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1

Chemical control of the red palm mite, Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) in banana and coconut.  

PubMed

The red palm mite (RPM), Raoiella indica Hirst, is a predominant pest of coconuts, date palms and other palm species, as well as a major pest of bananas (Musa spp.) in different parts of the world. Recently, RPM dispersed throughout the Caribbean islands and has reached both the North and South American continents. The RPM introductions have caused severe damage to palm species, and bananas and plantains in the Caribbean region. The work presented herein is the result of several acaricide trials conducted in Puerto Rico and Florida on palms and bananas in order to provide chemical control alternatives to minimize the impact of this pest. Spiromesifen, dicofol and acequinocyl were effective in reducing the population of R. indica in coconut in Puerto Rico. Spray treatments with etoxanole, abamectin, pyridaben, milbemectin and sulfur showed mite control in Florida. In addition, the acaricides acequinocyl and spiromesifen were able to reduce the population of R. indica in banana trials. PMID:21983877

Rodrigues, Jose Carlos Verle; Peña, J E

2012-08-01

2

First report of Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) and its damage to coconut palms in Puerto Rico and Culebra Island  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This is the first report of the occurrence of the Red Palm mite Raoiella indica and its damage in Puerto Rico and Culebra island. Raoiella indica is a new invasive pest threatening ornamental palm, coconut, and banana plantations. The mite was observed in eastern Puerto Rico and in Culebra island ...

3

Red Palm Mite Situation in the Caribbean and Florida  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The red palm mite (Raoiella indica Hirst Tenuipalpidae), a pest of coconuts and ornamental palms in Asia and Africa, was reported in the Caribbean in 2004. By 2008, it had spread to at least twelve islands, two counties in Florida and to Venezuela. Red palm mite causes yellowing and leaf necrosis wi...

4

Screening of plantain hybrids for resistance to Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) and use of a systemic acaricide to control the mite  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sixteen clones of plantain were screened for resistance to red palm mite (RPM), Raoiella indica Hirst. The plantain clones were established in 5kg pots with ten replicates. Mite infestation was carried out by introducing highly infested potted coconut palms between the plantain pots (1:10). Control ...

5

Effect of coconut palm proximities and Musa spp. germplasm resistance to colonization by Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).  

PubMed

Although coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is the predominant host for Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), false spider mite infestations do occur on bananas and plantains (Musa spp. Colla). Since its introduction, the banana and plantain industries have been negatively impacted to different degrees by R. indica infestation throughout the Caribbean. Genetic resistance in the host and the proximity of natural sources of mite infestation has been suggested as two of the main factors affecting R. indica densities in Musa spp. plantations. Greenhouse experiments were established to try to determine what effect coconut palm proximities and planting densities had on R. indica populations infesting Musa spp. plants. Trials were carried out using potted Musa spp. and coconut palms plants at two different ratios. In addition, fourteen Musa spp. hybrid accessions were evaluated for their susceptibility/resistance to colonization by R. indica populations. Differences were observed for mite population buildup for both the density and germplasm accession evaluations. These results have potential implications on how this important pest can be managed on essential agricultural commodities such as bananas and plantains. PMID:21915683

Rodrigues, Jose Carlos Verle; Irish, Brian M

2012-08-01

6

Phylogenetic investigation of the genus Raoiella (Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae): Diversity, distribution, and world invasions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The genus Raoiella is most well known because of the red palm mite, R. indica, a major pest of palms spreading aggressively throughout the Americas. Not much was known about the biology, geographic origins, or evolutionary history of the genus when R. indica emerged as a major invasive pest. This pa...

7

Potential geographical distribution of the red palm mite in South America.  

PubMed

Among pests that have recently been introduced into the Americas, the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae), is the most invasive. This mite has spread rapidly to several Caribbean countries, United States of America, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil. The potential dispersion of R. indica to other regions of South America could seriously impact the cultivation of coconuts, bananas, exotic and native palms and tropical flowers such as the Heliconiaceae. To facilitate the development of efficacious R. indica management techniques such as the adoption of phytosanitary measures to prevent or delay the dispersion of this pest, the objective of this paper was to estimate the potential geographical distribution of R. indica in South America using a maximum entropy model. The R. indica occurrence data used in this model were obtained from extant literature, online databases and field sampling data. The model predicted potential suitable areas for R. indica in northern Colombia, central and northern Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, east French Guiana and many parts of Brazil, including Roraima, the eastern Amazonas, northern Pará, Amapá and the coastal zones, from Pará to north of Rio de Janeiro. These results indicate the potential for significant R. indica related economic and social impacts in all of these countries, particularly in Brazil, because the suitable habitat regions overlap with agricultural areas for R. indica host plants such as coconuts and bananas. PMID:23297112

Amaro, George; de Morais, Elisangela Gomes Fidelis

2013-07-01

8

Life cycle of Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on ornamental plants, mostly Arecaceae.  

PubMed

The red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst, has been primarily found associated with coconut and musaceous plants in the New World. However, it has also been recorded on several other palms, heliconiaceous and zingiberaceous species. This study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of different botanical families on which R. indica has been collected in the field and of arecaceous plants of the natural vegetation of the neotropics. In total, ten species of Arecaceae as well as Heliconia psittacorum [Heliconiaceae] and Alpinia purpurata [Zingiberacae] were evaluated, using coconut as a control. The study was carried out under controlled conditions (29 ± 0.5 °C, 60 ± 10 % RH and photoperiod 12 h of light). Raoiella indica was able to complete immature development only on coconut, Adonidia merrillii, Ptychosperma macarthurii, H. psittacorum and A. purpurata. Duration of the immature phase (egg-adult) ranged between 21.5 days on coconut to 34.1 days on A. purpurata. Longevity was at least 50 % greater and oviposition at least 38 % higher on coconut than on other plants. Intrinsic rate of increase (rm) was higher on coconut (0.166) and A. merrillii (0.042), but negative on the other two plant species. Raoiella indica could not reach adulthood on any of the other ten arecaceous species considered in the study. The results suggested R. indica to be a threat to A. merrillii in addition to coconut, but not to other evaluated plants. However, complementary studies should be conducted to investigate whether the experimental procedures adopted in this study could not have prevented the mite from a better performance than it could have been under field conditions, especially in relation to Mauritia flexuosa, one of the dominant arecaceous plants in South America. PMID:25342244

Vásquez, C; Colmenárez, Y; de Moraes, G J

2015-02-01

9

Host plant range of Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) in areas of invasion of the New World.  

PubMed

Raoiella indica has spread rapidly through the Neotropical region where the mite damages economically and ecologically important plants. Three studies were conducted to determine the host plant range of R. indica, using the presence of colonies containing all life stages as an indicator of reproductive suitability. Periodic surveys at the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (Miami Dade County, FL, USA) and the Royal Botanical Gardens (Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago) identified 27 new reproductive host plants. The reproductive suitability of two dicotyledonous species and three native Florida palm species was examined. An updated list of reproductive host plants of R. indica is presented. All reported reproductive hosts (91 plant species) of R. indica are monocots from the orders Arecales (Arecaceae), Zingiberales (Heliconiaceae, Musaceae, Strelitziaceae, Zingiberaceae) and Pandanales (Pandanaceae). Most are palms of the family Arecaceae that originated in areas of the Eastern Hemisphere; about one fourth of the reported hosts are native to the New World and could be considered new host associations of R. indica. Six years after the initial detection in the Caribbean, R. indica has expanded its host plant range. Here we report 27 new reproductive host of R. indica that represent 30% of increase on previous host plant records. As this mite continues spreading in the Neotropical region a great diversity of plants is potentially affected. PMID:21915682

Carrillo, Daniel; Amalin, Divina; Hosein, Farzan; Roda, Amy; Duncan, Rita E; Peña, Jorge E

2012-08-01

10

Distribution patterns of coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis, and its predator Neoseiulus aff. paspalivorus in coconut palms.  

PubMed

Distribution patterns and numerical variability of the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer (Acari: Eriophyidae) and its predator Neoseiulus aff. paspalivorus DeLeon (Phytoseiidae) on the nuts of 3- to 7-month-old bunches of coconut palms were studied at two sites in Sri Lanka. At the two sites, coconut mites were present on 88 and 75% of the nuts but no more than three-quarters of those nuts showed damage symptoms. N. aff. paspalivorus was found more on mature nuts than on immature nuts. Spatial and temporal distribution of coconut mites and predatory mites differed significantly. The mean number of coconut mites per nut increased until 5-month-old bunches and declined thereafter. The densities of predatory mites followed a similar trend but peaked 1 month later. Variability in the numbers of mites among palms and bunches of the same age was great, but was relatively low on 6-month-old bunches. The results indicate that assessment of infestation levels by damage symptoms alone is not reliable. Sampling of coconut and/or predatory mite numbers could be improved by using several nuts of 6-month-old bunches. The effect of predatory mites on coconut mites over time suggests that N. aff. paspalivorus could be a prospective biological control agent of A. guerreronis. PMID:14756402

Fernando, L C P; Aratchige, N S; Peiris, T S G

2003-01-01

11

Comparison of two populations of the pantropical predator Amblyseius largoensis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) for biological control of Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).  

PubMed

The red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), was recently introduced in the Americas. It spread quickly throughout coconut palm growing areas, expanding considerably its host range. The invasion of this species has caused high economic impact in several countries. In Brazil, extensive areas are expected to be affected. For logistical reasons and other concerns, chemical control does not seem desirable for the control of this pest in most Latin American countries. Biological control of R. indica by introducing exotic natural enemies seems to be an important control measure to be considered. Surveys in many countries have shown that Amblyseius largoensis (Muma) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a very common predator on coconut palms. This study compared the biology of a population of A. largoensis found for a long time in association with R. indica in La Reunion Island (Indian Ocean) with a population from Roraima State (northern Brazil), where R. indica was first found about two and a half years ago. No significant differences were observed between populations in relation to the duration of different immature stages or total survivorship. However, the oviposition period, prey consumption and net reproductive rate were significantly higher for the La Reunion population, warranting further investigation to determine whether that population should be released in Roraima to control the pest. PMID:23100107

Domingos, Cleiton A; Oliveira, Leandro O; de Morais, Elisângela G F; Navia, Denise; de Moraes, Gilberto J; Gondim, Manoel G C

2013-05-01

12

Biological control of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by the parasitoid mite, Rhynchopolipus rhynchophori (Ewing) (Acarina: Podapolipidae).  

PubMed

The parasitoid mite, Rhynchopolipus rhynchophori was released against the red palm weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus stages. Released of this mite applied at four levels of treatment, A (30 parasitic mites: 1 prey), B (60 parasitic mites: 1 prey), C (90 parasitic mites: 1 prey) and D (120 parasitic mites: 1 prey). The parasitoid mites successfully suppressed population density of the red palm weevil, R. ferrugineus stages within two weeks. The killing of different developmental stages of the red palm is due to sucking their body fluid by the parasitoid mite, Rh. rhynchphori. But, the pupal weight was significantly (P < 0.5) decreased by increasing numbers of parasitoid mites at the different treatment levels. PMID:19795774

Abdullah, Mohammed A R

2009-08-01

13

Acarologia 52(2): 129134 (2012) DOI: 10.1051/acarologia/20122043  

E-print Network

to the family Arecaceae, namely coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) and areca nut palm@cnpma.embrapa.br ABSTRACT -- Since it first appeared in the New World in 2004, the palm red mite, Raoiella indica Hirst, has; palm tree INTRODUCTION The palm red mite, Raoiella indica Hirst, was orig- inally described about 88

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

14

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA: A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The objectives of the Household hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to quantify the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County, Florida's (the county) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal soli...

15

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The objectives of the Household Hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to: 1) Quantity the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County Florida?s (the County) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal s...

16

Anti-allergic properties of a matured fruit extract of the date palm tree (Phoenix dactylifera L.) in mite-sensitized mice.  

PubMed

The effects of oral ingestion of a hot water extract of matured fruit of the date palm tree (Phoenix dactylifera L.) on allergic responses were investigated in mite-sensitized mice. Sneezing and nose rubbing events in mice given a date extract-added diet were significantly lower than in those given an extract-free (control) diet. The serum total and mite antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and the number of spleen interleukin-4(+)CD4(+), IgE(+)B220(+) and Fc?RI?(+)CD117(+) cells was significantly lower in mice given the date extract-added diet than in those given the control diet. Chlorogenic acid, pelargonin and ferulic acid significantly reduced the number of IgE(+)B220(+) cells, while chlorogenic acid and pelargonin significantly decreased the number of Fc?RI?(+)CD117(+) cells in mouse spleen cell cultures. These results suggest that some polyphenols in the date may reduce mite-induced allergic symptoms in mice via a decrease in the number of IgE-producing plasma cells and high-affinity IgE receptor-expressing mast cells. PMID:23132311

Karasawa, Koji; Otani, Hajime

2012-01-01

17

Olfactory response of predatory mites to vegetative and reproductive parts of coconut palm infested by Aceria guerreronis.  

PubMed

The phytophagous mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer is an important pest of coconut worldwide. A promising method of control for this pest is the use of predatory mites. Neoseiulus baraki (Athias-Henriot) and Proctolaelaps bickleyi Bram are predatory mites found in association with A. guerreronis in the field. To understand how these predators respond to olfactory cues from A. guerreronis and its host plant, the foraging behavior of the predatory mites was investigated in a Y-tube olfactometer and on T-shaped arenas. The predators were subjected to choose in an olfactometer: (1) isolated parts (leaflet, spikelet or fruit) of infested coconut plant or clean air stream; (2) isolated parts of non-infested or infested coconut plant; and (3) two different plant parts previously shown to be attractive. Using T-shaped arenas the predators were offered all possible binary combinations of discs of coconut fruit epidermis infested with A. guerreronis, non-infested discs or coconut pollen. The results showed that both predators were preferred (the volatile cues from) the infested plant parts over clean air. When subjected to odours from different infested or non-infested plant parts, predators preferred the infested parts. Among the infested plant parts, the spikelets induced the greatest attraction to predators. On the arenas, both predators preferred discs of coconut fruits infested with A. guerreronis over every other alternative. The results show that both predators are able to locate A. guerreronis by olfactory stimuli. Foraging strategies and implications for biological control are discussed. PMID:21499777

Melo, José Wagner S; Lima, Debora B; Pallini, Angelo; Oliveira, José Eudes M; Gondim, Manoel G C

2011-10-01

18

Herbivore exploits chink in armor of host  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Mites in the genus Raoiella Hirst are obligate plant parasites that feed via stylet-like mouthparts adapted to pierce plant tissues. A species of particular interest in this genus, the red palm mite, R. indica Hirst, is currently spreading aggressively throughout the Americas on species of palm (Ar...

19

Mite (Arthropoda: Acari) Associates of palms (Arecaceae) in Brazil: VI. New genera and new species of Eriophyidae and Phytoptidae (Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three new genera and ten new species of Eriophyoidea associated with palm trees (Arecaceae) are illustrated and described from Brazil. Two new genera and seven new species are in the family Eriophyidae - Aceria gymnoscutan. sp. from Syagrus flexuosa and Syagrus cocoides; Aceria biornatan. sp. from Acrocomia aculeata; Aceria translinean. sp. from Syagrus romanzoffiana and Attalea dubia; Proartacris longiorn. sp.

Denise Navia; Carlos H. W. Flechtmann

2002-01-01

20

Mite allergens  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increasing awareness of the health implications of mite sensitivity, as it is closely related to asthma. Mite\\u000a allergy constitutes a complex worldwide problem, with sanitary and economical implications. Not only are mite species present\\u000a in house dust, producing potent allergens, but other, less studied species are also responsible for significant allergic reactions\\u000a in occupational settings. In this

Enrique Fernández-Caldas; Víctor Iraola Calvo

2005-01-01

21

Mite immunotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae are the most common house dust mites and are among the most common sources of indoor allergens worldwide. These species are\\u000a very common in humid regions, where most allergic individuals are sensitized to house dust mites. Specific immunotherapy with\\u000a mite extracts has demonstrated clinical benefits in several doubleblind, placebo-controlled trials that are included in recent

Enrique Fernández-Caldas; Victor Iraola; Manuel Boquete; Antonio Nieto; Miguel Casanovas

2006-01-01

22

Demodex mites.  

PubMed

Demodex mites are normal inhabitants of human hair follicles. D folliculorum is found predominantly in the follicular infundibulum of facial skin and is typically present in small groups. D brevis, the smaller of the two species, predominates on the trunk, typically as solitarily mites within the sebaceous glands and ducts. In a wide variety of animals, Demodex mites are recognized as a cause of mange. The role of Demodex mites as agents of human disease has been more controversial, but evidence favors their involvement in acneiform eruptions, folliculitis, and a range of eruptions in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:25441466

Elston, Carly A; Elston, Dirk M

2014-01-01

23

Harvestman and mites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Some mites use harvestmen for transportation only, while others use the harvestman as a food source. If the mites are feeding on the harvestman, this is a parasitic relationship because the mites gain food while the harvestman is harmed.

N/A N/A (None; )

2005-09-17

24

DATE PALM  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This book chapter reviews date palm biology and cultivation. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops grown in the arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula, North Africa, and the Middle East. The exact origin of the date palm is unknown but most probably the area of origin w...

25

Dust mite (image)  

MedlinePLUS

This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

26

Limits to ambulatory displacement of coconut mites in absence and presence of food-related cues.  

PubMed

Ambulatory movement of plant-feeding mites sets limits to the distances they can cover to reach a new food source. In absence of food-related cues these limits are determined by survival, walking activity, walking path tortuosity and walking speed, whereas in presence of food the limits are also determined by the ability to orient and direct the path towards the food source location. For eriophyoid mites such limits are even more severe because they are among the smallest mites on earth, because they have only two pairs of legs and because they are very sensitive to desiccation. In this article we test how coconut mites (Aceria guerreronis Keifer) are constrained in their effective displacement by their ability to survive in absence of food (meristematic tissue under the coconut perianth) and by their ability to walk and orient in absence or presence of food-related cues. We found that the mean survival time decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing humidity. Under climatic conditions representative for the Tropics (27 °C and 75 % relative humidity) coconut mites survived on average for 11 h and covered 0.4 m, representing the effective linear displacement away from the origin. Within a period of 5 h, coconut mites collected from old fruits outside the perianth moved further away from the origin than mites collected under the perianth of young fruits. However, in the presence of food-related cues coconut mites traveled over 30 % larger distances than in absence of these cues. These results show that ambulatory movement of eriophyoid mites may well bring them to other coconuts within the same bunch and perhaps also to other bunches on the same coconut palm, but it is unlikely to help them move from palm to palm, given that palms usually do not touch each other. PMID:24233102

Melo, J W S; Lima, D B; Sabelis, M W; Pallini, A; Gondim, M G C

2014-04-01

27

Dust Mites in the Home  

MedlinePLUS

MENU Return to Web version Asthma | Dust Mites in the Home What are dust mites? Dust mites are tiny bugs that live in your home. They measure about 1/ ... the period at the end of this sentence. Dust mites feed off of pet and human dander ( ...

28

Palm cryobanking.  

PubMed

We describe the development of an efficient cryopreservation protocol for proembryogenic masses (PEMs) of date palm variety 'Barhee'. Proembryos were induced by inoculating small pieces of juvenile leaves on MS medium supplemented with 0.3 mg per liter 2,4-D. Application of these in vitro conditions led to true-to-type plants as observed after plant fructification. When compared to the standard vitrification protocol, the ultra-rapid droplet-vitrification technique proved to be superior. Sucrose preculture considerably increased post-cryopreservation recovery. The highest regeneration after cryogenic exposure reached 63.3 percent when PEMs were treated with PVS2 for 30 min at 0 degree C and 56.7 percent when PVS2 treatment lasted for 15 min at 25 degree C. The first signs of regrowth of cryopreserved PEMs were observed after 2 to 3 weeks. Cryopreservation did not affect the morphogenetic capacities of the plant material. Moreover, highly proliferating suspension cultures could be established from the cryopreserved material. The overall production of somatic embryos from 500 mg cryopreserved PEMs reached 1030 +/- 50 units after 1 month. The morphological study of date palms regenerated from cryopreserved material confirmed the stability of clonal material following cryopreservation. PMID:22227705

Fki, Lotfi; Bouaziz, Neila; Sahnoun, Nahed; Swennen, Rony; Drir, Noureddine; Panis, Bart

2011-01-01

29

Allergies to House Dust Mites  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... reactions in some people. Pollen, house dust mites, mold, and animal dander are examples of allergens. In ... because it traps moisture and promotes mite and mold growth. Hardwood or linoleum floors are preferable for ...

30

Occurrence and seasonal prevalence of the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis (Eriophyidae), and associated arthropods in Oman.  

PubMed

The coconut palm is an important crop in the sub arid coastal plain of Dhofar, Oman, for the high demand for its nut water and its use as ornamental plant. Damage of coconut fruits by the eriophyid mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer was first reported in that region in the late 1980s, but background information about the ecology of the pest in Oman was missing. Four surveys were conducted in different seasons from 2008 to 2009, to assess the distribution and prevalence of the coconut mite and its damage as well as the presence of natural enemies. Infestation by the coconut mite was conspicuous on most (99.7 %) palm trees, with 82.5 % damaged fruits. The average (± SE) density of coconut mites per fruit was 750 ± 56; this level of infestation led to the incidence of over 25 % of surface damage on more than half of the fruits. The mite appeared more abundant at the end of the cold season through the summer. No significant differences were observed between infestation levels on local varieties, hybrids and on dwarf varieties. Neoseiulus paspalivorus (De Leon), Cydnoseius negevi (Swirski & Amitai) and Amblyseius largoensis (Muma) were the predatory mites found under the bracts of over 30 % of the coconut fruits and on 68 % of the coconut trees. Considering all sampling dates and all varieties together, average (± SE) phytoseiid density was 1.4 ± 1.19 per fruit. Other mites found in the same habitat as A. guerreronis included the tarsonemids Steneotarsonemus furcatus De Leon and Nasutitarsonemus omani Lofego & Moraes. The pathogenic fungus Hirsutella thompsonii Fisher was rarely found infecting the coconut mite in Dhofar. Other fungal pathogens, namely Cordyceps sp. and Simplicillium sp., were more prevalent. PMID:23435864

Al-Shanfari, Abdulaziz; Hountondji, Fabien C C; Al-Zawamri, Hamid; Rawas, Hassan; Al-Mashiki, Yussef; de Moraes, Gilberto J; Moore, Dave; Gowen, Simon R

2013-06-01

31

Demodex mites: Facts and controversies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because Demodex mites are ubiquitous, their potential as human pathogens has often been ignored. This contribution focuses on the growing body of evidence linking Demodex mites with various skin disorders. Histologically, spongiosis and lymphoid inflammation are regularly seen in follicles containing Demodex mites. In animals, they are well established as a cause of mange, and a human counterpart–demodectic alopecia–appears to

Dirk M. Elston

2010-01-01

32

Dermatoses associated with mites other than Sarcoptes.  

PubMed

Mites are arthropods of the subclass Acari (Acarina). Although Sarcoptes is the mite most commonly recognized as a cause of human skin disease in the United States, numerous other mite-associated dermatoses have been described, and merit familiarity on the part of physicians treating skin disease. This review discusses several non-scabies mites and their associated diseases, including Demodex, chiggers, Cheyletiella, bird mites, grain itch, oak leaf itch, grocer's itch, tropical rat mite, snake mite, and Psoroptes. PMID:25577848

Ken, Kimberly M; Shockman, Solomon C; Sirichotiratana, Melissa; Lent, Megan P; Wilson, Morgan L

2014-09-01

33

Carcases and mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mites are involved in the decomposition of animal carcases and human corpses at every stage. From initial decay at the fresh\\u000a stage until dry decomposition at the skeletal stage, a huge diversity of Acari, including members of the Mesostigmata, Prostigmata,\\u000a Astigmata, Endeostigmata, Oribatida and Ixodida, are an integral part of the constantly changing food webs on, in and beneath\\u000a the

Henk R. Braig; M. Alejandra Perotti

2009-01-01

34

Demodex mites: facts and controversies.  

PubMed

Because Demodex mites are ubiquitous, their potential as human pathogens has often been ignored. This contribution focuses on the growing body of evidence linking Demodex mites with various skin disorders. Histologically, spongiosis and lymphoid inflammation are regularly seen in follicles containing Demodex mites. In animals, they are well established as a cause of mange, and a human counterpart-demodectic alopecia-appears to exist. There is also a statistical association between Demodex mite density and rosacea, facial itching, and chronic blepharitis. Papulovesicular rosacealike lesions and spiny blepharitis often respond to agents that reduce Demodex numbers. Although these observations are not sufficient to fulfill Koch's postulates, Koch's postulates are also not fulfilled for the association between brown recluse spiders and dermal necrosis or the association between streptococci and guttate psoriasis. The evidence linking Demodex mites to human disease has implications regarding treatment. PMID:20797509

Elston, Dirk M

2010-01-01

35

Managing Varroa Mites in Honey Bee Colonies  

E-print Network

. While the male mite dies in the cell, the adult daughter mites climb onto an adult worker bee and feed Managing Varroa Mites in Honey Bee Colonies The varroa mite (Varroa destructor) is the most serious pest of honey bee colonies worldwide. This parasite was first detected in North Carolina in 1990

Tarpy, David R.

36

Molecular identification of house dust mites and storage mites.  

PubMed

Mites are known causes of allergic diseases. Currently, identification of mites based on morphology is difficult if only one mite is isolated from a (dust) sample, or when only one gender is found, or when the specimen is not intact especially with the loss of the legs. The purpose of this study was to use polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the ITS2 gene, to complement the morphological data for the identification of mites to the species level. For this, six species were cultured: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Blomia tropicalis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Aleuroglyphus ovatus and Glycycometus malaysiensis. Genomic DNA of the mites was extracted, quantified, amplified and digested individually with restriction enzymes. Hinf I and Ple I differentiated the restriction patterns of D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae. Bfa I and Alu I enzymes differentiated B. tropicalis and G. malaysiensis. Ple I enzyme was useful for the differentiation between T. putrescentiae and A. ovatus. Bfa I was useful for the differentiation of G. malaysiensis from the rest of the species. In conclusion, different species of mites can be differentiated using PCR-RFLP of ITS2 region. With the established PCR-RFLP method in this study, identification of these mites to the species level is possible even if complete and intact adult specimens of both sexes are not available. As no study to date has reported PCR-RFLP method for the identification of domestic mites, the established method should be validated for the identification of other species of mites that were not included in this study. PMID:21468750

Wong, Shew Fung; Chong, Ai Ling; Mak, Joon Wah; Tan, Jessie; Ling, Suk Jiun; Ho, Tze Ming

2011-10-01

37

The invasive coconut mite Aceria guerreronis (Acari: Eriophyidae): origin and invasion sources inferred from mitochondrial (16S) and nuclear (ITS) sequences.  

PubMed

Over the past 30 years the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer has emerged as one of the most important pests of coconut and has recently spread to most coconut production areas worldwide. The mite has not been recorded in the Indo-Pacific region, the area of origin of coconut, suggesting that it has infested coconut only recently. To investigate the geographical origin, ancestral host associations, and colonization history of the mite, DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial and one nuclear region were obtained from samples of 29 populations from the Americas, Africa and the Indo-ocean region. Mitochondrial DNA 16S ribosomal sequences were most diverse in Brazil, which contained six of a total of seven haplotypes. A single haplotype was shared by non-American mites. Patterns of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) variation were similar, again with the highest nucleotide diversity found in Brazil. These results suggest an American origin of the mite and lend evidence to a previous hypothesis that the original host of the mite is a non-coconut palm. In contrast to the diversity in the Americas, all samples from Africa and Asia were identical or very similar, consistent with the hypothesis that the mite invaded these regions recently from a common source. Although the invasion routes of this mite are still only partially reconstructed, the study rules out coconut as the ancestral host of A. guerreronis, thus prompting a reassessment of efforts using quarantine and biological control to check the spread of the pest. PMID:16336700

Navia, D; de Moraes, G J; Roderick, G; Navajas, M

2005-12-01

38

Pancake Syndrome (Oral Mite Anaphylaxis)  

PubMed Central

Oral mite anaphylaxis is a new syndrome characterized by severe allergic manifestations occurring in atopic patients shortly after the intake of foods made with mite-contaminated wheat flour. This clinical entity, observed more frequently in tropical/subtropical environments, is more often triggered by pancakes and for that reason it has been designated "pancake syndrome". Because cooked foods are able to induce the symptoms, it has been proposed that thermoresistant allergens are involved in its production. A novel variety of this syndrome occurs during physical exercise and therefore has been named dust mite ingestion-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis. To prevent mite proliferation and the production of anaphylaxis, it has been recommended that wheat flour be stored at low temperatures in the refrigerator. PMID:23283016

2009-01-01

39

The Melbourne House Dust Mite Study: Eliminating house dust mites in the domestic environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Hypersensitivity to house dust mite allergens is associated with increased asthma morbidity. Asthma severity appears to be related to the degree of mite allergen exposure. Short-term studies suggest that complete avoidance reduces disease severity. Objective: The study was designed to assess the effect of different mattress covers and floor coverings on mite allergen concentrations in the homes of mite-sensitive

David J. Hill; Philip J. Thompson; Geoffrey A. Stewart; John B. Carlin; Terence M. Nolan; Andrew S. Kemp; Clifford S. Hosking

1997-01-01

40

Dust mite allergens: Ecology and distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most important allergy-causing mites found in homes worldwide are the house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Euroglyphus maynei, and the storage mite Blomia tropicalis. Most homes contain multiple species. The most prevalent mite species and allergen in homes differ geographically, between\\u000a homes within a geographical region, and among areas within a home. Therefore, it is important to know

Larry G. Arlian; Marjorie S. Morgan; Jacqueline S. Neal

2002-01-01

41

Clinical Significance of Mites in Urine  

PubMed Central

We report a case where a mite egg found in urine caused diagnostic confusion. The possibility of gut or bladder mite infection should be entertained only after repeated identification of mites in urine or stool samples from a symptomatic patient with no other cause for the symptoms and where the possibilities of contamination and spurious infection have been excluded. PMID:16333130

Dini, Leigh A.; Frean, John A.

2005-01-01

42

Flat mites of the world - Edition 2  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Flat Mites of the World has an interactive key, fact sheets, descriptions, and images to aid in the identification of flat mites (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tetranychoidea: Tenuipalpidae) worldwide. The tool will help identify 36 genera of flat mites, including specific diagnostics for 13 species of...

43

PALM DESERT ENERGY INDEPENDENCE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

PALM DESERT ENERGY INDEPENDENCE PROGRAM SUMMARY OF LOAN PROCESS Proiect Scopina The first step by the property owner. Applications and instructions are available online at the Palm Desert web site that the applicant is the property owner through a City of Palm Desert contract with a nationally-recognized title

Kammen, Daniel M.

44

Human Demodex Mite: The Versatile Mite of Dermatological Importance  

PubMed Central

Demodex mite is an obligate human ecto-parasite found in or near the pilo-sebaceous units. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are two species typically found on humans. Demodex infestation usually remains asymptomatic and may have a pathogenic role only when present in high densities and also because of immune imbalance. All cutaneous diseases caused by Demodex mites are clubbed under the term demodicosis or demodicidosis, which can be an etiological factor of or resemble a variety of dermatoses. Therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion about the etiological role of Demodex in various dermatoses can help in early diagnosis and appropriate, timely, and cost effective management. PMID:24470662

Rather, Parvaiz Anwar; Hassan, Iffat

2014-01-01

45

Human demodex mite: the versatile mite of dermatological importance.  

PubMed

Demodex mite is an obligate human ecto-parasite found in or near the pilo-sebaceous units. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are two species typically found on humans. Demodex infestation usually remains asymptomatic and may have a pathogenic role only when present in high densities and also because of immune imbalance. All cutaneous diseases caused by Demodex mites are clubbed under the term demodicosis or demodicidosis, which can be an etiological factor of or resemble a variety of dermatoses. Therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion about the etiological role of Demodex in various dermatoses can help in early diagnosis and appropriate, timely, and cost effective management. PMID:24470662

Rather, Parvaiz Anwar; Hassan, Iffat

2014-01-01

46

Wheat curl mite resistance: interactions of mite feeding with wheat streak mosaic virus infection.  

PubMed

The majority of plant viruses are dependent on arthropod vectors for spread between plants. Wheat streak mosaic virus (family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus, WSMV) is transmitted by the wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, and this virus and vector cause extensive yield losses in most major wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-growing regions of the world. Many cultivars in use are susceptible to this vector-virus complex, and yield losses of 10-99% have been documented. wheat curl mite resistance genes have been identified in goat grass, Aegilops tauschii (Coss) Schmal., and transferred to hexaploid wheat, but very few varieties contain effectively wheat curl mite resistance, due to virulent wheat curl mite populations. However, wheat curl mite resistance remains an effective strategy to reduce losses due to WSMV. The goal of our project was to identify the most effective, reproducible, and rapid method for assessing wheat curl mite resistance. We also wanted to determine whether mite resistance is affected by WSMV infection, because the pathogen and pest commonly occur together. Single and group wheat curl mite infestations produced similar amounts of leaf rolling and folding on wheat curl mite-susceptible wheat varieties that were independent of initial wheat curl mite infestation. This finding will allow accurate, efficient, large-scale screening of wheat germplasm for wheat curl mite resistance by infesting plants with sections of wheat leaf tissue containing mixed stages of wheat curl mite. The wheat curl mite-resistant breeding line 'OK05312' displayed antibiosis (reduced wheat curl mite population development). The effect of WSMV infection on wheat curl mite reproduction was genotype-dependent. Mite populations increased on infected wheat curl mite- and WSMV-susceptible plants compared with uninfected plants, but WSMV infection had no significant effect on wheat curl mite populations on resistant plants. OK05312 is a strong source of wheat curl mite resistance for wheat breeding programs. PMID:21882710

Murugan, M; Sotelo Cardona, P; Duraimurugan, P; Whitfield, A E; Schneweis, D; Starkey, S; Smith, C M

2011-08-01

47

High Varroa mite abundance influences chemical profiles of worker bees and mite-host preferences.  

PubMed

Honeybee disappearance is one of the major environmental and economic challenges this century has to face. The ecto-parasitic mite Varroa destructor represents one of the main causes of the worldwide beehive losses. Although halting mite transmission among beehives is of primary importance to save honeybee colonies from further decline, the natural route used by mites to abandon a collapsing colony has not been extensively investigated so far. Here, we explored whether, with increasing mite abundance within the colony, mites change their behaviour to maximize the chances of leaving a highly infested colony. We show that, at low mite abundance, mites remain within the colony and promote their reproduction by riding nurses that they distinguish from foragers by different chemical cuticular signatures. When mite abundance increases, the chemical profile of nurses and foragers tends to overlap, promoting mite departure from exploited colonies by riding pollen foragers. PMID:25165133

Cervo, R; Bruschini, C; Cappa, F; Meconcelli, S; Pieraccini, G; Pradella, D; Turillazzi, S

2014-09-01

48

Exploration of the acarine fauna on coconut palm in Brazil with emphasis on Aceria guerreronis (Acari: Eriophyidae) and its natural enemies.  

PubMed

Coconut is an important crop in tropical and subtropical regions. Among the mites that infest coconut palms, Aceria guerreronis Keifer is economically the most important. We conducted surveys throughout the coconut growing areas of Brazil. Samples were taken from attached coconuts, leaflets, fallen coconuts and inflorescences of coconut palms in 112 localities aiming to determine the occurrence and the distribution of phytophagous mites, particularly A. guerreronis, and associated natural enemies. Aceria guerreronis was the most abundant phytophagous mite followed by Steneotarsonemus concavuscutum Lofego & Gondim Jr. and Steneotarsonemus furcatus De Leon (Tarsonemidae). Infestation by A. guerreronis was recorded in 87% of the visited localities. About 81% of all predatory mites belonged to the family Phytoseiidae, mainly represented by Neoseiulus paspalivorus De Leon, Neoseiulus baraki Athias-Henriot and Amblyseius largoensis Muma; 12% were Ascidae, mainly Proctolaelaps bickleyi Bram, Proctolaelaps sp nov and Lasioseius subterraneus Chant. Neoseiulus paspalivorus and N. baraki were the most abundant predators on attached coconuts. Ascidae were predominant on fallen coconuts, while A. largoensis was predominant on leaflets; no mites were found on branches of inflorescences. Leaflets harboured higher mite diversity than the attached coconuts. Mite diversity was the highest in the state Pará and on palms surrounded by seasonal forests and Amazonian rain-forests. Neoseiulus paspalivorus, N. baraki and P. bickleyi were identified as the most promising predators of A. guerreronis. Analyses of the influence of climatic factors revealed that dry ambient conditions favour the establishment of A. guerreronis. Neoseiulus paspalivorus and N. baraki have differing climatic requirements; the former being more abundant in warm and dry areas, the latter prevailing in moderately tempered and humid areas. We discuss the significance of our findings for natural and biological control of A. guerreronis. PMID:18062836

Lawson-Balagbo, L M; Gondim, M G C; de Moraes, G J; Hanna, R; Schausberger, P

2008-02-01

49

Date palm: Production  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The future of date palm, as a dioecious, monocot fruit tree largely depends on (1) developing advanced knowledge and information about the dynamics, management, and sustainability of the tree as a central component of the oasis agro-ecosystem, and (2) in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity ...

50

Biodiversity of date palm  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is the dominant component upon which the sustainable biophysical and socio-economic structures of the oasis ecosystem are based; a fruit tree with unique nutritional, biochemical and biophysical characteristics, a rich source of aesthetic and cultural values, and ...

51

Interactions between Phoretic Mites and the Arabian Rhinoceros Beetle, Oryctes agamemnon arabicus  

PubMed Central

Oryctes agamemnon arabicus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is one of the main pests on date palm trees in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Two mite species were found associated with this beetle: Sancassania sp. (Acari: Astigmata: Acaridae) and Hypoaspis rhinocerotis Oudemans (Acari: Mesostigmata: Laelapidae). Sancassania deutonymphs (hypopi) were phoretic on O. a. arabicus adults and larvae. However, they were also necromenic, because once the host dies they feed on its carcass. The highest deutonymph load was found in the subelytral space of O. a. arabicus adult. The phoretic and necromenic interactions between Sancassania sp. and O. a. arabicus need to be investigated in more detail. H. rhinocerotis was recorded for the first time in UAE. Its role has not yet been studied in the date palm agricultural ecosystem. PMID:23448160

Al-Deeb, Mohammad Ali; Muzaffar, Sabir Bin; Sharif, Eyas Mohammad

2012-01-01

52

Honey Bees: Sweetness and Mites  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Honey bee colony losses have been in the news lately and the potential reasons for these losses have taken up much space in the news media. In order to clarify what role mites play in the current loss (2006-2007) of bee colonies, called Colony Collapse Disorder, a better understanding of what a mit...

53

Coconut, date and oil palm genomics  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A review of genomics research is presented for the three most economically important palm crops, coconut (Cocos nucifera), date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), encompassing molecular markers studies of genetic diversity, genetic mapping, quantitative trait loci discovery...

54

Multipurpose palms: the sugar palm ( Arenga pinnata (Wurmb) Merr.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arenga pinnata is the most important sugar palm of the humid tropics. Besides yielding sugar, it provides a great number of products and benefits to its users, and is one of the most diverse multipurpose tree species in culture.The various ways in which this palm is used are illustrated for the native population of four Indonesian provinces. Although all people

J. Mogea; B. Seibert; W. Smits

1991-01-01

55

PALM GAME DESIGN Pieter Spronck  

E-print Network

PALM GAME DESIGN Pieter Spronck Universiteit Maastricht IKAT/Infonomics P.O. Box 616 NL-6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands E-mail: p.spronck@cs.unimaas.nl KEYWORDS Gaming, handheld computers, software engineering, design. ABSTRACT Though the Palm is mainly a business tool, many games have been developed

Spronck, Pieter

56

Original article Grooming behavior and damaged mites  

E-print Network

and Apis mellifera ligustica I Fries Wei Huazhen Shi Wei Chen Shu Jin2 1 Department of Entomology, Swedish and Apis mellifera ligustica Spin, where mites were added to observation hive bees and to full the importance of grooming behavior to Varroa mite tolerance in both A cerana and A mellifera. Apis mellifera

Boyer, Edmond

57

Life history of the predatory mites Neoseiulus paspalivorus and Proctolaelaps bickleyi, candidates for biological control of Aceria guerreronis.  

PubMed

The eriophyoid mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer (Eriophyidae), commonly called the coconut mite, is a key pest of coconut fruits. Surveys conducted on coconut palms in Brazil revealed the predatory mites Neoseiulus paspalivorus DeLeon (Phytoseiidae) and Proctolaelaps bickleyi Bram (Ascidae) as the most commonly associated natural enemies of A. guerreronis on coconut fruits. However, virtually nothing is known about the life history of these two predators. We conducted laboratory experiments at 25 +/- 0.1 degrees C, 70-90% RH and 12:12 h L:D photoperiod to determine the life history characteristics of the two predatory mites when feeding on A. guerreronis and other potential food sources present on coconut fruits such as Steneotarsonemus furcatus DeLeon (Tarsonemidae), coconut pollen and the fungus Rhizopus cf. stolonifer Lind (Mucoraceae). In addition, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Tetranychidae) was tested for its suitability as prey. Both predators, N. paspalivorus and P. bickleyi, thrived on A. guerreronis as primary food source resulting in shorter developmental time (5.6 and 4.4 days, respectively), higher oviposition rate (1.7 and 7.0 eggs/female/day, respectively) and higher intrinsic rate of increase (0.232 and 0.489 per female/day, respectively) than on any other diet but were unable to develop or lay eggs when fed T. urticae. Coconut pollen and S. furcatus were adequate alternative food sources for N. paspalivorus and Rhizopus for P. bickleyi. We discuss the relevance of our findings for natural and biological control of the coconut mite A. guerreronis. PMID:17828440

Lawson-Balagbo, L M; Gondim, M G C; de Moraes, G J; Hanna, R; Schausberger, P

2007-01-01

58

An opilioacarid mite in Cretaceous Burmese amber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fossil opilioacarid mite (Parasitiformes: Opilioacarida) in Burmese amber is described as ? Opilioacarus groehni sp. nov. This ca. 99 Ma record (Upper Cretaceous: Cenomanian) represents only the third fossil example of this putatively basal mite lineage, the others originating from Eocene Baltic amber (ca. 44-49 Ma). Our new record is not only the oldest record of Opilioacarida, but it is also one of the oldest examples of the entire Parasitiformes clade. The presence of Opilioacarida—potentially Opiloacarus—in the Cretaceous of SE Asia suggests that some modern genus groups were formerly more widely distributed across the northern hemisphere, raising questions about previously suggested Gondwanan origins for these mites.

Dunlop, Jason A.; de Oliveira Bernardi, Leopoldo Ferreira

2014-09-01

59

Anaphylaxis from ingestion of mites: pancake anaphylaxis.  

PubMed

Oral mite anaphylaxis is a new syndrome characterized by severe allergic symptoms occurring immediately after eating foods made with mite-contaminated wheat flour. This syndrome, which is more prevalent in tropical environments, is triggered more often by pancakes, and for that reason, it has been designated "the pancake syndrome." Because cooked foods are able to induce the symptoms, it has been suggested that thermoresistant allergens are involved in its pathogenesis. A variety of this syndrome can occur during physical exercise (dust mite ingestion-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis). PMID:23154081

Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Suárez Chacón, Raúl; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernán; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique

2013-01-01

60

Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) in Sweden.  

PubMed

Haematophagous mites were collected from the vent region and plumage of chickens in six hobby flocks of ornamental breeds in Sweden, one of which included turkeys. Soiled vent skin and feathers, dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, skin necroses and ulcers were observed in 12 necropsied birds from two of the flocks. The mites were identified as the northern fowl mite Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Mesostigmata: Macronyssidae). This was supported by sequence analysis of a 642-bp region in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene (COI) in mites collected from five flocks, which showed 97-99% sequence similarity to O.?sylviarum by blast analysis. Pairwise sequence comparisons revealed nucleotide variations in the range of 0-2.8%, whereas amino acid sequences were highly conserved. This paper represents one of very few records of O.?sylviarum in European poultry, and is the first to report COI sequence data for O.?sylviarum from poultry in Europe. PMID:24602037

Jansson, D S; Otman, F; Lundqvist, L; Höglund, J; Engström, A; Chirico, J

2014-12-01

61

Gall-Making Insects and Mites  

E-print Network

Galls are abnormal swellings of plant tissue caused by insects, bacteria, fungi, mites or nematodes. Insects that cause galls include certain moth caterpillars, beetles, flies, jumping plant lice, aphids and small wasps. Ways to control galls...

Bogran, Carlos E.; Drees, Bastiaan M.; Hudgeons, Jeremy L.

2006-03-30

62

Genotypic variability and relationships between mite infestation levels, mite damage, grooming intensity, and removal of Varroa destructor mites in selected strains of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to demonstrate genotypic variability and analyze the relationships between the infestation levels of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies, the rate of damage of fallen mites, and the intensity with which bees of different genotypes groom themselves to remove mites from their bodies. Sets of paired genotypes that are presumably susceptible and resistant to the varroa mite were compared at the colony level for number of mites falling on sticky papers and for proportion of damaged mites. They were also compared at the individual level for intensity of grooming and mite removal success. Bees from the "resistant" colonies had lower mite population rates (up to 15 fold) and higher percentages of damaged mites (up to 9 fold) than bees from the "susceptible" genotypes. At the individual level, bees from the "resistant" genotypes performed significantly more instances of intense grooming (up to 4 fold), and a significantly higher number of mites were dislodged from the bees' bodies by intense grooming than by light grooming (up to 7 fold) in all genotypes. The odds of mite removal were high and significant for all "resistant" genotypes when compared with the "susceptible" genotypes. The results of this study strongly suggest that grooming behavior and the intensity with which bees perform it, is an important component in the resistance of some honey bee genotypes to the growth of varroa mite populations. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:22465569

Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Emsen, Berna; Unger, Peter; Espinosa-Montaño, Laura G; Petukhova, Tatiana

2012-07-01

63

Inactivation of dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold from carpet.  

