4.8 ± 1.4 mSv) (p < 0.0001). Quantitative analysis revealed no statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (of pulmonary artery and aorta) and contrast-to-noise ratio. Subjective image quality was significantly better with target mode than with ungated mode (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION. Target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric scanning with iterative reconstruction performed with a 320-MDCT scanner has several benefits in cardiovascular imaging of neonates and infants, including low radiation dose, improved image quality, high diagnostic

  4. Automatic registration of megavoltage to kilovoltage CT images in helical tomotherapy: an evaluation of the setup verification process for the special case of a rigid head phantom.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Sarah; Tomé, Wolfgang; Jeraj, Robert; Jaradat, Hazim; Mackie, T Rock

    2006-11-01

    Precise daily target localization is necessary to achieve highly conformal radiation delivery. In helical tomotherapy, setup verification may be accomplished just prior to delivering each fraction by acquiring a megavoltage CT scan of the patient in the treatment position. This daily image set may be manually or automatically registered to the image set on which the treatment plan was calculated, in order to determine any needed adjustments. The system was tested by acquiring 104 MVCT scans of an anthropomorphic head phantom to which translational displacements had been introduced with respect to the planning image set. Registration results were compared against an independent, optically guided positioning system. The total experimental uncertainty was within approximately 1 mm. Although the registration of phantom images is not fully analogous to the registration of patient images, this study confirms that the system is capable of phantom localization with sub-voxel accuracy. In seven registration problems considered, expert human observers were able to perform manual registrations with comparable or inferior accuracy to automatic registration by mutual information. The time to compute an automatic registration is considerably shorter than the time required for manual registration. However, human evaluation of automatic results is necessary in order to identify occasional outliers, and to ensure that the registration is clinically acceptable, especially in the case of deformable patient anatomy. PMID:17153418

  5. Automatic registration of megavoltage to kilovoltage CT images in helical tomotherapy: An evaluation of the setup verification process for the special case of a rigid head phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, Sarah; Tome, Wolfgang; Jeraj, Robert; Jaradat, Hazim; Mackie, T. Rock

    2006-11-15

    Precise daily target localization is necessary to achieve highly conformal radiation delivery. In helical tomotherapy, setup verification may be accomplished just prior to delivering each fraction by acquiring a megavoltage CT scan of the patient in the treatment position. This daily image set may be manually or automatically registered to the image set on which the treatment plan was calculated, in order to determine any needed adjustments. The system was tested by acquiring 104 MVCT scans of an anthropomorphic head phantom to which translational displacements had been introduced with respect to the planning image set. Registration results were compared against an independent, optically guided positioning system. The total experimental uncertainty was within approximately 1 mm. Although the registration of phantom images is not fully analogous to the registration of patient images, this study confirms that the system is capable of phantom localization with sub-voxel accuracy. In seven registration problems considered, expert human observers were able to perform manual registrations with comparable or inferior accuracy to automatic registration by mutual information. The time to compute an automatic registration is considerably shorter than the time required for manual registration. However, human evaluation of automatic results is necessary in order to identify occasional outliers, and to ensure that the registration is clinically acceptable, especially in the case of deformable patient anatomy.

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They happen early during ... A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if the ...

  7. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules from whole lung helical CT scans: performance comparison for isolated and attached nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquobahrie, Andinet A.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate and compare the performance of our automated detection algorithm on isolated and attached nodules in whole lung CT scans. Isolated nodules are surrounded by the lung parenchyma with no attachment to large solid structures such as the chest wall or mediastinum surface, while attached nodules are adjacent to these structures. The detection algorithm involves three major stages. First, the region of the image space where pulmonary nodules are to be found is identified. This involves segmenting the lung region and generating the pleural surface. In the second stage, which is the hypothesis generation stage, nodule candidate locations are identified and their sizes are estimated. The nodule candidates are successively refined in the third stage a sequence of filters of increasing complexity. The algorithm was tested on a dataset containing 250 low-dose whole lung CT scans with 2.5mm slice thickness. A scan is composed of images covering the whole lung region for a single person. The dataset was partitioned into 200 and 50 scans for training and testing the algorithm. Only solid nodules were considered in this study. Experienced chest radiologists identified a total of 447 solid nodules. 345 and 102 of the nodules were from the training and testing datasets respectively. 126(28.2%) of the nodules in the dataset were attached nodules. The detection performance was then evaluated separately for isolated and attached nodule types considering different size ranges. For nodules 3mm and larger, the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 97.8% with 2.0 false positives (FPs) per scan and 95.7% with 19.3 FPs per scan for isolated and attached nodules respectively. For nodules 4mm and larger, a sensitivity of 96.6% with 1.5 FP per scan and a 100% sensitivity with 13 FPs per scan were obtained for isolated and attached nodule types respectively. The results show that our algorithm detects isolated and attached nodules with comparable

  8. A Novel Fast Helical 4D-CT Acquisition Technique to Generate Low-Noise Sorting Artifact–Free Images at User-Selected Breathing Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, David; Lamb, James; White, Benjamin; Jani, Shyam; Gaudio, Sergio; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Low, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) technique that exploits standard fast helical acquisition, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a breathing motion model to remove sorting artifacts. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were imaged under free-breathing conditions 25 successive times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low-dose fast helical protocol. An abdominal bellows was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformable registration was used to register the first image (defined as the reference image) to the subsequent 24 segmented images. Voxel-specific motion model parameters were determined using a breathing motion model. The tissue locations predicted by the motion model in the 25 images were compared against the deformably registered tissue locations, allowing a model prediction error to be evaluated. A low-noise image was created by averaging the 25 images deformed to the first image geometry, reducing statistical image noise by a factor of 5. The motion model was used to deform the low-noise reference image to any user-selected breathing phase. A voxel-specific correction was applied to correct the Hounsfield units for lung parenchyma density as a function of lung air filling. Results: Images produced using the model at user-selected breathing phases did not suffer from sorting artifacts common to conventional 4D-CT protocols. The mean prediction error across all patients between the breathing motion model predictions and the measured lung tissue positions was determined to be 1.19 ± 0.37 mm. Conclusions: The proposed technique can be used as a clinical 4D-CT technique. It is robust in the presence of irregular breathing and allows the entire imaging dose to contribute to the resulting image quality, providing sorting artifact–free images at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4D-CT techniques.

  9. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro. PMID:18650554

  10. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Support Resources Books for Kids and Adults Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area FAQs for ... Conference: For Patients and Families Glossary of Terms Cleft lip and cleft palate comprise the most common birth ...

  11. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery ... to correct a physical defect caused by a cleft lip or cleft palate, which occur once in every ...

  12. Helical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-08-01

    A straight, helical plasma equilibrium equation is solved numerically for a plasma with a helical magnetic axis. As is expected, by a suitable choice of the plasma boundary, the vacuum configuration is made line ..integral.. dl/B stable. As the plasma pressure increases, the line ..integral.. dl/B criterion will improve (again as expected). There is apparently no limit on the plasma ..beta.. from the equilibrium consideration. Thus helical-axis stellarator ..beta.. will presumably be limited by MHD stability ..beta.., and not by equilibrium ..beta...

  13. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  14. Ephrin regulation of palate development

    PubMed Central

    Benson, M. Douglas; Serrano, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of palate development are motivated by the all too common incidence of cleft palate, a birth defect that imposes a tremendous health burden and can leave lasting disfigurement. Although, mechanistic studies of palate growth and fusion have focused on growth factors such as Transforming Growth Factor ß-3 (Tgfß3), recent studies have revealed that the ephrin family of membrane bound ligands and their receptors, the Ephs, play central roles in palatal morphogenesis, growth, and fusion. In this mini-review, we will discuss the recent findings by our group and others on the functions of ephrins in palatal development. PMID:23055980

  15. Accommodating Picky Palates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    Healthy gourmet offerings are fast becoming the norm at college dining halls around the country. At a time when the children of Baby Boomers are hitting higher education in record numbers, college officials have scrambled to accommodate their picky palates and their insistence for healthier meals than were served to past generations. At the same…

  16. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity and function of the hard palate in growing rabbits.

    PubMed

    Menegaz, Rachel A; Sublett, Samantha V; Figueroa, Said D; Hoffman, Timothy J; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2009-02-01

    Morphological variation related to differential loading is well known for many craniomandibular elements. Yet, the function of the hard palate, and in particular the manner in which cortical and trabecular bone of the palate respond to masticatory loads, remains more ambiguous. Here, experimental data are presented that address the naturalistic influence of biomechanical loading on the postweaning development and structure of the hard palate. A rabbit model was used to test the hypothesis that variation in the morphology of the hard palate is linked to variation in masticatory stresses. Rabbit siblings were divided as weanlings into soft and hard/tough dietary treatment groups of 10 subjects each and were raised for 15 weeks until subadulthood. MicroCT analyses indicate that rabbits subjected to elevated masticatory loading developed hard palates with significantly greater bone area, greater cortical bone thickness along the oral lamina, and thicker anterior palates. Such diet-induced levels of palatal plasticity are comparable to those for other masticatory elements, which likely reflect osteogenic responses for maintaining the functional integrity of the palate vis-à-vis elevated stresses during unilateral mastication. These data support a role for mechanical loading in the determination of palatal morphology, especially its internal structure, in living and fossil mammals such as the hominin Paranthropus. Furthermore, these findings have potential implications for the evolution of the mammalian secondary hard palate as well as for clinical considerations of human oral pathologies. PMID:19089904

  18. Helical logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkle, Ralph C.; Drexler, K. Eric

    1996-12-01

    Helical logic is a theoretical proposal for a future computing technology using the presence or absence of individual electrons (or holes) to encode 1s and 0s. The electrons are constrained to move along helical paths, driven by a rotating electric field in which the entire circuit is immersed. The electric field remains roughly orthogonal to the major axis of the helix and confines each charge carrier to a fraction of a turn of a single helical loop, moving it like water in an Archimedean screw. Each loop could in principle hold an independent carrier, permitting high information density. One computationally universal logic operation involves two helices, one of which splits into two `descendant' helices. At the point of divergence, differences in the electrostatic potential resulting from the presence or absence of a carrier in the adjacent helix controls the direction taken by a carrier in the splitting helix. The reverse of this sequence can be used to merge two initially distinct helical paths into a single outgoing helical path without forcing a dissipative transition. Because these operations are both logically and thermodynamically reversible, energy dissipation can be reduced to extremely low levels. This is the first proposal known to the authors that combines thermodynamic reversibility with the use of single charge carriers. It is important to note that this proposal permits a single electron to switch another single electron, and does not require that many electrons be used to switch one electron. The energy dissipated per logic operation can very likely be reduced to less than 0957-4484/7/4/004/img5 at a temperature of 1 K and a speed of 10 GHz, though further analysis is required to confirm this. Irreversible operations, when required, can be easily implemented and should have a dissipation approaching the fundamental limit of 0957-4484/7/4/004/img6.

  19. Palatal pyogenic granulomaa.

    PubMed

    Mahabob, Nazargi; Kumar, Senthil; Raja, Subramani

    2013-07-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a kind of inflammatory hyperplasia seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection. In reality it arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. It is also called as pregnancy tumor because of its high frequency of occurrence during the early part of pregnancy. Even though, this lesion is non-neoplastic and treatment procedure is simple, it should be diagnosed correctly before proceeding with the treatment. The most common site for PGs is gingiva (75%) and rarely in the palate. In this case report, we are going to present very rare occurrence of pregnancy tumor in the hard palate. PMID:23956603

  20. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pradyumna Kumar; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Ghosh, Saradindu

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa. PMID:25298716

  1. [Palatal necrosis in children. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sancho, M A; Parri, F J; Raigosa, J M; Lerena, J; Cacéres, F; Muñoz, M E

    2006-04-01

    Palate necrosis as a consequence of palate infection it's an exceptional condition about there's not too much references at literature. We present a case of a 6 months old child who present a palatal necrosis after a supurative medial otitis that involved hard and soft palate, with positive culture for Pseudomona aeruginosa causing a almost complete absence of the palate that simulate a bilateral palatal cleft. PMID:16846136

  2. Helical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Johnson, Eric; Richardson, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  3. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  4. Morphological Study of Soft Palate by Using Computed Tomography–A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Nairita; Vijayvargiya, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Background Soft palate is an important part of oro-naso-pharyngeal apparatus. The morphometric assessment of soft palate is well-performed on computed tomography (CT). Aim To evaluate the morphology of soft palate in healthy individuals by using Computed tomography. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 300 healthy voluntary participants who were subjected to CT scan (sagittal view) of head and neck region. The measurements of antero-posterior and supero-inferior length of soft palate were performed by using Syngo CT 2009E software. Statistical Analysis The statistical analysis was performed by using SPSS software version 16 and test applied were one-way ANOVA, independent t-test, chi-square and Karl Pearson’s co-relation coefficient. Results The participant’s age ranged from 18-80 years with mean of 39.51±14.64. The study had equal number of males (n=150) and females (n=150). Out of six shapes of soft palate, Butt type (38.7%) was the commonest. The morphology of soft palate in different age groups was statistically not significant (p>0.05). The total mean of antero-posterior length (30.31±3.39 mm) of soft palate was more than supero-inferior length (10.72±1.71 mm). The mean of antero-posterior length in males (30.69±3.42 mm) was more than females (29.92±3.32 mm); which was statistically significant (p<0.05). The mean of supero-inferior length in males (10.67±1.78 mm) was less than females (10.78+1.64 mm), which was statistically not significant (p>0.05). Conclusion CT scan is an important diagnostic aid for studying the accurate morphology of soft palate. PMID:26436052

  5. Palatalization in Romanian: Experimental and Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinu, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Within the larger context of the Romance languages, Romanian stands alone in exhibiting a surface contrast between plain and palatalized consonants (that is, consonants with a secondary palatal articulation). While the properties of secondary palatalization are well known for language families in which the set of palatalized consonants is…

  6. From shape to cells: mouse models reveal mechanisms altering palate development in Apert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Holmes, Greg; Pankratz, Talia; Wang, Yingli; Zhou, Xueyan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Apert syndrome is a congenital disorder characterized by severe skull malformations and caused by one of two missense mutations, S252W and P253R, on fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). The molecular bases underlying differential Apert syndrome phenotypes are still poorly understood and it is unclear why cleft palate is more frequent in patients carrying the S252W mutation. Taking advantage of Apert syndrome mouse models, we performed a novel combination of morphometric, histological and immunohistochemical analyses to precisely quantify distinct palatal phenotypes in Fgfr2+/S252W and Fgfr2+/P253R mice. We localized regions of differentially altered FGF signaling and assessed local cell patterns to establish a baseline for understanding the differential effects of these two Fgfr2 mutations. Palatal suture scoring and comparative 3D shape analysis from high resolution μCT images of 120 newborn mouse skulls showed that Fgfr2+/S252W mice display relatively more severe palate dysmorphologies, with contracted and more separated palatal shelves, a greater tendency to fuse the maxillary-palatine sutures and aberrant development of the inter-premaxillary suture. These palatal defects are associated with suture-specific patterns of abnormal cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The posterior region of the developing palate emerges as a potential target for therapeutic strategies in clinical management of cleft palate in Apert syndrome patients. PMID:23519026

  7. Helical differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Willner, Marian; Chen, Liyuan; Tan, Renbo; Achterhold, Klaus; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Juergen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    We report on the first experimental results of helical differential phase-contrast computed tomography (helical DPC-CT) with a laboratory X-ray tube source and a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer. The results experimentally verify the feasibility of helical data acquisition and reconstruction in phase-contrast imaging, in analogy to its use in clinical CT systems. This allows fast and continuous volumetric scans for long objects with lengths exceeding the dimension of the detector. Since helical CT revolutionized the field of medical CT several years ago, we anticipate that this method will bring the same significant impact on the future medical and industrial applications of X-ray DPC-CT. PMID:24518822

  8. Laser soft-palate stiffening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; McMillan, Kathleen; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; Nemati, Babak; Carkner, Eric; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1998-07-01

    Preliminary animal model experiments have been performed to test the feasibility of a new treatment for snoring. Current surgical treatments for snoring at the palatal level involve either excision of tissue to shorten the palate, or interstitial ablation of the palate to induce fibrosis and stiffening. Both shortening and stiffening of the palate are believed to be effective in reducing snoring. Mucosal surface damage and delayed tissue sloughing are the cause of considerable pain for the patient. In the new treatment proposed here, palatal stiffening with mucosal preservation is accomplished by combining evaporative cooling at the tissue surface with laser irradiation to heat subsurface tissue layers. The surface is cooled using a timed spray of tetrafluoroethane immediately prior to each pulse from a 1.54 micrometer erbium glass laser. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the technique causes significant shrinkage and decreased elasticity in hamster skin, with no tissue sloughing. In vitro experiments with canine soft palates show that laser-induced thermal damage zones ranged from approximately 0.75 to 1.75 mm below the surface, depending on laser parameters. These results suggest that the noninvasive laser technique may produce palatal stiffening with protection of the mucosal surface, for treatment of snoring with minimal morbidity.

  9. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  10. Neurofibroma of the Palate

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Tirumalasetty Sreenivasa; Krishna, Yelamolu Rama; Nalabolu, Govind Rajkumar; Pasupuleti, Swetha; Surapaneni, Suneela; Ganta, Suresh Babu

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibroma is a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor comprising variable mixture of Schwann cells, perineurial-like cells, and fibroblasts. Neurofibroma may occur as solitary lesion or as part of a generalised syndrome of neurofibromatosis or very rarely as multiple neurofibromas without any associated syndrome. There are two distinct variants of neurofibromatosis type I and type II. We present a case of neurofibroma of the hard palate associated with neurofibromatosis type I. The diagnosis of the lesion was made based on the clinical findings, family history, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Literature was reviewed and different types of neurofibroma, their incidence and frequency in the oral cavity, its association with neurofibromatosis, clinical manifestations, histopathologic characteristics, immunohistochemical analysis, behaviour, treatment, and recurrence are discussed. PMID:24860683

  11. High temporal resolution for multislice helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Anno, H

    2000-05-01

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) substantially reduces scanning time. However, the temporal resolution of individual images is still insufficient for imaging rapidly moving organs such as the heart and adjacent pulmonary vessels. It may, in some cases, be worse than with current single-slice helical CT. The purpose of this study is to describe a novel image reconstruction algorithm to improve temporal resolution in multislice helical CT, and to evaluate its performance against existing algorithms. The proposed image reconstruction algorithm uses helical interpolation followed by data weighting based on the acquisition time. The temporal resolution, the longitudinal (z-axis) spatial resolution, the image noise, and the in-plane image artifacts created by a moving phantom were compared with those from the basic multislice helical reconstruction (helical filter interpolation, HFI) algorithm and the basic single-slice helical reconstruction algorithm (180 degrees linear interpolation, 180LI) using computer simulations. Computer simulation results were verified with CT examinations of the heart and lung vasculature using a 0.5 second multislice scanner. The temporal resolution of HFI algorithm varies from 0.28 and 0.86 s, depending on helical pitch. The proposed method improves the resolution to a constant value of 0.29 s, independent of pitch, allowing moving objects to be imaged with reduced blurring or motion artifacts. The spatial (z) resolution was slightly worse than with the HFI algorithm; the image noise was worse than with the HFI algorithm but was comparable to axial (step-and-shoot) CT. The proposed method provided sharp images of the moving objects, portraying the anatomy accurately. The proposed algorithm for multislice helical CT allowed us to obtain CT images with high temporal resolution. It may improve the image quality of clinical cardiac, lung, and vascular CT imaging. PMID:10841388

  12. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  13. Space Technology for Palate Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    University of Miami utilized NASA's spacecraft viewing technology to develop the optical profilometer provides more accurate measurements of cleft palate casts than has heretofore been possible, enabling better planning of corrective surgery. Lens like instrument electronically scans a palate cast precisely measuring its irregular contours by detecting minute differences in the intensity of a light beam reflected off the cast. Readings are computer processed and delivered to the surgeon by a teleprinter.

  14. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch. PMID:11488494

  15. Variety, Palatability, and Obesity1234

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Fiona; Wardle, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Among the key characteristics of the Western obesogenic food environment is a highly palatable and varied food supply. Laboratory investigations of eating behavior in both humans and animals established key roles for palatability and variety in stimulating appetite, delaying satiety, and promoting excessive energy intake. There is a robust effect of food palatability and variety on short-term food intake, and increased variety and palatability also cause weight gain in animal models. However, laboratory paradigms do not replicate the complexities of eating in a natural setting, and there is a shortage of evidence to estimate the magnitude of effects on weight in humans. There are substantial individual differences in susceptibility to the palatability effect and this may be a key determinant in individual vulnerability to weight gain. The understanding of pathways through which palatability and variety can affect eating is advancing, and epidemiologic and intervention studies are needed to translate laboratory findings into applications in public health or clinical domains, and to establish whether there is a role for greater regulation of the food environment in tackling increases in obesity. PMID:25398751

  16. Molecular Anatomy of Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Andrew S.; Potter, S. Steven

    2015-01-01

    The NIH FACEBASE consortium was established in part to create a central resource for craniofacial researchers. One purpose is to provide a molecular anatomy of craniofacial development. To this end we have used a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA-Seq to define the gene expression programs driving development of the murine palate. We focused on the E14.5 palate, soon after medial fusion of the two palatal shelves. The palate was divided into multiple compartments, including both medial and lateral, as well as oral and nasal, for both the anterior and posterior domains. A total of 25 RNA-Seq datasets were generated. The results provide a comprehensive view of the region specific expression of all transcription factors, growth factors and receptors. Paracrine interactions can be inferred from flanking compartment growth factor/receptor expression patterns. The results are validated primarily through very high concordance with extensive previously published gene expression data for the developing palate. In addition selected immunostain validations were carried out. In conclusion, this report provides an RNA-Seq based atlas of gene expression patterns driving palate development at microanatomic resolution. This FACEBASE resource is designed to promote discovery by the craniofacial research community. PMID:26168040

  17. Paramedian vertical palatal bone height for mini-implant insertion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, H; Vlachojannis, C; Bumann, A; Vlachojannis, J; Chrubasik, S

    2014-10-01

    Paramedian insertion of orthodontic mini-implants is increasingly used to anchor molar distalizers. The aim of this review was to systematically examine the available measurements of vertical palatal bone height (VBH). PUBMED, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched using specific search terms. Hand searches of bibliographies of articles were also performed to identify studies measuring VBH or bone thickness in the human palate. Sixteen studies were included, arising from 19 published articles. Repeat presentations were excluded. Ten of the 11 computed tomogram (CT)-based studies presented data from 956 orthodontic patients on average VBH and its variation at a range of palatal sites. Individual data were not available, and pooling of data was not feasible because of heterogeneity of subjects, different measurement sites, different CT methods and their associated software. The compilation of data did indicate that the region 3-4mm behind the incisive foramen and 3-9mm lateral to the midpalatal suture should normally provide sufficient VBH to anchor molar distalizers. The risks of unwanted effects during distalization should be small, but the limitations listed above and the small numbers of studies available impair the precision of the estimates and do not allow the results to be generalized. Paramedian anchorage in the anterior palate can be recommended for molar distalization but, given the great inter-individual variability of the palatal bone height, it must be preceded by reliable CT-based imaging in patients identified by routine investigations as being at risk. PMID:23221896

  18. SIGNALING NETWORKS IN PALATE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jamie; Kaartinen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Palatogenesis, the formation of the palate, is a dynamic process that is regulated by a complex series of context-dependent morphogenetic signaling events. Many genes involved in palatogenesis have been discovered through the use of genetically-manipulated mouse models as well as from human genetic studies, but the roles of these genes and their products in signaling networks regulating palatogenesis are still poorly known. In this review, we give a brief overview on palatogenesis and introduce key signaling cascades leading to formation of the intact palate. Moreover, we review conceptual differences between pathway biology and network biology and discuss how some of the recent technological advances in conjunction with mouse genetic models have contributed to our understanding of signaling networks regulating palate growth and fusion. PMID:24644145

  19. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  20. Pathosis of the hard and soft palate.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J F; Tsaknis, P J

    1978-04-01

    In this article a few of the more recently emphasized and pertinent conditions that may affect the hard and soft palate have been discussed. The purpose of the article is not to present in all-inclusive classification of lesions occurring the palate. Disease of the palate may be local in nature or may reflect a systemic condition. Dentists must be conscious of the palate as the site of many possible pathoses. The prosthodontist in particular must observe and carefully evaluate the palate and insure its good health before he can prescribe a prosthesis to cover it. Dentistry provides a health service which affects the entire human organism and not just the oral cavity. Therefore an understanding of the varied nature of pathosis as it relates to the oral cavity, and especially the palate, is essential. Continuous surveillance of the palatal regions insures that the dentist's obligation to detect oral abnormalities in patients is in large measure fulfilled. PMID:205648

  1. Abnormal Patterns of Tongue-Palate Contact in the Speech of Individuals with Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with cleft palate, even those with adequate velopharyngeal function, are at high risk for disordered lingual articulation. This article attempts to summarize current knowledge of abnormal tongue-palate contact patterns derived from electropalatographic (EPG) data in speakers with cleft palate. These data, which have been reported in 23…

  2. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-02

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  3. Helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    Ideal fluid flow conserves a special quantity known as helicity, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. Helicity can be understood as a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines of the flow, providing an important geometric tool to study diverse physical systems such as turbulent fluids and plasmas. Since superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, a natural question arises: Is there an extra conserved quantity akin to helicity in superfluids? We address the question of a ''superfluid helicity'' theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  4. Distortions in protein helices.

    PubMed

    Geetha, V

    1996-08-01

    alpha-helices are the most common secondary structures in observed proteins. However, they are not always found in ideal helical conformation and they often exhibit structural distortions. Quantification of these irregularities become essential in understanding the packing of helices and therefore, their role in the functional characteristics of the protein. The backbone torsions phi, psi are of limited utility in this endeavor, because distorted helices often maintain the backbone geometry. The local compensatory effects are responsible for the preservation of the entire hydrogen bond network of the helical stretch. Earlier descriptions of helical linearity and curvature rest mostly on approximation, thus motivating the search for a better method for understanding and quantifying helical irregularities. We developed a method which involves the rotation and superposition of identical repeating units of the protein by the quaternion method. The set of parameters derived from the rotation-superposition algorithm helps in identifying the bends and kinks which are not necessarily induced by unusual amino acids like proline. The quantification of irregularities of observed helices might lead to a better understanding of their packing interactions. PMID:8842770

  5. A Helical Stairway Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We answer a geometric question that was raised by the carpenter in charge of erecting helical stairs in a 10-story hospital. The explanation involves the equations of lines, planes, and helices in three-dimensional space. A brief version of the question is this: If A and B are points on a cylinder and the line segment AB is projected radially onto…

  6. Emerging double helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-07-01

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on `bottom-up' and `top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  7. Palatal Mucormycosis in An Infant.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nikhil; Bansal, Vishal; Kantoor, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    The maxilla rarely undergoes necrosis due to its rich vascularity. Maxillary necrosis can occur due to bacterial infections, viral infections, or fungal infections. Mucormycosis is an opportunistic fulminant fungal infection that mainly infects immunocompromised patients. The fungus invades the arteries, leading to thrombosis that subsequently causes necrosis of hard and soft tissues. The occurrence of mucormycosis is not considered rare in the jaws of adults, but involvement of the maxilla in infants is not usually seen. The purpose of this report is to discuss the diagnosis and management of a rare case of mucormycosis in the palate of a two-month-old boy. PMID:26731251

  8. Palatability, Familiarity, and Underage, Immoderate Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Jim; Stevenson, Richard; Gates, Peter; Copeland, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Data gathered in a study of palatability ("liking") and familiarity ratings of alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages by 350 subjects from 12 to 30 years of age included the usual number of drinks consumed. Blind ratings of palatability and familiarity for the beverages were tested for association with immoderate drinking (more than four for males,…

  9. Analysis of human soft palate morphogenesis supports regional regulation of palatal fusion.

    PubMed

    Danescu, Adrian; Mattson, Melanie; Dool, Carly; Diewert, Virginia M; Richman, Joy M

    2015-10-01

    It is essential to complete palate closure at the correct time during fetal development, otherwise a serious malformation, cleft palate, will ensue. The steps in palate formation in humans take place between the 7th and 12th week and consist of outgrowth of palatal shelves from the paired maxillary prominences, reorientation of the shelves from vertical to horizontal, apposition of the medial surfaces, formation of a bilayered seam, degradation of the seam and bridging of mesenchyme. However, in the soft palate, the mechanism of closure is unclear. In previous studies it is possible to find support for both fusion and the alternative mechanism of merging. Here we densely sample the late embryonic-early fetal period between 54 and 74 days post-conception to determine the timing and mechanism of soft palate closure. We found the epithelial seam extends throughout the soft palates of 57-day specimens. Cytokeratin antibody staining detected the medial edge epithelium and distinguished clearly that cells in the midline retained their epithelial character. Compared with the hard palate, the epithelium is more rapidly degraded in the soft palate and only persists in the most posterior regions at 64 days. Our results are consistent with the soft palate following a developmentally more rapid program of fusion than the hard palate. Importantly, the two regions of the palate appear to be independently regulated and have their own internal clocks regulating the timing of seam removal. Considering data from human genetic and mouse studies, distinct anterior-posterior signaling mechanisms are likely to be at play in the human fetal palate. PMID:26299693

  10. Tbx1 is Necessary for Palatal Elongation and Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Steven; Law, Amy; Sanchez, Gabriela; Baldwin, H. Scott; Brown, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX1 is a key mediator of developmental abnormalities associated with DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndrome. Studies in mice have demonstrated that decreased dosage of Tbx1 results in defects in pharyngeal arch, cardiovascular, and craniofacial development. The role of Tbx1 in cardiac development has been intensely studied; however, its role in palatal development is poorly understood. By studying the Tbx1-/- mice we found defects during the critical points of palate elongation and elevation. The intrinsic palate defects in the Tbx1-/- mice were determined by measuring changes in palate shelf length, proliferation, apoptosis, expression of relevant growth factors, and in palate fusion assays. Tbx1-/- embryos exhibit cleft palate with failed palate elevation in 100% and abnormal palatal-oral fusions in 50%. In the Tbx1-/- mice the palate shelf length was reduced and tongue height was greater, demonstrating a physical impediment to palate elevation and apposition. In vitro palate fusion assays demonstrate that Tbx1-/- palate shelves are capable of fusion but a roller culture assay showed that the null palatal shelves were unable to elongate. Diminished hyaluronic acid production in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves may explain failed palate shelf elevation. In addition, cell proliferation and apoptosis were perturbed in Tbx1-/- palates. A sharp decrease of Fgf8 expression was detected in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves, suggesting that Fgf8 is dependent on Tbx1 in the palate. Fgf10 is also up-regulated in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves and tongue. These data demonstrate that Tbx1 is a critical transcription factor that guides palatal elongation and elevation and that Fgf8 expression in the palate is Tbx1-dependent. PMID:20214979

  11. [Surgery of palatal and mandibular torus].

    PubMed

    Castro Reino, O; Perez Galera, J; Perez Cosio Martin, J; Urbon Caballero, J

    1990-06-01

    Surgical techniques for the exeresis of torus, both palatal and mandibular. We observe indications, contraindications and complications as well as enumerate all the right events to realize correctly the said techniques. PMID:2206647

  12. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and breathing, overbites/underbites, and appearance. Dental and Orthodontic Treatment Maintaining healthy teeth and preventing cavities is ... Kids with cleft lip and palate may begin orthodontic treatment as early as 6 years of age. ...

  13. Giant Myoepithelioma of the Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Murat; Yaman, Huseyin; Belada, Abdullah; Besir, Fahri Halit; Guclu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Myoepitheliomas are benign salivary gland tumors and account for less than 1% of all salivary gland tumors. They are usually located in the parotid gland. The soft palate is very rare affected site. The differential diagnosis of myoepitheliomas should include reactive and neoplastic lesions. The treatment of myoepitheliomas is complete removal of the tumor. Herein, we report a case with giant myoepithelioma of the soft palate, reviewing the related literature. PMID:24711949

  14. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  15. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  16. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  17. Palatal Abscess in a Pediatric Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, A. Pinar; Celenk, Peruze

    2008-01-01

    The palatal mass can pose a difficult diagnostic dilemma for the clinician. In differential diagnosis of the palatal mass, dental causes must be considered because they are so common. The palatal abscess typically represents the palatally directed drainage of an infection of pulpal or periodontal origin. The palatal abscess is often observed in the premolar-molar region and presents as a compressible mass or swelling usually lateral to the midline. This study reports the unusual case of a 5-year-old girl with a palatal abscess adjacent to the midline. PMID:19212536

  18. The rise and fall of the craniocervical junction relative to the hard palate: a lifetime story.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Grant W; Arutyunyan, Grigoriy; Murphy, Meghan E; Van Abel, Kathryn M; Francois, Elvis; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Fogelson, Jeremy L; O'Brien, Erin K; Clarke, Michelle J; Eckel, Laurence J; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Endoscopic approaches to the anterior craniocervical junction are increasing in frequency. Choice of oral versus endoscopic endonasal approach to the odontoid often depends on the relationship of the C1-2 complex to the hard palate. However, it is not known how this relevant anatomy changes with age. We hypothesize that there is a dynamic relationship of C-2 and the hard palate, which changes with age, and potentially affects the choice of surgical approach. The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship of C-2 relative to the hard palate with respect to age and sex. METHODS Emergency department billing and trauma records from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed for patients of all ages who underwent cervical or maxillofacial CT as part of a trauma evaluation for closed head injury. Patients who had a CT scan that allowed adequate visualization of the hard palate, opisthion, and upper cervical spine (C-1 and C-2) were included. Patients who had cervical or displaced facial/skull base fractures, a history of rheumatoid arthritis, or craniofacial anomalies were excluded. The distance from McGregor's palatooccipital line to the midpoint of the inferior endplate of C-2 (McL-C2) was measured on midsagittal CT scans. Patients were grouped by decile of age and by sex. A 1-way ANOVA was performed with each respective grouping. RESULTS Ultimately, 483 patients (29% female) were included. The mean age was 46 ± 24 years. The majority of patients studied were in the 2nd through 8th decades of life (85%). Significant variation was found between McL-C2 and decile of age (p < 0.001) and sex (p < 0.001). The mean McL-C2 was 27 mm in the 1st decade of life compared with the population mean of 37 mm. The mean McL-C2 was also noted to be smaller in females (mean difference 4.8 mm, p < 0.0001). Both decile of age (p = 0.0009) and sex (p < 0.0001) were independently correlated with McL-C2 on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS The relationship of C-2 and the hard palate

  19. Articulatory and acoustic adaptation to palatal perturbation.

    PubMed

    Thibeault, Mélanie; Ménard, Lucie; Baum, Shari R; Richard, Gabrielle; McFarland, David H

    2011-04-01

    Previous work has established that speakers have difficulty making rapid compensatory adjustments in consonant production (especially in fricatives) for structural perturbations of the vocal tract induced by artificial palates with thicker-than-normal alveolar regions. The present study used electromagnetic articulography and simultaneous acoustic recordings to estimate tongue configurations during production of [s š t k] in the presence of a thin and a thick palate, before and after a practice period. Ten native speakers of English participated in the study. In keeping with previous acoustic studies, fricatives were more affected by the palate than were the stops. The thick palate lowered the center of gravity and the jaw was lower and the tongue moved further backwards and downwards. Center of gravity measures revealed complete adaptation after training, and with practice, subjects' decreased interlabial distance. The fact that adaptation effects were found for [k], which are produced with an articulatory gesture not directly impeded by the palatal perturbation, suggests a more global sensorimotor recalibration that extends beyond the specific articulatory target. PMID:21476667

  20. Use of Postoperative Palatal Obturator After Total Palatal Reconstruction With Radial Forearm Fasciocutaneous Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Euicheol C; Jung, Young Ho; Shin, Jin-yong

    2015-07-01

    A 67-year-old-male patient visited our hospital for a mass on the soft palate of approximately 5.0 × 6.0  cm in size. He was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma and reconstruction after total palate resection was planned. After ablative surgery, a radial forearm free flap procedure was successfully performed to cover the hard and soft palates. However, wound disruption occurred twice during the postoperative period. When a palate defect is reconstructed using a soft tissue free flap, flap drooping by gravitation and the flap itself can generate irregularity in the lower contour of the palate and, in the long-term, insufficiencies of velopharyngeal function, speech, and mastication. To complement such functional and aesthetic problems caused by flap drooping, conventional prosthetics and new operative techniques have been discussed. However, overcoming wound disruption caused by flap drooping in the acute postoperative period has not been discussed. In this case, the temporary use of a palatal obturator during the postoperative period was beneficial after soft tissue reconstruction of the palate. PMID:26114541

  1. Clinical Outcomes of Primary Palatal Surgery in Children with Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate with and without Lip

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seunghee; Koh, Kyung S.; Moon, Heewon; Jung, Seungeun; Oh, Tae Suk

    2015-01-01

    This study presents clinical outcomes of primary cleft palate surgery, including rate of oronasal fistula development, rate of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) requiring secondary surgery, and speech outcomes. We examined the effect of cleft type on the clinical outcomes. Retrospective analysis was performed using clinical records of all patients who received a primary palatoplasty at the Cleft Palate Clinic at Seoul Asan Medical Center, South Korea, between 2007 and 2012. The study included 292 patients with nonsyndromic overt cleft palate (±cleft lip). The results revealed that the rate of oronasal fistula was 7.9% and the incidence of VPI based on the rate of secondary palatal surgery was 19.2%. The results showed that 50.3% of all the patients had received speech therapy and 28.8% and 51.4% demonstrated significant hypernasality and articulatory deficits, respectively. The results of the rate of VPI and speech outcomes were significantly different in terms of cleft type. Except for the rate of oronasal fistula, patients with cleft palate generally exhibited better clinical outcomes compared to those with bilateral or unilateral cleft lip and palate. This study suggests that several factors, including cleft type, should be identified and comprehensively considered to establish an optimal treatment regimen for patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273593

  2. Combined anomalies of the palate in Mohr syndrome: is preoperative electromyography of the palate useful?

    PubMed

    Velepic, Mitja S; Sasso, Antun; Velepic, Marko M; Lustica, Ivo; Starcevic, Radan; Komljenovic, Dejan

    2004-02-01

    The authors present a girl with typical characteristics of oral-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr syndrome) with a cleft soft palate and pendulous tongue nodules. Because of feeding difficulties, electromyography was performed of both morphologically identical halves of the soft palate. One half showed a normal muscle action potential and in the other half electrical silence was registered. Exploratory surgery during palatoplasty showed a fatty hamartoma in the half of the palate in which no electric potentials had been registered. PMID:14966745

  3. An EPG Study of Palatal Consonants in Two Australian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabain, Marija; Fletcher, Janet; Butcher, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study presents EPG (electro-palatographic) data on (alveo-)palatal consonants from two Australian languages, Arrernte and Warlpiri. (Alveo-)palatal consonants are phonemic for stop, lateral and nasal manners of articulation in both languages, and are laminal articulations. However, in Arrernte, these lamino-(alveo-)palatals contrast with…

  4. L2 Perception of Spanish Palatal Variants across Different Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Christine; Renaud, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    While considerable dialectal variation exists, almost all varieties of Spanish exhibit some sort of alternation in terms of the palatal obstruent segments. Typically, the palatal affricate [??] tends to occur in word onset following a pause and in specific linear phonotactic environments. The palatal fricative [?] tends to occur in syllable onset…

  5. Squamous papilloma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Babaji, Prashant; Singh, Vikram; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Masamatti, Vinaykumar S; Sharma, Akanksha Manmohan

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous papillomas are benign proliferating lesions induced by human papilloma virus. These lesions are painless and slowly growing masses. As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance. These lesions commonly occur between age 30 and 50 years, and sometimes can occur before the age of 10 years. Oral squamous papilloma accounts for 8% of all oral tumors in children. Common site predilection for the lesion is the tongue and soft palate, and may occur on any other surface of the oral cavity such as the uvula and vermilion of the lip. Here, we are presenting a case of squamous papilloma on the palate. PMID:25565755

  6. Palatal obturators in patients after maxillectomy

    PubMed Central

    CARDELLI, P.; BIGELLI, E.; VERTUCCI, V.; BALESTRA, F.; MONTANI, M.; DE CARLI, S.; ARCURI, C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthodontic management of palatal defects is fundamental to improve patient’s life undergoing to a maxillary surgical treatment. A lot of maxillary defects are a direct consequence of surgical treatment of malformations, neoplasms or trauma. The obturators are prosthesis used to close palatal defects after maxillectomy, to restore masticatory function and to improve speech. The primary goals of the obturator prosthesis are to preserve the remaining teeth and tissue and to provide comfort, function, and aesthetics to the patients. Different materials and retention methods are a characteristic of new types of obturators. PMID:25992263

  7. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  8. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  9. Sinonasal Angiomatous Polyp: Evaluation With 2-Phase Helical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changwei; Wang, Qiushi; Guo, Qiyong; Wang, Zhenhai; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sinonasal angiomatous polyp (SAP) is a rare benign nontumorous lesion and previously considered lack of characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. This study aimed to evaluate 2-phase helical CT for characterization of SAP. Twelve patients with pathologically confirmed SAP underwent 2-phase helical CT preoperatively. After injection of 80 mL contrast material at a rate of 3 mL/s, early and delayed phases were obtained with delays of 30 and 120 s, respectively. The degree and pattern of enhancement were visually analyzed. The attenuation changes were also analyzed quantitatively by measuring CT values and compared with those of the internal maxillary artery (IMA). All 12 cases showed vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement at both early and delayed phases. An irregular linear, nodular, and patchy enhancement pattern was found at the early phase, and enlarged and fused together, that is, progressive enhancement pattern was found at the delayed phase. There was no significant difference between the CT values of SAP and those of the IMA at the plain, arterial phase, and delayed phase (53 ± 6 Hounsfield units [HU] vs 56 ± 7 HU, 187 ± 56 HU vs 209 ± 71 HU, and 143 ± 22 HU vs 139 ± 19 HU, respectively, P = 0.361, 0.429, and 0.613, respectively). Vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement was a characteristic CT feature of SAP, and progressive enhancement on 2-phase helical CT could further convince the diagnosis. PMID:26200632

  10. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  11. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  12. Palatability of Forage Chicory Cultivars for Goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SL) in forage chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) may have anthelmintic activity against gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats, but have been implicated in poor palatability of forage. We used three levels of soil P fertilization to influence SL concentrations in three cu...

