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1

Seasonal Abundance of Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and Their Predators in Peppers and Ground Cover Plantings in South Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seasonal abundance of flower thrips, Frankliniella spp, melon thrips (MT), Thrips palmi Karny, and composite thrips (CT), Microcephalothrips abdominalis Crawford, was determined by collecting infested blooms from bell peppers, crimson clover (CCL), and creeping oxeye (COE) Wedelia trilobata (L.). Predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and minute pirate bugs (MPB), Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) were collected from all host plants.

Galen Frantz; Larry Jacobs; G. Dudley Sutherland; H. Charles Mellinger

2

Egg structure of Zorotypus caudelli Karny (Insecta, Zoraptera, Zorotypidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structural features of eggs of Zorotypus caudelli Karny are described in detail. The egg is elliptic with long and short diameters of 0.6 and 0.3mm respectively, and creamy white. The egg shows a honeycomb pattern on its surface, without any specialized structures for hatching such as an operculum or a hatching line. The fringe formed by a fibrillar substance

Yuta Mashimo; Ryuichiro Machida; Romano Dallai; Marco Gottardo; David Mercati; Rolf G. Beutel

2011-01-01

3

The Species Composition of Thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) Inhabiting Mango Orchards in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia  

PubMed Central

A field study was conducted at two localities on Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, during two consecutive mango flowering seasons in 2009 to identify variations in the species composition of thrips infesting treated and untreated mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchards. The CO2 immobilisation technique and the cutting method were used to recover different thrips species from mango panicles and weed host plants, respectively. The mango panicles and various weed species within the treated orchard were found to harbour four thrips species from the family Thripidae. These species were identified as Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan), Scirtothrips dorsalis (Hood), Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagnall). The weed species Mimosa pudica, Cleome rutidosperma, Echinochloa colonum, Borreria laevicaulis, Veronia cinerea and Asystasia coromandeliana served as additional hosts to these thrips. Six thrips species were found in the untreated orchard. These species included Thrips palmi (Karny), Haplothrips sp. (Amyot and Serville) and the four thrips species found in the treated orchard. A brief description of the larvae for each genus is provided.

Aliakbarpour, Hamaseh; Rawi, Che Salmah Md.

2012-01-01

4

Effect of Watermelon Silver Mottle Virus on the Life History and Feeding Preference of Thrips palmi.  

PubMed

Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus-Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospovirus, Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), to examine the effect of virus infection on its vector, Thrips palmi. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of WSMoV on the life history traits and feeding preference of T. palmi were examined. The survival rate and developmental time of the WSMoV-infected larval thrips did not differ significantly from those of the virus-free thrips. Comparing the developmental time of larval thrips fed on the healthy plants, thrips-damaged plants, and thrips-inoculated plants (the WSMoV-infected plants caused by thrips feeding), feeding on the thrips-damaged plants reduced the developmental time, and the WSMoV infection in host plants partially canceled the effect of thrips damage on the developmental time. In addition, no significant variations between the virus-free and WSMoV-infected adult thrips regarding longevity and fecundity were observed. These results implied that WSMoV did not directly affect the life history traits of T. palmi, but the WSMoV infection indirectly affected the development of T. palmi through the virus-infected plants. Furthermore, feeding preference tests indicated that T. palmi preferred feeding on either the thrips-damaged plants or the thrips-inoculated plants to the healthy plants. The effect of tospoviruses on the life history and feeding preference of vector thrips might vary among host plants, virus species, vector species, and environmental factors. PMID:25010157

Chen, Wei-Te; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Tsai, Chi-Wei

2014-01-01

5

Effect of Watermelon Silver Mottle Virus on the Life History and Feeding Preference of Thrips palmi  

PubMed Central

Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus–Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospovirus, Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), to examine the effect of virus infection on its vector, Thrips palmi. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of WSMoV on the life history traits and feeding preference of T. palmi were examined. The survival rate and developmental time of the WSMoV-infected larval thrips did not differ significantly from those of the virus-free thrips. Comparing the developmental time of larval thrips fed on the healthy plants, thrips-damaged plants, and thrips-inoculated plants (the WSMoV-infected plants caused by thrips feeding), feeding on the thrips-damaged plants reduced the developmental time, and the WSMoV infection in host plants partially canceled the effect of thrips damage on the developmental time. In addition, no significant variations between the virus-free and WSMoV-infected adult thrips regarding longevity and fecundity were observed. These results implied that WSMoV did not directly affect the life history traits of T. palmi, but the WSMoV infection indirectly affected the development of T. palmi through the virus-infected plants. Furthermore, feeding preference tests indicated that T. palmi preferred feeding on either the thrips-damaged plants or the thrips-inoculated plants to the healthy plants. The effect of tospoviruses on the life history and feeding preference of vector thrips might vary among host plants, virus species, vector species, and environmental factors.