PubMed

Carpet is known to be a reservoir for biological contaminants, such as dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold, if it is not kept clean. The accumulation of these contaminants in carpet might trigger allergies or asthma symptoms in both children and adults. The purpose of this study is to compare methods for removal of dust mites, dust mite allergens, and mold from carpet. Carpets were artificially worn to simulate 1 to 2 years of wear in a four-person household. The worn carpets were inoculated together with a common indoor mold (Cladosporium species) and house dust mites and incubated for 6 weeks to allow time for dust mite growth on the carpet. The carpets were randomly assigned to one of the four treatment groups. Available treatment regimens for controlling carpet contaminants were evaluated through a literature review and experimentation. Four moderately low-hazard, nondestructive methods were selected as treatments: vacuuming, steam-vapor, Neem oil (a natural tree extract), and benzalkonium chloride (a quaternary ammonium compound). Steam vapor treatment demonstrated the greatest dust mite population reduction (p < 0.05) when compared to other methods. The two physical methods, steam vapor and vacuuming, have no statistically significant efficacy in inactivating dust mite allergens (p = 0.084), but have higher efficacy when compared to the chemical method on dust mite allergens (p = 0.002). There is no statistically significant difference in the efficacy for reducing mold in carpet (p > 0.05) for both physical and chemical methods. The steam-vapor treatment effectively killed dust mites and denatured dust mite allergen in the laboratory environment. PMID:24467247

Ong, Kee-Hean; Lewis, Roger D; Dixit, Anupma; MacDonald, Maureen; Yang, Mingan; Qian, Zhengmin

2014-01-01

64

Wang et al.: Mites and Nematodes Associated with Termites 499 MITES AND NEMATODES ASSOCIATED WITH THREE  

E-print Network

Wang et al.: Mites and Nematodes Associated with Termites 499 MITES AND NEMATODES ASSOCIATED WITH THREE SUBTERRANEAN TERMITE SPECIES (ISOPTERA: RHINOTERMITIDAE) CHANGLU WANG1,3 , JANINE E. POWELL1,4 AND BARRY M. O'CONNOR2 1 Formosan Subterranean Termite Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Stoneville, MS 38776 2

Wang, Changlu

65

_____________ Augmentative releases ofpredatory mites on papaya in Hawaii 167 AUGMENTATIVE RELEASES OF PREDATORY MITES ON PAPAYA  

E-print Network

_____________ Augmentative releases ofpredatory mites on papaya in Hawaii 167 AUGMENTATIVE RELEASES OF PREDATORY MITES ON PAPAYA IN HAWAII: FAILURE AND SUCCESS V. Fournier,1,2 J.A. Rosenheirn," M.W. Iohnson on outdoor crops (Olkin and Shaw, 1995;Walsh et ai., 1998). Native to Central America, papaya (Carica papaya

Rosenheim, Jay A.

66

Hygienic Activity Toward Varroa Mites in Capped Brood is not Dependent on Mite Reproductive Status  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

- The varroa resistance of bees selectively bred for high levels of varroa sensitive hygiene (VSH) is characterized by a reduction of (1) the mite infestation rate (Harris 2007 J. Apic. Res. / Bee World 46: 134-139) and (2) the percentage of fertile mites (Harris and Harbo 1999 J. Econ. Entomol. 92:...

67

Bacterial Leaf Blight of Fishtail Palm  

Microsoft Academic Search

welve species of single- and cluster-stemmed fishtail palms in the genus Caryota are found from India and Sri Lanka to Southeast Asia, northern Australia, and the Solomon Islands. In Hawai'i, Caryota mitis (the Burmese fishtail palm) is widely grown in landscapes and is sometimes exported for use in interiorscapes or as houseplants. The Burmese fishtail palm is prone to damage

Scot Nelson

68

Colonization of greenhouse nematode cultures by nematophagous mites and fungi.  

PubMed

Unproductive > 7-year-old greenhouse cultures of citrus nematode (Tylenchulus semipenetrans) had a well-developed soil invertebrate fauna that included nematophagous mite species characteristic of Florida citrus groves. Nematophagous mite densities in box cultures were 285 +/- 42 mites/liter, 2.5 to 25 times higher than densities in citrus nematode-infested groves. Vigorous root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) cultures grown in steam-pasteurized soil had few nematophagous mites until more than 3 months after inoculation. Mite species diversity had a significant (P < 0.0001) positive linear relationship with culture age that explained about one-half the variance in species number. Nematophagous mite densities rose and then fell with culture age. In root-knot cultures > 3-months-old, mite densities often exceeded 1,000 mites/liter. Twelve species of nematophagous fungi also were isolated from greenhouse nematode cultures. PMID:19279841

Walter, D E; Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L

1993-12-01

69

[Animal mite-induced epizoonoses and their significance in dermatology].  

PubMed

Different mite species may infest humans temporarily; such arthropods should be considered a possible cause of pruritic skin reactions of unclear origin. Pseudo-scabies is a common problem. This self-limiting dermatosis may often be misdiagnosed. Several mite species including Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis, Sarcoptes scabiei var. bovis, Notoedres cati, Cheyletiella yasguri, Cheyletiella blakei, Dermanyssus gallinae and Ophionyssus natricis may infest human skin, causing symptoms. Other less common animal mites, Neotrombicula autumnalis and foodstuff mites are also discussed. PMID:9036121

Beck, W

1996-10-01

70

Control of spider mites on cotton by organic sulphur compounds  

E-print Network

COMTBOL OF SPIDER MITES ON COTTON BY ORGANIC SULPHUR COMPOUNDS A Dissertation Bor CHARLES EDWARD KING Approved as to style and content lay* (Chairman of Committee) 10 (Head of Dwpartaent or Student Advisor) CONTROL OF SPIDER MITES ON COTTON... of two species of spider mites using 8 gallons of spray per acre. . 57 10. Results of laboratory ovicidal tests for control of two species of spider mites using 100 gallons of spray per acre.................................................. 59 11...

King, Charles Edward

2013-10-04

71

THE AVOCADO BROWN MITE IN RELATION TO ITS NATURAL ENEMIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The avocado brown mite, Oligonychus punicae (Hirst), infests California avocado orchards in many areas every season. The presence of these mites is usually first noted when a characteristic brownish coloration, caused by mite feeding, appears on the upper surfaces of the leaves beginning along the midrib and main veins. The undersides of the leaves remain undamaged unless the infestation is

J. A. McMurtry; H. G. Johnson

72

Estimating citrus rust mite densities on fruit: Some sampling considerations  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Citrus rust mites continue to be key pests of citrus fruit in most Florida groves, particularly in fruit grown for the fresh market. There are two different species, the citrus rust mite and the pink citrus rust mite, and the currently the same scouting and management programs are used to manage bo...

73

Enabling mycelial application of Hirsutella thompsonii for managing the coconut mite.  

PubMed

Laboratory and field studies were conducted to examine the prospect of mycelial application of Hirsutella thompsonii as an alternative to the use of mycelial-conidial formulations of the fungus in the suppression of the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis. In a series of laboratory experiments, glycerol, yeast extract powder and dehydrated malt extract broth were found to be the best among nine substances investigated as possible adjuvants for use on coconut palms in the field along with H. thompsonii mycelia. H. thompsonii biomass in the presence of adjuvants not only produced more colonies but also yielded more conidia per pellet. In terms of the density of conidia generated on a mycelial mat the treatments varied highly significantly in two methods, with glycerol showing an average of 106% increase over control. Though irradiance with simulated sunlight resulted in reduced conidiogenesis, in general, adjuvant-treated pellets, both exposed and unexposed to simulated sunlight, produced substantial conidiation compared with control, irrespective of the two incubation conditions. Better conidiation was observed under alternating light-dark regime than under total darkness in all the treatments. Glycerol boosted the pathogenicity of H. thompsonii by 16.5% over control. In the field, a newly developed mycelial formulation of H. thompsonii applied after tank-mixing separately with the three selected adjuvants brought down the post-treatment population of the coconut mite by 85.6-97.1%. Application of the fungus in combination with glycerol resulted in a tolerable mean nut damage grade of 2.0 during the pre-harvest stage, compared with an acute score of 4.0 in control palms. PMID:18685957

Sreerama Kumar, P; Singh, Leena

2008-12-01

74

Rearing of coconut mite Aceria guerreronis and the predatory mite Neoseiulus baraki in the laboratory.  

PubMed

A method was developed for the rearing of coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer (Acari: Eriophyidae), and its predatory mite Neoseiulus baraki (Athias-Henriot) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on embryo culture seedlings of coconut (Cocos nucifera) in the laboratory. Seedlings in the ages of <2, 2-4 and 4-6 months were infested with 75 field-collected coconut mites and the population growth was determined up to six weeks after introduction. The populations of coconut mites increased exponentially up to five weeks after introduction and declined thereafter on seedlings of all ages with significant differences among the three groups of seedlings occurring over time. At week 5, a significantly higher mean number (+/-SE) of coconut mites (20,098 +/- 3,465) was bred on 4-6-month-old seedlings than on smaller seedlings, and on the largest seedlings the numbers were highest at all time intervals, except at week 2. Neoseiulus baraki was reared on embryo culture seedlings of the three age groups infested with coconut mites, by introduction of five female deutonymphs and one male, three weeks after introducing coconut mites. Predator numbers progressed significantly over time, but the size of seedlings did not significantly influence the numbers. On all groups of seedlings, the mean number of N. baraki increased up to two weeks after introduction on to seedlings and then declined. Many coconut mites were successfully reared in the laboratory for a longer period by this method and it could also be used as an alternative method to rear N. baraki. Development of this method may contribute to the progress of studies on the biology and ecology of coconut mite and its interactions with natural enemies. PMID:18058025

De Silva, P H P R; Fernando, L C P

2008-01-01

75

Genetic characterization of North American populations of the wheat curl mite and dry bulb mite.  

PubMed

The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, transmits at least three harmful viruses, wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), high plains virus (HPV), and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) throughout the Great Plains. This virus complex is considered to be the most serious disease of winter wheat in the western Great Plains. One component of managing this disease has been developing mite resistance in wheat; however, identification of mite biotypes has complicated deployment and stability of resistance. This biotypic variability in mites and differential virus transmission by different mite populations underscores the need to better understand mite identity. However, A. tosichella has a history of serious taxonomic confusion, especially as it relates to A. tulipae Keifer, the dry bulb mite. Molecular techniques were used to genetically characterize multiple A. tosichella populations and compare them to populations of A. tulipae. DNA from these populations was polymerase chain reaction amplified and the ribosomal ITS2 region sequenced and compared. These results indicated limited variability between these two species, but two distinct types within A. tosichella were found that corresponded to previous work with Australian mite populations. Further work using sequencing of several mitochondrial DNA genes also demonstrated two distinct types of A. tosichella populations. Furthermore, the separation between these two A. tosichella types is comparable to their separation with A. tulipae, suggesting that species scale differences exist between these two types ofA. tosichella. These genetic differences correspond to important biological differences between the types (e.g., biotypic and virus transmission differences). In light of these differences, it is important that future studies on biological response differences account for these mite differences. PMID:23156180

Hein, Gary L; French, Roy; Siriwetwiwat, Benjawan; Amrine, James W

2012-10-01

76

Survival and behavioural response to acaricides of the coconut mite predator Neoseiulus baraki.  

PubMed

The coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer, is a major pest of coconut palm in the world. The control of this pest species is done through acaricide applications at short time intervals. However, the predators of this pest may also be affected by acaricides. Among the predators of A. guerreronis, Neoseiulus baraki (Athias-Henriot) has potential for biological control. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of acaricides on the survival and behavior of N. baraki. The survivorship of N. baraki was recorded in surface-impregnated arenas. Choice and no-choice behavioral bioassays were carried out using a video tracking system to assess the walking behavior of the predator under acaricide exposure. Although all acaricides negatively affected the survival of N. baraki, chlorfenapyr and azadirachtin caused lower effect than the other acaricides. No significant differences in walking behavior were observed under exposure to fenpyroximate, chlorfenapyr and chlorpyrifos on fully-contaminated arenas. Azadirachtin and chlorpyrifos caused repellence. Irritability was observed for all acaricides, except for abamectin. Chlorfenapyr was the most suitable product for managing the coconut mite because of its low effect on survival and behavior of N. baraki. PMID:23224672

Lima, Debora B; Melo, José W S; Guedes, Raul N C; Siqueira, Herbert A A; Pallini, Angelo; Gondim, Manoel G C

2013-07-01

77

An opilioacarid mite in Cretaceous Burmese amber.  

PubMed

A fossil opilioacarid mite (Parasitiformes: Opilioacarida) in Burmese amber is described as ?Opilioacarus groehni sp. nov. This ca. 99 Ma record (Upper Cretaceous: Cenomanian) represents only the third fossil example of this putatively basal mite lineage, the others originating from Eocene Baltic amber (ca. 44-49 Ma). Our new record is not only the oldest record of Opilioacarida, but it is also one of the oldest examples of the entire Parasitiformes clade. The presence of Opilioacarida-potentially Opiloacarus-in the Cretaceous of SE Asia suggests that some modern genus groups were formerly more widely distributed across the northern hemisphere, raising questions about previously suggested Gondwanan origins for these mites. PMID:25027588

Dunlop, Jason A; de Oliveira Bernardi, Leopoldo Ferreira

2014-09-01

78

[Storage mites as the source of household allergens].  

PubMed

Storage mites of the families Acaridae and Glycyphagidae attracted attention as the source of household allergens. Storage mites occurring in house dust were studied. The fauna of storage mites in house dust was represented by two families. The dominating species, both in the relative amount and occurrence, were Tyrophagus putrescentiae and Chortoglyphus arcuatus. In addition, Caloglyphus rodionovi and Carpoglyphus lactis occur regularly. The specific activity of allergenic extracts obtained from storage mites was studied in ELISA. They were shown to have sensitizing and immunogenic properties. The study revealed that storage mites possessed specific determinants and those common with pyroglyphid, not linked with allergens of groups 1 and 2. PMID:9460873

Zheltikova, T M; Gervazieva, V B; Zhirova, S N; Mokronosova, M A; Sveranovskaia, V V

1997-01-01

79

LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-print Network

LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA 24 January 2014 ABSTRACT: Lake Worth Inlet connects Palm Beach Harbor to the Atlantic Ocean. The port is located in Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida. The Port of Palm Beach is the fourth busiest

US Army Corps of Engineers

80

Human hair follicle mites and forensic acarology.  

PubMed

The hair follicle mites of the genus Demodex (Demodecidae) were first discovered in humans in 1841. Since then, members of this host-specific genus have been found in 11 of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals with most host species harboring two or more species of Demodex. Humans are host to D. folliculorum and D. brevis. The biology, natural history, and anatomy of these mites as related to their life in the human pilosebaceous complex is reviewed. This information may provide insight into the application of Demodex as a tool for the forensic acarologist/entomologist. PMID:19557529

Desch, Clifford E

2009-10-01

81

P-MITE: a database for plant miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements  

PubMed Central

Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are prevalent in eukaryotic species including plants. MITE families vary dramatically and usually cannot be identified based on homology. In this study, we de novo identified MITEs from 41 plant species, using computer programs MITE Digger, MITE-Hunter and/or Repetitive Sequence with Precise Boundaries (RSPB). MITEs were found in all, but one (Cyanidioschyzon merolae), species. Combined with the MITEs identified previously from the rice genome, >2.3 million sequences from 3527 MITE families were obtained from 41 plant species. In general, higher plants contain more MITEs than lower plants, with a few exceptions such as papaya, with only 538 elements. The largest number of MITEs is found in apple, with 237 302 MITE sequences. The number of MITE sequences in a genome is significantly correlated with genome size. A series of databases (plant MITE databases, P-MITE), available online at http://pmite.hzau.edu.cn/django/mite/, was constructed to host all MITE sequences from the 41 plant genomes. The databases are available for sequence similarity searches (BLASTN), and MITE sequences can be downloaded by family or by genome. The databases can be used to study the origin and amplification of MITEs, MITE-derived small RNAs and roles of MITEs on gene and genome evolution. PMID:24174541

Chen, Jiongjiong; Hu, Qun; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Chen; Kuang, Hanhui

2014-01-01

82

Mites and Cherries in 2005 Dr. Nikki Rothwell, District IPM Educator  

E-print Network

Mites and Cherries in 2005 Dr. Nikki Rothwell, District IPM Educator Two-spotted spider mites can be a complex problem on cherry in hot, dry years. Apple and mites, on the other hand, seem to be easier to be able to better monitor predator mite populations. To add to the complexity of the mite on cherry issue

83

Population survey of phytoseiid mites and spider mites on peach leaves and wild plants in Japanese peach orchard.  

PubMed

A population survey of phytoseiid mites and spider mites was conducted on peach leaves and wild plants in Japanese peach orchards having different pesticide practices. The phytoseiid mite species composition on peach leaves and wild plants, as estimated using quantitative sequencing, changed during the survey period. Moreover, it varied among study sites. The phytoseiid mite species compositions were similar between peach leaves and some wild plants, such as Veronica persica, Paederia foetida, Persicaria longiseta, and Oxalis corniculata with larger quantities of phytoseiid mites, especially after mid-summer. A PCR-based method to detect the ribosomal ITS sequences of Tetranychus kanzawai and Panonychus mori from phytoseiid mites was developed. Results showed that Euseius sojaensis (specialized pollen feeder/generalist predator) uses both spider mites as prey in the field. PMID:24659516

Wari, David; Yamashita, Jun; Kataoka, Yoko; Kohara, Yoko; Hinomoto, Norihide; Kishimoto, Hidenari; Toyoshima, Shingo; Sonoda, Shoji

2014-07-01

84

Feather mites of the greater sandhill crane.  

PubMed

New taxa are described from Grus canadensis tabida: Brephosceles petersoni sp. n. (Alloptidae); Pseudogabucinia reticulata sp. n. (Kramerellidae); Geranolichus canadensis sp. n., and Gruolichus wodashae, gen. et sp. n. (Pterolichidae). Observations on resource partitioning by these mites are given. PMID:512759

Atyeo, W T; Windingstad, R M

1979-08-01

85

Mites associated with stored products in Greece.  

PubMed

A faunistic survey of mites was conducted in many product stores during a 6-year study period, 2000-2005, in Greece. A total of 1,073 samples were taken from 34 Greek counties. The survey was carried out on grains (wheat, maize, oat, barley), flour, bran, manufactured agricultural foodstuffs, dried fruits (figs, raisins), residues and dust, stored in varying quantities in five types of storage facilities (stores of agricultural cooperative unions, farm stores, commercial stores, flour mills and silos). Dominance-frequency analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA) were used to reveal the preferences of the collected taxa. Approximately 55% of the samples contained mites and 65 mite taxa were identified, belonging to 15 families in four orders. Six species, namely, Acarus gracilis Hughes, A. immobilis Griffiths, Caloglyphus oudemansi (Zachvatkin), Suidasia medanensis Oudemans, Tyrophagus perniciosus Zachvatkin and Kleemania plumigera (Oudemans), were new to the fauna of Greece. Five species, Tyrophagus similis Volgin, Blattisocius mali (Oudemans), Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes), Cheyletus cacahuamilpensis Baker and Storchia robustus (Berlese), were recorded for the first time in stored products in Greece. Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) and Acarus siro L. were dominant or intermediate in all storage facilities examined. Cheyletus malaccensis Oudemans was the most common predatory mite. The highest percentage of infestation (65.3) was recorded in the samples from stores of agricultural cooperative unions. Residue-type materials had the highest degrees and percentages of infestation. PMID:18379887

Palyvos, Nickolas E; Emmanouel, Nickolas G; Saitanis, Costas J

2008-03-01

86

INSECT AND MITES NEW TO FLORIDA SUGARCANE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The number of insect and mite species attacking sugarcane in Florida has increased over time. Five new pest species were discovered during the 31-year period 1964 to 1995, one species indigenous to Florida with no previous association with sugarcane and four invasive species entirely new to the Ever...

87

Standard methods for tracheal mite research  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This chapter, for the COLOSS Beebook from the Bee Research Center in Switzerland, summarizes all the current information about the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi) infesting honey bees (Apis mellifera). The chapter covers the effects on bees, its life history, and its range, as well as the identifica...

88

Growth of Hereford-Kedah Kelantan calves fed oil palm fronds and palm kernel cake based diet  

E-print Network

Growth of Hereford-Kedah Kelantan calves fed oil palm fronds and palm kernel cake based diet I, the important by- product is the oil palm frond (OPF) which can be utilised fresh or ensiled. Hereford-Kedah

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Isothermal crystallization kinetics of refined palm oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The induction times for the crystallization, under isothermal conditions, of refined, bleached, and deodorized palm oil from\\u000a the melt were studied by viscometry. At temperatures below 295 K, the crystallization of palm oil was observed to occur in\\u000a a two-stage process. This two-stage process was caused by the fractionation of palm oil, most probably into the stearin and\\u000a olein fractions.

C. W. Chen; O. M. Lai; H. M. Ghazali; C. L. Chong

2002-01-01

90

G93-1167 Spider Mite Management in Corn and Soybeans  

Microsoft Academic Search

This NebGuide describes the two common spider mites found in Nebraska corn and soybeans, their natural enemies and management.\\u000aTwo species of spider mites, the Banks grass mite and twospotted spider mite, commonly feed on Nebraska corn. Banks grass mites (BGM) feed almost exclusively on grasses, including corn and sorghum. Twospotted spider mites (TSM) not only feed on many species

Robert J Wright; Ronald C. Seymour; Leon G. Higley; John B. Campbell

1993-01-01

91

Verified and potential pathogens of predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several species of phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae), including species of the genera Amblyseius, Galendromus, Metaseiulus, Neoseiulus, Phytoseiulus and Typhlodromus, are currently reared for biological control of various crop pests and\\/or as model organisms for the study of predator–prey\\u000a interactions. Pathogen-free phytoseiid mites are important to obtain high efficacy in biological pest control and to get reliable\\u000a data in mite research,

Conny Schütte; Marcel Dicke

2008-01-01

92

Intraguild predation and cannibalism between the predatory mites Neoseiulus neobaraki and N. paspalivorus, natural enemies of the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis.  

PubMed

Neoseiulus neobaraki and N. paspalivorus are amongst the most common phytoseiid predators of coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis, found in the spatial niche beneath coconut fruit bracts. Both predators may occur on the same coconut palms in Benin and Tanzania and are therefore likely to interact with each other. Here, we assessed cannibalism and intraguild predation (IGP) of the two predators in the absence and presence of their primary prey A. guerreronis. In the absence of the shared extraguild prey, A. guerreronis, N. neobaraki killed 19 larvae of N. paspalivorus per day and produced 0.36 eggs/female/day, while the latter species killed only 7 larvae of the former and produced 0.35 eggs/female/day. Presence of A. guerreronis only slightly decreased IGP by N. neobaraki but strongly decreased IGP by N. paspalivorus, which consumed 4-7 times less IG prey than N. neobaraki. Resulting predator offspring to IG prey ratios were, however, 4-5 times higher in N. paspalivorus than N. neobaraki. Overall, provision of A. guerreronis increased oviposition in both species. In the cannibalism tests, in the absence of A. guerreronis, N. neobaraki and N. paspalivorus consumed 1.8 and 1.2 conspecific larvae and produced almost no eggs. In the presence of abundant herbivorous prey, cannibalism dramatically decreased but oviposition increased in both N. neobaraki and N. paspalivorus. In summary, we conclude that (1) N. neobaraki is a much stronger intraguild predator than N. paspalivorus, (2) cannibalism is very limited in both species, and (3) both IGP and cannibalism are reduced in the presence of the common herbivorous prey with the exception of IGP by N. neobaraki, which remained at high levels despite presence of herbivorous prey. We discuss the implications of cannibalism and IGP on the population dynamics of A. guerreronis and the predators in view of their geographic and within-palm distribution patterns. PMID:22669279

Negloh, Koffi; Hanna, Rachid; Schausberger, Peter

2012-11-01

93

Demodex mite infestation in patients with and without rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

In the present study we compared the prevalence of Demodex mites in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in one control group involving individuals of similar mean age. From each person we epilated 3-4 lashes from each eyelid and examined them under a microscope to find Demodex mites. In total 147 patients were examined. The prevalence of Demodex mites was 33% in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and 31% in the control group. Our results demonstrated that the prevalence of Demodex mites was similar in RA patients as compared to the control group. PMID:22807020

Garbacewicz, Aleksandra; Jaworski, Janusz; Grytner-Zi?cina, Barbara

2012-03-01

94

Respiratory symptoms in arable farmworkers: role of storage mites.  

PubMed Central

Storage mites (acarid mites) are related to the house dust mite but are usually found in agricultural environments. They have been shown to cause allergic symptoms in Scottish farmworkers exposed to stored hay, but whether farmworkers who grow and store grain are also at risk is unknown. One hundred and one farmworkers on 22 Essex farms with grain storage facilities (88% of the available workforce) participated in a survey of respiratory symptoms, with skin tests and determination of serum levels of IgE specific for mite species, including storage mites. Of the 101 workers, 21 reported attacks of cough, wheeze, or breathlessness after exposure to stored grain and 15 reported nasal symptoms after grain exposure. Storage mite specific IgE was found in 59% of farmworkers with work related respiratory symptoms, in 60% with work related nasal symptoms, and in only 9% of symptomless farmworkers. Work related respiratory and nasal symptoms were also significantly associated with atopy, and with positive skin test responses and serum IgE specific for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Storage mites were found in grain samples from 16 farms in which grain was sampled, whereas D pteronyssinus was not found in any. The close association between serum storage mite specific IgE and occupational respiratory symptoms suggests that storage mites may be responsible for respiratory symptoms in these Essex farmworkers exposed to grain. PMID:3194876

Blainey, A D; Topping, M D; Ollier, S; Davies, R J

1988-01-01

95

Sensitisation to mites in laboratory animal workers with rhinitis  

PubMed Central

Aims: To determine the frequency of sensitisation to mites among rhinitic laboratory animal workers and to clarify whether sensitisation could be occupational. Methods: Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed in 40 subjects who were working with laboratory animals in Kuopio University research units and who had been referred to Kuopio University Hospital for work related rhinitis. The SPT panel consisted of three storage mites, two house dust mites, 11 other common environmental airborne allergens, latex, and 2–4 individually relevant laboratory animals. To determine signs of mites in animal facilities, guanine was determined in 22 dust samples taken from feedstuffs or bedding material used for laboratory animals and from rooms where these materials were stored and handled. Results: Positive SPT results were found in 35 out of 40 workers: in 14 for storage mites, four for house dust mites, 25 for other common aeroallergens, as well as positive reactions to laboratory animals in 19 individuals. The guanine test was positive, indicating the presence of mite derived material in 21 out of 22 dust samples. Conclusions: This study suggests that subjects who are occupationally exposed to laboratory animals are also exposed to mite derived allergens. Sensitisation to mites is common and may be work related. PMID:16109817

Ruoppi, P; Koistinen, T; Pennanen, S

2005-01-01

96

Unilateral acrosyringeal lichen planus of palm  

PubMed Central

Lichen planus (LP) is a pruritic, benign, papulosquamous, inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology that affects either or all of the skin, mucus membrane, hair and nail. It presents with varied morphology on the palms and soles. Here we present a case of unusual acrosyringeal variant of LP on palm. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically. PMID:24350024

Gutte, Rameshwar M.

2013-01-01

97

Acoustic Detection of Insects in Palm Trees  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Commercial-crop and ornamental palm trees serve important functions in tropical and subtropical regions of the world, and considerable precautions are taken each year to identify and control infestations of a variety of different insect pests. Large weevils, including the red palm weevil and the co...

98

Human hair follicle mites and forensic acarology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hair follicle mites of the genus Demodex (Demodecidae) were first discovered in humans in 1841. Since then, members of this host-specific genus have been found in\\u000a 11 of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals with most host species harboring two or more species of Demodex. Humans are host to D. folliculorum and D. brevis. The biology, natural history, and

Clifford E. Desch

2009-01-01

99

Temperature preference and respiration of acaridid mites.  

PubMed

The thermal preferences in a grain mass and respiration at various temperatures in mites (Acari: Acarididae) of medical and economical importance [Acarus siro (L. 1758), Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes 1961, Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank 1871), and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank 1781)] were studied under laboratory conditions. Based on the distribution of mites in wheat, Triticum aestivum L., grain along a thermal gradient from 10 to 40 degrees C, L. destructor, D. farinae, and A. siro were classified as eurythermic and T. putrescentiae as stenothermic. The lowest preferred temperature was found for D. farinae (28 degrees C), followed by A. siro (28.5 degrees C), L. destructor (29.5 degrees C), and T. putrescentiae (31.5 degrees C). The relationship between the respiration rate and the temperature was similar for all four mite species. The highest respiration was found in the range from 31 to 33 degrees C. This is approximately 2 degrees C higher than the preferred temperature of these species. The lower temperature threshold of respiration ranged from 1 to 5 degrees C and the upper threshold ranged from 45 to 48 degrees C. Acclimatization of A. siro to temperature regimes of 5, 15, and 35 degrees C resulted in thermal preferences between 9 and 12 degrees C, 9 and 20 degrees C, and 28 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The respiration rate of acclimatized specimens increased with the temperature, reaching a maximum at 29.0 degrees C for mites acclimatized at 5 and 15 degrees C and a maximum at 33.7 degrees C for those acclimatized at 30 degrees C. PMID:21309251

Hubert, J; Pekár, S; Nesvorná, M; Sustr, V

2010-12-01

100

The PaLM system: explanation-based constraint programming  

E-print Network

. Jussien palm> shedulingProblem() eval 1]> f: 7..15] // our project cannot end before date 7 palm> Fig.2The PaLM system: explanation-based constraint programming Narendra Jussien and Vincent Barichard presents the PaLM system, an implementation of an explanation-based constraint programming system in choco

Barichard, Vincent

101

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain By EMILY ROACH  

E-print Network

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain stability By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:47 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 Posted: 10:26 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Palm Beach. The center had committed six years earlier to moving to West Palm Beach's city hall complex on Clematis

Belogay, Eugene A.

102

Catalytic processes towards the production of biofuels in a palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Malaysia, there has been interest in the utilization of palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of environmental friendly biofuels. A biorefinery based on palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of biofuels has been proposed. The catalytic technology plays major role in the different processing stages in a biorefinery for the production of liquid

Thiam Leng Chew; Subhash Bhatia

2008-01-01

103

Tyrophagus putrescentiae mites grown in dog food cultures and the effect mould growth has on mite survival and reproduction.  

PubMed

The purposes of this study were to determine whether the storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, could survive and thrive on dog food and if mould growth was important to their survival. All of the chambers (n = 42) were started with 10 female mites and evaluated every other day for mite survival and for the spontaneous development of mould. Ten chambers tested the effect of low moisture on mite survival. Eight chambers were used as positive and negative controls (n = 4 each); positive control mites were fed Fleischmann's((R)) yeast and negative controls had no food source. Three dog foods were evaluated in the same manner. Four chambers had food but mould development was limited by replacing the food kernel every 48 h and four chambers were allowed to grow mould. Mites grown in chambers without moisture died from desiccation within 5 days. The termination point was day 34 when all mites in the negative control group (moisture but no food) died. Although T. putrescentiae survived and grew on all three commercial dog foods, there was no statistically significant difference in mites counts among the dog foods (P < 0.10). Mite counts in the 'no' mould and mould groups ranged from 8 to 11 and 144 to 245, respectively, and differences were significant (P < 0.0001). This study found that T. putrescentiae is a fungivorous storage mite that can grow and flourish on dog food. The study demonstrated that the presence of mould positively influences mite viability, while low relative humidity can result in detrimental consequences for T. putrescentiae. PMID:19719462

Canfield, Michael S; Wrenn, William J

2010-02-01

104

Allexivirus transmitted by eriophyid mites in garlic plants.  

PubMed

Viruses in garlic plants (Allium sativum L.) have accumulated and evolved over generations, resulting in serious consequences for the garlic trade around the world. These viral epidemics are also known to be caused by aphids and eriophyid mites (Aceria tulipae) carrying Potyviruses, Carlaviruses, and Allexiviruses. However, little is known about viral epidemics in garlic plants caused by eriophyid mites. Therefore, this study investigated the infection of garlic plants with Allexiviruses by eriophyid mites. When healthy garlic plants were cocultured with eriophyid mites, the leaves of the garlic plants developed yellow mosaic strips and became distorted. In extracts from the eriophyid mites, Allexiviruses were observed using immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM). From an immunoblot analysis, coat proteins against an Allexivirus garlic-virus antiserum were clearly identified in purified extracts from collected viral-infected garlic plants, eriophyid mites, and garlic plants infected by eriophyid mites. A new strain of GarV-B was isolated and named GarV-B Korea isolate 1 (GarV-B1). The ORF1 and ORF2 in GarV-B1 contained a typical viral helicase, RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRp), and triple gene block protein (TGBp) for viral movement between cells. The newly identified GarV-B1 was phylogenetically grouped with GarV-C and GarV-X in the Allexivirus genus. All the results in this study demonstrated that eriophyid mites are a transmitter insect species for Allexiviruses. PMID:18092468

Kang, Sang Gu; Koo, Bong Jin; Lee, Eun Tag; Chang, Moo Ung

2007-11-01

105

Mite-related bacterial antigens stimulate inflammatory cells in rosacea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Patients with papulopustular rosacea have a higher density of Demodex folliculorum mites on their faces than normal subjects but the role, if any, of their mites in initiating inflammation is disputed. Selective antibiotics are effective in reducing the inflammatory changes of papulopustular rosacea, but their mode of action is unknown. Objectives To investigate whether a D. folliculorum-related bacterium was

N. Lacey; S. Delaney; K. Kavanagh; F. C. Powell

2007-01-01

106

Resurgences of spider mites (Acari: Tetranychidae) induced by synthetic pyrethroids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Causes of spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) population resurgences consequent upon exposure to synthetic pyrethroid (SP) treatments are reviewed. Resurgences may be seen as soon as 1 week, or even as late as a whole season, post-treatment. Synthetic pyrethroids vary in their adverse effects on spider mites, and also differ in their ability to invoke resurgences of different spidermite species on

Uri Gerson; Ephraim Cohen

1989-01-01

107

MITE (ACARINA) POPULATIONS IN RING-BILLED GULL NESTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Can. Ent. 106: 319-327 (1974) Mites collected from 69 Larus delawarensis Ord nests on Granite Island, Lake Superior, northwestern Ontario, during the summers of 1972 and 1973 showed phenological relationships with the breeding cycle of the gulls. The populations of five selected mite genera varied in relation to nest initiation, egg laying, and egg hatching periods of the gulls. Moisture

R. Freitag; J. P. Ryder; P. Wanson

1974-01-01

108

Mite and Booklouse Fauna From Vacuumed Dust Samples From Beijing  

PubMed Central

A significant-source of allergens come from house dust that contain particles derived from arthropods, molds, and pet dander. This study evaluated mite and booklouse fauna from vacuumed dust samples in Beijing China (a temperate zone). Our survey was carried out in Beijing in the homes of mite allergic patients who visited our Allergy Department. In total, 38 homes were selected for the collection of dust samples by vacuuming, from December 2008 to January 2010. The flotation method was used to isolate mites from house dust. Permanent slides were prepared for mite specimens and mites were identified and counted under a microscope. In total, 1,798 separate mite and insect specimens were found in 345 dust samples taken from 38 homes. A total of 95 individual Dermatophagoides (D) siboney were detected in 35 dust samples from 19 homes (representing 5.3% of all mite and insect species found in house dust); in addition, this mite was found to co-exist with D. farinae (Hughes, 1961) in 33 dust samples. Our results demonstrated the presence D. siboney that co-existed with D. farinae in house dust in Beijing China (a temperate zone). PMID:24843802

Sun, Jin-Lu; Shen, Lian; Chen, Jun; Yu, Jin-Miao

2014-01-01

109

Mite Biodiversity Under the Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

To date, more than 55,000 mite species have been described and only a few of them have been studied. Some mites are adapted to live deep in soil, others in fresh or sea water, some are on plants, algae, fungi or animals, and others are able to survive in both extreme cold and hot temperatures. The...

110

CLSM anatomy of internal genitalia of Mackiella reclinata n. sp. and systematic remarks on eriophyoid mites from the tribe Mackiellini Keifer, 1946 (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae).  

PubMed

A new mackielline mite, Mackiella reclinata n. sp., from a South African indigenous palm-tree, Phoenix reclinata, is described in detail using different microscopy techniques. A CSLM study of M. reclinata n. sp. internal genitalia shows that mites of this genus possess teardrop shaped spermathecae, sausage-like spermathecal tubes directed anteriad and a subtrapezoidal anterior genital apodeme with a peculiar apical plate, orthogonal to the anterior-posterior body axis. Pairwise angles between the spermatheca, spermathecal tube and the longitudinal bridge of M. reclinata n. sp. females were measured. The angle between the spermathecal tube and longitudinal bridge is a quite stable morphometric character and thus is considered to be appropriate for comparison of different eriophyoid taxa. LTSEM and CLSM study shows that M. reclinata n. sp. possesses a unique, broadened frontal lobe of the prodorsal shield comprised of apical and basal parts entirely covering the dorsal palpcoxae. The incompletely described mite species Mackiella borasis Mohanasundaram, 1981 does not conform to the diagnosis of Mackiella and herein is transferred to the subfamily Phytoptinae incertae sedis.  PMID:25283205

Chetverikov, Philipp E; Craemer, Charnie; Vishnyakov, Andrey E; Sukhareva, Sogdiana I

2014-01-01

111

American palm ethnomedicine: A meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Many recent papers have documented the phytochemical and pharmacological bases for the use of palms (Arecaceae) in ethnomedicine. Early publications were based almost entirely on interviews that solicited local knowledge. More recently, ethnobotanically guided searches for new medicinal plants have proven more successful than random sampling for identifying plants that contain biodynamic ingredients. However, limited laboratory time and the high cost of clinical trials make it difficult to test all potential medicinal plants in the search for new drug candidates. The purpose of this study was to summarize and analyze previous studies on the medicinal uses of American palms in order to narrow down the search for new palm-derived medicines. Methods Relevant literature was surveyed and data was extracted and organized into medicinal use categories. We focused on more recent literature than that considered in a review published 25 years ago. We included phytochemical and pharmacological research that explored the importance of American palms in ethnomedicine. Results Of 730 species of American palms, we found evidence that 106 species had known medicinal uses, ranging from treatments for diabetes and leishmaniasis to prostatic hyperplasia. Thus, the number of American palm species with known uses had increased from 48 to 106 over the last quarter of a century. Furthermore, the pharmacological bases for many of the effects are now understood. Conclusions Palms are important in American ethnomedicine. Some, like Serenoa repens and Roystonea regia, are the sources of drugs that have been approved for medicinal uses. In contrast, recent ethnopharmacological studies suggested that many of the reported uses of several other palms do not appear to have a strong physiological basis. This study has provided a useful assessment of the ethnobotanical and pharmacological data available on palms. PMID:20034398

2009-01-01

112

Host plant manipulation of natural enemies: leaf domatia protect beneficial mites from insect predators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acarodomatia are small tufts of hair or invaginations in the leaf surface and are frequently inhabited by several taxa of non-plant-feeding mites. For many years, ecologists have hypothesized that these structures represent a mutualistic association between mites and plants where the mites benefit the plant by reducing densities of phytophagous arthropods and epiphytic microorganisms, and domatia benefit the mite by

Andrew P. Norton; Greg English-Loeb; Edward Belden

2001-01-01

113

Original article Feeding-associated gene expression in sheep scab mites  

E-print Network

Original article Feeding-associated gene expression in sheep scab mites (Psoroptes ovis) Carol M ­ The mite Psoroptes ovis is the causative agent of sheep scab. Although not usually fatal, the disease can the mite to identify a host. Psoroptes / sheep / gene / protein / feeding 1. INTRODUCTION The mite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

New Building, Old Parasite: Mesostigmatid Mites—An Ever-Present Threat to Barrier Rodent Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mesostigmatid mites are blood-sucking parasitic mites found in wild rodent populations. Periodically they can also become a problem for laboratory rodent colonies, particu- larly when building construction or renovations disturb colonies of commensal (building) rodents that had been act- ing as hosts. Mesostigmatid mites infest both rats and mice and, unlike the more common rodent fur mites (Myobia, Myocoptes, and

Julie Watson

115

MITE ANTIGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN HOUSE DUST AND THE OCCURRENCE OF WHEEZING IN CHILDREN WITH MITE DUST ALLERGY  

EPA Science Inventory

We studied the relationship between dust mite antigen concentrations in house dust samples and the occurrence and frequency of wheezing in 58 children with dust mite allergy (wheal > 4 mm. mean diameter in response to a prick test with either D-. farinae or D pteronyssinus antige...

116

78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...the Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm...

2013-01-15

117

78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...the Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm...

2013-04-15

118

A Review of the Spider-Mite Problem on Grain Sorghum and Corn in West Texas.  

E-print Network

6-1 149 December 1974 A REVIEW OF THE SPIDER-MITE PROBLEM ON GRAIN SORGHUM 4 ne.Texas A&M University Syste lbe Texas Agricultural Experime College Station, Texas Summary and Conclusions Intensive investigations during the 1972 and 1973... growing seasons revealed four species of spider-mites infesting corn and grain sorghum in West Texas. These were: Banks grass mite, Oligonychus pratensis (Banks); grass mite, 0. stickneyi (McGregor) (corn only); two spotted spider-mite, Tetranychus...

Ehler, L. E.

1974-01-01

119

Date Palm Phoenix dactylifera L. Micropropagation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Date palm micropropagation began a quarter of a century ago (Reuveni, 1979; Reynolds & Murashige, 1979; Tisserat, 1979) and\\u000a has progressed relatively slowly due to its inherent slow growth nature and limited research resources available to the developing\\u000a countries where date palm is mostly grown. Several review articles describing early work on plant regeneration through indirect\\u000a somatic embryogenesis and indirect

J. Al-Khayri

120

Synthesis of Palm Oil-Based Diethanolamides  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, Epoxidized Palm Olein (EPOo) was blended with Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Kernel Olein (RBDPKOo) in a range of 10–100% (w\\/w) to react with diethanolamine (DEA) with a 1:3 molar ratio to produce diethanolamides that retained\\u000a some epoxides. The epoxidized diethanolamides are proposed as a new type of vegetable oil derived polyols for rigid polyurethane.\\u000a The optimal reaction

C. S. Lee; T. L. Ooi; C. H. Chuah; S. Ahmad

2007-01-01

121

House dust mite allergy: environment evaluation and disease prevention.  

PubMed

There are two groups of dust mites, house dust mites (HDMs) and storage mites (SMs), that have been identified in the household environment. Both could induce airway inflammation through activation of innate and adaptive immunity and lead to asthma. In order to monitor environmental dust mite infestation, different methods can be used to detect their presence, such as the use of floating methods, monoclonal antibodies, and nanostructured biosensor. SM could be identified in the storage room, mainly in contaminated food such as mushrooms and corn starch. In HDM-sensitive subjects and mice that were challenged with HDM or SM after sensitization, these mites could up-regulate IgE levels, T helper 2 associated cytokine production and airway hypersensitivity. Different age groups of subjects were sensitized by different species of mites. More subjects above 70 years were sensitized by SM and more subjects below the age of 40 years were sensitized to HDM. Different allergenic components of dust mite extracts, such as Der p 1, Der p 2, could activate innate immunity through activating pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and then lead to allergic inflammation. The best modality to treat HDM allergy is immunomodulation through Treg cells and IgA production. In the recent years, many studies indicated probiotics could increase IgA secretion and the number of Treg cells. However, some studies conducted in adults have contradictory effects in reducing allergic symptoms. Therefore, probiotics confer inconclusive benefits on the allergic symptoms. PMID:25379484

Yu, Sheng-Jie; Liao, En-Chih; Tsai, Jaw-Ji

2014-10-01

122

Bartonella-like bacteria carried by domestic mite species.  

PubMed

Bacteria of the genus Bartonella are carried by haematophagous mites, ticks, fleas and flies, and attack the erythrocytes of mammals. Here we describe a Bartonella-like clade, a distinct group related to Bartonellaceae, in stored-product mites (Acari: Astigmata) and a predatory mite Cheyletus eruditus (Acari: Prostigmata) based on the analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences. By using the clade-specific primers, closely related Bartonella-like 16S rRNA sequences were amplified from both laboratory colonies and field strains of three synanthropic mite species (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and a predatory mite. Altogether, sequences of Bartonella-like bacteria were found in 11 strains, but were not detected in Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus and two strains of L. destructor. All obtained sequences formed a separate cluster branching as a sister group to Bartonellaceae and related to other separate clusters comprising uncultured bacterial clones from human skin and hemipteran insects (Nysius plebeius and Nysius sp.). The classification of sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed a difference between A. siro and T. putrescentiae suggesting that the Bartonella-like bacteria are different in these two mite species. However, species specific sequences in separate OTUs were observed also for C. eruditus. Possible symbiotic interactions between Bartonella-like bacteria and their mite hosts are discussed. PMID:24711066

Kopecký, Jan; Nesvorná, Marta; Hubert, Jan

2014-09-01

123

House dust mite allergy: environment evaluation and disease prevention  

PubMed Central

There are two groups of dust mites, house dust mites (HDMs) and storage mites (SMs), that have been identified in the household environment. Both could induce airway inflammation through activation of innate and adaptive immunity and lead to asthma. In order to monitor environmental dust mite infestation, different methods can be used to detect their presence, such as the use of floating methods, monoclonal antibodies, and nanostructured biosensor. SM could be identified in the storage room, mainly in contaminated food such as mushrooms and corn starch. In HDM-sensitive subjects and mice that were challenged with HDM or SM after sensitization, these mites could up-regulate IgE levels, T helper 2 associated cytokine production and airway hypersensitivity. Different age groups of subjects were sensitized by different species of mites. More subjects above 70 years were sensitized by SM and more subjects below the age of 40 years were sensitized to HDM. Different allergenic components of dust mite extracts, such as Der p 1, Der p 2, could activate innate immunity through activating pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and then lead to allergic inflammation. The best modality to treat HDM allergy is immunomodulation through Treg cells and IgA production. In the recent years, many studies indicated probiotics could increase IgA secretion and the number of Treg cells. However, some studies conducted in adults have contradictory effects in reducing allergic symptoms. Therefore, probiotics confer inconclusive benefits on the allergic symptoms. PMID:25379484

Yu, Sheng-Jie; Liao, En-Chih

2014-01-01

124

The use of soil mites in ecotoxicology: a review.  

PubMed

Mites, and especially soil-inhabiting ones, have been less studied than the other invertebrates used in bio-assays for the assessment of soil quality and the hazards of chemicals, although these organisms are included in the regulatory assessment scheme of pesticides. The recent advances in the development of test methods for soil mites groups have provided more information on their sensitivities towards chemicals, which needs to be presented for a more robust assessment of the current trends in soil mite ecotoxicology. Moreover, interestingly mite is the only taxa for which test methods were developed and standardized on predatory organisms. This review summarizes the different protocols for the assessment of chemicals using soil-inhabiting mites, including laboratory, semi-field and field studies. Among the data found in the literature, most of the chemicals assessed with mites were pesticides, while a few environmental samples were assessed with these organisms. Their sensitivities towards chemicals were then compared and discussed regarding other soil invertebrates. Finally, we conclude on the usefulness of soil mites in ecotoxicology, and provide future research trail in this area. PMID:25366466

Huguier, Pierre; Manier, Nicolas; Owojori, Olugbenga John; Bauda, Pascale; Pandard, Pascal; Römbke, Jörg

2015-01-01

125

Preliminary date palm cultivar composition of Moroccan palm groves as revealed by leaf isoenzyme phenotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on isoenzyme electrophoresis, 28 reputed cultivars of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) previously characterized by morphological characters, were identified using the more variable enzyme systems in the date palm: esterases (EST), endopeptidases (ENP) and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), which showed, respectively, eight, six and seven electrophoretic phenotypes in leaf material. The phenotype combinations lead to an isoenzymebased key

K Bendiab; M Baaziz; K Majourhat

1998-01-01

126

FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM GENES USING AN AUTOMATED BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM  

E-print Network

FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM GENES USING AN AUTOMATED BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH 35 FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM GENES USING AN AUTOMATED BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH LAURA B WILLIS*; PHILIP A LESSARD sequence, we have developed bioinformatics tools that can be run on a desktop computer and save significant

Sinskey, Anthony J.