  13. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  14. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  15. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC. PMID:26741369

  16. Palate Morphogenesis: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    In the past, most scientists conducted their inquiries of nature via inductivism, the patient accumulation of “pieces of information” in the pious hope that the sum of the parts would clarify the whole. Increasingly, modern biology employs the tools of bioinformatics and systems biology in attempts to reveal the “big picture.” Most successful laboratories engaged in the pursuit of the secrets of embryonic development, particularly those whose research focus is craniofacial development, pursue a middle road where research efforts embrace, rather than abandon, what some have called the “pedestrian” qualities of inductivism, while increasingly employing modern data mining technologies. The secondary palate has provided an excellent paradigm that has enabled examination of a wide variety of developmental processes. Examination of cellular signal transduction, as it directs embryogenesis, has proven exceptionally revealing with regard to clarification of the “facts” of palatal ontogeny—at least the facts as we currently understand them. Herein, we review the most basic fundamentals of orofacial embryology and discuss how functioning of TGFβ, BMP, Shh, and Wnt signal transduction pathways contributes to palatal morphogenesis. Our current understanding of palate medial edge epithelial differentiation is also examined. We conclude with a discussion of how the rapidly expanding field of epigenetics, particularly regulation of gene expression by miRNAs and DNA methylation, is critical to control of cell and tissue differentiation, and how examination of these epigenetic processes has already begun to provide a better understanding of, and greater appreciation for, the complexities of palatal morphogenesis. PMID:20544696

  17. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  18. Hydrodynamic interactions between rotating helices.

    PubMed

    Kim, MunJu; Powers, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria use rotating helical flagella to swim. At this scale, viscous effects dominate inertia, and there are significant hydrodynamic interactions between nearby helices. These interactions cause the flagella to bundle during the "runs" of bacterial chemotaxis. Here we use slender-body theory to solve for the flow fields generated by rigid helices rotated by stationary motors. We determine how the hydrodynamic forces and torques depend on phase and phase difference, show that rigid helices driven at constant torque do not synchronize, and solve for the flows. We also use symmetry arguments based on kinematic reversibility to show that for two rigid helices rotating with zero phase difference, there is no time-averaged attractive or repulsive force between the helices. PMID:15244620

  19. Conservation of helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    Helicity arises as a special conserved quantity in ideal fluids, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. As a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines, Helicity provides an important tool for studying a wide variety of physical systems such as plasmas and turbulent fluids. Superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, making it natural to ask whether their knottedness is similarly preserved. We address the conservation of helicity in superfluids theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  20. Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers from Congenital Cleft Palates and Normal Palates of Spanish Goats

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Michael C.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Kuzon, William M.; Panter, Kip E.; Buchman, Steven R.; Faulkner, John A.; Yu, Deborah; Cederna, Paul S.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Analysis of the composition of muscle fibers constituent to a cleft palate could provide significant insight into the cause of velopharyngeal inadequacy. The authors hypothesized that levator veli palatini muscle dysfunction inherent to cleft palates could affect the timing and outcome of cleft palate repair. Methods Single, permeabilized muscle fibers from levator veli palatini muscles of three normal (n = 19 fibers) and three chemically induced congenital cleft palates (n = 21 fibers) of 14-month-old goats were isolated, and contractile properties were evaluated. The maximum isometric force and rate constants of tension redevelopment (ktr) were measured, and the specific force and normalized power were calculated for each fiber. Results The ktr measures indicate that cleft fibers are predominantly fast-fatigable; normal fibers are slow fatigue-resistant: after a 10-minute isometric contraction, fibers from cleft palates had a loss of force 16 percent greater than that from normal palates (p = 0.0001). The cross-sectional areas of the fibers from cleft palates (2750 ± 209 μm2) were greater (p = 0.05) than those from normal palates (2226 ± 143 μm2). Specific forces did not differ between the two groups. Maximum normalized power of fibers from cleft palates (11.05 ± 1.82 W/l) was greater (p = 0.0001) than fibers from normal palates (1.60 ± 0.12 W/l). Conclusions There are clear physiologic differences in single muscle fibers from cleft palates and normal palates: cleft palate fibers are physiologically fast, have greater fatigability, and have greater power production. Detection of functional and/or fiber type differences in muscles of cleft palates may provide preoperative identification of a patient's susceptibility to velopharyngeal inadequacy and permit early surgical intervention to correct this clinical condition. PMID:17440342

  1. A Comprehensive Study of Soft Palate Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Alexandre; Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital birth defects. Tremendous efforts have been made over the last decades towards understanding hard palate development. However, little is known about soft palate morphogenesis and myogenesis. Finding an appropriate surgical repair to restore physiological functions of the soft palate in patients with cleft palate is a major challenge for surgeons, and complete restoration is not always achievable. Here, we first analyzed the morphology, orientation and attachments of the four muscles of the murine soft palate and found that they are very similar to their counterparts in humans, validating the use of mus musculus as a model for future studies. Our data suggests that muscle differentiation extends from the lateral region to the midline following palatal fusion. We also detected an epithelial seam in the fusing soft palatal shelves, consistent with the process of fusion of the posterior palatal shelves, followed by degradation of the epithelial remnants. Innervation and vascularization are present mainly in the oral side of the soft palate, complementing the differentiated muscles. Cell lineage tracing using Wnt1-Cre;Zsgreenfl/fl mice indicated that all the tendons and mesenchyme embedding the soft palate muscles are neural crest-derived. We propose that the posterior attachment of the soft palate to the pharyngeal wall is an interface between the neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme in the craniofacial region, and thus can serve as a potential model for the study of boundaries during development. Taken together, our study provides a comprehensive view of the development and morphology of the murine soft palate and serves as a reference for further molecular analyses. PMID:26671681

  2. Tbx1 regulates oral epithelial adhesion and palatal development

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Richardson, James A.; Srivastava, Deepak; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate, the most frequent congenital craniofacial birth defect, is a multifactorial condition induced by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In addition to complete cleft palate, a large number of human cases involve soft palate cleft and submucosal cleft palate. However, the etiology of these forms of cleft palate has not been well understood. T-box transcriptional factor (Tbx) family of transcriptional factors has distinct roles in a wide range of embryonic differentiation or response pathways. Here, we show that genetic disruption of Tbx1, a major candidate gene for the human congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome), led to abnormal epithelial adhesion between the palate and mandible in mouse, resulting in various forms of cleft palate similar to human conditions. We found that hyperproliferative epithelium failed to undergo complete differentiation in Tbx1-null mice (Tbx1−/−). Inactivation of Tbx1 specifically in the keratinocyte lineage (Tbx1KCKO) resulted in an incomplete cleft palate confined to the anterior region of the palate. Interestingly, Tbx1 overexpression resulted in decreased cell growth and promoted cell-cycle arrest in MCF7 epithelial cells. These findings suggest that Tbx1 regulates the balance between proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes and is essential for palatal fusion and oral mucosal differentiation. The impaired adhesion separation of the oral epithelium together with compromised palatal mesenchymal growth is an underlying cause for various forms of cleft palate phenotypes in Tbx1−/− mice. Our present study reveals new pathogenesis of incomplete and submucous cleft palate during mammalian palatogenesis. PMID:22371266

  3. Helical tomotherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Balog, John; Soisson, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed. PMID:18406907

  4. Helical Tomotherapy Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, John Soisson, Emilie

    2008-05-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed.

  5. Prospective Analysis of Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M Gokul Chandra; Babu, V Ramesh; Rao, V Eswar; Chaitanya, J Jaya; Allareddy, S; Reddy, C Charan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the success of the uptake of bone graft in cleft alveolus of the cleft lip and palate patients, quantitatively through computed tomography (CT) scan 6 months postoperative. To assess the successful eruption of permanent lateral incisor or canine in the bone grafted area. Materials and Methods: The children age group of 9-21 years with unilateral cleft lip and palate came to the hospital, needing secondary alveolar bone grafting. A detailed history and clinical examination of the patient was taken. A 3D CT scan was taken and the volume of the cleft was measured pre-operatively. After ambulatory period, 3D CT scan of the alveolar cleft region was taken and volume of the bone grafted was measured and patient was discharged from the hospital. After 6 months, patient was recalled and again 3D CT scan was taken and the volume of remaining bone was measured. Results: The mean volume of the defect pre-operatively is 0.80 cm3 with a standard deviation of 0.36 cm3 with minimum volume of the defect 0.44 cm3 and maximum volume of the defect 1.60 cm3. The mean volume of the bone post-operative immediately after grafting is 1.01 cm3 with a standard deviation of 0.52 cm3 with minimum of bone volume is 0.48 cm3 and maximum of 2.06 cm3. The mean volume of the bone after 6 months after bone grafting is 0.54 cm3 with a standard deviation of 0.33 cm3, minimum bone volume of 0.22 cm3 and maximum bone volume of 1.42 cm3. Conclusion: The CT scan is a valuable radiographic imaging modality to assess and follow the clinical outcome of secondary alveolar bone grafting. PMID:25954076

  6. The effect of z overscanning on patient effective dose from multidetector helical computed tomography examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, A.; Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Stratakis, J.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    2005-06-15

    z overscanning in multidetector (MD) helical CT scanning is prerequisite for the interpolation of acquired data required during image reconstruction and refers to the exposure of tissues beyond the boundaries of the volume to be imaged. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on the patient effective dose from helical MD CT examinations. The Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport code was employed in the current study to simulate CT exposure. The validity of the Monte Carlo simulation was verified by (a) a comparison of calculated and measured standard computed tomography dose index (CTDI) dosimetric data, and (b) a comparison of calculated and measured dose profiles along the z axis. CTDI was measured using a pencil ionization chamber and head and body CT phantoms. Dose profiles along the z axis were obtained using thermoluminescence dosimeters. A commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantom was used for the estimation of effective doses from four standard CT examinations, i.e., head and neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk studies. Data for both axial and helical modes of operation were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The calculated effective dose from a CT exposure was normalized to CTDI{sub freeinair}. The percentage differences in the normalized effective dose between contiguous axial and helical scans with pitch=1, may reach 13.1%, 35.8%, 29.0%, and 21.5%, for head and neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Given that the same kilovoltage and tube load per rotation were used in both axial and helical scans, the above differences may be attributed to z overscanning. For helical scans with pitch=1, broader beam collimation is associated with increased z overscanning and consequently higher normalized effective dose value, when other scanning parameters are held constant. For a given beam collimation, the selection of a higher value of

  7. [The adolescent with cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Chapados, C

    1998-02-01

    Research studies afford an in-depth look at the problems experienced by adolescents born with a cleft lip, a cleft palate or cleft lip and palate. If not addressed, their problems can multiply with each successive stage of development. An interdisciplinary team, where the adolescents themselves play an important role, is one of the best means of helping them come to terms with the consequences of the abnormality. The nurse should be a key member of the team. To help adolescents cope with their situation now and in the future, the author promotes a holistic and humanistic approach. Here, she sees nurses creating therapeutic alliances as educators. She recommends that nurses assert themselves more as professionals and as essential resources. Her doctoral thesis proposes a training model to this effect. PMID:9573899

  8. Analysis of Zfhx1a mutant mice reveals palatal shelf contact independent medial edge epithelial differentiation during palate fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiu-Zhen; Li, Qun; Higashi, Yujiro; Darling, Douglas S.; Ding, Jixiang

    2008-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect that involves disruptions in multiple developmental steps such as growth, differentiation, elevation and fusion. Medial edge epithelial (MEE) differentiation is essential for palate fusion. An important question is that the MEE differentiation during fusion is induced by palate shelf contact or is programmed intrinsically by the palate shelf itself. Here, we report that the loss of Zfhx1a function in mice leads to a cleft palate phenotype that is mainly due to a delay in palate elevation. Zfhx1a encodes a transcription regulatory protein that modulates several signaling pathways including those activated by members of the TGF-β superfamily. Loss of Zfhx1a function in mice leads to a complete cleft palate with 100% penetrance. Zfhx1a mutant palatal shelves display normal cell differentiation and proliferation and are able to fuse in an in vitro culture system. The only defect detected was a 24–48 hour delay in palatal shelf elevation. Using the Zfhx1a mutant as a model, we studied the relationship between medial edge epithelial differentiation and palate contact/adhesion. We found that down regulation of Jag2 expression in the medial edge epithelial cells, a key differentiation event establishing palate fusion competence is independent of palate contact/adhesion. Moreover, the expression of several key factors essential for fusion, such as TGF-β3 and MMP13, are also down regulated at stage E16.5 in a contact independent manner, suggesting that differentiation of the medial edge epithelium is largely programmed through an intrinsic mechanism within the palate shelf. PMID:18470539

  9. Miller Fisher syndrome presenting as palate paralysis.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, Mohammad Hassan A; Sweid, Ahmad; Ahdab, Rechdi

    2016-09-15

    We report a 63-year old patient who presented to our care initially with a hypernasal voice followed by ataxia, ptosis, dysphonia, and paresthesias. The patient's history, physical examination, and additional tests led to a Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) diagnosis. Palatal paralysis as an inaugurating manifestation of MFS is quite rare and requires special attention from neurologists and otolaryngologists. Although it may present as benign as an acute change in voice, early diagnosis and prompt management may prevent further complications. PMID:27609285

  10. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  11. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  12. Helicity patterns on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A.

    Solar magnetic fields exhibit hemispheric preference for negative (pos- itive) helicity in northern (southern) hemisphere. The hemispheric he- licity rule, however, is not very strong, - the patterns of opposite sign helicity were observed on different spatial scales in each hemisphere. For instance, many individual sunspots exhibit patches of opposite he- licity inside the single polarity field. There are also helicity patterns on scales larger than the size of typical active region. Such patterns were observed in distribution of active regions with abnormal (for a give hemisphere) helicity, in large-scale photospheric magnetic fields and coronal flux systems. We will review the observations of large-scale pat- terns of helicity in solar atmosphere and their possible relationship with (sub-)photospheric processes. The emphasis will be on large-scale pho- tospheric magnetic field and solar corona.

  13. Homeobox family Hoxc localization during murine palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Azumi; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Imura, Hideto; Natsume, Nagato; Sugahara, Toshio; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Homeobox genes play important roles in craniofacial morphogenesis. However, the characteristics of the transcription factor Hoxc during palate formation remain unclear. We examined the immunolocalization patterns of Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 in palatogenesis of cleft palate (Eh/Eh) mice. On the other hand, mutations in the FGF/FGFR pathway are exclusively associated with syndromic forms of cleft palate. We also examined the immunolocalization of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 to clarify their relationships with Hoxc in palatogenesis. Some palatal epithelial cells showed Hoxc5 labeling, while almost no labeling of mesenchymal cells was observed in +/+ mice. As palate formation progressed in +/+ mice, Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 were observed in medial epithelial seam cells. Hoxc5 and Hoxc6 were detected in the oral epithelium. The palatal mesenchyme also showed intense staining for Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 with progression of palate formation. In contrast, the palatal shelves of Eh/Eh mice exhibited impaired horizontal growth and failed to fuse, resulting in a cleft. Hoxc5 was observed in a few epithelial cells and diffusely in the mesenchyme of Eh/Eh palatal shelves. No or little labeling of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 was detected in the cleft palate of Eh/Eh mice. These findings suggest that Hoxc genes are involved in palatogenesis. Furthermore, there may be the differences in the localization pattern between Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6. Additionally, Hoxc distribution in palatal cells during palate development may be correlated with FGF signaling. (228/250 words) © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society. PMID:26718736

  14. TCDD disrupts posterior palatogenesis and causes cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Hirata, Azumi; Sasabe, Eri; Yoshimura, Tomohide; Ohno, Seiji; Kitamura, Naoya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Dioxins (e.g. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD) cause cleft palate at a high rate. A post-fusional split may contribute to the pathogenesis, and tissue fragility may be a concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of TCDD on the palatal epithelium, bone and muscle, which contribute to tissue integrity. ICR mice (10-12 weeks old) were used. TCDD was administered on E12.5 at 40 mg/kg. Immunohistochemical staining for AhR, ER-α, laminin, collagen IV, osteopontin, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were performed. Furthermore, western blot analysis for osteopontin, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were performed to evaluate protein expression in the palatal tissue. Immunohistologically, there was little difference in the collagen IV and laminin localization in the palatal epithelium between control versus TCDD-treated mice. Runx2 and osteopontin immunoreactivity decreased in the TCDD-treated palatal bone, and MyoD and desmin decreased in the TCDD-treated palatal muscle. AhR and ER-α immunoreactivity were localized to the normal palatal bone, but ER-α was diminished in the TCDD-treated palate. On western blot analysis, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were all downregulated in the TCDD-treated palate. TCDD may suppress palatal osteogenesis and myogenesis via AhR, and cause cleft palates via a post-fusional split mechanism, in addition to a failure of palatal fusion. PMID:23602632

  15. A new approach to repairing cleft palate and acquired palatal defects with distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D-Z; Chen, G; Liao, Y-M; Liu, S-G; Gao, Z-W; Hu, J; Li, J-H; Liao, C-H

    2006-08-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is one of the most common human congenital deformities, and acquired palate defects after trauma or tumour resection are also common. In this study, distraction osteogenesis (DO) for CP and other palatal bone defects was evaluated. Twenty cats were assigned randomly to 3 groups of (1) 15, (2) 3 and (3) 2 cats. In groups 1 and 2, a rectangular ostectomy, in the posterior of the palatal bone shelf, was performed in the sagittal axis to establish the CP defect model. At the same time, a pure titanium intraoral distractor was fixed to molar teeth with brackets and to the palatal bone shelf across the defect with titanium miniscrews bilaterally. Four weeks later, a secondary transport disc (TD) osteotomy was performed, and gradual DO treatment started at 0.4mm twice a day, after 6 days of latency. DO was performed until the TD reached the opposite margin over the gap in 5-6 days. Three cats each of group 1 were killed at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after completion of DO. In group 2, the bone and soft-tissue defects were untreated until death 6 weeks later. Group 3 cats (control) were killed after 6 weeks. The TD successfully recombined with the opposite palatal bone stump, and proportional expansion of the overlay mucoperiosteal flap was achieved. Intramembranous bone formation was revealed: parallel collagen bundles gradually deposited on new bone trabeculae while the proliferative osteoblasts produced bone matrix. The bone defect was finally reconstructed by de novo osteogenesis. The control group was observed to have no spontaneous repairing. These results suggest that the CP defect was reconstructed by osteogenesis in situ, and the soft tissues expanded simultaneously to achieve functional correction. The intraoral distractor provided both effective distraction and stability. PMID:16690250

  16. CT of perineural tumor extension: pterygopalatine fossa

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Williams, R.; Johnson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Tumors of the oral cavity and paranasal sinuses can spread along nerves to areas apparently removed from the primary tumor. In tumors of the palate, sinuses, and face, this perineural spread usually involves the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. The pterygopalatine fossa is a pathway of the maxillary nerve and becomes a key landmark in the detection of neural metastasis by computed tomography (CT). Obliteration of the fat in the fossa suggests pathology. Case material illustrating neural extension is presented and the CT findings are described.

  17. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  18. A simplified palatal lift prosthesis for neurogenic velopharyngeal incompetence.

    PubMed

    Rilo, Benito; Fernández-Formoso, Noelia; da Silva, Luis; Pinho, Joâo Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Velopharyngeal incompetence is a contributing factor to speech disorders and implies the presence of hypernasality, inappropriate nasal escape, and decreased air pressure during speech. One prosthetic treatment is a rehabilitative procedure employing a palatal lift prosthesis (PLP), which reduces hypernasality by approximating the incompetent soft palate to the posterior pharyngeal wall and consists of two parts, the anterior denture base and the palatal lifting plate, which are connected with steel wires; however, it seems difficult to reproduce the mobility of the soft palate in speaking, and it is therefore likely that the palatal lifting plate stimulates or oppresses the tissue of the soft palate and hinders rather than assists articulatory function. To avoid these disturbances we devised an adjustable PLP with a flexible conjunction between the denture base and the palatal lifting plate to obtain the optimal vertical lifting angle. The palatal plate was adapted to conform in a passive manner to the soft palate with light-cured resin. The designed PLP simplified the procedure and reduced the number of adjustments and visits. PMID:23387878

  19. A Glance at Methods for Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolinejad, Sima; Ebrahimzadeh Bidskan, Alireza; Ashraf, Hami; Hamidi Alamdari, Daryoush

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cleft palate is the second most common birth defect and is considered as a challenge for pediatric plastic surgeons. There is still a general lack of a standard protocol and patients often require multiple surgical interventions during their lifetime along with disappointing results. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed search was undertaken using search terms including 'cleft palate repair', 'palatal cleft closure', 'cleft palate + stem cells', 'cleft palate + plasma rich platelet', 'cleft palate + scaffold', 'palatal tissue engineering', and 'bone tissue engineering'. The found articles were included if they defined a therapeutic strategy and/or assessed a new technique. Results: We reported a summary of the key-points concerning cleft palate development, the genes involving this defect, current therapeutic strategies, recently novel aspects, and future advances in treatments for easy and fast understanding of the concepts, rather than a systematic review. In addition, the results were integrated with our recent experience. Conclusions: Tissue engineering may open a new window in cleft palate reconstruction. Stem cells and growth factors play key roles in this field. PMID:25593724

  20. Molecular contribution to cleft palate production in cleft lip mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasunori; Taya, Yuji; Saito, Kan; Fujita, Kazuya; Aoba, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Taku

    2014-05-01

    Cleft palate following cleft lip may include a developmental disorder during palatogenesis. CL/Fr mice fetuses, which develop cleft lip and palate spontaneously, have less capability for in vivo cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme compared with CL/Fr normal fetuses. In order to know the changes of signaling molecules contributing to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip, the mRNA expression profiles were compared in palatal shelves oriented vertically (before elevation) in CL/Fr fetuses with or without cleft lip. The changes in mRNA profile of cleft palate morphogenesis were presented in a microarray analysis, and genes were restricted to lists contributing to cleft palate development in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip. Four candidate genes (Ywhab, Nek2, Tacc1 and Frk) were linked in a gene network that associates with cell proliferation (cell cycle, MAPK, Wnt and Tgf beta pathways). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR highlighted the candidate genes that significantly changed in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip (Ywhab, Nek2 and Tacc1). The results of these molecular contributions will provide useful information for a better understanding of palatogenesis in cleft palate following cleft lip. Our data indicated the genetic contribution to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip. PMID:24206222

  1. Midface fracture in an unoperated adult patient with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Sanyog; Baliga, Shridhar; Kotrashetti, Sharadaindu Mahadevappa; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    In western countries, it is hard to find an unoperated cleft palate due to better healthcare services and awareness. Here, we present an unoperated adult case of cleft palate that had midfacial fractures following a road traffic accident. The patient's cleft lip was repaired when he was 2 years old but the palate was not operated because of poor follow-up. We would like to share the difficulties encountered in diagnosis and treatment planning for this rare kind of trauma case. After routine investigations, a palatal acrylic splint was constructed for fixation and an acceptable degree of function and aesthetics was achieved postoperatively. PMID:25150231

  2. Molecular contribution to cleft palate production in cleft lip mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasunori; Taya, Yuji; Saito, Kan; Fujita, Kazuya; Aoba, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Taku

    2014-01-01

    Cleft palate following cleft lip may include a developmental disorder during palatogenesis. CL/Fr mice fetuses, which develop cleft lip and palate spontaneously, have less capability for in vivo cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme compared with CL/Fr normal fetuses. In order to know the changes of signaling molecules contributing to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip, the mRNA expression profiles were compared in palatal shelves oriented vertically (before elevation) in CL/Fr fetuses with or without cleft lip. The changes in mRNA profile of cleft palate morphogenesis were presented in a microarray analysis, and genes were restricted to lists contributing to cleft palate development in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip. Four candidate genes (Ywhab, Nek2, Tacc1 and Frk) were linked in a gene network that associates with cell proliferation (cell cycle, MAPK, Wnt and Tgf beta pathways). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR highlighted the candidate genes that significantly changed in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip (Ywhab, Nek2 and Tacc1). The results of these molecular contributions will provide useful information for a better understanding of palatogenesis in cleft palate following cleft lip. Our data indicated the genetic contribution to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip. PMID:24206222

  3. Rehabilitation of Cleft Palate: Parents and Professionals, A Unifying Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannbacker, Mary; Schneiderman, Carl

    1977-01-01

    Described are commonalities and differences between parents of children with cleft palate and rehabilitation professionals, and offered are suggestions to increase communication and joint effectiveness. (DB)

  4. Closure of huge palatal fistula in an adult patient with isolated cleft palate: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-02-01

    Closure of huge palatal fistula surrounded by fully erupted permanent dentition in the adult patients with cleft is a challenge. Posteriorly based buccinator myomucosal flap is a neurovascular pedicled flap, with inherent nature of thin thickness, saliva secretion, and axial pattern blood supply. Vicinity of donor site to the palate and low donor-site morbidity are the other advantages. It is an ideal choice in such situation. In this article, the details of surgical technique and the effectiveness of this method are presented. PMID:25750845

  5. Mesenchymal cell re-modeling during mouse secondary palate re-orientation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiu-Zhen; Tan, Min; Warner, Dennis R.; Darling, Douglas S.; Higashi, Yujiro; Gridley, Thomas; Ding, Jixiang

    2010-01-01

    The formation of mammalian secondary palate requires a series of developmental events such as growth, elevation and fusion. Despite recent advances in the field of palate development, the process of palate elevation remains poorly understood. The current consensus on palate elevation is that the distal end of the vertical palatal shelf corresponds to the medial edge of the elevated horizontal palatal shelf. We provide evidence suggesting that the prospective medial edge of the vertical palate is located toward the interior side (the side adjacent to the tongue), instead of the distal end, of the vertical palatal shelf and that the horizontal palatal axis is generated through palatal outgrowth from the side of the vertical palatal shelf rather than rotating the pre-existing vertical axis orthogonally. Since palate elevation represents a classical example of embryonic tissue re-orientation, our findings here may also shed light on the process of tissue re-orientation in general. PMID:20549719

  6. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  7. Antialiasing backprojection for helical MDCT.

    PubMed

    Mori, I

    2008-03-01

    Helical CTs are well known to suffer from aliasing artifacts because of their finite longitudinal sampling pitch. The artifact pattern is typically strong streaks from bone edges in clinical images. Especially in the case of multidetector row CT, the artifact resulting from longitudinal aliasing is often called a windmill artifact because the visible streaks form a windmill pattern when the object is of a particular shape. The scan must be performed using a very thin slice thickness, i.e., fine sampling in the longitudinal direction, with a longer scan time to mitigate this aliasing artifact. Some elaborate longitudinal interpolation methods to remediate longitudinal aliasing have been proposed, but they have not been successful in practice despite their theoretical importance. A periodic swing of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction, a so-called z-flying focal spot, was introduced recently to achieve finer sampling. Although it is a useful technique, some important deficiencies exist: It is sufficiently effective only near the isocenter and is difficult to apply to a scan using a thick slice thickness, even though longitudinal aliasing is more serious at the thicker scan. In this paper, the author addresses the nature of interlaced (or unequally spaced) sampling and derives a new principle of data treatment that can suppress the aliased spectra selectively. According to this principle, the common practice of image reconstruction, which backprojects data along the original sampling ray path, is never the best choice. The author proposes a new scheme of backprojection, which involves the longitudinal shift of projection data. A proper choice of longitudinal shift for backprojection provides effective and selective suppression of aliased spectra, with retention of the original frequency spectrum depending on the level of focus swing. With this shifted backprojection, the swing of focus can be made much smaller than for a conventional z-flying focal spot. The

  8. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  9. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  10. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  11. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the palate in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Werther, Patti L; Alawi, Faizan; Lindemeyer, Rochelle G

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively rare, minor salivary gland tumors are more likely to be malignant in pediatric patients than in adults. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) represents the most common malignant tumor of the salivary glands. It is critical to differentiate such tumors from common benign salivary gland lesions. The purposes of this report are to present the case of a 15-year-old female with MEC of the palate, and to discuss the importance of a thorough intraoral examination on all patients regardless of age, as well as the need for timely referral for appropriate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25909845

  12. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI.

  13. [A woman with a pigmentation of the hard palate].

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Erik H; Nieken, Judith; de Visscher, Jan G A M

    2013-01-01

    A bluish flat pigmented lesion of the hard palate of a 51-year-old woman was excised to exclude malignancy, in particular oral malignant melanoma. On histopathological examination, depositions of black pigment were seen accompanied by several foreign body giant cells. Probably due to a childhood trauma, a pencil point had penetrated the hard palate. PMID:24330792

  14. Palatalization and Intrinsic Prosodic Vowel Features in Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    The presented study is aimed at investigating the interaction of palatalization and intrinsic prosodic features of the vowel in CVC (consonant+vowel+consonant) syllables in Russian. The universal nature of intrinsic prosodic vowel features was confirmed with the data from the Russian language. It was found that palatalization of the consonants…

  15. Enhancement technology improves palatability of normal and callipyge lamb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was to determine if BPI Processing Technology improved palatability of normal (NN) and callipyge (CN) lamb meat and determine the mechanism by which palatability was improved. Ten ewe and 10 wether lambs of each phenotype were harvested and carcass traits were assessed by a trained eva...

  16. COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR THE CHILD WITH A CLEFT PALATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENSEN, JACK F.; WHITE, FRAZER D.

    A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO CHILDREN WITH CLEFT PALATES IS DESCRIBED. THE SOUTH FLORIDA CLEFT PALATE CLINIC, REPRESENTING NINE PROFESSIONAL SPECIALTIES, MEETS WEEKLY TO SEE SIX OR SEVEN CASES. SPEECH PERFORMANCE IS RECORDED ON SIX DIAGNOSTIC, DATA COLLECTING FORMS WHICH PROVIDE A BASIS FOR RECORDING CLINICAL JUDGMENTS. PROGNOSIS AND…

  17. Single-Word Intelligibility in Speakers with Repaired Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara; Chau, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Many speakers with repaired cleft palate have reduced intelligibility, but there are limitations with current procedures for assessing intelligibility. The aim of this study was to construct a single-word intelligibility test for speakers with cleft palate. The test used a multiple-choice identification format, and was based on phonetic contrasts…

  18. Early Speech Production of Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, Theresa; Broen, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    The study comparing word-initial target phonemes and phoneme production of five toddlers with cleft palate and five normal toddlers found that the cleft palate children tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels and fewer words with word-initial stops, fricatives, and affricates than normal children. (Author/DB)

  19. Phonological Patterns Observed in Young Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broen, Patricia A.; And Others

    The study examined the speech production strategies used by 4 young children (30- to 32-months-old) with cleft palate and velopharyngeal inadequacy during the early stages of phonological learning. All the children had had primary palatal surgery and were producing primarily single word utterances with a few 2- and 3-word phrases. Analysis of each…

  20. ORGAN CULTURE OF MID-FACIAL TISSUE AND SECONDARY PALATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Palatal organ culture provides an in vitro model for the study of the formation of the secondary palate, which forms the roof of the mouth in the developing fetus. The protocol describes the steps for culture of the mid-facial region of the fetal mouse or rat. In cult...

  1. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  2. Clefting of the Alveolus: Emphasizing the Distinction from Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Nicholas; Sidman, James; Block, William

    2016-05-01

    Oral clefting is one of the most common significant fetal abnormalities. Cleft lip and cleft palate have drastically different clinical ramifications and management from one another. A cleft of the alveolus (with or without cleft lip) can confuse the diagnostic picture and lead to a false assumption of cleft palate. The cleft alveolus should be viewed on the spectrum of cleft lip rather than be associated with cleft palate. This is made evident by understanding the embryological development of the midface and relevant terminology. Cleft alveolus carries significantly different clinical implications and treatment options than that of cleft palate. Accurately distinguishing cleft alveolus from cleft palate is crucial for appropriate discussions regarding the patient's care. PMID:26906186

  3. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  4. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus is a neuroanatomical substrate for the inhibition of palatable food intake by neuropeptide S.