Chen, Wei-Te; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Tsai, Chi-Wei

2014-01-01

6

Thrips (Insecta, Thysanoptera) of Iran: a revised and updated checklist  

PubMed Central

Abstract In Iran, as a result of recent changes in nomenclature 201 species and one species group of the insect Order Thysanoptera, are here listed in 70 genera and five families. In considering species listed previously from this country, the presence of 7 species is considered not confirmed, and 12 species are excluded from the Iranian list. Problems in the study of Iranian Thysanoptera are discussed briefly.

Minaei, Kambiz

2013-01-01

7

Spinosad resistance of melon thrips, Thrips palmi, is conferred by G275E mutation in ?6 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and cytochrome P450 detoxification.  

PubMed

To examine the resistance mechanisms of Thrips palmi against spinosad, we cloned partial nucleotide sequences of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ?6 subunit (TP?6) gene from susceptible (OK) and resistant (TS1 and TS5) strains and compared the deduced amino acid sequences among the three strains. The OK, TS1, and TS5 strains respectively showed LC50 values of 3.4mg/L, 2838.5mg/L, and 6655.5mg/L. The deduced amino acid sequence of TP?6 gene showed 96% identity with that of Frankliniella occidentalis. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of TP?6 gene among the three strains showed that the TS1 and TS5 strains had a resistant amino acid, Glu, at amino acid position 275. On the other hand, a susceptible amino acid, Gly, was encoded at the corresponding amino acid position for the OK strain. The synergist, piperonyl butoxide, respectively caused 1.1-fold , 5.8-fold , and 9.0-fold decreases in the resistance ratios of the OK, TS1, and TS5 strains. These results suggest that spinosad resistance of T. palmi is conferred by reduced sensitivity of TP?6 and cytochrome P450-mediated detoxification. PMID:24974117

Bao, Wen Xue; Narai, Yutaka; Nakano, Akio; Kaneda, Takemichi; Murai, Tamotsu; Sonoda, Shoji

2014-06-01

8

Analysis of the thrips fauna (Thysanoptera) on flowers of herbs.  

PubMed

Studies of Thysanoptera were realized at the Agricultural Experimental Station in Mydlniki near Cracow over the years 2003-2005. This research work covers the observations of the species composition of thrips and the periods of the occurrence of the particulars species of thrips and their numerousness. The thrips were collected from flowers of Valeriana officinalis L., Hypericum perforatum L. and Levisticum officinale Koch. Following thrips species dominated samples collected directly from plants: Frankliniella intonsa (Trybom), Thrips fuscipennis Haliday, Thrips tabaci Lindeman and Thrips major Uzel. The greatest number of thrips was noticed during flowering period on Valeriana officinalis L., and Hypericum perforatum L. PMID:18399479

Pobozniak, Maria

2007-01-01

9

Distribution and ecology of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) bacterial symbionts.  

PubMed

Bacterial populations in Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) collected in diverse California environments consisted of two bacterial symbionts: BFo-1 and BFo-2 (B = bacteria, Fo = Frankliniella occidentalis, numbers reflect different types). Dual infections of BFo-1 and BFo-2 were found in 50% of the thrips, 18% had neither bacterium, and 24 and 8% were infected solely with BFo-1 and BFo-2, respectively. No other bacteria consistently infected F. occidentalis. Dual infections occurred more often in male thrips and in thrips of both sexes from southern mountain and valley sites. As average collection year or month minimum temperature decreased, infections of BFo-1, alone or in dual infections, increased significantly. As yearly precipitation increased, infection with BFo-1 alone also increased. F. occidentalis color morphology did not affect bacterial infection. BFo-1 created weak biofilms at 25 and 32 degrees C; BFo-2 made strong biofilms at 25 degrees C and no biofilms at 32 degrees C. When the bacteria were grown in culture together, weak biofilms formed at both temperatures studied, although there was no way to determine what each bacterium contributed to the biofilm. BFo-1 and BFo-2 grew at similar rates at 25 and 30 degrees C. Our data show BFo-1 and BFo-2 occur in natural populations of F. occidentalis and support the hypothesis BFo have a symbiotic relationship with F. occidentalis. Regional differences in bacterial prevalence suggest bacterial infection is associated with environmental conditions, and altitude, temperature, and precipitation may be important factors. PMID:19689885

Chanbusarakum, Lisa J; Ullman, Diane E

2009-08-01

10

An illustrated key to the genera of Thripinae (Thysanoptera, Thripidae) from Iran  

PubMed Central

Abstract An illustrated key is provided for the identification of 35 genera of Thripinae (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) from Iran with comments for each genus. Chirothrips maximi Ananthakrishnan and Limothrips cerealium Haliday are recorded from Iran for the first time. A checklist is provided of Thripinae recorded from this country.