127

New initiatives for managment of red palm weevil threats to historical Arabian date palms  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The date palm is an important part of the religious, cultural, and economic heritage of the Arabian Peninsula. This heritage is threatened by the recent invasion of the red palm weevil(RPW) from Southeast Asia. In Saudi Arabia, a national campaign for control of RPW by containment/destruction of inf...

128

An ant-associated mesostigmatid mite in Baltic amber.  

PubMed

Fossil mesostigmatid mites (Acari: Parasitiformes: Mesostigmata) are extremely rare, and specimens from only nine families, including four named species, have been described so far. A new record of Myrmozercon sp. described here from Eocene (ca 44-49 Myr) Baltic amber represents the first-and so far only-fossil example of the derived, extant family Laelapidae. Significantly, modern species of this genus are habitually myrmecophilous and the fossil mite described here is preserved attached to the head of the dolichoderine ant Ctenobethylus goepperti (Mayr, 1868). It thus offers the oldest unequivocal evidence for an ecological association between mesostigmatid mites and social insects in the order Hymenoptera. PMID:25209198

Dunlop, Jason A; Kontschán, Jen?; Walter, David E; Perrichot, Vincent

2014-09-01

129

Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... skeletal abnormalities. Skin manifestations include pits in the palms and soles, and numerous basal cell carcinomas. This ... close-up of the pits found in the palm of an individual with basal cell nevus syndrome.

130

THE NRL MITE AIR VEHICLE James Kellogg,1  

E-print Network

and a wingspan of 8 to 18 inches, depending on payload weight. The 14-inch MITE 2 can carry a one- ounce analog sufficient wing area within a compact wingspan. Although the low aspect ratio increases the induced drag

131

Original article Virus-like particles in the tracheal mite  

E-print Network

har- boured numerous 27 nm isometric virus-like particles. These virus-like particles were formed in relation to the honey bee tracheal mite resistance is discussed. honey bee / Acarapis woodi / virus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

132

Risk factors and prevalence of Demodex mites in young adults.  

PubMed

Demodex mites are ectoparasites often found in follicles of facial skin. Their role in human diseases is under investigation, and a growing number of studies indicated that they contribute to chronic inflammatory conditions of the skin, such as rosacea, blepharitis, otitis externa, alopecia and folliculitis. In our study we tested 96 healthy adults for the presence of Demodex mites. Risk factors influencing presence of mites and skin types of the tested individuals were evaluated. We found Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis in 17.7% of the samples, more frequently in males (21.9%) and in older adults (20%). Use of make-up seems to reduce the likelihood of Demodex carriage, while pet ownership, use of shared items and living in close contact with older adults had no significant influence of presence of mites. Demodex positive individuals described their skin to be drier, more prone to erythema, but less for folliculitis compared to Demodex negative subjects. PMID:21715284

Horváth, Andrea; Neubrandt, Dóra Maja; Ghidán, Á; Nagy, K

2011-06-01

133

Feather mites of the greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

New taxa are described from Grus canadensis tabida: Brephosceles petersoni sp. n. (Alloptidae); Pseudogabucinia reticulata sp. n. (Kramerellidae); Geranolichus canadensis sp. n., and Gruolichus wodashae, gen. et sp. n. (Pterolichidae). Observations on resource partitioning by these mites are given.

Atyeo, W.T.; Windingstad, Ronald M.

1979-01-01

134

Microbiota of Demodex mites from rosacea patients and controls.  

PubMed

Proliferation of Demodex mites is associated with rosacea. Furthermore, Demodex-associated bacteria were suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of rosacea. We decided to analyze Demodex microbiota. Mites were collected by standardized skin surface biopsies from patients with erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular rosacea or from control subjects. The microbiota from each mite was characterized by 16S rRNA clone library approach. The 16S rRNA clone library consisted of 367 clones obtained from 73 extracts originating from 5 samples per study group (ETR, PPR or healthy subjects). A total of 86 species were identified with 36 as Demodex-specific microbiota. In the papulopustular group, proportions of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased whereas proportion of Actinobacteria decreased. Here, we report preliminary results on the microbiota of Demodex mites based on a molecular approach showing an unexpected diversity. Differences according to the host status need to be confirmed but open new perspectives for diagnostic of rosacea. PMID:24768927

Murillo, Nathalia; Aubert, Jérome; Raoult, Didier

2014-01-01

135

RAPID COMMUNICATION NATIONAL HONEY BEE MITE SURVEY (1)  

E-print Network

RAPID COMMUNICATION NATIONAL HONEY BEE MITE SURVEY (1) INVENTAIRE NATIONAL DES ACARIENS DE L Institute, Bioenvironmental Bee Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705. ** Department of Entomology, University Bee Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705). *** U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Phoretic mites associated with animal and human decomposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phoretic mites are likely the most abundant arthropods found on carcases and corpses. They outnumber their scavenger carriers\\u000a in both number and diversity. Many phoretic mites travel on scavenger insects and are highly specific; they will arrive on\\u000a a particular species of host and no other. Because of this, they may be useful as trace indicators of their carriers even

M. Alejandra Perotti; Henk R. Braig

2009-01-01

137

Sarcoptes scabiei Mites Modulate Gene Expression in Human Skin Equivalents  

PubMed Central

The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs) that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1? (IL-1?) precursor, IL-1?, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin’s protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host’s protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin. PMID:23940705

Morgan, Marjorie S.; Arlian, Larry G.; Markey, Michael P.

2013-01-01

138

Sensitization of Children to Storage Mites in Kutahya, Turkey  

PubMed Central

Specific IgE against Acarus siro, Glycphagus domesticus, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Lepidoglyphus destructor have been investigated by ELISA in sera of 92 children. Of them, 41 were found to be specific IgE positive (? 0.35 IU/ml) against at least one of house dust mite species, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae, by an immunoblot. In 65.9% of the dust mite-sensitized children, specific IgE against at least one of these mite species was found. Sensitization levels, including co-sensitization cases were found to be 35.7% against A. siro, 24.4% against T. putrescentiae, 31.7% against L. destructor, and 26.8% against G. domesticus. In non-sensitized children, dust mite sensitization level was found to be 25.5%. Breakdown of sensitization by individual species in this group was; against A. siro and T. putrescentiae at 7.8%, against L. destructor at 13.7%, and against G. domesticus at 9.8%. When all children were reckoned, 43.5% was found to be sensitized against at least one storage mite species, with sensitizations against A. siro at 18.5%, T. putrescentiae at 26.1%, L. destructor at 21.7%, and G. domesticus at 17.4%. In dust samples collected from the dwellings of children, distribution of species was found to be A. siro (17%), G. domesticus (23%), T. putrescentiae (29%), L. destructor (25%), and unidentified (6%). In Fisher's chi-square test on SPSS program, there was a relationship between dust mite sensitization and storage mite sensitization (P < 0.05), but no meaningful relationship was found on the basis of individual mite species. PMID:19967087

Soyucen, Erdogan

2009-01-01

139

Sensitization of children to storage mites in Kutahya, Turkey.  

PubMed

Specific IgE against Acarus siro, Glycphagus domesticus, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Lepidoglyphus destructor have been investigated by ELISA in sera of 92 children. Of them, 41 were found to be specific IgE positive (> or = 0.35 IU/ml) against at least one of house dust mite species, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae, by an immunoblot. In 65.9% of the dust mite-sensitized children, specific IgE against at least one of these mite species was found. Sensitization levels, including co-sensitization cases were found to be 35.7% against A. siro, 24.4% against T. putrescentiae, 31.7% against L. destructor, and 26.8% against G. domesticus. In non-sensitized children, dust mite sensitization level was found to be 25.5%. Breakdown of sensitization by individual species in this group was; against A. siro and T. putrescentiae at 7.8%, against L. destructor at 13.7%, and against G. domesticus at 9.8%. When all children were reckoned, 43.5% was found to be sensitized against at least one storage mite species, with sensitizations against A. siro at 18.5%, T. putrescentiae at 26.1%, L. destructor at 21.7%, and G. domesticus at 17.4%. In dust samples collected from the dwellings of children, distribution of species was found to be A. siro (17%), G. domesticus (23%), T. putrescentiae (29%), L. destructor (25%), and unidentified (6%). In Fisher's chi-square test on SPSS program, there was a relationship between dust mite sensitization and storage mite sensitization (P < 0.05), but no meaningful relationship was found on the basis of individual mite species. PMID:19967087

Akdemir, Cihangir; Soyucen, Erdogan

2009-12-01

140

Biology, predation, and life table of Cydnoseius negevi and Neoseiulus barkeri (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on the old world date mite, Oligonychus afrasiaticus (Acari: Tetranychidae).  

PubMed

The old world date mite, Oligonychus afrasiaticus (McGregor) (Acari: Tetranychidae) is a severe spider mite pest of date palm in most of the Middle East and North Africa. Considering that nothing is known about the performance of phytoseiid predators against O. afrasiaticus, biology, predation, and life table parameters of Cydnoseius negevi (Swirski and Amitai) and Neoseiulus barkeri Hughes (Acari: Phytoseiidae), collected from date palm orchards, were studied under laboratory conditions (25, 35°C and 35 ± 10% RH) as a first step to understand their effectiveness against all mobile life stages of O. afrasiaticus. For both predators, oviposition period was significantly shorter at 35°C than at 25°C. The following parameters were obtained for C. negevi and N. barkeri at 25 and 35°C, respectively: female longevity, 31.8, 20.1, 35.7, 27.4 d; fecundity, 21.6, 38.0, 18.8, 34.8 eggs per female; oviposition period, 23.9, 13.7, 25.9, 18.1 d. Total predation of C. negevi and N. barkeri female was 246.0, 270.0, 227.6, 205.3 prey at 25 and 35°C, respectively. Rectal plugs were observed attached to the opisthosoma of some adult females of N. barkeri, which often cause the mite to stick to the surface. Life table parameters were estimated as net reproductive rate (R0) 10.44, 17.35, 10.19, 13.84, intrinsic rate of increase (rm) 0.14, 0.19, 0.13, 0.16 d(-1), finite rate of increase (?) 1.15, 1.21, 1.12, 1.17 d(-1), generation time (T) 17.03, 15.17, 17.83, 16.61 d, doubling time (DT) 04.95, 03.64, 05.33, 04.33 d for C. negevi and N. barkeri at 25 and 35°C, respectively. The values of intrinsic rate of increase and net reproductive rate were higher in C. negevi than N. barkeri at both temperature regimes. Therefore, it could be concluded that C. negevi performance was better than N. barkeri against O. afrasiaticus and can be considered as a valuable addition to the existing methods for spider mites control. PMID:25368087

Negm, Mohamed W; Alatawi, Fahad J; Aldryhim, Yousif N

2014-01-01

141

Pathogenic role of Demodex mites in blepharitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review To summarize the key literature and our research experience regarding Demodex infestation as a potential cause of ocular inflammatory diseases with a special emphasis on Demodex blepharitis. Recent findings Two distinct Demodex species have been confirmed as a cause of blepharitis: Demodex folliculorum can cause anterior blepharitis associated with disorders of eyelashes, and D. brevis can cause posterior blepharitis with meibomian gland dysfunction and keratoconjunctivitis. Tea tree oil treatments with either 50% lid scrubs or 5% lid massages are effective in eradicating mites and reducing ocular surface inflammation. Summary Demodex blepharitis is a common but overlooked external eye disease. The pathogenesis of Demodex blepharitis in eliciting ocular surface inflammation has been further clarified. The modified eyelash sampling and counting method makes it easier and more accurate to diagnose Demodex infestation. Tea tree oil shows promising potential to treat Demodex blepharitis by reducing Demodex counts with additional antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:20689407

Liu, Jingbo; Sheha, Hosam; Tseng, Scheffer C.G.

2010-01-01

142

Date Palms of Arabia: A Multifunctional Genetic Resource  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Arabia Deserta is a part of the center of origin and constitutes a sizable part of the center of diversity of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera). Cultivated date palm is closely related to a variable aggregate of wild and feral palms distributed over the southern, warm and dry Middle East as well a...

143

DATE PALMS OF ARABIA: A MULTIFUNCTIONAL GENETIC RESOURCE [ABSTRACT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Arabia Deserta is a part of the center of origin and constitutes a sizable part of the center of diversity of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera). Cultivated date palm is closely related to a variable aggregate of wild and feral palms distributed over the southern, warm and dry Middle East as well a...

144

Original article Vegetative multiplication of date palms from in vitro  

E-print Network

Original article Vegetative multiplication of date palms from in vitro cultured inflorescences 16 March 1998; accepted 24 July 1998) Abstract - Explants from inflorescences of date palms from. The technique offers great promise for vegetative propagation of date palms since several hundred plants could

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged'  

E-print Network

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged' 2012-02-01 17:16:03 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- As expected Newt Gingrich lost in Florida by a landslide. The polls predicted of three created a "Palm Beach County for Newt Gingrich 2012" Facebook page in November. Shortly afterwards

Belogay, Eugene A.

146

Investigation of oil palm ash microwave absorber for broadband application  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation of oil palm ash microwave absorbers involves the design, simulation and fabrication of an effective broadband frequency for anechoic chamber. The resistive and magnetic materials in the oil palm ash compose its potential to be used as microwave absorbing materials. These oil palm ash absorbers are simulated using CST Microwave Studio. The arch measurement is executed to investigate

Ida Rahayu Mohamed Noordin; Hasnain Abdullah Idris; Mohd Nasir Taib; Anis Diyana Rosli; Asmalia Zanal; Ahmad Takiyuddin Abdullah

2012-01-01

147

Dust mite allergens and asthma: a worldwide problem*  

PubMed Central

After the discovery of house dust mites in 1964 their association with asthma has been reported from many different parts of the world including the developing countries. Two sets of major allergens from mites of the genus Dermatophagoides are now well recognized. The Group I allergens are glycoproteins of relative molecular mass (Mr) 25 000, which show both structural homology and cross-reactivity. The allergen Der p I has been cloned and sequenced confirming the Mr and establishing its nature as a protease. The Group II allergens (Mr 15 000) show even closer homology and cross-reactivity. Specific immunoassays for Group I and Group II allergens, using monospecific antisera and monoclonal antibodies, have been standardized and are suitable for measuring allergen levels in different parts of the world. Measures for reducing the levels of mite allergens in houses include the covering of mattresses, hot washing of bedding, and removal of carpets from bedrooms as well as humidity control, vacuum cleaning, and the use of acaricides in the rest of the house. There is already evidence that these procedures can cause a major improvement in the symptoms of asthma. While provisional standards for both sensitization to mites and also mite allergen exposure can now be recommended, there is an urgent need for controlled studies using protocols demonstrated to reduce mite allergen levels by at least tenfold and for further international collaboration. PMID:3069235

1988-01-01

148

New Wolbachia supergroups detected in quill mites (Acari: Syringophilidae).  

PubMed

Wolbachia is the most abundant intracellular bacterial genus infecting a wide range of arthropods and filarial nematodes. Wolbachia have evolved parasitic, mutualistic and commensal relationships with their hosts but in arthropods generally act as reproductive parasites, inducing a wide range of phenotypic effects such as cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis, feminization and male-killing. Up to now, the genus has been divided into 14 supergroups successively named A-O. Here, we describe two new Wolbachia supergroups from syringophilid mites (Acari: Cheyletoidea). These obligatory ectoparasites of birds inhabit the quills of feathers in many avian groups. The species of this family reproduce in a haplodiploid mode sensu arrhenotoky and are usually strongly female-biased. Based on the sequences of four protein-coding genes (ftsZ, gltA and groEL and coxA) and the 16S rRNA we identified strains of three Wolbachia supergroups (F and two distinct, yet undescribed ones) in five quill mite species. Our results suggest that in some cases the distribution of the bacteria can be better correlated with the mite's bird host rather than with mite taxonomy as such. The discovery of two new Wolbachia supergroups not only broadens the knowledge of the diversity of this bacterium but also raises questions about potential effects induced in quill mites and transmission mechanisms of the endosymbionts in this peculiar bacteria-quill mite-bird system. PMID:25541519

Glowska, Eliza; Dragun-Damian, Anna; Dabert, Miroslawa; Gerth, Michael

2015-03-01

149

Oral Mite Anaphylaxis Caused by Mite-Contaminated Okonomiyaki/Pancake-Mix in Japan: 8 Case Reports and a Review of 28 Reported Cases.  

PubMed

Background: Anaphylaxis after the ingestion of foods contaminated with mites has recently been recognized. Case series and case reports thus far have shown that mite-contaminated wheat flour is the major cause of oral mite anaphylaxis. However, we have found 8 cases of oral mite anaphylaxis which were caused by mite-contaminated okonomiyaki-mix, a savory Japanese style pancake mix, in our hospital. Methods: In addition to our 8 cases, the databases of MEDLINE and ICHUSHI were systematically searched for patients with oral mite anaphylaxis in Japan. Results: Thirty-six patients including our 8 cases with oral mite anaphylaxis were identified. Thirty-four out of 36 cases (94%) ingested okonomiyaki or takoyaki, prepared at home using okonomiyaki-mix or takoyaki-mix which was previously opened and stored for months at ambient temperature. Microscopic examination of culprit mixes of 16 cases including our 1 case revealed contamination of mites such as Dermatophagoides farina (Der f) (5 cases), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tyr p) (4 cases), and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) (3 cases). The specific IgE to each mite is generally upregulated in these patients. Especially, the titers of specific IgE to Der p and Der f were more than class 2 in all cases. Conclusions: Mite-contaminated flavored flour is the major cause of oral mite anaphylaxis in Japan. PMID:24368585

Takahashi, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Masami; Fukutomi, Yuma; Sekiya, Kiyoshi; Watai, Kentaro; Mitsui, Chihiro; Tanimoto, Hidenori; Oshikata, Chiyako; Tsuburai, Takahiro; Tsurikisawa, Naomi; Minoguchi, Kenji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Kazuo

2013-12-25

150

Mite species inhabiting commercial bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) nests in Polish greenhouses.  

PubMed

Nests of social insects are usually inhabited by various mite species that feed on pollen, other micro-arthropods or are parasitic. Well-known negative effects of worldwide economic importance are caused by mites parasitizing honeybee colonies. Lately, attention has focused on the endoparasitic mite Locustacarus buchneri that has been found in commercial bumblebees. However, little is known of other mites associated with commercial bumblebee nests. Transportation of commercial bumblebee colonies with unwanted residents may introduce foreign mite species to new localities. In this study, we assessed the prevalence and species composition of mites associated with commercial bumblebee nests and determined if the mites are foreign species for Poland and for Europe. The study was conducted on 37 commercial bumblebee nests from two companies (Dutch and Israeli), originating from two greenhouses in southern Poland, and on 20 commercial bumblebee colonies obtained directly from suppliers. The species composition and abundance of mites inhabiting commercial bumblebee nests were determined. Seven mite species from three families were found in nests after greenhouse exploitation. The predominant mite species was Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acaridae) that was a 100-fold more numerous than representatives of the family Laelapidae (Hypoaspis marginepilosa, H. hyatti, H. bombicolens). Representatives of Parasitidae (Parasitellus fucorum, P. crinitus, P. ignotus) were least numerous. All identified mite species are common throughout Europe, foreign species were not found. Mites were not detected in nests obtained directly from suppliers. We conclude that probably bumblebee nests are invaded by local mite species during greenhouse exploitation. PMID:22270110

Ro?ej, El?bieta; Witali?ski, Wojciech; Szentgyörgyi, Hajnalka; Wantuch, Marta; Moro?, Dawid; Woyciechowski, Michal

2012-03-01

151

Phytophagous and predaceous mites associated with vegetable crops from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

This study was conducted to investigate phytophagous and predatory mites associated with vegetable plants in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Eight phytophagous and 10 predacious mites were collected from 14 species of vegetable crops covering five major production localities. Out of these 18 mite species, 13 species are new to the mite fauna of Saudi Arabia. In addition, the two species, Tenuipalpus punicae and Agistemus exsertus, are reported for the first time on vegetable crops in Saudi Arabia. For each mite species found, notes on host plant association and occurrence period are given. An illustrated key for the identification of the 18 mite species reported in this study is provided and this can be used to improve the IPM programs by applying the local natural predatory mites in controlling mite pests in Saudi Arabia. PMID:23961130

Al-Atawi, Fahad J.

2011-01-01

152

ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC AND ENERGY IMPACTS OF MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFS) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. he MITE Program is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protecti...

153

ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC, AND ENERGY IMPACTS OF MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFS) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. he MITE Program is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protecti...

154

Quality assessment of palm products upon prolonged heat treatment.  

PubMed

Extending the frying-life of oils is of commercial and economic importance. Due to this fact, assessment on the thermal stability of frying oils could provide considerable savings to the food processors. In this study, the physico-chemical properties of five palm products mainly palm oil, single-fractionated palm olein, double-fractionated palm olein, red palm olein and palm-based shortening during 80 hours of heating at 180 degrees C were investigated. Heating properties of these products were then compared with that of high oleic sunflower oil, which was used as reference oil. The indices applied in evaluating the quality changes of oils were free fatty acid, smoke point, p-anisidine value, tocols, polar and polymer compounds. Three palm products i.e. palm oil, single-fractionated palm olein and double-fractionated palm olein were identified to be the most stable in terms of lower formation of free fatty acid, polar and polymer compounds as well as preserving higher smoke point and tocols content compared to the other three oils. The low intensity of hydrolytic and oxidative changes due to prolonged heating, suggests that these palm products are inherently suitable for frying purposes. PMID:19001776

Tarmizi, Azmil Haizam Ahmad; Lin, Siew Wai

2008-01-01

155

Current status of red palm weevil infestation in date palm plantations in Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The red palm weevilRhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (RPW) is the most serious pest of date palms in the Middle East. Weevil infestation was first detected in Israel\\u000a in the summer of 1999 in date plantations in the Jordan Valley, on the west bank of the Jordan River and in the northern area\\u000a of the Dead Sea. For 2 years following the

V. Soroker; D. Blumberg; A. Haberman; M. Hamburger-Rishard; S. Reneh; S. Talebaev; L. Anshelevich; A. R. Harari

2005-01-01

156

A method for rapidly marking adult varroa mites for use in brood inoculation experiments  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We explored a method for marking varroa mites using correction fluid (PRESTO!TM Jumbo Correction Pen, Pentel Co., Ltd., Japan). Individual mites were placed on a piece of nylon mesh (165 mesh) to prevent the mites from moving during marking. A small piece of nylon fishing line (diameter = 0.30 mm)...

157

Nest mites (Pellonyssus reedi) and the reproductive biology of the house finch  

E-print Network

Nest mites (Pellonyssus reedi) and the reproductive biology of the house finch (Carpodacus biology of the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) in east-central Alabama, U.S.A. Mites were absent from colour of breeding adult male house finches was not correlated with nest-mite levels, nor did it appear

McGraw, Kevin J.

158

The presence of eriophyid mites on native and weed Cirsium species in North America  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Aceria anthocoptes is an eriophyid mite that is known to feed on Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). While this mite species has been considered to be host specific, a detailed evaluation of its host range has yet to be determined. To assess the risks associated with using this mite as a biological ...

159

Review. When to leave the brood chamber? Routes of dispersal in mites associated with burying beetles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most nests of brood-caring insects are colonized by a rich community of mite species. Since these nests are ephemeral and scattered in space, phoresy is the principal mode of dispersal in mites specializing on insect nests. Often the mites will arrive on the nest-founding insect, reproduce in the nest and their offspring will disperse on the insect's offspring. A literature

Horst H. Schwarz; Stella Koulianos

1998-01-01

160

Control of Powdery Mildew in Wild and Cultivated Grapes by a Tydeid Mite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The leaf surface of woody perennials is inhabited by an extraordinary diversity of mites. Although a majority of these mite species are thought to feed on fungi or other microbes, their ability to control plant pathogens has not been rigorously investigated. We present experimental evidence that a tydeid mite,Orthotydeus lambi,can suppress the development of grape powdery mildew on wild and

Greg English-Loeb; Andrew P Norton; David M Gadoury; Robert C Seem; Wayne F Wilcox

1999-01-01

161

DURATION AND SPREAD OF AN ENTOMOPATHOGENIC FUNGUS USED TO TREAT VARROA MITES IN HONEYBEE HIVES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A strain of Beauveria bassiana isolated from varroa mites was used to treat bees against varroa mites in southern France. Fungal treatment was associated with a considerable increase in the percentage of infected varroa mites over baseline levels in two field experiments. The percentage of infecte...

162

Engorgement success of parasitic mites on adult sexes of the colour polymorphic mountain stone weta  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the prevalence and intensity of the ectoparasitic mite Wetapolipus ja?miesoni was examined on two colour morphs of the mountain stone weta Hemideina maori, collected from the Rock and Pillar Range in the province of Otago, New Zealand. We scored success of mites by identifying whether mites were alive or dead on hosts. We determined whether these indices

T. Robb; M. R. Forbes; I. G. Jamieson

2004-01-01

163

Effects of herbivory and plant conditioning on the population dynamics of spider mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants vary in their resistance to tetranychid spider mites, and this can have profound effects on spider-mite population dynamics. Such variation can be attributable to many factors. In this review, however, we focus on how previous or concurrent feeding by phytophagous hervivores influences expression of plant resistance to spider mites.

Richard Karban; Greogory M. English-Loeb

1988-01-01

164

Effects of fungicide treatment and vacuuming on pyroglyphid mites and their allergens in mattress dust  

Microsoft Academic Search

House-dust mites (Pyroglyphidae) are an important source of indoor airborne allergens. Several methods may be applied to reduce the population growth of these mites and thus the quantity of allergen formed. One such method is to interfere with the mites' food chain. Fungi are a key factor in this food chain: they serve as an indirect food source. In this

J. E. M. H. Van Bronswijk; J. W. F. Reumer; R. Pickard

1987-01-01

165

MITE-Hunter: a program for discovering miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements from  

E-print Network

and genome evolution, we developed MITE-Hunter, a program pipeline that can identify MITEs as well as other and families (5). In plants, six Class 2 superfamilies have been identified thus far: Tc1/Mariner, PIF of the Tc1/Mariner and the PIF/Harbinger superfamilies, respectively (12,17­19). MITEs have also been

Wessler, Susan

166

The Formation of Collective Silk Balls in the Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae Koch  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tetranychus urticae is a phytophagous mite that forms colonies of several thousand individuals. These mites construct a common web to protect the colony. When plants become overcrowded and food resources become scarce, individuals gather at the plant apex to form a ball composed of mites and their silk threads. This ball is a structure facilitating group dispersal by wind or

Gwendoline Clotuche; Anne-Catherine Mailleux; Aina Astudillo Fernández; Jean-Louis Deneubourg; Claire Detrain; Thierry Hance; Robert Planque

2011-01-01

167

THE MICROORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM THE MITES VARROA DESTRUCTOR AND THE VERIFICATION OF THEIR PATHOGENITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our research was concentrated on the finding one of Varroa destructor mite with pathological symptoms and on the isolation of its microorganisms. The dead mites were collected from sticky boards in beehives and observed under the stereomicroscope. The mites suspected of dying caused by pathological process were examined by means of bacteriological and mycological methods. The pathogenity of isolated microorganisms

J. HRABÁK

168

Immune response to flour and dust mites in a United Kingdom bakery  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study of 279 United Kingdom bakery workers a high prevalence of immunological response to storage mites was found. To determine whether this was the consequence of exposure to storage mites in bakery work, a population of salt packing workers was examined as a comparison group not at occupational risk of exposure to storage mites. Forty two per cent

R D Tee; D J Gordon; S Gordon; B Crook; A J Nunn; A W Musk; K M Venables; A J Taylor

1992-01-01

169

www.elsevier.de/pedobi Astigmatid mite growth and fungi preference  

E-print Network

www.elsevier.de/pedobi Astigmatid mite growth and fungi preference (Acari: Acaridida): Comparisons of fungi for sustaining mite population growth was tested in the laboratory. The effect of mite fungal preference on spore dispersion was also studied. Eight species of microscopic fungi, Alternaria alternata

Kratochvíl, Lukas

170

solution is the selective breeding of honey bees to produce bees that suppress mite  

E-print Network

solution is the selective breeding of honey bees to produce bees that suppress mite reproduction [8). This is a heritable 1. INTRODUCTION Long-term solutions to the parasitism of honey bees by the mite, Varroa destructor to avoid using pesticides in a bee colony and because of acaricide resistance by the mite [14, 18­21, 26

Boyer, Edmond

171

PARASITIC MITES OF HONEY BEES Greg Hunt, Bee Specialist, Purdue University  

E-print Network

Beekeeping PARASITIC MITES OF HONEY BEES Greg Hunt, Bee Specialist, Purdue University Figure 1. Varroa mites in the brood cells of the bees. A) The cell was uncapped and the honey bee pupa was removed so that you can see immature mites in the brood cell on the right, and a honey bee egg in the cell

Hunt, Greg

172

How predatory mites find plants with whitefly prey.  

PubMed

We investigated the searching behaviour of two species of predatory mites, Typhlodromips swirskii (Athias-Henriot) and Euseius scutalis (Athias-Henriot), both known to feed on immature stages of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci Gennadius. When released in a greenhouse inside a circle of cucumber plants that were alternatingly clean or infested with immature whiteflies, the mites took several days to find plants. Both species were recaptured significantly more on plants with whiteflies. This suggests that the mites are able to discriminate between plants with and without whiteflies. The predators may either have been attracted to plants with whiteflies from a distance or arrested on plants with whiteflies. Typhlodromips swirskii that had previously fed on whitefly immatures on cucumber leaves were significantly attracted by volatiles from cucumber plants with whiteflies in a Y-tube olfactometer. This suggests that the mites use volatile cues to discriminate between infested and clean plants. However, this response waned rapidly; if predators, experienced as above, were starved for 3-4 h in absence of cucumber leaves, they no longer preferred volatiles of infested plants to clean plants. Furthermore, T. swirskii that had no experience with immature whiteflies on cucumber plants also did not prefer odours of infested plants to those of clean plants. Because the release experiment with this species in the greenhouse was done with inexperienced predators, this suggests that the aggregation of mites on plants with whiteflies was mainly caused by differential arrestment of mites on plants with prey and clean plants. For T. swirskii, this was in agreement with the finding that the fraction of predators on plants with prey increased with time to levels higher than 70%. A less clear trend was found for E. scutalis, for which the fraction of predators on plants with prey stabilized soon after release to levels from 54-70%. Hence, the predatory mites may find plants with prey by random searching, but they are subsequently arrested on these plants. An earlier study showed that 87% of all whiteflies released in a set-up as used here were recaptured within 1 day. Hence, the effectiveness with which predatory mites locate plants with whiteflies is low compared with that of their prey. We expect this to generate spatial patterns in the dynamics of predator and prey and this may have consequences for biological control of whiteflies with predatory mites. PMID:16132740

Nomikou, Maria; Meng, Ruixia; Schraag, Ruud; Sabelis, Maurice W; Janssen, Arne

2005-01-01

173

Evaluation of the Sabal Palm Laboratory Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Sabal Palm Elementary School in Miami, Florida, cooperated with Florida International University to develop three innovative language programs: (1) Spanish, employing a modified immersion technique for kindergarten and first and second grades; (2) Latin, emphasizing the Latin origin of English for grades five and six; and (3) Shakespeare's…

Martinez, Carlos, Jr.

174

Palm cooling does not improve running performance.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the BEX Runner palm cooling device during a combination of exercise and environmental heat stress. Twelve subjects completed two randomly ordered time-to-exhaustion runs at 75% VO2max, 30 °C, and 50% relative humidity with and without palm cooling. Time to exhaustion runs started once the warm-up had elicited a core temperature of 37.5 °C. Heart rate, Rating of Perceived Exertion, Feeling Scale, and core temperature were recorded at 2-min intervals during each run. Time to exhaustion was longer in control than treatment (46.7±31.1 vs. 41.3±26.3 min, respectively, p<0.05); however, when warm-up time was included in analysis, there was no difference between trials for total exercise time (52.5±24.2 vs. 54.5±31.4 min, respectively). The rate-of-rise of core temperature was not different between control and treatment (0.047 vs. 0.048 °C · min-1, respectively). The use of the BEX Runner palm cooling device during a run in hot conditions did not eliminate or even attenuate the rise in core temperature. Exercise time in hot conditions did not increase with the use of the palm cooling device and time to exhaustion was reduced. PMID:23444094

Scheadler, C M; Saunders, N W; Hanson, N J; Devor, S T

2013-08-01

175

Acaricidal Activity of Eugenol Based Compounds against Scabies Mites  

PubMed Central

Backgound Human scabies is a debilitating skin disease caused by the “itch mite” Sarcoptes scabiei. Ordinary scabies is commonly treated with topical creams such as permethrin, while crusted scabies is treated with topical creams in combination with oral ivermectin. Recent reports of acaricide tolerance in scabies endemic communities in Northern Australia have prompted efforts to better understand resistance mechanisms and to identify potential new acaricides. In this study, we screened three essential oils and four pure compounds based on eugenol for acaricidal properties. Methodology/Principal Findings Contact bioassays were performed using live permethrin-sensitive S. scabiei var suis mites harvested from pigs and permethrin-resistant S. scabiei var canis mites harvested from rabbits. Results of bioassays showed that clove oil was highly toxic against scabies mites. Nutmeg oil had moderate toxicity and ylang ylang oil was the least toxic. Eugenol, a major component of clove oil and its analogues –acetyleugenol and isoeugenol, demonstrated levels of toxicity comparable to benzyl benzoate, the positive control acaricide, killing mites within an hour of contact. Conclusions The acaricidal properties demonstrated by eugenol and its analogues show promise as leads for future development of alternative topical acaricides to treat scabies. PMID:20711455

Pasay, Cielo; Mounsey, Kate; Stevenson, Graeme; Davis, Rohan; Arlian, Larry; Morgan, Marjorie; Vyszenski-Moher, DiAnn; Andrews, Kathy; McCarthy, James

2010-01-01

176

Biosynthesis of linoleic acid in Tyrophagus mites (Acarina: Acaridae).  

PubMed

We report here that Tyrophagus similis and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Astigmata: Acaridae) have the ability to biosynthesize linoleic acid [(9Z, 12Z)-9, 12-octadecadienoic acid] via a ?12-desaturation step, although animals in general and vertebrates in particular appear to lack this ability. When the mites were fed on dried yeast enriched with d31-hexadecanoic acid (16:0), d27-octadecadienoic acid (18:2), produced from d31-hexadecanoic acid through elongation and desaturation reactions, was identified as a major fatty acid component of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) in the mites. The double bond position of d27-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) of PCs and PEs was determined to be 9 and 12, respectively by dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) derivatization. Furthermore, the GC/MS retention time of methyl 9, 12-octadecadienoate obtained from mite extracts agreed well with those of authentic linoleic acid methyl ester. It is still unclear whether the mites themselves or symbiotic microorganisms are responsible for inserting a double bond into the ?12 position of octadecanoic acid. However, we present here the unique metabolism of fatty acids in the mites. PMID:23973745

Aboshi, Takako; Shimizu, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Yuji; Honda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Amano, Hiroshi; Mori, Naoki

2013-11-01

177

Efforts to control mites on Iberian ham by physical methods.  

PubMed

This study is aimed at the development of a method for integrated mite control in the industrial production of Iberian and Alentejan ham. The investigations were carried out on the premises of five factories in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula. Tyrophagus longior was predominant on hams in the drying rooms, Tyrophagus putrescentiae in cellars, while Tyrolichus casei was observed only in one factory, together with Melichares dendriticus (Acari: Ascidae), a predator of tyroglyphids. Relative humidity levels below 60% reduced the growth of mites on the ham surface, but these conditions forced the mites to seek refuge: T. putrescentiae and T. casei were found in cavities inside the ham. At the end of the experimental curing period, 11% of the hams were totally disintegrated by mite damage inside. Mites survived high-temperature treatments which are detrimental to the hams: 71 degrees C, 11 min; 57 degrees C, 30 min and 40 degrees C, 96 h. They also survived a long low-humidity period: 1 month at 18 degrees C and 32% R.H. PMID:15139271

García, Nazaret

2004-01-01

178

Present situation of house dust mites in Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt.  

PubMed

House dust mites are common inhalant allergens, which can precipitate atopic disease episodes. The present study revealed presence of four mites. These are Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Acheles gracilis and Ornithonyssus bacoti. Population densities of different live adult mites were investigated in different house habitats. In urban houses, pyroglyphid mites were the predominant in bedrooms and D. farinae was the most abundant. A. gracilis was more abundant in living rooms followed by D. farinae then D. pteronyssinus. A. gracilis was the most prevalent in kitchens. While in rural houses, O. bacoti was the most abundant species followed by pyroglyphid mites. Since Dermatophagoides species and A. gracilis were present in numbers high enough to allow their ecological consideration, their seasonal abundance in urban bed-rooms was investigated and revealed that both D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus have two peaks of abundance, one slightly higher in spring and the second in autumn. A. gracilis has two peaks but the higher occurred in autumn and the second in spring. PMID:16605105

El-Shazly, Atef M; El-Beshbishi, Samar N; Azab, Manar S; El-Nahas, Hala A; Soliman, Mohamed E; Fouad, Mahmoud A H; Monib, Mohammad El-Salahy M M

2006-04-01

179

Analyses of hypomethylated oil palm gene space.  

PubMed

Demand for palm oil has been increasing by an average of ?8% the past decade and currently accounts for about 59% of the world's vegetable oil market. This drives the need to increase palm oil production. Nevertheless, due to the increasing need for sustainable production, it is imperative to increase productivity rather than the area cultivated. Studies on the oil palm genome are essential to help identify genes or markers that are associated with important processes or traits, such as flowering, yield and disease resistance. To achieve this, 294,115 and 150,744 sequences from the hypomethylated or gene-rich regions of Elaeis guineensis and E. oleifera genome were sequenced and assembled into contigs. An additional 16,427 shot-gun sequences and 176 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) were also generated to check the quality of libraries constructed. Comparison of these sequences revealed that although the methylation-filtered libraries were sequenced at low coverage, they still tagged at least 66% of the RefSeq supported genes in the BAC and had a filtration power of at least 2.0. A total 33,752 microsatellites and 40,820 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were identified. These represent the most comprehensive collection of microsatellites and SNPs to date and would be an important resource for genetic mapping and association studies. The gene models predicted from the assembled contigs were mined for genes of interest, and 242, 65 and 14 oil palm transcription factors, resistance genes and miRNAs were identified respectively. Examples of the transcriptional factors tagged include those associated with floral development and tissue culture, such as homeodomain proteins, MADS, Squamosa and Apetala2. The E. guineensis and E. oleifera hypomethylated sequences provide an important resource to understand the molecular mechanisms associated with important agronomic traits in oil palm. PMID:24497974

Low, Eng-Ti L; Rosli, Rozana; Jayanthi, Nagappan; Mohd-Amin, Ab Halim; Azizi, Norazah; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Maqbool, Nauman J; Maclean, Paul; Brauning, Rudi; McCulloch, Alan; Moraga, Roger; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Singh, Rajinder

2014-01-01

180

Analyses of Hypomethylated Oil Palm Gene Space  

PubMed Central

Demand for palm oil has been increasing by an average of ?8% the past decade and currently accounts for about 59% of the world's vegetable oil market. This drives the need to increase palm oil production. Nevertheless, due to the increasing need for sustainable production, it is imperative to increase productivity rather than the area cultivated. Studies on the oil palm genome are essential to help identify genes or markers that are associated with important processes or traits, such as flowering, yield and disease resistance. To achieve this, 294,115 and 150,744 sequences from the hypomethylated or gene-rich regions of Elaeis guineensis and E. oleifera genome were sequenced and assembled into contigs. An additional 16,427 shot-gun sequences and 176 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) were also generated to check the quality of libraries constructed. Comparison of these sequences revealed that although the methylation-filtered libraries were sequenced at low coverage, they still tagged at least 66% of the RefSeq supported genes in the BAC and had a filtration power of at least 2.0. A total 33,752 microsatellites and 40,820 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were identified. These represent the most comprehensive collection of microsatellites and SNPs to date and would be an important resource for genetic mapping and association studies. The gene models predicted from the assembled contigs were mined for genes of interest, and 242, 65 and 14 oil palm transcription factors, resistance genes and miRNAs were identified respectively. Examples of the transcriptional factors tagged include those associated with floral development and tissue culture, such as homeodomain proteins, MADS, Squamosa and Apetala2. The E. guineensis and E. oleifera hypomethylated sequences provide an important resource to understand the molecular mechanisms associated with important agronomic traits in oil palm. PMID:24497974

Jayanthi, Nagappan; Mohd-Amin, Ab Halim; Azizi, Norazah; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Maqbool, Nauman J.; Maclean, Paul; Brauning, Rudi; McCulloch, Alan; Moraga, Roger; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Singh, Rajinder

2014-01-01

181

Will oil palm's homecoming spell doom for Africa's great apes?  

PubMed

Expansion of oil palm plantations has led to extensive wildlife habitat conversion in Southeast Asia [1]. This expansion is driven by a global demand for palm oil for products ranging from foods to detergents [2], and more recently for biofuels [3]. The negative impacts of oil palm development on biodiversity [1, 4, 5], and on orangutans (Pongo spp.) in particular, have been well documented [6, 7] and publicized [8, 9]. Although the oil palm is of African origin, Africa's production historically lags behind that of Southeast Asia. Recently, significant investments have been made that will likely drive the expansion of Africa's oil palm industry [10]. There is concern that this will lead to biodiversity losses similar to those in Southeast Asia. Here, we analyze the potential impact of oil palm development on Africa's great apes. Current great ape distribution in Africa substantially overlaps with current oil palm concessions (by 58.7%) and areas suitable for oil palm production (by 42.3%). More importantly, 39.9% of the distribution of great ape species on unprotected lands overlaps with suitable oil palm areas. There is an urgent need to develop guidelines for the expansion of oil palm in Africa to minimize the negative effects on apes and other wildlife. There is also a need for research to support land use decisions to reconcile economic development, great ape conservation, and avoiding carbon emissions. PMID:25017207

Wich, Serge A; Garcia-Ulloa, John; Kühl, Hjalmar S; Humle, Tatanya; Lee, Janice S H; Koh, Lian Pin

2014-07-21

182

Control of two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) by predators on potted plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three predators Scolothrips sexmaculatus Pergande, Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias - Henriot and Stethorus punctillum Weise were used to control two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch on potted bean plants. Mite population increased exponentially on the untreated plants, but on the predator treated plants, increase of mite population was checked and remained within minimum number. Early release of predator checked the mite

Mst. Mursalin Parvin

2008-01-01

183

Species identification of Cecidophyopsis mites (Acari: Eriophyidae) from different Ribes species and countries using molecular genetics.  

PubMed

Cecidophyopsis mites were studied by PCR amplification of parts of their ribosomal DNA, followed by restriction enzyme analysis. Mite specimens on Ribes nigrum (black currant) from six countries gave the same digestion pattern, which was distinct from the pattern for mites found on R. rubrum from Poland and Finland and for R. grossularia from the USA. This suggests that each Ribes species is host to a different mite species: C. ribis, C. selachodon and C. grossulariae, respectively. Two other mite samples from R. alpinum and R. aureum were identical but were distinct from each of the other species. PMID:7663755

Fenton, B; Malloch, G; Jones, A T; Amrine, J W; Gordon, S C; A'Hara, S; McGavin, W J; Birch, A N

1995-06-01

184

Enzymatic activity of allergenic house dust and storage mite extracts.  

PubMed

Proteases are involved in the pathogenicity of allergy, increasing epithelial permeability and acting as adjuvants. Enzymatic activity is therefore important for the allergenicity of an extract and also affects its stability and safety. However, the enzymatic activity of extracts is not usually evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic activity of the most allergenic mite extracts and to investigate their allergenic properties. Extracts from nine allergenic mite species (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes, Euroglyphus maynei, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank), Glycyphagus domesticus (DeGeer), Acarus siro L., Chortoglyphus arcuatus, and Blomia tropicalis) were characterized. Protein and allergen profiles were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western-blot, respectively. Gelatinolytic activity was evaluated with a zymogram and the activity of other enzymes (cysteine, serine proteases, and esterases) was evaluated individually or with the API-ZYM system. The main differences in protease activity were found between house dust mites and storage mites. House dust mites presented higher cysteine protease activity while storage mites presented higher serine protease activity. These differences are in line with their trophic specialization. A wide range of different activities was found in all the extracts analyzed, reflecting the fact that the extracts preserve the activity of many enzymes, this being necessary for a correct diagnosis. However, enzymes may act as adjuvants and, therefore, could lead to undesirable effects in immunotherapies, making this activity not suitable for treatment products. Modified extracts with lower enzymatic activity could be more appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:23427664

Morales, Maria; Iraola, Víctor; Leonor, Jose R; Carnés, Jerónimo

2013-01-01

185

Under the lash: Demodex mites in human diseases.  

PubMed

Demodex mites, class Arachnida and subclass Acarina, are elongated mites with clear cephalothorax and abdomens, the former with four pairs of legs. There are more than 100 species of Demodex mite, many of which are obligatory commensals of the pilosebaceous unit of mammals including cats, dogs, sheep, cattle, pigs, goats, deer, bats, hamsters, rats and mice. Among them, Demodex canis, which is found ubiquitously in dogs, is the most documented and investigated. In excessive numbers D. canis causes the inflammatory disease termed demodicosis (demodectic mange, follicular mange or red mange), which is more common in purebred dogs and has a hereditary predisposition in breeding kennels1. Two distinct Demodex species have been confirmed as the most common ectoparasite in man. The larger Demodex folliculorum, about 0.3-0.4 mm long, is primarily found as a cluster in the hair follicle (Figure 1a), while the smaller Demodex brevis, about 0.2-0.3 mm long with a spindle shape and stubby legs, resides solitarily in the sebaceous gland (Figure 1b). These two species are also ubiquitously found in all human races without gender preference. The pathogenic role of Demodex mites in veterinary medicine is not as greatly disputed as in human diseases. In this article, we review the key literature and our joint research experience regarding the pathogenic potential of these two mites in causing inflammatory diseases of human skin and eye. We hope that the evidence summarized herein will invite readers to take a different look at the life of Demodex mites in several common human diseases. PMID:20664811

Lacey, Noreen; Kavanagh, Kevin; Tseng, Scheffer C G

2009-08-01

186

78 FR 6258 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation...IFR) operations within the West Palm Beach, FL airspace area. This action...feet above the surface in the West Palm Beach, FL area. New Standard...

2013-01-30

187

77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

2012-10-17

188

Mite Infestations of Man Contracted from Dogs and Cats  

PubMed Central

Acarine infestations of the dog and cat are transmissible to man. The relation between age incidence in the host, duration of disease, and circumstances under which the animal is kept are stated. Fifty out of 65 human contacts at risk to 42 infected dogs and cats showed lesions of mite infestation; 48% of these lesions were confined to the arms and torso. It is important to consider animal mite infestation in the differential diagnosis of human pruritic and papular skin disease. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4969550

Thomsett, L. R.

1968-01-01

189

Morphological diagnosis of the eggs of stored-products mites.  