    PubMed

    Fedeli, Amalia; Braconi, Simone; Economidou, Daina; Cannella, Nazzareno; Kallupi, Marsida; Guerrini, Remo; Calò, Girolamo; Cifani, Carlo; Massi, Maurizio; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2009-10-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a recently discovered neurotransmitter that binds to its cognate G-protein coupled receptor, NPSR. Previous studies have shown that central administration of this peptide induces anxiolytic-like effects, promotes arousal and inhibits feeding in the same dose range. In the present study, we sought to investigate further the unique physiopharmacological profile of the NPS system by characterizing its effects on palatable food consumption in rats and comparing it with the effect of the classical anxiolytic benzodiazepine midazolam. The results demonstrated that midazolam (5.0 or 10.0 mg/kg) increases palatable food consumption, while intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NPS markedly reduces it. The anorectic effect of NPS (0.1-1.0 nmol per rat, ICV) was prevented by ICV pretreatment with the NPSR antagonist [D-Cys(tBU)(5)]NPS (20.0-60.0 nmol per rat). Pretreatment with the nonselective corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor (CRF) antagonist alpha-helical CRF 9-41 (6.25 and 12.5 nmol per rat) completely reversed the hypophagic action of CRF (0.4 nmol per rat, ICV) but did not prevent the anorectic effect of ICV NPS (1.0 nmol per rat). Brain site-specific microinjection experiments revealed that NPS markedly inhibits palatable food intake if administered into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). A similar but smaller and shorter lasting reduction of feeding was observed following intra-lateral hypothalamus administration, whereas no effect was observed following injection into the central amygdala. The present study demonstrates that NPS evokes a potent inhibition of palatable food consumption and that the PVN is an important site of action for its effect. PMID:19821837

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of helical tomotherapy with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterpin, E.; Salvat, F.; Cravens, R.; Ruchala, K.; Olivera, G. H.; Vynckier, S.

    2008-04-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the simultaneous movement of the couch, the gantry and the binary multileaf collimator (MLC), a procedure that differs from conventional dynamic or step-and-shoot IMRT. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of HT in the helical mode therefore requires a new approach. Using validated phase-space files (PSFs) obtained through the MC simulation of the static mode with PENELOPE, an analytical model of the binary MLC, called the 'transfer function' (TF), was first devised to perform the transport of particles through the MLC much faster than time-consuming MC simulation and with no significant loss of accuracy. Second, a new tool, called TomoPen, was designed to simulate the helical mode by rotating and translating the initial coordinates and directions of the particles in the PSF according to the instantaneous position of the machine, transporting the particles through the MLC (in the instantaneous configuration defined by the sinogram), and computing the dose distribution in the CT structure using PENELOPE. Good agreement with measurements and with the treatment planning system of tomotherapy was obtained, with deviations generally well within 2%/1 mm, for the simulation of the helical mode for two commissioning procedures and a clinical plan calculated and measured in homogeneous conditions.

  6. Foxf2 is required for secondary palate development and Tgfβ signaling in palatal shelf mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Nik, Ali M; Johansson, Jeanette A; Ghiami, Mozhgan; Reyahi, Azadeh; Carlsson, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The secondary palate separates the oral from the nasal cavity and its closure during embryonic development is sensitive to genetic perturbations. Mice with deleted Foxf2, encoding a forkhead transcription factor, are born with cleft palate, and an abnormal tongue morphology has been proposed as the underlying cause. Here, we show that Foxf2(-/-) maxillary explants cultured in vitro, in the absence of tongue and mandible, failed to close the secondary palate. Proliferation and collagen content were decreased in Foxf2(-/-) palatal shelf mesenchyme. Phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was reduced in mutant palatal shelf, diagnostic of attenuated canonical Tgfβ signaling, whereas phosphorylation of p38 was increased. The amount of Tgfβ2 protein was diminished, whereas the Tgfb2 mRNA level was unaltered. Expression of several genes encoding extracellular proteins important for Tgfβ signaling were reduced in Foxf2(-)(/)(-) palatal shelves: a fibronectin splice-isoform essential for formation of extracellular Tgfβ latency complexes; Tgfbr3 - or betaglycan - which acts as a co-receptor and an extracellular reservoir of Tgfβ; and integrins αV and β1, which are both Tgfβ targets and required for activation of latent Tgfβ. Decreased proliferation and reduced extracellular matrix content are consistent with diminished Tgfβ signaling. We therefore propose that gene expression changes in palatal shelf mesenchyme that lead to reduced Tgfβ signaling contribute to cleft palate in Foxf2(-)(/)(-) mice. PMID:27180663

  7. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  8. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  9. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  10. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  11. Morphology and function of the palatal dentition in Choristodera.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ryoko; Evans, Susan E

    2016-03-01

    Choristoderes are a group of extinct freshwater reptiles that were distributed throughout Laurasia from the Middle Jurassic to the Miocene. They are inferred to have had a lifestyle similar to that of extant gavialid crocodiles, but they differed from crocodiles in retaining an extensive palatal dentition. All choristoderes had teeth on the vomers, palatines and pterygoids, and teeth are rarely present on the parasphenoid. Palatal teeth are conical, as in the marginal dentition, and form longitudinal and transverse rows. Detailed examination of different genera shows that the orientation of the palatal tooth crowns changes with their position on the palate, supporting the view that they are involved in intra-oral food transportation, presumably in combination with a fleshy tongue. Moreover, observed variation in palatal tooth shape and the width of palatal tooth batteries may provide additional clues about diet. The European Simoedosaurus lemoinei has sharper palatal teeth than its North American counterpart, S. dakotensis, suggesting a preference for softer prey - a conclusion consistent with the more gracile teeth and narrower snout. PMID:26573112

  12. Selective control for helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsamba, Panayiota; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    One of the greatest aspirations for artificial microswimmers is their application in non-invasive medicine. For any practical use, adequate mechanisms enabling control of multiple artificial swimmers is of paramount importance. Here we propose a multi-helical, freely-jointed motor as a novel selective control mechanism. We show that the nonlinear step-out behavior of a magnetized helix driven by a rotating magnetic field can be exploited, when used in conjunction with other helices, to obtain a velocity profile that is non-negligible only within a chosen interval of operating frequencies. Specifically, the force balance between the competing opposite-handed helices is tuned to give no net motion at low frequencies while in the middle frequency range, the swimming velocity increases monotonically with the driving frequency if two opposite helices are used, thereby allowing speed adjustment by varying the driving frequency. We illustrate this idea in detail on a two-helix system, and demonstrate how to generalize to N helices, both numerically and theoretically. We finish by explaining how to solve the inverse problem and design an artificial swimmer with an arbitrarily-complex velocity vs. frequency relationship.

  13. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  14. Helicity Injected Torus Program Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Aboulhosn, R. Z.; Akcay, C.; Hamp, W. T.; Marklin, G.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Sutphin, G. L.; Wrobel, J. S.; Mueller, D.; Roquemore, L.

    2006-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT--SI) spheromak experiment [Sieck, Nucl. Fusion v.46, p.254 (2006)] addresses critical issues for spheromaks, including current drive, high-beta operation, confinement quality and efficient steady-state operation. HIT--SI has a ``bow-tie'' shaped axisymmetric confinement region (major radius R=0.33 m, axial extent of 0.57 m) and two half-torus helicity injectors, one mounted on each end of the flux conserver. HIT--SI has produced spheromaks with up to 30 kA of toroidal current, using less than 4 MW of applied power, demonstrating that Steady Inductive Helicity Injection can generate and sustain discharges with modest power requirements. Fast camera images of HIT--SI discharges indicate a toroidally rotating n=1 structure, driven by the helicity injectors. The direction of the toroidal current is determined by the direction of rotation of the driven n=1. Measured surface and internal magnetic fields in HIT--SI discharges are consistent with that of the true 3D Taylor state, including the injectors. Recent HIT--SI physics studies, diagnostic improvements and machine upgrades will also be summarized.

  15. Exact helical reconstruction using native cone-beam geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noo, Frédéric; Pack, Jed; Heuscher, Dominic

    2003-12-01

    This paper is about helical cone-beam reconstruction using the exact filtered backprojection formula recently suggested by Katsevich (2002a Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2583-97). We investigate how to efficiently and accurately implement Katsevich's formula for direct reconstruction from helical cone-beam data measured in two native geometries. The first geometry is the curved detector geometry of third-generation multi-slice CT scanners, and the second geometry is the flat detector geometry of C-arms systems and of most industrial cone-beam CT scanners. For each of these two geometries, we determine processing steps to be applied to the measured data such that the final outcome is an implementation of the Katsevich formula. These steps are first described using continuous-form equations, disregarding the finite detector resolution and the source position sampling. Next, techniques are presented for implementation of these steps with finite data sampling. The performance of these techniques is illustrated for the curved detector geometry of third-generation CT scanners, with 32, 64 and 128 detector rows. In each case, resolution and noise measurements are given along with reconstructions of the FORBILD thorax phantom.

  16. The contribution of electromyography to the diagnostics of some rare palatal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Velepic, Mitja S; Sasso, Antun B; Ahel, Vladimir V; Starcevic, Radan A; Komljenovic, Dean B; Velepic, Marko M

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents the electromyographic (EMG) findings of the soft palate in three patients: a patient with Mohr syndrome and cleft palate, a patient with palatal asymmetry and rhinolalia and a patient with vertical oro-ocular facial cleft with marked asymmetry of the cleft palate. In the first patient, electrical silence was registered in one half of the palate. In the second patient, moderate loss of active motor units was registered in the hypoplastic part of the palate. In the third patient, in spite of asymmetry, the EMG finding was normal on both sides of the palate. PMID:15911014

  17. Receptor-dependent mechanisms of glucocorticoid and dioxin-induced cleft palate

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    Glucocorticoids (triamcinolone) and dioxins (TCDD) are highly specific teratogens in the mouse, in that cleft palate is the major malformation observed. Glucocorticoids and TCDD both readily cross the yolk sac and placenta and appear in the developing secondary palate. Structure-activity relationships for glucocorticoid- and TCDD-induced cleft palate suggest a receptor involvement. Receptors for glucocorticoids and TCDD are present in the palate and their levels in various mouse strains are highly correlated with their sensitivity to cleft palate induction. Receptors for glucocorticoids appear to be more prevalent in the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas those for TCDD are probably located in the palatal epithelial cells. Glucocorticoids exert their teratogenic effect on the palate by inhibiting the growth of the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas TCDD alters the terminal cell differentiation of the media palatal epithelial cells. 71 references.

  18. Membrane Assisted Palatal Fistula Closure in a Cleft Palate Patient: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Siva Prasad; Reddy, G Venkateshwara; Sree, P Karuna; Reddy, K Sravan Kumar; Reddy, P Amarnath

    2016-03-01

    Palatal fistula following cleft palate repair, is one of the considerable complications and remains a challenging problem to the surgeons. The reported recurrence rate of the fistula is between 33% to 37%. Due to fibrosis and poor vascularity of adjacent tissues, high recurrence rates are typical. Closure of palatal fistulas can be achieved by different surgical techniques like local, regional and distant flaps, local turnover flaps, pedicled flaps from oral mucosa, buccal fat pad flaps, inter-positional cartilage grafts can be utilized for management of small fistulas. For larger fistualas, tongue flaps, temporalis muscle flaps, musculomucosal flaps, nasal septal flaps and free flaps can be used. These procedures are often cumbersome and leave a raw nasal or oral surface, which may increase the incidence of postoperative problems or some flaps can be bulky and may require a second-stage procedure. Different synthetic materials such as alloderm, Poly-D and L-Lactic Acid or "PdLLA" and collagen membrane are used in multilayer repair represented by the nasal mucosa, the inter-positional graft and oral mucosa. These interpositional grafts provide a scaffold for in growth of tissues, revascularization and mucosal epithelialization. We present a case of closure of an oronasal fistula, using resorbable collagen membrane in three layered repair to avoid recurrence. PMID:27135018

  19. Membrane Assisted Palatal Fistula Closure in a Cleft Palate Patient: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, G. Siva Prasad; Reddy, G. Venkateshwara; Reddy, K. Sravan Kumar; Reddy, P. Amarnath

    2016-01-01

    Palatal fistula following cleft palate repair, is one of the considerable complications and remains a challenging problem to the surgeons. The reported recurrence rate of the fistula is between 33% to 37%. Due to fibrosis and poor vascularity of adjacent tissues, high recurrence rates are typical. Closure of palatal fistulas can be achieved by different surgical techniques like local, regional and distant flaps, local turnover flaps, pedicled flaps from oral mucosa, buccal fat pad flaps, inter-positional cartilage grafts can be utilized for management of small fistulas. For larger fistualas, tongue flaps, temporalis muscle flaps, musculomucosal flaps, nasal septal flaps and free flaps can be used. These procedures are often cumbersome and leave a raw nasal or oral surface, which may increase the incidence of postoperative problems or some flaps can be bulky and may require a second-stage procedure. Different synthetic materials such as alloderm, Poly-D and L-Lactic Acid or “PdLLA” and collagen membrane are used in multilayer repair represented by the nasal mucosa, the inter-positional graft and oral mucosa. These interpositional grafts provide a scaffold for in growth of tissues, revascularization and mucosal epithelialization. We present a case of closure of an oronasal fistula, using resorbable collagen membrane in three layered repair to avoid recurrence. PMID:27135018

  20. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shaila; Chacko, Reena Annie; Thomas, Abi M; Singh, Namita; Thomas, Rodny; Abraham, Deena

    2014-01-01

    A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient's weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury. PMID:25231044

  1. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  2. Rational design of helical architectures

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Fejer, Szilard N.; Wales, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Nature has mastered the art of creating complex structures through self-assembly of simpler building blocks. Adapting such a bottom-up view provides a potential route to the fabrication of novel materials. However, this approach suffers from the lack of a sufficiently detailed understanding of the noncovalent forces that hold the self-assembled structures together. Here we demonstrate that nature can indeed guide us, as we explore routes to helicity with achiral building blocks driven by the interplay between two competing length scales for the interactions, as in DNA. By characterizing global minima for clusters, we illustrate several realizations of helical architecture, the simplest one involving ellipsoids of revolution as building blocks. In particular, we show that axially symmetric soft discoids can self-assemble into helical columnar arrangements. Understanding the molecular origin of such spatial organisation has important implications for the rational design of materials with useful optoelectronic applications.

  3. The anatomy of the dog soft palate. III. Histological evaluation of the caudal soft palate in brachycephalic neonates.

    PubMed

    Pichetto, Michela; Arrighi, Silvana; Gobbetti, Matteo; Romussi, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    A thickened and abnormally long soft palate is mostly involved in the pathogenesis of both nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal narrowing, affecting the respiratory activity in virtually all of the brachycephalic dogs suffering from Brachycephalic Airway Obstructive Syndrome (BAOS). The morphology of the soft palate in adult mesaticephalic and brachycephalic dogs has been previously described. In this article specimens from brachycephalic dog neonates (N=10) dead from one to 3 hr after birth of unrelated conditions were collected and histologically evaluated at three transverse levels to describe the microscopic aspect of the caudal part of the soft palate. The soft palate of neonate brachycephalic dogs was histologically characterized by a musculo-connective axis containing salivary glands and coated by a mucosal layer on both the nasopharyngeal and the oral side. Quali-quantitative features, such as thickened superficial epithelium, broad oedema of the lamina propria, mucous gland hyperplasia and diverse muscular modifications described in adult brachycephalic dogs, were not observed in the soft palate of brachycephalic neonate dogs. The lack of tissue lesions in the soft palate of newborn brachycephalic dogs further supports the hypothesis that inspiratory depression during the inspiratory phase causes chronic vibration and microtrauma, which lead to soft palate alterations in adult brachycephalic dogs starting from the earliest grade of the respiratory syndrome. Overall, this study provides baseline information for the comprehension of the pathogenesis of BAOS. PMID:25257843

  4. Obturator prostheses following palatal resection: clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Tirelli, G; Rizzo, R; Biasotto, M; Di Lenarda, R; Argenti, B; Gatto, A; Bullo, F

    2010-01-01

    Summary Malignant tumours of the upper gum and hard palate account for 1-5% of malignant neoplasms of the oral cavity; two thirds of the lesions which involve these areas are squamous cell carcinomas. Most of these carcinomas are diagnosed late, when they invade the underlying bone. The procedures of choice for removal are: alveolectomy, palatectomy, maxillectomy, which may be total or partial. Surgical reconstruction of the defect may be carried out using a wide range of microvascularized flaps: osteomuscolocutaneous of the internal iliac crest, an osteocutaneous flap of the fibula or scapula, fascia, or osteocutaneous radial flap, or a pedicled flap of temporal muscle. These flaps are supported by single or multiple obturator prostheses. Rehabilitation via palatal obturators is preferred in patients with a poor prognosis or in weak condition. Rehabilitation aims to: restore the separation between the oral and nasal cavities, enable the patient to swallow, maintain or provide mastication, sufficient occlusion and mandibular support, support the soft facial tissues, re-establish speech and restore an aesthetically pleasing smile. Hence, it is crucial to work in close cooperation with the staff who makes the prosthesis and who evaluates the case when the surgery is planned and obtains the necessary gnatological, anatomical and functional information. Thereafter, during the surgical stage, for the immediate obturators, or in the successive days, for the temporary obturators, work is devoted to making the prostheses. In this regard, the Odonto-prostheses Service of the Stomatological Clinic does not follow a rigid protocol but materials and techniques are selected on a personal basis, according to the features of each individual clinical case. Mobile rehabilitative systems are the systems of choice, both of which related to the traditional concepts of retention and stability and systems of self-stabilizing prostheses according to J. Dichamp, albeit modified in

  5. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  6. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  7. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique. PMID:16997210

  8. OPE for all helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Caetano, João; Córdova, Lucía; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM to account for all possible helicities of the external states. This is done by constructing a simple map between helicity configurations and so-called charged pentagon transitions. These OPE building blocks are generalizations of the bosonic pentagons entering MHV amplitudes and they can be bootstrapped at finite coupling from the integrable dynamics of the color flux tube. A byproduct of our map is a simple realization of parity in the super Wilson loop picture.

  9. Artifacts in CT: recognition and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Julia F; Keat, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Artifacts can seriously degrade the quality of computed tomographic (CT) images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand why artifacts occur and how they can be prevented or suppressed. CT artifacts originate from a range of sources. Physics-based artifacts result from the physical processes involved in the acquisition of CT data. Patient-based artifacts are caused by such factors as patient movement or the presence of metallic materials in or on the patient. Scanner-based artifacts result from imperfections in scanner function. Helical and multisection technique artifacts are produced by the image reconstruction process. Design features incorporated into modern CT scanners minimize some types of artifacts, and some can be partially corrected by the scanner software. However, in many instances, careful patient positioning and optimum selection of scanning parameters are the most important factors in avoiding CT artifacts. PMID:15537976

  10. The Palatal and Oral Manifestations of Muenke Syndrome (FGFR3 related craniosynostosis)

    PubMed Central

    Agochukwu, Nneamaka B.; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Doherty, Emily S.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    Palatal anomalies including cleft palate and higharched palate have been reported in the most common craniosynostosis syndromes, including Pfeiffer syndrome (associated with mutations in FGFR1, FGFR2), Apert syndrome (FGFR2), Muenke syndrome (FGFR3) and Crouzon syndrome (FGFR2). Although Muenke syndrome is the most common syndromic form of craniosynostosis, the frequency of oral and palatal anomalies including high arched palate, cleft lip with or without cleft palate has not been documented in a patient series of Muenke syndrome to date. Further, to our knowledge, cleft lip and palate has not been reported yet in a patient with Muenke syndrome (a previous patient with isolated cleft palate has been reported). This study sought to evaluate the frequency of palatal anomalies in patients with Muenke syndrome through both a retrospective investigation and literature review. A total of 21 patients who met criteria for this study were included in the retrospective review. 15 patients (71%) had a structural anomaly of the palate. Cleft lip and palate was present in one patient (5%). Other palatal findings included: high arched hard palate in 14 patients (67%). Individuals with Muenke syndrome have the lowest incidence of cleft palate among the most common craniosynostosis syndromes. However, high arched palate in Muenke syndrome is common and may warrant clinical attention, as these individuals are more susceptible to recurrent chronic otitis media with effusion, dental malocclusion and hearing loss. PMID:22565872

  11. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  12. Application of fast radon transform to CT scanners: difficulties and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhishek; Banerjee, Swapna

    2007-03-01

    As a tomographic reconstruction algorithm, the recently proposed "Fast Radon Transform" (FRT) has some computational advantages. To prove its practical importance the technical difficulties associated with its application to fan-beam CT scanners as well as Spiral/Helical CT system are solved here. Some techniques are described to convert the actual fan-beam data or the spiral/helical CT data to parallel-beam data required for the FRT algorithm in order to reconstruct the CT images. Simulation results are presented to validate the complete method.

  13. The transport of relative canonical helicity

    SciTech Connect

    You, S.

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive boundary conditions.

  14. Reconstruction of Congenital Nose, Cleft Primary Palate, and Lip Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiani, Nadine; Verstraete, Frank J M; Arzi, Boaz

    2016-07-01

    Clefts of the primary palate in the dog are uncommon, and their repair can be challenging. The aims of this article are to provide information regarding pathogenesis and convey practical information for the repair of these defects. PMID:26965528

  15. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  16. Roles of BMP Signaling Pathway in Lip and Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and cleft palate only (CP) are severe disruptions affecting orofacial structures. Patients with orofacial clefts require complex interdisciplinary care, which includes nursing, plastic surgery, maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, speech therapy, audiology, psychological and genetic counseling, orthodontics and dental treatment, among others. Overall, treatment of clefts of the lip and palate entails a significant economic burden for families and society. Therefore, prevention is the ultimate objective and this will be facilitated by a complete understanding of the etiology of this condition. Here we review the current concepts regarding the genetic and environmental factors contributing to orofacial clefts and emphasize on the roles of BMP signaling pathway components in the normal and aberrant development of the lip and palate. PMID:22759670

  17. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  18. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  19. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  20. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  1. Treatment of a Maxillary First Molar with Two Palatal Roots

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Ghasemi, Negin; Talebzadeh, Bita; Norlouoni, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of the morphology and internal anatomy of the root canal system is essential, because it determines the successful outcome of endodontic treatment. The main goal of endodontic treatment is to prevent apical periodontitis and/or to promote the healing of periapical lesion. Presence of two canals or roots on the palatal side of the first maxillary molar has rarely been reported. This case report presents a maxillary first molar with two separate palatal roots. PMID:26523146

  2. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements. PMID:26701347

  3. Novel FGFR1 and KISS1R Mutations in Chinese Kallmann Syndrome Males with Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Niu, Yonghua; Wang, Tao; Liu, Simin; Xu, Hua; Wang, Shaogang; Liu, Jihong; Ye, Zhangqun

    2015-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is characterized by isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) with anosmia and is sometimes associated with cleft lip/palate (CLP). In order to describe the clinical features, genetic etiology, and treatment outcome of KS males with CLP, we performed genetic screening for 15 known causal IHH genes (KAL1, FGFR1, NELF, FGF8, CHD7, WDR11, SEMA3A, KISS1R, KISS1, PROKR2, PROK2, TAC3, TACR3, GNRH1, and GNRHR) in four KS with CLP patients and six IHH patients without CLP. Two novel heterozygous missense mutations in FGFR1, (NM_001174066): c.776G>A (p.G259E) and (NM_001174066): c.358C>T (p.R120C), were identified in a 23-year-old KS male with cleft lip and an 18-year-old KS patient with cleft lip and palate, dental agenesis, and high arched palate, respectively. These two mutations were not presented in their healthy parents and 200 normal controls. One novel heterozygous missense mutation in KISS1R, (NM_032551): c.587C>A (p.P196H), was identified in an 18-year-old KS male with cleft lip and dental agenesis who developed sperm after being treated with gonadotropin. This mutation was also presented in his healthy father and grandfather. These results have implications for the diagnosis, genetic counseling, and treatment of KS and CLP males with mutations in FGFR1 gene. PMID:26199944

  4. CT imaging features of obturator prostheses in patients following palatectomy or maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V A; Hofstede, T M; Ginsberg, L E

    2011-01-01

    Palatal tumors are often treated with palatectomy or maxillectomy. The resulting surgical defect produces an oroantral communication. An obturator is a removable prosthesis used to close the palatal or maxillectomy defect. Fifteen patients who had undergone palatectomy or maxillectomy for carcinoma and subsequent obturator prosthesis placement were retrospectively studied. Obturators were characterized by Hounsfield units and were subdivided into 3 CT imaging groups: either hyperattenuated, hollow (air-containing), or heterogeneous (isoattenuated to hyperattenuated with internal foci of air). Eight patients had hyperattenuated obturators either representing acrylic resin or Trusoft. Four patients had hollow obturators also composed of acrylic resin or Trusoft. Three patients had heterogeneous obturators, which were composed of only Trusoft. The postoperative imaging of patients treated for palatal or maxillary tumors can be complicated by the presence of obturator prostheses. The intent of this article was to familiarize the reader with the CT imaging features of obturator prostheses. PMID:21799037

  5. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-15

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

  6. Helicity Generation by Heat Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In a large laboratory plasma (ne ~= 10^12 cm-3, k Te ~= 2 eV, B0 ~= 30 G, 1 m ⊥ B_0, 2.5 m allel B_0), the electrons are heated locally by a short intense current pulse (100 A, 0.2 μs) using a magnetic loop antenna or a biased electrode. The heat transport along the field establishes a flux tube with strong radial and weak axial temperature gradients. The time scale of temperature relaxation (Δ t ~= 50 μs) is much longer than that of the transient whistler wave pulse excited by the initial current pulse (Δ t < 2 μs). The temperature gradients drive linked field-aligned and diamagnetic currents which, due to their linkage, exhibit helicity and form a flux rope with J × B ~= 0.(R. L. Stenzel and J. M. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1469 (1996). Alternatively, the helicity generation can be understood by the twisting of magnetic field lines which, in the parameter regime of electron MHD, are frozen into the electron fluid. The electron heating at one end of the flux tube causes a nonuniform diamagnetic rotation, hence the helicity. The heat transport by helical convection and conduction is investigated. The slowly time-varying magnetic field may excite Alfvénic perturbations.

  7. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10-10 Pa-1), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (˜10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (˜20 μm without the plug-in support), light (˜5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (˜μN) and high resolution (˜nN) force sensors.

  8. Note: helical nanobelt force sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G; Hashimoto, H

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (~10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (~20 μm without the plug-in support), light (~5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (~μN) and high resolution (~nN) force sensors. PMID:23278031

  9. Palatal sclerotherapy for the treatment of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate in 51 standardbred racehorses

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Daniel; Picandet, Valerie; Céleste, Christophe; Macieira, Susana; Cesarini, Carla; Morisset, Sophie; Rossier, Yves; Marcoux, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy and side effects of palatal sclerotherapy in standardbred racehorses suspected to have intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (IDDSP). Fifty-one horses were treated with multiple endoscopically guided injections of 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate in the soft palate. Two groups were identified: those that had respiratory noises during exercise (n = 27) and those that did not (n = 24). Treatment was well-tolerated. Furthermore, horses significantly reduced their racing times for the last 400 m compared with their times before treatment and even when their times were compared to the mean times for horses in the same race. In conclusion, palatal sclerotherapy appears to be a suitable alternative therapeutic option for horses suspected to have IDDSP. PMID:22547840

  10. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of the mid-palatal suture in rapid palatal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gumussoy, I; Bayrakdar, I S; Dagistan, S; Caglayan, F

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Orthodontists usually evaluate the mid-palatal sutural opening with occlusal radiography. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the sutural opening with ultrasonography (USG) in a series of patients undergoing rapid palatal expansion (RPE). Methods: The study included 87 USG images and 87 occlusal radiographs from 29 healthy patients (mean age, 13.9 years; range, 11–20 years; boys, 12; girls, 17) who required RPE treatment. The sutural opening was assessed with USG, and the amount of sutural expansion as mesiodistal length was measured immediately after appliance practice (T0), 10 turns (T1) and 20 turns (T2) during the expansion period. Sutural expansion evaluated by occlusal radiographs was scored at every stage. Measurements obtained by USG and scores observed in the occlusal radiographs were compared by non-parametric Kendall's tau test. Results: Both USG and radiographic images revealed normal anatomical structure during pre-expansion (stage T0). On USG, sutural expansion was seen in 19 patients at stage T1. There was no expansion at this stage in ten patients. At stage T2, on USG and radiography, an increase in the amount of expansion was observed in 19 patients with sutural expansion at stage T1 and sutural expansion was observed in 5 patients without sutural expansion at stage T1. No expansion was observed at both stages T1 and T2 in five patients. USG measurements and occlusal scores in both T1 and T2 turns showed statistically significant correlation (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The results indicate that USG might be a useful method to assess mid-palatal sutural opening in patients undergoing RPE. PMID:25168810

  11. The anatomy of the dog soft palate. I. Histological evaluation of the caudal soft palate in mesaticephalic breeds.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Silvana; Pichetto, Michela; Roccabianca, Paola; Romussi, Stefano

    2011-07-01

    The gross anatomy and overall structure of the soft palate has been described in the average dog's head, however, no descriptive microanatomical studies of the dog soft palate are available, despite their possible utility in view of the manifold and important repercussions of this organ physiology. This is the first of two companion papers, dealing with the caudal part of the soft palate in the canine species, in mesaticephalic and brachycephalic dogs. Specimens from mesaticephalic healthy dogs (N = 8) were collected after euthanasia, processed for histology and sectioned at six transversal levels. Morphological stainings were used for a microscopic evaluation of the tissue layers composing the distal part of the soft palate in adult mesaticephalic dogs, and histochemical reactions were applied to assess mucin types within glandular tissue and to investigate the connective tissues. The organ was characteristically organized into a major deep musculo-connective axis mixed with salivary glands and covered by the mucosal lining on either the nasopharyngeal or the oral sides. The results of this investigation add to the general knowledge of the anatomy of soft palate in the canine species and establish baseline information for the parallel study on the long and thickened soft palate, which is typical of adult brachycephalic dogs. PMID:21634021

  12. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  13. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-01-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths. PMID:25387544

  14. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-05-01

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  15. Studies with WNT Genes and Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Renato; Letra, Ariadne; Kim, Ana H.; Kuchler, Erika C.; Day, Alicia; Tannure, Patricia N.; da Motta, Luise Gomes; Paiva, Katiucia Batista; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Clefts of the lip and/or palate (cleft lip/palate) are notable for their complex etiology. The WNT pathway regulates multiple developmental processes including craniofacial development and may play a role in cleft lip/palate and other defects of craniofacial development such as tooth agenesis. Variations in WNT genes have been recently associated with cleft lip/palate in humans. In addition, two WNT genes, Wnt3 and Wnt9B, are located in the clf1 cleft locus in mice. Methods We investigated 13 SNPs located in WNT3A, WNT5A, WNT8A, WNT11, WNT3 and WNT9B genes, for association with cleft lip/palate subphenotypes in 500 cleft cases and 500 unrelated controls. Genotyping of selected polymorphisms was carried out using Taqman assays. PLINK 1.06 software was used to test for differences in allele frequencies of each polymorphism between affected and unaffected individuals. Haplotype analysis was also performed. Results Individuals carrying variant alleles in WNT3 presented an increased risk for cleft lip/palate (P=0.0003; OR=1.61 95% C.I: 1.29 -2.02) in the population studied. Conclusion Our results continue to support a role for WNT genes in the pathogenesis of cleft lip/palate. Although much remains to be learned about the function of individual WNT genes during craniofacial development, additional studies should focus in the identification of potentially functional variants in these genes as contributors to human clefting. PMID:20890934

  16. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-09-15

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity.

  17. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  18. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  19. Lamb Wave Helical Ultrasonic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. R.; Hinders, M. K.

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT). This new technique, among other things, has direct application to advanced pipe inspection. HUT uses guided ultrasonic waves along with an adaptation of the tomographic reconstruction algorithms developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel in various helical crisscross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar crisscross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. We demonstrate the feasibility of the HUT technique via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  20. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  1. Palatal bone thickness measured by palatal index method using cone-beam computed tomography in nonorthodontic patients for placement of mini-implants

    PubMed Central

    Manjula, W. S.; Murali, R. V.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Tajir, Faizal; Mahalakshmi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the bone thickness of the palatal areas in different palatal index (PI) groups Materials and Methods: Cone-beam computed tomography scans of 10 subjects were selected with ameanage group of 18 years. The measurements of palatal bone thickness were made at 36 sites using CareStream 3D Imaging software. The PIwas measured using Korkhaus ratio (palatal height/palatal width). One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze intergroup differences, as well as the PI difference. Results: Bone thickness was higher in the anterior region than in the middle and posterior regions P <0.001. Furthermore, significant differences were found among the midline, medial, and lateralareas of the palate. Conclusions: These findings might be helpful for clinicians to enhance the successful useof temporary anchorage devices in the palate. PMID:26015685

  2. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers. PMID:26829250

  3. Iterative image reconstruction for limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Helical trajectory satisfying the condition of exact reconstruction, has been widely utilized in the commercial computed tomography (CT). While limited by the scanning environment in some practical applications, the conventional helical cone-beam CT imaging is hard to complete, thus, developing an imaging system suited for long-object may be valuable. Three-dimensional C-arm CT is an innovative imaging technique which has been greatly concerned. Since there is a high degree of freedom of C-arm, more flexible image acquisition trajectories for 3D imaging can be achieved. In this work, a fast iterative reconstruction algorithm based on total variation minimization is developed for a trajectory of limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam CT, which can be applied to detect long-object without slip-ring technology. The experimental results show that the developed algorithm can yield reconstructed images of low noise level and high image quality. SCANNING 38:4-13, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26130367

  4. Topology of modified helical gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The topology of several types of modified surfaces of helical gears is proposed. The modified surfaces allow absorption of a linear or almost linear function of transmission errors. These errors are caused by gear misalignment and an improvement of the contact of gear tooth surfaces. Principles and corresponding programs for computer aided simulation of meshing and contact of gears have been developed. The results of this investigation are illustrated with numerical examples.

  5. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  6. CT colonography: techniques, indications, findings.