Mirab-balou, Majid; Minaei, Kambiz; Chen, Xue-Xin

2013-01-01

11

Risks and benefits of lethal male fighting in the colonial, polygynous thrips Hoplothrips karnyi (Insecta: Thysanoptera)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Males of Hoplothrips karnyi (Hood) (Insecta: Thysanoptera), a colonial fungus-feeding thrips, fight each other in defense of communal egg mass sites, where they mate with females that come to oviposit. Fighting males stab each other with their enlarged, armed forelegs and hit each other with their abdomens. Escalated fights occur between large males of similar size. Fights are often lethal;

Bernard J. Crespi

1988-01-01

12

Thysanoptera intercepted in the Netherlands on plant products from Ethiopia, with description of two new species of the genus Thrips.  

PubMed

An overview is given of 18 Thysanoptera species found on Ethiopian cut flowers, cuttings and vegetables during import inspection in the Netherlands. Consignments consisted mostly of cut flowers, in total belonging to twelve plant genera. Details on geographical distribution and host plants of the thrips encountered are given, and two are newly described: T. cacuminis sp. n. and T. dezeeuwi sp. n. The results do not give any serious indication of increased invasiveness by Ethiopian Thysanoptera.  PMID:24870899

Vierbergen, Gijsbertus

2014-01-01

13

Identification of the terebrantian thrips (Insecta, Thysanoptera) associated with cultivated plants in Java, Indonesia.  

PubMed

An illustrated identification key is provided to 49 species of Thysanoptera, Terebrantia that have been found in association with cultivated plants in Java. This is the first published identification system to this group of insects from Indonesia, and includes 15 species not previously recorded from Indonesia, and a further three species not previously recorded from Java. A table is provided indicating the plants from which thrips were taken. PMID:23794915

Sartiami, Dewi; Mound, Laurence A

2013-01-01

14

Conspectus of the Phlaeothripinae genera from China and Southeast Asia (Thysanoptera, Phlaeothripidae).  

PubMed

An illustrated identification key is provided to 100 genera of Phlaeothripinae from China and Southeast Asia, together with a diagnosis for each genus, and comments on the species diversity. One new genus with a new species, Akarethrips iotus gen.n. & sp.n., and two new species, Heliothripoides boltoni sp.n. and Terthrothrips strasseni sp.n., are described from specimens collected in Peninsular Malaysia and Java respectively. Three Phlaeothripinae genera are synonymised, Mychiothrips Haga & Okajima syn.n. of Veerabahuthrips Ramakrishna, Syringothrips Priesner syn.n. of GigantothripsZimmermann, and Sauridothrips Priesner syn.n. of Gynaikothrips Zimmermann. In addition, four nomenclatural changes are included, Adelphothrips ignotus (Reyes) comb.n. transferred from Mesothrips, Karnyothrips palmerae (Chen) comb.n from Xylaplothrips, Xylaplothrips bogoriensis (Karny) comb.n from Brachythrips, and Oidanothrips notabilisFeng, Guo & Duan considered as a new synonym of Oidanothrips frontalis (Bagnall). PMID:24871154

Dang, Li-Hong; Mound, Laurence A; Qiao, Ge-Xia

2014-01-01

15

Life-stage variation in insecticide resistance of the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

The life-stage variations in insecticide resistance of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), to selective insecticides (acrinathrin, formetanate, and methiocarb) were studied using resistant laboratory strains. In each strain, the second-instar larva was less susceptible to the insecticides tested than the adults. The lower the resistance level of the adults, the higher the difference between larva and adult susceptibility: 32-fold to methiocarb, 15.4-fold to formetanate, and 180-fold to acrinathrin in the reference strain. In laboratory-selected resistant strains, these differences were much lower: 5.8-fold to methiocarb, 4.8-fold to formetanate, and 2.0-fold to acrinathrin. In selected strains, higher resistance levels for each insecticide were found, both for larvae and adults, compared with the reference strain. These results show that after insecticide resistance selection in adults, the resistance is carried over to the larvae, but at lower levels. PMID:21309240

Contreras, J; Espinosa, P J; Quinto, V; Abellán, J; Grávalos, C; Fernández, E; Bielza, P

2010-12-01

16

Habitat-specific population structure in native western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Insecta, Thysanoptera).  