PubMed

Eggs of 13 species of common, economically important stored-product pest mites (Acarus siro, A. gracilis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, T. brevicrinatus, Tyroborus lini, Aleuroglyphus ovatus, Caloglyphus redikorzevi, C. oudemansi, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Glycyphagus domesticus, Aeroglyphus robustus, Chortoglyphus arcuatus and Carpoglyphus lactis) from four families (Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, Chortoglyphidae, Carpoglyphidae) were studied in order to build a diagnostic key. The morphological study dealt with shape, size and surface sculpturing of eggs. Morphological details were visualised using scanning electron microscopy. A key for distinguishing eggs at genus and species level was developed for the major stored-product mites. PMID:19252823

Kucerova, Zuzana; Stejskal, Vaclav

2009-11-01

190

Evaluation of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus , for spider mite control on greenhouse sweet pepper under hot arid field conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of Neoseiulus californicus (a generalist predatory mite) for the biological control of Tetranychus urticae, was compared to release of Phytoseiulus persimilis (a specialist predatory mite) and an acaricide treatment in sweet pepper plants grown in greenhouse tunnels in a hot and\\u000a arid climate. To ensure uniform pest populations, spider mites were spread on pepper plants in two seasons; a natural infestation

P. Weintraub; E. Palevsky

2008-01-01

191

Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.  

PubMed

Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems. PMID:24867061

Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

2014-11-01

192

[A view of mites infestation on cheese and stored foods in terms of public health].  

PubMed

Mites are small live organism that may result in a large number of allergenic diseases such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma that may cause individuals' physical, social and mental health, adversely affects quality of life. Mites that can be found everywhere where people live are found in various foodstuffs. The purpose of this review is to examine the types of mites and possible illness result from mites can be found in stored foods especially cheese in terms of public health assessment. Finding mite in the stored foods except for some local cheeses is not desirable because of it's health risks. However, especially in cheese which is maturing in the open always to be the case of mite enfestation. In particular, this risk is much higher in some enterprises where have not taken measures enough in terms of food safety. Besides the lack of standarts related to cheese, fighting against mite in quality assurance systems have generally not been taken into consideration. Whereas mites in cheese consumed by individuals at any age, there is always a possibility of the potential cause of the allergic reactions seen in the consumer. Prevention of possible infestations in cheese, potential presence of storage mite and cheese mite in various stored foods and local cheese of Turkey should be investigated more comprehensive and protective measures should be developed in order to protect public health against mites. PMID:20954123

Cev?zc?, Sibel; Gökçe, Seher; Bostan, Kamil; Kaypmaz, Ay?e

2010-01-01

193

Wheat curl mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) dispersal and its relationship with kernel red streaking in maize.  

PubMed

Wheat curl mites, Aceria tosichella Keifer, dispersing from wheat (Triticum spp.) to nearby corn (Zea mays L.) fields play a role in the development of kernel red streaking in corn. These studies were undertaken to verify the relationship of wheat curl mite to kernel red streaking, to determine whether wheat is the main source of curl mites dispersing into corn and to determine whether planting corn in temporal or spatial isolation of wheat is a valid management strategy. These studies were conducted on farm fields using sticky traps to monitor mites, followed by sampling mature grain for kernel streaking in southwestern Ontario from 1999 to 2002. The dominant source mites were winter wheat. Mite dispersal occurred during the first 3 wk of winter wheat maturation after the wheat had reached Zadoks stage 87. Mite dispersal corresponded to prevailing winds in the area with the lowest number of mites and the lowest severity of kernel red streaking occurring 60 m from wheat fields planted to the north, south, and east of cornfields and 90 m from wheat fields planted to the west of cornfields. The severity of kernel red streaking was positively correlated with the density of wheat curl mites in corn; however, the correlation was weak and kernel red streaking was still high in many cornfields when few or no mites were present. These findings suggest that wheat curl mite migration into corn is not entirely predictive of the incidence and severity of kernel red streaking. PMID:16334327

Liu, J; Lee, E A; Sears, M K; Schaafsma, A W

2005-10-01

194

Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland  

PubMed Central

Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. PMID:25665827

Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

2015-01-01

195

Study on mange mite of camel in Raya-Azebo district, northern Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence and species of camel mange mite infestation in Raya-Azebo district, Northern part of Ethiopia. Accordingly, Three hundred and eighty-four camels were examined and mange mite infestation was detected on 64 of camels. Only Sarcoptes scabiei var. cameli was identified as the only mite species in all skin scraping samples collected from the suspected mange mite lesions. There was significant difference in the prevalence of mange mite infestation between male and female camels (p < 0.05) but no significance difference was observed among the age groups and body condition score of camels (p > 0.05). The result indicated that camel mange mite infestation was a problem in northern part of Ethiopia, hence, further studies and strategic control measures are recommended to reduce the effect of mange mite infestation on camel husbandry.

Awol, Nesibu; Kiros, Semere; Tsegaye, Yisehak; Ali, Mohammed; Hadush, Birhanu

2014-01-01

196

Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis control of synanthropic mites (Acari: Acaridida) under laboratory conditions.  

PubMed

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins present a potential for control of pest mites. Information concerning the effect of Bt and its possible application to the biocontrol of synathropic mites is rare. The toxic effect of Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis producing Cry3A toxin was tested on the mites Acarus siro L., Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank), Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes, and Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank) via feeding tests. Fifty mites were reared on Bt additive diets in concentrations that ranged from 0 to 100 mg g(-1) under optimal conditions for their development. After 21 days, the mites were counted and the final populations were analyzed using a polynomial regression model. The Bt diet suppressed population growth of the four mite species. The fitted doses of Bt for 50% suppression of population growth were diets ranging from 25 to 38 mg g(-1). There were no remarkable differences among species. Possible applications of Bt for the control of synanthropic mites are discussed. PMID:19381844

Erban, Tomas; Nesvorna, Marta; Erbanova, Michaela; Hubert, Jan

2009-12-01

197

Palm harvesting affects seed predation of Euterpe edulis, a threatened palm of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.  

PubMed

The palm tree Euterpe edulis is endemic to the Atlantic Forest, where it constitutes an economically important forest product. The often unplanned and illegal harvesting of palm hearts has led to drastic reductions in the populations of E. edulis in many areas where this palm used to be the dominant understorey tree species. We investigated the effects of harvesting on seed and seedling predation of E. edulis. We tested the predictions of the dominance-predation hypothesis according to which predator satiation leads to an inverse relationship between the amount of predation and the dominance of a tree species. During two consecutive years, seeds were set experimentally on an unharvested (> 250 adult palms/ha) and a neighboring harvested site (few, if any, adult palms) located in the Atlantic Forest of SE Brazil. Seedling mortality was studied at both sites for a six-month period in each of two consecutive years. Seed predation caused by rodents was higher at the harvested site, while insects caused more damage to seeds placed at the unharvested site. The proportion of seeds preyed upon by rodents varied annually, while insect predation did not. Seedling mortality did not differ between harvested and unharvested sites. The dominance-predation hypothesis was confirmed for generalist rodent seed predators, but not for specialist insect predators. This result shows that density-dependent mortality, not only at the individual level but also at the population-level scale, is a function of the class of predators and their types of foraging behavior. PMID:15620006

Pizo, M A; Vieira, E M

2004-08-01

198

Differential Water Mite Parasitism, Phenoloxidase Activity, and Resistance to Mites Are Unrelated across Pairs of Related Damselfly Species  

PubMed Central

Related host species often demonstrate differences in prevalence and/or intensity of infection by particular parasite species, as well as different levels of resistance to those parasites. The mechanisms underlying this interspecific variation in parasitism and resistance expression are not well understood. Surprisingly, few researchers have assessed relations between actual levels of parasitism and resistance to parasites seen in nature across multiple host species. The main goal of this study was to determine whether interspecific variation in resistance against ectoparasitic larval water mites either was predictive of interspecific variation in parasitism for ten closely related species of damselflies (grouped into five “species pairs”), or was predicted by interspecific variation in a commonly used measure of innate immunity (total Phenoloxidase or potential PO activity). Two of five species pairs had interspecific differences in proportions of individuals resisting larval Arrenurus water mites, only one of five species pairs had species differences in prevalence of larval Arrenurus water mites, and another two of five species pairs showed species differences in mean PO activity. Within the two species pairs where species differed in proportion of individuals resisting mites the species with the higher proportion did not have correspondingly higher PO activity levels. Furthermore, the proportion of individuals resisting mites mirrored prevalence of parasitism in only one species pair. There was no interspecific variation in median intensity of mite infestation within any species pair. We conclude that a species’ relative ability to resist particular parasites does not explain interspecific variation in parasitism within species pairs and that neither resistance nor parasitism is reflected by interspecific variation in total PO or potential PO activity. PMID:25658982

Mlynarek, Julia J.; Iserbyt, Arne; Nagel, Laura; Forbes, Mark R.

2015-01-01

199

Trade in Palm Products in North-Western South America  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 200 scientific publications and Internet sources dealing with trade in palm products in north-western South America\\u000a are reviewed. We focus on value chains, trade volumes, prices, and recent developments for some of the most important raw\\u000a materials derived from native palms. Trade in palm products takes place at local, regional, national, and international levels.\\u000a For local communities and

Grischa Brokamp; Natalia Valderrama; Moritz Mittelbach; Anders S. Barfod; Maximilian Weigend

200

Carbon emissions from forest conversion by Kalimantan oil palm plantations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil palm supplies >30% of world vegetable oil production. Plantation expansion is occurring throughout the tropics, predominantly in Indonesia, where forests with heterogeneous carbon stocks undergo high conversion rates. Quantifying oil palm's contribution to global carbon budgets therefore requires refined spatio-temporal assessments of land cover converted to plantations. Here, we report oil palm development across Kalimantan (538,346km2) from 1990 to 2010, and project expansion to 2020 within government-allocated leases. Using Landsat satellite analyses to discern multiple land covers, coupled with above- and below-ground carbon accounting, we develop the first high-resolution carbon flux estimates from Kalimantan plantations. From 1990 to 2010, 90% of lands converted to oil palm were forested (47% intact, 22% logged, 21% agroforests). By 2010, 87% of total oil palm area (31,640km2) occurred on mineral soils, and these plantations contributed 61-73% of 1990-2010 net oil palm emissions (0.020-0.024GtCyr-1). Although oil palm expanded 278% from 2000 to 2010, 79% of allocated leases remained undeveloped. By 2020, full lease development would convert 93,844km2 (~ 90% forested lands, including 41% intact forests). Oil palm would then occupy 34% of lowlands outside protected areas. Plantation expansion in Kalimantan alone is projected to contribute 18-22% (0.12-0.15GtCyr-1) of Indonesia's 2020 CO2-equivalent emissions. Allocated oil palm leases represent a critical yet undocumented source of deforestation and carbon emissions.

Carlson, Kimberly M.; Curran, Lisa M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Pittman, Alice Mcdonald; Trigg, Simon N.; Marion Adeney, J.

2013-03-01

201

Palm-3000 on-sky results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PALM-3000, the second-generation facility adaptive optics system for the 5-meter telescope at Palomar Observatory, successfully obtained first high-order correction on sky on UT June 21, 2011. Within PALM-3000, low-order wavefront correction is applied with a Xinetics, Inc. 349 (241 active) actuator deformable mirror reused from the 1999 PALAO system. High-order correction is applied with a new Xinetics, Inc. 4,356 (3,388 active) actuator deformable mirror based upon a 6 x 6 array of 11 x 11 actuator Photonex modules. The system also uses a new CCD50-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor camera and a novel real-time computer based upon a bank of commercial GPU's. Currently, the first of four planned wavefront sensor pupil sampling modes (N = 64 subapertures per pupil) has been tested, emphasizing early high-contrast exoplanet science with the PHARO coronagraphic imager and P1640 coronagraphic integral field spectrograph. We report on AO correction performance to date and our experience with the unique 66 x 66 actuator Xinetics, Inc. DM, as well as describe the PALM-3000 commissioning program and future plans.

Dekany, R.; Roberts, J.; Burruss, R.; Truong, T.; Palmer, D., Guiwits, S., Hale, D., Angione, J., Baranec, C., Croner, E., Davis, J. T. C., Zolkower, J., Henning, J., McKenna, D., Bouchez, A. H.

2011-09-01

202

Feather mites of Brazil (Acari: Astigmata: Analgoidea and Pterolichoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a checklist of feather mites known from native birds in Brazil. The list was compiled from a survey of Brazilian records published in indexing databases (e.g. Zoological Records) and from the available literature. To date, 185 nominal species representing 21 families have been recorded from Brazilian birds. Associations with 15 bird orders were found: Anseriformes, Apodiformes, Caprimulgiformes, Ciconiiformes,

Michel P. Valim; Fabio A. Hernandes; Heather C. Proctor

2011-01-01

203

DO TRACHEAL MITES REDUCE THE LONGEVITY OF WORKERS?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The longevity of individual workers exposed to tracheal mites at different times of the year was evaluated in observation hives and in hoarding cages. Young workers (< 24 h) from colonies known to be highly resistant and highly susceptible to infestation were painted or tagged with plastic-numbered...

204

Acaricidal Activity of Eugenol Based Compounds against Scabies Mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgoundHuman scabies is a debilitating skin disease caused by the “itch mite” Sarcoptes scabiei. Ordinary scabies is commonly treated with topical creams such as permethrin, while crusted scabies is treated with topical creams in combination with oral ivermectin. Recent reports of acaricide tolerance in scabies endemic communities in Northern Australia have prompted efforts to better understand resistance mechanisms and to

Cielo Pasay; Kate Mounsey; Graeme Stevenson; Rohan Davis; Larry Arlian; Marjorie Morgan; Diann Vyszenski-Moher; Kathy Andrews; James McCarthy; Cesar V. Munayco

2010-01-01

205

Cecidophyopsis mites (Acari: Eriophyidae) on Ribes spp. (Grossulariaceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present a review and morphological study of the eriophyid mites in the genus Cecidophyopsis occurring on gooseberries and currants of the genus Ribes (Grossulariaceae). Three species are redescribed and illustrated: Cecidophyopsis ribis (Westwood 1869) causing galling on black currants, Ribes nigrum; C. selachodon Eyndhoven 1967 causing galling on red currants, R. rubrum; and C. grossulariae (Collinge 1907), a

James W. Amrine Jr; George H. Duncan; Teifion A. Jones; Stuart C. Gordon; Ian M. Roberts

1994-01-01

206

NEW OBSERVATIONS ON PHYLOGENY OF CHEYLETOID MITES (ACARI: PROSTIGMATA: CHEYLETOIDEA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mite superfamily Cheyletoidea (Acari: Prostigmata) includes 5 families: Cheyletidae, Syringophilidae, Harpirhynchidae (including Ophioptinae), Psorergatidae, and Demodicidae. A new hypothesis of cheyletoid phylogeny was carried out with maximum parsimony approach. Raphignathus collegiatus (Raphignathidae) and Storchia robusta (Stigmaeidae) were selected as outgroups. Cheyletoid ingroup species are represented by Eucheyletia asiatica and Cheyletiella parasitivorax (Cheyletidae), Syringophilus bipectinatus and Picobia sturni (Syringophilidae), Harpyrhynchoides

A. V. Bochkov

2008-01-01

207

An unusual species of demodex mite in a cat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skin scrapings taken from an adult neutered female cat were found to contain demodicid mites. These differed morphologically from Demodex cati but resembled a currently unnamed species which has recently been reported from the cat. Measurements of this parasite are given for the first time. The skin lesions were treated with rotenone, but the animal died within a few days

CJ Chesney

1988-01-01

208

Sampling plans for pest mites on physic nut.  

PubMed

The starting point for generating a pest control decision-making system is a conventional sampling plan. Because the mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi are among the most important pests of the physic nut (Jatropha curcas), in the present study, we aimed to establish sampling plans for these mite species on physic nut. Mite densities were monitored in 12 physic nut crops. Based on the obtained results, sampling of P. latus and T. bastosi should be performed by assessing the number of mites per cm(2) in 160 samples using a handheld 20× magnifying glass. The optimal sampling region for T. bastosi is the abaxial surface of the 4th most apical leaf on the branch of the middle third of the canopy. On the abaxial surface, T. bastosi should then be observed on the side parts of the middle portion of the leaf, near its edge. As for P. latus, the optimal sampling region is the abaxial surface of the 4th most apical leaf on the branch of the apical third of the canopy on the abaxial surface. Polyphagotarsonemus latus should then be assessed on the side parts of the leaf's petiole insertion. Each sampling procedure requires 4 h and costs US$ 7.31. PMID:24682638

Rosado, Jander F; Sarmento, Renato A; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Galdino, Tarcísio V S; Marques, Renata V; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Picanço, Marcelo C

2014-08-01

209

Ubiquity and diversity of human-associated Demodex mites.  

PubMed

Demodex mites are a group of hair follicle and sebaceous gland-dwelling species. The species of these mites found on humans are arguably the animals with which we have the most intimate interactions. Yet, their prevalence and diversity have been poorly explored. Here we use a new molecular method to assess the occurrence of Demodex mites on humans. In addition, we use the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) to assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of Demodex lineages. Within our samples, 100% of people over 18 years of age appear to host at least one Demodex species, suggesting that Demodex mites may be universal associates of adult humans. A phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA reveals intraspecific structure within one of the two named human-associated Demodex species, D. brevis. The D. brevis clade is geographically structured, suggesting that new lineages are likely to be discovered as humans from additional geographic regions are sampled. PMID:25162399

Thoemmes, Megan S; Fergus, Daniel J; Urban, Julie; Trautwein, Michelle; Dunn, Robert R

2014-01-01

210

SOME INSECTS AND MITES NEW TO FLORIDA SUGARCANE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The number of insect and mite species attacking sugarcane in Florida has increased over time. Five new pest species were discovered during the 31-year period 1964 to 1995, one species indigenous to Florida with no previous association with sugarcane and four invasive species entirely new to the Ever...

211

Plant cell piercing by a predatory mite: evidence and implications.  

PubMed

Omnivorous arthropods can play an important role as beneficial natural enemies because they can sustain their populations on plants when prey is scarce, thereby providing prophylactic protection against an array of herbivores. Although some omnivorous mite species of the family Phytoseiidae consume plant cell-sap, the feeding mechanism and its influence on the plant are not known. Using scanning electron microscopy we demonstrated that the omnivorous predatory mite Euseius scutalis penetrates epidermal cells of pepper foliage and wax membranes. Penetration holes were teardrop shape to oval, of 2-5 µm diameter. The similarities between penetration holes in pollen grains and in epidermal cells implied that the same penetration mechanism is used for pollen feeding and plant cell-sap uptake. Variation in shape and size of penetration holes in leaves and a wax membrane were attributed to different mite life stages, depth of penetration or the number of chelicerae puncturing (one or both). Punctured stomata, epidermal and vein cells appeared flat and lacking turgor. When the mite penetrated and damaged a single cell, neighboring cells were most often intact. In a growth chamber experiment very large numbers of E. scutalis negatively affected the growth of young pepper plants. Consequently caution should be taken when applying cell-piercing predators to young plants. Further studies are needed to take advantage of the potential sustainability of plant cell-sap feeding predators. PMID:25391448

Adar, E; Inbar, M; Gal, S; Issman, L; Palevsky, E

2015-02-01

212

May/June 2004 Varroa Mite Control Neonicotinoids  

E-print Network

but the parasitized winter bees will not be around next spring.] Neonicotinoids and Bees Chemists working1 May/June 2004 Varroa Mite Control Neonicotinoids Oxalic Acid WAS 2004 Conference Flash Acid Trts. labeled use should be safe to the bees and beekeepers, as well as avoiding honey contamination 4. Europe

Ferrara, Katherine W.

213

Bulb mite, Rhizoglyphus robini (Astigmata: Acaridae) as an experimental animal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhizoglyphus robini Claparède (Acari: Astigmata: Acaridae) is proposed as a model laboratory animal for biological, ecological, physiological and toxicological studies. The mite is easy and inexpensive to rear, quite fecund, convenient to manipulate, and may rapidly be raised to gram quantities. Examples are presented of its use in soil pest ecology and control studies, and in physiological, biochemical and toxicological

Uri Gerson; Ephraim Cohen; Shlomo Capua

1991-01-01

214

Identification of astigmatid mites using ITS2 and COI regions.  

PubMed

Identification of astigmatid mites based on their morphological characteristics is difficult because of the similarity of their organs, especially in immature mites. The ribosomal second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) regions are highly conserved in the eukaryotes and are usually used as barcodes. The ITS2 and COI regions of six species of astigmatid mites (Aleuroglyphus ovatus, Blomia tropicalis, Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Euroglyphus maynei, Tyrophagus putrescentiae) were obtained by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The lengths of the ITS2 sequences varied from 316 to 488 bp, while the COI regions were 377 or 378 bp long. Considering the ITS2 genes, the intraspecific genetic distance was in the range of 0.00-0.077844, whereas the interspecific genetic distance was 0.202426-0.912959. The values were 0.000-0.029748 and 0.138403-0.279304 for intra- and interspecific genetic distances when COI genes were used. The phylogenetic trees inferred from the ITS2 and the COI regions, by using maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining methods, were identical to those based on their morphological classification. Thus, the ITS2 and COI regions can be applied as barcodes to identify different species of astigmatid mites. PMID:21072538

Yang, Bin; Cai, Junlong; Cheng, Xunjia

2011-02-01

215

Sept/Oct 2004 Mites Influencing Pollination Honey Refractometers  

E-print Network

into any host population, our European honey bees were pretty much unable to fend off the infestations, the infested colonies died. Those deaths first were attributed to overwhelm- ing mite numbers (which can happen. Dying colonies did not simply dry up and disappear. They became weak and suscep- tible to robbing

Ferrara, Katherine W.

216

May/June 1996 AHB Update Tracheal Mites and Amitraz  

E-print Network

at the scene when bees are dying, they are likely to pick up the colonies and leave as quickly as possible on bee kill residues. By that time, the bees have long since died off or recovered, so the senseMay/June 1996 AHB Update Tracheal Mites and Amitraz Loss Reports Tucson Bee Lab Furadan and Cotton

Ferrara, Katherine W.

217

Enzymatic adaptations of herbivorous insects and mites to phytochemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of oxidases, reductases, esterases, epoxide hydrolases, and group transferases in herbivorous insects and mites detoxify and facilitate the excretion of toxic phytochemicals (allelochemicals). Current theory indicates that the cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function oxidases (MFOs) are by far the most important enzymes because they have many attributes that are essential for an effective detoxification system. Data presented here on the

Sami Ahmad

1986-01-01

218

Ubiquity and Diversity of Human-Associated Demodex Mites  

PubMed Central

Demodex mites are a group of hair follicle and sebaceous gland-dwelling species. The species of these mites found on humans are arguably the animals with which we have the most intimate interactions. Yet, their prevalence and diversity have been poorly explored. Here we use a new molecular method to assess the occurrence of Demodex mites on humans. In addition, we use the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) to assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of Demodex lineages. Within our samples, 100% of people over 18 years of age appear to host at least one Demodex species, suggesting that Demodex mites may be universal associates of adult humans. A phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA reveals intraspecific structure within one of the two named human-associated Demodex species, D. brevis. The D. brevis clade is geographically structured, suggesting that new lineages are likely to be discovered as humans from additional geographic regions are sampled. PMID:25162399

Thoemmes, Megan S.; Fergus, Daniel J.; Urban, Julie; Trautwein, Michelle; Dunn, Robert R.

2014-01-01

219

Original article Determination of the LC50in the mite  

E-print Network

of the organophosphorus aca- ricides, the active ingredients of Perizin® and Cekafix®, to the mite Varroa to these acaricides were not studied. Varroa jacobsoni / toxicity/ resistance / coumaphos / organophosphorus acaricide to evaluate the toxicity of two #12;organophosphorus acaricides widely used against V jacobsoni, the active

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

220

Phase Behavior of Palm Oil in Blends with Palm-Based Diacylglycerol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phase behavior of palm oil (PO) in blends with different concentrations (10% intervals) of palm-based diacylglycerol oil (PO-DAG)\\u000a was studied using the iso-solid diagram, solid fat content (SFC) with the hardness thermal protocol, DSC melting and crystallization\\u000a curves, X-ray diffraction curves, and texture analysis (hardness). Minor eutectic effects were observed at around 20–50% PO-DAG\\u000a in 20–50% SFC iso-lines. The phase

Amir Hossein Saberi; Tan Chin-Ping; Lai Oi-Ming

221

Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues  

SciTech Connect

The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

2009-08-07

222

Interaction of the mite Aceria mangiferae with Fusarium mangiferae, the causal agent of mango malformation disease.  

PubMed

The role of the mango bud mite, Aceria mangiferae, in carrying conidia of Fusarium mangiferae, vectoring them into potential infection sites, and assisting fungal infection and dissemination was studied. Following the mite's exposure to a green fluorescent protein-marked isolate, conidia were observed clinging to the mite's body. Agar plugs bearing either bud mites or the pathogen were placed on leaves near the apical buds of potted mango plants. Conidia were found in bud bracts only when both mites and conidia were co-inoculated on the plant, demonstrating that the mite vectored the conidia into the apical bud. Potted mango plants were inoculated with conidia in the presence or absence of mites. Frequency and severity of infected buds were significantly higher in the presence of mites, revealing their significant role in the fungal infection process. Conidia and mite presence were monitored with traps in a diseased orchard over a 2-year period. No windborne bud mites bearing conidia were found; however, high numbers of windborne conidia were detected in the traps. These results suggest that A. mangiferae can carry and vector conidia between buds and assist in fungal penetration but does not play a role in the aerial dissemination of conidia between trees. PMID:19159307

Gamliel-Atinsky, E; Freeman, S; Sztejnberg, A; Maymon, M; Ochoa, R; Belausov, E; Palevsky, E

2009-02-01

223

Generalist-feeding subterranean mites as potential biological control agents of immature corn rootworms.  

PubMed

Predatory mites are important components of subterranean food webs and may help regulate densities of agricultural pests, including western corn rootworms (Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Implementing conservation and/or classical biocontrol tactics could enhance densities of specialist or generalist predatory mites and lead to pest suppression, but first relevant mite species must be identified and their predatory capabilities evaluated. We conducted lab assays to quantify consumption of immature rootworms and oviposition rates of various mite species. Our study indicates that rootworms are a sub-optimal food source for the mite taxa tested. However, all mite species fed upon rootworms to some degree, although consumption by nematophagous Eviphis ostrinus was extremely low. Predators consumed more rootworm larvae than eggs, and mite size was correlated with prey consumption, with larger predators eating more prey. Four mite taxa (Gaeolaelaps sp., S. miles, Gl. americana, and G. aculeifer) had detrimental effects on survival of rootworm larvae, and the latter two species also had negative impacts on densities of pest eggs. Although it is unlikely that any of these mite species by itself has a major impact on rootworm control, the community of generalist soil-dwelling mites may play an important role in regulating immature rootworm populations in the field. PMID:21598089

Prischmann, Deirdre A; Knutson, Eric M; Dashiell, Kenton E; Lundgren, Jonathan G

2011-11-01

224

Shift of Bacterial Community in Synanthropic Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae Induced by Fusarium Fungal Diet  

PubMed Central

Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Astigmata) and Fusarium sp. co-occur in poorly managed grain. In a laboratory experiment, mite grazing resulted in significant reduction of fungal mycelium on cultivation plates. The destruction of mycelium appeared to be a result of an interaction between the mites, fungi and associated bacteria. Methodology and Principal Findings A laboratory experiment was performed to simulate a situation of grain multiinfested by mites and Fusarium fungi. Changes of mite-associated bacterial community in T. putrescentiae were described in 3 habitats: (i) T. putrescentiae mites from a rearing diet prior to their transfer to fungal diet; (ii) fungal mycelium before mite introduction; (iii) mites after 7 day diet of each Fusarium avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. poae and F. verticillioides. Bacterial communities were characterized by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing. In total, 157 nearly full-length 16 S rRNA gene sequences from 9 samples representing selected habitats were analyzed. In the mites, the shift from rearing to fungal diet caused changes in mite associated bacterial community. A diverse bacterial community was associated with mites feeding on F. avenaceum, while feeding on the other three Fusarium spp. led to selection of a community dominated by Bacillaceae. Conclusions/Significance The work demonstrated changes of bacterial community associated with T. putrescentiae after shift to fungal diets suggesting selection for Bacillaceae species known as chitinase producers, which might participate in the fungal mycelium hydrolysis. PMID:23119013

Hubert, Jan; Nesvorná, Marta; Ságová-Mare?ková, Markéta; Kopecký, Jan

2012-01-01

225

Genetic characterization of North American populations of the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella) and dry bulb mite (Aceria tulipae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, transmits at least three harmful viruses, wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), high plains virus (HPV), and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) throughout the Great Plains. This virus complex is considered to be the most serious d...

226

MITES OF THE HONEY BEE: WE TAKE A BREIF OVERVIEW OF THE ORIGIN OF PARASITIC HONEY BEE MITES AND HOW THEY FIT INTO THE SCHEME OF THINGS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Mites exploit any habitat in which animals or plants can live, and they are rival insects in the diversity of living sites and life cycles. Mites are found in soil, in water (fresh and salt), in and on plants, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates. They are found in polar extremes and desert ...

227

A first genetic map of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) reveals long-range genome structure conservation in the palms  

PubMed Central

Background The date palm is one of the oldest cultivated fruit trees. It is critical in many ways to cultures in arid lands by providing highly nutritious fruit while surviving extreme heat and environmental conditions. Despite its importance from antiquity, few genetic resources are available for improving the productivity and development of the dioecious date palm. To date there has been no genetic map and no sex chromosome has been identified. Results Here we present the first genetic map for date palm and identify the putative date palm sex chromosome. We placed ~4000 markers on the map using nearly 1200 framework markers spanning a total of 1293 cM. We have integrated the genetic map, derived from the Khalas cultivar, with the draft genome and placed up to 19% of the draft genome sequence scaffolds onto linkage groups for the first time. This analysis revealed approximately ~1.9 cM/Mb on the map. Comparison of the date palm linkage groups revealed significant long-range synteny to oil palm. Analysis of the date palm sex-determination region suggests it is telomeric on linkage group 12 and recombination is not suppressed in the full chromosome. Conclusions Based on a modified gentoyping-by-sequencing approach we have overcome challenges due to lack of genetic resources and provide the first genetic map for date palm. Combined with the recent draft genome sequence of the same cultivar, this resource offers a critical new tool for date palm biotechnology, palm comparative genomics and a better understanding of sex chromosome development in the palms. PMID:24735434

2014-01-01

228

PALM: Pacific Area Language Materials. [CD-ROM].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This CD-ROM provides a resource for anyone interested in the diverse languages of the Pacific. It contains a digital archive of approximately 700 booklets in 11 Pacific languages. The original booklets were produced several years ago by the PALM project in order to record Pacific regional languages and to serve as teaching tools. This digital PALM

Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

229

CERFACS Climate Modelling and Global Change Team The PALM group  

E-print Network

CERFACS Climate Modelling and Global Change Team The PALM group 24 th january 2002 A coding norm of extracting documentation from the source code. The reference languages for the PALM software are FORTRAN 77; a REFERENCE to further documentation #15; the AUTHOR and date the routine was written, together with MODI

230

The role of mites in the transmission and maintenance of Hantaan virus (Hantavirus: Bunyaviridae).  

PubMed

This review examines the evidence indicating a role for parasitic mites in the transmission and maintenance of Hantaan virus in nature. The available data, much of it from recent studies in China, indicate that both trombiculid and gamasid mites are naturally infected with Hantaan virus and that infected mites can transmit the virus by bite to laboratory mice and transovarially (vertically) through eggs to their offspring. Collectively, these findings challenge the current paradigm of hantavirus transmission, namely, that rodents serve as the reservoir of human pathogenic hantaviruses in nature and that humans are infected with these viruses by inhalation of aerosols of infectious rodent excreta. Further research is needed to confirm the mite-hantavirus association and to determine if parasitic mites are in fact the major source and principal vectors of human pathogenic hantaviruses, such as Hantaan. If the mite hypothesis is correct, then it will significantly alter current concepts about the epidemiology, prevention, and control of human hantavirus infection. PMID:24958909

Yu, Xue-jie; Tesh, Robert B

2014-12-01

231

Pollen consumption by flower mites in three hummingbird-pollinated plant species.  

PubMed

Laboratory studies suggest that pollen consumption by flower mites may decrease the male fitness of the plant by reducing the available pollen for dispersal. Here we assessed pollen consumption by flower mites under natural conditions in three plant species with long-lived, protandrous flowers, Moussonia deppeana (Gesneriaceae), Lobelia laxiflora and L. cardinalis (Lobeliaceae). Total pollen mass was measured after 24 and 48 h in flowers exposed to flower mites and excluded from hummingbirds, flowers exposed to mites and hummingbird visitation, and in flowers recently opened with dehisced anthers. Compared with recently opened flowers, pollen availability was reduced about half in the presence of flower mites and the same effect was observed in the three plant species. Our results suggest that flower mites are removing a great deal of pollen and the reduction of pollen implies the possibility of direct impact on pollen transfer. PMID:19763848

Velázquez, Tonatiuh; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

2010-02-01

232

First report on sensitization to allergens of a house dust mite, Suidasia pontifica (Acari: Saproglyphidae).  

PubMed

A species of house dust mite, Suidasia pontifica, was recently shown to produce allergens affecting man. The species may be as important as other allergen producing mite in sensitization and causing allergic symptoms in Malaysians. Surveys conducted demonstrated that 80% of the houses surveyed were positive for this mite with densities ranged from 2 to 50 mites per gram of dust. Colonies of the species has been successfully established and materials from those colonies have been used to produce extracts for studies on sensitization to the mites. A total of 85 suspected allergic rhinitis patients were tested and 74.1% demonstrated positive reactions. Extract of this mite should be considered for routine diagnostic testing and possible immunotherapy. PMID:11414419

Mariana, A; Ho, T M; Gendeh, B S; Iskandar, H; Zainuldin-Taib, M

2000-12-01

233

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer  

E-print Network

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer By BILL DIPAOLO Palm Beach Quick quiz: Who'll be Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer this year? Donald Trump? Wrong. Jack to figures released by the Palm Beach County Tax Collector's office today. That's about 1.6 percent of the $3

Belogay, Eugene A.

234

Wealth gap: Minority jobless rates double overall figure in Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

of the West Palm Beach NAACP and also of the Center for Enterprise Opportunity, which lends supportWealth gap: Minority jobless rates double overall figure in Palm Beach County By JOHN LANTIGUA Palm," said Jorge Avellana, executive director of the Hispanic Human Resources Council of Palm Beach County

Belogay, Eugene A.

235

Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) tissue culture ESTs: Identifying genes associated with callogenesis and embryogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is one of the most important oil bearing crops in the world. However, genetic improvement of oil palm through conventional breeding is extremely slow and costly, as the breeding cycle can take up to 10 years. This has brought about interest in vegetative propagation of oil palm. Since the introduction of oil palm tissue

Eng-Ti L Low; Halimah Alias; Soo-Heong Boon; Elyana M Shariff; Chi-Yee A Tan; Leslie CL Ooi; Suan-Choo Cheah; Abdul-Rahim Raha; Kiew-Lian Wan; Rajinder Singh

2008-01-01

236

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1  

E-print Network

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1 *, Yew. Oil palm vegetation liquor thus represents a new source of phenolic bioactives. Key words: Oil palm , Krishnan Subramaniam5 , Soon-Sen Leow1 , Kenneth C. Hayes6 and Mohd Basri Wahid1 1 Malaysian Palm Oil Board

Sinskey, Anthony J.

237

Digital Image Enhancement using Normalization Techniques and their application to Palm Leaf Manuscripts  

E-print Network

Digital Image Enhancement using Normalization Techniques and their application to Palm Leaf as the late 19th century. Palm leaf manuscripts relating to art and architecture, mathematics, astronomy the world. Palm leaf manuscripts typically last a few centuries but with time the palm leaves degrade

Govindaraju, Venu

238

An alternative energy source from palm wastes industry for Malaysia and Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malaysia and Indonesia are the largest producers of palm oil product. The palm oil industry has contributed the biggest income to the countries for many years. Moreover, palm oils has emerged as one of the most important oils in the world’s oils and the market of fats. About 90% of palm oil is used as food related products worldwide, and

T. M. I Mahlia; M. Z Abdulmuin; T. M. I Alamsyah; D Mukhlishien

2001-01-01

239

Red palm weevils threaten ornamental, date, and native palms in California. This invasive pest is native to Southeast  

E-print Network

These Invasive Species Facts? Invasive arthropod species are establishing in California at a rate of nine new species per year, or one every 40 days. Invasive pests cost California more than $3 billion per yearRed palm weevils threaten ornamental, date, and native palms in California. This invasive pest

Hoddle, Mark S.

240

House dust mites and their sensitivity to wood oils and volatiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Allergic diseases such as bronchial asthma, perennial rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis caused by the house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae, which are dominant species in homes, have recently become serious health problems. Reducing the number of and exposure to\\u000a mites and mite allergens are the most important factors in preventing allergic diseases. Recently, the effects of essential\\u000a oils

Yasushi Hiramatsu; Satoshi Shida; Yoshifumi Miyazaki

2008-01-01

241

Nests of the black stork Ciconia nigra as a habitat for mesostigmatid mites (Acari: Mesostigmata)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We surveyed the Mesostigmatid mite fauna of nests of the black stork Ciconia nigra, to determine the role of these mites in the biology of their hosts. We present preliminary results obtained on the basis\\u000a of material collected from 31 nests. A total of 1,615 mite specimens was recorded, belonging to 39 species. The most abundant\\u000a species were Dendrolaelaps strenzkei,

Jerzy B?oszyk; Dariusz J. Gwiazdowicz; Bruce Halliday; Pawe? T. Dolata; Bart?omiej Go?dyn

2009-01-01

242

Multiple categories of resistance to wheat curl mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) expressed in accessions of Aegilops tauschii.  

PubMed

The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, is an important pest in the western plains of the United States as well as in most major wheat-growing regions of the world. This mite is a vector of the economically important diseases wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and High Plains virus (HPV). This study looked at seven accessions of Aegilops tauschii (Coss) Schmal to determine if they exhibit antibiosis, tolerance, and/or antixenosis to the wheat curl mite using 'Jagger', a known wheat curl mite-susceptible variety, and OK05312, a known wheat curl mite-resistant variety, as controls. Four of the seven tested accessions showed antibiotic effects on the population growth of wheat curl mite, as demonstrated by low number of wheat curl mite adults and nymphs at the end of the experiment. Three accessions and the commercial wheat variety Jagger showed some level of tolerance to wheat curl mite infestations, as demonstrated by a significantly reduced percentage proportional tissue dry weight and by tolerance index values. Four accessions demonstrated a strong antixenotic effect on the wheat curl mite, as demonstrated by significantly reduced numbers of mite adults at the end of the experiment. This study also established an effective method for determining antixenosis to the wheat curl mite in wheat that can be used for future experiments. All accessions demonstrated at least one type of plant resistance that could provide a genetic source for control of the wheat curl mite that may have the potential to be transferred into commercial wheat varieties. PMID:23356085

Carrera, Sandra Garcés; Davis, Holly; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Murugan, Marimuthu; Smith, C Mike

2012-12-01

243

IgE reactivity to Acarus siro extract in Korean dust mite allergic patients.  

PubMed

Although specific IgE to the storage mite Acarus siro is often detected, there are no detailed studies on IgE reactivity to A. siro in Korea. This study was undertaken to investigate the cross-reactivity to the mite species Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and A. siro in Korean mite allergic patients. Specific IgE values were determined for the four mite species and a competitive inhibition test was performed for mite extracts using the ImmunoCAP system. The IgE value to D. farinae was the highest among the four mite species tested. There was a strong correlation in the IgE value between house dust mites (D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae) and between storage mites (A. siro and T. putrescentiae). IgE reactivity to A. siro was inhibited by D. farinae and T. putrescentiae extract. Dermatophagoides farinae extract was the strongest inhibitor of IgE binding to A. siro extract, indicating that IgE reactivity to A. siro extract is a cross-reaction caused by sensitization to D. farinae. Strong IgE reactive components were observed in D. farinae and T. putrescentiae extract by SDS-PAGE and IgE immunoblotting. However, no strong IgE-binding component was observed for A. siro. Dermatophagoides farinae is the main source of mite allergens that cause sensitization in Korea. Serum IgE from some of the house dust mite-sensitized patients showed positive responses to storage mite allergens by cross-reaction. Therefore, it is necessary to pay special attention to the diagnosis of mite allergies. PMID:24287899

Son, Mina; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kim, Bum Joon; Lim, Kook-Jin; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

2014-05-01

244

Phylogenetic relationships among arecoid palms (Arecaceae: Arecoideae)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims The Arecoideae is the largest and most diverse of the five subfamilies of palms (Arecaceae/Palmae), containing >50 % of the species in the family. Despite its importance, phylogenetic relationships among Arecoideae are poorly understood. Here the most densely sampled phylogenetic analysis of Arecoideae available to date is presented. The results are used to test the current classification of the subfamily and to identify priority areas for future research. Methods DNA sequence data for the low-copy nuclear genes PRK and RPB2 were collected from 190 palm species, covering 103 (96 %) genera of Arecoideae. The data were analysed using the parsimony ratchet, maximum likelihood, and both likelihood and parsimony bootstrapping. Key Results and Conclusions Despite the recovery of paralogues and pseudogenes in a small number of taxa, PRK and RPB2 were both highly informative, producing well-resolved phylogenetic trees with many nodes well supported by bootstrap analyses. Simultaneous analyses of the combined data sets provided additional resolution and support. Two areas of incongruence between PRK and RPB2 were strongly supported by the bootstrap relating to the placement of tribes Chamaedoreeae, Iriarteeae and Reinhardtieae; the causes of this incongruence remain uncertain. The current classification within Arecoideae was strongly supported by the present data. Of the 14 tribes and 14 sub-tribes in the classification, only five sub-tribes from tribe Areceae (Basseliniinae, Linospadicinae, Oncospermatinae, Rhopalostylidinae and Verschaffeltiinae) failed to receive support. Three major higher level clades were strongly supported: (1) the RRC clade (Roystoneeae, Reinhardtieae and Cocoseae), (2) the POS clade (Podococceae, Oranieae and Sclerospermeae) and (3) the core arecoid clade (Areceae, Euterpeae, Geonomateae, Leopoldinieae, Manicarieae and Pelagodoxeae). However, new data sources are required to elucidate ambiguities that remain in phylogenetic relationships among and within the major groups of Arecoideae, as well as within the Areceae, the largest tribe in the palm family. PMID:21325340

Baker, William J.; Norup, Maria V.; Clarkson, James J.; Couvreur, Thomas L. P.; Dowe, John L.; Lewis, Carl E.; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe; Savolainen, Vincent; Wilmot, Tomas; Chase, Mark W.

2011-01-01

245

Performance Assessment Links in Math (PALM)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Performance Assessment Links in Math (PALM) is an online, standards-based resource bank of mathematics performance assessment tasks, indexed via the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). The tasks have been collected from numerous sources. The description of each task includes student directions and response forms, administration procedures, scoring rubrics, examples of student work, and technical-quality data, calculated from field testing, when such testing has been conducted. Users may select standards and draw upon the collection of tasks to create assessment charts--matrices of tasks intended to test the standards--or select tasks to create a chart of standards that are addressed by those tasks.

246

Identification of molecular markers associated with mite resistance in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).  

PubMed

Coconut mite (Aceria guerreronis 'Keifer') has become a major threat to Indian coconut (Coçcos nucifera L.) cultivators and the processing industry. Chemical and biological control measures have proved to be costly, ineffective, and ecologically undesirable. Planting mite-resistant coconut cultivars is the most effective method of preventing yield loss and should form a major component of any integrated pest management stratagem. Coconut genotypes, and mite-resistant and -susceptible accessions were collected from different parts of South India. Thirty-two simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 7 RAPD primers were used for molecular analyses. In single-marker analysis, 9 SSR and 4 RAPD markers associated with mite resistance were identified. In stepwise multiple regression analysis of SSRs, a combination of 6 markers showed 100% association with mite infestation. Stepwise multiple regression analysis for RAPD data revealed that a combination of 3 markers accounted for 83.86% of mite resistance in the selected materials. Combined stepwise multiple regression analysis of RAPD and SSR data showed that a combination of 5 markers explained 100% of the association with mite resistance in coconut. Markers associated with mite resistance are important in coconut breeding programs and will facilitate the selection of mite-resistant plants at an early stage as well as mother plants for breeding programs. PMID:17546069

Shalini, K V; Manjunatha, S; Lebrun, P; Berger, A; Baudouin, L; Pirany, N; Ranganath, R M; Prasad, D Theertha

2007-01-01

247

The effect of herbivore faeces on the edaphic mite community: implications for tapeworm transmission.  

PubMed

Oribatid mites may be of epidemiological and medical importance because several species have been shown to serve as intermediate hosts for anoplocephalid tapeworms of wild and domestic animals. Despite their economic and conservation significance, relatively few studies examined factors influencing the effective number of oribatid mites that can serve as intermediate hosts. We examined variation in the structure of the edaphic arthropod community in functionally different territory parts of the Alpine marmot (Marmota marmota latirostris), a known definitive host of a prevalent anoplocephalid tapeworm, Ctenotaenia marmotae. We used a field experiment to test whether the abundance of oribatid mites in marmot pastures is affected by the presence of fresh herbivore faeces. We found that the abundance of soil and litter dwelling oribatid mites in marmot pastures did not change shortly after faeces addition. In contrast, numbers of other predominant soil-litter and phoretic microarthropods increased after faeces addition. The abundance of the two predominant phoretic mites colonizing the faeces was inversely related to the abundance of oribatid mites. In contrast, the abundance of a ubiquitous soil-litter mesostigmatid mite was a positive function of oribatid numbers. Although absolute numbers of oribatid mites did not change after faeces addition, our study suggests that, depending on soil quality or type, the probability of tapeworm egg ingestion by oribatid mites can be reduced due to increased interspecific prey-predatory and trophic interactions. Latrine site selection in Alpine marmots is consistent with a reduced probability of tapeworm transmission by oribatids. PMID:24114339

Václav, Radovan; Kalúz, Stanislav

2014-03-01

248

South American Spider Mites: New Hosts and Localities  

PubMed Central

In order to contribute to taxonomic information on Tetranychid mites (Acari: Tetranychidae) in South America, surveys were conducted in Brazil (15 States and the Federal District) and Uruguay (one Department); 550 samples of 120 plant species were collected. Tetranychid mite infestations were confirmed in 204 samples, and 22 species belonging to seven genera of the Bryobiinae and Tetranychinae subfamilies were identified on 58 different host plants. Thirty-six new plant hosts were found in Brazil, South America, and worldwide for the following species: Eutetranychus banksi (McGregor); Mononychellus tanajoa (Bondar); Oligonychus anonae Paschoal; O. mangiferus (Rahman and Sapra); Tetranychus bastosi Tuttle, Baker and Sales; T. desertorum Banks, 1900, T. evansi Baker and Pritchard; T. ludeni Zacher; T. mexicanus (McGregor); T. neocaledonicus André; and T. urticae Koch. Four new localities in Brazil were reported for Eotetranychus tremae De Leon; O. anonae; Panonychus ulmi (Koch); and T. gloveri Baker and Pritchard. PMID:22224405

Mendonça, Renata S; Navia, Denise; Diniz, Ivone R; Flechtmann, Carlos HW

2011-01-01

249

Global honey bee viral landscape altered by a parasitic mite.  