    PubMed

    Mang, Thomas; Graser, Anno; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for imaging the entire colon. Based on a helical thin-section CT of the cleansed and air-distended colon, two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections are used for image interpretation. Several clinical improvements in patient preparation, technical advances in CT, and new developments in evaluation software have allowed CTC to develop into a powerful diagnostic tool. It is already well established as a reliable diagnostic tool in symptomatic patients. Many experts currently consider CTC a comparable alternative to conventional colonoscopy, although there is still debate about its sensitivity for the detection of colonic polyps in a screening population. This article summarizes the main indications, the current techniques in patient preparation, data acquisition and data analysis as well as imaging features for common benign and malignant colorectal lesions. PMID:17224254

  7. A Comparison of Three-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional Cephalometric Evaluations of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Tulunoglu, Ozlem; Esenlik, Elcin; Gulsen, Ayse; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the consistency of orthodontic measurement performed on cephalometric films and 3D CT images of cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients. Methods: The study was conducted with 2D radiographs and 3D CT images of 9 boys and 6 girls aged 7–12 with CLP. 3D reconstructions were performed using MIMICS software. Results: Frontal analysis found statistical differences for all parameters except occlusal plane tilt (OcP-tilt) and McNamara analysis found statistical differences in 2D and 3D measurements for all parameters except ANS-Me and Co-Gn; Steiner analysis found statistical differences for all parameters except SND, SNB and Max1-SN. Intra-group variability in measurements was also very low for all parameters for both 2D and 3D images. Conclusions: Study results indicate significant differences between measurements taken from 2D and 3D images in patients with cleft lip and palate. PMID:21912501

  8. Soft palate preservation after tumor resection with transoral laser microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Gómez-Pedraza, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background: Management and preservation of the soft palate is dependent on clinical stage and tumor histology. However, available literature is scarce regarding the palate preservation with the use of laser CO2. Objectives: We report the results obtained after management with laser surgery and soft palate preservation in three patients with salivary gland neoplasms. Method: Three patients with minor salivary gland tumors were treated by means of transoral laser microsurgery. All tumors were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. All tumors were >3 cm. Soft palate function was preserved and reconstruction was performed with primary closure. Patients began oral feeding the same day and were discharged after 24 h. Conclusions: Transoral laser microsurgery is recommended for treatment of soft palate tumors. This treatment can be considered a better option when compared with other modalities such as radio- or chemoradiotherapy which require a longer time of treatment, are more expensive and tend to produce significant toxicity. Key words:Laser CO2, neoplasms, salivary gland. PMID:23229273

  9. The morphology transformation from helical nanofiber to helical nanotube in a diarylethene self-assembly system.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yulong; Yan, Shihai; Zhou, Xinhong; Xu, Wei; Xu, Hongxia; Liu, Zhihong; Zhang, Lixue; Zhang, Chuanjian; Cui, Guanglei; Yao, Lishan

    2014-08-01

    A helical nanostructure can be obtained by self-assembly of a diarylethene derivative that bears two malononitrile substitutes in a tetrahydrofuran/water medium. It is revealed that the helical nanostructure changed from helical nanofiber to helical nanotube when the diarylethene monomer changed from the open-ring isomer to the closed-ring isomer upon irradiation with 365 nm ultraviolet light, meanwhile, the helix angle of the nanostructure changed from 50° ± 5° to 75° ± 5°. There is a great possibility that the helical nanofibers and helical nanotubes are assembled from dimers as base units based on theoretical calculation and experimental results. PMID:24940732

  10. CT of acute abdominal aortic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; Menias, Christine O; Heiken, Jay P

    2003-11-01

    Aortic aneurysm rupture, aortic dissection, PAU, acute aortic occlusion, traumatic aortic injury, and aortic fistula represent acute abdominal aortic conditions. Because of its speed and proximity to the emergency department, helical CT is the imaging test of choice for these conditions. MR imaging also plays an important role in the imaging of aortic dissection and PAU, particularly when the patient is unable to receive intravenous contrast material. In this era of MDCT, conventional angiography is used as a secondary diagnostic tool to clarify equivocal findings on cross-sectional imaging. Ultrasound is helpful when CT is not readily available and the patient is unable or too unstable to undergo MR imaging. PMID:14661663

  11. Transverse changes in lateral and medial aspects of palatal rugae after mid palatal expansion: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Priyanka; Miglani, Ragini

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Palatal rugae has established role in forensic identification of an individual due to its stability in growth as well as orthodontic treatment. However effect of orthodontic mid-palatal expansion on rugae stability still requires further investigation. Hence, this study was aimed at evaluating the stability of palatal rugae in transverse dimension in adolescent patients of mid-palatal expansion. Materials and Methods: The study sample consists of 14 subjects (10F,4M, age 12.4 ± 2.0 years) with transverse maxillary constriction, treated with bonded and banded rapid maxillary expansion (RME) appliance. 1st to 3rd rugae on pre- and post-expansion casts were recorded synchronously. Inter-medial and inter-lateral rugae distance were measured with digital calipers to record the transverse positional rugae changes. Results: There was a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in values after expansion between medial aspects of 2nd (p = 0.002) and 3rd rugae (p = 0.005) and lateral aspects of 1st (p = 0.015), 2nd (p = 0.006) and 3rd (p = 0.001) rugae. The transverse changes were recorded in the order of 3rd rugae >2nd rugae >1st rugae. Conclusion: This pilot study does not support stability of medial and lateral ruga points of 2nd and 3rd primary rugae for forensic identification in individuals treated with mid palatal expansion. PMID:25709313

  12. Transforming growth factor-β3 is required for secondary palate fusion

    PubMed Central

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Pawlowski, Sharon A.; Wiles, Michael V.; Yin, Moying; Boivin, Gregory P.; Howles, Philip N.; Ding, Jixang; Ferguson, Mark W. J.; Doetschman, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking TGF-β3 exhibit an incompletely penetrant failure of the palatal shelves to fuse leading to cleft palate. The defect appears to result from impaired adhesion of the apposing medial edge epithelia of the palatal shelves and subsequent elimination of the mid-line epithelial seam. No craniofacial abnormalities were observed. This result demonstrates that TGF-β3 affects palatal shelf fusion by an intrinsic, primary mechanism rather than by effects secondary to craniofacial defects. PMID:7493021

  13. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  14. Conditioned taste aversion, drugs of abuse and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-You; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2014-01-01

    LIN, J.-Y., J. Arthurs and S. Reilly. Conditioned taste aversion: Palatability and drugs of abuse. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XX(x) XXX-XXX, 2014. – We consider conditioned taste aversion to involve a learned reduction in the palatability of a taste (and hence in amount consumed) based on the association that develops when a taste experience is followed by gastrointestinal malaise. The present article evaluates the well-established finding that drugs of abuse, at doses that are otherwise considered rewarding and self-administered, cause intake suppression. Our recent work using lick pattern analysis shows that drugs of abuse also cause a palatability downshift and, therefore, support conditioned taste aversion learning. PMID:24813806

  15. Common Dental Anomalies in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    HAQUE, Sanjida; ALAM, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. Methods: By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Results: Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. Conclusion: The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies. PMID:26023296

  16. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  17. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the palate: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jarde, Samiksha Jaypal; Das, Sushma; Narayanswamy, Savitha Arumugam; Chatterjee, Anirban; Babu, Chaitanya

    2016-01-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs) of minor salivary gland origin are rare in children and adolescents and have been reported rarely. Literature regarding their clinical features and biologic behavior is scanty. The purpose of this case report is to discuss the clinical manifestation, diagnosis, and treatment plan of MEC of the palate. A 16-year-old male subject visited the Department of Periodontics, The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bangalore, India complaining of a painless swelling in the left posterior area of the hard palate since 6 months. Several clinical, radiographic, and histopathological investigations were carried out to rule out the lesion. Incisional biopsy of the lesion confirmed the diagnosis of lesion as MEC of the palate following which a wide surgical excision with adjacent free margins was carried out. This case report highlights the need for proper diagnosis and treatment plan in the cases of malignant tumors as it can lead to morbidity and mortality. PMID:27143836

  18. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the palate: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Jarde, Samiksha Jaypal; Das, Sushma; Narayanswamy, Savitha Arumugam; Chatterjee, Anirban; Babu, Chaitanya

    2016-01-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs) of minor salivary gland origin are rare in children and adolescents and have been reported rarely. Literature regarding their clinical features and biologic behavior is scanty. The purpose of this case report is to discuss the clinical manifestation, diagnosis, and treatment plan of MEC of the palate. A 16-year-old male subject visited the Department of Periodontics, The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bangalore, India complaining of a painless swelling in the left posterior area of the hard palate since 6 months. Several clinical, radiographic, and histopathological investigations were carried out to rule out the lesion. Incisional biopsy of the lesion confirmed the diagnosis of lesion as MEC of the palate following which a wide surgical excision with adjacent free margins was carried out. This case report highlights the need for proper diagnosis and treatment plan in the cases of malignant tumors as it can lead to morbidity and mortality. PMID:27143836

  19. The palatal ruga pattern in possible paternity determination.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C J; Kotze, T J; Nash, J M

    1986-01-01

    The use of a genetic marker in paternity determination has been successful with the ABO blood group system but unsuccessful in dermatoglyphics and palatal rugae because the genetic mechanism is polygenic. The palatal rugae of 17 families (34 parents and 49 children) were classified and recorded, and the data used to construct a statistical analysis system (SAS) cluster map. A positive result would have meant a father clustering with all his children at Level 83, where, in fact, the best result achieved was at Level 5. The best cluster occurred at Level 82 between the ten-year-old boy of Family 7 and the eleven-year-old girl of Family 3. It is thus clear that the palatal rugae cannot be used in a practical procedure to determine paternity. PMID:3944569

  20. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern spiral scanners can perform the exam without stopping. A computer ...

  1. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Zuhaib, Mohammed; Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Parmar, Renu; Shetty, Pritham N.; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Context: Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1) To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (2) To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (3) To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results: Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, significant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. Conclusions: PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle closure in unilateral

  2. A Cross-Linguistic Articulatory Analysis of Palatalization in Korean, English, and Scottish Gaelic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Palatalization refers to a type of coarticulation in which the place of articulation of some sound is closer to the palate than otherwise expected, very often triggered by adjacent palatal segments. It has been known as one of the most dynamic phonological phenomena in phonetic and phonological research, but the articulatory nature of…

  3. TCDD AND EGF AFFECT MAPK PATHWAY ACTIVATION IN MURINE EMBRYONIC PALATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Palatal fusion occurs on GD 14-15 in the mouse, accompanied by a decrease in EGF receptor (EGFR) at the medial edge of the palatal shelves. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces cleft palate and maintains EGF and EGF receptor (EGFR) expression levels in the medial ed...

  4. Single-layer Closure with Tongue Flap for Palatal Fistula in Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Abdulla K.; Alwabari, Mufeed Saeed; Almugarrab, Fatimah Jawad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tongue flap is a good option to close a complicated palatal fistula in cleft patients. Most surgeons advocate a double-layer closure to decrease the recurrence rates. In this study, we have reported our experience with a modified single-layer closure with tongue flap in cleft patients. Method: All cases done by a single surgeon using this modified technique in a period of 10 years were retrospectively reviewed. A thorough description of this technique is also provided in the study. Results: Only 5 cases were operated on using this technique. The success rate of all these cases was 100%, with no recurrence of fistula and few complications. Conclusions: This technique provides a way to avoid nasal layer closure in cases where nasal layer is difficult or impossible to close. It also limits the need for a second flap for nasal layer closure.

  5. "High-precision, reconstructed 3D model" of skull scanned by conebeam CT: Reproducibility verified using CAD/CAM data.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Seiko; Sato, Keita; Ikawa, Tomoko; Yamamura, Keiko; Ando, Eriko; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning has recently been introduced into forensic medicine and dentistry. However, the presence of metal restorations in the dentition can adversely affect the quality of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of a "high-precision, reconstructed 3D model" obtained from a conebeam CT scan of dentition, a method that might be particularly helpful in forensic medicine. We took conebeam CT and helical CT images of three dry skulls marked with 47 measuring points; reconstructed three-dimensional images; and measured the distances between the points in the 3D images with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) marker. We found that in comparison with the helical CT, conebeam CT is capable of reproducing measurements closer to those obtained from the actual samples. In conclusion, our study indicated that the image-reproduction from a conebeam CT scan was more accurate than that from a helical CT scan. Furthermore, the "high-precision reconstructed 3D model" facilitates reliable visualization of full-sized oral and maxillofacial regions in both helical and conebeam CT scans. PMID:26832374

  6. Helicity in dynamical processes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Maksimenkov, Leonid; Khapaev, Alexey; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2016-04-01

    In modern geophysical fluid dynamics and dynamic meteorology, a notable interest is observed to the notion of helicity ("kinetic helicity" to be distinguished from "magnetic helicity" widely used in magnetohydrodynamics, astrophysics and Solar physics), which is defined by the scalar product of 3D vectors of velocity and vorticity. In this contribution, we bring together different, both known in the literature and novel formulations of the helicity balance equation, by also taking into account the effects of air compressibility and Earth rotation. Equations and relationships are presented that are valid under different approximations customarily made in the dynamic meteorology, e.g. Boussinesq approximation, quasi-static approximation, quasi-geostrophic approximation. An emphasis is placed on the helicity budget analysis in large-scale atmospheric motions. An explicit expression is presented for the rate of helicity injection from the free atmosphere into a non-linear Ekman boundary layer. This injection is shown to be exactly balanced by the helicity viscous destruction within the boundary layer. It is conjectured that this helicity injection may characterize the intensity of atmospheric circulation in extratropical latitudes of both terrestrial hemispheres. Examples are provided based on re-analyses data. Vertical distribution of helicity and superhelicity in different Ekman boundary layers is also discussed.

  7. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  8. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  9. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  10. Helical tomotherapy superficial dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Seibert, Rebecca M.; Robison, Benjamin; Mitchell, Martha

    2007-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy is a treatment technique that is delivered from a 6 MV fan beam that traces a helical path while the couch moves linearly into the bore. In order to increase the treatment delivery dose rate, helical tomotherapy systems do not have a flattening filter. As such, the dose distributions near the surface of the patient may be considerably different from other forms of intensity-modulated delivery. The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions near the surface for helical tomotherapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom. A hypothetical planning target volume (PTV) was defined on an anthropomorphic head phantom to simulate a 2.0 Gy per fraction IMRT parotid-sparing head and neck treatment of the upper neck nodes. A total of six target volumes were created with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm of separation between the surface of the phantom and the outer edge of the PTV. Superficial doses were measured for each of the treatment deliveries using film placed in the head phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the phantom's surface underneath an immobilization mask. In the 0 mm test case where the PTV extends to the phantom surface, the mean TLD dose was 1.73{+-}0.10 Gy (or 86.6{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose). The measured superficial dose decreases to 1.23{+-}0.10 Gy (61.5{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose) for a PTV-surface separation of 5 mm. The doses measured by the TLDs indicated that the tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimates superficial doses by 8.9{+-}3.2%. The radiographic film dose for the 0 mm test case was 1.73{+-}0.07 Gy, as compared to the calculated dose of 1.78{+-}0.05 Gy. Given the results of the TLD and film measurements, the superficial calculated doses are overestimated between 3% and 13%. Without the use of bolus, tumor volumes that extend to the surface may be underdosed. As such, it is recommended that bolus be added for these

  11. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  12. Spheromak Power and Helicity Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    2000-05-18

    This note addresses the division of gun power and helicity between the open line volume and the closed flux surface volume in a steady state flux core spheromak. Our assumptions are that fine scale turbulence maintains each region close to a Taylor state, {mu}{sub o}J = {lambda}B. The gun region that feeds these two volumes surrounded by a flux conserver is shown topologically below. (The actual geometry is toroidal). Flux and current from the magnetized gun flow on open lines around the entire closed surface containing the spheromak. The gun current flows down the potential gradient, the potential difference between the two ends of each line being the gun voltage. Here, the gun voltage excludes the sheath drops at each end. When these volumes have different values of {lambda} (ratio of {mu}{sub o}B{sup -2}j {center_dot} B in each region) in the open line volume V{sub 1} and the closed spheromak volume V{sub 2} the efficiency of transferring the gun power to the spheromak to sustain the ohmic loss is the {lambda}-ratio of these regions, in the limit V{sub 1} << V{sub 2}. This result follows immediately from helicity balance in that limit. Here we give an accounting of all the gun power, and do not assume a small edge (open line) region.

  13. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  14. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J.; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  15. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  16. [Development of a computerized three-dimension system for displaying and analyzing mandibular helical axis pathways].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Hailan; Zhang, Fengjun

    2014-12-01

    This paper is aimed to develop a computerized three dimensional system for displaying and analyzing mandibular helical axis pathways. Mandibular movements were recorded using a six-degrees-of-freedom ultrasonic jaw movement recording device. The three-dimensional digital models of the midface and the mandible were reconstructed and segmented from CT skull images. The digital models were then transformed to the coordinate system of mandibular motion data by using an optical measuring system. The system was programmed on the base of the Visualization ToolKit and Open Scene Graphics Library. According to the motion data, transformation matrices were calculated to simulate mandibular movements. Meanwhile, mandibular helical axis pathways were calculated and displayed three dimensionally by means of an eigenvalues method. The following parameters of mandibular helical axis were calculated: the rotation around instantaneous helical axis, the translation along it, its spatial orientation, its position and distance relative to any special reference point. These parameters could be exported to describe comprehensively the whole mandiblular movements. It could be concluded that our system would contribute to the study of mandiblular helical axis pathways. PMID:25868236

  17. Composition and Palatability of Breads Made with Ground Soybean Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Barbara P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Ground soy products made from whole soybeans were used in bread as substitutes for 12 percent of the wheat flour to demonstrate that home-prepared soy products can be used to bake palatable breads and supplement their protein content. (Author/SK)

  18. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  19. Palatability of tastes is associated with facial circulatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hamada, Yuka; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2014-03-01

    To examine whether various types of taste stimuli in the oral cavity elicit unique changes in facial skin blood flow (SkBF) according to the palatability perceived by an individual, the facial SkBF was observed by laser speckle flowgraphy in 15 healthy subjects (11 males and 4 females) before and during the ingestion of bitter tea, chilli sauce, coffee, orange juice, soup, and a water control. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and SkBF in the index finger were recorded continuously. Subjects reported their subjective palatability and taste intensity scores after each stimulus. The vascular conductance indexes (CIs) in the face and finger were calculated as ratios of SkBF to MAP. CI in the eyelid increased significantly in response to chilli sauce, orange juice, and soup, whereas CIs in the forehead, nose, and cheek decreased in response to bitter tea. There was a significant correlation between the palatability scores and CI values in the eyelid when changes induced by chilli sauce were excluded. These results suggest that the facial circulatory response reflects the degree of palatability of a foodstuff. PMID:24391145

  20. INFLUENCE OF ISOLATED CLEFT PALATE AND PALATOPLASTY ON THE FACE

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Omar Gabriel; Rosa, Larissa Alves de Albuquerque; Lauris, Rita de Cássia M. Carvalho

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The literature has demonstrated that alterations in craniofacial morphology characterizing individuals with cleft palate are observed in both operated and unoperated patients. Objective This study evaluated the influence of isolated cleft palate and palatoplasty on the face, based on facial analysis. Material and methods Lateral facial photographs of the right side of 85 young adult patients with cleft palate were analyzed, of whom 50 were operated on and 35 had never received any previous surgical treatment. The nasolabial angle and zygomatic projection were used to define the maxillary position in the face. Mandibular positioning was classified as Pattern I, II and III. Results Patients were distributed into 54.12% as Pattern I, 32.94% Pattern II and 12.94% Pattern III. Distribution of facial patterns did not show statistically significant differences between groups (p>0.05). Although palatoplasty did not influence the facial pattern, the zygomatic projection was vulnerable to plastic surgeries. Twenty-eight percent of the patients in the operated group showed zygomatic deficiency, compared to only 8.5% in the unoperated group. Conclusions In patients with isolated cleft palate, palatoplasty may influence negatively the sagittal behavior of the maxilla, according to the zygomatic projection of the face, though without compromising the facial pattern. PMID:19089130

  1. Lip Prints and Inheritance of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    CJ, Manasa Ravath; HC, Girish; Hegde, Ramesh B; JK, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Labial mucosa has elevations and depressions forming a pattern called ‘Lip Prints’. Parents of patients with cleft lip &/or palate are known to have a particular lip print pattern. Objectives: Analysis of lip prints and relationship between Cheiloscopy and inheritance of cleft lip &/or cleft palate. Methodology: The study included 100 subjects [study groupparents with children having cleft lip &/or cleft palate, 50 fathers and 50 mothers) and 50 subjects (control group-parents having children without cleft lip &/or cleft palate, 25 fathers and 25 mothers. The lip prints of the subjects were obtained using the cellophane method and analysed using Suzuki & Tsuchihashi classification of lip prints. The data was subjected to Chi- Square test, Fisher Exact test and Student t-test [two tailed, independent]. Results: A new whorl pattern was present in the study group. The groove count was higher in the fathers’ than in the mothers’ prints in the upper lip and vice versa in the lower lip. Conclusion: The new pattern was present in the study group in a significant number of cases. The groove count was significantly high in the study group. These two parameters can be of significant value to similar future studies. PMID:25177633

  2. Influence of palatal surface shape of dentures on food perception.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Kodaira, Y; Ishizaki, K; Sakurai, K

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the palatal surface shape of dentures on food perception. Eighteen healthy dentulous subjects (mean age, 24 years) were investigated. Four types of experimental plate were used: (i) a tailor-made plate, (ii) an average-model plate, (iii) a smooth plate, and (iv) a wrinkle plate. Test foods consisted of Bavarian cream cubes containing one to three mustard seeds and six raw carrot pieces of different shapes. Bavarian cream cubes with three seeds were used for analysis. Other foods were used as dummy foods. Subjects were required to wear experimental plates and press test foods placed on the anterior area of the tongue against the experimental plates. We measured time required to perceive number of spherical bodies, rate of correct answers, and level of perception with each type of experimental plate using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. The results showed a significant difference in response time between the average-model plate and the other experimental plates, with response time longest for the average-model plate. On the other hand, no significant differences in rate of correct answers regarding number of spherical bodies or level of perception were found among the experimental plates. When incisive papilla, palatine suture and palatal rugae based on the standard Japanese shape were replicated on the palatal surface of the plates, the time required for food perception during ingestion was prolonged in comparison to plates with other palatal surface shapes. PMID:18713309

  3. Progressive Ataxia and Palatal Tremor: Think about POLG Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mongin, Marie; Delorme, Cécile; Lenglet, Timothée; Jardel, Claude; Vignal, Catherine; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) can be observed in both acquired brainstem or cerebellar lesions and genetic disorders. Phenomenology shown PAPT due to mutation in POLG, the gene encoding the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Educational value POLG mutation should be considered in patients with PAPT, particularly when additional clues such as a sensory neuronopathy or an ophthalmoplegia are present.

  4. Adaptation to an Electropalatograph Palate: Acoustic, Impressionistic, and Perceptual Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Sharynne; Searl, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. Method: Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to…

  5. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  6. Speech Analyses of Four Children with Repaired Cleft Palates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Gene R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Spontaneous speech samples were collected from four three-year olds with surgically repaired cleft palates. Analyses showed that subjects were similar to one another with respect to their phonetic inventories but differed considerably in the frequency and types of phonological processes used. (Author/JDD)

  7. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  8. Prevention of Communication Problems Associated with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannbacker, Mary

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews principles of preventative intervention and their application to communication problems associated with cleft palate. Ten specific suggestions (such as continuing professional education, identification of adenoidal atrophy, and prompt referral for secondary management) and activities are described. (Author/DB)

  9. Observations on Hearing Levels of Preschool Cleft-Palate Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert J.; Philips, Betty Jane

    1971-01-01

    Pure-tone audiometry performed monthly on nine preschool cleft palate children showed the incidence of hearing loss ranging from 25 to 71 percent from month to month, with all children experiencing a significant hearing loss at some time. (Author/KW)

  10. Helping the Child with a Cleft Palate in Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Michael J.; Pentz, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    Guidelines for teachers of a student with a cleft palate include understand the physical problem; know what kind of speech problem to expect; be alert to the possibility of language-based learning difficulties; watch for signs of hearing loss; be alert to socialization problems; help the student make up work; and avoid self-fulfilling prophecies.…

  11. A Study of Cleft Palate Speakers with Marginal Velopharyngeal Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, M. A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The study examined a previously hypothesized model for a subgroup of cleft palate speakers with marginal velopharyngeal competence during speech. Evaluation of 52 5- and 6-year-olds with appropriate lateral X-ray results indicated that most met fewer than three of the other five criteria required by the model. (Author/DB)

  12. Cleft Palate Repair Using a Double Opposing Z-Plasty.

    PubMed

    Moores, Craig; Shah, Ajul; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2016-07-01

    Cleft palate is a common congenital defect with several described surgical repairs. The most successful treatment modality remains a controversy. The goals of repair focus on achievement of normal speech and optimizing velopharyngeal function while minimizing both fistula formation and facial growth restriction. In this video, the authors demonstrate use of the double opposing Z-plasty technique in the repair of a Veau II type cleft palate. The video demonstrates the marking, incisions, dissection, and repair of the cleft. It also examines the use of von Langenbeck-type relaxing incisions and demonstrates a specific approach to the repair of this particular cleft. The authors believe that the Furlow double opposing Z-plasty with the von Langenbeck relaxing incision can provide the best postoperative outcome by combining the benefits of each individual operation. The Z-plasty technique works to correct the aberrant muscle of the soft palate while increasing the length of the palate. The authors believe that this results in better velopharyngeal function. PMID:27315321

  13. Palatal Complexity Revisited: An Electropalatographic Analysis of /image omitted/ in Brazilian Portuguese with Comparison to Peninsular Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shosted, Ryan; Hualde, Jose Ignacio; Scarpace, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Are palatal consonants articulated by multiple tongue gestures (coronal and dorsal) or by a single gesture that brings the tongue into contact with the palate at several places of articulation? The lenition of palatal consonants (resulting in approximants) has been presented as evidence that palatals are simple, not complex: When reduced, they do…

  14. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Results: Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Conclusion: Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively. PMID:25954706

  15. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  16. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  17. Hydrodynamic characteristics of the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kohei; Hosoda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ariyoshi, Koki; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Sato, Masami; Hara, Sintaro; Lee, Xinyang; Wu, Sheng-Yuan; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) was invented to be an ideal pump for developing the TAH and the helical flow TAH (HFTAH) using two HFPs has been developed. However, since the HFP is quite a new pump, hydrodynamic characteristics inside the pump are not clarified. To analyze hydrodynamic characteristics of the HFP, flow visualization study using the particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed. The experimental and computational models were developed to simulate the left HFP of the HFTAH and distributions of flow velocity vectors, shear stress and pressure inside the pump were examined. In distribution of flow velocity vectors, the vortexes in the vane were observed, which indicated that the HFP has a novel and quite unique working principle in which centrifugal force rotates the fluid in the helical volutes and the fluid is transferred from the inlet to the outlet helical volutes according to the helical structure. In distribution of shear stress, the highest shear stress that was considered to be occurred by the shunt flow across the impeller was found around the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not so high to cause hemolysis. This shunt flow is thought to be improved by redesigning the inlet and outlet helical volutes. In distribution of pressure, negative pressure was found near the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not high. Negative pressure is thought to be reduced with an improvement in the design of the impeller or the vane shape. PMID:25784463

  18. Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

  19. Chiral self-assembly of helical particles.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Hima Bindu; Cinacchi, Giorgio; Ferrarini, Alberta; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-04-12

    The shape of the building blocks plays a crucial role in directing self-assembly towards desired architectures. Out of the many different shapes, the helix has a unique position. Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and a helical shape is exhibited by the most important biopolymers like polynucleotides, polypeptides and polysaccharides as well as by cellular organelles like flagella. Helical particles can self-assemble into chiral superstructures, which may have a variety of applications, e.g. as photonic (meta)materials. However, a clear and definite understanding of these structures has not been entirely achieved yet. We have recently undertaken an extensive investigation on the phase behaviour of hard helical particles, using numerical simulations and classical density functional theory. Here we present a detailed study of the phase diagram of hard helices as a function of their morphology. This includes a variety of liquid-crystal phases, with different degrees of orientational and positional ordering. We show how, by tuning the helix parameters, it is possible to control the organization of the system. Starting from slender helices, whose phase behaviour is similar to that of rodlike particles, an increase in curliness leads to the onset of azimuthal correlations between the particles and the formation of phases specific to helices. These phases feature a new kind of screw order, of which there is experimental evidence in colloidal suspensions of helical flagella. PMID:26767786

  20. Constitutively active mutation of ACVR1 in oral epithelium causes submucous cleft palate in mice.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kazuo; Mishina, Yuji; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-15

    Cleft palate is among the most common human birth defects. Submucous cleft palate (SMCP) is a subgroup of cleft palate, which may be as common as overt cleft palate. Despite the high frequency of SMCP in humans, only recently have several animal models of SMCP begun to provide insight into the mechanisms by which SMCP develops. In this study, we show that enhanced BMP signaling through constitutively active ACVR1 in palatal epithelium causes submucous cleft palate in mice. In these mutant mice, the fusion of both palatal mesenchyme in hard palate, and muscles in soft palate were hampered by epithelial tissue. During palatal fusion, enhanced SMAD-dependent BMP signaling impaired cell death and altered cell proliferation rate in medial edge epithelium (MEE), and resulted in MEE persistence. At the molecular level, downregulation of ΔNp63, which is crucial for normal palatal fusion, in MEE cells was impaired, leading to a reduction in caspase-3 activation. Our study provides a new insight into the etiology of SMCP caused by augmented BMP signaling. PMID:26116174

  1. Molecular signaling along the anterior–posterior axis of early palate development

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara M.; Lozanoff, Scott; Iyyanar, Paul P.; Nazarali, Adil J.

    2013-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common congenital birth defect in humans. In mammals, the palatal tissue can be distinguished into anterior bony hard palate and posterior muscular soft palate that have specialized functions in occlusion, speech or swallowing. Regulation of palate development appears to be the result of distinct signaling and genetic networks in the anterior and posterior regions of the palate. Development and maintenance of expression of these region-specific genes is crucial for normal palate development. Numerous transcription factors and signaling pathways are now recognized as either anterior- (e.g., Msx1, Bmp4, Bmp2, Shh, Spry2, Fgf10, Fgf7, and Shox2) or posterior-specific (e.g., Meox2, Tbx22, and Barx1). Localized expression and function clearly highlight the importance of regional patterning and differentiation within the palate at the molecular level. Here, we review how these molecular pathways and networks regulate the anterior–posterior patterning and development of secondary palate. We hypothesize that the anterior palate acts as a signaling center in setting up development of the secondary palate. PMID:23316168

  2. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  3. Rat embryonic palatal shelves respond to TCDD in organ culture

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1990-05-01

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, is teratogenic in mice, inducing cleft palate (CP) and hydronephrosis at doses which are not overtly maternally or embryo toxic. Palatal shelves of embryonic mice respond to TCDD, both in vivo and in organ culture, with altered differentiation of medial epithelial cells. By contrast, in the rat TCDD produces substantial maternal, embryonic, and fetal toxicity, including fetal lethality, with few malformations. In this study the possible effects of maternal toxicity on induction of cleft palate were eliminated by exposure of embryonic rat palatal shelves in organ culture. The shelves were examined for specific TCDD-induced alterations in differentiation of the medial cells. On Gestation Day (GD) 14 or 15 palatal shelves from embryonic F344 rats were placed in organ culture for 2 to 3 days (IMEM:F12 medium, 5% FBS, 0.1% DMSO) containing 0, 1 x 10(-8), 1 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-10), or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. The medial epithelial peridermal cells degenerated on shelves exposed to control media or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. Exposure to 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8) M TCDD inhibited this degeneration in 20, 36, and 60% of the shelves, respectively, and was statistically significant at the two highest doses. A normally occurring decrease in (3H)TdR incorporation was inhibited in some GD 15 shelves cultured with 10(-10) and 10(-9) M TCDD. The medial cells of TCDD-exposed shelves continued to express high levels of immunohistochemically detected EGF receptors. The altered differentiation of rat medial epithelium is similar to that reported for TCDD-exposed mouse medial cells in vivo and in vitro. However, in order to obtain these responses, the cultured rat shelves require much higher concentrations of TCDD than the mouse shelves.

  4. Assessment of Change in Palatal Sensation in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients by Using Two-Point Palatal Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Youngsoo; Choi, Hye Rang; Cho, Jae Hoon; Kim, Gee-Tae; Kim, Jin Kook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have impaired responses to inspiratory resistive loading during sleep. This may be due, in part, to a change in the upper airway sensation. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients with OSAS have diminished upper airway sensation due to snoring. Methods. A total of 53 participants were selected based on clinical evaluation and polysomnography. Two-point discrimination was measured with modified calipers in the tongue and soft palate. Results. A total of 10 participants were included in the control group, 12 participants in the simple snoring group, and 27 participants in the OSAS group. There were 12 patients in the impaired sensation group of the OSAS group. On comparing polysomnography, patients with impairment of their palatal sensory input in two-point discrimination (TPD) had a more protracted duration of the longest snoring episode than those with simple snoring and normal sensation. Patients with decreased sensory input in TPD had longer average duration of snoring episodes and relative snoring time than those with simple snoring and normal sensory input in cold uvular TPD. Comparison of the cold uvular TPD for normal sensation and impaired sensation in patients with OSAS after treatment showed a different trend. Conclusion. Impaired sensation of the soft palate was correlated with the longest snoring episode duration, average snoring episode duration, and relative snoring time. It is helpful in detecting the early stage of neural degradation in OSAS patients by assessing snoring components of polysomnography and TPD in the soft palate. PMID:27095515

  5. Principles of CT and CT technology.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-09-01

    This article provides a review of the basic principles of CT within the context of the evolution of CT. Modern CT technology can be understood as a natural progression of improvements and innovations in response to both engineering problems and clinical requirements. Detailed discussions of multislice CT, CT image quality evaluation, and radiation doses in CT will be presented in upcoming articles in this series. PMID:17823453

  6. Helices of fractionalized Maxwell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Abro, Kashif Ali; Khan, Najeeb Alam

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the helical flows of fractionalized Maxwell fluid model, through a circular cylinder, is studied. The motion is produced by the cylinder that at the initial moment begins to rotate around its axis with an angular velocity Omegatp, and to slide along the same axis with linear velocity Utp. The solutions that have been obtained using Laplace and finite Hankel transforms and presented in series form in terms of the newly defined special function M(z), satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Moreover, the corresponding solutions for ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluid obtained as special cases of the present general solution. Finally, the influence of various pertinent parameters on fluid motion as well as the comparison among different fluids models is analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  7. Thermal deformation of helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Fei, Ye-tai; Liu, Shan-lin

    2010-08-01

    The analytical equation for the thermal field of a helical gear under normal working condition in a stable thermal field is established using mathematical physics, and the thermal deformation of the gear can be computed using this equation. The variations of gear geometric parameters, such as radial dimension, tooth depth, spiral angle, pressure angle, flank clearance and etc., are investigated with respect to the temperature change. According to the analytical and computational results obtained using the equation, the thermal deformation of the gear is strongly dependent on the choice of parameters, which is also confirmed using simulation software (COMSOL Multiphysic software). This is significant for the improvement of the rotation precision and working efficiency of screw gears.

  8. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  9. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  10. Thoracic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... table that slides into the center of the scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... than 300 pounds, have your doctor contact the scanner operator before the exam. CT scanners have a ...

  11. Adding helicity to inflationary magnetogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caprini, Chiara; Sorbo, Lorenzo E-mail: sorbo@physics.umass.edu

    2014-10-01

    The most studied mechanism of inflationary magnetogenesis relies on the time-dependence of the coefficient of the gauge kinetic term F{sub μν} F{sup μν}. Unfortunately, only extremely finely tuned versions of the model can consistently generate the cosmological magnetic fields required by observations. We propose a generalization of this model, where also the pseudoscalar invariant F{sub μν}  F-tilde {sup μν} is multiplied by a time dependent function. The new parity violating term allows more freedom in tuning the amplitude of the field at the end of inflation. Moreover, it leads to a helical magnetic field that is amplified at large scales by magnetohydrodynamical processes during the radiation dominated epoch. As a consequence, our model can satisfy the observational lower bounds on fields in the intergalactic medium, while providing a seed for the galactic dynamo, if inflation occurs at an energy scale ranging from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 10} GeV. Such energy scale is well below that suggested by the recent BICEP2 result, if the latter is due to primordial tensor modes. However, the gauge field is a source of tensors during inflation and generates a spectrum of gravitational waves that can give a sizable tensor to scalar ratio r=O(0.2) even if inflation occurs at low energies. This system therefore evades the Lyth bound. For smaller values of r, lower values of the inflationary energy scale are required. The model predicts fully helical cosmological magnetic fields and a chiral spectrum of primordial gravitational waves.

  12. Tbx22null mice have a submucous cleft palate due to reduced palatal bone formation and also display ankyloglossia and choanal atresia phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pauws, Erwin; Hoshino, Aya; Bentley, Lucy; Prajapati, Suresh; Keller, Charles; Hammond, Peter; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro; Moore, Gudrun E; Stanier, Philip

    2009-11-01

    Craniofacial defects involving the lip and/or palate are among the most common human birth defects. X-linked cleft palate and ankyloglossia results from loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the T-box transcription factor TBX22. Further studies show that TBX22 mutations are also found in around 5% of non-syndromic cleft palate patients. Although palate defects are obvious at birth, the underlying developmental pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report a Tbx22(null) mouse, which has a submucous cleft palate (SMCP) and ankyloglossia, similar to the human phenotype, with a small minority showing overt clefts. We also find persistent oro-nasal membranes or, in some mice a partial rupture, resulting in choanal atresia. Each of these defects can cause severe breathing and/or feeding difficulties in the newborn pups, which results in approximately 50% post-natal lethality. Analysis of the craniofacial skeleton demonstrates a marked reduction in bone formation in the posterior hard palate, resulting in the classic notch associated with SMCP. Our results suggest that Tbx22 plays an important role in the osteogenic patterning of the posterior hard palate. Ossification is severely reduced after condensation of the palatal mesenchyme, resulting from a delay in the maturation of osteoblasts. Rather than having a major role in palatal shelf closure, we show that Tbx22 is an important determinant for intramembranous bone formation in the posterior hard palate, which underpins normal palate development and function. These findings could have important implications for the molecular diagnosis in patients with isolated SMCP and/or unexplained choanal atresia. PMID:19648291

  13. Neonatal Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis Reduces Cleft Palate Width and Lengthens Soft Palate, Influencing Palatoplasty in Patients With Pierre Robin Sequence.