PubMed

Invasions by pest organisms are among the main challenges for sustainable crop protection. They pose a serious threat to crop production by introducing a highly unpredictable element to existing crop protection strategies. The western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Insecta, Thysanoptera) managed to invade ornamental greenhouses worldwide within < 25 years. To shed light on possible genetic and/or ecological factors that may have been responsible for this invasion success, we studied the population genetic structure of western flower thrips in its native range in western North America. Analysis of nucleotide sequence variation and variation at microsatellite loci revealed the existence of two habitat-specific phylogenetic lineages (ecotypes) with allopatric distribution. One lineage is associated with hot/dry climates, the second lineage is restricted to cool/moist climates. We speculate that the ecological niche segregation found in this study may be among the key factors determining the invasion potential of western flower thrips. PMID:20149024

Brunner, P C; Frey, J E

2010-04-01

17

Selection of colour of sticky trap for monitoring adult bean thrips, Caliothrips fasciatus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Adult bean thrips, Caliothrips fasciatus (Pergande), overwintering inside the navel of navel oranges shipped from California to Australia, are an actionable pest for the importing country, i.e. infested lots are fumigated with methyl bromide. Strict quarantine regulations regarding C. fasciatus prompted studies on the best colour sticky trap that might be used to monitor for bean thrips populations in the vicinity of California citrus groves prior to harvesting fruit for export. Preliminary experiments identified the most attractive trap of each of four colours (blue, green, white, yellow) commonly used to sample adult Thysanoptera. Three trials of a field study were conducted, comparing C. fasciatus capture on the best card of each colour using asparagus ferns naturally infested with high levels of this pest. Based on significantly higher catch on green sticky cards, this colour trap is recommended for potential use in California's bean thrips mitigation plan designed to reduce thrips levels on citrus exported to Australia. PMID:17125151

Harman, J Alex; Mao, Chang Xuan; Morse, Joseph G

2007-02-01

18

Semi-commercial ultralow oxygen treatment for control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), on harvested iceberg lettuce  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pallet-scale ultralow oxygen (ULO) treatment was applied to iceberg lettuce after various lengths of postharvest storage to determine the effects of pre-treatment storage on lettuce tolerance to ULO treatment for control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Lettuce from seven cultivars was vacuum cooled and stored at 2°C after harvest for 0, 2, 3, and 5d before

Yong-Biao Liu

2011-01-01

19

[Thysanoptera (Insecta)-Vicia faba (Fabaceae) association in Prepuna and Puna in Jujuy, Argentina].  

PubMed

The different phenological stages of Vicia faba provide food resources and substrates for the development of a significant diversity of insects. This study aimed to identify the complex of anthophyllous thrips, analyze the species population fluctuations, to obtain some bioecological aspects and the role they play in this association. The study and sampling was conducted during the flowering-fruiting bean crop stages in two phytogeographical regions of Jujuy: Prepuna (2 479m asl) on a weekly basis, from October-December 1995-1996 and Puna (3 367m asl) every two weeks, from December 2007-March 2008. Each sample consisted of 25 flowers taken at random; only at Prepuna a complementary sampling of three hits per plant (n=10 plants) was conducted. Observations were made on oviposition sites, admission to the flower, pupation sites, feeding behavior and injuries caused. In Prepuna, the Thysanoptera complex consisted of Frankliniella australis, F. occidentalis, F. gemina, F. schultzei and Thrips tabaci; in Puna, the specific diversity was restricted to F. australis and F. gemina. Although the planting-harvest period in both areas did not match, the fluctuations in populations showed the same pattern: as flowering progressed, the number of thrips coincided with the availability of food resources. In both areas, F. australis was the dominant species and maintained successive populations; it layed eggs in flower buds, and larvae hatched when flowers opened; feeding larvae and adults brought about silvery stains with black spots. In Prepuna, F. australis went through the mobile immature stages on flowers, while quiescent stages were on the ground; in the Puna, all development stages took place within the flowers. Thrips tabaci, F. shultzei, F. occidentalis and F. gemina were temporary and opportunistic in Prepuna, while the presence of F. gemina was sporadic in Puna. The number of Thysanoptera species associated with beans cultivation in Argentina has increased. PMID:22458213

Zamar, María Inés; Neder de Román, Lilia Estela

2012-03-01

20

Impact of straw mulch on populations of onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in onion.  

PubMed

Development of insecticide resistance in onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), populations in onion (Allium spp.) fields and the incidence of the T. tabaci transmitted Iris yellow spot virus have stimulated interest in evaluating alternative management tactics. Effects of straw mulch applied in commercial onion fields in muck areas of western New York were assessed in 2006 and 2007 as a possible onion thrips management strategy. In trials in which no insecticides were applied for thrips control, straw mulch-treated plots supported significantly lower T. tabaci populations compared with control plots. In both years, the action thresholds of one or three larvae per leaf were reached in straw mulch treatments between 7 and 14 d later than in the control. Ground predatory fauna, as evaluated by pitfall trapping, was not increased by straw mulch in 2006; however, populations of the common predatory thrips Aeolothrips fasciatus (L.) (Thysanoptera: Aeolothripidae) were significantly lower in straw mulch plots in both years. Interference of straw mulch in the pupation and emergence of T. tabaci was investigated in the lab and their emergence was reduced by 54% compared with bare soil. In the field the overall yield of onions was not affected by the straw mulch treatment; however, the presence of jumbo grade onions (>77 mm) was increased in 2006, but not in 2007. These results indicate that populations of T. tabaci adults and larvae can be significantly reduced by the use of straw mulch without compromising overall onion yield. The use of this cultural practice in an onion integrated pest management program seems promising. PMID:18767742