PubMed

Emerging diseases are among the greatest threats to honey bees. Unfortunately, where and when an emerging disease will appear are almost impossible to predict. The arrival of the parasitic Varroa mite into the Hawaiian honey bee population allowed us to investigate changes in the prevalence, load, and strain diversity of honey bee viruses. The mite increased the prevalence of a single viral species, deformed wing virus (DWV), from ~10 to 100% within honey bee populations, which was accompanied by a millionfold increase in viral titer and a massive reduction in DWV diversity, leading to the predominance of a single DWV strain. Therefore, the global spread of Varroa has selected DWV variants that have emerged to allow it to become one of the most widely distributed and contagious insect viruses on the planet. PMID:22679096

Martin, Stephen J; Highfield, Andrea C; Brettell, Laura; Villalobos, Ethel M; Budge, Giles E; Powell, Michelle; Nikaido, Scott; Schroeder, Declan C

2012-06-01

250

Contrasting palm species and use diversity in the Yucatan Peninsula and the Ecuadorian Amazon  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the relationship between palm species diversity and diversity of palm use in two areas (Amazonian Ecuador; Yucatan\\u000a Peninsula) of equivalent size but with contrasting characteristics in palm species diversity and morphology, and in the phylogenetic\\u000a composition of palm flora. The areas also differ in their cultural and socioeconomic contexts. Palm use diversity is significantly\\u000a higher in the Ecuadorian

Lucía de la Torre; Luz María Calvo-Irabién; Carmen Salazar; Henrik Balslev; Finn Borchsenius

2009-01-01

251

Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Fibre Reinforced Epoxy for Building Short Span Bridge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil palm industries generate at least 30 million tonnes of lignocellulosic biomass annually in the form of oil palm trunks\\u000a (OPT), empty fruit bunches (EFB), oil palm fronds (OPF) and palm pressed fibres (PPF). At present, the biomass is either left\\u000a to rot in the plantations to provide organic nutrients to the oil palm trees (mulching) or used as solid

Mimi Azlina Abu Bakar; Valliyappan D. Natarajan; Anizah Kalam; Nor Hayati Kudiran

252

First record of the invasive mite Tetranychus evansi in Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

The red spider miteTetranychus evansi (Acari: Tetranychidae) Baker and Pritchard was recorded for the first time in Greece, in the area of Tympaki (south-central\\u000a Crete) onSolanum nigrum. T. evansi is a pest of crops of the family Solanaceae, which are grown extensively in Crete. The species identification was based on\\u000a both morphological and molecular data. The second internal transcribed spacer

A. Tsagkarakou; S. Cros-Arteil; M. Navajas

2007-01-01

253

Some predaceous mites [ Phytoseiidae ] on citrus in the mediterranean region  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven species of phytoseiid mites were collected from citrus trees in the Mediterranean region during a survey in 1971.Amblyseius stipulatus\\u000a Athias-Henriot was the most abundant and widespread species in all countries surveyed (Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain).A. californicus (McGregor) was collected only in Spain;A. potentillae (Garman) andPhytoseiulus persimilis. A.-H. only in Italy.Typhlodromus talbii A.-H. was collected in Greece and Spain,T. athiasae

J. A. McMurtry

1977-01-01

254

PCR analysis for Wolbachia in human and canine Demodex mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many skin diseases such as Demodex folliculitis, rosacea- or steroid-induced rosacea Demodex mites are present in abundance and are at least partially held responsible for causing these disorders. Although it is known\\u000a that these diseases respond well to tetracyclines, it is unclear if this is due to the antiinflammatory effects of the antibiotics\\u000a or to an antibacterial effect on

Sibylle N. Borgo; Elke C. Sattler; Michael Hogardt; Kristin Adler; Gerd Plewig

2009-01-01

255

The oribatid mite genus Benoibates (Acari, Oribatida, Oripodidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Two species of oribatid mites of the genus Benoibates (Oribatida, Oripodidae), i.e., Benoibates bolivianus Balogh & Mahunka, 1969(a) and Benoibates minimus Mahunka, 1985, are recorded for the first time in Costa Rica. Both are redescribed in details, using drawings, images and SEM micrographs, on the basis of Costa Rican specimens. An identification key to the known species of Benoibates is given. PMID:25349489

Ermilov, Sergey G.; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Olman; Kontschán, Jen?; Retana-Salazar, Axel P.

2014-01-01

256

Organotin compounds and their use for insect and mite control.  

PubMed Central

A brief overview of biological activity of organotin compounds is given, with emphasis on activity against plant-feeding arthropods. Plictran miticide, containing cyhexatin (tricyclohexylhydroxystannane), the first product to be fully commercialized for control of plant-feeding mites on a broad range of agricultural crops, is used as a model to indicate the chemistry and potential performance, phytotoxicity, residues, limitations on usage, environmental acceptability, and use patterns for products containing similar organotin compounds. PMID:976226

Hunter, R C

1976-01-01

257

Elastosis Perforans Serpiginosa in Association with Scabies Mite  

PubMed Central

Elastosis perforans serpiginosa is a form of perforating dermatoses, which has a characteristic clinical presentation of grouped keratotic papules coalescing into serpiginous or annular configurations. The majority of elastosis perforans serpiginosa cases are idiopathic; however, various etiologies have been postulated for the pathogenesis of this syndrome. The authors present a unique case of elastosis perforans serpiginosa that developed focally secondary to a scabies mite. PMID:24155992

Frederickson, Julie; Griffith, Jack; Shitabata, Paul; Horowitz, David

2013-01-01

258

Tandem Repeat-Containing MITEs in the Clam Donax trunculus  

PubMed Central

Two distinct classes of repetitive sequences, interspersed mobile elements and satellite DNAs, shape eukaryotic genomes and drive their evolution. Short arrays of tandem repeats can also be present within nonautonomous miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In the clam Donax trunculus, we characterized a composite, high copy number MITE, named DTC84. It is composed of a central region built of up to five core repeats linked to a microsatellite segment at one array end and flanked by sequences holding short inverted repeats. The modular composition and the conserved putative target site duplication sequence AA at the element termini are equivalent to the composition of several elements found in the cupped oyster Crassostrea virginica and in some insects. A unique feature of D. trunculus element is ordered array of core repeat variants, distinctive by diagnostic changes. Position of variants in the array is fixed, regardless of alterations in the core repeat copy number. Each repeat harbors a palindrome near the junction with the following unit, being a potential hotspot responsible for array length variations. As a consequence, variations in number of tandem repeats and variations in flanking sequences make every sequenced element unique. Core repeats may be thus considered as individual units within the MITE, with flanking sequences representing a “cassette” for internal repeats. Our results demonstrate that onset and spread of tandem repeats can be more intimately linked to processes of transposition than previously thought and suggest that genomes are shaped by interplays within a complex network of repetitive sequences. PMID:24317975

Šatovi?, Eva; Plohl, Miroslav

2013-01-01

259

Molecular defense response of oil palm to Ganoderma infection.  

PubMed

Basal stem rot (BSR) of oil palm roots is due to the invasion of fungal mycelia of Ganoderma species which spreads to the bole of the stem. In addition to root contact, BSR can also spread by airborne basidiospores. These fungi are able to break down cell wall components including lignin. BSR not only decreases oil yield, it also causes the stands to collapse thus causing severe economic loss to the oil palm industry. The transmission and mode of action of Ganoderma, its interactions with oil palm as a hemibiotroph, and the molecular defence responses of oil palm to the infection of Ganodermaboninense in BSR are reviewed, based on the transcript profiles of infected oil palms. The knowledge gaps that need to be filled in oil palm-Ganoderma molecular interactions i.e. the associations of hypersensitive reaction (HR)-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) kinetics to the susceptibility of oil palm to Ganoderma spp., the interactions of phytohormones (salicylate, jasmonate and ethylene) at early and late stages of BSR, and cell wall strengthening through increased production of guaiacyl (G)-type lignin, are also discussed. PMID:25457484

Ho, C-L; Tan, Y-C

2014-11-12

260

Importance of house dust and storage mites in canine atopic dermatitis in the geographic region of Galicia, Spain.  

PubMed

Sensitisation to mites is frequent in atopic dogs. The main mite genus involved in canine atopic dermatitis is Dermatophagoides. The importance of storage mite allergens in dogs has been controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitisation rates against storage mites (Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and house dust mites (Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus) in atopic dogs from Galicia, a highly humid and temperate region of Spain, using a FcepsilonRIalpha-based immunoglobulin E (IgE) in vitro test. The study was performed on 95 dogs suffering from atopic dermatitis and presenting detectable specific serum IgE levels: 91.6% of the dogs tested positive for storage mites, whereas sensitisation to house dust mites was detected in 87.4%. These results indicate the importance of storage mites in this specific geographic area. PMID:18669243

Goicoa, Ana; Espino, Luciano; Rodriguez, Isabel; Puigdemont, Anna; Brazis, Pilar; Rejas, Juan

2008-06-01

261

Role of neonicotinyl insecticides in Washington apple integrated pest management. Part II. Nontarget effects on integrated mite control  

PubMed Central

The effect of neonicotinyl insecticides on integrated mite control in Washington apple was examined from 0 In a series of 20 field trials (54 treatments) designed primarily to look at efficacy against the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, nearly half of the treatments using four or more applications of acetamiprid had peak mite densities exceeding the economic threshold of 5 mites per leaf. Overall, acetamiprid treatments had 4.6-fold higher mite densities than the standard organophosphate insecticide treatment. Of the treatments with high mite populations, Panonychus ulmi, the European red mite, and Tetranychus urticae, the twospotted spider mite, were the dominant species in roughly equal numbers of cases. Only 11.1% of the thiacloprid treatments exceeded 5 mites per leaf; these experimental treatments included eight applications, whereas the current label restricts the number of applications at the rate for C. pomonella to two applications. One out of six clothianidin treatments caused a significantly higher mite density than the standard treatment; however, this material appeared to suppress predatory mites. Neonicotinyl insecticides did not eliminate predatory mites, but they inhibited their ability to respond normally to increasing prey populations. In field trials designed specifically to examine mite population densities where neonicotinyl insecticides were used, significantly higher levels of tetranychid mites occurred in one or more acetamiprid treatments (one, two or four applications) in five out of six trials. In the sixth trial (in a commercial orchard), only two acetamiprid applications were made, and mite populations were low in all treatments. While elevated mite densities were more likely to occur with four applications, in one case it occurred following a single application. The predominant tetranychid mite species (either P. ulmi or T. urticae) varied from trial to trial; however, there was no apparent bias regarding stimulation of the two species. Horticultural mineral oil was used with acetamiprid in some trials in an attempt to mitigate mite outbreaks. However, the addition of oil did not counteract the tendency of acetamiprid to increase tetranychid mite populations, and in one trial, had a negative effect on predatory mite densities. Seasonal tetranychid mite density was positively related to the total grams AI (or number of applications) of acetamiprid, thus reducing the number of applications per season should lower the probability of mite outbreaks. Abbreviation: AI active ingredient CMD cumulative mite days PMID:16341248

Beers, E. H.; Brunner, J. F.; Dunley, J. E.; Doerr, M.; Granger, K.

2005-01-01

262

Weed management practices affect the diversity and relative abundance of physic nut mites.  

PubMed

Crop management practices determine weed community, which in turn may influence patterns of diversity and abundance of associated arthropods. This study aimed to evaluate whether local weed management practices influence the diversity and relative abundance of phytophagous and predatory mites, as well as mites with undefined feeding habits-of the families Oribatidae and Acaridae-in a physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) plantation subjected to (1) within-row herbicide spraying and between-row mowing; (2) within-row herbicide spraying and no between-row mowing; (3) within-row weeding and between-row mowing; (4) within-row weeding and no between-row mowing; and (5) unmanaged (control). The herbicide used was glyphosate. Herbicide treatments resulted in higher diversity and relative abundance of predatory mites and mites with undefined feeding habit on physic nut shrubs. This was probably due to the toxic effects of the herbicide on mites or to removal of weeds. Within-row herbicide spraying combined with between-row mowing was the treatment that most contributed to this effect. Our results show that within-row weeds harbor important species of predatory mites and mites with undefined feeding habit. However, the dynamics of such mites in the system can be changed according to the weed management practice applied. Among the predatory mites of the family Phytoseiidae Amblydromalus sp. was the most abundant, whereas Brevipalpus phoenicis was the most frequent phytophagous mite and an unidentified oribatid species was the most frequent mite with undefined feeding habit. PMID:25528451

de Sousa Saraiva, Althiéris; Sarmento, Renato A; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; de Souza, Danival José; Teodoro, Adenir V; Silva, Daniella G

2015-03-01

263

Cheyletus eruditus (taurrus): an effective candidate for the biological control of the snake mite (Ophionyssus natricis).  

PubMed

The most commonly encountered ectoparasite in captive snakes is the hematophagous snake mite (Ophionyssus natricis). Infected snakes often exhibit lethargy, dysecdysis, pruritus, crusting dermatitis (sometimes progressing to abscesses), and behavioral changes (increased bathing time, rubbing against objects). Anemia and septicemia are occasional complications. Eliminating snake mites from a collection is frustrating. Insecticidal and acaricidal compounds used in mammals can be used against O. natricis infestation in reptiles, but they all are potentially neurotoxic to reptiles. The use of a biological agent to control the snake mite was first developed by using the predatory mites Hypoaspis miles and Hypoaspis aculeifer. However, no data are available regarding the potential of these mites to control O. natricis. Furthermore, the survival and predatory behavior of H. aculeifer and H. miles decreases above 28 degrees C, which is the lower value of the optimal temperature zone range required for rearing snakes. The aim of this study is to identify the ability of the predatory mite Cheyletus eruditus to control O. natricis. In the first experiment, 125 O. natricis mites where placed in separate plastic tubes together with the same number of C. eruditus mites. After 48 hr, the survival rate of snake mites was 6% compared with 92% in the control group (n = 125, P < 0,001). In the second experiment, 11 infested (average of 13 O. natricis per snake) ball pythons, with an average of 13 O. natricis per individual, were placed in separate cages with 1,000 C. eruditus mites + vermiculite After 15 days, only an average of two mites per snake remained, compared with 48 per snake in the control group (t-test, P < 0,01). PMID:24063093

Schilliger, Lionel H; Morel, Damien; Bonwitt, Jesse H; Marquis, Olivier

2013-09-01

264

The Effect of Antibiotics on Associated Bacterial Community of Stored Product Mites  

PubMed Central

Background Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata). The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria. Methodology and Principal Findings Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and associated bacterial community structure were assessed. Mites were treated by antibiotic supplementation (1 mgg?1 of diet) for 21 days and numbers of mites and bacterial communities were analyzed and compared to the untreated control. Bacterial quantities, determined by real-time PCR, significantly decreased in antibiotic treated specimens from 5 to 30 times in A. siro and T. putrescentiae, while no decline was observed in L. destructor. Streptomycin treatment eliminated Bartonella-like bacteria in the both A. siro and T. putrescentiae and Cardinium in T. putrescentiae. Solitalea-like bacteria proportion increased in the communities of neomycin and streptomycin treated A. siro specimens. Kocuria proportion increased in the bacterial communities of ampicillin and streptomycin treated A. siro and neomycin and streptomycin treated L. destructor. Conclusions/Significance The work demonstrated the changes of mite associated bacterial community under antibiotic pressure in pests of medical importance. Pre-treatment of mites by 1 mgg?1 antibiotic diets improved mite fitness as indicated accelerated population growth of A. siro pretreated streptomycin and neomycin and L. destructor pretreated by neomycin. All tested antibiotics supplemented to diets caused the decrease of mite growth rate in comparison to the control diet. PMID:25387104

Kopecky, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Mareckova-Sagova, Marketa; Hubert, Jan

2014-01-01

265

A rapid method to assess grape rust mites on leaves and observations from case studies in western Oregon vineyards  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A rapid method for extracting eriophyoid mites was adapted from previous studies to provide growers and IPM consultants with a practical, efficient, and reliable tool to monitor for rust mites in vineyards. The rinse in bag (RIB) method allows quick extraction of mites from collected plant parts (sh...

266

Effects of soil water stress and twospotted spider mites on net photosynthesis and transpiration of apple leaves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil water stress and twospotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch) were tested for their influence on the content and activity of leaves of greenhouse grown Delicious apple trees. Soil water stress caused reductions in net photosynthesis (Pn), transpiration (Tr), and shoot growth. Leaf water potential was decreased by both water stress and mite feeding. Feeding of 15 adult mites\\/leaf for

D. C. Ferree; F. R. Hall

1980-01-01

267

Comparisons of the allergenic mite prevalence in dwellings and certain outdoor environments of the Upper Silesia (southwest Poland).  

PubMed

The occurrence of allergenic mites (pyroglyphid house-dust mites, acarid and glycyphagid storage mites and others) in dwellings and in synanthropic outdoor sites in a densely populated urban area was investigated. A total of 335 house dust samples were collected from dwellings at 7 different locations in Upper Silesia (Poland), including 84 samples from dwellings of Katowice. Mites were found in 188 of the samples examined (56.1%). A total of 4410 mite specimens were isolated and identified, including 4212 members of the family Pyroglyphidae (95.51%). Among them, Dermatophagoides farinae was predominant (75.3%), followed by D. pteronyssinus (18.6%) and Euroglyphus maynei (1.5%). Moreover, litter soiled with communal wastes was sampled. All 86 samples contained mites. A total of 7547 mite specimens were isolated including 6050 mites known as allergenic (80.5%). Among the astigmatid mites two acarids were dominant: Tyrophagus silvester and T. longior (28.7% and 25.1% of all mites). It should be stressed that 6 of the acarid mite species or genera found in outdoor environments are typical domestic mites (T. putrescentiae), or they have been collected from house dust samples (T. longior, Tyrolichus casei, Thyreophagus entomophagus, Mycetoglyphus fungivorus and Rhizoglyphus robini). The litter of synanthropic sites can therefore form a substantial source of infestation. PMID:17222584

Solarz, Krzysztof; Senczuk, Liliana; Maniurka, Hanna; Cichecka, Ewelina; Peszke, Magdalena

2007-12-01

268

Role of neonicotinyl insecticides in Washington apple integrated pest management. Part II. Nontarget effects on integrated mite control.  

PubMed

The effect of neonicotinyl insecticides on integrated mite control in Washington apple was examined from 0 In a series of 20 field trials (54 treatments) designed primarily to look at efficacy against the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, nearly half of the treatments using four or more applications of acetamiprid had peak mite densities exceeding the economic threshold of 5 mites per leaf. Overall, acetamiprid treatments had 4.6-fold higher mite densities than the standard organophosphate insecticide treatment. Of the treatments with high mite populations, Panonychus ulmi, the European red mite, and Tetranychus urticae, the twospotted spider mite, were the dominant species in roughly equal numbers of cases. Only 11.1% of the thiacloprid treatments exceeded 5 mites per leaf; these experimental treatments included eight applications, whereas the current label restricts the number of applications at the rate for C. pomonella to two applications. One out of six clothianidin treatments caused a significantly higher mite density than the standard treatment; however, this material appeared to suppress predatory mites. Neonicotinyl insecticides did not eliminate predatory mites, but they inhibited their ability to respond normally to increasing prey populations. In field trials designed specifically to examine mite population densities where neonicotinyl insecticides were used, significantly higher levels of tetranychid mites occurred in one or more acetamiprid treatments (one, two or four applications) in five out of six trials. In the sixth trial (in a commercial orchard), only two acetamiprid applications were made, and mite populations were low in all treatments. While elevated mite densities were more likely to occur with four applications, in one case it occurred following a single application. The predominant tetranychid mite species (either P. ulmi or T. urticae) varied from trial to trial; however, there was no apparent bias regarding stimulation of the two species. Horticultural mineral oil was used with acetamiprid in some trials in an attempt to mitigate mite outbreaks. However, the addition of oil did not counteract the tendency of acetamiprid to increase tetranychid mite populations, and in one trial, had a negative effect on predatory mite densities. Seasonal tetranychid mite density was positively related to the total grams AI (or number of applications) of acetamiprid, thus reducing the number of applications per season should lower the probability of mite outbreaks. PMID:16341248

Beers, E H; Brunner, J F; Dunley, J E; Doerr, M; Granger, K

2005-01-01

269

The weasel ( Mustela nivalis ) helps in detecting Demodex mites in rodents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many stages of parasites living in or on prey animals can pass undestroyed through the intestinal tract of carnivores and carnivorous animals. Nematode eggs, whole nematodes, even cestodes can be found in their faeces, but of the ectoparasitic mites usually only the eggs are found. It was therefore surprising thatDemodex mites, some of them even still alive, were found to

Brigitte Loos-Frank

1988-01-01

270

OUTBREAKS OF ITCHING BITES IN THE MIDWESTERN USA CAUSED BY AN INTRODUCED SPECIES OF ITCH MITE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Several reports of high incidences of red, itching and painful welts on people in different areas of the midwestern USA led to the discovery of an European species of itch mite, Pyemotes herfsi (Oudemans 1936), preying on gall-making midge larvae on oak leaves. The mite's great reproductive potenti...

271

Immunologic Characterization and Allergenicity of Recombinant Tyr p 3 Allergen from the Storage Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The involvement of the storage mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae in allergies has been increasingly reported in many countries. Molecular analysis has shown that group 3 mite allergens are homologous to trypsin. Similar allergens have not been identified in T. putrescentiae. Our aims were to characterize group 3 allergens in T. putrescentiae and to investigate their significance in allergenicity. Methods: cDNAs

En-Chih Liao; Err-Lieh Hsu; Jaw-Ji Tsai; Chau-Mei Ho

2009-01-01

272

New taxa of oribatid mites of the family Liacaridae (Acariformes: Oribatida) from the Caucasus  

E-print Network

New taxa of oribatid mites of the family Liacaridae (Acariformes: Oribatida) from the Caucasus. 2009: New taxa of oribatid mites of the family Liacaridae (Acariformes: Oribatida) from the Caucasus the Caucasus (Georgia) are described: a new subgenus and species Adoristes (Gordeeviella) krivolutskyisubg

Arillo, Antonio Gabriel

273

Relationship of wheat streak mosaic and barley stripe mosaic viruses to vector and nonvector eriophyid mites.  

PubMed

Large amounts of wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) accumulate in the midgut of its mite vector Eriophyes tulipae reared on virus infected plants. Masses of flexuous rod shaped virus particles persisted in the midgut, without degradation, for at least 5 of the 6--9 day adult life of mites. WSMV particles also were found distributed in the body cavity and in salivary glands of mites suggesting that the virus is "circulative" in E. tulipae. Abacarus hystrix, a nonvector of WSMV, when reared on virus infected plants, occasionally contained a small number of virus particles in its gut only. Extracts of such mites were not infective. Barley stripe mosaic (BSMV)--a rod-shaped virus, was not transmitted by E. tulipae, although a large concentration of virus particles was found in the midgut of mites reared on virus infected plants. Extracts of such mites were infective and the virus particles were retained for several days in the gut of such mites held on virus-free plants. BSMV particles were also found in the body cavity of mites. Possible reasons for E. tulipae being a nonvector of BSMV are discussed. PMID:7356391

Paliwal, Y C

1980-01-01

274

Intraspecific variation in humidity susceptibility of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus: Survival, development and reproduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological control of spider mites on crops grown in arid environments is a serious problem, which is difficult to solve with the currently commercially available predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae). In phytoseiids the degree of adaptation to low humidity underlies considerable intraspecific variability allowing the screening for a dry resistant strain within a given species. We considered the generalist predator Neoseiulus

A. Walzer; M. Castagnoli; S. Simoni; M. Liguori; E. Palevsky; P. Schausberger

2007-01-01

275

Gall Mite Molecular Phylogeny and its Relationship to the Evolution of Plant Host Specificity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phylogenetic relationships of all seven known species of Cecidophyopsis mites (Acari: Eriophyidae) with Ribes hosts have been inferred from ribosomal DNA sequences. This analysis found groups of closely related mites. The five gall-forming species, four of which are monophagous and one which has two hosts, were found in two groups. Another group consisted of the two non gall-forming species,

B. Fenton; A. N. E. Birch; G. Malloch; P. G. Lanham; R. M. Brennan

2000-01-01

276

Checklist of the mites (Arachnida: Acari) associated with bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) in the British Isles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 16 species of bats that occur in the British Isles are all protected under current legislation, and their conservation is the subject of much scientific research and public concern. Of the many arthropod parasites carried by these bats, mites have colonized the greatest range of niches. This paper presents an annotated list of the 64 species of mite taken

ANNE S. BAKER; JENNY C. CRAVEN

277

Guanine as a hygienic index for allergologically relevant mite infestations in mattress dust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since guanine is not only an essential constituent of vital nucleic acids, but also the main end product of nitrogenous waste excretion in arachnids, it is a potential candidate for a hygienic index for mite activity in house dust. The public health significance of these mites is based on their production of allergen in the home environment.

J. E. M. H. Van Bronswijk

1986-01-01

278

A comparative survey of the hydrolytic enzymes of ectoparasitic and free-living mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extracts of ectoparasitic mites of birds (Dermanyssus gallinae), sheep (Psoroptes ovis) and plants (Tetranychus urticae) and of free-living mites (Acarus siro) contained acid and alkaline phosphatase, C4 and C8 esterases, lipase, leucine and valine aminopeptidases and a range of glycosidase activities. Dermanyssus gallinae and P. ovis, species highly adapted to an animal parasitic lifestyle, had very similar profiles and contained

Alasdair J Nisbet; Peter F Billingsley

2000-01-01

279

A REVIEW AND CHECKLIST OF THE PARASITIC MITES (ACARINA) OF THE FALCONIFORMES AND STRIGIFORMES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Referenced checklists are provided of the 86 species of parasitic feather, quill, respiratory, skin, and nest mites (Acarina) that are known from 116 species of hawks, eagles, falcons, and vultures, and the 91 species of parasitic mites known from 51 species of owls.

JAMES R. PHILIPS

2000-01-01

280

SPIDER MITES ON ORNAMENTALS Clifford S. Sadof and Timothy J. Gibb, Extension Entomologists  

E-print Network

: Floweringfruittreesanddeciduoustrees and shrubs in the rose family. This brownish-red elliptical-shaped mite has four rows of spines not winter on tree bark. European red mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch) Plantsattacked that run down its back. The eggs are bright red to orange and have a stalk so that they resemble

Ginzel, Matthew

281

Mites (Arachnida: Acari) inhabiting coffee domatia: a short review and recent findings from Costa Rica.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Six previously unreported domatia-inhabiting mites are reported from Coffea arabica accessions planted in Costa Rica. One of these is a new species of Asca found to be carrying fungal spores on its cuticle. A review of the literature on mites in coffee domatia is presented....

282

Conditional immune-gene suppression of honeybees parasitized by Varroa mites  

PubMed Central

The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is the most destructive parasite of managed honeybee colonies worldwide. Since V. destructor transfers pathogens to honeybees, it may be adaptive for bees to respond to mite infestation by upregulating their immune responses. Mites, however, may overcome the host's immune responses by suppressing them, which could facilitate the mite's ability to feed on hemolymph. A humoral immune response of bees parasitized by V. destructor may be detected by studying the expression levels of antibacterial peptides, such as abaecin and defensin, known to be immune-responsive. Expression levels for these two antibacterial peptides changed non-linearly with respect to the number of mites parasitizing honeybee pupae. Bees exposed to low or moderate number of mites had fewer immune-related transcripts than pupae that were never parasitized or pupae with high mite loads. Although many of the pupae tested indicated the presence of bacteria, no correlation with mite numbers or immune-response levels existed. All bees tested negative for acute paralysis and Kashmir bee viruses known to be vectored by V. destructor. PMID:16299597

Gregory, Pamela G.; Evans, Jay D.; Rinderer, Thomas; de Guzman, Lilia

2005-01-01

283

growing information on mite biology, there also is good data on the intrinsic growth rate  

E-print Network

not support the hypothesis that mites become concentrated on the remaining bees as bees die off from citations in the literature in which the number of mites that died with bees outside the colonies that approximately half of the population of bees may die in a climate similar to Scandinavia (Avitabile, 1978

Boyer, Edmond

284

Diagnostic genetic test for the honey bee tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi, has become a worldwide pest of honey bees. Identification and description of A. woodi is hampered by the minute size of these mites, their cryptic lifestyle, and a general lack of strong morphological differences with relatives. Here we describe a diagnostic gene...

285

Parasitism of Sympetrum dragonflies by Arrenurus planus mites: maintenance of resistance particular to one species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using field surveys and histological methods, we show that a dragonfly species (Sympetrum internum) has an effective resistance, not seen previously in other odonates, to a mite parasite (Arrenurus planus). This mite is a generalist parasite known to effectively engorge on several other odonate species. We argue that selection is likely weak, favouring counter adaptations of Arrenurus planus to Sympetrum

Mark R. Forbes; Katherine E. Muma; Bruce P. Smith

1999-01-01

286

A Scientific note on Varroa mites found in East Africa; Threat or Opportunity  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Varroa mites have devastated Apis mellifera L. honeybee populations wherever they co-occur around the world, yet in East Africa these mites may have finally met their match. Varroa destructor Anderson and Truman (Acari:Varroidae) was found in Kenya and Tanzania for the first time in early 2009, but...

287

The finding of the cat fur-mite Lynxacarus radovskyi in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

extractIn the letter: A New Zealand record for the cat fur-mite, Lynxacarus (Felistrophorus) radovskyi Tenorio (Acarina: Astigmata: Listrophoridae) by Heath and Mariadass (1999), it is briefly reported “that prior to the cat’s intended release on 31\\/01\\/97, a hair sample was taken and mites found”.

D. L. Jones

2000-01-01

288

Predatory — prey relationships in subtropical zooplankton: water mite against cladocerans in an Argentine lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a small lake in northern Argentina pelagic water mite Piona sp. had the maximum of population density in January following with a five-day delay after the peak of zooplankton dominant — Daphnia laevis. The mite density was highly predicted by the previous variations of Daphnia density during 4 months of observation (December–March). Daphnia density was a negative delayed function

V. F. Matveev; C. C. Martinez; S. M. Frutos

1989-01-01

289

Exposure to house dust mite allergens and the clinical activity of asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: House dust mite allergens play an important role in inducing IgE-mediated sensitization and the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and asthma. This study investigated the relationship between mite allergen exposure and the clinical activity and severity of asthma. Methods: Nonsmoking adult patients with asthma (n = 53) were randomly recruited from the asthma registry of two large family practitioner

Adnan Custovic; Simon C. O. Taggart; Helen C. Francis; Martin D. Chapman; Ashley Woodcock

1996-01-01

290

Domestic ventilation rates, indoor humidity and dust mite allergens: are our homes causing the asthma pandemic?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with historical changes in domestic ventilation rates, relative humidity and the associated risk of house dust mite colonization. A controlled trial evaluated allergen and water vapour control measures on the level of house dust mite (HDM) Der p1 allergen and indoor humidity, concurrently with changes in lung function in 54 subjects who completed the protocol. Mechanical

S G Howieson; A Lawson; C McSharry; G Morris; E McKenzie; J Jackson

2003-01-01

291

Cospeciation between the nasal mite Ptilonyssus sairae (Acari: Rhinonyssidae) and its bird hosts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The parasitic nasal mite Ptilonyssus sairae Castro has been classified as one species, but we find that significant sequence divergence exists between host-specific mite populations. The low level of gene flow between conspecifics is probably a result of the parasites' low rate of dispersal among different bird host species. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene

MARCO MORELLI; GREG S. SPICER

2007-01-01

292

[Allergenic mites found in raw material of herbs based on literature about the Pyroglyphidae (Acari: Acaridida)].  

PubMed

The occurrence of two pyroglyphid mites. Euroglyphus maynei (COOREMAN, 1950) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (TROUESSART, 1897) in the raw material of herbs is discussed and compared with the literature data. These mites are considered to be the cause of human atopic diseases. PMID:8755152

Solarz, K; Karnkowski, W

1996-01-01

293

Females as intraguild predators of males in cross-pairing experiments with phytoseiid mites.  

PubMed

Studies on intraguild interactions between phytoseiid species have shown that intraguild predation occurs and is most commonly manifested as adult females of one species feeding on juveniles of another. Whether such intraguild interactions can also occur between adult females of one species and adult males of another, is not known. Herein, we report on intraguild interactions between adults of the two sexes in cross-pairing experiments involving three related phytoseiid species (Neoseiulus paspalivorus, N. baraki and N. neobaraki) that are potential candidates for controlling the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis, a serious pest of coconut palms in tropical countries. For comparative reasons, the experiments were repeated with larvae instead of males, and with only males or only females of two different species together. In the presence of an ample supply of prey, females of N. neobaraki never fed on individuals of their own species, yet appeared to be very aggressive against males, as well as larvae of the other two phytoseiid species. They also fed on females of N. paspalivorus, but rarely on females of N. baraki. Males of N. neobaraki did not suffer mortality when together with females of either of the two other phytoseiid species. Males of N. baraki did not suffer predation from females of N. paspalivorus, but males of N. paspalivorus suffered some mortality (15 %) from N. baraki females. Larvae of each of the three species were vulnerable to intraguild predation by heterospecific adult females, except for N. neobaraki larvae when together with N. baraki females. The absence or presence of intraguild predation is largely explained by the size ratios of the individuals that were put together: large individuals feed on smaller ones, but never the reverse. For each sex, size declines in the following order: N. neobaraki > N. baraki > N. paspalivorus. Moreover, for each species, females are larger than males and males are larger than larvae. Strikingly, however, females did not kill males and larvae of their own species. We propose that niche competition between related phytoseiid species is not only determined by intraguild predation on heterospecific larvae, but also by imposing great mortality on males from the intraguild prey because phytoseiid females being pseudo-arrhenotokous require insemination to produce offspring of both sexes. PMID:23673924

Famah Sourassou, Nazer; Hanna, Rachid; Negloh, Koffi; Breeuwer, Johannes A J; Sabelis, Maurice W

2013-10-01

294

West Palm Beach Traffic Calming The Second Generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Transportation Division of West Palm Beach city, Florida, is implementing innovative practices based on traffic calming, New Urbanism, and associated principles. In North America, the city's program can be considered \\

TIMOTHY STILLINGS; IAN LOCKWOOD

295

VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING ROYAL PALMS ALONG THE STREET. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING ROYAL PALMS ALONG THE STREET. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

296

Oil palm phenolics suppresses oxidative stress and inflammation  

E-print Network

Water-soluble Oil Palm Phenolics (OPP), derived from Elaeis guineensis, contains a unique blend of plant phenolics. Recent cell and animal studies have demonstrated positive health benefits in a number of different organ ...

Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi

2013-01-01

297

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives  

E-print Network

Waste from agricultural products represents a disposal liability, which needs to be addressed. Palm oil is the most widely traded edible oil globally, and its production generates 85 million tons of aqueous by-products ...

Sambandan, T. G.

298

Oil palm plantation effects on water quality in Kalimantan, Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global demand for palm oil has stimulated a 7-fold increase in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantation area in Indonesia since 1990. Expansion will continue as Indonesia plans to double current production by 2020. Oil palm fertilizers, effluent from oil palm mills, and erosion from land clearing and roads threaten river water quality near plantations. These rivers provide essential ecosystem services including water for drinking, cooking, and washing. Robust empirical measurements of plantation expansion impacts on water resources are necessary to discern the effects of agribusiness on local livelihoods and ecosystems. In Ketapang District, West Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo, we evaluated the effects of land cover change on water quality by assessing water chemistry in streams draining four end-member watersheds ( ~600-1900 ha watershed-1): Logged forest, mixed agro-forest dominated by rubber and upland rice fallows, young oil palm forest (0-5 years), and old oil palm forest (10-15 years). To assess land cover change, we used CLASLite software to derive fractional cover from a time series (1989-2008) of Landsat data. Nearest neighbor classification and post-classification change detection yielded classes including primary forest, logged forest, secondary forest regrowth, smallholder agriculture, and oil palm. Stream water quality (temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, optical chlorphyll, and pH) and quantity (discharge) were quantified with the YSI 6600-V2 sonde. The sonde was deployed in each stream for month-long intervals 2-3 times from 2009-2010. Such extended deployment captures episodic events such as intense storms and allows examination of interdiel dynamics by sampling continuously and at high frequency, every 10 minutes. We find that across the Ketapang District study region (~12,000 km2), oil palm has cleared mostly forests (49%) and agroforests (39%). What are the impacts of such land cover changes on water quality? Compared to forests and agroforests, streams draining oil palm show greater biological activity, as indicated by elevated pH and reduced dissolved oxygen levels. Moreover, turbidity is elevated in young oil palm plantations watersheds compared to forest, agroforest, and old oil palm land covers. We discuss the implications of these findings for communities and ecosystems.

Carlson, K. M.; Curran, L. M.

2011-12-01

299

75 FR 53370 - RailAmerica, Inc., Palm Beach Holding, Inc., RailAmerica Transportation Corp., Central Railroad...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. FD 35379] RailAmerica, Inc., Palm Beach Holding, Inc., RailAmerica Transportation Corp...for RailAmerica, Inc. (RailAmerica); Palm Beach Holding, Inc. (Palm Beach); RailAmerica Transportation Corp....

2010-08-31

300

A new method to estimate the population size of coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis, on a coconut.  

PubMed

Studies of the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis, often require accurate assessment of the population density on individual infested coconuts. Here an efficient and accurate method was developed to estimate its population density on an infested coconut. The coconut mites were removed by washing the bracts and surface of an infested coconut with 30 ml of a detergent solution. Shaking the wash for 5 s allowed the mites to distribute uniformly. The number of mites in the first 1 ml of the first wash (X) yielded a very accurate predictor of the total number of mites on a coconut (Y): Y = 30.1X (R2 = 0.99; p <0.0001), also confirming that the wash was indeed homogeneous. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are discussed. PMID:16180078

Siriwardena, P H A P; Fernando, L C P; Peiris, T S G

2005-01-01

301

Reduction of contact sensitivity reactions to oxazolone in mite-infested mice.  

PubMed Central

Oxazolone-sensitized mite-infested (SWR-M) and mite-free (SWR-J) mice were challenged with oxazolone on the skin of the neck and shoulder. The migration of radioactively labeled cells to the site of contact sensitivity reaction to oxazolone was significantly less in SWR-M than in SWR-J mice. Serum obtained from SWR-M mice suppressed the extravasation of cells into the skin site of SWR-J mice challenged with oxazolone. The decrease in cellular influx in SWR-M mice occurred in areas of mite infestation (skin of neck and shoulder) as well as in areas not infested with mites (the ears). SWR-M mice also gave evidence of enhanced vascular permeability. A possible role for histamine in the inhibition of contact sensitivity in mite-infested mice is discussed. Images PMID:500208

Laltoo, H; Kind, L S

1979-01-01

302

Identification of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and biogenesis of their siRNAs in the Solanaceae: New functional implications for MITEs  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Small RNAs regulate the genome by guiding transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing machinery to specific target sequences, including genes and transposable elements (TEs). Although miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are closely associated with euchromatic genes, the br...

303

Electrocoagulation of Palm Oil Mill Effluent  

PubMed Central

Electrocoagulation (EC) is an electrochemical technique which has been employed in the treatment of various kinds of wastewater. In this work the potential use of EC for the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) was investigated. In a laboratory scale, POME from a factory site in Chumporn Province (Thailand) was subjected to EC using aluminum as electrodes and sodium chloride as supporting electrolyte. Results show that EC can reduce the turbidity, acidity, COD, and BOD of the POME as well as some of its heavy metal contents. Phenolic compounds are also removed from the effluent. Recovery techniques were employed in the coagulated fraction and the recovered compounds was analysed for antioxidant activity by DPPH method. The isolate was found to have a moderate antioxidant activity. From this investigation, it can be concluded that EC is an efficient method for the treatment of POME. PMID:19139537

Agustin, Melissa B.; Sengpracha, Waya P.; Phutdhawong, Weerachai

2008-01-01

304

Utilisation d'OPAVAR avec PALM CERFACS, septembre 2005, Toulouse.  

E-print Network

Utilisation d'OPAVAR avec PALM CERFACS, septembre 2005, Toulouse. Nicolas Daget CERFACS, Toulouse #12;Unité PALM Unité Entrées Sorties Communicatio n directe Communication avec un buffer Priorité A l (tris, contrôle qualité...) #12;Branche Modèle Lecture du fichier restart et de la date et pas de temps

305

Density and humidity gradients in veneers of oil palm stems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large variations in the stem of oil palm in terms of moisture content and density hinder its full utilization in the plywood\\u000a industry. In this study, the density and moisture content (MC) pattern throughout the trunk of the oil palm tree were measured\\u000a and established. The veneer samples were taken from various sections i.e., top, bottom, outer and inner parts

Adrian Cheng Yong Choo; Alinaghi Karimi; Edi Suhaimi Bakar; Khalina Abdan; Azmi Ibrahim; Loh Yueh Feng

306

effects of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed kernel extracts from different solvents on the predacious mite Phytoseiulus persimilis and the phytophagous mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of neem seed kernel extracts from different solvents on the predacious mitePhytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and the phytophagous miteTetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisd.) were compared. All extracts were much more toxic to the latter pest than to the former. Using the respective LC50 for the two species, the toxicity index (LC50\\u000a Phytoseiulus\\/LC50\\u000a Tetranychus) was found to be 3 for the methanol,

F. Mansour; K. R. S. Ascher; N. Omari

1987-01-01

307

Resistance status of the carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus and the twospotted spider mite, T. urticae to selected acaricides on strawberries.  

PubMed

The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) and the twospotted spider mite, T. urticae Koch, are serious pests of strawberries and many other horticultural crops. Control of these pests has been heavily dependent upon chemical acaricides. Objectives of this study were to determine the resistance status of these two pest species to commonly used acaricides on strawberries in a year-round intensive horticultural production region. LC90 of abamectin for adult carmine spider mites was 4% whereas that for adult twospotted spider mites was 24% of the top label rate. LC90s of spiromesifen, etoxazole, hexythiazox and bifenazate were 0.5%, 0.5%, 1.4% and 83% of their respective highest label rates for carmine spider mite eggs, 0.7%, 2.7%, 12.1% and 347% of their respective highest label rates for the nymphs. LC90s of spiromesifen, etoxazole, hexythiazox and bifenazate were 4.6%, 11.1%, 310% and 62% of their respective highest label rates for twospotted spider mite eggs, 3%, 13%, 432,214% and 15% of their respective highest label rates for the nymphs. Our results suggest that T. cinnabarinus have developed resistance to bifenazate and that the T. urticae have developed resistance to hexythiazox. These results strongly emphasize the need to develop resistance management strategies in the region. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID:25409919

Bi, Jian-Long; Niu, Zi-Mian; Yu, Lu; Toscano, Nick C

2014-11-20

308

Identification of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and biogenesis of their siRNAs in the Solanaceae: New functional implications for MITEs  

PubMed Central

Small RNAs regulate the genome by guiding transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing machinery to specific target sequences, including genes and transposable elements (TEs). Although miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are closely associated with euchromatic genes, the broader functional impact of these short TE insertions in genes is largely unknown. We identified 22 families of MITEs in the Solanaceae (MiS1–MiS22) and found abundant MiS insertions in Solanaceae genomic DNA and expressed sequence tags (EST). Several Solanaceae MITEs generate genome changes that potentially affect gene function and regulation, most notably, a MiS insertion that provides a functionally indispensable alternative exon in the tobacco mosaic virus N resistance gene. We show that MITEs generate small RNAs that are primarily 24 nt in length, as detected by Northern blot hybridization and by sequencing small RNAs of Solanum demissum, Nicotiana glutinosa, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Additionally, we show that stable RNAi lines silencing DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3) in tobacco and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) in potato cause a reduction in 24-nt MITE siRNAs, suggesting that, as in Arabidopsis, TE-derived siRNA biogenesis is DCL3 and RDR2 dependent. We provide evidence that DICER-LIKE4 (DCL4) may also play a role in MITE siRNA generation in the Solanaceae. PMID:19037014

Kuang, Hanhui; Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Li, Feng; Kamei, Ayako; Bhaskar, Pudota B.; Ouyang, Shu; Jiang, Jiming; Buell, C. Robin; Baker, Barbara

2009-01-01

309

Catalytic processes towards the production of biofuels in a palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery.  

PubMed

In Malaysia, there has been interest in the utilization of palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of environmental friendly biofuels. A biorefinery based on palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of biofuels has been proposed. The catalytic technology plays major role in the different processing stages in a biorefinery for the production of liquid as well as gaseous biofuels. There are number of challenges to find suitable catalytic technology to be used in a typical biorefinery. These challenges include (1) economic barriers, (2) catalysts that facilitate highly selective conversion of substrate to desired products and (3) the issues related to design, operation and control of catalytic reactor. Therefore, the catalytic technology is one of the critical factors that control the successful operation of biorefinery. There are number of catalytic processes in a biorefinery which convert the renewable feedstocks into the desired biofuels. These include biodiesel production from palm oil, catalytic cracking of palm oil for the production of biofuels, the production of hydrogen as well as syngas from biomass gasification, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) for the conversion of syngas into liquid fuels and upgrading of liquid/gas fuels obtained from liquefaction/pyrolysis of biomass. The selection of catalysts for these processes is essential in determining the product distribution (olefins, paraffins and oxygenated products). The integration of catalytic technology with compatible separation processes is a key challenge for biorefinery operation from the economic point of view. This paper focuses on different types of catalysts and their role in the catalytic processes for the production of biofuels in a typical palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery. PMID:18434141

Chew, Thiam Leng; Bhatia, Subhash

2008-11-01

310

Vulnerability and behavioral response to ultraviolet radiation in the components of a foliar mite prey-predator system.  

PubMed

Ambient ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation impacts plant-dwelling arthropods including herbivorous and predatory mites. However, the effects of UVB on prey-predator systems, such as that between the herbivorous spider mite and predatory phytoseiid mite, are poorly understood. A comparative study was conducted to determine the vulnerability and behavioral responses of these mites to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. First, we analyzed dose-response (cumulative irradiance-mortality) curves for the eggs of phytoseiid mites (Neoseiulus californicus, Neoseiulus womersleyi, and Phytoseiulus persimilis) and the spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) to UVB radiation from a UV lamp. This indicated that the phytoseiid mites were more vulnerable than the spider mite, although P. persimilis was slightly more tolerant than the other two phytoseiid mites. Second, we compared the avoidance behavior of adult female N. californicus and two spider mite species (T. urticae, a lower leaf surface user; Panonychus citri, an upper leaf surface user) in response to solar UV and visible light. N. californicus actively avoided both types of radiation, whereas P. citri showed only minimal avoidance behavior. T. urticae actively avoided UV as well as N. californicus but exhibited a slow response to visible light as well as P. citri. Such variation in vulnerability and avoidance behavior accounts for differences in the species adaptations to solar UVB radiation. This may be the primary factor determining habitat use among these mites on host plant leaves, subsequently affecting accessibility by predators and also intraguild competition. PMID:23093097

Tachi, Fuyuki; Osakabe, Masahiro

2012-12-01

311

Reciprocal responses in the interaction between Arabidopsis and the cell-content-feeding chelicerate herbivore spider mite.  