    PubMed

    Collares, Marcus V M; Duarte, Daniele W; Sobral, Davi S; Portinho, Ciro P; Faller, Gustavo J; Fraga, Mariana M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) on cleft dimensions and on early palatoplasty outcomes in patients with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). In a prospective cohort study that enrolled 24 nonsyndromic patients with PRS, 12 submitted to the MDO group and 12 patients not treated (non-MDO group), the authors compared patients for cleft palate dimensions through 7 morphometric measurements at the moment of palatoplasty and for early palatoplasty outcomes. At palatoplasty, the MDO group presented a significant shorter distance between the posterior nasal spines (PNS-PNS, P < 0.001) and between uvular bases (UB-UB, P < 0.001), representing a reduction in cleft palate width. They also had significant soft palate lengthening represented by a larger distance between UB and retromolar space (UB-RM, P < 0.001) and UB and PNS (UB-PNS, P = 0.014). Their UB moved away from the posterior wall of the nasopharynx (UB-NPH, P < 0.001). The MDO group had a length of operative time significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and no early palatoplasty complications compared with the non-MDO group. In conclusion, MDO acted as an orthopedic procedure that reduced cleft palate width and elongated the soft palate in patients with PRS. These modifications enabled a reduction of around 11% in the length of operative time of palatoplasty (P < 0.001). PMID:27315309

  14. Current and Novel Imaging Techniques in Coronary CT.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography (CT), which is widely performed to assess coronary artery disease noninvasively and accurately, provides excellent image quality. Use of electrocardiography (ECG)-controlled tube current modulation and low tube voltage can reduce patient exposure to nephrotoxic contrast media and carcinogenic radiation when using standard coronary CT with a retrospective ECG-gated helical scan. Various imaging techniques are expected to overcome the limitations of standard coronary CT, which also include insufficient spatial and temporal resolution, beam-hardening artifacts, limited coronary plaque characterization, and an inability to allow functional assessment of coronary stenosis. Use of a step-and-shoot scan, iterative reconstruction, and a high-pitch dual-source helical scan can further reduce radiation dose. Dual-energy CT can improve contrast medium enhancement and reasonably reduce the contrast dose when combined with noise reduction with the use of iterative reconstruction. High-definition CT can improve spatial resolution and diagnostic evaluation of small or peripheral coronary vessels and coronary stents. Dual-source CT and a motion correction algorithm can improve temporal resolution and reduce coronary motion artifacts. Whole-heart coverage with 320-detector CT and an intelligent boundary registration algorithm can eliminate stair-step artifacts. By decreasing beam hardening and enabling material decomposition, dual-energy CT is expected to remove or reduce the depiction of coronary calcification to improve intraluminal evaluation of calcified vessels and to provide detailed analysis of coronary plaque components and accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT is a state-of-the-art noninvasive technique for accurately identifying myocardial ischemia beyond coronary CT. Understanding these techniques is important to enhance the value of coronary CT

  15. Spontaneous sense inversion in helical mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, H. H.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the pitch sensitivity of chiral nematic phases of helicoidal patchy cylinders as a generic model for chiral (bio-)polymers and helix-shaped colloidal rods. The behaviour of the macroscopic helical pitch is studied from microscopic principles by invoking a simple density functional theory generalised to accommodate weakly twisted director fields. Upon changing the degree of alignment along the local helicoidal director we find that chiral nematic phases exhibit a sudden sense inversion whereby the helical symmetry changes from left- to right-handed and vice versa. Since the local alignment is governed by thermodynamic variables such as density, temperature or the amplitude of an external directional field, such pitch sense inversions can be expected in systems of helical mesogens of both thermotropic and lyotropic origin. We show that the spontaneous change of helical symmetry is a direct consequence of an antagonistic effective torque between helical particles with a certain prescribed internal helicity. The results may help opening up new routes towards precise control of the helical handedness of chiral assemblies by a judicious choice of external control parameters.

  16. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  17. A Shh-Foxf-Fgf18-Shh Molecular Circuit Regulating Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyue; Liu, Han; Lan, Yu; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Jiang, Rulang

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is among the most common birth defects in humans. Previous studies have shown that Shh signaling plays critical roles in palate development and regulates expression of several members of the forkhead-box (Fox) family transcription factors, including Foxf1 and Foxf2, in the facial primordia. Although cleft palate has been reported in mice deficient in Foxf2, whether Foxf2 plays an intrinsic role in and how Foxf2 regulates palate development remain to be elucidated. Using Cre/loxP-mediated tissue-specific gene inactivation in mice, we show that Foxf2 is required in the neural crest-derived palatal mesenchyme for normal palatogenesis. We found that Foxf2 mutant embryos exhibit altered patterns of expression of Shh, Ptch1, and Shox2 in the developing palatal shelves. Through RNA-seq analysis, we identified over 150 genes whose expression was significantly up- or down-regulated in the palatal mesenchyme in Foxf2-/- mutant embryos in comparison with control littermates. Whole mount in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the Foxf2 mutant embryos exhibit strikingly corresponding patterns of ectopic Fgf18 expression in the palatal mesenchyme and concomitant loss of Shh expression in the palatal epithelium in specific subdomains of the palatal shelves that correlate with where Foxf2, but not Foxf1, is expressed during normal palatogenesis. Furthermore, tissue specific inactivation of both Foxf1 and Foxf2 in the early neural crest cells resulted in ectopic activation of Fgf18 expression throughout the palatal mesenchyme and dramatic loss of Shh expression throughout the palatal epithelium. Addition of exogenous Fgf18 protein to cultured palatal explants inhibited Shh expression in the palatal epithelium. Together, these data reveal a novel Shh-Foxf-Fgf18-Shh circuit in the palate development molecular network, in which Foxf1 and Foxf2 regulate palatal shelf growth downstream of Shh signaling, at least in part, by repressing Fgf18 expression in the palatal

  18. Magnetic Helicity in Solar Dynamo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark; Augustson, Kyle C.; Zhang, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. Yet, despite its significance, magnetic helicity is often neglected in observational and theoretical studies of solar magnetism. This can be attributed to two factors; First, the calculation of the magnetic helicity is not unique; in general it depends on an electromagnetic guage through the magnetic vector potential. Second, unless it is explicitly calculated as part of the computational algorithm in numerical models, it is not always straightforward to obtain the magnetic vector potential. Here we consider gauge-invariant measures of the magnetic helicity and magnetic helicity flux and we describe how they can be computed from measurable quantities such as the magnetic field, the bulk plasma velocity, and the electrical current density. These measures can be applied to local Cartesian geometries as well as global spherical shells. Here we apply them to two global dynamo simulations, each exhibiting regular magnetic cycles. These include a convective MHD dynamo model and a 3-D Babcock-Leighton dynamo model. Both exhibit patterns of magnetic helicity evolution that reflect the global restructuring of the magnetic field over the

  19. Enhanced helical swimming in Boger fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, Francisco; Mendez-Rojano, Rodrigo; Zenit, Roberto; Lauga, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We conduct experiments with force-free magnetically-driven helical swimmers in Newtonian and viscoelastic (Boger) fluids. In order assess the effect of viscoelasticity on the swimming performance, we conduct experiments for swimmers with different helical tail geometries. We use helices with the same wave length and total length but vary the angle of the helix. As previously reported by the computational study of Spagniole and collaborators, we found that the swimming performance can either increase, decrease or remain unchanged, depending on the geometry of the tail. With the right geometry, the enhancement can be up to a factor of two.

  20. Helicity oscillations of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, Alexandra; Kartavtsev, Alexander; Raffelt, Georg

    2016-06-01

    The helicity of a Dirac neutrino with mass m evolves under the influence of a B field because it has a magnetic dipole moment proportional to m . Moreover, it was recently shown that a polarized or anisotropic medium engenders the same effect for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Because a B field polarizes a background medium, it instigates helicity oscillations even for Majorana neutrinos unless the medium is symmetric between matter and antimatter. Motivated by these observations, we review the impact of a B field and of an anisotropic or polarized medium on helicity oscillations for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos from the common perspective of in-medium dispersion.

  1. Steering Chiral Swimmers along Noisy Helical Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-08-01

    Chemotaxis along helical paths towards a target releasing a chemoattractant is found in sperm cells and many microorganisms. We discuss the stochastic differential geometry of the noisy helical swimming path of a chiral swimmer. A chiral swimmer equipped with a simple feedback system can navigate in a concentration gradient of chemoattractant. We derive an effective equation for the alignment of helical paths with a concentration gradient which is related to the alignment of a dipole in an external field and discuss the chemotaxis index.

  2. Thermally activated helicity reversals of skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X. Z.; Shibata, K.; Koshibae, W.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kimoto, K.; Taguchi, Y.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic bubbles with winding number S =1 are topologically equivalent to skyrmions. Here we report the discovery of helicity (in-plane magnetization-swirling direction) reversal of skyrmions, while keeping their hexagonal lattice form, at above room temperature in a thin hexaferrite magnet. We have observed that the frequency of helicity reversals dramatically increases with temperature in a thermally activated manner, revealing that the generation energy of a kink-soliton pair for switching helicity on a skyrmion rapidly decreases towards the magnetic transition temperature.

  3. Helical flux ropes in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1990-01-01

    The present numerical method for the computation of force-free, cancelling magnetic structures shows that flux cancellation at the neutral line in a sheared magnetic arcade generates helical field lines that can support a prominence's plasma. With increasing flux cancellation, the axis of the helical fields moves to greater heights; this is suggestive of a prominence eruption. Two alternative scenarios are proposed for the formation of polar crown prominences which yield the correct axial magnetic field sign. Both models are noted to retain the formation of helical flux tubes through flux cancellation as their key feature.

  4. A three-dimensional-weighted cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction in volumetric CT—helical scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Nilsen, Roy A.; Dutta, Sandeep; Samsonov, Dmitry; Hagiwara, Akira

    2006-02-01

    Based on the structure of the original helical FDK algorithm, a three-dimensional (3D)-weighted cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithm is proposed for image reconstruction in volumetric CT under helical source trajectory. In addition to its dependence on view and fan angles, the 3D weighting utilizes the cone angle dependency of a ray to improve reconstruction accuracy. The 3D weighting is ray-dependent and the underlying mechanism is to give a favourable weight to the ray with the smaller cone angle out of a pair of conjugate rays but an unfavourable weight to the ray with the larger cone angle out of the conjugate ray pair. The proposed 3D-weighted helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm is implemented in the cone-parallel geometry that can improve noise uniformity and image generation speed significantly. Under the cone-parallel geometry, the filtering is naturally carried out along the tangential direction of the helical source trajectory. By exploring the 3D weighting's dependence on cone angle, the proposed helical 3D-weighted CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm can provide significantly improved reconstruction accuracy at moderate cone angle and high helical pitches. The 3D-weighted CB-FBP algorithm is experimentally evaluated by computer-simulated phantoms and phantoms scanned by a diagnostic volumetric CT system with a detector dimension of 64 × 0.625 mm over various helical pitches. The computer simulation study shows that the 3D weighting enables the proposed algorithm to reach reconstruction accuracy comparable to that of exact CB reconstruction algorithms, such as the Katsevich algorithm, under a moderate cone angle (4°) and various helical pitches. Meanwhile, the experimental evaluation using the phantoms scanned by a volumetric CT system shows that the spatial resolution along the z-direction and noise characteristics of the proposed 3D-weighted helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm are maintained very well in comparison to the FDK

  5. [CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Juran, R

    2004-07-01

    Percutaneous biopsy of pulmonary nodules requires precise needle placement, with the goal of attaining a secure position of the needle for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes as quickly as possible and with minimal tissue damage along the access route. The requirements from the image guidance system during the intervention are, in addition to universal applicability, a quick reaction time and a user-friendly interface. CT fluoroscopy fulfils these requirements, although radiation protection for the patient and radiologist becomes an important issue. PMID:15232690

  6. The influence of forage diets and aging on beef palatability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Busboom, J R; Nelson, M L; O'Fallon, J; Ringkob, T P; Rogers-Klette, K R; Joos, D; Piper, K

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the influence of diet and aging on beef palatability, lipid oxidative stability, and fatty acid composition, crossbred steers were assigned to Feedlot S (alfalfa and grain), Forage TR (triticale and annual ryegrass), Forage TK (triticale and kale), or Forage+Feedlot (grazing ryegrass, fescue and orchardgrass, finished on alfalfa and grain) dietary treatments. Heifers were finished on Feedlot H (alfalfa and grain). Longissimus and tricep muscles were sampled from these animals for steaks and ground beef, respectively. Steaks were either dry- or wet-aged for 14 d. Ground beef was dry-aged, wet-aged for 14 d, or not aged. Trained sensory panelists evaluated palatability attributes of steaks and ground beef. Diet did not influence sensory attributes of steaks or ground beef. Aging impacted (P<0.05) sensory attributes of ground beef. Diet and aging had no impact on lipid oxidative stability but affected fatty acid composition of raw ground beef. PMID:20709462

  7. Genetic and environmental factors in human cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common craniofacial birth defect and its etiology has been the focus of many reports in the literature. It is well accepted that both genetics and environment play a role in the condition, however we still have not been able to translate what have been learned into clinical applications. This paper provides an interpretation of the latest research findings in humans and a perspective for where the field is going. The latest effort in gene identification and the associations between isolated cleft lip and palate and the loci harboring IRF6 (1q32) and 8q24.21 are highlighted, as well as the latest insight from more sophisticated phenotypical characterization and the inclusion of covariables related to the environment in the analysis of genetic variation. PMID:22759667

  8. Unique expression of cytoskeletal proteins in human soft palate muscles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Farhan; Berggren, Diana; Holmlund, Thorbjörn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Stål, Per

    2016-03-01

    The human oropharyngeal muscles have a unique anatomy with diverse and intricate functions. To investigate if this specialization is also reflected in the cytoarchitecture of muscle fibers, intermediate filament proteins and the dystrophin-associated protein complex have been analyzed in two human palate muscles, musculus uvula (UV) and musculus palatopharyngeus (PP), with immunohistochenmical and morphological techniques. Human limb muscles were used as reference. The findings show that the soft palate muscle fibers have a cytoskeletal architecture that differs from the limb muscles. While all limb muscles showed immunoreaction for a panel of antibodies directed against different domains of cytoskeletal proteins desmin and dystrophin, a subpopulation of palate muscle fibers lacked or had a faint immunoreaction for desmin (UV 11.7% and PP 9.8%) and the C-terminal of the dystrophin molecule (UV 4.2% and PP 6.4%). The vast majority of these fibers expressed slow contractile protein myosin heavy chain I. Furthermore, an unusual staining pattern was also observed in these fibers for β-dystroglycan, caveolin-3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase nNOS, which are all membrane-linking proteins associated with the dystrophin C-terminus. While the immunoreaction for nNOS was generally weak or absent, β-dystroglycan and caveolin-3 showed a stronger immunostaining. The absence or a low expression of cytoskeletal proteins otherwise considered ubiquitous and important for integration and contraction of muscle cells indicate a unique cytoarchitecture designed to meet the intricate demands of the upper airway muscles. It can be concluded that a subgroup of muscle fibers in the human soft palate appears to have special biomechanical properties, and their unique cytoarchitecture must be taken into account while assessing function and pathology in oropharyngeal muscles. PMID:26597319

  9. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins. PMID:780004

  10. A whole genome association study on meat palatability in hanwoo.

    PubMed

    Hyeong, K-E; Lee, Y-M; Kim, Y-S; Nam, K C; Jo, C; Lee, K-H; Lee, J-E; Kim, J-J

    2014-09-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was carried out to find quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sensory evaluation traits in Hanwoo. Carcass samples of 250 Hanwoo steers were collected from National Agricultural Cooperative Livestock Research Institute, Ansung, Gyeonggi province, Korea, between 2011 and 2012 and genotyped with the Affymetrix Bovine Axiom Array 640K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Among the SNPs in the chip, a total of 322,160 SNPs were chosen after quality control tests. After adjusting for the effects of age, slaughter-year-season, and polygenic effects using genome relationship matrix, the corrected phenotypes for the sensory evaluation measurements were regressed on each SNP using a simple linear regression additive based model. A total of 1,631 SNPs were detected for color, aroma, tenderness, juiciness and palatability at 0.1% comparison-wise level. Among the significant SNPs, the best set of 52 SNP markers were chosen using a forward regression procedure at 0.05 level, among which the sets of 8, 14, 11, 10, and 9 SNPs were determined for the respectively sensory evaluation traits. The sets of significant SNPs explained 18% to 31% of phenotypic variance. Three SNPs were pleiotropic, i.e. AX-26703353 and AX-26742891 that were located at 101 and 110 Mb of BTA6, respectively, influencing tenderness, juiciness and palatability, while AX-18624743 at 3 Mb of BTA10 affected tenderness and palatability. Our results suggest that some QTL for sensory measures are segregating in a Hanwoo steer population. Additional WGA studies on fatty acid and nutritional components as well as the sensory panels are in process to characterize genetic architecture of meat quality and palatability in Hanwoo. PMID:25178363

  11. Relative efficacy and palatability of three activated charcoal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R P; Navarro, K R; Krenzelok, E P

    1980-02-01

    The addition of bentonite with or without chocolate syrup improved the palatability of activated charcoal preparations. Furthermore, bentonite did not significantly reduce the efficacy of charcoal to absorb aspirin. Chocolate syrup reduced the adsorption effectiveness significantly. The mixtures have a reduced shelf-life when premixed with water. However, the dry ingredients can be pre-weighed and sealed in a large jar. Water can be added just prior to administration. PMID:7361450

  12. A Whole Genome Association Study on Meat Palatability in Hanwoo

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, K.-E.; Lee, Y.-M.; Kim, Y.-S.; Nam, K. C.; Jo, C.; Lee, K.-H.; Lee, J.-E.; Kim, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was carried out to find quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sensory evaluation traits in Hanwoo. Carcass samples of 250 Hanwoo steers were collected from National Agricultural Cooperative Livestock Research Institute, Ansung, Gyeonggi province, Korea, between 2011 and 2012 and genotyped with the Affymetrix Bovine Axiom Array 640K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Among the SNPs in the chip, a total of 322,160 SNPs were chosen after quality control tests. After adjusting for the effects of age, slaughter-year-season, and polygenic effects using genome relationship matrix, the corrected phenotypes for the sensory evaluation measurements were regressed on each SNP using a simple linear regression additive based model. A total of 1,631 SNPs were detected for color, aroma, tenderness, juiciness and palatability at 0.1% comparison-wise level. Among the significant SNPs, the best set of 52 SNP markers were chosen using a forward regression procedure at 0.05 level, among which the sets of 8, 14, 11, 10, and 9 SNPs were determined for the respectively sensory evaluation traits. The sets of significant SNPs explained 18% to 31% of phenotypic variance. Three SNPs were pleiotropic, i.e. AX-26703353 and AX-26742891 that were located at 101 and 110 Mb of BTA6, respectively, influencing tenderness, juiciness and palatability, while AX-18624743 at 3 Mb of BTA10 affected tenderness and palatability. Our results suggest that some QTL for sensory measures are segregating in a Hanwoo steer population. Additional WGA studies on fatty acid and nutritional components as well as the sensory panels are in process to characterize genetic architecture of meat quality and palatability in Hanwoo. PMID:25178363

  13. Mid-face osteotomy in the adolescent cleft palate patient.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, B

    1977-10-01

    Retrognathia or retrusion of the maxilla and mid-face is present in about one-third of treated cleft palate patients. Surgical repositioning of either the dental segments, or the entire mid-face into a forward position, can greatly enhance appearance and at the same time provide for a more functional occlusion. Some surgical aspects of this work are presented together with an evaluation of soft tissue change. PMID:277152

  14. Presurgical nasoalveolar molding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul J.; Kharkar, Viraj R.; Kamath, Shamika

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients have an esthetic and functional compromise of the middle third of the face and nasal structures. To improve the esthetic result of lip repair, the concept of presurgical nasoalveolar molding (PNAM) was brought into conception. PNAM is an easy and passive method of bringing the alveolus and lips together by redirecting the forces of natural growth. This case report documents a 2-year follow-up of PNAM in UCLP. PMID:26681868

  15. On helical vortex motions of moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    Two results that are fundamentally different from what takes place in a dry atmosphere have been obtained for adiabatic motions of unsaturated moist air: (1) the steady helical motion of moist air with collinear velocity and vorticity vectors everywhere is dynamically impossible; (2) the spontaneous amplification (generation) of helicity in a moist air due to baroclinicity is dynamically and thermodynamically feasible. In the absence of helicity flux through the boundary of the domain occupied by air flows, the difference between the values of integral helicity H at time instant t delaying at a small time interval from the initial instant t 0 (at which the instantaneous state of air motion is isomorphic either to a steady Beltrami flow or to an irrotational flow) and the initial value of H increases proportionally to ( t - t 0)4. The nonzero value of the proportionality factor is ensured by the difference in values of the Poisson ratio for dry air and water vapor, respectively.

  16. Passive micromixers with dual helical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keyin; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Yulong; Meng, Xiangwei; Shan, Chao; Li, Yanyang

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) micromixer with cross-linked double helical microchannels is studied to achieve rapid mixing of fluids at low Reynolds numbers (Re). The 3D micromixer takes full advantages of the chaotic advection model with helical microchannels; meanwhile, the proposed crossing structure of double helical microchannels enables two flow patterns of repelling flow and straight flow in the fluids to promote the agitation effect. The complex 3D micromixer is realized by an improved femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) technology embedded in fused silica. The mixing results show that cross-linked double helical microchannels can achieve excellent mixing within 3 cycles (300 μm) over a wide range of low Re (1.5×10-3~600), which compare well with the conventional passive micromixers. This highly-effective micromixer is hoped to contribute to the integration of microfluidic systems.

  17. Emergence of helicity in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Mininni, Pablo D.; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2013-03-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying rotating stratified turbulence and show, in the Boussinesq framework, that helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), as observed in supercell storms and hurricanes, is spontaneously created due to an interplay between buoyancy and rotation common to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Helicity emerges from the joint action of eddies and of inertia-gravity waves (with inertia and gravity with respective associated frequencies f and N), and it occurs when the waves are sufficiently strong. For N/f<3 the amount of helicity produced is correctly predicted by a quasilinear balance equation. Outside this regime, and up to the highest Reynolds number obtained in this study, namely Re≈10000, helicity production is found to be persistent for N/f as large as ≈17, and for ReFr2 and ReRo2, respectively, as large as ≈100 and ≈24000.

  18. Evolution of helicities in dynamo problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The properties of wavelet spectra of kinetic and magnetic energies, as well as of helicities, are considered by the example of a three-dimensional dynamo model in a rapidly rotating a plane layer and heated from below. It is shown that the transition from the kinematic mode to the full dynamo mode is accompanied by a decrease in the magnetic energy of the system. The hydrodynamic helicity changes its sign by height and has the same sign for all scales. The current and magnetic helicities also have the dipole form of symmetry in the physical space; however, their sign at small and large scales is different—the so-called effect of separation in scales. The cross-helicity has no separation in scales, but it can change the sign with time so that its averaged value is small.

  19. Helical vortices: viscous dynamics and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maurice; Selcuk, Can; Delbende, Ivan; Ijlra-Upmc Team; Limsi-Cnrs Team

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamical properties of helical vortices is of great importance for numerous applications such as wind turbines, helicopter rotors, ship propellers. Locally these flows often display a helical symmetry: fields are invariant through combined axial translation of distance Δz and rotation of angle θ = Δz / L around the same z-axis, where 2 πL denotes the helix pitch. A DNS code with built-in helical symmetry has been developed in order to compute viscous quasi-steady basic states with one or multiple vortices. These states will be characterized (core structure, ellipticity, ...) as a function of the pitch, without or with an axial flow component. The instability modes growing in the above base flows and their growth rates are investigated by a linearized version of the DNS code coupled to an Arnoldi procedure. This analysis is complemented by a helical thin-cored vortex filaments model. ANR HELIX.

  20. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  1. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    In most numerical simulations of the Earth's core the dynamo resides outside the tangent cylinder and may be crudely classified as being of the α2 type. In this region the flow comprises a sea of thin columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, taking the form of alternating cyclones and anticyclones. The dynamo is thought to be driven by these columnar vortices within which the flow is observed to be highly helical, helicity being a crucial ingredient of planetary dynamos. As noted in Davidson, one of the mysteries of this dynamo cartoon is the origin of the helicity, which is observed to be positive in the south and negative in the north. While Ekman pumping at the mantle can induce helicity in some of the overly viscous numerical simulations, it is extremely unlikely to be a significant source within planets. In this paper we return to the suggestion of Davidson that the helicity observed in the less viscous simulations owes its existence to helical wave packets, launched in and around the equatorial plane where the buoyancy flux is observed to be strong. Here we show that such wave packets act as a potent source of planetary helicity, constituting a simple, robust mechanism that yields the correct sign for h north and south of the equator. Since such a mechanism does not rely on the presence of a mantle, it can operate within both the Earth and the gas giants. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that helical wave packets dispersing from the equator produce a random sea of thin, columnar cyclone/anticyclone pairs, very like those observed in the more strongly forced dynamo simulations. We examine the local dynamics of helical wave packets dispersing from the equatorial regions, as well as the overall nature of an α2-dynamo driven by such wave packets. Our local analysis predicts the mean emf induced by helical waves, an analysis that rests on a number of simple approximations which are consistent with our numerical experiments, while our global

  2. Perception of English palatal codas by Korean speakers of English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Sang-Hee

    2003-04-01

    This study aimed at looking at perception of English palatal codas by Korean speakers of English to determine if perception problems are the source of production problems. In particular, first, this study looked at the possible first language effect on the perception of English palatal codas. Second, a possible perceptual source of vowel epenthesis after English palatal codas was investigated. In addition, individual factors, such as length of residence, TOEFL score, gender and academic status, were compared to determine if those affected the varying degree of the perception accuracy. Eleven adult Korean speakers of English as well as three native speakers of English participated in the study. Three sets of a perception test including identification of minimally different English pseudo- or real words were carried out. The results showed that, first, the Korean speakers perceived the English codas significantly worse than the Americans. Second, the study supported the idea that Koreans perceived an extra /i/ after the final affricates due to final release. Finally, none of the individual factors explained the varying degree of the perceptional accuracy. In particular, TOEFL scores and the perception test scores did not have any statistically significant association.

  3. Epinephrine Affects Pharmacokinetics of Ropivacaine Infiltrated Into Palate.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Yasuda, Asako; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulpal anesthesia success rates for ropivacaine following maxillary infiltration anesthesia seem to be low. We investigated the hypothesis that the addition of epinephrine would affect the pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine by retaining ropivacaine in the mucosa of the injected area through the time-dependent distribution of ropivacaine in the rat maxilla and serum following maxillary infiltration anesthesia using (3)H-labeled ropivacaine. We then examined the vasoactivity of ropivacaine with or without epinephrine on local peripheral blood flow. The addition of epinephrine to ropivacaine increased ropivacaine concentrations in the palatal mucosa and adjacent maxilla by more than 3 times that of plain ropivacaine at 20 minutes. By observing the autoradiogram of (3)H-ropivacaine, plain ropivacaine in the maxilla was remarkably reduced 20 minutes after injection. However, it was definitely retained in the palatal mucosa, hard palate, adjacent maxilla, and maxillary nerve after the administration with epinephrine. Ropivacaine with epinephrine significantly decreased labial blood flow. This study suggests that 10 μg/mL epinephrine added to 0.5% ropivacaine could improve anesthetic efficacy and duration for maxillary infiltration anesthesia over plain ropivacaine. PMID:27269664

  4. Linking suckling biomechanics to the development of the palate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingtao; Johnson, Chelsey A.; Smith, Andrew A.; Hunter, Daniel J.; Singh, Gurpreet; Brunski, John B.; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-02-01

    Skulls are amongst the most informative documents of evolutionary history but a complex geometry, coupled with composite material properties and complicated biomechanics, have made it particularly challenging to identify mechanical principles guiding the skull’s morphogenesis. Despite this challenge, multiple lines of evidence, for example the relationship between masticatory function and the evolution of jaw shape, nonetheless suggest that mechanobiology plays a major role in skull morphogenesis. To begin to tackle this persistent challenge, cellular, molecular and tissue-level analyses of the developing mouse palate were coupled with finite element modeling to demonstrate that patterns of strain created by mammalian-specific oral behaviors produce complementary patterns of chondrogenic gene expression in an initially homogeneous population of cranial neural crest cells. Neural crest cells change from an osteogenic to a chondrogenic fate, leading to the materialization of cartilaginous growth plate-like structures in the palatal midline. These growth plates contribute to lateral expansion of the head but are transient structures; when the strain patterns associated with suckling dissipate at weaning, the growth plates disappear and the palate ossifies. Thus, mechanical cues such as strain appear to co-regulate cell fate specification and ultimately, help drive large-scale morphogenetic changes in head shape.

  5. Morphological Study of Palatal Rugae in a Sudanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla; Hamid, Awrad

    2015-01-01

    Palatal rugae patterns have unique characteristics and have been proposed as an alternative method to establish identity when other means, such as fingerprints and dental records, are not attainable. This study was conducted to determine the morphological characteristics of palatine rugae and to assess the existence of side asymmetry in them in Sudanese Arabs. It also assesses the possibility of determining sex using logistic regression. One hundred dental casts for 50 males and 50 females aged between 18 and 23 were studied for palatal rugae dimensions, shapes, and orientations, as well as sexual dimorphism and side symmetry. The most predominant rugae were primary, and the most prevalent shapes in both sexes were wavy, curved, and straight forms. The predominant orientation was forward. Side asymmetry existed more in the orientations than in the shapes, but no side asymmetry was recorded in the dimensions. There was no significant sexual dimorphism in the rugae dimensions, shapes, and orientations, except for forward-directed rugae (P < 0.037). A predictive value of 60% was obtained in assigning sex using dimensions and orientations and of 58% using shapes alone. Therefore, the palatal rugae are not recommended for assigning sex effectively among Sudanese Arabs unless it is the only means available. PMID:25737723

  6. Palatability Can Drive Feeding Independent of AgRP Neurons.

    PubMed

    Denis, Raphaël G P; Joly-Amado, Aurélie; Webber, Emily; Langlet, Fanny; Schaeffer, Marie; Padilla, Stéphanie L; Cansell, Céline; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Castel, Julien; Delbès, Anne-Sophie; Martinez, Sarah; Lacombe, Amélie; Rouch, Claude; Kassis, Nadim; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Verdié, Pascal; Hnasko, Thomas S; Palmiter, Richard D; Krashes, Michael J; Güler, Ali D; Magnan, Christophe; Luquet, Serge

    2015-10-01

    Feeding behavior is exquisitely regulated by homeostatic and hedonic neural substrates that integrate energy demand as well as the reinforcing and rewarding aspects of food. Understanding the net contribution of homeostatic and reward-driven feeding has become critical because of the ubiquitous source of energy-dense foods and the consequent obesity epidemic. Hypothalamic agouti-related peptide-secreting neurons (AgRP neurons) provide the primary orexigenic drive of homeostatic feeding. Using models of neuronal inhibition or ablation, we demonstrate that the feeding response to a fast ghrelin or serotonin receptor agonist relies on AgRP neurons. However, when palatable food is provided, AgRP neurons are dispensable for an appropriate feeding response. In addition, AgRP-ablated mice present exacerbated stress-induced anorexia and palatable food intake--a hallmark of comfort feeding. These results suggest that, when AgRP neuron activity is impaired, neural circuits sensitive to emotion and stress are engaged and modulated by food palatability and dopamine signaling. PMID:26278050

  7. Sensory influences on food intake control: moving beyond palatability.

    PubMed

    McCrickerd, K; Forde, C G

    2016-01-01

    The sensory experience of eating is an important determinant of food intake control, often attributed to the positive hedonic response associated with certain sensory cues. However, palatability is just one aspect of the sensory experience. Sensory cues based on a food's sight, smell, taste and texture are operational before, during and after an eating event. The focus of this review is to look beyond palatability and highlight recent advances in our understanding of how certain sensory characteristics can be used to promote better energy intake control. We consider the role of visual and odour cues in identifying food in the near environment, guiding food choice and memory for eating, and highlight the ways in which tastes and textures influence meal size and the development of satiety after consumption. Considering sensory characteristics as a functional feature of the foods and beverages we consume provides the opportunity for research to identify how sensory enhancements might be combined with energy reduction in otherwise palatable foods to optimize short-term energy intake regulation in the current food environment. Moving forward, the challenge for sensory nutritional science will be to assess the longer-term impact of these principles on weight management. PMID:26662879

  8. Surgical Management of Minor Salivary Gland Neoplasms of the Palate

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian A.; Burkey, Brian B.; Netterville, James L.; Butcher, R. Brent; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Minor salivary gland tumors are uncommon, accounting for up to 15% of salivary gland neoplasms. We describe our experience with both benign and malignant tumors of the palatal minor salivary glands, focusing on the extent of resection and options for defect reconstruction. Study Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Results: From 1994 to 2002, 37 patients with primary neoplasms originating in the palatal minor salivary glands were treated at a single institution. Patients ranged in age from the second to the seventh decades, with a female preponderance. Twenty-four percent of the lesions were benign. The most common malignant tumor encountered was low grade polymorphous adenocarcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. The extent of surgical resection was dictated by tumor pathology and evidence of perineural spread, and defects were reconstructed with a variety of techniques. Postoperative complications included velopharyngeal insufficiency, flap fistulization or loss, and trismus. After 1 month to 8 years of follow-up, 1 patient has died with regional and systemic metastases. Conclusions: Neoplasms of the minor salivary glands in the palate may be excised, with limits dictated by tumor histopathology and perineural invasion. Improved functional results may be achieved by immediately reconstructing the defects with rotational flaps, reserving free flaps for more extensive defects of the maxilla and infratemporal fossa. PMID:21603498

  9. Do palatal lift prostheses stimulate velopharyngeal neuromuscular activity?

    PubMed

    Witt, P D; Rozelle, A A; Marsh, J L; Marty-Grames, L; Muntz, H R; Gay, W D; Pilgram, T K

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of palatal lift prostheses to stimulate the neuromuscular activity of the velopharynx. Nasendoscopic evaluations were audio-videotaped preprosthetic and postprosthetic management for 25 patients who underwent placement of a palatal lift prosthesis for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). These audio-videotapes were presented in blinded fashion and random order to three speech pathologists experienced in assessment of patients with VPD. They rated the tapes on the following parameters: VP gap size, closure pattern, orifice estimate, direction and magnitude of change, and qualitative descriptions of the adequacy of VP closure during speech. VP closure for speech was unchanged in 69% of patients and the number of patients rated as improved or deteriorated was nearly identical at about 15%. Postintervention gap shape remained unchanged in 70% of patients. The extent of VP orifice closure during speech remained unchanged in 57% of patients. Articulations that could impair VP function improved in 30% of patients, deteriorating in only 4%. Results of this study neither support the concept that palatal lift prostheses alter the neuromuscular patterning of the velopharynx, nor provide objective documentation of the feasibility of prosthetic reduction for weaning. PMID:8547286

  10. Prosthodontic treatment of the edentulous adult cleft palate patient.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Leanne M

    2003-03-01

    Clefts of the upper lip and plate are relatively common, yet dental treatment of these patients is still very poor and many grow up suffering dental neglect. Dental practitioners should become involved in the treatment team as dental needs are present from birth to death. Adult cleft patients often need tooth replacement with obturation of any residual clefts. They are best treated with tooth-supported removable appliances including partial and complete overdentures, thus preservation of their natural dentition is desirable. Edentulous cleft palate patients present with restorative difficulties due to their compromised maxillary arches as well as the presence of scar tissue in their palates and lips. An outline of these complications and guidelines for their treatment is illustrated in the form of three case reports from members of one family all presenting with varying cleft lip and palate defects. This article highlights the need for dental students to be exposed to dentally compromised patients so that they will feel confident enough to treat them in private practice. PMID:12800267

  11. Morphological study of palatal rugae in a Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla; Hamid, Awrad

    2015-01-01

    Palatal rugae patterns have unique characteristics and have been proposed as an alternative method to establish identity when other means, such as fingerprints and dental records, are not attainable. This study was conducted to determine the morphological characteristics of palatine rugae and to assess the existence of side asymmetry in them in Sudanese Arabs. It also assesses the possibility of determining sex using logistic regression. One hundred dental casts for 50 males and 50 females aged between 18 and 23 were studied for palatal rugae dimensions, shapes, and orientations, as well as sexual dimorphism and side symmetry. The most predominant rugae were primary, and the most prevalent shapes in both sexes were wavy, curved, and straight forms. The predominant orientation was forward. Side asymmetry existed more in the orientations than in the shapes, but no side asymmetry was recorded in the dimensions. There was no significant sexual dimorphism in the rugae dimensions, shapes, and orientations, except for forward-directed rugae (P < 0.037). A predictive value of 60% was obtained in assigning sex using dimensions and orientations and of 58% using shapes alone. Therefore, the palatal rugae are not recommended for assigning sex effectively among Sudanese Arabs unless it is the only means available. PMID:25737723

  12. Linking suckling biomechanics to the development of the palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingtao; Johnson, Chelsey A.; Smith, Andrew A.; Hunter, Daniel J.; Singh, Gurpreet; Brunski, John B.; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Skulls are amongst the most informative documents of evolutionary history but a complex geometry, coupled with composite material properties and complicated biomechanics, have made it particularly challenging to identify mechanical principles guiding the skull’s morphogenesis. Despite this challenge, multiple lines of evidence, for example the relationship between masticatory function and the evolution of jaw shape, nonetheless suggest that mechanobiology plays a major role in skull morphogenesis. To begin to tackle this persistent challenge, cellular, molecular and tissue-level analyses of the developing mouse palate were coupled with finite element modeling to demonstrate that patterns of strain created by mammalian-specific oral behaviors produce complementary patterns of chondrogenic gene expression in an initially homogeneous population of cranial neural crest cells. Neural crest cells change from an osteogenic to a chondrogenic fate, leading to the materialization of cartilaginous growth plate-like structures in the palatal midline. These growth plates contribute to lateral expansion of the head but are transient structures; when the strain patterns associated with suckling dissipate at weaning, the growth plates disappear and the palate ossifies. Thus, mechanical cues such as strain appear to co-regulate cell fate specification and ultimately, help drive large-scale morphogenetic changes in head shape. PMID:26842915

  13. Cleft lip and palate in a Brazilian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Cuozzo, Fernanda Dornelles Martins; Espinosa, Mariano Martínez; da Silva, Katia Tavares Serafim; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Background: This work aimed to access the profile of cleft lip and palate patients of a sub-population in Mid-West Brazil. Materials & Methods: Research was carried out through a cross-sectional study at the Craniofacial Rehabilitation Center of the University General Hospital of the University of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Variables related to oral cleft type, gender, race, age and presence or absence of associated congenital anomalies or syndromes were analyzed. Results: 313 patients treated at the institution from 2004 to 2007 were recruited. There were 54% male and 46% female patients with the mean age of 11.4 years. Cleft lip and palate was the most prevalent alteration in 49.6% of cases. Caucasians were the most affected in 54.6% of cases. 6.4% of patients had other anomalies or syndromes associated with cleft. Conclusion: More comprehensive surveys should be conducted in order to supply the lack of data on the occurrence and determinants of oral clefts in this region. How to cite this article:Cuozzo FD, Espinosa MM, Serafim da Silva KT, Martins de Barros YB, Bandeca MC, Aranha AM, Borges AH, Volpato LE. Cleft lip and palate in a Brazilian subpopulation. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):15-20. PMID:24155614

  14. [Oral dosage forms for children: acceptability and palatability].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Children generally reject taking medicine which does not have a favorable shape, taste, flavor, etc. However, if a child who needs to take a medicine, rejects taking it, he might never recover from his condition. When a child is unable to take medicine orally, it is intravenously administered, and he and his caregivers then may experience stress. Syrups and suspensions are considered as favorable types of dosage forms in which to orally administer medicine to infants and children. However, they may have disadvantages such as solubility, a bad taste, portability problems or required refrigerator storage. World Health Organization (WHO) currently favors that infants and children be treated with oral solid medicines. New oral solid tablets, such as a mini-tablet, instead of liquid medicines are proposed for this group, however, there are a few reports that mini-tablets are suitable for infants and children. Palatability is one of the main elements of patient acceptability of an oral pediatric medicine. Palatability is defined as the overall appreciation of an oral medicinal product in relation to its smell, taste, aftertaste and feeling in the mouth. Design of the formulation of an oral pediatric medicine should be considered together with its palatability. PMID:25747220

  15. Spheromak Power and Helicity Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    2000-05-18

    This note addresses the division of gun power and helicity between the open line volume and the closed flux surface volume in a steady state flux core spheromak. Our assumptions are that fine scale turbulence maintains each region close to an axisymmetric Taylor state, {mu}{sub o}j = {lambda}B. The gun region that feeds these two volumes surrounded by a flux conserver is shown topologically below. (The actual geometry is toroidal). Flux and current from the magnetized gun flow on open lines around the entire closed surface containing the spheromak. The gun current flows down the potential gradient, the potential difference between the two ends of each line being the gun voltage. Here, the gun voltage excludes the sheath drops at each end. These volumes have different values of {lambda} in each region (open line volume V{sub 1} and closed spheromak volume V{sub 2}) and we want to calculate the efficiency of transferring the gun power to the spheromak to sustain the ohmic loss in steady state.