Larentzaki, E; Plate, J; Nault, B A; Shelton, A M

2008-08-01

21

Maize planting time and arthropod abundance in southern Mindanao, Philippines. I. Population dynamics of insect pests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monthly plantings conducted over 4 years in a rainfed triple maize cropping system in southern Mindanao, Philippines, revealed the Asian corn borer (ACB) Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée) as the most important insect pest. Of minor importance and being restricted to one crop stage were rice seedling maggot Atherigona oryzae Malloch, thrips Thrips palmi Karny and Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagnall), corn leafhopper Cicadulina

J. A. Litsinger; C. G. Dela Cruz; B. L. Canapi; A. T. Barrion

2007-01-01

22

Variation in preference and performance of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on three strawberry cultivars.  

PubMed

Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a major pest of strawberry, causing substantial yield loss through direct feeding on the flowers and fruit. Insecticides are the main method used for its control; however, F. occidentalis has developed resistance to insecticides from all major chemical classes. Chemical control is not a long-term strategy and integrated pest management is required. This study determined whether F. occidentalis damage could be reduced by host plant resistance or tolerance in three commercial strawberry cultivars (Fragaria X ananassa [Rosaceae]: 'Albion', 'Camarosa', and 'Camino Real'). Determination of resistance or tolerance to F. occidentalis was based on olfactory response, feeding damage, ovipositional preference, and host suitability for reproduction on leaves. F. occidentalis adults preferred to feed on Camarosa; however, if leaves had been fed on previously by conspecifics, there was no difference in feeding preference. Camarosa was the most preferred cultivar for oviposition, and more eggs were laid by F. occidentalis on Camarosa than either Albion or Camino Real. More larvae hatched and adults were reared from Camarosa than either Albion or Camino Real. The percentage of unhatched eggs, larvae, and pupae that died was highest on Camino Real. Survival rate was highest on Camarosa. Egg incubation, prepupation, pupation, and total developmental periods were shortest on Camarosa, but the larval period was longest on Camarosa. Camarosa was the most favorable cultivar for F. occidentalis population growth on leaves. PMID:21061975

Rahman, Touhidur; Spafford, Helen; Broughton, Sonya

2010-10-01

23

Accuracy, precision, and economic efficiency for three methods of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) population density assessment.  

PubMed

Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a major horticultural pest and an important vector of plant viruses in many parts of the world. Methods for assessing thrips population density for pest management decision support are often inaccurate or imprecise due to thrips' positive thigmotaxis, small size, and naturally aggregated populations. Two established methods, flower tapping and an alcohol wash, were compared with a novel method, plant desiccation coupled with passive trapping, using accuracy, precision and economic efficiency as comparative variables. Observed accuracy was statistically similar and low (37.8-53.6%) for all three methods. Flower tapping was the least expensive method, in terms of person-hours, whereas the alcohol wash method was the most expensive. Precision, expressed by relative variation, depended on location within the greenhouse, location on greenhouse benches, and the sampling week, but it was generally highest for the flower tapping and desiccation methods. Economic efficiency, expressed by relative net precision, was highest for the flower tapping method and lowest for the alcohol wash method. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed for all three methods used. If relative density assessment methods such as these can all be assumed to accurately estimate a constant proportion of absolute density, then high precision becomes the methodological goal in terms of measuring insect population density, decision making for pest management, and pesticide efficacy assessments. PMID:21882699

Sutherland, Andrew M; Parrella, Michael P

2011-08-01

24

Onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae): a global pest of increasing concern in onion.  

PubMed

During the past two decades, onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), has become a global pest of increasing concern in commercial onion (Allium cepa L.), because of its development of resistance to insecticides, ability to transmit plant pathogens, and frequency of producing more generations at high temperatures. T. tabaci feeds directly on leaves, causing blotches and premature senescence as well as distorted and undersized bulbs. T. tabaci can cause yield loss > 50% but can be even more problematic when it transmits Iris yellow spot virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Tospovirus, IYSV). IYSV was identified in 1981 in Brazil and has spread to many important onion-producing regions of the world, including several U.S. states. IYSV symptoms include straw-colored, dry, tan, spindle- or diamond-shaped lesions on the leaves and scapes of onion plants and can cause yield loss up to 100%. Here, we review the biology and ecology of T. tabaci and discuss current management strategies based on chemical, biological, and cultural control as well as host resistance. Future directions for research in integrated pest management are examined and discussed. PMID:21404832

Diaz-Montano, John; Fuchs, Marc; Nault, Brian A; Fail, József; Shelton, Anthony M