PubMed

Most molecular-genetic studies of plant defense responses to arthropod herbivores have focused on insects. However, plant-feeding mites are also pests of diverse plants, and mites induce different patterns of damage to plant tissues than do well-studied insects (e.g. lepidopteran larvae or aphids). The two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) is among the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on a staggering number of plant hosts. To understand the interactions between spider mite and a plant at the molecular level, we examined reciprocal genome-wide responses of mites and its host Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Despite differences in feeding guilds, we found that transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis to mite herbivory resembled those observed for lepidopteran herbivores. Mutant analysis of induced plant defense pathways showed functionally that only a subset of induced programs, including jasmonic acid signaling and biosynthesis of indole glucosinolates, are central to Arabidopsis's defense to mite herbivory. On the herbivore side, indole glucosinolates dramatically increased mite mortality and development times. We identified an indole glucosinolate dose-dependent increase in the number of differentially expressed mite genes belonging to pathways associated with detoxification of xenobiotics. This demonstrates that spider mite is sensitive to Arabidopsis defenses that have also been associated with the deterrence of insect herbivores that are very distantly related to chelicerates. Our findings provide molecular insights into the nature of, and response to, herbivory for a representative of a major class of arthropod herbivores. PMID:24285850

Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Bruinsma, Kristie A; Arbona, Vicent; Santamaria, M Estrella; Cazaux, Marc; Wybouw, Nicky; Osborne, Edward J; Ens, Cherise; Rioja, Cristina; Vermeirssen, Vanessa; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Krishna, Priti; Diaz, Isabel; Schmid, Markus; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Van de Peer, Yves; Grbic, Miodrag; Clark, Richard M; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Grbic, Vojislava

2014-01-01

312

Improvement in Sensitivity of an Inductive Oil Palm Fruit Sensor  

PubMed Central

Among palm oil millers, the ripeness of oil palm Fresh Fruit Bunch (FFB) is determined through visual inspection. To increase the productivity of the millers, many researchers have proposed with a new detection method to replace the conventional one. The sensitivity of such a sensor plays a crucial role in determining the effectiveness of the method. In our preliminary study a novel oil palm fruit sensor to detect the maturity of oil palm fruit bunches is proposed. The design of the proposed air coil sensor based on an inductive sensor is further investigated to improve its sensitivity. This paper investigates the results pertaining to the effects of the air coil structure of an oil palm fruit sensor, taking consideration of the used copper wire diameter ranging from 0.10 mm to 0.18 mm with 60 turns. The flat-type shape of air coil was used on twenty samples of fruitlets from two categories, namely ripe and unripe. Samples are tested with frequencies ranging from 20 Hz to 120 MHz. The sensitivity of the sensor between air to fruitlet samples increases as the coil diameter increases. As for the sensitivity differences between ripe and unripe samples, the 5 mm air coil length with the 0.12 mm coil diameter provides the highest percentage difference between samples and it is amongst the highest deviation value between samples. The result from this study is important to improve the sensitivity of the inductive oil palm fruit sensor mainly with regards to the design of the air coil structure. The efficiency of the sensor to determine the maturity of the oil palm FFB and the ripening process of the fruitlet could further be enhanced. PMID:24496313

Misron, Norhisam; Harun, Noor Hasmiza; Lee, Yeoh Kian; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Aris, Ishak; Wakiwaka, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Kunihisa

2014-01-01

313

Assessment of Aegilops tauschii for resistance to biotypes of wheat curl mite (Acari: Eriophyidae).  

PubMed

Aegilops tauschii, the wild diploid D-genome progenitor of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., is an important source of resistance to several arthropod pests and pathogens. A total of 108 Ae. tauschii accessions from different geographic regions were evaluated for resistance to biotypes of the wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, from Kansas, Nebraska, and Montana. The wheat curl mite is the only vector known to transmit wheat streak mosaic virus. Wheat curl mite resistance was detected in germplasm from all the geographic locations represented. The highest percentage of resistant accessions originated from Turkey, followed by Afghanistan and the Caspian Sea region of Iran. Sixty-seven percent of the accessions exhibited resistance to at least one wheat curl mite biotype and 19% were resistant to all the three biotyopes. Resistance to the accessions tested occurred more frequently in the Nebraska and Kansas biotypes (69% and 64%, respectively) than did resistance to the Montana biotype (42%), although the frequency of resistance was not significant. The differential reactions of accessions to the different wheat curl mite biotypes suggests that Ae. tauschii has at least five different genes for resistance to mite colonization. Ae. tauschii continues to be a very useful source for wheat curl mite resistance genes for bread wheat improvement. PMID:14503608

Malik, Renu; Smith, C Michael; Brown-Guedira, Gina L; Harvey, Tom L; Gill, Bikram S

2003-08-01

314

Emerging risk of infestation and contamination of dried fruits by mites in the Czech Republic.  

PubMed

The introduction of live insects into human food is rare in developed countries. However, we report, for the first time, an emerging risk that exists from dried fruit in Central Europe. Recently, massive and frequent infestation of dried fruit imported from the Mediterranean region by the mite, Carpoglpyhus lactis L. (Acarina: Carpoglyphidae), has been found. In 180 samples taken from supermarkets, 13% were contaminated; the contamination levels ranged from 0 to 660 mites per g of dried fruit. The contamination was found in dried apricots, figs, plums and raisins. To estimate the risks and food preferences of C. lactis, its growth rate was examined under laboratory conditions. Starting with a hypothetical population of 10 mites per g of dried fruit, the risk level of 1000 mites per g of dried fruit is reached at 42 days for dried figs, 49 days for dried pineapple and 63 days for dried apricots, dates and plums at 25 °C and 85% relative humidity. We found that mites are able to enter every dried fruit packing material tested, including polypropylene and aluminum foils. This indicates that mites can move from package to package in supermarkets. Mites are known as allergen producers and vectors of mycotoxin-producing fungi. These findings indicate that an increased risk of C. lactis contamination exists in dried fruit. PMID:21793685

Hubert, Jan; Erban, Tomas; Nesvorna, Marta; Stejskal, Vaclav

2011-09-01

315

Spider mites adaptively learn recognizing mycorrhiza-induced changes in host plant volatiles.  

PubMed

Symbiotic root micro-organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi commonly change morphological, physiological and biochemical traits of their host plants and may thus influence the interaction of aboveground plant parts with herbivores and their natural enemies. While quite a few studies tested the effects of mycorrhiza on life history traits, such as growth, development and reproduction, of aboveground herbivores, information on possible effects of mycorrhiza on host plant choice of herbivores via constitutive and/or induced plant volatiles is lacking. Here we assessed whether symbiosis of the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae with common bean plants Phaseolus vulgaris influences the response of the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae to volatiles of plants that were clean or infested with spider mites. Mycorrhiza-naïve and -experienced spider mites, reared on mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal bean plants for several days before the experiments, were subjected to Y-tube olfactometer choice tests. Experienced but not naïve spider mites distinguished between constitutive volatiles of clean non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal plants, preferring the latter. Neither naïve nor experienced spider mites distinguished between spider mite-induced volatiles of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. Learning the odor of clean mycorrhizal plants, resulting in a subsequent preference for these odors, is adaptive because mycorrhizal plants are more favorable host plants for fitness of the spider mites than are non-mycorrhizal plants. PMID:25097072

Patiño-Ruiz, J David; Schausberger, Peter

2014-12-01

316

Three Halloween genes from the Varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) and their expression during reproduction.  

PubMed

The ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway involves sequential enzymatic hydroxylations by a group of enzymes collectively known as Halloween gene proteins. Complete sequences for three Halloween genes, spook (Vdspo), disembodied (Vddib) and shade (Vdshd), were identified in varroa mites and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of predicted amino acid sequences for Halloween orthologues showed that the acarine orthologues were distantly associated with insect and crustacean clades indicating that acarine genes had more ancestral characters. The lack of orthologues or pseudogenes for remaining genes suggests these pathway elements had not evolved in ancestral arthropods. Vdspo transcript levels were highest in gut tissues, while Vddib transcript levels were highest in ovary-lyrate organs. In contrast, Vdshd transcript levels were lower overall but present in both gut and ovary-lyrate organs. All three transcripts were present in eggs removed from gravid female mites. A brood cell invasion assay was developed for acquiring synchronously staged mites. Mites within 4?h of entering a brood cell had transcript levels of all three that were not significantly different from mites on adult bees. These analyses suggest that varroa mites may be capable of modifying 7-dehydro-cholesterol precursor and hydroxylations of other steroid precursors, but whether the mites directly produce ecdysteroid precursors and products remains undetermined. PMID:25488435

Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Evans, J D; Hung, K; Sims, J; Alborn, H; Teal, P E A

2014-12-01

317

Ricoseius loxocheles, a phytoseiid mite that feeds on coffee leaf rust.  

PubMed

One of the most important diseases of coffee plants is the coffee leaf rust fungus Hemileia vastatrix Berkeley and Broome (Uredinales). It can cause 30 % yield loss in some varieties of Coffea arabica (L.). Besides fungus, the coffee plants are attacked by phytophagous mites. The most common species is the coffee red mite, Oligonychus ilicis McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae). Predatory mites of the Phytoseiidae family are well-known for their potential to control herbivorous mites and insects, but they can also develop and reproduce on various other food sources, such as plant pathogenic fungi. In a field survey, we found Ricoseius loxocheles (De Leon) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on the necrotic areas caused by the coffee leaf rust fungus during the reproductive phase of the pathogen. We therefore assessed the development, survivorship and reproduction of R. loxocheles feeding on coffee leaf rust fungus and measured predation and oviposition of this phytoseiid having coffee red mite as prey under laboratory conditions. The mite fed, survived, developed and reproduced successfully on this pathogen but it was not able to prey on O. ilicis. Survival and oviposition with only prey were the same as without food. This phytoseiid mite does not really use O. ilicis as food. It is suggested that R. loxocheles is one phytoseiid that uses fungi as a main food source. PMID:24744058

Oliveira, Cleber M; Ferreira, João A M; Oliveira, Rafael M; Santos, Francisco O; Pallini, Angelo

2014-10-01

318

New building, old parasite: Mesostigmatid mites--an ever-present threat to barrier facilities.  

PubMed

Mesostigmatid mites are blood-sucking parasitic mites found in wild rodent populations. Periodically they can also become a problem for laboratory rodent colonies, particularly when building construction or renovations disturb colonies of commensal (building) rodents that had been acting as hosts. Mesostigmatid mites infest both rats and mice and, unlike the more common rodent fur mites (Myobia, Myocoptes, and Radfordia sp.), can survive for long periods in the environment and travel considerable distances in search of new hosts. They easily penetrate barrier caging systems, including individually ventilated cages, thus circumventing the usual precautions to protect rodents from infection. The two mites reported in laboratory rodent colonies, Ornithonyssus bacoti and Laelaps echidnina, also bite humans and have the potential to transmit zoonotic diseases. Once the mites gain access to a colony, eradication requires elimination of commensal rodent reservoirs in addition to insecticide treatment of both the laboratory rodents and the environment. In view of the undesirability of insecticide use in the animal facility, it is advisable to investigate the effectiveness of preventive treatments, such as environmental application of insect growth regulators or silica-based products. This article summarizes available information on mesostigmatid mites and their laboratory incursions, and provides suggestions for diagnosis, treatment, and control based on the authors experience with several outbreaks at a large academic institution.. PMID:18506063

Watson, Julie

2008-01-01

319

The coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis, in Benin and Tanzania: occurrence, damage and associated acarine fauna.  

PubMed

The coconut mite Aceria guerreronis (Eriophyidae) is considered the most important pest of coconut fruits in Africa; however, quantitative knowledge about its distribution and abundance is lacking. We conducted four diagnostic surveys-three in Southern Benin and one along the coast of Tanzania-to determine the distribution of A. guerreronis and the severity of its damage to coconut fruits, as well as the diversity and abundance of other associated mites and potential natural enemies. Aceria guerreronis was found in all visited plantations with the percentage of damaged fruits varying considerably among plantations-67-85% in Benin and 43-81% in Tanzania. Overall, 30-40% of the fruit surfaces were damaged by A. guerreronis. Damage severity increased with fruit age and negatively affected fruit weight of 7- to 12-months-old fruits. Aceria guerreronis was by far the most abundant mite on coconut fruits but its abundance depended on fruit age. The highest densities of A. guerreronis were observed on 3- to 4-months-old fruits. Neocypholaelaps sp. (Ameroseiidae) was the most abundant mite on inflorescences. Three species of predatory mites (Phytoseiidae)-Neoseiulus baraki, N. neobaraki and N. paspalivorus-were the most commonly found predatory mites beneath the coconut bracts in association with A. guerreronis. Neoseiulus neobaraki was the prevailing predator in Tanzania while N. paspalivorus was the most frequent predator in Benin. Other mites found beneath the bracts were the herbivore Steneotarsonemus furcatus (Tarsonemidae) and the detritivore and fungivore Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acaridae). PMID:21789564

Negloh, K; Hanna, R; Schausberger, P

2011-12-01

320

Stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata) infesting food in various types of packaging.  

PubMed

From 2008 to 2014, stored product mites have been reported from prepackaged dried food on the market in the Czech Republic. The infestation was by Carpoglyphus lactis (L.) in dried fruits and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) in dog feed. The infestation is presumably caused by poor protection of the packages. We compared various packaging methods for their resistance to mites using dried apricots and dog feed in laboratory experiments. The trial packages included nine different plastic films, monofilm, duplex and triplex, and one type of plastic cup (ten replicates per packaging type). All packaging materials are available on the Czech market for dried food products. The samples of dried food were professionally packed in a factory and packaged dried apricots were exposed to C. lactis and dog food to T. putrescentiae. After 3 months of exposure, the infestation and mite density of the prepackaged food was assessed. Mites were found to infest six types of packages. Of the packaging types with mites, 1-5 samples were infested and the maximum abundance was 1,900 mites g(-1) of dried food. Mites entered the prepackaged food by faulty sealing. Inadequate sealing is suggested to be the major cause of the emerged infestation of dried food. PMID:25420687

Hubert, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Volek, Vlado

2015-02-01

321

Collecting Sea Palms: Planning for Sustainable Use in a Variable Environment  

E-print Network

date, data have been collected on: 1) population demography of four populations of Postelsia palmaeformis (sea palm)Palms in Mendocino (http://www- csgc.ucsd.edu/NEWSROOM/NEWSRELEASES/Seapalms-Mendocino.html) Authors: Christina S. Johnson Date:

Nielsen, Karina J; Blanchette, Carol A.

2008-01-01

322

Control of the sheep scab mite Psoroptes ovis in vivo and in vitro using fungal pathogens.  

PubMed

As part of a research programme designed to identify biological agents for the control of sheep scab, the pathogenicity of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae to Psoroptes mites in the presence of sheepskin and wool was examined in the laboratory. No inhibitory effects of skin and wool were observed and high levels of infection were recorded. Subsequently the pathogenicity of formulations of both M. anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana to Psoroptes ovis was studied in vivo. For this, 36 batches of 20 adult female Psoroptes mites were confined in 25 mm diameter chambers which were attached to the backs of 6 scab-naive sheep. In some treatments, mites were exposed to the fungal pathogens for 48 h in vitro prior to being placed on the host, while other treatments involved mites with no prior exposure placed directly onto the skin of a host treated with a fungal pathogen. After 48 h on the host, mites were removed, incubated individually and all fungal infections were recorded. Fungal infection was observed in all treatments, except untreated controls. However, B. bassiana infected a significantly greater number of mites than M. anisopliae with all the formulations examined. Infection rates were highest when mites were exposed to dry conidia (>90%) and lowest with M. anisopliae in diatomaceous earth. Overall, the infection rate was not affected by whether or not the mites were given prior exposure to the conidia, before being placed on the sheep. The results demonstrate that Psoroptes mites can become infected by entomopathogenic fungi on the skin of sheep and provides a first demonstration of the potential of this technology for the control of sheep scab. PMID:17624674

Abolins, S; Thind, B; Jackson, V; Luke, B; Moore, D; Wall, R; Taylor, M A

2007-09-30

323

Tactic responses of the parasitic mite, Psoroptes ovis, to light and temperature.  

PubMed

The astigmatid mite, Psoroptes ovis (Hering) (Acari: Psoroptidae), is an obligate, non-burrowing ectoparasite of vertebrates, of particular economic importance in domestic sheep flocks where it causes clinical psoroptic mange. To help understand the behaviour which facilitates transmission via the environment, the responses of P. ovis derived from rabbits (syn. Psoroptes cuniculi) to temperature and light were examined in the laboratory. On a vertical surface of uniform temperature, the presence and direction of illumination had a significant effect on the distance and direction moved by the mites. In darkness or with illumination from both above and below, the mites moved relatively little, but this movement was upwards. In contrast, with illumination from above only, mites moved downwards. When the direction of the illumination was reversed so that it came from below only, the mites moved upwards. On a vertical surface with a temperature gradient, in darkness or with illumination from both above and below, the mites moved up or down towards the area of highest temperature, depending on whether this was above or below, respectively. However, the movement of the mites in response to the temperature gradient was strongly displaced up or down by the presence of unidirectional illumination from above or below, respectively. The results indicate that the movement of these mites is strongly directed towards areas of high temperature but away from higher light intensity. These behaviours might be expected to maintain the position of the mites on a host animal and help them locate the skin surface of a new host when displaced into the environment. PMID:15285139

Pegler, K R; Wall, R

2004-01-01

324

Passive airborne dust sampling to assess mite antigen exposure in farming environments.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to estimate mite antigen exposure in farming environments by passive sampling of airborne dust. Antigen concentrations were measured with enzyme immunoassays specific for three storage mites (SM): Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae and the house dust mite (HDM) Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Dust samples were collected with electrostatic dust fall collectors (EDCs) in three different areas of cattle farms. EDCs were placed in cow stables (working area), in changing rooms (transit area) and in different rooms of farmer dwellings (living area). Mite concentrations in the living area of farm homes were compared to those of urban homes. In dust samples from stables, antigens of all four mite species could be detected. The highest exposure level was to L. destructor (median 56.7 ?g/m(2)), the lowest to A. siro (median 14.4 ?g/m(2)). Mite concentrations of different species showed no correlation within the cow stables. In comparison to stables, the median mite concentrations in farm homes were significantly lower, ranging from below the detection limit to 1.5 ?g/m(2). Antigens of SM were predominantly found in changing rooms and kitchens, and HDM antigens were mainly detected in bedrooms. Antigens of all mites were measured the least often in living rooms. T. putrescentiae was the most prevalent mite in all room types, and the exposure levels correlated strongly between different rooms. The number of SM positive samples in farm homes was considerably higher than in urban homes, while the percentage of HDM positive samples did not differ significantly. PMID:21842065

Zahradnik, Eva; Sander, Ingrid; Kendzia, Benjamin; Fleischer, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika

2011-09-01

325

Eradication of elephant ear mites (Loxoanoetus bassoni) in two African elephants (Loxodonta africana).  

PubMed

Elephant ear mites, not previously described in North America, were eradicated in two African elephants (Loxodonta africana) after six otic instillations of ivermectin at 2-wk intervals. The microscopic examination of a clear, mucoid discharge collected from the external ear canals of two wild-born African elephants housed in a New York State zoo for 25 yr revealed live mites (Loxoaneotus bassoni). The cytologic examination demonstrated no evidence of inflammation or infection. Both elephants were asymptomatic with normal hemograms and serum chemistry panels. A diagnosis of otoacariasis was made. Each elephant was treated six times with 5 ml of 1% ivermectin syrup instilled in each ear canal once every 2 wk. Microscopic examinations of clear mucus collected from each elephant's ear canals 9 days after the first instillation of ivermectin were negative for any life stages of ear mites. Microscopic examinations of mucus collected from both elephants' ear canals at 6, 11, and 16 wk, as well as annually post-treatment for 7 yr, confirmed eradication of the ear mites. The L. bassoni ear mite was first identified in the external ear canals of wild, asymptomatic, lesion-free, African elephants culled in Kruger National Park in South Africa. However, a new species in the same genus of mites (Loxoanoetus lenae) was identified at the necropsy of an 86-yr-old Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) living in a circus in Australia. The autopsy revealed a marked, ballooning distension of bone around the left external acoustic meatus, suggestive of mite-induced otitis externa, as seen in cattle infested with ear mites (Raillieta auris). Elephant health care providers should identify the prevalence of, and consider treatment of, elephants in their care infested with ear mites, given the possible risk for adverse health effects. PMID:22448521

Wyatt, Jeff; DiVincenti, Louis

2012-03-01

326

Mesostigmatid mites in four classes of wood decay.  

PubMed

We studied the mesostigmatid mite community in four classes of wood decay in mixed (pine-oak) forest stands in the Wielkopolska region, Cental-West Poland. A total of 80 samples, including bark, phloem and rotten wood of coniferous and deciduous species logs, were taken in August 2006 and 2007. Decay classes were a qualitative, categorical index based on visual assessment of decomposition in coarse woody debris. A total of 3621 mesostigmatid mites were counted and identified to 91 species. In general the total number of species was diverse in the decay classes and ranged from 35 (classes I and II) to 58 (class IV). The average number of species did not differ significantly among wood decay classes. Also the abundance of mesostigmatids did not differ significantly among wood decay classes, but the highest abundance was observed in the last class (IV). Cluster analysis of the species identity index showed that the microhabitats were divided into two main clusters: relatively undecayed wood and decayed wood. Species accumulation curves showed that relatively decayed wood (class IV) had a greater rate of species accumulation than undecayed wood from the class I decomposition. PMID:21479776

Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Kamczyc, Jacek; Rakowski, Rados?aw

2011-10-01

327

Preparation and evaluation of yoghurt like fermented dairy product containing transesterified palm olein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Main objective of this research work was to develop yoghurt like fermented dairy product by replacing milk fat with enzymatically\\u000a transesterified palm olein. Milk fat was replaced with enzymatically transesterified palm olein at different levels, i.e.,\\u000a T1 (1.5% enzymatically transesterified palm olein and 2% milk fat), T2 (2.5% enzymatically transesterified palm olein and 1% milk fat), T3 (3.5% enzymatically transesterified

M. Abdullah; M. Nadeem; T. N. Pasha; I. Hussain; S. Inayat; M. Ilyas; A. Rashid

328

Interpretation of Sound Tomography Image for the Recognition of Ganoderma Infection Level in Oil Palm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Basal stem rot (BSR) disease in oil palm caused by a group of decaying fungi called Ganoderma is considered as the most serious disease faced by the oil palm plantations in SouthEast Asia [1]. Significant yield losses\\u000a can be observed when the number of palms infected by the fungus increases in the plantation as the infected palms will produce\\u000a less

Mohd Su'ud Mazliham; Pierre Loonis; Abu Seman Idris

329

Diurnal and seasonal variation in photosynthesis of peach palms grown under subtropical conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Amazonian peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) has been grown for heart-of-palm production under subtropical conditions. As we did not see any substantial study\\u000a on its photosynthesis under Amazonian or subtropical conditions, we carried out an investigation on the diurnal and seasonal\\u000a variations in photosynthesis of peach palms until the first heart-of-palm harvest, considering their relationship with key\\u000a environmental factors.

M. L. S. Tucci; N. M. Erismann; E. C. Machado; R. V. Ribeiro

2010-01-01

330

Acaricidal activity of aqueous extracts of camomile flowers, Matricaria chamomilla, against the mite Psoroptes cuniculi.  

PubMed

Arcaricidal properties of decoctions, infusions and macerates of dried flower heads of camomile, Matricaria chamomilla L. (Asterales: Asteraceae) were tested in vitro against the mite Psoroptes cuniculi Delafond (Parasitiformes: Psoroptidae). This mite species is responsible for otoacariasis in domestic animals. Mites were exposed to the extracts for 24, 48 or 72 h. All the extracts tested showed highly significant acaricidal activity when compared with controls. Among them, a decoction of 10% was the only formulation which gave 100% activity at all the three observations times. PMID:15189247

Macchioni, F; Perrucci, S; Cecchi, F; Cioni, P L; Morelli, I; Pampiglione, S

2004-06-01

331

Design and Development of the MITEE-B Bi-Modal Nuclear Propulsion Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies of compact, ultra-lightweight high performance nuclear thermal propulsion engines have concentrated on systems that only deliver high thrust. However, many potential missions also require substantial amounts of electric power. Studies of a new, very compact and lightweight bi-modal nuclear engine that provides both high propulsive thrust and high electric power for planetary science missions are described. The design is a modification of the MITEE nuclear thermal engine concept that provided only high propulsive thrust. In the new design, MITEE-B, separate closed cooling circuits are incorporated into the reactor, which transfers useful amounts of thermal energy to a small power conversion system that generates continuous electric power over the full life of the mission, even when the engine is not delivering propulsive thrust. Two versions of the MITEE-B design are described and analyzed. Version 1 generates 1 kW(e) of continuous power for control of the spacecraft, sensors, data transmission, etc. This power level eliminates the need for RTG's on missions to the outer planets, and allowing considerably greater operational capability for the spacecraft. This, plus its high thrust and high specific impulse propulsive capabilities, makes MITEE-B very attractive for such missions. In Version 2, of MITEE-B, a total of 20 kW(e) is generated, enabling the use of electric propulsion. The combination of high open cycle propulsion thrust (20,000 Newtons) with a specific impulse of ~1000 seconds for short impulse burns, and long term (months to years), electric propulsion greatly increases MITEE's ?V capability. Version 2 of MITEE-B also enables the production and replenishment of H2 propellant using in-situ resources, such as electrolysis of water from the ice sheet on Europa and other Jovian moons. This capability would greatly increase the ?V available for certain planetary science missions. The modifications to the MITEE multiple pressure tube/fuel element assembly to achieve bi-modal capability are modest. Small diameter coolant tubes are bonded to the surface of the MITEE cold frits that enclose the fuel elements. When the MITEE-B is not operating with H2 propellant to generate high thrust, the reactor continues to operate at low thermal, which is transferred to the closed coolant circuit. Three electric power generations are examined for MITEE-B: closed Brayton, Stirling, and a conventional steam cycle with a mini-turbine. The Stirling and steam cycles have the lowest specific masses in kg/kW(e). Both appear practical for MITEE-B.

Paniagua, John C.; Powell, James R.; Maise, George

2003-01-01

332

Selected Factors Influenceing the Abundance of Banks Grass Mite in Sorghum.  

E-print Network

CONTENTS Resdts and Dkussisn ... ..t'..*-+. .rf.q EfIds of @+urn fPB I and Spidm B&e PcrpU *- f.,&*b= .................... 4 EBkts of hkide A hations on Spider yite P-&S in Grain Sorghum .......... 5 E&ts of Water St#essed Sorghum... on Spider Mite Population Levels. .................... 7 SUMMARY Banks grass mite, Oligonychus pratensis (Banks), population densities changed in correlation to host phenology. Prior to sorghum boot development, spider mite numbers were low...

Kattes, David H.; Teetes, George L.

1978-01-01

333

Parasitism of wild Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) by the air-sac mite Sternostoma tracheacolum.  

PubMed

Sixty-two percent of 26 wild caught Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) were infected with Sternostoma tracheacolum, a parasitic rhinonyssid mite. The intensity of infection was higher in adult finches than juveniles, and higher in juvenile females than juvenile males. Histopathological investigation of wild Gouldian Finches revealed bronchopneumonia and air sacculitis associated with mite infection. Although this mite may not have contributed to the decline of Gouldian finch populations in the wild during the past 20 yr, it may be suppressing the return of the finch to its former status. PMID:1548805

Tidemann, S C; McOrist, S; Woinarski, J C; Freeland, W J

1992-01-01

334

Synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate from palm oil and some new applications.  

PubMed

Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a potential substitute for some petrochemical-based plastics. This biodegradable plastic is derived from microbial fermentation using various carbon substrates. Since carbon source has been identified as one of the major cost-absorbing factors in PHA production, cheap and renewable substrates are currently being investigated as substitutes for existing sugar-based feedstock. Plant oils have been found to result in high-yield PHA production. Malaysia, being the world's second largest producer of palm oil, is able to ensure continuous supply of palm oil products for sustainable PHA production. The biosynthesis and characterization of various types of PHA using palm oil products have been described in detail in this review. Besides, by-products and waste stream from palm oil industry have also demonstrated promising results as carbon sources for PHA biosynthesis. Some new applications in cosmetic and wastewater treatment show the diversity of PHA usage. With proper management practices and efficient milling processes, it may be possible to supply enough palm oil-based raw materials for human consumption and other biotechnological applications such as production of PHA in a sustainable manner. PMID:21279347

Sudesh, Kumar; Bhubalan, Kesaven; Chuah, Jo-Ann; Kek, Yik-Kang; Kamilah, Hanisah; Sridewi, Nanthini; Lee, Yan-Fen

2011-03-01

335

"I've Got a Palm in My Pocket": Using Handheld Computers in an Inclusive Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes what happened when Palm Pilots were given to 28 sixth-graders, 6 with special needs. Students preferred using the Palm Pilot to a traditional notebook for recording assignments and used the Palm Pilots to access spelling lists and to check math and spelling. (Contains references.) (CR)

Bauer, Anne M.; Ulrich, Mary E.

2002-01-01

336

Male Aggregation Pheromone of Date Palm Fruit Stalk Borer Oryctes elegans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory and field investigations were carried out to characterize the chemical communication system of the date palm fruit stalk borer, Oryctes elegans, and to develop pheromone-based trapping in Eastern Iran. Adults of both sexes feeding on date palm pieces attracted conspecifics, whereas date palm alone was minimally attractive. Males were twice as attractive as females. More beetles were captured at

Didier Rochat; Kazem Mohammadpoor; Christian Malosse; Arman Avand-Faghih; Martine Lettere; Josiane Beauhaire; Jean-Paul Morin; Adeline Pezier; Michel Renou; Gholam Abbas Abdollahi

2004-01-01

337

Major Palm Nutrient Deficiency Symptoms and Fertilizer Applications 1. Deficient Nutrient  

E-print Network

;1. Magnesium (Mg) 2. Canary Island Date 3. Old Moderate/Severe: i) In feather palms, broad chlorotic (yellowMajor Palm Nutrient Deficiency Symptoms and Fertilizer Applications 1. Deficient Nutrient 2. Palms. Queen, coconut, foxtail, royal, pygmy date 3. New Mild: i) Sharply bent (hooked leaf) leaflet tips ii

Jawitz, James W.

338

78 FR 7670 - Safety Zone; Indian Street Bridge Construction, St. Lucie Canal, Palm City, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Construction, St. Lucie Canal, Palm City, FL AGENCY: Coast...the St. Lucie Canal, Palm City, Florida to provide...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...delay in the effective date of this rule would be...Indian Street Bridge in Palm City, Florida. The...

2013-02-04

339

Palm olein in infant formula: absorption of fat and minerals by normal infants13  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palm olein, a low-melting fraction of palm oil, and soy oil can be combined to obtain fat blends with proportions of palmitic and oleic acids similar to those of human milk. We compared the absorption of fat and calcium by infants fed a formula containing a blend of palm olein (53%) and soy oil (47%) (Formula POtS) with that by

Steven E Nelson; Ronald R Rogers; Joan A Frantz; Ekhard E Ziegler

340

Research on basal stem rot (BSR) of ornamental palms caused by basidiospores from Ganoderma boninense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Basidiospores were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma infecting oil palms from an estate in Johor and from ornamental palms (including oil palms) from Singapore. The spores were then germinated to obtain homokaryotic mycelia. Based on clamp connection formation in paired hyphal fusions, tester strains were identified from the homokaryons isolated. Compatibility tests were then carried out using these

H. P. Lim; Y. K. Fong

2005-01-01

341

76 FR 36014 - Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL AGENCY: Federal...This action proposes to modify the Palm Beach International Airport Class C airspace...the floor of Class C airspace above Palm Beach County Park Airport (LNA) from...

2011-06-21

342

78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...amends Class E Airspace in the West Palm Beach, FL area, as new Standard Instrument...Procedures (SIAPs) have been developed at Palm Beach County Park Airport. Airspace...

2013-05-01

343

78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...safety zone on Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm Beach, Florida, to provide for the safety of...conducted on Lake Worth Inlet in West Palm Beach, Florida. These operations will...

2013-02-15

344

76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL AGENCY: Federal...SUMMARY: This action modifies the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace...the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport. The FAA is...

2011-12-13

345

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami By Donna Gehrke in Palm Beach and Broward counties, according to new projections released Monday by a leading economist, and will rise by 1.5 percent in Palm Beach County, Wells Fargo Securities senior economist Mark Vitner said

Belogay, Eugene A.

346

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County March 13, 2013|By Donna in Palm Beach County fell in February, according to data from the Florida Department of Children from last year when the number of food stamp recipients in Palm Beach County jumped nearly 14 percent

Fernandez, Eduardo

347

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:07 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 Posted: 4:59 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 agency Space Florida. For many in Palm Beach County's aerospace industry, the shuttle's demise merits

Belogay, Eugene A.

348

New census numbers show Palm Beach County's 85-plus crowd grows 41%  

E-print Network

New census numbers show Palm Beach County's 85-plus crowd grows 41% By CHRISTINE STAPLETON AND GEORGE BENNETT Palm Beach Post Staff Writers Updated: 8:32 a.m. Thursday, May 5, 2011 Posted: 8:21 a community near West Palm Beach, 87-year-old Lou Hazan tried to offer some insights into the modern

Belogay, Eugene A.

349

U.S. pullout from Iraq long overdue, Palm Beach County veterans agree  

E-print Network

U.S. pullout from Iraq long overdue, Palm Beach County veterans agree By KEVIN D. THOMPSON Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 9:03 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, 2011 Posted: 8:57 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, 2011, a West Palm Beach native, was flying across the mountainous border of Pakistan and Afghanistan, an area

Belogay, Eugene A.

350

Offseason discounts expected to keep Palm Beach County tourist attractions sizzling  

E-print Network

- addled years, he said. Last year, U.S. News & World Report ranked West Palm Beach as the 11th-best summerOffseason discounts expected to keep Palm Beach County tourist attractions sizzling By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 1:50 p.m. Monday, June 4, 2012 Posted: 10:41 p.m. Sunday, June 3

Belogay, Eugene A.

351

Revival of an ancient starch crop: a review of the agronomy of the sago palm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1971 there has been a revival of interest in the possibilities for cultivation of the true sago palm, Metroxylon spp. Agronomic and economic research shows that the palm can become an important starch producing crop. Many queries concerning the agronomy of the crop have been solved. The palm is especially suited to humid tropical lowlands. It is fairly salinity

M. Flach; D. L. Schuiling

1988-01-01

352

Environmental Performance of the Milling Process Of Malaysian Palm Oil Using The Life Cycle Assessment Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malaysia is currently the world leader in the production and export of palm oil. This study has a gate to gate system boundary. The inventory data collection starts at the oil palm fresh fruit bunch hoppers when the fresh fruit bunch is received at the mill up till the production of the crude palm oil in the storage tanks at

Vijaya Subramaniam; Ma An Ngan; Choo Yuen May; Nik Meriam Nik Sulaiman

353

Conversion of waste cooking oil (WCO) and palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) to biodiesel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The search for alternative fuels to substitute for fossil fuels with competitive price range is an ongoing subject for research. There are several proposed feedstock, namely refined palm oil, crude palm oil, waste cooking oil and currently, palm fatty acid distillate. Refined and crude oils were debatable to be used as the main uses for both oils were for edible

A. K. Siti Kartina; M. H. Nor Suhaila

2011-01-01

354

Technological assessment of palm oil production in Osun and Ondo states of Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential economic returns from the oil palm are high if processed with efficient technologies. This study was undertaken to evaluate the technologies in use for the production of palm oil from a gender perspective. A survey was conducted in Osun and Ondo States of Nigeria using a structured questionnaire and the participatory learning approach. A total of 28 palm

K. A Taiwo; O. K Owolarafe; L. A Sanni; J. O Jeje; K Adeloye; O. O Ajibola

2000-01-01

355

Development and material properties of new hybrid plywood from oil palm biomass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shortage of wood as a raw material has forced wood-based industries to find alternative local raw materials. Currently, oil palm biomass is undergoing research and development (R & D) and appears to be the most viable alternative. This work examines the conversion of oil palm trunk (OPT) and oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) into new plywood and analyses its

H. P. S. Abdul Khalil; M. R. Nurul Fazita; A. H. Bhat; M. Jawaid; N. A. Nik Fuad

2010-01-01

356

Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to determine free fatty acid contents in palm olein  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple and rapid method for the quantitative determination of free fatty acid (FFA) contents in palm olein by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission spectroscope is described. A set of palm olein samples is used as the calibration set. This set was prepared by spiking increasing amounts of oleic acid into a series of palm oleins that covers a wide

Y. B. Che Man; G. Setiowaty

1999-01-01

357

Palm oil: Biochemical, physiological, nutritional, hematological and toxicological aspects: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The link between dietary fats and cardiovascular diseases has necessitateda growing research interest in palm oil, the second largest consumedvegetable oil in the world. Palm oil, obtained from a tropical plant, Elaeis guineensis contains 50% saturated fatty acids, yet it does notpromote atherosclerosis and arterial thrombosis. The saturated fatty acidto unsaturated fatty acid ratio of palm oil is close to

D. O. Edem

2002-01-01

358

Ensilage of cardboard and date palm leaves.  

PubMed

Eight treatments of cardboard (CB) and date palm leaves (DPL) with or without alkali treatments plus molasses, dates, and ammonium sulfate were ensiled in laboratory silos. Latobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculants were added at an application rate of 10(5) cfu/g of silage to study their possible influence on the fermentation process. Silos were sealed and incubated at 30 degrees C. The anaerobic ensiling was evaluated for chemical and microbiological variables by opening the silos after 30, 60, and 90 days. After 90 days, significantly low pH values (5.2-3.5) were obtained. The percentages of hemicellulose, cellulose, lignin, and ash were determined. Concentrations of reducing sugars, ether extract, and crude protein tended to be acceptable among treatments. Silages showed a significantly high lactic acid concentration (up to 4.3%) and only traces of butyric acid (below 1%). Also changes in acetic and propionic acids concentrations were determined. Lactobacillus populations remained almost static while yeast and molds populations tended to be lower after 90 days of ensilage. Neither alkali treatment nor microbial inoculants showed a relationship with the ensiling process. Thus, overall, it was concluded that CB and DPL can be effectively ensiled and the resultant silages are acceptable to merit their use as ruminant feed in arid regions. PMID:15027834

Baroon, Z; El-Nawawy, A S; Al-Othman, A

2004-01-01

359

Effect of high pressure microfluidization on the crystallization behavior of palm stearin - palm olein blends.  

PubMed

Moderate and high microfluidization pressures (60 and 120 MPa) and different treatment times (once and twice) were used to investigate the effect of high-pressure microfluidization (HPM) treatment on the crystallization behavior and physical properties of binary mixtures of palm stearin (PS) and palm olein (PO). The polarized light microscopy (PLM), texture analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were applied to analyze the changes in crystal network structure, hardness, polymorphism and thermal property of the control and treated blends. PLM results showed that HPM caused significant reductions in maximum crystal diameter in all treated blends, and thus led to changes in the crystal network structure, and finally caused higher hardness in than the control blends. The XRD study demonstrated that HPM altered crystalline polymorphism. The HPM-treated blends showed a predominance of the more stable ?' form, which is of more interest for food applications, while the control blend had more ?- and ?-form. This result was further confirmed by DSC observations. These changes in crystallization behavior indicated that HPM treatment was more likely to modify the crystallization processes and nucleation mechanisms. PMID:24879582

Han, Lijuan; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Guoqin; Liu, Xinqi; Wang, Xuede

2014-01-01

360

A review of the status of the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis (Acari: Eriophyidae), a major tropical mite pest.  

PubMed

The coconut mite (CM), Aceria guerreronis Keifer, has spread to most coconut production areas worldwide and it has been considered one of the most notorious and important pests of coconut fruits in many countries. Although CM has been reported to damage coconuts for over 40 years in the Americas and Africa it continues to cause considerable losses in countries of these continents, and in the last 15 years it has also reached countries from southeast Asia-India and Sri Lanka. Several other countries of southeast Asia are also major coconut producers and the impact by the mite in currently affected areas suggests that the dispersion of CM to these major producers could lead to very heavy losses. Great advances about our knowledge on CM and its control have been achieved, especially in the last decade, after its introduction into Asia. However, much remains to be known to allow the design of efficient strategies to it. This paper brings together information on CM invasive history, distribution, hosts, morphology, biology, dispersal, colonization process, population dynamics, symptoms and injury, estimated losses, sampling techniques, control strategies and new perspectives for its control. PMID:23192330

Navia, Denise; Gondim, Manoel Guedes Correa; Aratchige, Nayanie S; de Moraes, Gilberto José

2013-02-01

361

Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).  

PubMed

The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ? 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs. PMID:22414329

Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

2012-05-01

362

Below-ground plant parts emit herbivore-induced volatiles: olfactory responses of a predatory mite to tulip bulbs infested by rust mites.  

PubMed

Although odour-mediated interactions among plants, spider mites and predatory mites have been extensively studied above-ground, belowground studies are in their infancy. In this paper, we investigate whether feeding by rust mites (Aceria tulipae) cause tulip bulbs to produce odours that attract predatory mites (Neoseiulus cucumeris). Since our aim was to demonstrate such odours and not their relevance under soil conditions, the experiments were carried out using a classic Y-tube olfactometer in which the predators moved on a Y-shaped wire in open air. We found that food-deprived female predators can discriminate between odours from infested bulbs and odours from uninfested bulbs or artificially wounded bulbs. No significant difference in attractiveness to predators was found between clean bulbs and bulbs either wounded 30 min or 3 h before the experiment. These results indicate that it may not be simply the wounding of the bulbs, but rather the feeding by rust mites, which causes the bulb to release odours that attract N. cucumeris. Since bulbs are belowground plant structures, the olfactometer results demonstrate the potential for odour-mediated interactions in the soil. However, their importance in the actual soil medium remains to be demonstrated. PMID:15285135

Aratchige, N S; Lesna, I; Sabelis, M W

2004-01-01

363

Image Segmentation of Historical Handwriting from Palm Leaf Manuscripts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Palm leaf manuscripts were one of the earliest forms of written media and were used in Southeast Asia to store early written knowledge about subjects such as medicine, Buddhist doctrine and astrology. Therefore, historical handwritten palm leaf manuscripts are important for people who like to learn about historical documents, because we can learn more experience from them. This paper presents an image segmentation of historical handwriting from palm leaf manuscripts. The process is composed of three steps: 1) background elimination to separate text and background by Otsu's algorithm 2) line segmentation and 3) character segmentation by histogram of image. The end result is the character's image. The results from this research may be applied to optical character recognition (OCR) in the future.

Surinta, Olarik; Chamchong, Rapeeporn

364

BVOC fluxes from oil palm canopies in South East Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluxes by virtual disjunct eddy covariance were measured for the first time in South-East Asia in 2008 from an oil palm plantation. Malaysia and Indonesia account for more than 80% of world oil palm production. Our in situ findings suggest much higher isoprene emissions from oil palms than from rainforest, which is consistent with earlier lab-based predictions of emissions from oil palms (Wilkinson et al., 2006). 50% of global biogenic VOC emissions are estimated to derive from tropical rainforests (Guenther et al., 1995) although in fact a large portion of the emission may derive from oil palms in the tropics. Isoprene and monoterpenes are regarded as the most important biogenic VOCs for the atmospheric chemistry. Overall, maximum isoprene emissions from oil palms were recorded at 11:00 local time, with a mean value of 13 mg m-2 h-1. At the rainforest, the maximum fluxes of isoprene were observed later in the day, at about 13:00 with an average of 2.5 mg m-2 h-1. Initial flux results for total monoterpenes indicate that their mass emission ratio with respect to isoprene was about 1:9 at the rainforest and 1:18 at the oil palm plantation. The results are presented with reference to temperature, photosynthetic radiation and meteorological drivers as well as in comparison with CO2 and H2O fluxes. Empirical parameters in the Guenther algorithm for MEGAN (Guenther et al, 2006), which was originally designed for the Amazon region, have been optimised for this oil palm study. The emission factor obtained from eddy covariance measurements was 18.8 mg m-2 h-1, while the one obtained from leaf level studies at the site was 19.5 mg m-2 h-1. Isoprene fluxes from both Amazonia (Karl et al., 2007) and from rainforest in Borneo 2008 seem to be much lower than from oil palms. This can have consequences for atmospheric chemistry of land use change from rainforest to oil palm plantation, including formation of ozone, SOA and particles and indirect effects on the removal rate of greenhouse gases and pollutants by decreasing OH budgets. Global models predicting atmospheric changes and bottom-up estimates from the tropics must be constrained by direct measurements such as presented here, taking separate account of these major contributions from oil palm plantations and tropical rainforests. References: Guenther, A., C.N. Hewitt, D. Erickson, R. Fall, C. Geron, T.E. Graedel, P. Harley, L. Klinger, M. Lerdau, W.A. McKay, T. Pierce, B. Scholes, R. Steinbrecher, R. Tallamraju, J. Taylor and P. Zimmerman, 1995: A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions. Journal of Geophysical Research 100, 8873-8892. Guenther, A., T. Karl, P. Harley, C. Wiedinmyer, P. I. Palmer, and C. Geron, 2006: Estimates of global terrestrial isoprene emissions using MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature). Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 6, 107-173. Karl, T., A. Guenther, R. J. Yokelson, J. Greenberg, M. Potosnak, D. R. Blake, and P. Artaxo, 2007: The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: Emission, chemistry, and transport of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the lower atmosphere over Amazonia. Journal of Geophysical Research 112, D18302. Wilkinson, M. J., S. M. Owen, M. Possell, J. Hartwell, P. Gould, A. Hall, C. Vickers, and C. N. Hewitt, 2006: Circadian control of isoprene emissions from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis). Plant Journal 47, 960-968.

Misztal, P. K.; Cape, J. N.; Langford, B.; Nemitz, E.; Helfter, C.; Owen, S.; Heal, M. R.; Hewitt, C. N.; Fowler, D.

2009-04-01

365

Following basal stem rot in young oil palm plantings.  

PubMed

The PCR primer GanET has previously been shown to be suitable for the specific amplification of DNA from Ganoderma boninense. A DNA extraction and PCR method has been developed that allows for the amplification of the G. boninense DNA from environmental samples of oil palm tissue. The GanET primer reaction was used in conjunction with a palm-sampling programme to investigate the possible infection of young palms through cut frond base surfaces. Ganoderma DNA was detected in frond base material at a greater frequency than would be expected by comparison with current infection levels. Comparisons are made between the height of the frond base infected, the number of frond bases infected, and subsequent development of basal stem rot. The preliminary results suggest that the development of basal stem rot may be more likely to occur when young lower frond bases are infected. PMID:15750744

Panchal, G; Bridge, P D

2005-01-01

366

Miniature Inverted–Repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs) Have Been Accumulated through Amplification Bursts and Play Important Roles in Gene Expression and Species Diversity in Oryza sativa  

PubMed Central

Miniature inverted–repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are predicted to play important roles on genome evolution. We developed a BLASTN-based approach for de novo identification of MITEs and systematically analyzed MITEs in rice genome. The genome of rice cultivar Nipponbare (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) harbors 178,533 MITE-related sequences classified into 338 families. Pairwise nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that individual MITE families were resulted from one or multiple rounds of amplification bursts. The timing of amplification burst varied considerably between different MITE families or subfamilies. MITEs are associated with 23,623 (58.2%) genes in rice genome. At least 7,887 MITEs are transcribed and more than 3,463 were transcribed with rice genes. The MITE sequences transcribed with rice coding genes form 1,130 pairs of potential natural sense/antisense transcripts. MITEs generate 23.5% (183,837 of 781,885) of all small RNAs identified from rice. Some MITE families generated small RNAs mainly from the terminals, while other families generated small RNAs predominantly from the central region. More than half (51.8%) of the MITE-derived small RNAs were generated exclusively by MITEs located away from genes. Genome-wide analysis showed that genes associated with MITEs have significantly lower expression than genes away from MITEs. Approximately 14.8% of loci with full-length MITEs have presence/absence polymorphism between rice cultivars 93-11 (O. sativa ssp. indica) and Nipponbare. Considering that different sets of genes may be regulated by MITE-derived small RNAs in different genotypes, MITEs provide considerable diversity for O. sativa. PMID:22096216

Lu, Chen; Chen, Jiongjiong; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Qun; Su, Wenqing; Kuang, Hanhui

2012-01-01

367

Cospeciation between the nasal mite Ptilonyssus sairae (Acari: Rhinonyssidae) and its bird hosts  

E-print Network

The parasitic nasal mite Ptilonyssus sairae Castro has been classified as one species, but we find that significant sequence divergence exists between host-specific mite populations. The low level of gene flow between conspecifics is probably a result of the parasites ’ low rate of dispersal among different bird host species. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene from P. sairae populations was sequenced and used for phylogenetic inference and subsequently compared to their passerine bird host phylogeny. In addition to finding restricted gene flow between host-associated parasites, the reconciliation of host and parasite gene trees reveals statistically significant levels of strict cospeciation between bird hosts and host-specific mite populations. Our findings suggest that cryptic speciation may be common in this group of mites.