  16. Helical rotary screw expander power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.; Sprankle, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    An energy converter for the development of wet steam geothermal fields is described. A project to evaluate and characterize a helical rotary screw expander for geothermal applications is discussed. The helical screw expander is a positive displacement machine which can accept untreated corrosive mineralized water of any quality from a geothermal well. The subjects of corrosion, mineral deposition, the expansion process, and experience with prototype devices are reported.

  17. Studies of Solar Helicity Using Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Pevstov, Alexei A.

    1999-01-01

    observations of photospheric magnetic fields made with vector magnetographs have been used recently to study solar helicity. In this paper we indicate what can and cannot be derived from vector magnetograms, and point out some potential problems in these data that could affect the calculations of 'helicity'. Among these problems are magnetic saturation, Faraday rotation, low spectral resolution, and the method of resolving the ambiguity in the azimuth.

  18. Noise reduction for helical computed tomography using coupled projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-03-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) has demonstrated the effectiveness in virtual colonoscopy (VC) or CTcolonography (CTC). One major concern with this clinical application is associated with the risk of high radiation exposure, especially for its use for screening purpose at a large population. In this work, we presented an improved Karhunen-Loeve (KL) domain penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) strategy which considers the data correlations among the projection rays mainly due to partially overlap while system rotates. Two 1-dimensional (1D) projections, which called coupled projections (CPs), are composed according to the geometry. Each element of the 1D projection is carefully selected for a specific point within 2π angle along the system rotates and thus a highly correlation can be observed between any specific projection and the CPs. These highly correlated projections can be treated by an adaptive KL-PWLS strategy for accurate noise reduction. This method has been implemented and tested on computer simulated sinograms which mimic low-dose CT scans. The reconstructed images by the presented strategy demonstrated the potential of ultra low-dose CT application.

  19. Bioinspired helical microswimmers based on vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Feng, Xiaomiao; Pei, Allen; Kane, Christopher R; Tam, Ryan; Hennessy, Camille; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based bioinspired magnetically propelled helical microswimmers are described. The helical microstructures are derived from spiral water-conducting vessels of different plants, harnessing the intrinsic biological structures of nature. Geometric variables of the spiral vessels, such as the helix diameter and pitch, can be controlled by mechanical stretching for the precise fabrication and consistent performance of helical microswimmers. Xylem vessels of a wide variety of different plants have been evaluated for the consistency and reproducibility of their helical parameters. Sequential deposition of thin Ti and Ni layers directly on the spiral vessels, followed by dicing, leads to an extremely simple and cost-efficient mass-production of functional helical microswimmers. The resulting plant-based magnetic microswimmers display efficient propulsion, with a speed of over 250 μm/s, as well as powerful locomotion in biological media such as human serum. The influence of actuation frequencies on the swimming velocity is investigated. Such use of plant vessels results in significant savings in the processing costs and provides an extremely simple, cost-effective fabrication route for the large-scale production of helical magnetic swimmers. PMID:24283342

  20. The AGS with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  1. On the helicity of open magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We reconsider the topological interpretation of magnetic helicity for magnetic fields in open domains, and relate this to the relative helicity. Specifically, our domains stretch between two parallel planes, and each of these ends may be magnetically open. It is demonstrated that, while the magnetic helicity is gauge-dependent, its value in any gauge may be physically interpreted as the average winding number among all pairs of field lines with respect to some orthonormal frame field. In fact, the choice of gauge is equivalent to the choice of reference field in the relative helicity, meaning that the magnetic helicity is no less physically meaningful. We prove that a particular gauge always measures the winding with respect to a fixed frame, and propose that this is normally the best choice. For periodic fields, this choice is equivalent to measuring relative helicity with respect to a potential reference field. However, for aperiodic fields, we show that the potential field can be twisted. We prove by construction that there always exists a possible untwisted reference field.

  2. [Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome, report of a case with variable expressivity].

    PubMed

    Meza Escobar, Luis Enrique; Isaza, Carolina; Pachajoa, Harry

    2012-10-01

    The ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate syndrome is a rare entity associated with mutations in the genes that express the protein p63. We present a case of a patient with right foot ectrodactyly associated with cleft lip and palate, without other evident anomalies. The patient has a positive familiar history for cleft lift and palate and mortality during the perinatal period. The management of each case must be specific and multidisciplinary. PMID:23070194

  3. The inverse agonist of CB1 receptor SR141716 blocks compulsive eating of palatable food.

    PubMed

    Dore, Riccardo; Valenza, Marta; Wang, Xiaofan; Rice, Kenner C; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-09-01

    Dieting and the increased availability of highly palatable food are considered major contributing factors to the large incidence of eating disorders and obesity. This study was aimed at investigating the role of the cannabinoid (CB) system in a novel animal model of compulsive eating, based on a rapid palatable diet cycling protocol. Male Wistar rats were fed either continuously a regular chow diet (Chow/Chow, control group) or intermittently a regular chow diet for 2 days and a palatable, high-sucrose diet for 1 day (Chow/Palatable). Chow/Palatable rats showed spontaneous and progressively increasing hypophagia and body weight loss when fed the regular chow diet, and excessive food intake and body weight gain when fed the palatable diet. Diet-cycled rats dramatically escalated the intake of the palatable diet during the first hour of renewed access (7.5-fold compared to controls), and after withdrawal, they showed compulsive eating and heightened risk-taking behavior. The inverse agonist of the CB1 receptor, SR141716 reduced the excessive intake of palatable food with higher potency and the body weight with greater efficacy in Chow/Palatable rats, compared to controls. Moreover, SR141716 reduced compulsive eating and risk-taking behavior in Chow/Palatable rats. Finally, consistent with the behavioral and pharmacological observations, withdrawal from the palatable diet decreased the gene expression of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase in the ventromedial hypothalamus while increasing that of CB1 receptors in the dorsal striatum in Chow/Palatable rats, compared to controls. These findings will help understand the role of the CB system in compulsive eating. PMID:23587012

  4. A Surgical Technique for the Management of Suction Cup-Induced Palatal Perforation: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Suction cap-induced palatal perforation is uncommon today. In the surgical management of such a complication, the surgeon should consider the large bony defect hidden behind the small slit in the palatal mucosa. In this article a case is presented,in which a combination of anteriorly based inferior turbinate flap and posteriorly based palatal submucosal flap solved the problem properly. The advantages of this technique are two-layer closure and predictability of the technique. PMID:26393223

  5. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  6. Super-imposing maxillary and palatal locations for electroarticulometry: A SIMPLE method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-rong; Chang, Yueh-chin; Best, Catherine T; Derrick, Donald

    2015-08-01

    This study proposes a method of superimposing a physical palatal profile, extracted from a speaker's maxillary impression, onto real-time mid-sagittal articulatory data. A palatal/dental profile is first obtained by three-dimensional-scanning the maxillary impression of the speaker. Then a high resolution mid-sagittal palatal line, extracted from the profile, is sub-divided into articulatory zones and superimposed, by Iterative Closest Point algorithm, onto reconstructed palatal traces in electromagnetic articulometric (EMA) data. Evaluations were carried out by comparing consonant targets elicited by EMA with the proposed method and by static palatography. The proposed method yields accurate results, as supported by palatography. PMID:26328743

  7. Metal reinforcement of a complete maxillary denture without a palate: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Mizuno, Yoko; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    This preliminary study examined laboratory-simulated differences between maxillary complete dentures with and without a palate (palateless) as well as the effect of reinforcement of the latter design. Five types of experimental dentures and three types of reinforcements were made. Strain gauges were attached, and a vertical load was applied. The strain was statistically compared using analysis of variance (P = .05). Strain recordings on the palatal side of palateless dentures without reinforcement were significantly higher than in complete dentures and palateless dentures with reinforcement (P < .05). These preliminary observations suggest that such reinforcement with a palatal bar or metal-based palate may reduce the risk of fracture and deformation. PMID:25822307

  8. A Correlative Histocytological Study of Carcinoma and Epithelial Atypia of the Palate Among Indian Reverse Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Fali S.; Sahiar, B. E.; Daftary, D. K.; Gupta, P. C.; Pindborg, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    A correlative histocytological study was made of 6 patients with palatal carcinomata and 342 patients with palatal lesions (primarily leukoplakias) associated with reverse smoking from the Srikakulam district of Andhra Pradesh. Among 6 histologically diagnosed carcinomata only 2 showed cytological findings typical of carcinoma. Of the 46 atypias diagnosed histologically among the other palatal lesions, only 6 (13%) were diagnosed cytologically. Our findings show that cytological examination of precancerous and cancerous lesions located on the hard palate, which is a highly keratinized area of the oral cavity, may not be reliable enough for revealing premalignant or malignant changes. PMID:5047146

  9. Development of the palatal size in Pan troglodytes, Hominids and Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Zoellner, A; Sebastian, T

    2004-12-01

    As the hard palate plays an important role in speech production it was the aim of this study whether similarities or dissimilarities in palatal size may allow conclusions about the ability to produce speech in the extant investigated species. The palatal size of Pan troglodytes, Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus robustus, Australopithecus boisei, Homo erectus, Homo neanderthalensis and Cro-Magnon has been investigated using euclidian distance matrix analysis (EDMA) and thin-plate-spline analysis. The results show that the palatal size of all australopithecine specimens and H. erectus is very similar to that of P toglodytes, whereas the palatal size of H. neanderthalensis more closely resembles that of H. sapiens. Postnatal development of palatal size in P troglodytes is different from that of H. sapiens. In P troglodytes not only the size of the palate changes but also the form. In H. sapiens there is little change in form, but a continuos uniform growth from infantile to adult specimens. From the results we conclude that in all australopithecine samples which have been investigated, the palatal size is similar to that of P troglodytes. Therefore, it is unlikely that austraopithecine individuals were capable of producing vowels and consonants. The palatal size of H. neandethalensis and Cro-Magnon is similar to that of H. sapiens which may indicate the possibility that they were capable of speech production. PMID:15646285

  10. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    A new representation of helical structure by four parameters, [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], is able to generate an entire helical construct from asymmetric units, including cases of helical assembly with a seam. Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation.

  11. The anatomy of the dog soft palate. II. Histological evaluation of the caudal soft palate in brachycephalic breeds with grade I brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pichetto, Michela; Arrighi, Silvana; Roccabianca, Paola; Romussi, Stefano

    2011-07-01

    In brachycephalic dogs, the skull bone shortening is not paralleled by a decreased development of soft tissues. Relatively longer soft palate is one of the main factors contributing to pharyngeal narrowing during normal respiratory activity of these dog breeds, which are frequent carriers of the brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS), which affects most part of them during their postnatal life. No histological studies assessing the morphology and the normal tissue composition of the soft palate in brachycephalic dogs are available, neither has ever been determined whether the elongated soft palate is a primary or secondary event. Aim of this study was to describe the morphology of the caudal soft palate in brachycephalic dogs with Grade I BAOS to identify potential features possibly favoring the pathogenesis of BAOS. Specimens from brachycephalic dogs (N = 11) that underwent preventive surgery were collected from surgery, processed for histology, and examined at six transversal levels. The brachycephalic soft palates showed peculiar features such as thickened superficial epithelium, extensive oedema of the connective tissue, and mucous gland hyperplasia. Several muscular alterations were evidenced in addition. The results of this investigation add to the general knowledge of the anatomy of soft palate in the canine species and establish baseline information on the morphological basis of the soft palate thickening in brachycephalic dogs. PMID:21634020

  12. The influence of helical background fields on current helicity and electromotive force of magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Küker, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the empirical finding that the known hemispheric rules for the current helicity at the solar surface are not strict, we demonstrate the excitation of small-scale current helicity by the influence of large-scale helical magnetic background fields on nonrotating magnetoconvection. This is shown within a quasilinear analytic theory of driven turbulence and by nonlinear simulations of magnetoconvection that the resulting small-scale current helicity has the same sign as the large-scale current helicity, while the ratio of both pseudoscalars is of the order of the magnetic Reynolds number of the convection. The same models do not provide finite values of the small-scale kinetic helicity. On the other hand, a turbulence-induced electromotive force is produced including the diamagnetic pumping term, as well as the eddy diffusivity but, however, no α effect. It has thus been argued that the relations for the simultaneous existence of small-scale current helicity and α effect do not hold for the model of nonrotating magnetoconvection under consideration. Calculations for various values of the magnetic Prandtl number demonstrate that, for the considered diffusivities, the current helicity increases for growing magnetic Reynolds number, which is not true for the velocity of the diamagnetic pumping, which is in agreement with the results of the quasilinear analytical approximation.

  13. Palatal development of preterm and low birthweight infants compared to term infants – What do we know? Part 1: The palate of the term newborn

    PubMed Central

    Hohoff, Ariane; Rabe, Heike; Ehmer, Ulrike; Harms, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Background The evidence on prematurity as 'a priori' a risk for palatal disturbances that increase the need for orthodontic or orthognathic treatment is still weak. Further well-designed clinical studies are needed. The objective of this review is to provide a fundamental analysis of methodologies, confounding factors, and outcomes of studies on palatal development. One focus of this review is the analysis of studies on the palate of the term newborn, since knowing what is 'normal' is a precondition of being able to assess abnormalities. Methods A search profile based on Cochrane search strategies applied to 10 medical databases was used to identify existing studies. Articles, mainly those published before 1960, were identified from hand searches in textbooks, encyclopedias, reference lists and bibliographies. Sources in English, German, and French of more than a century were included. Data for term infants were recalculated if particular information about weight, length, or maturity was given. The extracted values, especially those from non-English paper sources, were provided unfiltered for comparison. Results The search strategy yielded 182 articles, of which 155 articles remained for final analysis. Morphology of the term newborn's palate was of great interest in the first half of the last century. Two general methodologies were used to assess palatal morphology: visual and metrical descriptions. Most of the studies on term infants suffer from lack of reliability tests. The groove system was recognized as the distinctive feature of the infant palate. The shape of the palate of the term infant may vary considerably, both visually and metrically. Gender, race, mode of delivery, and nasal deformities were identified as causes contributing to altered palatal morphology. Until today, anatomical features of the newborn's palate are subject to a non-uniform nomenclature. Conclusion Today's knowledge of a newborn's 'normal' palatal morphology is based on non

  14. Investigations on the palatal rugae pattern in cleft patients. Part I: A morphological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, H; Opitz, C

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of the palatal rugae zone (number of rugae, relief type, posterior limitation) were investigated on the maxillary casts of 44 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 28 patients with bilateral clefts by means of reflex microscopy, a three-dimensional, computer-assisted, touch-free measuring system for the metrical registration and analysis of the parameters directly on the maxillary casts for the segments of the 2 cleft groups. The features "number of palatal rugae" and "relief type" (primary rugae) were determined both before and after surgical repair of the cleft palate. Both segments in unilateral cleft lip and palate and both lateral segments in bilateral clefts most commonly had 4 to 5 palatal rugae. The number of rugae in cleft patients is thus in a range that other authors have reported for non-cleft individuals. Following palatal cleft repair, the rugae counts per segment decreased significantly in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate but the 3rd rugae was never lost after surgery. The relief type identified in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was the same as in isolated cleft palates and did not differ from that in non-cleft subjects. The posterior limitation of the palatal rugae zone was determined both in a tooth-defined manner and as an absolute linear distance (at all time points). The most frequent tooth-defined posterior limitation of the rugae zone in unilateral and bilateral clefts was the second deciduous molar, which is also the position identified for non-cleft individuals. The linear distance from the tuberosity line to the rugae zone increased in all segments of unilateral and bilateral clefts during the interval up to palatal cleft repair, indicating sagittal maxillary development in the posterior area of the palate. Surgical repair of the cleft palate resulted in a significant shortening of the distance in both segments of the unilateral cleft, most likely due to the

  15. Use of rotation flap in repair of cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Durucu, Cengiz; Isik, Yasemin; Atik, Bekir; Kocak, Omer Faruk; Karatas, Erkan; Bekerecioglu, Mehmet

    2011-07-01

    Although cleft palate anomaly is frequent, the criterion standards in surgical treatment have not been determined yet. There are a few techniques described for cleft palate repair owing to the limited tissue in the palatal mucosa, the rigid structure of the palatal mucosa, and the limited vascularity of the hard palate. In this study, a novel cleft palate repair technique based on separating the soft palate from the hard palate as a musculomucosal flap and using it as a rotation flap has been described. The operation is evaluated individually for each anomaly because variations occur in the surgical technique according to the extension of the cleft toward the teeth in the palate. This operation was performed on a total of 28 patients (17 girls and 11 boys) aged between 1.5 and 16 years and presented to our clinic. Patients were assessed for speech analysis outcomes, tympanogram values, hearing functions, magnitude of palatal lengthening during the operation, and rate of fistulae. Statistically significant differences in values of the speech analysis and the audiometric assessment were determined between before and 6 months after surgery. Complete recovery of otitis was observed 1 month after surgery without another treatment in 9 (42.8%) of 21 patients who were detected to have serous otitis media preoperatively. Tension-free closure, lower risk of fistula, good restoration of velopharyngeal functions, ability to be performed on all types of cleft palate, ability to provide a good intraoperative exposure, and being a single stage seem to be the most important advantages of this technique. PMID:21772216

  16. Altered FGF Signaling Pathways Impair Cell Proliferation and Elevation of Palate Shelves

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weijie; Gu, Shuping; Sun, Cheng; He, Wei; Xie, Xiaohua; Li, Xihai; Ye, Wenduo; Qin, Chunlin; Chen, Yiping; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    In palatogenesis, palatal shelves are patterned along the mediolateral axis as well as the anteroposterior axis before the onset of palatal fusion. Fgf10 specifically expressed in lateral mesenchyme of palate maintains Shh transcription in lateral epithelium, while Fgf7 activated in medial mesenchyme by Dlx5, suppressed the expansion of Shh expression to medial epithelium. How FGF signaling pathways regulate the cell behaviors of developing palate remains elusive. In our study, we found that when Fgf8 is ectopically expressed in the embryonic palatal mesenchyme, the elevation of palatal shelves is impaired and the posterior palatal shelves are enlarged, especially in the medial side. The palatal deformity results from the drastic increase of cell proliferation in posterior mesenchyme and decrease of cell proliferation in epithelium. The expression of mesenchymal Fgf10 and epithelial Shh in the lateral palate, as well as the Dlx5 and Fgf7 transcription in the medial mesenchyme are all interrupted, indicating that the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during palatogenesis are disrupted by the ectopic activation of mesenchymal Fgf8. Besides the altered Fgf7, Fgf10, Dlx5 and Shh expression pattern, the reduced Osr2 expression domain in the lateral mesenchyme also suggests an impaired mediolateral patterning of posterior palate. Moreover, the ectopic Fgf8 expression up-regulates pJak1 throughout the palatal mesenchyme and pErk in the medial mesenchyme, but down-regulates pJak2 in the epithelium, suggesting that during normal palatogenesis, the medial mesenchymal cell proliferation is stimulated by FGF/Erk pathway, while the epithelial cell proliferation is maintained through FGF/Jak2 pathway. PMID:26332583

  17. Evaluation of helicity generation in the tropical storm Gonu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Majid M.; Khansalari, Sakineh; Azadi, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Helicity is a valuable dynamical concept for the study of rotating flows. Consequently helicity flux, indicative of the source or sink of helicity, owns comparable importance. In this study, while reviewing the existing methods, a mathematical relation between helicity and helicity-flux is introduced, discussed and examined. The computed values of helicity and helicity fluxes in an actual case, using the classical and this proposed method are compared. The down-stream helicity flux including sources and sinks of helicity is considered for the tropical storm Gonu that occurred over the coasts of Oman and Iran on June 2-7, 2007. Results show that the buoyancy, through the upper troposphere down to a height within boundary layer, is the main source in producing helicity, and surface friction from earth surface up to a height within boundary layer, is the main dissipating element of helicity. The dominance of buoyancy forcing over the dissipative friction forcing results in generation of vortex or enhancement of it after bouncing the land. Furthermore, the increase (decrease) of helicity results in an increase (decrease) in the height of the level in which maximum helicity flux occurs. It is suggested that the maximum helicity flux occurs at the top of the turbulent boundary layer, so that the height of boundary layer could be obtained.

  18. Association of achondroplasia with Down syndrome: difficulty in prenatal diagnosis by sonographic and 3-D helical computed tomographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akimune; Murotsuki, Jun; Kamimura, Miki; Kimura, Masato; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Kanno, Junko; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia and Down syndrome are relatively common conditions individually. But co-occurrence of both conditions in the same patient is rare and there have been no reports of fetal analysis of this condition by prenatal sonographic and three-dimensional (3-D) helical computed tomography (CT). Prenatal sonographic findings seen in persons with Down syndrome, such as a thickened nuchal fold, cardiac defects, and echogenic bowel were not found in the patient. A prenatal 3-D helical CT revealed a large head with frontal bossing, metaphyseal flaring of the long bones, and small iliac wings, which suggested achondroplasia. In a case with combination of achondroplasia and Down syndrome, it may be difficult to diagnose the co-occurrence prenatally without typical markers of Down syndrome. PMID:25385298

  19. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping.

    PubMed

    Marschner, M; Willner, M; Potdevin, G; Fehringer, A; Noël, P B; Pfeiffer, F; Herzen, J

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal. PMID:27052368

  20. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  1. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    PubMed Central

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal. PMID:27052368

  2. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Burg, Madeleine L; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  3. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  4. Postoperative Speech Outcomes and Complications in Submucous Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Seo; Nam, Su Bong; Kang, Kyung Dong; Sung, Ji Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The postoperative speech outcomes of submucous cleft palate (SMCP) surgery are known to be poorer than those of other types of cleft palate. We attempted to objectively characterize the postoperative complications and speech outcomes of the surgical treatment of SMCP through a comparison with the outcomes of incomplete cleft palate (ICP). Methods This study included 53 SMCP patients and 285 ICP patients who underwent surgical repair from 1998 to 2015. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 3.9±1.9 years for the SMCP patients and 1.3±0.9 years for the ICP patients. A retrospective analysis was performed of the complications, the frequency of subsequent surgical correction for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), and speech outcomes. Results In both the SMCP and ICP patients, no cases of respiratory difficulty, bleeding, or wound disruption were noted. Delayed wound healing and fistula occurred in 18.9% and 5.7% of the SMCP patients and in 14% and 3.2% of the ICP patients, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference in either delayed wound healing or fistula occurrence was observed between the two groups. The rate of surgical correction for VPD in the SMCP group was higher than in the ICP group. In the subset of 26 SMCP patients and 62 ICP patients who underwent speech evaluation, the median speech score value was 58.8 in the SMCP group and 66 in the ICP group, which was a statistically significant difference. Conclusions SMCP and ICP were found to have similar complication rates, but SMCP had significantly worse speech outcomes. PMID:27218023

  5. Protein Hydrolysates as Hypoallergenic, Flavors and Palatants for Companion Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagodawithana, Tilak W.; Nelles, Lynn; Trivedi, Nayan B.

    Early civilizations have relied upon their good sense and experience to develop and improve their food quality. The discovery of soy sauce centuries ago can now be considered one of the earliest protein hydrolysates made by man to improve palatability of foods. Now, it is well known that such savory systems are not just sources for enjoyment but complex semiotic systems that direct the humans to satisfy the body's protein need for their sustenance. Recent developments have resulted in a wide range of cost effective savory flavorings, the best known of which are autolyzed yeast extracts and hydrolyzed vegetable proteins. New technologies have helped researchers to improve the savory characteristics of yeast extracts through the application of Maillard reaction and by generating specific flavor enhancers through the use of enzymes. An interesting parallel exists in the pet food industry, where a similar approach is taken in using animal protein hydrolysates to create palatability enhancers via Maillard reaction scheme. Protein hydrolysates are also utilized extensively as a source of nutrition to the elderly, young children and immuno-compromised patient population. These hydrolysates have an added advantage in having peptides small enough to avoid any chance of an allergenic reaction which sometimes occur with the consumption of larger sized peptides or proteins. Accordingly, protein hydrolysates are required to have an average molecular weight distribution in the range 800-1,500 Da to make them non-allergenic. The technical challenge for scientists involved in food and feed manufacture is to use an appropriate combination of enzymes within the existing economic constraints and other physical factors/limitations, such as heat, pH, and time, to create highly palatable, yet still nutritious and hypoallergenic food formulations.

  6. Working member of a helical downhole motor for drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kochnev, A.M.; Vshivkov, A.N.; Goldobin, V.B.

    1993-06-22

    A working member of a helical downhole motor is described for drilling wells comprising: separate tubular sections having helical teeth arranged in succession and interconnected by connecting elements, each connecting element having the form of a ring, rigidly secured at the tubular sections and having helical teeth of a pitch and a direction equal to a pitch and a direction, respectively, of the helical teeth of the tubular sections, whereas a profile of the helical teeth of the ring is equidistant to a profile of the helical teeth of the sections.

  7. Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy and Megavoltage Computed Tomography for Rectal Cancer: Impact on the Irradiated Volume of Small Bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark Tournel, Koen; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Coninck, Peter; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy A.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is considered to be standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer, but is associated with significant small-bowel toxicity. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent helical tomotherapy and daily megavolt (MV) CT imaging may reduce the irradiated volume of small bowel. Methods and Materials: A 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan with CTV-PTV margins adjusted for laser-skin marks (15, 15, and 10 mm for X, Y, and Z directions, respectively) was compared with helical tomotherapy (IMRT) using the same CTV-PTV margins, and to helical tomotherapy with margins adapted to daily MV-CT imaging (IMRT/IGRT; 8, 11, 7, and 10 mm for X, Y{sub ant}, Y{sub post} and Z resp.) for 11 consecutive patients. The planning goals were to prescribe 43.7 Gy to 95% of the PTV, while minimizing the volume of small bowel receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15} {sub SB}). Results: The mean PTV was reduced from 1857.4 {+-} 256.6 cc to 1462.0 {+-} 222.3 cc, when the CTV-PTV margins were adapted from laser-skin marks to daily MV-CT imaging (p < 0.01). The V{sub 15} {sub SB} decreased from 160.7 {+-} 102.9 cc to 110.9 {+-} 74.0 cc with IMRT and to 81.4 {+-} 53.9 cc with IMRT/IGRT (p < 0.01). The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for developing Grade 2+ diarrhea was reduced from 39.5% to 26.5% with IMRT and to 18.0% with IMRT/IGRT (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The combination of helical tomotherapy and daily MV-CT imaging significantly decreases the irradiated volume of small bowel and its NTCP.

  8. A Partial Palatal Coverage Overdenture Retained by Zygomatic Implants.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Daniel M; Bloom, Mitchell J; Mancia, Gregorio O

    2015-12-01

    Prosthodontic rehabilitation of an atrophic edentulous maxilla can be challenging and is further complicated when multiple risk factors are present. Fixed prostheses require multiple implants for support/retention organized in biomechanically favorable positions in order to afford a good prognosis. Such suitable implant arrangements in an atrophic edentulous ridge can often be difficult to achieve. Removable prostheses require fewer implants for a favorable prognosis and can furthermore take advantage of the additional anatomical structures for support/retention. This clinical treatment will describe the fabrication of a partial palatal coverage overdenture retained by zygomatic implants. PMID:26215793

  9. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Reema Sharma; Bora, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefting along with some associated features. Presence of all the three major features in a single individual is extremely rare. We report a case of 4 year 11 months old child with EEC syndrome having ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and cleft palate and ectrodactyly with some associated features. Clinical features, diagnosis and role of a dentist in the multidisciplinary treatment approach have been elaborated in this case report. PMID:25231046

  10. Oral myiasis involving palatal mucosa of a young female.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suresh; Tyagi, Shallu; Kumar, Prince; Puri, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    In literal terms myiasis is the invasion of the tissues and organs of human beings by fly larvae. This phenomenon is well documented in the skin, especially among animals and people in developed and developing countries. When the tissues of oral cavity are invaded by the parasitic larvae of flies, the condition is called as oral myiasis. With the paper we are presenting a case of 19-year-old female suffering from oral myiasis of upper lip and palate. The treatment consisted of manual removal of the larvae, surgical debridement of the wound and oral therapy with doxycycline used as a locally acting drug for faster and better recovery. PMID:24678227

  11. Oral focal mucinosis of palatal mucosa: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Vipin; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    Oral focal mucinosis (OFM), an oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis, is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Its pathogenesis may be due to the overproduction of hyaluronic acid by a fibroblast, at the expense of collagen production, resulting in focal myxoid degeneration of the connective tissue, primarily affecting the mucosa overlying the bone. It has no distinctive clinical features, as the diagnosis is solely based on the histopathological features. This article reports of a 32-year-old female having the rare disease of oral focal mucinosis, involving the posterior palatal mucosa, and discusses its clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of myxomatous lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:23230367

  12. S-duality and helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, Kitran; Terning, John

    2016-03-01

    We examine interacting Abelian theories at low energies and show that holomorphically normalized photon helicity amplitudes transform into dual amplitudes under SL(2, {Z} ) as modular forms with weights that depend on the number of positive and negative helicity photons and on the number of internal photon lines. Moreover, canonically normalized helicity amplitudes transform by a phase, so that even though the amplitudes are not duality invariant, their squares are duality invariant. We explicitly verify the duality transformation at one loop by comparing the amplitudes in the case of an electron and the dyon that is its SL(2, {Z} ) image, and extend the invariance of squared amplitudes order by order in perturbation theory. We demonstrate that S-duality is a property of all low-energy effective Abelian theories with electric and/or magnetic charges and see how the duality generically breaks down at high energies.

  13. Heat Loss by Helicity Injection II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    2006-04-25

    Arguments are reviewed showing that helicity transport always flattens the temperature profile, yielding unit current amplification in SSPX and flat temperature profiles in RFP's whenever the dynamo is active. The argument is based on transport theory yielding a hyper-resistivity {Lambda} {approx} (c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pc}{sup 2}){chi}{sub c} with electron thermal diffusivity {chi}{sub c}, valid for any process producing a random-walk in electron constants of motion in the unperturbed field. The theory could be tested by deriving {Lambda} from helicity transport in SSPX, by analogy with recent analysis yielding {chi}{sub c} from heat transport. If the predicted ratio {Lambda}/{chi}{sub c} is confirmed, efforts to increase current amplification in SSPX must be based on scenario scenarios consistent with slow helicity transport compared to heat s transport (pulsed reactor, multipulse, neutral beam injection).

  14. Single-superfield helical-phase inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketov, Sergei V.; Terada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Large-field inflation in supergravity requires the approximate global symmetry needed to protect flatness of the scalar potential. In helical-phase inflation, the U(1) symmetry of the Kähler potential is assumed, the phase part of the complex scalar of a chiral superfield plays the role of inflaton, and the radial part is strongly stabilized. The original model of helical phase inflation, proposed by Li, Li and Nanopoulos (LLN), employs an extra (stabilizer) superfield. We propose a more economical new class of the helical phase inflationary models without a stabilizer superfield. As the specific examples, the quadratic, the natural, and the Starobinsky-type inflationary models are studied in our approach.

  15. Demonstration of steady inductive helicity injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, P. E.; Jarboe, T. R.; Izzo, V. A.; Hamp, W. T.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Redd, A. J.; Smith, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Initial results demonstrating the concept of constant inductive helicity injection are presented. Constant helicity injection is achieved using two oscillating inductive helicity injectors, with the goal of producing a bow tie spheromak. Each injector is a 180° segment of a reverse field pinch and they are driven 90° out of phase. Approximately 5 MW of power is injected during the 6 ms pulse, and the input power has been maintained at a fairly constant value by directly fuelling the injectors with neutral gas. Motivation for the experiment is given, including beta-limit calculations for the bow tie spheromak. Fuelling the injectors with neutral gas during the discharge is shown to produce injector parameters that are more constant in time. A series of discharges with increasing power input shows a promising increase in toroidal current. Unique construction techniques of the experiment are also described.

  16. Helical motion of chiral liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Sano, Masaki

    Artificial swimmers have been intensively studied to understand the mechanism of the locomotion and collective behaviors of cells and microorganisms. Among them, most of the artificial swimmers are designed to move along the straight path. However, in biological systems, chiral dynamics such as circular and helical motion are quite common because of the chirality of their bodies, which are made of chiral biomolecules. To understand the role of the chirality in the physics of microswimmers, we designed chiral artificial swimmers and the theoretical model for the chiral motion. We found that chiral liquid crystal droplets, when dispersed in surfactant solutions, swim in the helical path induced by the Marangoni effect. We will discuss the mechanism of the helical motion with our phenomenological model. This work is supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (Grant No. 26.9814), and MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 25103004.

  17. Structural Transition from Helices to Hemihelices

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tianxiang; Bertoldi, Katia; Clarke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are amongst the most common structures in nature and in some cases, such as tethered plant tendrils, a more complex but related shape, the hemihelix forms. In its simplest form it consists of two helices of opposite chirality joined by a perversion. A recent, simple experiment using elastomer strips reveals that hemihelices with multiple reversals of chirality can also occur, a richness not anticipated by existing analyses. Here, we show through analysis and experiments that the transition from a helical to a hemihelical shape, as well as the number of perversions, depends on the height to width ratio of the strip's cross-section. Our findings provides the basis for the deterministic manufacture of a variety of complex three-dimensional shapes from flat strips. PMID:24759785

  18. Helicity and singular structures in fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, H. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Helicity is, like energy, a quadratic invariant of the Euler equations of ideal fluid flow, although, unlike energy, it is not sign definite. In physical terms, it represents the degree of linkage of the vortex lines of a flow, conserved when conditions are such that these vortex lines are frozen in the fluid. Some basic properties of helicity are reviewed, with particular reference to (i) its crucial role in the dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in cosmic systems; (ii) its bearing on the existence of Euler flows of arbitrarily complex streamline topology; (iii) the constraining role of the analogous magnetic helicity in the determination of stable knotted minimum-energy magnetostatic structures; and (iv) its role in depleting nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes equations, with implications for the coherent structures and energy cascade of turbulence. In a final section, some singular phenomena in low Reynolds number flows are briefly described. PMID:24520175

  19. The Etiology of Cleft Palate Formation in BMP7-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouskoura, Thaleia; Kozlova, Anastasiia; Alexiou, Maria; Blumer, Susanne; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Graf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Palatogenesis is a complex process implying growth, elevation and fusion of the two lateral palatal shelves during embryogenesis. This process is tightly controlled by genetic and mechanistic cues that also coordinate the growth of other orofacial structures. Failure at any of these steps can result in cleft palate, which is a frequent craniofacial malformation in humans. To understand the etiology of cleft palate linked to the BMP signaling pathway, we studied palatogenesis in Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. Bmp7 expression was found in several orofacial structures including the edges of the palatal shelves prior and during their fusion. Bmp7 deletion resulted in a general alteration of oral cavity morphology, unpaired palatal shelf elevation, delayed shelf approximation, and subsequent lack of fusion. Cell proliferation and expression of specific genes involved in palatogenesis were not altered in Bmp7-deficient embryos. Conditional ablation of Bmp7 with Keratin14-Cre or Wnt1-Cre revealed that neither epithelial nor neural crest-specific loss of Bmp7 alone could recapitulate the cleft palate phenotype. Palatal shelves from mutant embryos were able to fuse when cultured in vitro as isolated shelves in proximity, but not when cultured as whole upper jaw explants. Thus, deformations in the oral cavity of Bmp7-deficient embryos such as the shorter and wider mandible were not solely responsible for cleft palate formation. These findings indicate a requirement for Bmp7 for the coordination of both developmental and mechanistic aspects of palatogenesis. PMID:23516636

  20. Metric Analysis of the Hard Palate in Children with Down Syndrome--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagyalakshmi, Gopalan; Renukarya, Annappa Jai; Rajangam, Sayee

    2007-01-01

    The hard palate is viewed as playing an important role in the passive articulation of speech. Its probable role in the defective articulation of speech in individuals with Down syndrome has been examined in the present study. In individuals with Down syndrome, the hard palate is highly arched, constricted, and narrow and stair type with malformed…

  1. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  2. MECHANISMS OF TCDD-INDUCTION OF CLEFT PALATE: INSIGHTS FROM IN VIVO AND IN VITRO APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TCDD induced cleft palate (CP) in C57BL6N embryos by altering proliferation and differentiation of palatal medial epithelial cells. hese effects correlated with altered expression of the growth factors, TGF-a,EGF. TGF-B1 and TGF-B2, and the EGF receptor. ynergistic interactions b...