2011-02-01

25

Lethal and sublethal effects of fenpropathrin on the biological performance of Scolothrips longicornis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Determination of negative nontarget effects of pesticides on beneficial organisms by measuring only lethal effects is likely to underestimate effects of sublethal doses. In this study, the sublethal effects of fenpropathrin on the predatory thrips Scolothrips longicornis Priesner (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) fed on Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) were evaluated under laboratory conditions. The estimated values of LC50 for female and male predators were 6.53 and 5.47 microg a.i./ml, respectively. Exposure to low-lethal concentrations (LC10, LC20, and LC30) of fenpropathrin significantly affected the biological characteristics of treated females of S. longicornis, the most noticeable effects being a shortening of female life span by > 70% accompanied by large reductions in oviposition period and fecundity. The offspring of females treated with low-lethal concentrations of fenpropathrin likewise had significantly reduced longevity, oviposition period, and fecundity, although not to the same extent as experienced by their mothers. Their juvenile development time was, however, not affected. These effects on the offspring were reflected in reduced rates of population increase and increased doubling times. PMID:24498736

Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

2013-12-01

26

Dissecting the mode of maize chlorotic mottle virus transmission (Tombusviridae: Machlomovirus) by Frankliniella williamsi (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) (Tombusviridae: Machlomovirus) has been recorded in Hawaii (Kauai Island) since the early 1990s and has since become one of the most widespread corn viruses in the Hawaiian Islands. In the United States Mainland, MCMV has been reported to be transmitted by six different species of chrysomelid beetles, including the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. However, none of these beetle species have been reported in Hawaii where the corn thrips, Frankliniella williamsi Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) has been identified to be the main vector. In this study, we developed leaf disk transmission assays and real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to examine the mode of MCMV transmission by the corn thrips. We showed that thrips transmitted the virus with no evidence for latent periods. Both larvae and adults transmitted the virus for up to 6 d after acquisition, with decreasing rates of transmission as time progressed. There was no evidence that adult thrips that acquired the virus as larvae were competent vectors. Real time reverse-transcription polomerase chain reaction assays showed that viral load was depleted from the vector's body after thrips had access to healthy plant tissue. Depletion of viral load was also observed when thrips matured from larvae to adults. Thrips were able to transmit MCMV after acquisition and inoculation access periods of 3 h. However, transmission efficiency increased with longer acquisition and inoculation access periods. Taken altogether our data suggests that corn thrips transmit MCMV in a semipersistent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first work reporting evidence of a plant virus transmitted semipersistently by thrips. PMID:23448010

Cabanas, D; Watanabe, S; Higashi, C H V; Bressan, A

2013-02-01

27

Botanical insecticides in controlling Kelly's citrus thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on organic grapefruits.  

PubMed

Kelly's citrus thrips, Pezothrips kellyanus (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) was first recorded in Cyprus in 1996 and became an economic citrus pest. In Cyprus, Kelly's citrus thrips larvae cause feeding damage mainly on immature lemon and grapefruit fruits. Use of botanical insecticides is considered an alternative tool compared with synthetic chemicals, in offering solutions for healthy and sustainable citrus production. During 2008-2010, the efficacy of the botanical insecticides azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W and Oikos 10 EC), garlic extract (Alsa), and pyrethrins (Vioryl 5%SC) was evaluated in field trials against Kelly's citrus thrips larval stage I and II aiming at controlling the pest's population and damage to organic grapefruit fruits. In each of the trial years treatments with pyrethrins and azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W) were the most effective against Kelly's citrus thrips compared with the untreated control (for 2008: P < 0.018; for 2009: P < 0.000; for 2010: P < 0.008). In 2008, the mean number of damaged fruits in treatments with pyrethrins and Neemex was 9.6 (19.2%) and 9.7 (19.5%) respectively, compared with 12.2 (24.3%) in the untreated control. In 2009, the mean number of damaged fruits in treatment with pyrethrins was 3.7 (7.3%) and 3.9 (7.8%) in treatment with Neemex compared with 8.6 (17.3%) in the untreated control, while in 2010 the mean damaged fruits in these treatments was recorded at 18.7 (37.5%) and 19.6 (39.2), respectively, compared with 29.6 fruits (59.2%) in the control. Oikos 10 EC showed significant effect only in 2009 and 2010. In these years, the mean number of damaged fruits was recorded at 5.5 and 21.2 compared with 8.6 and 29.6 fruits in the untreated control, respectively. Garlic extract showed the lowest effect from all the botanicals used compared with the untreated control. PMID:22299360

Vassiliou, V A

2011-12-01

28

Flower-inhabiting Frankliniella Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), pesticides, and Fusarium hardlock in cotton.  