Marco Morelli; Greg S. Spicer

368

Progress in the development of specific immunotherapies for house dust mite allergies.  

PubMed

Allergen-specific immunotherapy is used to treat patients exposed and co-sensitized to the two common house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae. Based on seroepidemiological studies and a detailed characterization of mite allergens, an optimal immunotherapeutic product should associate extracts from the two Dermatophagoides species, and include both bodies and fecal particles. Both subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapies performed with aqueous mite extracts are safe and efficacious in children and adults with mite-induced rhinitis and/or asthma. Double-blind placebo-controlled studies are conducted to further document the efficacy of immunotherapeutic products, with promising results that were obtained already with sublingual tablets. Current developments of second-generation products relying upon recombinant allergens and peptides are reviewed. PMID:25187166

Moingeon, Philippe

2014-12-01

369

Novel control of the sheep scab mite, Psoroptes ovis, through the application of bacteriophage therapy   

E-print Network

trails were used to isolate bacteriophage from environmental samples. Sixteen bacteriophage were successfully isolated, which were infective against three mite faecal bacteria. Isolated bacteriophage were characterised by a number of methods including...

Hall, Sarah Alice

2011-11-24

370

PARASITISM OF WILD GOULDIAN FINCHES (ERYTHRURA GOULDIAE) BY THE AIRSAC MITE STERNOSTOMA TRACHEACOLUM  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT:,Sixty-two,percent,of,26 wild,caught,Gouldian,finches,(Erythrura,gouldlae),were infected with Sternostoma tracheacolum, a parasitic rhinonyssid mite. The intensity of infection was higher in adult finches than juveniles, and higher in juvenile females than juvenile males. Histopathological,investigation,of wild,Gouldian,Finches,revealed,bronchopneumonia,and,air sacculitis,associated,with,mite,infection.,Although,this,mite,may,not,have,contributed,to,the decline,of,Gouldian,finch,populations,in,the,wild,during,the,past,20 yr. it may,be suppressing the return,of the finch to its former,status. Key words: Gouldian finch, respiratory parasite, air-sac mite, Erythrura gouldlae, Sternostoma tracheacolum, disease, air sacculitis.

Sonia C. Tidemann; Steven Mcorist; J. C. Z. Woinarski; W. J. Freeland

371

Palm-Vein Classification Based on Principal Orientation Features  

PubMed Central

Personal recognition using palm–vein patterns has emerged as a promising alternative for human recognition because of its uniqueness, stability, live body identification, flexibility, and difficulty to cheat. With the expanding application of palm–vein pattern recognition, the corresponding growth of the database has resulted in a long response time. To shorten the response time of identification, this paper proposes a simple and useful classification for palm–vein identification based on principal direction features. In the registration process, the Gaussian-Radon transform is adopted to extract the orientation matrix and then compute the principal direction of a palm–vein image based on the orientation matrix. The database can be classified into six bins based on the value of the principal direction. In the identification process, the principal direction of the test sample is first extracted to ascertain the corresponding bin. One-by-one matching with the training samples is then performed in the bin. To improve recognition efficiency while maintaining better recognition accuracy, two neighborhood bins of the corresponding bin are continuously searched to identify the input palm–vein image. Evaluation experiments are conducted on three different databases, namely, PolyU, CASIA, and the database of this study. Experimental results show that the searching range of one test sample in PolyU, CASIA and our database by the proposed method for palm–vein identification can be reduced to 14.29%, 14.50%, and 14.28%, with retrieval accuracy of 96.67%, 96.00%, and 97.71%, respectively. With 10,000 training samples in the database, the execution time of the identification process by the traditional method is 18.56 s, while that by the proposed approach is 3.16 s. The experimental results confirm that the proposed approach is more efficient than the traditional method, especially for a large database. PMID:25383715

Zhou, Yujia; Liu, Yaqin; Feng, Qianjin; Yang, Feng; Huang, Jing; Nie, Yixiao

2014-01-01

372

Palm-vein classification based on principal orientation features.  

PubMed

Personal recognition using palm-vein patterns has emerged as a promising alternative for human recognition because of its uniqueness, stability, live body identification, flexibility, and difficulty to cheat. With the expanding application of palm-vein pattern recognition, the corresponding growth of the database has resulted in a long response time. To shorten the response time of identification, this paper proposes a simple and useful classification for palm-vein identification based on principal direction features. In the registration process, the Gaussian-Radon transform is adopted to extract the orientation matrix and then compute the principal direction of a palm-vein image based on the orientation matrix. The database can be classified into six bins based on the value of the principal direction. In the identification process, the principal direction of the test sample is first extracted to ascertain the corresponding bin. One-by-one matching with the training samples is then performed in the bin. To improve recognition efficiency while maintaining better recognition accuracy, two neighborhood bins of the corresponding bin are continuously searched to identify the input palm-vein image. Evaluation experiments are conducted on three different databases, namely, PolyU, CASIA, and the database of this study. Experimental results show that the searching range of one test sample in PolyU, CASIA and our database by the proposed method for palm-vein identification can be reduced to 14.29%, 14.50%, and 14.28%, with retrieval accuracy of 96.67%, 96.00%, and 97.71%, respectively. With 10,000 training samples in the database, the execution time of the identification process by the traditional method is 18.56 s, while that by the proposed approach is 3.16 s. The experimental results confirm that the proposed approach is more efficient than the traditional method, especially for a large database. PMID:25383715

Zhou, Yujia; Liu, Yaqin; Feng, Qianjin; Yang, Feng; Huang, Jing; Nie, Yixiao

2014-01-01

373

Control of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) in glasshouse roses.  

PubMed

Populations of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, can increase rapidly in glasshouse production, especially during summer. Both chemical and biological control must start at low densities for effective control. The combined efficacy of Phytoseiulus persimilis and the predatory midge, Feltiella acarisuga to control T. urticae on roses was evaluated in 2002. A second year rose crop (Rosa hybrida cv. First Red) was used for this experiment. Two glasshouse compartments of 200 m2 each were used, one was assigned for integrated control and the other for chemical control. The mite populations were monitored by bi-weekly analysis of 12 randomly selected harvestable flower stems, extracted on the Berlese funnel. Sticky plates (3 yellow and 3 blue/200 m2) were used for monitoring the Feltiella adults. End of January a population of +/- 2 spider mites/flower was present in both compartments. In the integrated control, the first Phytoseiulus were released on February the 7th, while the first release of Feltiella was on February the 20th. From week 7 till 13 the population of T. urticae increased exponentially to 90 spider mites/flower stem, while Phytoseiulus population was below one/flower stem. A treatment of fenbutatinoxide + hexythiazox (Torque + Nissuron) was necessary to reduce the spider mite population. A maximum number of predatory mite (4/flower stem) and predatory midge (106 adults/sticky plate) was found only 4 weeks later. A second increase of spider mite population occurred in week 27. Although 2 weeks later 3 predatory mites/flower stem were present, additional chemical treatment was necessary to control. A third and last increase of spider mite occurred in week 39. This last raise could be controlled effectively by Phytoseiulus and Feltiella. Chemical control in the second compartment was effective all-year-round with the exception of week 23 when a major increase up to 60 spider mites/flower stem was found. The applied biocontrol agents could not efficiently control spider mite in glasshouse rose. However, combined with selective insecticides they offer possibilities for IPM in glasshouse roses. PMID:15149115

Blindeman, L; Van Labeke, M C

2003-01-01

374

A report on biocompounds from palm fossil of India.  

PubMed

The occurrence of a large number of fossil woods having resemblance in anatomical features with the modern palm genus, Phoenix L in Deccan Intertrappean fossil flora of Maastrichtian-Danian age (i. e. Late Cretaceous and Earliest Tertiary (65-67 my)) indicates the most primitive record of date palm. Present discovery of biocompounds from fossil wood of Phoenix collected from Deccan Intertrappean having affinity with the biocompounds known from modern plant further exemplify the earliest documentation of Phoenix in Indian peninsula. PMID:24966541

Sharma, Dinesh Chandra; Khan, Mohd Sajid; Khan, M Salman; Srivastava, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashwini Kumar; Shukla, Ritu

2014-01-01

375

Gender Classification Based on Geometry Features of Palm Image  

PubMed Central

This paper presents a novel gender classification method based on geometry features of palm image which is simple, fast, and easy to handle. This gender classification method based on geometry features comprises two main attributes. The first one is feature extraction by image processing. The other one is classification system with polynomial smooth support vector machine (PSSVM). A total of 180 palm images were collected from 30 persons to verify the validity of the proposed gender classification approach and the results are satisfactory with classification rate over 85%. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed approach is feasible and effective in gender recognition. PMID:24892081

Wu, Ming; Yuan, Yubo

2014-01-01

376

Acariform mites (Acariformes) - permanent symbionts of Hapalomys delacouri Thomas (Rodentia, Muridae) in Vietnam  

PubMed Central

Abstract Two new species of parasitic acariform mites (Acariformes) are described from the Delacour’s marmoset rat Hapalomys delacouri Thomas (Rodentia: Muridae) in Vietnam: Afrolistrophorus (Afrolistrophorus) hapalomys sp. n. (Listrophoridae) and Radfordia (Radfordia) mirabilis sp. n. (Myobiidae). Based on morphological evidences, we show that species of both mite genera associated with Hapalomys Blyth do not demonstrate clear phylogenetic links with respective congeners from rodents of the closest genus Chiropodomys Peters (Rodentia: Muridae).

Bochkov, Andre V.; Abramov, Alexei V.

2014-01-01

377

Increased transcription of Glutathione S-transferases in acaricide exposed scabies mites  

PubMed Central

Background Recent evidence suggests that Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis mites collected from scabies endemic communities in northern Australia show increasing tolerance to 5% permethrin and oral ivermectin. Previous findings have implicated detoxification pathways in developing resistance to these acaricides. We investigated the contribution of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes to permethrin and ivermectin tolerance in scabies mites using biochemical and molecular approaches. Results Increased in vitro survival following permethrin exposure was observed in S. scabiei var. hominis compared to acaricide naïve mites (p < 0.0001). The addition of the GST inhibitor diethyl maleate restored in vitro permethrin susceptibility, confirming GST involvement in permethrin detoxification. Assay of GST enzymatic activity in mites demonstrated that S. scabiei var. hominis mites showed a two-fold increase in activity compared to naïve mites (p < 0.0001). Increased transcription of three different GST molecules was observed in permethrin resistant S. scabiei var. canis- mu 1 (p < 0.0001), delta 1 (p < 0.001), and delta 3 (p < 0.0001). mRNA levels of GST mu 1, delta 3 and P-glycoprotein also significantly increased in S. scabiei var. hominis mites collected from a recurrent crusted scabies patient over the course of ivermectin treatment. Conclusions These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that increased drug metabolism and efflux mediate permethrin and ivermectin resistance in scabies mites and highlight the threat of emerging acaricide resistance to the treatment of scabies worldwide. This is one of the first attempts to define specific genes involved in GST mediated acaricide resistance at the transcriptional level, and the first application of such studies to S. scabiei, a historically challenging ectoparasite. PMID:20482766

2010-01-01

378

Cold-hardiness in the predatory mite Amblyseius potentillae (Acari: Phytoseiidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cold-hardiness was studied in the predatory miteAmblyseius potentillae (Garman) by determining the mortality after exposure to -5°C. Predators reared under diapause-inducing conditions were more cold-resistant than mites that had been kept under long-day conditions. An acclimatization period at 4°C prior to exposure to sub-zero temperatures had a positive effect on the cold-hardiness of the predator, and was remarkable in diapausing

L. P. S. van der Geest; W. P. J. Overmeer; A. Q. van Zon

1991-01-01

379

Two new species of the feather mite family Gabuciniidae (Acariformes: Pterolichoidea) from wrens (Passeriformes: Troglodytidae).  

PubMed

Two new species of the feather mite family Gabucinidae (Acari: Astigmata) are described from birds of the family Troglodytidae (Passeriformes) from Central America: Piciformobia cinnycerthiae sp. nov. from Cinnycerthia unirufa (Lafresnaye) in Ecuador, and P. henicorhinae sp. nov. from Henicorhina leucosticte (Cabanis) in Costa Rica. These are the first records of mites of the genus Piciformobia Gaud et Atyeo, 1975 from passerine hosts. A renewed diagnosis of the genus Piciformobia and key to all known species are provided. PMID:25236264

Mironov, Sergey V; Literak, Ivan; Sychra, Oldrich; Capek, Miroslav

2014-10-01

380

Acariform mites (Acariformes) - permanent symbionts of Hapalomysdelacouri Thomas (Rodentia, Muridae) in Vietnam.  

PubMed

Two new species of parasitic acariform mites (Acariformes) are described from the Delacour's marmoset rat Hapalomysdelacouri Thomas (Rodentia: Muridae) in Vietnam: Afrolistrophorus (Afrolistrophorus) hapalomyssp. n. (Listrophoridae) and Radfordia (Radfordia) mirabilissp. n. (Myobiidae). Based on morphological evidences, we show that species of both mite genera associated with Hapalomys Blyth do not demonstrate clear phylogenetic links with respective congeners from rodents of the closest genus Chiropodomys Peters (Rodentia: Muridae). PMID:25561857

Bochkov, Andre V; Abramov, Alexei V

2014-01-01

381

Parasite-host interactions between the Varroa mite and the honey bee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction<\\/h3>

Varroa mites as parasites of honey bees<\\/h4>Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman, 2000), is the most important pest of European races of the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera L., weakening bees and vectoring bee diseases (Matheson, 1993). Over the past decades it has spread all over the world and control measures are required to maintain healthy honey bee colonies.Originally, this mite

J. N. M. Calis

2001-01-01

382

Gene Pyramiding of Peptidase Inhibitors Enhances Plant Resistance to the Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae  

PubMed Central

The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a damaging pest worldwide with a wide range of host plants and an extreme record of pesticide resistance. Recently, the complete T. urticae genome has been published and showed a proliferation of gene families associated with digestion and detoxification of plant secondary compounds which supports its polyphagous behaviour. To overcome spider mite adaptability a gene pyramiding approach has been developed by co-expressing two barley proteases inhibitors, the cystatin Icy6 and the trypsin inhibitor Itr1 genes in Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The presence and expression of both transgenes was studied by conventional and quantitative real time RT-PCR assays and by indirect ELISA assays. The inhibitory activity of cystatin and trypsin inhibitor was in vitro analysed using specific substrates. Single and double transformants were used to assess the effects of spider mite infestation. Double transformed lines showed the lowest damaged leaf area in comparison to single transformants and non-transformed controls and different accumulation of H2O2 as defence response in the leaf feeding site, detected by diaminobenzidine staining. Additionally, an impact on endogenous mite cathepsin B- and L-like activities was observed after feeding on Arabidopsis lines, which correlates with a significant increase in the mortality of mites fed on transformed plants. These effects were analysed in view of the expression levels of the target mite protease genes, C1A cysteine peptidase and S1 serine peptidase, identified in the four developmental mite stages (embryo, larvae, nymphs and adults) performed using the RNA-seq information available at the BOGAS T. urticae database. The potential of pyramiding different classes of plant protease inhibitors to prevent plant damage caused by mites as a new tool to prevent pest resistance and to improve pest control is discussed. PMID:22900081

Santamaria, Maria Estrella; Cambra, Inés; Martinez, Manuel; Pozancos, Clara; González-Melendi, Pablo; Grbic, Vojislava; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Diaz, Isabel

2012-01-01

383

[Gamasid mites of common voles in the central Volga River region].  

PubMed

The specific composition of gamasid mites from three species of voles (Microtus arvalis Pall., M. agrestis L., M. oeconomus Pall.) is given. Forest, field and flood-land groupings of the common vole having distinct phenotypical differences are characterized by differences in the structure of their parasite fauna. In the forest the number of meadow and meadow-field species decreases while that of forest species of mites regularly increases. PMID:2942832

Borisova, V I; Nazarova, I V

1986-01-01

384

Vineyard snail allergy possibly induced by sensitization to house-dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus).  

PubMed

A female patient experienced a severe allergic reaction after consumption of vineyard snails. The patient proved to be sensitized to house-dust mite (HDM) and demonstrated a positive skin test and specific IgE to snail (Eobania vermiculata, Lofarma). The snail RAST was > 80% inhibited by HDM, whereas the mite RAST was < 10% inhibited by snail extract. This is possibly another example of food allergy related to primary sensitization by an aeroallergen. PMID:7573833

De Maat-Bleeker, F; Akkerdaas, J H; van Ree, R; Aalberse, R C

1995-05-01

385

House-dust mite (Pyroglyphidae) populations in mattresses, and their control by electric blankets  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reduction in house-dust-mite populations of 19–84% in beds in regular use could be achieved by heating the mattresses with electric blankets, when the beds were not being slept on. The effect of the heating treatment on the temperature and relative humidity inside the mattress is discussed. Housedust mites in the heated portions of the mattress migrated deeper inside the

R. de Boer; L. P. S. van der Geest

1990-01-01

386

The toxicity of several organic phosphorus compounds to cotton insects and spider mites  

E-print Network

THE TOXICITY OF SEVERAL ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO COTTON INSECTS AND SPIDER MITES A Dissertation By FREEMAN MIREE FULLER, JR. Approved as to style and content lays TH EOX flnnmn +.*h*Chairraan^of Committee Head or Department May 1THE... THE TOXICITY OF SEVERAL ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS TO COTTON INSECTS AND SPIDER MITES By FREEMAN MIREE FULLER, JR. ?? ? A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment...

Fuller, Freeman Miree

2013-10-04

387

Immune response to flour and dust mites in a United Kingdom bakery.  

PubMed Central

In a study of 279 United Kingdom bakery workers a high prevalence of immunological response to storage mites was found. To determine whether this was the consequence of exposure to storage mites in bakery work, a population of salt packing workers was examined as a comparison group not at occupational risk of exposure to storage mites. Forty two per cent of both groups were atopic (had a positive skin prick response greater than negative controls to D pteronyssinus, grass pollen, or cat fur by 2 mm or more) and 33% had an immediate skin prick test response to at least one of four storage mites (L destructor, G domesticus, T putrescentiae, A Siro). A higher percentage of the salt packing workers than the bakery workers had a positive radioallergosorbent test (RAST) (greater than or equal to 0.35 PRU) to D pteronyssinus and to the four storage mites. Logistic regression analysis identified atopy as the most significant variable for a positive skin test and RAST response to storage mites in both groups of workers. RAST inhibition was used to analyse extracted area and personal air samples. Analysis of static area samples for aeroallergen showed immunological identity with flour but L destructor was found in only one of seven exposed filters. The concentration of airborne flour was related to exposure rank of perceived dustiness and gravimetric measurement of total dust. Nineteen out of 32 filters from workers in jobs with higher dust exposure (rank >/=6) had a level of > 10 microgram/m(3) flour whereas this concentrations was exceeded in only one of 23 filters from workers in low dust exposure (< rank 6). It is concluded that storage mites are not of special significance in allergic responses in bakery workers. The development of immunological (and airway) responsiveness to inhaled flour dust is increased in those exposed to higher concentrations of airborne allergen, which appears to be predominantly flour and not storage mites. PMID:1515350

Tee, R D; Gordon, D J; Gordon, S; Crook, B; Nunn, A J; Musk, A W; Venables, K M; Taylor, A J

1992-01-01

388

Assessment of cross-reactivity among five species of house dust and storage mites.  

PubMed

In vitro cross-reactivity among two house dust (Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus) and three storage (Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Lepidoglyphus destructor) mites was examined in 20 mite-sensitive dogs with natural occurring atopic dermatitis (group A), 13 high-IgE beagles experimentally sensitized to D. farinae (group B), and five healthy beagles (group C). Intradermal testing (IDT) and serology for allergen-specific IgE demonstrated that co-sensitization for all possible pairs of the five mites was generally 45% or higher among group A dogs. In the same dogs, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay cross-inhibition results indicated that each one of D. farinae, A. siro and T. putrescentiae was a strong inhibitor of all the remaining mites, whereas D. pteronyssinus was a strong inhibitor of L. destructor. A high number of positive IDT and serology test results for D. pteronyssinus, A. siro, T. putrescentiae and L. destructor were recorded among group B dogs. No conclusive evidence of exposure to these mites was found upon analysis of dust samples from their environment and their food for the presence of mites and guanine. Also, the number of positive test results was generally higher among group B than among group C dogs. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay cross-inhibition revealed that D. farinae was a strong inhibitor of D. pteronyssinus, A. siro and T. putrescentiae. Collectively, these results demonstrated extensive in vitro cross-reactivity among house dust and/or storage mites that can explain false-positive results upon testing of dust mite-sensitive dogs with atopic dermatitis. PMID:18336423

Saridomichelakis, Manolis N; Marsella, Rosanna; Lee, Kenneth W; Esch, Robert E; Farmaki, Rania; Koutinas, Alexander F

2008-04-01

389

Forecasting emergence and movement of overwintering hazelnut big bud mites from big buds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eriophyoid big bud mites are key pests of hazelnut throughout the world, but they are difficult to control with chemicals\\u000a or other methods because they are protected inside the bud. The most effective time for control is during the relatively short\\u000a emergence period which is difficult for growers to predict. The key objectives of this study were to monitor mite

Janette Webber; R. Bruce Chapman; S. P. Worner

2008-01-01

390

IgE sensitivity and cross-reactivity to crude and purified mite allergens (Der f 1, Der f 2, Der p 1, Der p 2) in atopic dogs sensitive to Dermatophagoides mite allergens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigates IgE-reactivity to crude and purified mite allergens by intradermal skin test (IDST), Immunodot method, and ELISA in atopic dogs sensitive to mite allergens, as well as the allergenic cross-reactivity between Dermatophgoides (D) farinae (DF) and D. pteronyssinus (DP) in dogs by IgE-ELISA inhibition. IDST and Immunodot method for crude mite allergens were performed for atopic dogs

K. Masuda; H. Tsujimoto; S. Fujiwara; K. Kurata; A. Hasegawa; H. Yasueda; K. Yamashita; D. J. DeBoer; A. L. de Weck; M. Sakaguchi

1999-01-01

391

Process integration possibilities for biodiesel production from palm oil using ethanol obtained from lignocellulosic residues of oil palm industry.  

PubMed

In this paper, integration possibilities for production of biodiesel and bioethanol using a single source of biomass as a feedstock (oil palm) were explored through process simulation. The oil extracted from Fresh Fruit Bunches was considered as the feedstock for biodiesel production. An extractive reaction process is proposed for transesterification reaction using in situ produced ethanol, which is obtained from two types of lignocellulosic residues of palm industry (Empty Fruit Bunches and Palm Press Fiber). Several ways of integration were analyzed. The integration of material flows between ethanol and biodiesel production lines allowed a reduction in unit energy costs down to 3.4%, whereas the material and energy integration leaded to 39.8% decrease of those costs. The proposed integrated configuration is an important option when the technology for ethanol production from biomass reaches such a degree of maturity that its production costs be comparable with those of grain or cane ethanol. PMID:18930392

Gutiérrez, Luis F; Sánchez, Oscar J; Cardona, Carlos A

2009-02-01

392

Rapid cold hardening response in the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus.  

PubMed

We investigated the rapid cold hardening (RCH) response in the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) (Acari: Phytoseiidae). On direct exposure, ?2 % of adult females survived -10 °C for 2 h. However, when acclimatized first at 5 °C for 1 h, 75 % of females survived. RCH could also be induced by acclimatization at 30 °C for 2 h or anoxia (oxygen-free nitrogen) for 1-2 h. All immature stages showed enhanced survival when acclimatized at 5 °C for 2 h before exposure to -10 °C. Acclimatization at 30 °C induced RCH only in eggs and deutonymphs, and anoxia was effective for eggs, larvae, and deutonymphs. The variability among immature stages may be attributed to the cost associated with the acclimatization treatments. Our findings suggest that RCH may promote the survival of N. californicus during unexpected changes in temperatures, and can be an important feature particularly when this natural enemy is introduced to non-native environments. PMID:24682616

Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Amano, Hiroshi

2014-08-01

393

Effects of soil water stress and twospotted spider mites on net photosynthesis and transpiration of apple leaves.  

PubMed

Soil water stress and twospotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch) were tested for their influence on the content and activity of leaves of greenhouse grown Delicious apple trees. Soil water stress caused reductions in net photosynthesis (Pn), transpiration (Tr), and shoot growth. Leaf water potential was decreased by both water stress and mite feeding. Feeding of 15 adult mites/leaf for 28 days resulted in a 16% reduction in Pn while an initial population of 10 mites leaf/left to develop for 20 days reduced Pn by 27%. Mite feeding reduced leaf nitrogen and non-structural carbohydrate levels when sampled 20 days after placement on the leaf. There was no interaction between the changed physiology of the leaf due to soil water stress and mite feeding. PMID:24470083

Ferree, D C; Hall, F R

1980-09-01

394

Genetic structure of a phytophagous mite species affected by crop practices: the case of Tetranychus urticae in clementine mandarins.  

PubMed

Tetranychus urticae Koch is a cosmopolitan mite considered as the most polyphagous species among spider mites. This mite is a key pest of clementine mandarins in Eastern Spain, where Spanish clementine production concentrates. Crop management practices can affect the population dynamics of this mite and, consequently, its impact on the orchard. Microsatellite markers were used to study mite population genetics from two commercial orchards which had been managed differently following Integrated Pest Management (IPM) or Organic Pest Management (OPM) schemes during four consecutive years. A multiplex system including 20 microsatellite loci was designed specifically and allowed an efficient and inexpensive genotyping of individual mites. We found that the IPM population had a stronger fluctuation of population structure and higher genetic diversity compared to OPM population. Thus, our study concludes that crop management has an impact on the population genetics of T. urticae which may be related to the alternation of some acaricides under IPM. PMID:24233157

Pascual-Ruiz, S; Gómez-Martinez, M A; Ansaloni, T; Segarra-Moragues, J G; Sabater-Muñoz, B; Jacas, J A; Hurtado-Ruiz, M A

2014-04-01

395

Modelling the potential distribution of the invasive tomato red spider mite, Tetranychus evansi (Acari: Tetranychidae).  

PubMed

Predicting the potential geographical distribution of a species is particularly important for pests with strong invasive abilities. Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard, possibly native to South America, is a spider mite pest of solanaceous crops. This mite is considered an invasive species in Africa and Europe. A CLIMEX model was developed to predict its global distribution. The model results fitted the known records of T. evansi except for some records in dry locations. Dryness as well as excess moisture stresses play important roles in limiting the spread of the mite in the tropics. In North America and Eurasia its potential distribution appears to be essentially limited by cold stress. Detailed potential distribution maps are provided for T. evansi in the Mediterranean Basin and in Japan. These two regions correspond to climatic borders for the species. Mite establishment in these areas can be explained by their relatively mild winters. The Mediterranean region is also the main area where tomato is grown in open fields in Europe and where the pest represents a threat. According to the model, the whole Mediterranean region has the potential to be extensively colonized by the mite. Wide expansion of the mite to new areas in Africa is also predicted. Agricultural issues highlighted by the modelled distribution of the pest are discussed. PMID:19153813

Migeon, Alain; Ferragut, Francisco; Escudero-Colomar, Lucía Adriana; Fiaboe, Komi; Knapp, Markus; de Moraes, Gilberto J; Ueckermann, Eddie; Navajas, Maria

2009-07-01

396

Potential role of Demodex mites and bacteria in the induction of rosacea.  

PubMed

Rosacea is a common dermatological condition that predominantly affects the central regions of the face. Rosacea affects up to 3?% of the world's population and a number of subtypes are recognized. Rosacea can be treated with a variety of antibiotics (e.g. tetracycline or metronidazole) yet no role for bacteria or microbes in its aetiology has been conclusively established. The density of Demodex mites in the skin of rosacea patients is higher than in controls, suggesting a possible role for these mites in the induction of this condition. In addition, Bacillus oleronius, known to be sensitive to the antibiotics used to treat rosacea, has been isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea and a potential role for this bacterium in the induction of rosacea has been proposed. Staphylococcus epidermidis has been isolated predominantly from the pustules of rosacea patients but not from unaffected skin and may be transported around the face by Demodex mites. These findings raise the possibility that rosacea is fundamentally a bacterial disease resulting from the over-proliferation of Demodex mites living in skin damaged as a result of adverse weathering, age or the production of sebum with an altered fatty acid content. This review surveys the literature relating to the role of Demodex mites and their associated bacteria in the induction and persistence of rosacea and highlights possible therapeutic options. PMID:22933353

Jarmuda, Stanislaw; O'Reilly, Niamh; Zaba, Ryszard; Jakubowicz, Oliwia; Szkaradkiewicz, Andrzej; Kavanagh, Kevin

2012-11-01

397

Determination of pH in Regions of the Midguts of Acaridid Mites  

PubMed Central

The pH of the guts of mites strongly affects their digestive processes. This study was carried out to determine the pH in the guts of 12 species of stored product and house dust mites. Eighteen pH indicators were chosen and offered to the mites in the feeding biotest. Based on the color changes of the indicators, the gut contents of acaridid mites were determined to be within a pH range of 4 to neutral. The gut contents showed a gradient in pH from the anterior to the posterior part. The anterior midgut (ventriculus and caeca) of most species had a pH ranging from 4.5 to 5, or slightly more alkaline for most of the species, while the middle midgut (intercolon/colon) had a pH of 5 to 6. Finally, the pH of the posterior midgut (postcolon) was between 5.5 and 7. Except for Dermatophagoides spp., no remarkable differences in the pH of the gut were observed among the tested species. Dermatophagoides spp. had a more acidic anterior midgut (a pH of 4 to 5) and colon (a pH of 5) with postcolon (a pH of below 6). The results characterizing in vivo conditions in the mite gut offer useful information to study the activity of mite digestive enzymes including their inhibitors and gut microflora. PMID:20572792

Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

2010-01-01

398

DIVERSITY OF FEATHER MITES (ACARI: ASTIGMATA) ON DARWIN’S FINCHES  

PubMed Central

Feather mites are a diverse group of ectosymbionts that occur on most species of birds. Although Darwin’s finches are a well-studied group of birds, relatively little is known about their feather mites. Nearly 200 birds across 9 finch species, and from 2 locations on Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos, were dust-ruffled during the 2009 breeding season. We found 8 genera of feather mites; the most prevalent genus was Mesalgoides (53–55%), followed by Trouessartia (40–45%), Amerodectes and Proctophyllodes (26–33%), Xolalgoides (21–27%), Analges and Strelkoviacarus (0–6%), and Dermoglyphus (2–4%). There was no evidence for microclimatic effects (ambient temperature and relative humidity) on mite diversity. Host body mass was significantly correlated with mean feather mite abundance across 7 of 8 well-sampled species of finches. Certhidea olivacea, the smallest species, did not fit this pattern and had a disproportionately high number of mites for its body mass. PMID:23691947

Villa, Scott M.; Le Bohec, Céline; Koop, Jennifer A. H.; Proctor, Heather C.; Clayton, Dale H.

2014-01-01

399

Chemical investigation of aggregation behaviour in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae.  

PubMed

The silk produced by the group-living mite Tetranychus urticae provides group protection and is used as an informative material during habitat settlement, egg laying, mating, and dispersal events. In this context, cues contained in the silk and other materials produced by mites [eggs, black faeces (BF) and white faeces + silk (WFS)] were investigated. Chemical compounds were extracted by hexane or methanol, and choice tests were used to determine the individual attractiveness of each extract. For both solvents, individuals did not respond to the extract from eggs and WFS. BF extracts were attractive for both solvents. After separating the BF methanol extract into four different chemical components using thin layer chromatography, no component was determined to be responsible for mite attraction. This work supports the evidence that the faeces of T. urticae do contain substances that promote behavioural changes. Not particular chemical compounds but combinations of them seem to induce the mites' preference. Moreover, the response of mites to chemicals seemed to be context dependent as mites belonging to populations with different densities differed in their attraction to BF extracts. PMID:24535123

Clotuche, Gwendoline; Yano, Shuichi; Akino, Toshiharu; Amano, Hiroshi

2014-07-01

400

Larval chigger mites collected from small mammals in 3 provinces, Korea.  

PubMed

A total of 9,281 larval chigger mites were collected from small mammals captured at Hwaseong-gun, Gyeonggi-do (Province) (2,754 mites from 30 small mammals), Asan city, Chungcheongnam-do (3,358 mites from 48 mammals), and Jangseong-gun, Jeollanam-do (3,169 for 62 mammals) from April-November 2009 in the Republic of Korea (= Korea) and were identified to species. Leptotrombidium pallidum was the predominant species in Hwaseong (95.8%) and Asan (61.2%), while Leptotrombidium scutellare was the predominant species collected from Jangseong (80.1%). Overall, larval chigger mite indices decreased from April (27.3) to June (4.9), then increased in September (95.2) and to a high level in November (169.3). These data suggest that L. pallidum and L. scutellare are the primary vectors of scrub typhus throughout their range in Korea. While other species of larval chigger mites were also collected with some implications in the transmission of Orientia tsutsugamushi, they only accounted for 11.2% of all larval chigger mites collected from small mammals. PMID:24850971

Lee, In-Yong; Song, Hyeon-Je; Choi, Yeon-Joo; Shin, Sun-Hye; Choi, Min-Kyung; Kwon, So-Hyun; Shin, E-Hyun; Park, Chan; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Park, Kyung-Hee; Jang, Won-Jong

2014-04-01

401

Tasty but protected--first evidence of chemical defense in oribatid mites.  

PubMed

Oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) represent one of the most abundant and speciose groups of microarthropods in the decomposer food webs of soils, but little is known of their top-down regulation by predators. Oribatids are relatively long-lived and have numerous morphological defensive adaptations, and so have been proposed to live in 'enemy-free space'. Most also possess a pair of large exocrine oil glands that produce species-specific mixtures of hydrocarbons, terpenes, aromatics, and alkaloids with presumably allomonal functions, although their adaptive value has never been tested empirically. We developed a protocol that discharges the oil glands of the model oribatid species, Archegozetes longisetosus. and offered 'disarmed' individuals as prey to polyphagous Stenus beetles (Staphylinidae), using untreated mites as controls. Stenus juno fed on disarmed mites with behavioral sequences and success rates similar to those observed when they prey on springtails, a common prey. In contrast, mites from the control group with full glands were almost completely rejected; contact with the gland region elicited a strong reaction and cleaning behavior in the beetle. This is the first evidence of an adaptive value of oribatid mite oil gland secretions for chemical defense. The protocol of discharging oil glands should facilitate future studies on top-down control of oribatid mites that aim to differentiate between morphological and chemical aspects of defensive strategies. PMID:21898169

Heethoff, Michael; Koerner, Lars; Norton, Roy A; Raspotnig, Günther

2011-09-01

402

Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review  

PubMed Central

Palms (Arecaceae) are prominent elements in African traditional medicines. It is, however, a challenge to find detailed information on the ritual use of palms, which are an inextricable part of African medicinal and spiritual systems. This work reviews ritual uses of palms within African ethnomedicine. We studied over 200 publications on uses of African palms and found information about ritual uses in 26 of them. At least 12 palm species in sub-Saharan Africa are involved in various ritual practices: Borassus aethiopum, Cocos nucifera, Dypsis canaliculata, D. fibrosa, D. pinnatifrons, Elaeis guineensis, Hyphaene coriacea, H. petersiana, Phoenix reclinata, Raphia farinifera, R. hookeri, and R. vinifera. In some rituals, palms play a central role as sacred objects, for example the seeds accompany oracles and palm leaves are used in offerings. In other cases, palms are added as a support to other powerful ingredients, for example palm oil used as a medium to blend and make coherent the healing mixture. A better understanding of the cultural context of medicinal use of palms is needed in order to obtain a more accurate and complete insight into palm-based traditional medicines. PMID:25056559

2014-01-01

403

Potential geographic distribution of two invasive cassava green mites.  

PubMed

The cassava green mites Mononychellus tanajoa and M. mcgregori are highly invasive species that rank among the most serious pests of cassava globally. To guide the development of appropriate risk mitigation measures preventing their introduction and spread, this article estimates their potential geographic distribution using the maximum entropy approach to distribution modeling. We compiled 1,232 occurrence records for M. tanajoa and 99 for M. mcgregori, and relied on the WorldClim climate database as a source of environmental predictors. To mitigate the potential impact of uneven sampling efforts, we applied a distance correction filter resulting in 429 occurrence records for M. tanajoa and 55 for M. mcgregori. To test for environmental biases in our occurrence data, we developed models trained and tested with records from different continents, before developing the definitive models using the full record sets. The geographically-structured models revealed good cross-validation for M. tanajoa but not for M. mcgregori, likely reflecting a subtropical bias in M. mcgregori's invasive range in Asia. The definitive models exhibited very good performance and predicted different potential distribution patterns for the two species. Relative to M. tanajoa, M. mcgregori seems better adapted to survive in locations lacking a pronounced dry season, for example across equatorial climates. Our results should help decision-makers assess the site-specific risk of cassava green mite establishment, and develop proportional risk mitigation measures to prevent their introduction and spread. These results should be particularly timely to help address the recent detection of M. mcgregori in Southeast Asia. PMID:25491291

Parsa, Soroush; Hazzi, Nicolas A; Chen, Qing; Lu, Fuping; Herrera Campo, Beatriz Vanessa; Yaninek, John Stephen; Vásquez-Ordóñez, Aymer Andrés

2015-02-01

404

Enzyme production and profile by Aspergillus niger during solid substrate fermentation using palm kernel cake as substrate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oil palm sector is one of the major plantation industries in Malaysia. Palm kernel cake is a byproduct of extracted palm\\u000a kernel oil. Mostly palm kernel cake is wasted or is mixed with other nutrients and used as animal feed, especially for ruminant\\u000a animals. Recently, palm kernel cake has been identified as an important ingredient for the formulation of

L. G. A. Ong; S. Abd-Aziz; S. Noraini; M. I. A. Karim; M. A. Hassan

2004-01-01

405

Phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on apple trees and in surrounding vegetation in southern Finland. Densities and species composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leaf samples were collected from sprayed (n=29) and unsprayed (n=19) apple orchards, from the surrounding vegetation (n=58) and from one arboretum (n=12), altogether from 46 plant species (1–5 samples each). The density of phytoseiid mites averaged 1.2 mites\\/leaf on unsprayed apple trees, but only 0.06 mites\\/leaf on sprayed trees. The phytoseiid density exceeded 1\\/leaf onAesculus hippocastani, Aristolochia macrophylla, Corylus avellana,

T. Tuovinen; J. A. H. Rokx

1991-01-01

406

Demodex mite infestation of unknown significance in a patient with rhinocerebral mucormycosis due to Apophysomyces elegans species complex.  

PubMed

Demodex mites have been reported in the past as a cause of facial rash in immunosuppressed patients. Here, we report an interesting case of possible demodicosis associated with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The association of mites with a fungus was detected on direct microscopic examination of the scrapings of a nasal ulcer. The mite and the fungus were identified as Demodex folliculorum and Apophysomyces elegans species complex, respectively. PMID:23475907

Hallur, Vinaykumar; Singh, Gagandeep; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Kapoor, Rakesh; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

2013-06-01

407

Effect of hinoki ( Chamaecyparis obtusa ) wood-wool in tatami mat on the activity of house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus  

Microsoft Academic Search

To suppress the activity of house dust mites in tatami mats, where they tend to breed, a tatami mat consisting of hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtuse) wood-wool was prepared. The suppressive effect of hinoki wood-wool on house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) was then measured. To investigate the effective period of the wood-wool on the mites, 5-day exposure tests were conducted\\u000a every few

Yasushi Hiramatsu; Naoyuki Matsui; Tatsuro Ohira; Yasunori Imai; Yoshifumi Miyazaki

2006-01-01

408

Bacterial community composition of three candidate insect vectors of palm phytoplasma (Texas phoenix palm decline and lethal yellowing).  

PubMed

Texas Phoenix Palm Decline (TPPD) and Lethal Yellowing are two phytoplasma-linked diseases in palms. The phytoplasma causing TPPD is thought to be transmitted by three putative planthopper vectors, Ormenaria rufifascia, Omolicna joi, and Haplaxius crudus. These insects have been morphologically and molecularly described, and have screened positive for Candidatus Phytoplasma palmae. Individuals from each species were subjected to 16S bacterial community sequencing using the Roche 454 platform, providing new information regarding the previously unexplored bacterial communities present in putative vectors. PMID:25298076

Powell, Christopher M; Hail, Daymon; Potocnjak, Julia; Hanson, J Delton; Halbert, Susan H; Bextine, Blake R

2015-02-01

409

Study on life parameters of the invasive species Octodonta nipae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on different palm species, under laboratory conditions.  

PubMed

In southeastern China, the invasion of the nipa palm hispid Octodonta nipae (Maulik) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) results in devastating damage to palms. Host plants play an important role in the population increases and outbreaks of O. nipae. O. nipae could not complete its development on the Majestic palm (Ravenea rivularis Jumelle & Perrier), and females did not lay eggs on Chinese fan palm (Livistona chinensis R. Brown). However, this insect species both completed development and laid eggs on Chinese windmill palm (Trachycarpus fortunei (Hooker) H. Wendland), Canary Island date palm (Phoenix canariensis Chabaud), and pygmy date palm (Phoenix roebelenii O' Brien). The demographic characteristics of O. nipae reared on Chinese windmill palm, Canary Island date palm, and pygmy date palm were compared with an age-stage, two-sex life table. In this study, the developmental periods from egg to adult varied from 42.1 d on Chinese windmill palm to 49.8 d on pygmy date palm. The survivorship from egg to adult on Chinese windmill palm, Canary Island date palm, and pygmy date palm was 77.5, 79.4, and 66.7%, respectively. Although the adult longevity and the mean fecundity for individuals reared on Chinese windmill palm, Canary Island date palm, and pygmy date palm were not significantly different, there were significant differences in the intrinsic rate of increase, the finite rate, and the mean generation time among palm species, and the values of intrinsic rate of increase and finite rate were higher for populations reared on Chinese windmill palm and Canary Island date palm (0.0313 and 1.0318 d(-1) and 0.0278 and 1.0282 d(-1), respectively) and lower for populations reared on pygmy date palm (0.0192 and 1.0194 d(-1)). However, mean generation time was shorter on Chinese windmill palm (124.11 d) and Canary Island date palm (129.62 d) and longer on pygmy date palm (166.03 d). Our study indicated that different hosts affected life parameters of O. nipae, with the most preferred hosts being the Chinese windmill palm and Canary Island date palm. These results may be useful for the design of culture management strategies for O. nipae. PMID:25195440

Hou, Youming; Miao, Yunxin; Zhang, Zhiyong

2014-08-01

410

Longevity and Developmental Stability in the Dung Fly Sepsis cynipsea, as Affected by the Ectoparasitic Mite, Pediculoides mesembrinae  

PubMed Central

Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is a widely employed measure of developmental stability. It has been found to increase with many stressors including parasite infection. Associations between parasites and FA may exist for several reasons in addition to parasites being the direct cause of increased FA. Developmentally stable individuals may have superior immune systems, and be less susceptible to parasite infection, and/or may be less exposed to parasites than developmentally unstable ones. Mites negatively impact host fitness in a number of insects, and if FA is a reflection of general genetic quality, as has been proposed, associations between mite number and FA are predicted. Potential relationships were investigated between an ectoparasitic mite, Pediculoides mesembrinae (Canestrini) (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) and FA in the common dung fly Sepsis cynipsea (L.) (Diptera: Sepsidae). While it was found that mite infested flies died much faster than flies without mites, indicating that mites indeed stress their hosts, counter to expectations, no associations between mites and FA were found in any analyses. Additionally, FA in mite-infected flies generally did not differ from previously published FA data from uninfected S. cynipsea. Nevertheless, parasitized males tended to be somewhat less asymmetrical than non-parasitized males, but based on our data, it does not appear that mite infestation is generally associated with developmental stability in S. cynipsea. PMID:20053121

Martin, Oliver Y.; Hosken, David J.

2009-01-01

411

The cat fur mite, Lynxacarus radovskyi Tenorio, 1974 (Acarina: Astigmata: Listrophoridae) from cat, Felis catus in peninsular Malaysia.  

PubMed

The cat fur mite, Lynxacarus radovskyi Tenorio, 1974 (Acarina: Astigmata: Listrophoridae) is reported from cats, Felis catus from three sites in peninsular Malaysia. The first site is a Malay village, Kampong Menteri in Taiping, Perak, where the mites were found on local pet cats. The other two sites are urban cities of Kuala Lumpur, in the Federal Territory and Georgetown, in the island of Penang. Mites from the urban areas were collected from stray cats. Although several ectoparasites (fleas, mites, ticks and lice) have been previously reported, L. radovskyi is recorded herein for the first time on cats from peninsular Malaysia. PMID:22735855

Jeffery, J; Norhidayu, S; Mohd Zain, S N; Noor Hayati, M I; Nurazila, B

2012-06-01

412

Recent developments in the use of acoustic sensors and signal processing tools to target early infestations of Red Palm Weevil in agricultural environments  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Much of the damage caused by red palm weevil larvae to date palms, ornamental palms, and palm offshoots could be mitigated by early detection and treatment of infestations. Acoustic technology has potential to enable early detection, but the short, high-frequency sound impulses produced by red palm ...

413

Recent developments in the use of acoustic sensors and signal processing tools to target early infestations of red palm weevil (Coleopter: Curculionidae) in agricultural environments  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Much of the damage caused by red palm weevil larvae to date palms, ornamental palms, and palm offshoots could be mitigated by early detection and treatment of infestations. Acoustic technology has potential to enable early detection, but the short, high-frequency sound impulses produced by red palm ...

414

The ecological distribution of reproductive mode in oribatid mites, as related to biological complexity.  