  3. Palatal Activity in Voicing Distinctions: A Simultaneous Fiberoptic and Electromyographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell-Berti, Fredericka; Hirose, Hajime

    1975-01-01

    A study of electromyographic (EMG) activity and palatal movement is reported. Motion pictures were taken of the nasal surface of the soft palate and EMG recordings from the levator palatini muscle were obtained. Both were analyzed for the relationship of velar height to EMG strength and time. (SC)

  4. PALATAL EXPRESSION OF TGFB ISOFORMS IN NORMAL AND RETINOIC ACID-TREATED EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic Acid (RA) is know to induce cleft palate in all mammalian species tested. he aetiology of RA-induced cleft palate has been extensively investigated in C57B16 mouse embryos by one of us 1. e have recently shown distinct site- and stage-specific expression pattern of the R...

  5. EFFECTS OF 5-FLUOROURACIL ON EMBRYONIC RAT PALATE IN VITRO: FUSION IN THE ABSENCE OF PROLIFERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) inhibits the enzyme thymidylate synthetase (TS) which results in inhibition of DNA synthesis. 5-FU is teratogenic in many species, inducing cleft palate, limb, and tail defects. n the present study, GD 14 embryonic rat palates were exposed to 5-FU in organ c...

  6. The etiology of cleft palate formation in BMP7-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, Thaleia; Kozlova, Anastasiia; Alexiou, Maria; Blumer, Susanne; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias; Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Graf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Palatogenesis is a complex process implying growth, elevation and fusion of the two lateral palatal shelves during embryogenesis. This process is tightly controlled by genetic and mechanistic cues that also coordinate the growth of other orofacial structures. Failure at any of these steps can result in cleft palate, which is a frequent craniofacial malformation in humans. To understand the etiology of cleft palate linked to the BMP signaling pathway, we studied palatogenesis in Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. Bmp7 expression was found in several orofacial structures including the edges of the palatal shelves prior and during their fusion. Bmp7 deletion resulted in a general alteration of oral cavity morphology, unpaired palatal shelf elevation, delayed shelf approximation, and subsequent lack of fusion. Cell proliferation and expression of specific genes involved in palatogenesis were not altered in Bmp7-deficient embryos. Conditional ablation of Bmp7 with Keratin14-Cre or Wnt1-Cre revealed that neither epithelial nor neural crest-specific loss of Bmp7 alone could recapitulate the cleft palate phenotype. Palatal shelves from mutant embryos were able to fuse when cultured in vitro as isolated shelves in proximity, but not when cultured as whole upper jaw explants. Thus, deformations in the oral cavity of Bmp7-deficient embryos such as the shorter and wider mandible were not solely responsible for cleft palate formation. These findings indicate a requirement for Bmp7 for the coordination of both developmental and mechanistic aspects of palatogenesis. PMID:23516636

  7. Effects of Listening Instructions and Severity of Cleft Palate Speech on Listeners. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shames, George H.; And Others

    Mothers of cleft and noncleft palate children (C- and non C-mothers) listened to a reading by a cleft palate child of a passage containing specified combinations of nasality and intelligibility. Groups were either uninstructed or instructed to listed to the content or the manner of speech; they assessed the nasality and intelligibility of the…

  8. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  9. Vocal Development of 9-Month-Old Babies with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Kathy L.; Hardin-Jones, Mary; Schulte, Julie; Halter, Kelli Ann

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the prelinguistic vocal development of 30 9- month-old babies with unrepaired cleft palate and age-matched peers (N=15). Fewer of the babies with cleft palate had reached the canonical babbling stage (57 percent versus 93 percent) and had smaller consonant inventories. However, syllable types and length and number of…

  10. A Demonstration Project of Speech Training for the Preschool Cleft Palate Child. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert J.

    To ascertain the efficacy of a program of language and speech stimulation for the preschool cleft palate child, a research and demonstration project was conducted using 137 subjects (ages 18 to 72 months) with defects involving the soft palate. Their language and speech skills were matched with those of a noncleft peer group revealing that the…

  11. Perception of Place of Articulation by Children with Cleft Palate and Posterior Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Francis, Alexander L.; Ching, Christine K-Y.

    2003-01-01

    A study examined if 10 children (ages 4-12) with repaired cleft palate who demonstrate posterior placement of alveolar targets differed from 10 children with cleft palate without such error patterns, and from 10 controls in the perception of alveolar targets. Children with posterior placement appeared unable to distinguish alveolar targets.…

  12. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  13. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  14. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  15. The Interrelationships between Ratings of Speech and Facial Acceptability in Persons with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinko, Garnet R.; Hedrick, Dona L.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty untrained young adult observers rated the speech and facial acceptablity of 20 speakers with cleft palate. The observers were reliable in rating both speech and facial acceptability. Judgments of facial acceptability were generally more positive, suggesting that speech is generally judged more negatively in speakers with cleft palate.…

  16. Psychosocial Aspects of Cleft Lip and Palate: Implications for Parental Education. Research Report 138.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalland, Mirjam

    This study focused on the psychosocial aspects of cleft lip and/or palate on maternal emotional reactions and the family, with emphasis on the effect on the maternal-infant bond. Interviews were conducted with 40 mothers of 1-year-old infants with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenological…

  17. A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harvey R.; Ferrand, Carole T.

    1987-01-01

    Respirometric quotients (RQ), the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained from the productions of oral and nasal airflow of 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. Cleft palate speakers without their appliances exhibited the lowest RQ values. (Author/DB)

  18. Acquisition of Linguistic and Cognitive Skills by Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broen, Patricia A.; Devers, Monica C.; Doyle, Shirley S.; Prouty, Jo McCauley; Moller, Karlind T.

    1998-01-01

    This study compared cognitive and linguistic development of young children with (N=28) and without (N=29) cleft palate. Children with cleft palate, although well within the normal range, performed significantly below the control group on cognitive and linguistic tests. Cognitive differences were linguistic in nature and were related to hearing…

  19. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Pamplona, Maria Carmen; Calderon, Juan F.; Shaheen, Kenneth; Chaiyasate, Konkgrit; Rontal, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management. PMID:26273595

  20. An adaptive approach to metal artifact reduction in helical computed tomography for radiation therapy treatment planning: Experimental and clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdia, Mehran; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc . E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, an approach to metal artifact reduction is proposed that is practical for clinical use in radiation therapy. It is based on a new interpolation scheme of the projections associated with metal implants in helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. Methods and Materials: A three-step approach was developed consisting of an automatic algorithm for metal implant detection, a correction algorithm for helical projections, and a new, efficient algorithm for projection interpolation. The modified raw projection data are transferred back to the CT scanner device where CT slices are regenerated using the built-in reconstruction operator. The algorithm was tested on a CT calibration phantom in which the density of inserted objects are known and on clinical prostate cases with two hip prostheses. The results are evaluated using the CT number and shape of the objects. Results: The validations on a CT calibration phantom with various inserts of known densities show that the algorithm improved the overall image quality by restoring the shape and the representative CT number of the objects in the image. For the clinical hip replacement cases, a large fraction of the bladder, rectum, and prostate that were not visible on the original CT slices were recovered using the algorithm. Precise contouring of the target volume was thus feasible. Without this enhancement, physicians would have drawn bigger margins to be sure to include the target and, at the same time, could have prescribed a lower dose to keep the same level of normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: In both phantom experiment and patient studies, the algorithm resulted in significant artifact reduction with increases in the reliability of planning procedure for the case of metallic hip prostheses. This algorithm is now clinically used as a preprocessing before treatment planning for metal artifact reduction.

  1. Primordial magnetic helicity from stochastic electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra

    2014-04-01

    We study the possibility that primordial magnetic fields generated in the transition between inflation and reheating posses magnetic helicity, HM. The fields are induced by stochastic currents of scalar charged particles created during the mentioned transition. We estimate the rms value of the induced magnetic helicity by computing different four-point scalar quantum electrodynamics Feynman diagrams. For any considered volume, the magnetic flux across its boundaries is in principle not null, which means that the magnetic helicity in those regions is gauge dependent. We use the prescription given by Berger and Field and interpret our result as the difference between two magnetic configurations that coincide in the exterior volume. In this case, the magnetic helicity gives only the number of magnetic links inside the considered volume. We calculate a concrete value of HM for large scales and analyze the distribution of magnetic defects as a function of the scale. Those defects correspond to regular as well as random fields in the considered volume. We find that the fractal dimension of the distribution of topological defects is D=1/2. We also study if the regular fields induced on large scales are helical, finding that they are and that the associated number of magnetic defects is independent of the scale. In this case, the fractal dimension is D=0. We finally estimate the intensity of fields induced at the horizon scale of reheating and evolve them until the decoupling of matter and radiation under the hypothesis of the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. The resulting intensity is high enough and the coherence length long enough to have an impact on the subsequent process of structure formation.

  2. Au nanorod helical superstructures with designed chirality.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Lu, Xuxing; Shen, Chenqi; Ke, Yonggang; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-01-14

    A great challenge for nanotechnology is to controllably organize anisotropic nanomaterials into well-defined three-dimensional superstructures with customized properties. Here we successfully constructed anisotropic Au nanorod (AuNR) helical superstructures (helices) with tailored chirality in a programmable manner. By designing the 'X' pattern of the arrangement of DNA capturing strands (15nt) on both sides of a two-dimensional DNA origami template, AuNRs functionalized with the complementary DNA sequences were positioned on the origami and were assembled into AuNR helices with the origami intercalated between neighboring AuNRs. Left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) AuNR helices were conveniently accomplished by solely tuning the mirrored-symmetric 'X' patterns of capturing strands on the origami. The inter-rod distance was precisely defined as 14 nm and inter-rod angle as 45°, thus a full helix contains 9 AuNRs with its length up to about 220 nm. By changing the AuNR/origami molar ratio in the assembly system, the average number of AuNR in the helices was tuned from 2 to 4 and 9. Intense chiroptical activities arose from the longest AuNR helices with a maximum anisotropy factor of ∼0.02, which is highly comparable to the reported macroscopic AuNR assemblies. We expect that our strategy of origami templated assembly of anisotropic chiral superstructures would inspire the bottom-up fabrication of optically active nanostructures and shed light on a variety of applications, such as chiral fluids, chiral signal amplification, and fluorescence combined chiral spectroscopy. PMID:25516475

  3. Helical Axis Data Visualization and Analysis of the Knee Joint Articulation.

    PubMed

    Millán Vaquero, Ricardo Manuel; Vais, Alexander; Dean Lynch, Sean; Rzepecki, Jan; Friese, Karl-Ingo; Hurschler, Christof; Wolter, Franz-Erich

    2016-09-01

    We present processing methods and visualization techniques for accurately characterizing and interpreting kinematical data of flexion-extension motion of the knee joint based on helical axes. We make use of the Lie group of rigid body motions and particularly its Lie algebra for a natural representation of motion sequences. This allows to analyze and compute the finite helical axis (FHA) and instantaneous helical axis (IHA) in a unified way without redundant degrees of freedom or singularities. A polynomial fitting based on Legendre polynomials within the Lie algebra is applied to provide a smooth description of a given discrete knee motion sequence which is essential for obtaining stable instantaneous helical axes for further analysis. Moreover, this allows for an efficient overall similarity comparison across several motion sequences in order to differentiate among several cases. Our approach combines a specifically designed patient-specific three-dimensional visualization basing on the processed helical axes information and incorporating computed tomography (CT) scans for an intuitive interpretation of the axes and their geometrical relation with respect to the knee joint anatomy. In addition, in the context of the study of diseases affecting the musculoskeletal articulation, we propose to integrate the above tools into a multiscale framework for exploring related data sets distributed across multiple spatial scales. We demonstrate the utility of our methods, exemplarily processing a collection of motion sequences acquired from experimental data involving several surgery techniques. Our approach enables an accurate analysis, visualization and comparison of knee joint articulation, contributing to the evaluation and diagnosis in medical applications. PMID:27367532

  4. Data correction for gantry-tilted local CT.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongzhu; Zhang, Cishen; Yan, Ming

    2008-06-01

    The gantry-tilted helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has an inherent problem that the relative shift of the region of interest (ROI) blurs the reconstructed image. This problem becomes more serious in the gantry-tilted local CT imaging due to the nature of local scanning. This paper proposes a new method to improve the gantry-tilted local imaging by correcting the local scanning data. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can enhance the local imaging performance to a certain extent in terms of the image sharpening and artifacts reduction. PMID:18314308

  5. Two-impurity helical Majorana problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Erik; Zazunov, Alex; Sodano, Pasquale; Egger, Reinhold

    2015-02-01

    We predict experimentally accessible signatures for helical Majorana fermions in a topological superconductor by coupling to two quantum dots in the local moment regime (corresponding to spin-1 /2 impurities). Taking into account Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions mediated by bulk and edge modes, where the latter cause a long-range antiferromagnetic Ising coupling, we formulate and solve the low-energy theory for this two-impurity helical Majorana problem. In particular, we show that the long-time spin dynamics after a magnetic field quench displays weakly damped oscillations with universal quality factor.

  6. A quantitative method for defining high-arched palate using the Tcof1(+/-) mutant mouse as a model.

    PubMed

    Conley, Zachary R; Hague, Molly; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-15

    The palate functions as the roof of the mouth in mammals, separating the oral and nasal cavities. Its complex embryonic development and assembly poses unique susceptibilities to intrinsic and extrinsic disruptions. Such disruptions may cause failure of the developing palatal shelves to fuse along the midline resulting in a cleft. In other cases the palate may fuse at an arch, resulting in a vaulted oral cavity, termed high-arched palate. There are many models available for studying the pathogenesis of cleft palate but a relative paucity for high-arched palate. One condition exhibiting either cleft palate or high-arched palate is Treacher Collins syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by numerous craniofacial anomalies. We quantitatively analyzed palatal perturbations in the Tcof1(+/-) mouse model of Treacher Collins syndrome, which phenocopies the condition in humans. We discovered that 46% of Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and new born pups exhibit either soft clefts or full clefts. In addition, 17% of Tcof1(+/-) mutants were found to exhibit high-arched palate, defined as two sigma above the corresponding wild-type population mean for height and angular based arch measurements. Furthermore, palatal shelf length and shelf width were decreased in all Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and pups compared to controls. Interestingly, these phenotypes were subsequently ameliorated through genetic inhibition of p53. The results of our study therefore provide a simple, reproducible and quantitative method for investigating models of high-arched palate. PMID:26772999

  7. The Impact of Early Intervention on Speech and Lexical Development for Toddlers with Cleft Palate: A Retrospective Look at Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin-Jones, Mary; Chapman, Kathy L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the impact of early intervention on speech and lexical measures for toddlers with cleft palate. Method: Speech measures of ten 27-month-old toddlers with cleft palate who had been referred for therapy at 17 months of age were compared to those of 10 toddlers with cleft palate who had…

  8. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  9. Rapid Maxillary Expansion to Correct Palatal Fracture Malunion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, Prasad; Vikrant; Aravind, Narahari Kalyana Srinivas; Bindra, Sukhvinder

    2016-01-01

    Mid palatal fractures are usually present in conjunction with Le Fort I maxillary fractures. Literature on isolated mid palatal fractures as seen in this case is relatively rare. A novel approach for the management of this case was undertaken. A rapid maxillary expander was used to separate palatal segments which healed well. The patient’s crossbite and open bite was corrected with elastic use. The protocol of management of malunion of isolated mid palatal fractures is simple with reduced costs, morbidity and higher rates of acceptance. We report a case of a 26-year-old male patient involved in a road traffic accident leading to an isolated mid palatal fracture which is a rare entity. Due to lack of specialized care, the fracture fragments united inadequately resulting in deranged occlusion, open bite and reduced masticatory efficiency. PMID:27437371

  10. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Mridula; Jangra, Babita; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  11. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  12. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C. E.; Belova, E. V.; Brown, M. R.; Gray, T.; Cothran, C. D.; Schaffer, M. J.

    2011-11-15

    Recent counter-helicity spheromak merging experiments in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) have produced a novel compact torus (CT) with unusual features. These include a persistent antisymmetric toroidal magnetic field profile and a slow, nonlinear emergence of the n = 1 tilt mode. Experimental measurements are inconclusive as to whether this unique CT is a fully merged field-reversed configuration (FRC) with strong toroidal field or a partially merged ''doublet CT'' configuration with both spheromak- and FRC-like characteristics. In this paper, the SSX merging process is studied in detail using three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations from the Hybrid Magnetohydrodynamics (HYM) code. These simulations show that merging plasmas in the SSX parameter regime only partially reconnect, leaving behind a doublet CT rather than an FRC. Through direct comparisons, we show that the magnetic structure in the simulations is highly consistent with the SSX experimental observations. We also find that the n = 1 tilt mode begins as a fast growing linear mode that evolves into a slower-growing nonlinear mode before being detected experimentally. A simulation parameter scan over resistivity, viscosity, and line-tying shows that these parameters can strongly affect the behavior of both the merging process and the tilt mode. In fact, merging in certain parameter regimes is found to produce a toroidal-field-free FRC rather than a doublet CT.

  13. Functional role of TGF-β receptors during palatal fusion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Akira; Ito, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Eiji; Sano, Remi; Karasawa, Yoko; Maeno, Masao; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Shuler, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reported expression patterns for TGF-β receptors (TβR-I, -II, and -III) during palatogenesis suggest that they play essential roles in the mechanisms leading to palatal fusion. The purpose of this study was to compare the functions of the three TβRs during palatal fusion. Methods Using organ culture of mouse palatal shelves, expression levels of TβR-I, -II, and -III were suppressed by transfecting the siRNAs siTβR-I, -II, and -III, respectively. Phosphorylation of SMAD2 was examined as an indicator of downstream signaling via each TβR. Linkage between TGF-β signaling and critical events in palatal fusion led to the use of, MMP-13 expression as an outcome measure for the function of the TGF-β receptors. Results The siRNA treatment decreased the expression level of each receptor by more than 85%. When treated with either siTβR-I or -II, palatal shelves at E13 + 72 h were not fused, with complete clefting in the anterior and posterior regions. The middle palatal region following treatment with either siTβR-I or -II had fusion from one-half or one-third of the palatal region. Treatment with siTβR-III resulted in a persistent midline seam of medial edge epithelium (MEE) in the anterior region with islands of persistent MEE in the middle and posterior regions of the midline. Treatment with all three siTβRs altered the pattern of SMAD2 phosphorylation. Palatal shelf cultures treated with siTβR-I or -II, but not -III, showed altered MMP-13 expression levels. Conclusion The ability to identify and recover MEE and palatal mesenchymal cells during palatal fusion will aid in the evaluation of the different mechanistic events regulated by each TβR during palatogenesis. PMID:25105252

  14. Negative Dystonia of the Palate: A Novel Entity and Diagnostic Consideration in Hypernasal Speech

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Catherine F.; Simonyan, Kristina; Brin, Mitchell F.; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present the first documented series of patients with negative dystonia (ND) of the palate, including clinical symptoms, functional MRI findings, and management options. Study Design Case series ascertained from clinical research centers that evaluated patients with both hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorders. Methods Between July 1983 and March 2013, data was collected on patient demographics, disease characteristics, functional MRI findings, long-term management options, and outcomes. We sought patients whose clinical examination demonstrated absent palatal movement on speaking, despite normal palatal activity on other activities. Results Five patients (2 males, 3 females) met clinical criteria. All patients presented with hypernasal speech without associated dysphagia. Clinical examination revealed absent palatal movement on speaking despite intact gag reflexes, normal palate elevation on swallowing, and normal cranial nerve examinations. Other cranial and/or limb dystonias were present in four patients (80.0%). Three patients (60.0%) had previously failed oral pharmacologic therapy. Two patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, which demonstrated an overall decrease of cortical and subcortical activation during production of symptomatic syllables and asymptomatic coughing. Management included speech therapy (all patients) and palatal lift (2 patients) with limited improvement. Calcium hydroxyapatite injection (1 patient) into the soft palate and Passavants’ ridge was beneficial. Conclusions This is the first report of ND of the palate. Characteristic findings were task-specific absent palatal movement with speech, despite normal movement on swallowing, coughing, and an intact gag reflex, as well as disorder-specific decreased brain activation on functional MRI. A diagnosis of ND of the palate should be considered for patients who present with hypernasal speech. Level of Evidence 4. PMID:25646795

  15. Structure and Protein-Protein Interaction Studies on Chlamydia trachomatis Protein CT670 (YscO Homolog)

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzini, Emily; Singer, Alexander; Singh, Bhag; Lam, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Savchenko, Alexei; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2010-07-28

    Comparative genomic studies have identified many proteins that are found only in various Chlamydiae species and exhibit no significant sequence similarity to any protein in organisms that do not belong to this group. The CT670 protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the proteins whose genes are in one of the type III secretion gene clusters but whose cellular functions are not known. CT670 shares several characteristics with the YscO protein of Yersinia pestis, including the neighboring genes, size, charge, and secondary structure, but the structures and/or functions of these proteins remain to be determined. Although a BLAST search with CT670 did not identify YscO as a related protein, our analysis indicated that these two proteins exhibit significant sequence similarity. In this paper, we report that the CT670 crystal, solved at a resolution of 2 {angstrom}, consists of a single coiled coil containing just two long helices. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that in solution CT670 exists in both monomeric and dimeric forms and that the monomer predominates at lower protein concentrations. We examined the interaction of CT670 with many type III secretion system-related proteins (viz., CT091, CT665, CT666, CT667, CT668, CT669, CT671, CT672, and CT673) by performing bacterial two-hybrid assays. In these experiments, CT670 was found to interact only with the CT671 protein (YscP homolog), whose gene is immediately downstream of ct670. A specific interaction between CT670 and CT671 was also observed when affinity chromatography pull-down experiments were performed. These results suggest that CT670 and CT671 are putative homologs of the YcoO and YscP proteins, respectively, and that they likely form a chaperone-effector pair.

  16. [A case of palatal polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, S; Tanaka, T; Nibu, K; Ishibashi, T; Ichimura, K; Yamada, A

    1995-07-01

    We present a 58-year-old male patient with bilateral cheek swelling and an extraorally protruding tumor who has had deaf mutism since birth. He underwent surgery of the right hard palate 11 years ago. Five years later biopsy was performed for a recurrent lesion diagnosed as pleomorphic adenoma. He refused additional treatment and the size of the tumor subsequently increased slowly. As rapid tumor-growth had been observed since autumn of 1992, he was referred to Tokyo University Hospital. We took meticulous care of this deaf-mute patient, especially from the psychological aspect, which caused him to place great reliance upon us. We performed bilateral maxillectomy with partial resection of the right cheek skin and reconstructed his face and palate successfully using both latissmus dorsi and serratus anterior musculocutaneous free flaps with a rib. Histopathological diagnosis of the tumor was polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma, which was registered as a definite entity in the WHO Classification in 1991. There was no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis one year postoperatively. PMID:7562229

  17. Causal attributions of cleft lip and palate across cultures.

    PubMed

    Mednick, Lauren; Snyder, Julie; Schook, Carolyn; Blood, Emily A; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Weatherley-White, R C A

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To describe and compare the causal beliefs associated with cleft lips and/or palates across several different countries. Design : Cross-sectional survey. Setting : Operation Smile surgery screenings in six developing countries. Participants : Two hundred seventy-nine adult patients and parents of children with cleft lips and/or palates in Kenya, Russia, Cambodia, India, Egypt, and Peru. Interventions : In person interviews were conducted with interpreters. Main Outcome Measure : As part of a larger study, a semistructured questionnaire was created to explore cleft perceptions, belief systems that affect these perceptions, and social reactions to individuals with clefts. Results : Causal attributions were grouped by category (environment, self-blame, supernatural, chance, unknown, or other) and type of locus of control (external, internal, or unknown). Results indicate significant difference by country for both causal attribution category (P < .001) and type (P < .001). This difference was maintained in multivariate analyses, which controlled for differences by demographic variables between countries. Conclusions : This study provides evidence that causal attributions for clefts are influenced by culture. As harmful beliefs about cause may continue to impact affected individuals and their families even after a repair, it is insufficient to provide surgical care alone. Care of the entire person must include attempts to change misinformed cultural beliefs through educating the broader community. PMID:23030676

  18. Relations between anterior permanent teeth, dental arches and hard palate.

    PubMed

    Petricević, Nikola; Stipetić, Jasmina; Antonić, Robert; Borcić, Josipa; Strujić, Mihovil; Kovacić, Ivan; Celebić, Asja

    2008-12-01

    The width and length of the anterior teeth, the dimensions of the frontal dental arches and the dimensions of the hard palate were measured (24 men and 56 women, age range of 18-30 years). The results showed gender-related dimorphism only for the cervical width of the maxillary canine, which were wider in men, p < 0.05. The width-to-length ratios of the maxillary frontal teeth varied from 0.82 to 0.91. The tooth-to-tooth width ratios among different maxillary frontal teeth varied from 0.78 to 0.91. The sum of all anterior maxillary teeth widths was equal to the hamular width and to the distal maxillary arch width (p > 0.05), meaning that the sum of the frontal artificial teeth width may be selected upon the measurement of the hamular width on the hard palate. The ratios between the maxillary and the mandibular frontal dental arch dimensions are representative values for the skeletal class I. PMID:19149214

  19. Reduced Palatability in Pain-Induced Conditioned Taste Aversions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-You; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether internal pain-inducing agents can modulate palatability of a tastant in the same way as illness-inducing agents (e.g., lithium chloride). Similar to traditional conditioned taste aversion (CTA) experiments, during conditioning the rats were exposed to a saccharin solution followed by intraperitoneal injections of either gallamine (Experiment 1) or hypertonic sodium chloride (NaCl; Experiments 1 and 2). In addition to the total amount consumed, the time of each lick was recorded for lick pattern analysis. The results showed that both gallamine and hypertonic NaCl caused suppression in saccharin intake. Importantly, both lick cluster size and initial lick rate (the measures of taste palatability) were reduced as well. This pattern of results suggests that these pain-inducing agents reduce the hedonic value of the associated tastant and thus CTA is acquired. The current finding serves as evidence supporting the view that CTA is a broadly tuned mechanism that can be triggered by changes in internal body states following consummatory experience. PMID:23769688

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  1. Modulation of BMP signaling by Noggin is required for the maintenance of palatal epithelial integrity during palatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Fenglei; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Ying; Matsui, Maiko; Yu, Xueyan; Chai, Yang; Klingensmith, John; Chen, YiPing

    2010-01-01

    BMP signaling plays many important roles during organ development, including palatogenesis. Loss of BMP signaling leads to cleft palate formation. During development, BMP activities are finely tuned by a number of modulators at the extracellular and intracellular levels. Among the extracellular BMP antagonists is Noggin, which preferentialy binds to BMP2, BMP4 and BMP7, all of which are expressed in the developing palatal shelves. Here we use targeted Noggin mutant mice as a model for gain of BMP signaling function to investigate the role of BMP signaling in palate development. We find prominent Noggin expression in the palatal epithelium along the anterior-posterior axis during early palate development. Loss of Noggin function leads to overactive BMP signaling, particularly in the palatal epithelium. This results in disregulation of cell proliferation, excessive cell death, and changes in gene expression, leading to formation of complete palatal cleft. The excessive cell death in the epithelium disrupts the palatal epithelium integrity, which in turn leads to an abnormal palate-mandible fusion and prevents palatal shelf elevation. This phenotype is recapitulated by ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of BMPR-IA but not BMPR-IB in the epithelium of the developing palate; this suggests a role for BMPR-IA in mediating overactive BMP signaling in the absence of Noggin. Together with the evidence that overexpression of Noggin in the palatal epithelium does not cause a cleft palate defect, we conclude from our results that Noggin mediated modulation of BMP signaling is essential for palatal epithelium integrity and for normal palate development. PMID:20727875

  2. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2007-03-01

    Multislice CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multislice CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. Moreover, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by using a lung cancer screening algorithm built into mobile helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening done in the region without the hospital. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system.

  3. QCD Evolution of Helicity and Transversity TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  4. Theory of helical electron beams in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuftin, A.N.; Lygin, V.K.; Manuilov, V.N.; Raisky, B.V.; Solujanova, E.A.; Tsimring, S.E.

    1993-04-01

    Helical electron beams (HEB) with disturbed axial symmetry of currents density and HEB with locking electrons in magnetic trap are described. The theory of magnetron injection gun (MIG) in space-charge limited current is developed. Systems on permanent magnets forming HEB are considered. 30 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Dynamics of helical states in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Stefano; Auriemma, F.; Brower, D.; Chapman, B. E.; den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Duff, J.; Franz, P.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D.; Lin, L.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Morton, L.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    The thermal and the magnetic dynamics of quasi-single-helicity (QSH) plasmas evolve independently during the formation and sustainment of the core helical structure. At higher plasma current (and Lundquist number) MST plasmas transition from an axisymmetric multi-helicity state to a QSH state characterized by a strong core helical mode and reduced secondary mode amplitudes. Plasmas in the QSH state tend to wall-lock, often in an orientation that is unfavorable for optimized measurements of the 3D structure using MST's advanced diagnostics. Recently a technique to control the locking position through an applied resonant magnetic perturbation has been developed. Using this technique it is possible to adjust the 3D phase more optimally for specific diagnostics, to study the dynamics of the QSH structure and thermal features. The multi-chord FIR interferometer shows the presence of a density structure for the duration of the QSH state. Measurements of the time evolution of the electron temperature profile using the Thomson Scattering diagnostic reveal that the transition to QSH allows the presence of a 3D thermal structure, but this structure is intermittent. Understanding the mechanism(s) driving these dynamics is the goal of this work. Work supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  6. Deformation of flexible micro helices under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daieff, Marine; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Morozov, Alexander; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    The interaction of small helices with fluids is important because of its relevance to both fundamental science and technological applications, such as swimming microrobots or microflow sensors. Helically shaped flagella are also exploited by swimming microorganisms to move through their surrounding fluids. Here we study experimentally the deformation of flexible helical ribbons under flow in a microfluidic channel. The size of the helix is typically microscale for the diameter and nanoscale for the thickness. We focus on two different aspects: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Due to the non-uniform distribution of the pitch under distributed loading, we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Utilizing our system, we explore the impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties on the mechanics of helix-fluid interactions.

  7. Vibration of thin, tensioned, helically wrapped plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ernesto; Müftü, Sinan

    2011-02-01

    Free vibration analysis of a thin tensioned plate, wrapped around a cylindrical guide in a helical manner is presented. The system is a model of a thin, flexible web wrapped around a turn-bar. The equation of motion of the wrapped plate is derived by using the energy method and with the Kirchhoff-Love assumptions. The weak form of the equation of motion was obtained by the finite element method and the eigenvalue problem was solved numerically. The effects of parameters such as plate tension, guide radius, longitudinal and helical wrap angles, plate width, and the lengths of the non-wrapped segments were investigated. Eigenmodes with same mode numbers were observed in symmetric and anti-symmetric fashion about the center of the plate, for symmetrically wrapped plates. It was shown that the plate/shell boundary of the wrapped plate effectively acts like a support. For non-helically wrapped plates the free edges cause a frequency clustering of the lateral modes about the dominant longitudinal mode. The frequency clustering diminishes when helical wrap is introduced.

  8. Bunch Coalescing in a Helical Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Yonehara, K.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    A high-luminosity Muon Collider requires bunch recombination for optimal luminosity. In this paper, we take advantage of the large slip factor attainable in a helical transport channel (HTC) to coalesce bunches of muons into a single one over a shorter distance than can be achieved over a straight channel.

  9. Filament Channel Formation by Helicity Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.

    2013-12-01

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear, in the form of filament channels, at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear also represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. Consequently, the observations raise the question: Why is helicity observed to be concentrated along PILs? Preliminary results of 3D MHD simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) are presented that support the magnetic-helicity condensation model of filament-channel formation (Antiochos 2013). In this work, we address the problem of filament-channel formation by considering supergranular twisting of a quasi-potential flux system, bounded by a PIL and containing a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse-cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH boundary. This, in effect, produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth and, in agreement with Antiochos (2013), are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH. We present a detailed analysis of our simulation results and discuss their implications for observations.

  10. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  11. Phase diagram of two interacting helical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul A.; Gutman, D. B.; Carr, Sam T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider two coupled time-reversal-invariant helical edge modes of the same helicity, such as would occur on two stacked quantum spin Hall insulators. In the presence of interaction, the low-energy physics is described by two collective modes, one corresponding to the total current flowing around the edge and the other one describing relative fluctuations between the two edges. We find that quite generically, the relative mode becomes gapped at low temperatures, but only when tunneling between the two helical modes is nonzero. There are two distinct possibilities for the gapped state depending on the relative size of different interactions. If the intraedge interaction is stronger than the interedge interaction, the state is characterized as a spin-nematic phase. However, in the opposite limit, when the interaction between the helical edge modes is strong compared to the interaction within each mode, a spin-density wave forms, with emergent topological properties. First, the gap protects the conducting phase against localization by weak nonmagnetic impurities; second, the protected phase hosts localized zero modes on the ends of the edge that may be created by sufficiently strong nonmagnetic impurities.

  12. Helically corrugated circular waveguides as antenna feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jecko, F.; Papiernik, A.

    1983-07-01

    Rotation of the plane of polarization of the TE(11)-mode is predicted and observed in a helically corrugated circular waveguide. Rotation is suppressed by a longitudinal deformation produced on the corrugation. This modified structure can be used as an antenna feeder with low losses.

  13. Exabyte helical scan devices at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Kaczar, K.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Votava, M.; White, V.; Hockney, G.; Bracker, S.; de Miranda, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Exabyte 8mm helical scan storage devices are in use at Fermilab in a number of applications. These devices have the functionality of magnetic tape, but use media which is much more economical and much more dense than conventional 9 track tape. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-06-01

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion--a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins--that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magnetic field on spin-polarized electrons. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct visualization of skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets. Topologically, skyrmions are equivalent to magnetic bubbles (cylindrical domains) in ferromagnetic thin films, which were extensively explored in the 1970s for data storage applications. In this study we use Lorentz microscopy to image magnetic domain patterns in the prototypical magnetic oxide-M-type hexaferrite with a hint of scandium. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic bubbles and stripes in the hexaferrite have a much more complex structure than the skyrmions and spirals in helimagnets, which we associate with the new degree of freedom--helicity (or vector spin chirality) describing the direction of spin rotation across the domain walls. We observe numerous random reversals of helicity in the stripe domain state. Random helicity of cylindrical domain walls coexists with the positional order of magnetic bubbles in a triangular lattice. Most unexpectedly, we observe regular helicity reversals inside skyrmions with an unusual multiple-ring structure. PMID:22615354

  15. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  16. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae: Neutrino-induced fluid helicity and helical plasma instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Chirality of neutrinos modifies the conventional kinetic theory and hydrodynamics, leading to unusual chiral transport related to quantum anomalies in field theory. We argue that these corrections have new phenomenological consequences for hot and dense neutrino gases, especially in core-collapse supernovae. We find that the neutrino density can be converted to the fluid helicity through the chiral vortical effect. This fluid helicity effectively acts as a chiral chemical potential for electrons via the momentum exchange with neutrinos and induces a "helical plasma instability" that generates a strong helical magnetic field. This provides a new mechanism for converting the gravitational energy released by the core collapse to the electromagnetic energy and potentially explains the origin of magnetars. The other possible applications of the neutrino chiral transport theory are also discussed.