PubMed

Cotton hardlock caused by Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc. Nirenberg) can reduce cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., yields > 70% in the southeastern United States. The spores infect flowers on the day of pollination, resulting in hardlock, which is the failure of the fiber to fluff as the boll opens at maturity. Frankliniella spp. Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) inhabiting the flowers are hypothesized to increase hardlock by spreading the conidia or by creating entranceways for the germinating Fusarium conidia. Experiments were conducted at Marianna and Quincy in Florida in 2006 and 2007 to determine whether there was a relationship between the number of adult and larval thrips inhabiting the flowers of cotton and the incidence of cotton hardlock. Frankliniella tritici (Fitch) was > 98% of the adult thrips in the samples at both locations each year. The adults of Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan) and Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) also were collected. There were no significant regression relationships between weekly mean densities of thrips in the flowers and the incidence of cotton hardlock at harvest in any of the experiments. Additional experiments were conducted at each location in 2006 and 2007 to determine whether weekly applications during flowering of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin, the fungicide thiophanate methyl, and the combination of the two reduced the incidence of cotton hardlock at harvest. Applications of the insecticide significantly reduced the numbers of adult F. tritici, the number of thrips larvae, and the incidence of hardlock at harvest. Applications of the insecticide were as affective as applications of the insecticide plus fungicide. In one experiment, applications of the fungicide reduced the incidence of hardlock at harvest. Applications of the insecticide usually significantly increased the number of adult F. occidentalis. None of the pesticide treatments significantly affected the numbers of the key thrips predator Orius insidiosus (Say). We conclude that insecticidal control of the adults and larvae of F. tritici during flowering reduced the incidence of cotton hardlock. However, there were no significant regression relationships between the incidence of cotton hardlock at harvest and the number of thrips in the flowers. PMID:19610399

Osekre, Enoch A; Wright, David L; Marois, James J; Funderburk, Joe

2009-06-01

29

Investigating alternatives to traditional insecticides: effectiveness of entomopathogenic fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis against citrus thrips and avocado thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Citrus thrips, Scirtothrips citri (Moulton) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a plant-feeding pest most widely recognized for causing damage to citrus (Citrus spp. L. [Rutaceae]) and mango (Mangifera indica L. [Anacardiaceae]) fruits. This insect has recently broadened its known host range to become a significant pest of California grown blueberries. Avocado thrips, Scirtothrips. perseae Nakahara (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a recent, invasive pest of California avocados, Persea americana Mill. (Laurales: Lauraceae). Effective alternatives to traditional pesticides are desirable for both pests to reduce impacts on natural enemies and broaden control options in an effort to minimize pesticide resistance via rotation of control materials. We evaluated Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) subsp. israelensis proteins (Cyt 1A and Cry 11A, activated and inactivated) and multiple strains (GHA, 1741ss, SFBb1, S44ss, NI1ss, and 3769ss) of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin against both species. Avocado thrips and citrus thrips were not susceptible to either Bt protein tested, regardless of activation status. All strains of B. bassiana were able to infect both avocado thrips and citrus thrips. However, the commercially available GHA strain was the most effective strain against both species and had a faster rate of infection then the other strains tested. Citrus thrips were more susceptible than avocado thrips to all B. bassiana strains (LC50 and LC95 of 8.6 x 10(4) and 4.8 x 10(6) conidia per ml for citrus thrips, respectively). Investigation of citrus thrips field control using the GHA strain of B. bassiana is therefore justified. PMID:23448016

Zahn, Deane K; Morse, Joseph G

2013-02-01

30

Low temperature phosphine fumigation for postharvest control of western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberry.  

PubMed

U.S. exported lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberries often harbor western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a quarantined pest in Taiwan, and therefore require quarantine treatment. Fumigation with diluted pure phosphine at a low temperature of 2 degrees C was studied to control western flower thrips and to determine effects on the quality of the treated products. Total thrips control was achieved in > or = 18-h fumigation treatments with > or = 250 ppm phosphine. One day fumigation treatment with 1,000 ppm phosphine was tested on lettuce and broccoli. One-day fumigation treatments with 500 ppm and 1,000 ppm phosphine were tested on asparagus and strawberry. Visual quality of lettuce, broccoli, and asparagus was evaluated after 2-wk posttreatment storage. Strawberry quality was evaluated immediately after fumigation and after 1-wk posttreatment storage. For all the products, there were no significant differences between the treatments and the controls in postharvest quality, and there were no injuries caused by the fumigation treatments. Therefore, phosphine fumigation at low temperature was promising for postharvest control of western flower thrips on lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberry. PMID:19133457

Liu, Yong-Biao

2008-12-01

31

Repellency of essential oils to Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) as affected by type of oil and polymer release.  