PubMed

The high incidence of asexuality in oribatid mites presents an unusual opportunity for examining hypotheses for the maintenance of sex. There is a presumed range in age of asexual species: many oribatid species are phylogenetically clustered, occurring in speciose early-derivative families or genera without sexual species, while others are phylogenetically isolated from other asexual species, occurring in later derivative taxa with sexual congeners. We examined the distribution of oribatid mite reproductive mode in soil of corn fields, grassy and shrub fields, and forests in central New York State (three replicate plots of each type, with 25 samples per plot), to test three ecological predictions from current theory. (1) If overall biotic uncertainty, as generated by competitors and predators, mediates the ecological distribution of oribatid mites, then the proportion of asexual oribatid mites should be negatively correlated with biological diversity; we examine this prediction using literature data as well. (2) If Muller's Ratchet (the stochastic loss of best genotypes, which is independent of environment), mediates the success of asexuality, then no ecological pattern should exist. (3) If general purpose genotypes are characteristic of asexual oribatid mites, their habitat distribution should be broader than that of sexual species. For each plot the level of asexuality was compared to indices of overall biotic diversity, as calculated from the pooled oribatid mite (competitors) and mesostigmatid mite (predator) communities. We found no negative correlation in this relationship in our own data or in the literature analysis of 290 faunal surveys from 50 literature sources, so we reject biotic uncertainty as an important determinant of reproductive mode distribution. When only data on phylogenetically clustered asexuals are considered, there is instead a positive correlation between asexuality and diversity that is not explained. Because of the latter pattern we tentatively reject Muller's Ratchet as the primary factor maintaining reproductive mode in these mites, but cannot reject it for isolated asexual species. Niche breadth in sexual and asexual oribatid mites provides no support for widespread general purpose genotypes but broad patterns in the literature suggest that the idea needs further investigation. Possible complicating or unknown factors that are discussed include historical disturbance in the study area, the relationship between parasitism and general biotic diversity, and the level and source of genetic diversity in asexual oribatid mites. PMID:16900312

Cianciolo, Jennifer M; Norton, Roy A

2006-01-01

415

Effectiveness of eriophyid mites for biological control of weedy plants and challenges for future research.  

PubMed

Eriophyid mites have been considered to have a high potential for use as classical biological control agents of weeds. We reviewed known examples of the use of eriophyid mites to control weedy plants to learn how effective they have been. In the past 13 years, since Rosenthal's 1996 review, 13 species have undergone some degree of pre-release evaluation (Aceria genistae, A. lantanae, Aceria sp. [boneseed leaf buckle mite (BLBM)], A. salsolae, A. sobhiani, A. solstitialis, A. tamaricis, A. thalgi, A. thessalonicae, Cecidophyes rouhollahi, Floracarus perrepae, Leipothrix dipsacivagus and L. knautiae), but only four (A. genistae, Aceria sp. [BLBM], C. rouhollahi and F. perrepae) have been authorized for introduction. Prior to this, three species (Aceria chondrillae, A. malherbae and Aculus hyperici) were introduced and have become established. Although these three species impact the fitness of their host plant, it is not clear how much they have contributed to reduction of the population of the target weed. In some cases, natural enemies, resistant plant genotypes, and adverse abiotic conditions have reduced the ability of eriophyid mites to control target weed populations. Some eriophyid mites that are highly coevolved with their host plant may be poor prospects for biological control because of host plant resistance or tolerance of the plant to the mite. Susceptibility of eriophyids to predators and pathogens may also prevent them from achieving population densities necessary to reduce host plant populations. Short generation time, high intrinsic rate of increase and high mobility by aerial dispersal imply that eriophyids should have rapid rates of evolution. This raises concerns that eriophyids may be more likely to lose efficacy over time due to coevolution with the target weed or that they may be more likely to adapt to nontarget host plants compared to insects, which have a longer generation time and slower population growth rate. Critical areas for future research include life history, foraging and dispersal behavior, mechanisms controlling host plant specificity, and evolutionary stability of eriophyid mites. This knowledge is critical for designing and interpreting laboratory and field experiments to measure host plant specificity and potential impact on target and nontarget plants, which must be known before they can be approved for release. One of the more successful examples of an eriophyid mite controlling an invasive alien weed is Phyllocoptes fructiphilus, whose impact is primarily due to transmission of a virus pathogenic to the target, Rosa multiflora. Neither the mite nor the virus originated from the target weed, which suggests that using "novel enemies" may sometimes be an effective strategy for using eriophyid mites. PMID:19760101

Smith, L; de Lillo, E; Amrine, J W

2010-07-01

416

FISHERY REGULATION VIA OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY1 WILLIAM J. PALM'  

E-print Network

FISHERY REGULATION VIA OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY1 WILLIAM J. PALM' ABSTRACT This paper attempts to show how control theory can be used to formulate a regulatory scheme for fisheries. The regulatory, is one method within the larger framework of op- timal control theory. Other optimal control methods have

417

Status of the PALM-3000 high order adaptive optics instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the status of PALM-3000, the second generation adaptive optics instrument for the 5.1 meter Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. PALM-3000 was released as a facility class instrument in October 2011, and has since been used on the Hale telescope a total of over 250 nights. In the past year, the PALM-3000 team introduced several instrument upgrades, including the release of the 32x32 pupil sampling mode which allows for correction on fainter guide stars, the upgrade of wavefront sensor relay optics, the diagnosis and repair of hardware problems, and the release of software improvements. We describe the performance of the PALM-3000 instrument as a result of these upgrades, and provide on-sky results. In the 32x32 pupil sampling mode (15.8 cm per subaperture), we have achieved K-band strehl ratios as high as 11% on a 14.4 mv star, and in the 64x64 pupil sampling mode (8.1 cm per subaperture), we have achieved K-band strehl ratios as high as 86% on stars brighter than 7th mv.

Burruss, Rick S.; Dekany, Richard G.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Shelton, J. C.; Wallace, J. K.; Tesch, Jonathan A.; Palmer, Dean L.; Hale, David; Bartos, Randall; Rykoski, Kevin M.; Heffner, Carolyn M.; Eriksen, Jamey E.; Vescelus, Fred

2014-07-01

418

MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF EGYPTIAN DATE PALM: 11.RAPD FINGERPRINTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

RAPD fingerprints were performed on DNA extracted trom the internal leaves of the offshoots of five date palm cultivars (Samanie, Seaweae, Hyeane, Amhat and Zaghlool). Two random primers (OPC2 and OPD16) out of ten were selected on the basis of the number and frequency of polymorphic bands produced. Distinguishable RAPD fingerprints among the different varieties were obtainable if suitable primers

Mahmoud M. Saker; Hamdy A. Moursy

419

A Development Plan for the Palm Beach County Library System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Palm Beach County Library System is evaluated for its program to date and for its existing public library resources in the County. Population trends are examined and a realistic program for the development of library services over a six-year period is recommended. The estimated costs for implementation of these recommendations are outlined in…

Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA.

420

NUTRITIONAL DYNAMICS OF DATE PALM (PHOENIX DACTYLIFERA L.)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Leaves and fruit of date palms (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cv. 'Deglet Noor' grown under commercial conditions were assessed during the course of an entire growing season for nutrient levels of most macro- and micro-nutrients. The different nutrients showed various patterns in the different organs thro...

421

REAR ELEVATION WITH BASE OF PALM TREE IN FOREGROUND. VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

REAR ELEVATION WITH BASE OF PALM TREE IN FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Type 9, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

422

VIEW OF REAR YARD WITH PLUMERIA TREES AND SMALL PALMS. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF REAR YARD WITH PLUMERIA TREES AND SMALL PALMS. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Types 8 and 11, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

423

The Palm Beach County Family Study Second Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Children's Services Council (CSC) of Palm Beach County commissioned Chapin Hall Center for Children to conduct a longitudinal study to examine the effects of this service system on children and families. The goal of the longitudinal study is to describe the characteristics and needs of families the service system is intended to serve, how they…

Spielberger, Julie; Lyons, Sandra; Gouvea, Marcia; Haywood, Thomas; Winje, Carolyn

2007-01-01

424

Sulphanilamide as a Preservative for Sweet Juices from Palm Trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE sweet juices from palm trees (date, brab, coconut and sago) which grow abundantly in the tropics are collected for toddy (fermented juice) or for conversion into liquor. The fresh juice is found to contain about 10-14 per cent of sucrose and could be a useful source of sugar, thus replacing cane sugar and releasing fertile land for cereals.

D. G. Walawalkar

1950-01-01

425

Resources for College Students in Need PALM BEACH COUNTY  

E-print Network

to those struggling with homelessness. Contact them at 561.494.0125 or http://www.thelordsplace.org/. West service agencies and provides the following services: Homeless Prevention, Homeless Intervention, Traveler. The Homeless Coalition of Palm Beach County, Inc. works to advocate for the rights of the homeless and serves

Fernandez, Eduardo

426

VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING DATE PALMS. NOTE TRELLIS ON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING DATE PALMS. NOTE TRELLIS ON TYPE 11 FACILITY, FACILITY 808. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

427

The conservation value of botanic garden palm collections  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a case study on the differing roles of temperate and tropical ex situ facilities in supporting the conservation of a major tropical plant group. The conservation value of botanic garden palm collections is reviewed by using (1) survey data from 35 collections in 20 countries, and (2) case studies examining the conservation value and utility of botanic garden

M. Maunder; B. Lyte; J. Dransfield; W. Baker

2001-01-01

428

Large estragole fluxes from oil palms in Borneo  

EPA Science Inventory

During two field campaigns (OP3 and ACES), which ran in Borneo in 2008, we measured large emissions of estragole in ambient air above oil palm canopies flower enclosures. However, we did not detect this compound at a nearby rainforest. Estragole is a known attractant of the Afric...

429

CELLULOSE EXTRACTION FROM PALM KERNEL CAKE USING LIQUID PHASE OXIDATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cellulose is widely used in many aspect and industries such as food industry, pharmaceutical, paint, polymers, and many more. Due to the increasing demand in the market, studies and work to produce cellulose are still rapidly developing. In this work, liquid phase oxidation was used to extract cellulose from palm kernel cake to separate hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The method

FARM YAN YAN; DUDUKU KRISHNIAH; MARIANI RAJIN; AWANG BONO

430

Bio oil from palm oil industry solid waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fossil fuel is the most important energy resources for human life whilst its production tend to decrease in recent year, hence it is needed an alternative renewable energy resources for replacement. Many researches were developed to investigate an alternative energy resource. The conversion of biomass to bio oil is one of the prospective alternative energy resources. This research used palm

Syaiful Bahri; Edy Saputra; I. Detrina; Yusnitawati; Muhdarina

2010-01-01

431

Esperanza Fire near Palm Springs, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Esperanza fire started on October 26 in the dry brush near Palm Springs, CA. By the time it was contained 6 days later, the fire had consumed 40,200 acres, and destroyed 34 homes and 20 outbuildings. Racing through grass, brush, and timber, the blaze had forced hundreds to evacuate, and it killed five firefighters who were working to protect homes. Fire officials are reporting the cause of the blaze as arson. In this ASTER image composite of visible and infrared bands, burned areas are shown in shades of red, vegetation is green, brown vegetation is brown and asphalt and concrete are blue-gray.

With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

Size: 21.4 by 26.9 kilometers (13.2 by 16.6 miles) Location: 33.6 degrees North latitude, 116.8 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 7, 3 and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 15 meters (49.2 feet) and 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: November 3, 2006

2006-01-01

432

Degumming of crude palm oil by membrane filtration.  

PubMed

The application of membrane separation in palm oil refining process has potential for energy and cost savings. The conventional refining of crude palm oil results in loss of oil and a contaminated effluent. Degumming of crude palm oil by membrane technology is conducted in this study. The objective of this research is to study the feasibility of membrane filtration for the removal of phospholipids in the degumming of crude palm oil, including analyses of phosphorus content, carotene content free fatty acids (as palmitic acid), colour and volatile matter. A PCI membrane module was used which was equipped with polyethersulfone membranes having a molecular weight cut off of 9,000 (type ES209). In this study, phosphorus content was the most important parameter monitored. The membrane effectively removed phospholipids resulting in a permeate with a phosphorus content of less than 0.3 ppm The percentage removal of phosphorus was 96.4% and was considered as a good removal. Lovibond colour was reduced from 27R 50Y to 20R 30Y. The percentage removal of carotene was 15.8%. The removal of colour was considered good but the removal of carotene was considered insignificant by the membrane. Free fatty acids and volatile matter were not removed. Typical of membrane operations, the permeate flux decreased with time and must be improved in order to be adopted on an industrial scale. Membrane technology was found to have good potential in crude palm oil degumming. However, an appropriate method has to be developed to clean the membranes for reuse. PMID:10595436

Ong, K K; Fakhru'l-Razi, A; Baharin, B S; Hassan, M A

1999-01-01

433

Determination of mechanisms of host plant resistance to the Banks grass mite Oligonychus pratensis (Banks) (Acari: Tetranychidae) in selected maize inbreds  

E-print Network

Terranychus urticae Koch, complicates mite control (Pickett and Gilstrap 1985). Laboratory studies have shown that a combination of insecticides with a synergist were highly toxic to mites, but field tests are needed to verify the effectiveness...

Krakowsky, Matthew David

1999-01-01

434

Rhinovirus exacerbates house-dust-mite induced lung disease in adult mice.  

PubMed

Human rhinovirus is a key viral trigger for asthma exacerbations. To date, murine studies investigating rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airways disease have employed systemic sensitisation/intranasal challenge with ovalbumin. In this study, we combined human-rhinovirus infection with a clinically relevant mouse model of aero-allergen exposure using house-dust-mite in an attempt to more accurately understand the links between human-rhinovirus infection and exacerbations of asthma. Adult BALB/c mice were intranasally exposed to low-dose house-dust-mite (or vehicle) daily for 10 days. On day 9, mice were inoculated with human-rhinovirus-1B (or UV-inactivated human-rhinovirus-1B). Forty-eight hours after inoculation, we assessed bronchoalveolar cellular inflammation, levels of relevant cytokines/serum antibodies, lung function and responsiveness/sensitivity to methacholine. House-dust-mite exposure did not result in a classical TH2-driven response, but was more representative of noneosinophilic asthma. However, there were significant effects of house-dust-mite exposure on most of the parameters measured including increased cellular inflammation (primarily macrophages and neutrophils), increased total IgE and house-dust-mite-specific IgG1 and increased responsiveness/sensitivity to methacholine. There were limited effects of human-rhinovirus-1B infection alone, and the combination of the two insults resulted in additive increases in neutrophil levels and lung parenchymal responses to methacholine (tissue elastance). We conclude that acute rhinovirus infection exacerbates house-dust-mite-induced lung disease in adult mice. The similarity of our results using the naturally occurring allergen house-dust-mite, to previous studies using ovalbumin, suggests that the exacerbation of allergic airways disease by rhinovirus infection could act via multiple or conserved mechanisms. PMID:24632596

Phan, Jennifer A; Kicic, Anthony; Berry, Luke J; Fernandes, Lynette B; Zosky, Graeme R; Sly, Peter D; Larcombe, Alexander N

2014-01-01

435

Rhinovirus Exacerbates House-Dust-Mite Induced Lung Disease in Adult Mice  

PubMed Central

Human rhinovirus is a key viral trigger for asthma exacerbations. To date, murine studies investigating rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airways disease have employed systemic sensitisation/intranasal challenge with ovalbumin. In this study, we combined human-rhinovirus infection with a clinically relevant mouse model of aero-allergen exposure using house-dust-mite in an attempt to more accurately understand the links between human-rhinovirus infection and exacerbations of asthma. Adult BALB/c mice were intranasally exposed to low-dose house-dust-mite (or vehicle) daily for 10 days. On day 9, mice were inoculated with human-rhinovirus-1B (or UV-inactivated human-rhinovirus-1B). Forty-eight hours after inoculation, we assessed bronchoalveolar cellular inflammation, levels of relevant cytokines/serum antibodies, lung function and responsiveness/sensitivity to methacholine. House-dust-mite exposure did not result in a classical TH2-driven response, but was more representative of noneosinophilic asthma. However, there were significant effects of house-dust-mite exposure on most of the parameters measured including increased cellular inflammation (primarily macrophages and neutrophils), increased total IgE and house-dust-mite-specific IgG1 and increased responsiveness/sensitivity to methacholine. There were limited effects of human-rhinovirus-1B infection alone, and the combination of the two insults resulted in additive increases in neutrophil levels and lung parenchymal responses to methacholine (tissue elastance). We conclude that acute rhinovirus infection exacerbates house-dust-mite-induced lung disease in adult mice. The similarity of our results using the naturally occurring allergen house-dust-mite, to previous studies using ovalbumin, suggests that the exacerbation of allergic airways disease by rhinovirus infection could act via multiple or conserved mechanisms. PMID:24632596

Phan, Jennifer A.; Kicic, Anthony; Berry, Luke J.; Fernandes, Lynette B.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Sly, Peter D.; Larcombe, Alexander N.

2014-01-01

436

Mar, a MITE family of hAT transposons in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Background Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are short, nonautonomous DNA elements flanked by subterminal or terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) with no coding capacity. MITEs were originally recognized as important components of plant genomes, where they can attain extremely high copy numbers, and are also found in several animal genomes, including mosquitoes, fish and humans. So far, few MITEs have been described in Drosophila. Results Herein we describe the distribution and evolution of Mar, a MITE family of hAT transposons, in Drosophilidae species. In silico searches and PCR screening showed that Mar distribution is restricted to the willistoni subgroup of the Drosophila species, and a phylogenetic analysis of Mar indicates that this element may have originated prior to the diversification of these species. Most of the Mar copies in D. willistoni present conserved target site duplications and TIRs, indicating recent mobilization of these sequences. We also identified relic copies of potentially full-length Mar transposon in D. tropicalis and D. willistoni. The phylogenetic relationship among transposases from the putative full-length Mar and other hAT superfamily elements revealed that Mar is placed into the recently determined Buster group of hAT transposons. Conclusion On the basis of the obtained data, we can suggest that the origin of these Mar MITEs occurred before the subgroup willistoni speciation, which started about 5.7 Mya. The Mar relic transposase existence indicates that these MITEs originated by internal deletions and suggests that the full-length transposon was recently functional in D. willistoni, promoting Mar MITEs mobilization. PMID:22935191

2012-01-01

437

Effect of stored product mite extracts on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.  

PubMed

Stored product mites commonly occur in agricultural work environments and sometimes in homes in significant numbers. They are a source of allergens that sensitize and induce allergic reactions. This may include atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the common species of storage mites are the sources of molecules that influence the function of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells that regulate the trafficking of inflammatory and immune cells into the dermis during allergic reactions and other skin diseases. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were challenged with varying doses of extracts of the storage mites Acarus siro L., Chortoglyphus arcuatus (Troupeau), Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank), or Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) and the secretion of cytokines and expression of adhesion molecules were measured. The role of endotoxin and protein in inducing these responses was evaluated. These stored product mite extracts induced secretion of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor. Some of these effects were induced by protein present in the extracts, some were induced by endotoxin, and some were induced by other substances. C. arcuatus and T. putrescentiae extracts also down-regulated tumor necrosis factor a-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Stored product mite extracts contain an assortment of molecules, including endotoxins and proteins, which modulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules and the secretion of cytokines by microvascular endothelial cells. These modulating properties varied among mite species indicating that each mite species has a unique set of molecules that is responsible for its activity. PMID:23270170

Elder, B Laurel; Morgan, Marjorie S; Arlian, Larry G

2012-11-01

438

Effectiveness of education for control of house dust mites and cockroaches in Seoul, Korea  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the efficacy of health education in reducing indoor arthropod allergens in Seoul. The mite control measures comprised the use of mite-proof mattress and pillow coverings, regular washing of potentially infested materials, maintenance of a low humidity, removal of carpets, and frequent vacuum cleaning. Cockroach control measures included trapping, application of insecticides, and protecting food. Of 201 homes enrolled in October 1999, 63 volunteers were included in a 2-year follow-up survey between April 2000 and January 2002. Before intervention, the density of mites/g of dust varied greatly; 27.1/g in children's bedding, 20/g in adult bedding, 7.2/g on the floors of children's bedrooms, 6.8/g in sofas, 5.9/g on the floors of adult's bedrooms, 3.9/g on living room floors, 3.7/g in carpets, and 1.9 mites/g on kitchen floors. The predominant mite species and house percentages infested were; Dermatophagoides farinae 93%, D. pteronyssinus 9%, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae 8%. Comparing 1999 and 2001 infestations, before and after 25 mo of education, mite abundance was reduced by 98%, from 23.7 to 0.57 mites/g of dust. In 1999, cockroaches were detected in 62% homes: 36% Blattella germanica and 35% Periplaneta spp., including 9% double infestations of B. germanica and P. americana. Following intervention, cockroach infestation rates decreased to 22% of houses in 2000 and 23% in 2001. We conclude that continuous and repetitive health education resulted in the effective control of domestic arthropods. PMID:16514286

Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Lee, In-Yong; Lee, Jongweon; Ree, Han-Il; Hong, Chein-Soo

2006-01-01

439

Effect of Stored Product Mite Extracts on Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells  

PubMed Central

Stored product mites commonly occur in agricultural work environments and sometimes in homes in significant numbers. They are a source of allergens that sensitize and induce allergic reactions. This may include atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the common species of storage mites are the sources of molecules that influence the function of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells that regulate the trafficking of inflammatory and immune cells into the dermis during allergic reactions and other skin diseases. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were challenged with varying doses of extracts of the storage mites Acarus siro L., Chortoglyphus arcuatus (Troupeau), Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank), or Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) and the secretion of cytokines and expression of adhesion molecules were measured. The role of endotoxin and protein in inducing these responses was evaluated. These stored product mite extracts induced secretion of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor. Some of these effects were induced by protein present in the extracts, some were induced by endotoxin, and some were induced by other substances. C. arcuatus and T. putrescentiae extracts also down-regulated tumor necrosis factor ?-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Stored product mite extracts contain an assortment of molecules, including endotoxins and proteins, which modulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules and the secretion of cytokines by microvascular endothelial cells. These modulating properties varied among mite species indicating that each mite species has a unique set of molecules that is responsible for its activity. PMID:23270170

ELDER, B. LAUREL; MORGAN, MARJORIE S.; ARLIAN, LARRY G.

2012-01-01

440

Evaluation of dry-adapted strains of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus for spider mite control on cucumber, strawberry and pepper  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this study was to evaluate spider mite control efficacy of two dry-adapted strains of Neoseiulus californicus. Performance of these strains were compared to a commercial strain of Phytoseiulus persimilis on whole cucumber, pepper and strawberry plants infested with Tetranychus urticae at 50 ± 5% RH. Under these dry conditions predators’ performance was very different on each host plant. On

E. Palevsky; A. Walzer; S. Gal; P. Schausberger

2008-01-01

441

Observations on the removal of brood inoculated with Tropilaelaps mercedesae (Mesostigmata: Laelapidae) and the mite’s reproductive success in Apis mellifera colonies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This study assessed the response of Apis mellifera to brood deliberately infested with Tropilaelaps mercedesae. The reproductive success of T. mercedesae in mite-inoculated and naturally infested brood was also compared. The presence of T. mercedesae inside brood cells significantly affected brood ...

442

Plant defence in a tritrophic context : chemical and behavioural analysis of the interactions between spider mites, predatory mites and various plant species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch is a serious pest in field crops, glasshouse vegetables and fruit crops. It is a generalist herbivore with several hundreds of host plant species. Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot is one of its natural enemies. Investigations of the tritrophic system of plant, T. urticae and P. persimilis will contribute to a better knowledge about the direct

Boom van den C. E. M

2003-01-01

443

Comparison of Parasitic Mites in Russian-Hybrid and Italian Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies across Three Different Locations in North Carolina  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most economically important parasites of honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hyme- noptera: Apidae), colonies are the parasitic mitesVarroadestructor Anderson & Trueman andAcarapis woodi (Rennie). Research has shown that mite-tolerant stocks are effective means to reduce mite infestations within colonies, but it is unclear whether the stocks available commercially are viable means of mite control because they are likely to

David R. Tarpy; Joshua Summers; Jennifer J. Keller

2007-01-01

444

JOURNAL OF OIL PALM RESEARCH SPECIAL ISSUE ON MALAYSIA-MIT BIOTECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME: VOLUME 2 -OIL PALM METABOLIC ENGINEERING (JULY 2008)  

E-print Network

30 JOURNAL OF OIL PALM RESEARCH SPECIAL ISSUE ON MALAYSIA-MIT BIOTECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME: VOLUME 2 - OIL PALM METABOLIC ENGINEERING (JULY 2008) NON-RADIOACTIVE ASSAY FOR ACETYL-CoA CARBOXYLASE 2007. ABSTRACT Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a key enzyme in oil biosynthesis and is critical for the oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

445

INCIDENCE OF THE TWO DATE PALM PATHOGENS, THIELAVIOPSIS PARADOXA AND T. PUNCTULATA IN SOIL FROM DATE PALM PLANTATIONS IN ELX, SOUTH-EAST SPAIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study reports the frequent isolation of the two date palm pathogens Thielaviopsis paradoxa (de Seynes) Hohn and T. punctulata (Hennebert) Paulin, Harrington et McNew from soil of date palm plantations at Elx, south-east Spain, using dilu- tion plate, direct soil plating or by soil treatment either with acetic acid or phenol. The two species showed a high isolation

Samir K. Abdullah; Leticia Asensio; Elena Monfort; Sonia Gomez-Vidal; Jesus Salinas; Luis V. Lopez Lorca; Hans B. Jansson

446

Efficacy of aggregation pheromone in trapping red palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier) and rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros Linn.) from infested coconut palms.  

PubMed

Red palm weevil and Rhinoceros beetle are the major pests inflicting severe damage to coconut palms. Due to ineffectiveness of the current management practices to control the two important pests on coconut, a study was conducted to know the attractiveness of red palm weevil and rhinoceros beetle to aggregation pheromone. Olfactometer studies indicated that the aggregation pheromone of red palm weevil and rhinoceros beetle attracted significantly more number of weevils (13.4 females and 7.6 male weevils) and beetles (6.5 male and 12.3 female beetles), respectively than control. Similarly, field studies found that both 750 and 1000 mg pheromone dosage lures of red palm weevil and rhinoceros beetle trapped significantly higher numbers of weevils (695.80 and 789 weevils, respectively) and beetles (98 and 108 beetles, respectively) in traps (P < 0.05), respectively. On an average (n = 6 field trials) 80-85% red palm weevil and 72-78% rhinoceros beetle population got trapped. Observations indicated activity of red palm weevil throughout the year and of rhinoceros beetle from September to March around Bangalore, South India. Pheromone traps for red palm weevil can be placed in fields from June to August and October to December and September to February for rhinoceros beetle. Population reductions of the two coleopteran pests by pheromone traps are compatible with mechanical and cultural management tools with cumulative effects. PMID:24813002

Chakravarthy, A K; Chandrashekharaiah, M; Kandakoor, Subhash B; Nagaraj, D N

2014-05-01

447

FIELD TRIALS USING THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN, METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE (DEUTERMYCETES: HYPHOMYCETE) TO CONTROL THE ECTOPARASITIC MITE, VARROA DESTRUCTOR (ACARI: VARROIDAE) IN HONEY BEE COLONIES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The potential for Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschinkoff) to control the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman), in honey bee colonies was evaluated in field trials. Peak mortality of Varroa mites occurred 3-4 days after the conidia were applied; however, the mites were still infect...

448

Scabies Mites Alter the Skin Microbiome and Promote Growth of Opportunistic Pathogens in a Porcine Model  

PubMed Central

Background The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei) are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. Conclusions/Significance This is the first experimental in vivo evidence supporting previous assumptions that establishment of pathogens follow scabies infection. Our findings provide an explanation for a biologically important aspect of the disease pathogenesis. The methods developed from this pig trial will serve as a guide to analyze human clinical samples. Studies building on this will offer implications for development of novel intervention strategies against the mites and the secondary infections. PMID:24875186

Swe, Pearl M.; Zakrzewski, Martha; Kelly, Andrew; Krause, Lutz; Fischer, Katja

2014-01-01

449

Scabies Mite Peritrophins Are Potential Targets of Human Host Innate Immunity  

PubMed Central

Background Pruritic scabies lesions caused by Sarcoptes scabiei burrowing in the stratum corneum of human skin facilitate opportunistic bacterial infections. Emerging resistance to current therapeutics emphasizes the need to identify novel targets for protective intervention. We have characterized several protein families located in the mite gut as crucial factors for host-parasite interactions. Among these multiple proteins inhibit human complement, presumably to avoid complement-mediated damage of gut epithelial cells. Peritrophins are major components of the peritrophic matrix often found in the gut of arthropods. We hypothesized that a peritrophin, if abundant in the scabies mite gut, could be an activator of complement. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel full length scabies mite peritrophin (SsPTP1) was identified in a cDNA library from scabies mites. The amino acid sequence revealed four putative chitin binding domains (CBD). Recombinant expression of one CBD of the highly repetitive SsPTP1 sequence as TSP-hexaHis-fusion protein resulted in soluble protein, which demonstrated chitin binding activity in affinity chromatography assays. Antibodies against a recombinant SsPTP1 fragment were used to immunohistochemically localize native SsPTP1 in the mite gut and in fecal pellets within the upper epidermis, co-localizing with serum components such as host IgG and complement. Enzymatic deglycosylation confirmed strong N- and O-glycosylation of the native peritrophin. Serum incubation followed by immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody against mannan binding lectin (MBL), the recognition molecule of the lectin pathway of human complement activation, indicated that MBL may specifically bind to glycosylated SsPTP1. Conclusions/Significance This study adds a new aspect to the accumulating evidence that complement plays a major role in scabies mite biology. It identifies a novel peritrophin localized in the mite gut as a potential target of the lectin pathway of the complement cascade. These initial findings indicate a novel role of scabies mite peritrophins in triggering a host innate immune response within the mite gut. PMID:21980545

Holt, Deborah C.; Kemp, Dave J.; Fischer, Katja

2011-01-01

450

Severe ulceronecrotic dermatitis associated with mite infestation in the critically endangered Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis).  

PubMed

The entire range of the critically endangered Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis) consists of less than 20 km(2) of riparian habitat in the Amargosa River drainage of the Mojave Desert in southern California. In September 2010, deformities on ears and chiggers on the ears and genitalia were detected, with some individuals so severely affected that they were missing ear pinnae altogether. Follow-up trapping was performed to document the presence of mites and mite-associated disease, and molecular characterization was performed on the mites. Of 151 Amargosa voles sampled from February to April of 2011, 60 (39.7%) voles had hard orange mites adhered to some part of their bodies, on ears of 46 (76.7%), on genitalia of 11 (18.3%), and near mammary tissue of 13 (21.7%) voles. Gross lesions were not detected on genitalia, but 47% of all individuals examined showed pinnal lesions and deformities, which included alopecia, swelling, marginal necrosis, and ulceration, as well as scarring, scabbing, and loss of pinna mass covering 25-100% of the pinnae. Biopsies revealed parakeratotic hyperkeratosis and acanthosis with diffuse neutrophilic exocytosis and dense necrotic granulocytes in the epidermis and superficial dermis associated with focal erosion and ulceration. In the underlying dermis, there were dense pleocellular inflammatory cell infiltrates composed primarily of necrotic granulocytes and multifocal hemorrhage. In some samples, mite mouthparts could be seen penetrating the superficial epidermis associated with focal necrosis, and mite fragments were found on the surface epidermis and within hair follicles. Microscopic examination of the mites documented that they were a larval trombiculid in the genus Neotrombicula with anatomical features that most closely resemble Neotrombicula microti, based on scutal shape, setation, and texture. PCR of 2 mite pools (each consisting of 3 mites from an individual animal) amplified 331 bp amplicons, which had 92-97% homology with the 18S rRNA gene of Leptotrombidium deliense, although coverage of Trombiculidae in GenBank is sparse. The severity and prevalence of lesions due to this chigger were atypical and distinct. Severe clinical trombiculiasis in this endangered species could negatively impact individual health and fitness. PMID:23458565

Foley, Janet; Branston, Tammy; Woods, Leslie; Clifford, Deana

2013-08-01

451

Novel Scabies Mite Serpins Inhibit the Three Pathways of the Human Complement System  

PubMed Central

Scabies is a parasitic infestation of the skin by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei that causes significant morbidity worldwide, in particular within socially disadvantaged populations. In order to identify mechanisms that enable the scabies mite to evade human immune defenses, we have studied molecules associated with proteolytic systems in the mite, including two novel scabies mite serine protease inhibitors (SMSs) of the serpin superfamily. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that within mite-infected human skin SMSB4 (54 kDa) and SMSB3 (47 kDa) were both localized in the mite gut and feces. Recombinant purified SMSB3 and SMSB4 did not inhibit mite serine and cysteine proteases, but did inhibit mammalian serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin, albeit inefficiently. Detailed functional analysis revealed that both serpins interfered with all three pathways of the human complement system at different stages of their activation. SMSB4 inhibited mostly the initial and progressing steps of the cascades, while SMSB3 showed the strongest effects at the C9 level in the terminal pathway. Additive effects of both serpins were shown at the C9 level in the lectin pathway. Both SMSs were able to interfere with complement factors without protease function. A range of binding assays showed direct binding between SMSB4 and seven complement proteins (C1, properdin, MBL, C4, C3, C6 and C8), while significant binding of SMSB3 occurred exclusively to complement factors without protease function (C4, C3, C8). Direct binding was observed between SMSB4 and the complement proteases C1s and C1r. However no complex formation was observed between either mite serpin and the complement serine proteases C1r, C1s, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3. No catalytic inhibition by either serpin was observed for any of these enzymes. In summary, the SMSs were acting at several levels mediating overall inhibition of the complement system and thus we propose that they may protect scabies mites from complement-mediated gut damage. PMID:22792350

Mika, Angela; Reynolds, Simone L.; Mohlin, Frida C.; Willis, Charlene; Swe, Pearl M.; Pickering, Darren A.; Halilovic, Vanja; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Pike, Robert N.; Blom, Anna M.; Kemp, David J.; Fischer, Katja

2012-01-01

452

Behavior of varroa mites in worker brood cells of Africanized honey bees.  

PubMed

The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is currently the most important pest of the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Because mite reproduction occurs within the sealed cell, the direct observation of varroa activity inside the cell is difficult. A video observation method using transparent polystyrol cells containing infested brood was used to analyze the behavior of varroa mites in worker brood of Africanized honey bees. We recorded how mites feed on the larva and pupa, construct a fecal accumulation site and how the bee larva carried out some longitudinal movements around the cell. The feeding activity of the foundress mite varies during the course of the cycle. On the prepupa mites were found to feed often (0.3 +/- 0.2 bouts h(-1)) for a period of 8.7 +/- 8.4 min h(-1) and there was no preference for a specific segment as feeding site. On the opposite, during the pupal stage mites fed less often (0.1 +/- 0.1 bouts h(-1)) for a period of 6.2 +/- 4.0 min h(-1) and almost always at a particular site (92.4%). On pupa, 83.7% of the feeding was on the 2nd abdominal segment (n = 92), and only few perforations were found on the thorax. Varroa shows a preference for defecation in the posterior part of the cell (cell apex), close to the bee's anal zone. We found a high correlation between the position of the feeding site on the pupa and the position of the fecal accumulation on the cell wall. Most infested cells have only one fecal accumulation site and it was the favorite resting site for the mite, where it spent 24.3 +/- 3.9 min h(-1). Longitudinal displacements were observed in 28.0% (n = 25) of the analyzed bee larvae. Turning movements around the cell, from the bottom to the top, were carried out by these larvae, mainly during the second day (47.7 +/- 22.5 min h(-1)), just before pupation, with a total time of 874.9 +/- 262.2 min day(-1) (n = 7 individuals). These results in worker brood of Africanized bees demonstrate adaptations of varroa mites to parasitizing the developing bee inside the capped brood cells. PMID:19381843

Calderón, Rafael A; Fallas, Natalia; Zamora, Luis G; van Veen, Johan W; Sánchez, Luis A

2009-12-01

453

Host-plant specificity and specialization in eriophyoid mites and their importance for the use of eriophyoid mites as biocontrol agents of weeds.  

PubMed

Eriophyoid mites, which are among the smallest plant feeders, are characterized by the intimate relationships they have with their hosts and the restricted range of plants upon which they can reproduce. The knowledge of their true host ranges and mechanisms causing host specificity is fundamental to understanding mite-host interactions, potential mite-host coevolution, and diversity of this group, as well as to apply effective control strategies or to use them as effective biological control agents. The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge on host specificity and specialization in eriophyoid mites, and to point out knowledge gaps and doubts. Using available data on described species and recorded hosts we showed that: (1) 80% of eriophyoids have been reported on only one host species, 95% on one host genus, and 99% on one host family; (2) Diptilomiopidae has the highest proportion of monophagous species and Phytoptidae has the fewest; (3) non-monophagous eriophyoids show the tendency to infest closely related hosts; 4) vagrant eriophyoids have a higher proportion of monophagous species than refuge-seeking and refuge-inducing species; (5) the proportions of monophagous species infesting annual and perennial hosts are similar; however, many species infesting annual hosts have wider host ranges than those infesting perennial hosts; (6) the proportions of species that are monophagous infesting evergreen and deciduous plants are similar; (7) non-monophagous eriophyoid species have wider geographic distribution than monophagous species. Field and laboratory host-specificity tests for several eriophyoid species and their importance for biological control of weeds are described. Testing the actual host range of a given eriophyoid species, searching for ecological data, genetic differentiation analysis, and recognizing factors and mechanisms that contribute to host specificity of eriophyoid mites are suggested as future directions for research. PMID:19789985

Skoracka, Anna; Smith, Lincoln; Oldfield, George; Cristofaro, Massimo; Amrine, James W

2010-07-01

454

Orchestration of an uncommon maturation cascade of the house dust mite protease allergen quartet.  

PubMed

In more than 20% of the world population, sensitization to house dust mite allergens triggers typical allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Amongst the 23 mite allergen groups hitherto identified, group 1 is cysteine proteases belonging to the papain-like family whereas groups 3, 6, and 9 are serine proteases displaying trypsin, chymotrypsin, and collagenolytic activities, respectively. While these proteases are more likely to be involved in the mite digestive system, they also play critical roles in the initiation and in the chronicity of the allergic response notably through the activation of innate immune pathways. All these allergenic proteases are expressed in mite as inactive precursor form. Until recently, the exact mechanisms of their maturation into active proteases remained to be fully elucidated. Recent breakthroughs in the understanding of the activation mechanisms of mite allergenic protease precursors have highlighted an uncommon and unique maturation pathway orchestrated by group 1 proteases that tightly regulates the proteolytic activities of groups 1, 3, 6, and 9 through complex intra- or inter-molecular mechanisms. This review presents and discusses the currently available knowledge of the activation mechanisms of group 1, 3, 6, and 9 allergens of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus laying special emphasis on their localization, regulation, and interconnection. PMID:24744761

Dumez, Marie-Eve; Herman, Julie; Campizi, Vincenzo; Galleni, Moreno; Jacquet, Alain; Chevigné, Andy

2014-01-01

455

Immunoglobulin E-binding epitopes of mite allergens: from characterization to immunotherapy.  

PubMed

House dust mites and storage mites produce a number of allergens that can induce hypersensitivity reactions in humans and result in allergic diseases like asthma, rhinitis, and dermatitis. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing these allergens--and, in particular, their immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding epitopes--have produced a wealth of knowledge. Here, methods for identifying IgE-binding epitopes, from immunoassays to in silico approaches, are summarized and placed in context with the identification of epitopes of mite allergens, particularly from the Dermatophagoides spp. major allergen groups 1 and 2. Finally, the transfer of this information to the clinical development and application of new diagnostic and immunotherapeutic approaches is discussed. While progress in recent years has built on the specific immunotherapies established decades ago, much work remains to be done to mitigate mite allergic disease. Future studies should seek to identify epitopes for mite species beyond Dermatophagoides and for minor allergens. Efforts in translational medicine should use the current epitope data to develop modified allergens for immunotherapy. PMID:24218295

Cui, Yubao

2014-12-01

456

Tree hybridization and genotypic variation drive cryptic speciation of a specialist mite herbivore.  

PubMed

Few studies have investigated the roles that plant hybridization and individual plant genotype play in promoting population divergence within arthropod species. Using nrDNA sequence information and reciprocal transfer experiments, we examined how tree cross type (i.e., pure Populus angustifolia and P. angustifolia x P. fremontii F(1) type hybrids) and individual tree genotype influence host race formation in the bud-galling mite Aceria parapopuli. Three main findings emerged: (1) Strong genetic differentiation of mite populations found on pure P. angustifolia and F(1) type hybrids indicates that these mites represent morphologically cryptic species. (2) Within the F(1) type hybrids, population genetic analyses indicate migration among individual trees; however, (3) transfer experiments show that the mites found on heavily infested F(1) type trees perform best on their natal host genotype, suggesting that genetic interactions between mites and their host trees drive population structure, local adaptation, and host race formation. These findings argue that hybridization and genotypic differences in foundation tree species may drive herbivore population structure, and have evolutionary consequences for dependent arthropod species. PMID:18752612

Evans, Luke M; Allan, Gerard J; Shuster, Stephen M; Woolbright, Scott A; Whitham, Thomas G

2008-12-01

457

Reduced mite allergen levels in dwellings with mechanical exhaust and supply ventilation.  

PubMed

Seventy similar bungalows constructed between 1968 and 1970 in the same suburban area of Stockholm were investigated regarding the content of house dust mite allergen, absolute indoor humidity, type of ventilation and basement construction. Houses with mechanical exhaust and supply ventilation had an indoor humidity above 7 g/kg less often than houses without this type of ventilation (Odds ratio 0.1, 95% confidence interval 0.0-0.2). Furthermore, only five of the 24 houses with exhaust and supply ventilation contained mattress dust mite allergen concentrations exceeding the median value (98.5 ng/g) compared with 30 of 46 hours which did not have such ventilation (odds ratio = 0.1, C.I. 0.0-0.5). Houses with both natural ventilation and crawl space basement harboured significantly less mattress mite allergen than houses having the same type of ventilation, but with a concrete slab basement. In a cold temperature climate, type of building construction and ventilation seem to be important for the occurrence of house dust mite allergens in dwellings. Our results indicate that modern energy-efficient houses should be equipped with mechanical exhaust and supply ventilation to reduce indoor air humidity during the dry winter months and the risk of mite infestation. PMID:8187025

Wickman, M; Emenius, G; Egmar, A C; Axelsson, G; Pershagen, G

1994-02-01

458

Environmental and oral challenge with storage mites in beagles experimentally sensitized to Dermatophagoides farinae.  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate whether challenge with storage mites elicited flare ups of atopic dermatitis (AD) in Dermatophagoides farinae sensitized atopic Beagles housed in a house dust and storage mite-free environment. Atopic Beagles were environmentally challenged with 50 mg of Tyrophagus putrescentiae for three days in a row. Clinical signs were scored before, 6 h after each challenge and then every 24 h for a total of 5 days using a Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index. Four healthy Beagles, negative on serology and intradermal testing for both house dust and storage mites, were used as controls and similarly challenged. A month after environmental challenge, the atopic Beagles were challenged by the oral route (50 mg of T. putrescentiae for three days in a row) and evaluated as described. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used for comparisons between groups and types of challenges. All atopic Beagles developed erythematous pruritic lesions clinically compatible with AD on the face, pinnae, feet and ventral abdomen after both environmental and oral challenge. Control dogs did not develop dermatitis except for mild pinnal erythema in one dog. In the environmental challenge, ANOVA showed a significant effect of time, group, and group x time interaction, with atopic Beagles showing significantly higher scores than the controls. There were no significant differences in clinical scores after oral and environmental challenge in the atopic group. Cross-reactivity between house dust and storage mites could therefore contribute to flare ups of AD in house dust mite allergic dogs. PMID:20187916

Marsella, Rosanna; Saridomichelakis, Manolis N

2010-02-01

459

212?Allergic Sensitization to Domestic Mites in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of mites sensitization in Santo Domingo. Methods One hundred consecutive patients (52 males and 48 females, mean age 30.3 years; 4–68) with asthma and /or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were skin tested with 9 commercial extracts of mites of the following species: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Blomia tropicalis, B. kulagini, Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Glycyphagus domesticus and Chortoglyphus arcuatus. A skin test was considered positive when the wheal was > 3 mm with erythema. Conventional exclusion criteria were used, in order to avoid masking a skin reaction. Results A positive skin test to any of the mites tested was detected in 98% of the patients; Dermatophagoides spp. was positive in 89% of the patients; 15% were exclusively positive to Dermatophagoides spp; 87% reacted to Blomia spp. and 3% were exclusively positive to Blomia tropicalis spp; 80% were sensitized to 3 or more specie. Conclusions The allergy sensitization to domestic mites in Santo Domingo is high. Sensitization to several species is very common. B. tropicalis is an important species in this region. With these results we could extrapolate that immunotherapy with only Dermatophagoides species could not be enough achieve clinical improvement in mite allergic patients. Other species, such as B. tropicalis may be needed.

Castillo, Antonio; Muñoz, William; Fernandez-Caldas, Enrique

2012-01-01

460

Acaricidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus and Azadirachta indica against house dust mites  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the acaricidal effects of the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus leaf extract (lemongrass) and ethanolic Azadirachta indica leaf extract (neem) against house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus). Methods Twenty-five adults mites were placed onto treated filter paper that is soaked with plant extract and been tested at different concentrations (50.00%, 25.00%, 12.50%, 6.25% and 3.13%) and exposure times (24hrs, 48hrs, 72hrs and 96 hrs). All treatments were replicated 7 times, and the experiment repeated once. The topical and contact activities of the two herbs were investigated. Results Mortalities from lemongrass extract were higher than neem for both topical and contact activities. At 50 % concentration, both 24 hrs topical and contact exposures to lemongrass resulted in more than 91% mortalities for both species of mites. At the same concentration and exposure time, neem resulted in topical mortalities of 40.3% and 15.7% against D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae respectively; contact mortalities were 8.0% and 8.9% against the 2 mites, respectively. There was no difference in topical mortalities of D. pteronyssinus from exposure to concentrations of lemongrass and neem up to 12.50%; lemongrass was more effective than neem at the higher concentrations. Conclusions Generally, topical mortalities of D. farinae due to lemongrass are higher than that due to neem. Contact mortalities of lemongrass are always higher that neem against both species of mites. PMID:23569794

Hanifah, Azima Laili; Awang, Siti Hazar; Ming, Ho Tze; Abidin, Suhaili Zainal; Omar, Maizatul Hashima

2011-01-01

461

Efficacy of two fungus-based biopesticide against the honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor.  

PubMed

The varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) (Acari: Varroidae), is known as the most serious ectoparasitic mite on honeybee, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in the world. Based on the spores of entomopathogenic fungi, two commercial preparations; Bioranza (Metarhizium anisopliae) and Biovar (Beauveria bassiana) were evaluated through application into the hives against varroa mite. Data showed significant differences between treatments with Bioranza and Biovar, the results were significant after 7 and 14 days post-treatment. Mean a daily fallen mite individual was significantly different between the hives before and after the applications of the two biopesticides and wheat flour. Also, mites' mortality was, significantly, different between the hives before and after treatments. There were significant differences between treatments with the two biopesticides in worker's body weight. Bioranza and Biovar did not infect the honeybee in larval, prepupal, pupal and adult stages. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy images showed spores and hyphae penetration through stigma and wounds on varroa. The results suggest that Bioranza and Biovar are potentially are effective biopesticides against V. destructor in honeybee colonies. PMID:24498835

Ahmed, Abdelaal A; Abd-Elhady, Hany K

2013-08-15

462

Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites: What do we really know?  

PubMed

The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mi