  17. Systematic analysis of palatal transcriptome to identify cleft palate genes within TGFβ3-knockout mice alleles: RNA-Seq analysis of TGFβ3 Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, cleft palate (CP) accounts for one of the largest number of birth defects with a complex genetic and environmental etiology. TGFβ3 has been established as an important regulator of palatal fusion in mice and it has been shown that TGFβ3-null mice exhibit CP without any other major deformities. However, the genes that regulate cellular decisions and molecular mechanisms maintained by the TGFβ3 pathway throughout palatogenesis are predominantly unexplored. Our objective in this study was to analyze global transcriptome changes within the palate during different gestational ages within TGFβ3 knockout mice to identify TGFβ3-associated genes previously unknown to be associated with the development of cleft palate. We used deep sequencing technology, RNA-Seq, to analyze the transcriptome of TGFβ3 knockout mice at crucial stages of palatogenesis, including palatal growth (E14.5), adhesion (E15.5), and fusion (E16.5). Results The overall transcriptome analysis of TGFβ3 wildtype mice (C57BL/6) reveals that almost 6000 genes were upregulated during the transition from E14.5 to E15.5 and more than 2000 were downregulated from E15.5 to E16.5. Using bioinformatics tools and databases, we identified the most comprehensive list of CP genes (n = 322) in which mutations cause CP either in humans or mice, and analyzed their expression patterns. The expression motifs of CP genes between TGFβ3+/− and TGFβ3−/− were not significantly different from each other, and the expression of the majority of CP genes remained unchanged from E14.5 to E16.5. Using these patterns, we identified 8 unique genes within TGFβ3−/− mice (Chrng, Foxc2, H19, Kcnj13, Lhx8, Meox2, Shh, and Six3), which may function as the primary contributors to the development of cleft palate in TGFβ3−/− mice. When the significantly altered CP genes were overlaid with TGFβ signaling, all of these genes followed the Smad-dependent pathway. Conclusions Our study represents the

  18. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The hemispheric sign rule for solar magnetic helicity, which states that negative/positive helicity occurs preferentially in the northern/southern hemisphere, provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. However, previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been significantly affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulent motions. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning from 2006 to 2012, we studied the effects of two important data processing steps that imitate the effects of atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values that are weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We applied these processing techniques to the helicity distribution maps for active regions NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, along with the average helicities of 36 active regions, in order to imitate and understand the effects of seeing from atmospheric turbulence. We found that rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, Gaussian smoothing and noise reduction enhanced existing trends by pushing outliers towards the mean or removing them altogether. We also found that, when separated for weak and strong magnetic fields, the average helicities of the 36 active regions conformed to the hemisphere rule for weak field helicities and breached the rule for strong field helicities. In general, we found that data processing did not affect whether the hemisphere rule held for data taken from space-based instruments, and thus that seeing from atmospheric turbulence did not significantly affect previous studies' ground-based results on the hemisphere rule. This work was carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  19. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goat Palates

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Michael C.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Panter, Kip E.; McClellan, W. Thomas; Caterson, Stefanie A.; Buchman, Steven R.; Faulkner, John A.; Yu, Deborah; Cederna, Paul S.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Inherent differences in the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle of cleft palates before palatoplasty may play a role in persistent postrepair velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Contractile properties of LVP muscle fibers were analyzed from young (2-month) normal (YNP), young congenitally cleft (YCP) and again on the same YCP subjects 6 months after palatoplasty, mature repaired palate (MRP). The cross-sectional area and rate of force development (ktr) were measured. Specific force (sF0) and normalized power (nPmax) were calculated. Using ktr to determine fiber type composition, YNP was 44% type 1 and 56% type 2, while YCP was 100% type 2. Two MRP subjects shifted to 100% type 1; 1 demonstrated increased resistance to fatigue. No differences in sF0 were observed. nPmax increased with presence of type 2 fibers. The persistent state of type 2 fibers following palatoplasty leads to increased fatigue in the LVP of MRP subjects and may cause VPI symptoms. PMID:18216514

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of cleft lip/palate: The surface rendered oro-palatal (SROP) view of the fetal lips and palate, a tool to improve information-sharing within the orofacial team and with the parents.

    PubMed

    Levaillant, Jean-Marc; Nicot, Romain; Benouaiche, Laurence; Couly, Gérard; Rotten, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The ultrasonographic surface rendered oro-palatal (SROP) view is a 3D reconstructed view of the fetal perioral region, which combines ultrasound insonation in a trans oral, upward directed axial direction and the surface rendered mode. It allows the simultaneous visualization on a single scan of the superior lip, alveolar ridge and secondary palate. It corresponds prenatally to the submental intra oral photography of the palate of neonates. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the benefice of using the SROP view in the management of cleft lip with or without cleft palate, uni- or bi-lateral, diagnosed prenatally (22-28 gestational weeks). The SROP view allowed the representation on a single view of the characteristics of the defect useful to the different members of the orofacial team to exactly evaluate the difformity and to plan the ulterior therapeutic steps (e.g. side, extension of the cleft to the secondary palate, tooth organization). Also, being easier to read by lay people thanks to the use of a surface rendered representation rather than the usual multiplanar reconstructions in the three traditional orthogonal planes, the SROP view makes it easier to bring exact information to the parents about the malformation and its consequences. PMID:27211349

  1. Patient-specific CT dose determination from CT images using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qing

    Radiation dose from computed tomography (CT) has become a public concern with the increasing application of CT as a diagnostic modality, which has generated a demand for patient-specific CT dose determinations. This thesis work aims to provide a clinically applicable Monte-Carlo-based CT dose calculation tool based on patient CT images. The source spectrum was simulated based on half-value layer measurements. Analytical calculations along with the measured flux distribution were used to estimate the bowtie-filter geometry. Relative source output at different points in a cylindrical phantom was measured and compared with Monte Carlo simulations to verify the determined spectrum and bowtie-filter geometry. Sensitivity tests were designed with four spectra with the same kVp and different half-value layers, and showed that the relative output at different locations in a phantom is sensitive to different beam qualities. An mAs-to-dose conversion factor was determined with in-air measurements using an Exradin A1SL ionization chamber. Longitudinal dose profiles were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and compared with the Monte-Carlo-simulated dose profiles to verify the mAs-to-dose conversion factor. Using only the CT images to perform Monte Carlo simulations would cause dose underestimation due to the lack of a scatter region. This scenario was demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom study. Four different image extrapolation methods from the existing CT images and the Scout images were proposed. The results show that performing image extrapolation beyond the scan region improves the dose calculation accuracy under both step-shoot scan mode and helical scan mode. Two clinical studies were designed and comparisons were performed between the current CT dose metrics and the Monte-Carlo-based organ dose determination techniques proposed in this work. The results showed that the current CT dosimetry failed to show dose differences between patients with the same

  2. Hydrodynamics of helical-shaped bacterial motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-08-01

    To reveal the underlying hydrodynamic mechanism for the directed propulsion of the bacterium Spiroplasma, we formulate a coarse-grained elastic polymer model with domains of alternating helicities along the contour. Using hydrodynamic simulations and analytic arguments, we show that the propagation of helical domain walls leads to the directed propulsion of the cell body opposite to the domain-wall traveling direction. Several key features of Spiroplasma motility are reproduced by our model. We in particular show that the helical pitch angle observed for Spiroplasma meliferum, ψ=35° , is optimized for maximal swimming speed and energy-conversion efficiency. Our analytic theory based on the slender-body hydrodynamic approximation agrees very well with our numerical data demonstrating how the chirality switch propagating along the helical cell body is converted to a translational thrust for the cell body itself. We in detail consider thermal effects on the propulsion efficiency in the form of orientational fluctuations and conformational fluctuations of the helix shape. The body length dependence of the cell motility is studied numerically and compared to our approximate analytic theory. For fixed pitch angle ψ=35° , the swimming speed is maximized at a ratio of cell-body length to domain length of about 2-3, which are typical values for real cells. We also propose simple analytic arguments for an enhancement of the swimming velocity with increasing solution viscosity by taking into account the effects of transient confinement of a helical cell body in a polymeric meshwork. Comparison with a generalized theory for the swimming speed of flagellated bacteria in polymeric meshworks shows that the presence of a finite-sized bacterial head gives rise to a maximal swimming speed at a finite solution viscosity, whereas in the absence of a head the swimming speed monotonically increases with increasing viscosity.

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2008-03-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The function to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and security improvement of medical information.

  4. EphB2 and EphB3 forward signalling are required for palate development.

    PubMed

    Risley, Michael; Garrod, David; Henkemeyer, Mark; McLean, William

    2009-01-01

    Ephs and ephrins are cell surface receptors that bind to each other and initiate distinct, bidirectional signalling pathways in processes known as forward (Eph) and reverse (ephrin) signalling. Previous work had shown that the loss of ephrinB1 protein alone or compound loss of EphB2 and EphB3 leads to cleft palate. Because of the bidirectional signalling capability of these molecules, it was not clear whether forward or reverse signalling caused the cleft palate in the ephrinB1 protein null or EphB2 and EphB3 compound null mice. We demonstrate that forward signalling is essential for palatogenesis. Foetuses with a cytoplasmically truncated EphB2 protein, which could initiate reverse but not forward signalling, and were protein null for EphB3 had a cleft palate. This happened because their palatal shelves, which could elevate in vivo and adhere and fuse in culture, were too small to contact one another. Small shelf size was due to reduced proliferation in the palatal mesenchyme. The reduced proliferation was not the result of abnormal vascular development within the palate. In conclusion, strong evidence is provided for specific and co-operative roles of EphB2 and EphB3 in palate development. PMID:19032981

  5. Fasting for 24 h improves nasal chemosensory performance and food palatability in a related manner.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jameason D; Goldfield, Gary S; Doucet, Éric

    2012-06-01

    Changes in smell function can modify feeding behaviour but there is little evidence of how acute negative energy balance may impact olfaction and palatability. In a within-subjects repeated measures design, 15 subjects (nine male; six female) aged 28.6±4.5 years with initial body weight (BW) 74.7±4.9 kg and body mass index (BMI) 25.3±1.4 kg/m(2) were randomized and tested at baseline (FED) and Post Deprivation (FASTED) for nasal chemosensory performance (Sniffin' Sticks) and food palatability (visual analogue scale). Significant main effects for time indicated improvements in the FASTED session for odor threshold, odor discrimination, and total odor scores (TDI), and for increased palatability. There were significant positive correlations between initial BW and the change in odor threshold (r=.52) and TDI scores (r=.53). Positive correlations were also noted between delta identification score and delta palatability (r=.68). When the sample was split by sex, only for females were there significant correlations between delta palatability and: delta BW (r=.88); delta odor identification (r=.94); and delta TDI score (r=.85). Fasting for 24h improved smell function and this was related to increased palatability ratings and initial BW. Further studies should confirm the role of BW and sex in the context of olfaction, energy deprivation and palatability. PMID:22387713

  6. Effect of epidermal growth factor/urogastrone on glycosaminoglycan synthesis and accumulation in vitro in the developing mouse palate.

    PubMed

    Turley, E A; Hollenberg, M D; Pratt, R M

    1985-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor/urogastrone (EGF-URO) has previously been implicated in murine secondary-palate formation. We report here that, in correlation with its effects on palate fusion, EGF-URO in physiological amounts (1.7 nmol/l) markedly affects glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production in organ cultures of mouse palate tissue; the effects of EGF-URO are dependent on the developmental stage of the palate. GAG production, particularly that of hyaluronic acid (HA), is stimulated two- to eight-fold by EGF-URO in cultures of palate tissue obtained between days 11-12 and 13-15 of development; by the time of birth, EGF-URO no longer stimulates GAG production in such cultures. EGF-URO increases the amount and alters the distribution of HA within the palate. The results suggest a role for EGF-URO and for HA in the process of normal palatal development. PMID:3888761

  7. Enhancement technology improves palatability of normal and callipyge lambs.

    PubMed

    Everts, A K R; Wulf, D M; Wheeler, T L; Everts, A J; Weaver, A D; Daniel, J A

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if BPI Processing Technology (BPT) improved palatability of normal (NN) and callipyge (CN) lamb meat and to determine the mechanism by which palatability was improved. Ten ewe and 10 wether lambs of each phenotype were slaughtered, and carcass traits were assessed by a trained evaluator. The LM was removed at 2 d postmortem. Alternating sides served as controls (CON) or were treated with BPT. Muscles designated BPT were injected to a target 120% by weight with a patented solution containing water, ammonium hydroxide, carbon monoxide, and salt. Muscle pH, cooking loss, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS), sarcomere length, cooked moisture retention, and desmin degradation were measured. A trained sensory panel and a take-home consumer panel evaluated LM chops. Callipyge had a heavier BW and HCW, less adjusted fat thickness, reduced yield grades, and greater conformation scores than NN (P < 0.05). For LM, NN had shorter sarcomeres, smaller WBS values, greater juiciness ratings, more off-flavors, reduced consumer ratings for raw characteristics (like of portion size, like of color, like of leanness, overall like of appearance) and greater consumer ratings for eating characteristics (like of juiciness, like of flavor) than CN (P < 0.05). For LM, BPT had greater cooked moisture retention, smaller WBS values, greater juiciness ratings, less off-flavors, and greater consumer ratings for raw characteristics (like of portion size, like of color, overall like of appearance) and eating characteristics (like of juiciness, like of flavor) than CON (P < 0.05). Significant phenotype × treatment interactions occurred for LM muscle pH, desmin degradation, tenderness, consumer like of texture/tenderness, and consumer overall like of eating quality (P < 0.05). For LM, BPT increased muscle pH more for NN than CN (P < 0.01) and increased desmin degradation for NN but decreased desmin degradation for CN (P < 0.01). The BPT enhancement

  8. Effect of cleft lip palate repair on craniofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Zuber Ahamed; Shivalinga, BM; Ravi, S; Munawwar, Syeda Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare craniofacial growth among operated and unoperated unilateral cleft lip and palate non-syndromic subjects. Materials and Methods: A sample of 180 subjects of Indian origin was selected. Of them, 90 were operated, and 90 were unoperated complete unilateral cleft lip and palate individuals. The subjects were divided into three age groups of 3–5, 8–10, and 20–25 years comprised of 30 patients in each group. The following measurements were evaluated: Angle and length of the cranial base; maxillary spatial positioning and length; mandibular spatial positioning; morphology and length; maxillomandibular relationship. Comparative analysis of the means between the groups was performed with Student's t-test at the significance levels of 5%. The ANOVA test has been performed to test the effect of time. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measurements that represented the angle and length of the cranial base of unoperated and the operated patients (P>0.05). There was statistically significant decrease (P˂0.05) in the maxillary length (Co-A; 69.00 mm in 3–5 years, 68.33 mm in 8–10 years, and 67.17 mm in 20–25 years age group), and SNA angle (74.83° in 3–5 years, 74.17 ° in 8–10 years and 73.17 ° in 20–25 years age group) in operated group. No significant difference noticed on cephalometric values of the mandible, except Ar-Go-Me angle (P˂0.05), which showed vertical growth pattern in unoperated patients (132.50 ° in 3–5 years, 132.00 ° I 8–10 years and 138.33 ° in 20–25 years age group). Conclusion: Lip and palate repair has a significant influence on the maxilla and resulting in retarded growth of maxilla, which causes midface deficiency beyond acceptable sagittal limits. The Gonial angle showed vertical growth pattern in unoperated patients, but the cranial base angle and length of unoperated and the operated patients were similar. PMID:26229945

  9. Implications of TGFβ on Transcriptome and Cellular Biofunctions of Palatal Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiujuan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Pandey, Sanjit; Guda, Chittibabu (Babu); Nawshad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Development of the palate comprises sequential stages of growth, elevation, and fusion of the palatal shelves. The mesenchymal component of palates plays a major role in early phases of palatogenesis, such as growth and elevation. Failure in these steps may result in cleft palate, the second most common birth defect in the world. These early stages of palatogenesis require precise and chronological orchestration of key physiological processes, such as growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. There is compelling evidence for the vital role of TGFβ-mediated regulation of palate development. We hypothesized that the isoforms of TGFβ regulate different cellular biofunctions of the palatal mesenchyme to various extents. Human embryonic palatal mesenchyme (HEPM) cells were treated with TGFβ1, β2, and β3 for microarray-based gene expression studies in order to identify the roles of TGFβ in the transcriptome of the palatal mesenchyme. Following normalization and modeling of 28,869 human genes, 566 transcripts were detected as differentially expressed in TGFβ-treated HEPM cells. Out of these altered transcripts, 234 of them were clustered in cellular biofunctions, including growth and proliferation, development, morphology, movement, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Biological interpretation and network analysis of the genes active in cellular biofunctions were performed using IPA. Among the differentially expressed genes, 11 of them are known to be crucial for palatogenesis (EDN1, INHBA, LHX8, PDGFC, PIGA, RUNX1, SNAI1, SMAD3, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, and TGFβR1). These genes were used for a merged interaction network with cellular behaviors. Overall, we have determined that more than 2% of human transcripts were differentially expressed in response to TGFβ treatment in HEPM cells. Our results suggest that both TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 orchestrate major cellular biofunctions within the palatal mesenchyme in vitro by regulating expression of 234 genes. PMID

  10. Implications of TGFβ on Transcriptome and Cellular Biofunctions of Palatal Mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiujuan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Pandey, Sanjit; Guda, Chittibabu Babu; Nawshad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Development of the palate comprises sequential stages of growth, elevation, and fusion of the palatal shelves. The mesenchymal component of palates plays a major role in early phases of palatogenesis, such as growth and elevation. Failure in these steps may result in cleft palate, the second most common birth defect in the world. These early stages of palatogenesis require precise and chronological orchestration of key physiological processes, such as growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. There is compelling evidence for the vital role of TGFβ-mediated regulation of palate development. We hypothesized that the isoforms of TGFβ regulate different cellular biofunctions of the palatal mesenchyme to various extents. Human embryonic palatal mesenchyme (HEPM) cells were treated with TGFβ1, β2, and β3 for microarray-based gene expression studies in order to identify the roles of TGFβ in the transcriptome of the palatal mesenchyme. Following normalization and modeling of 28,869 human genes, 566 transcripts were detected as differentially expressed in TGFβ-treated HEPM cells. Out of these altered transcripts, 234 of them were clustered in cellular biofunctions, including growth and proliferation, development, morphology, movement, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Biological interpretation and network analysis of the genes active in cellular biofunctions were performed using IPA. Among the differentially expressed genes, 11 of them are known to be crucial for palatogenesis (EDN1, INHBA, LHX8, PDGFC, PIGA, RUNX1, SNAI1, SMAD3, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, and TGFβR1). These genes were used for a merged interaction network with cellular behaviors. Overall, we have determined that more than 2% of human transcripts were differentially expressed in response to TGFβ treatment in HEPM cells. Our results suggest that both TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 orchestrate major cellular biofunctions within the palatal mesenchyme in vitro by regulating expression of 234 genes. PMID

  11. Sucking and swallowing rates after palatal anesthesia: an electromyographic study in infant pigs

    PubMed Central

    Waranch, Danielle R.; Campbell-Malone, Regina; Ding, Peng; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    Infant mammalian feeding consists of rhythmic suck cycles and reflexive pharyngeal swallows. Although we know how oropharyngeal sensation influences the initiation and frequency of suck and swallow cycles, the role of palatal sensation is unknown. We implanted EMG electrodes into the mylohyoid muscle, a muscle active during suckling, and the thyrohyoid muscle, a muscle active during swallowing, in eight infant pigs. Pigs were then bottle-fed while lateral videofluoroscopy was simultaneously recorded from the electrodes. Two treatments were administered prior to feeding and compared with control feedings: 1) palatal anesthesia (0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride), and 2) palatal saline. Using the timing of mylohyoid muscle and thyrohyoid muscle activity, we tested for differences between treatment and control feedings for swallowing frequency and suck cycle duration. Following palatal anesthesia, four pigs could not suck and exhibited excessive jaw movement. We categorized the four pigs that could suck after palatal anesthesia as group A, and those who could not as group B. Group A had no significant change in suck cycle duration and a higher swallowing frequency after palatal saline (P = 0.021). Group B had significantly longer suck cycles after palatal anesthesia (P < 0.001) and a slower swallowing frequency (P < 0.001). Swallowing frequency may be a way to predict group membership, since it was different in control feedings between groups (P < 0.001). The qualitative and bimodal group response to palatal anesthesia may reflect a developmental difference. This study demonstrates that palatal sensation is involved in the initiation and frequency of suck and swallow cycles in infant feeding. PMID:23636723

  12. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  13. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  14. Biot-Savart helicity versus physical helicity: A topological description of ideal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahihi, Taliya; Eshraghi, Homayoon

    2014-08-01

    For an isentropic (thus compressible) flow, fluid trajectories are considered as orbits of a family of one parameter, smooth, orientation-preserving, and nonsingular diffeomorphisms on a compact and smooth-boundary domain in the Euclidian 3-space which necessarily preserve a finite measure, later interpreted as the fluid mass. Under such diffeomorphisms the Biot-Savart helicity of the pushforward of a divergence-free and tangent to the boundary vector field is proved to be conserved and since these circumstances present an isentropic flow, the conservation of the "Biot-Savart helicity" is established for such flows. On the other hand, the well known helicity conservation in ideal flows which here we call it "physical helicity" is found to be an independent constant with respect to the Biot-Savart helicity. The difference between these two helicities reflects some topological features of the domain as well as the velocity and vorticity fields which is discussed and is shown for simply connected domains the two helicities coincide. The energy variation of the vorticity field is shown to be formally the same as for the incompressible flow obtained before. For fluid domains consisting of several disjoint solid tori, at each time, the harmonic knot subspace of smooth vector fields on the fluid domain is found to have two independent base sets with a special type of orthogonality between these two bases by which a topological description of the vortex and velocity fields depending on the helicity difference is achieved since this difference is shown to depend only on the harmonic knot parts of velocity, vorticity, and its Biot-Savart vector field. For an ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow three independent constant helicities are reviewed while the helicity of magnetic potential is generalized for non-simply connected domains by inserting a special harmonic knot field in the dynamics of the magnetic potential. It is proved that the harmonic knot part of the vorticity

  15. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  16. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  17. Bilateral optic disc pit with maculopathy in a patient with cleft lip and cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Anisha; Gupta, Rajat; Gupta, Anika; Raina, Usha K; Ghosh, Basudeb

    2015-01-01

    Optic disc pit (ODP) is small, gray-white, oval depression found at the optic nerve head. It is a congenital defect that occurs due to imperfect closure of superior edge of the embryonic fissure. Cleft lip and palate are also congenital midline abnormalities occurring due to defect in the fusion of frontonasal prominence, maxillary prominence and mandibular prominence. There is only one case report describing the occurrence of ODP in a young patient with cleft lip and palate who also had basal encephalocele. We describe a 52-year-old patient with congenital cleft lip and palate with bilateral ODP with maculopathy but without any other midline abnormality. PMID:26044478

  18. Description of a clinical technique for tooth extraction in the cleft lip and palate area.

    PubMed

    Dalben, G S; Gomide, M R; Costa, B; Neves, L T

    2001-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate are relatively common congenital malformations, which may require specialist paedodontic treatment. In this article, the case of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate is presented. He attended the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies (HRAC) for routine examination, during which the presence of pre-canine supernumeraries bilaterally in the cleft area was seen. The extraction of these dental elements was justified by extensive carious lesions and because they represented a potential problem during secondary palatoplasty. The precautions needed in tooth extraction in patients with cleft lip and palate are described, together with illustrations of the clinical procedure. PMID:11310139

  19. Pediatric Myofibroma of the Palate with Ulceration and Bone Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Capo, Joseph A.; Moubayed, Dina; Hernandez-Prera, Juan C.; Khorsandi, Azita; Buchbinder, Daniel; Urken, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroma is a rare benign neoplasm occurring in the head and neck, arising primarily in infants and children. Frequently, myofibromas grow rapidly leading to suspicion of malignancy and the potential for overaggressive surgical excision. We aim to report a rare case of myofibroma with ulceration and bone destruction. A nine-year-old female presented with an ulcerated left hard palate mass. Open biopsy was performed with pathology suggestive of myofibroma. A left partial maxillectomy and reconstruction with a buccal advancement flap were performed. Final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a benign myofibroma. Myofibroma is a rare benign tumor of the head and neck which must be considered in the differential diagnosis by the clinician and the pathologist in order to prevent inappropriate and/or overaggressive treatment. PMID:27403363

  20. The double opposing myomucosal cheek flap in hard palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pabiszczak, Maciej; Banaszewski, Jacek; Pastusiak, Tomasz; Buczkowska, Agata; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Limited defects in the oral cavity can be treated with local and pedicled cheek flaps. It allows to preserve the functions of the resected organ. Large defects in the midline of the hard palate can be reconstructed with double opposing myomucosal cheek flaps. The aim of this study was to discuss the methodology of the flap harvest and to show our experiences of treatment in a group of 15 patients with oral cavity cancer. In 1 patient the double opposing myomucosal cheek flap was harvested due to the wider local defect. The small size of the flap with ability to use the double opposing cheek flap in more extended defects as well as short duration of the surgery procedure can lead to reduced risk of postoperative complications. Finally, cheek flaps form an effective method of treatment of defects in the oral cavity. PMID:26388355

  1. Stabilization of Helical Macromolecular Phases by Confined Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-07-01

    By means of extensive replica-exchange simulations of generic coarse-grained models for helical polymers, we systematically investigate the structural transitions into all possible helical phases for flexible and semiflexible elastic polymers with self-interaction under the influence of torsion barriers. The competing interactions lead to a variety of conformational phases including disordered helical arrangements, single helices, and ordered, tertiary helix bundles. Most remarkably, we find that a bending restraint entails a clear separation and stabilization of the helical phases. This aids in understanding why semiflexible polymers such as double-stranded DNA tend to form pronounced helical structures and proteins often exhibit an abundance of helical structures, such as helix bundles, within their tertiary structure.

  2. THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

  3. [Importance of the palatal seal for complete denture's retention].

    PubMed

    Krizan, F; Panduric, J

    1991-01-01

    By preserving the anatomic integrity of the stomatognathic system, a prosthesis allows its physiologic activities to proceed normally. A function imprint provides a picture of the prosthesis support and relationship between mobile tissues and prosthesis rims. A high-quality function imprint required, but current literature offers different opinions and views concerning the choice and method of taking a function imprint. Several procedures covering all methodologic differences can still be singled out: taking a function imprint without pressure, taking a function imprint with pressure, taking a function imprint with the mouth open, taking a function imprint with the mouth closed. The regions with a thin and less keratinized mucosa over the bone but without a submucosal interlayer must be relieved or imprinted without pressure. Forward inclination of the head and the position of the tongue make the soft palate to acquire a functional position on taking the imprint, thus allowing the posterior pharyngeal rim of the upper prosthesis to be determined. The greater the valve effect and the lesser the space between the prosthesis base and support, the higher the negative pressure upon the support. Imbibition is achieved by the prosthesis rims lying in the initial part of mobile mucosa, and the pharyngeal rim on the border between the hard and soft palate, in the region of the "ah" line. Retention of the prosthesis is mostly secured by its posterior, dorsal patal or pharyngeal rim. When pointing to its importance in retention, it applies to the rim margins, its relation to the support and its role in the valve closure of the upper total prosthesis. PMID:1819956

  4. Does seaweed-coral competition make seaweeds more palatable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G. O.; Hay, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Seaweed-coral interactions are increasingly common on modern coral reefs, but the dynamics, processes, and mechanisms affecting these interactions are inadequately understood. We investigated the frequency and effect of seaweed-coral contacts for common seaweeds and corals in Belize. Effects on corals were evaluated by measuring the frequency and extent of bleaching when contacted by various seaweeds, and effects on a common seaweed were evaluated by assessing whether contact with coral made the seaweed more palatable to the sea urchin Diadema antillarum. Coral-seaweed contacts were particularly frequent between Agaricia corals and the seaweed Halimeda opuntia, with this interaction being associated with coral bleaching in 95 % of contacts. Pooling across all coral species, H. opuntia was the seaweed most commonly contacting corals and most frequently associated with localized bleaching at the point of contact. Articulated coralline algae, Halimeda tuna and Lobophora variegata also frequently contacted corals and were commonly associated with bleaching. The common corals Agaricia and Porites bleached with similar frequency when contacted by H. opuntia (95 and 90 %, respectively), but Agaricia experienced more damage than Porites when contacted by articulated coralline algae or H. tuna. When spatially paired individuals of H. opuntia that had been in contact with Agaricia and not in contact with any coral were collected from the reefs and offered to D. antillarum, urchins consumed about 150 % more of thalli that had been competing with Agaricia. Contact and non-contact thalli did not differ in nutritional traits (ash-free-dry-mass, C or N concentrations), suggesting that Halimeda chemical defenses may have been compromised by coral-algal contact. If competition with corals commonly enhances seaweed palatability, then the dynamics and nuances of small-scale seaweed-coral-herbivore interactions at coral edges are deserving of greater attention in that such

  5. Fast iterative reconstructions for animal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.-M.; Hsiao, I.-T.; Jan, M.-L.

    2009-06-01

    For iterative x-ray computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, the convex algorithm combined with ordered subset (OSC) [1] is a relatively fast algorithm and has shown its potential for low-dose situations. But it needs one forward projection and two backprojections per iteration. Unlike convex algorithm, the gradient algorithm only requires one forward projection and one backprojection per iteration. Here, we applied ordered subsets of projection data to a modified gradient algorithm. In order to further reduce computation time, the new algorithm, the ordered subset gradient (OSG) algorithm, can be adjusted with a step size. We also implemented another OS-type algorithm called OSTR. The OSG algorithm is compared with OSC algorithm and OSTR algorithm using three-dimensional simulated helical cone-beam CT data. The performance is evaluated in terms of log-likelihood, contrast recovery, and bias-variance studies. Results show that images of OSG has compatible visual image quality to those of OSC and OSTR, but in the resolution and bias-variance studies, OSG seems to reach stable values with faster speed. In particular, OSTR has better recovery in a smoother region, but both OSG and OSC have better recovery in the high-frequency regions. Moreover, in terms of log likelihood with respect to computation time, OSG has faster convergence rate than that of OSC and similar to that of OSTR. We conclude that OSG has potential to provide comparable image quality and is more computationally efficient, and thus could be suitable for low-dose, helical cone-beam CT image reconstruction.

  6. Analysis of peripheral doses for base of tongue treatment by linear accelerator and helical TomoTherapy IMRT.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian Richard; Lamba, Michael A S; Elson, Howard R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral doses to various organs from a typical head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered by linear accelerator (linac) and helical TomoTherapy. Multiple human CT data sets were used to segment critical structures and organs at risk, fused and adjusted to an anthropomorphic phantom. Eighteen contours were designated for thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) placement. Following the RTOG IMRT Protocol 0522, treatment of the primary tumor and involved nodes (PTV70) and subclinical disease sites (PTV56) was planned utilizing IMRT to 70Gy and 56 Gy. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were produced for linac and TomoTherapy treatments. TLDs were placed and each treatment plan was delivered to the anthropomorphic phantom four times. Within 2.5 cm (one helical TomoTherapy field width) superior and inferior to the field edges, normal tissue doses were on average 45% lower using linear accelerator. Beyond 2.5 cm, the helical TomoTherapy normal tissue dose was an average of 52% lower. The majority of points proved to be statistically different using the Student's t-test with p > 0.05. Using one method of calculation, probability of a secondary malignancy was 5.88% for the linear accelerator and 4.08% for helical TomoTherapy. Helical TomoTherapy delivers more dose than a linac immediately above and below the treatment field, contributing to the higher peripheral doses adjacent to the field. At distances beyond one field width (where leakage is dominant), helical TomoTherapy doses are lower than linear accelerator doses. PMID:20717081

  7. Independent quality assurance of a helical tomotherapy machine using the dose magnifying glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Hardcastle, N.; Tome, W. A.; and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Helical tomotherapy is a complex delivery technique, integrating CT image guidance and intensity modulated radiotherapy in a single system. The integration of the CT detector ring on the gantry not only allows patient position verification but is also often used to perform various QA procedures. This convenience lacks the rigor of a machine-independent QA process. Methods: In this article, a Si strip detector, known as the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), was used to perform machine-independent QA measurements of the multileaf collimator alignment, leaf open time threshold, and leaf fluence output factor (LFOF). Results: The DMG measurements showed good agreements with EDR2 film for the MLC alignment test while the CT detector agrees well with DMG measurements for leaf open time threshold and LFOF measurements. The leaf open time threshold was found to be approximately 20 ms. The LFOF measured with the DMG agreed within error with the CT detector measured LFOF. Conclusions: The DMG with its 0.2 mm spatial resolution coupled to TERA ASIC allowed real-time high temporal resolution measurements of the tomotherapy leaf movement. In conclusion, DMG was shown to be a suitable tool for machine-independent QA of a tomotherapy unit.

  8. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin R; Hinders, Mark K

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced. PMID:12942959

  9. Algebraic Apect of Helicities in Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Murat; Ji, Chueng

    2015-04-01

    We examined the relation of polarization vectors and spinors of (1 , 0) ⊕(0 , 1) representation of Lorentz group in Clifford algebra Cl1 , 3 , their relation with standard algebra, and properties of these spinors. Cl1 , 3 consists of different grades:e.g. the first and the second grades represent (1 / 2 , 1 / 2) and (1 , 0) ⊕(0 , 1) representation of spin groups respectively with 4 and 6 components. However, these Clifford numbers are not the helicity eigenstates and thus we transform them into combinations of helicity eigenstates by expressing them as spherical harmonics. We relate the spin-one polarization vectors and (1 , 0) ⊕(0 , 1) spinors under one simple transformation with the spin operators. We also link our work with Winnberg's work of a superfield of a spinors of Clifford algebra by giving a physical meaning to Grassmann variables and discuss how Grassman algebra is linked with Clifford algebra.

  10. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call ``cross borehole'' tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  11. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, O. B.; Scott, D. J.; Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Carr, S.; Clarke, J. A.; Cooke, P.; Dainton, J. B.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Malysheva, L. I.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Rochford, J.; Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE; Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD

    2007-07-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of {approx}10 MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of {approx}100 nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4-6 mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100-200 m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  12. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  13. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  14. On the energy density of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Barros, Manuel; Ferrández, Angel

    2014-12-01

    We solve the problem of determining the energy actions whose moduli space of extremals contains the class of Lancret helices with a prescribed slope. We first see that the energy density should be linear both in the total bending and in the total twisting, such that the ratio between the weights of them is the prescribed slope. This will give an affirmative answer to the conjecture stated in Barros and Ferrández (J Math Phys 50:103529, 2009). Then, we normalize to get the best choice for the helical energy. It allows us to show that the energy, for instance of a protein chain, does not depend on the slope and is invariant under homotopic changes of the cross section which determines the cylinder where the helix is lying. In particular, the energy of a helix is not arbitrary, but it is given as natural multiples of some basic quantity of energy. PMID:24390481

  15. A Helical Magnet Design for RHIC^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, E.; Gupta, R.; Kelly, E.; Muratore, J.

    1997-05-01

    Helical dipole magnets are required in a project for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to control and preserve the beam polarization in order to allow the collision of polarized proton beams. The project requires superconducting magnets with a 100 mm coil aperture and a 4 Tesla field in which the field rotates 360 degrees over a distance of 2.4 meters. A design restraint is that the magnets operate at relatively low current (less than 500 amperes) in order to minimize the heat load from the current leads. A magnet has been developed that uses a small diameter superconducting cable wound into helical grooves machined into a thick-walled aluminum cylinder. The design and test results of this prototype magnet will be described. ^*Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Broadband optical isolator based on helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hu; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Based on helical metamaterials, a new broadband optical isolator with a triple-helix structure is proposed in this paper. The right-handed circularly polarized light can transmit through the isolator with its polarization unchanged. The reverse propagating light, which is caused by the reflection of the latter optical devices, is converted into left-handed circularly polarized light that is suppressed by the proposed isolator because of absorption. Our design has some unprecedented advantages such as broad frequency ranges and a compact structure; moreover, neither polarizers nor adscititious magnetic fields are required. Properties of the isolator are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and this phenomenon is studied by the mechanism of helical antenna theory. PMID:26366900

  17. Helical relativistic electron beam Vlasov equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. M.

    1980-08-01

    Three existing helical relativistic electron beam models are discussed and compared. Both Yoshikawa's and Lawson's models are shown to be derivable from appropriate Vlasov equilibria. A new helical Vlasov equilibrium with energy spread is presented and studied. Unlike Auer's axial current model in which the allowance of an energy spread limits the total current in the relativistic beam case, the present model, with the addition of an azimuthal current, permits solutions with arbitrarily large current. On the other hand, like the model studied by Kan and Lai, the present model leads to nonhollowed-out beam solutions in which, the larger the beam current, the more force-free is the magnetic field configuration.

  18. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  19. Coherent electron transport in a helical nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Yong-Long; Du, Long; Jiang, Hua; Kang, Guang-Zhen; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-09-01

    The quantum dynamics of carriers bound to helical tube surfaces is investigated in a thin-layer quantization scheme. By numerically solving the open-boundary Schrödinger equation in curvilinear coordinates, geometric effect on the coherent transmission spectra is analysed in the case of single propagating mode as well as multimode. It is shown that, the coiling endows the helical nanotube with different transport properties from a bent cylindrical surface. Fano resonance appears as a purely geometric effect in the conductance, the corresponding energy of quasibound state is obviously influenced by the torsion and length of the nanotube. We also find new plateaus in the conductance. The transport of double-degenerate mode in this geometry is reminiscent of the Zeeman coupling between the magnetic field and spin angular momentum in quasi-one-dimensional structure.

  20. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.