PubMed

Eight essential oils [0.125-1.0% (vol:vol) in acetone] were separately deposited on leaf disks to evaluate their potential to repel western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), adult females. Two of the best-performing essential oils were incorporated into polymer matrices of methyl cellulose or alginate [0.5 or 1% (wt:vol)] to verify the potential of the polymer to extend repellency of oils over time (24-120 h). Results showed that at a concentration of 0.5%, Thymus vulgaris L. (common thyme) and Satureja montana L. (winter savory) were the most repellent essential oils. For these two treatments, no western flower thrips were counted on treated leaf disks 60 min after the start of the test. T. serpyllum and O. compactum also showed repellency values > or = 90% at this concentration. With both the alginate and methyl cellulose polymers, the incorporation of polymers into treatment solutions containing 0.5% concentrations of S. montana and T. serpyllum resulted in higher repellency compared with treatment solutions lacking these polymers for a minimum of 3 d. For the alginate polymer, differences associated with polymer concentrations were most dramatic. High repellency was maintained for 4 d when a 0.5% concentration of the alginate was used in combination with a 0.5% concentration of S. montana. The use of repellent oils with polymers that extend their repellency may prove useful for both pre- and postharvest applications in flower crops. PMID:22928303

Picard, Isabelle; Hollingsworth, Robert G; Salmieri, Stéphane; Lacroix, Monique

2012-08-01

32

Potential new insecticides for the control of western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on sweet pepper, tomato, and lettuce.  

PubMed

New pesticides are required to maintain effective resistance management strategies for control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). We tested the efficacy of acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam, two neonicotinoids that represent a newer class of insecticides for the control of thrips. We also tested chlorfenapyr, a pyrrol compound, and a lower than registered rate of the biopesticide spinosad. Laboratory bioassays were used to predict the relative efficacy of insecticides against F. occidentalis and to forecast likely field rates. Two doses within the calculated LC99.99 range were used to predict field rates and trial rates of 0.5 g and 1.0 active ingredient (AI)/liter acetamiprid, 0.025 and 0.05 g (AI)/liter chlorfenapyr, 0.3 and 0.6 g (AI)/liter thiamethoxam, and 0.01 g (AI)/ liter spinosad were tested in the greenhouse against pepper, lettuce, and tomato. With the exception of acetamiprid, field trial doses predicted from laboratory bioassay translated to effective field efficacy. All products controlled F. occidentalis at the rates trialed and so have potential to augment current chemical controls. Increasing mortality correlated with increasing acetamiprid concentration in a greenhouse lettuce trial, suggesting that the higher trial rate (1.0 g [AI]/liter) may be required in some lettuce crops. The lower than registered (0.01 g [AI]/liter) rate of spinosad also significantly reduced F. occidentalis numbers and is a viable control option that may be useful in specific integrated pest management programs. The implications of introducing neonicotinoids into existing insecticide resistance management strategies for F. occidentalis are discussed. PMID:19449645

Broughton, S; Herron, G A

2009-04-01

33

Nuclear-mitochondrial barcoding exposes the global pest Western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) as two sympatric cryptic species in its native California.  

PubMed

Over the past three decades, Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), has become a major worldwide pest of many agricultural and horticultural crops. In response, much time, money, and effort have been put into pure and applied research focusing on the biology and control of this pest. Western flower thrips is native to Western North America and widespread in California. High levels of variation in basic biology, pest status, and resistance to insecticides bring into question the specific status of Western flower thrips. We used nuclear-mitochondrial barcoding to compare DNA sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial genes between Western flower thrips populations across California, looking for association between these unlinked loci. Sequences of D2 domain of 28S and cytochrome c oxidase I gene revealed the existence of two distinct but sympatric genetic entities, and we describe a simple polymerase chain reaction-based method for diagnosing these entities. The complete association of these nuclear and mitochondrial loci in areas of sympatry is indicative of reproductive isolation and the existence of two cryptic species, both of which key out to Western flower thrips by using morphological characters. The finding that Western flower thrips is a complex of two species has important implications for past, current, and most importantly future research on these pests. PMID:20568635

Rugman-Jones, Paul F; Hoddle, Mark S; Stouthamer, Richard

2010-06-01

34

Impact of insecticide efficacy on developing action thresholds for pest management: a case study of onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on onion.  

PubMed

An action threshold (AT) is one of the most important decision-making elements in integrated pest management. Unlike economic thresholds, ATs are not typically derived from an economic injury level model, but they are more commonly used. ATs may be identified from research-based, pest-crop relationships, but they also may be based on experience. ATs may be adjusted depending on, e.g., weather and plant variety, but modifying ATs to accommodate differences in insecticide efficacy has received little attention. To examine this point, several combinations of ATs and insecticides were evaluated against onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a major pest of onion (Allium cepa L.). Studies were conducted in New York onion fields from 2006 to 2008 by using registered insecticides for T. tabaci on onions. We hypothesized that the most efficacious insecticides would provide acceptable control of thrips populations regardless of AT (one, three, and five thrips per leaf), whereas less effective products would only control populations using the lowest AT (one thrips per leaf). Results indicated that T. tabaci infestations were managed effectively when spinetoram was applied after a three larvae per leaf threshold, but not when using lambda-cyhalothrin, methomyl or formetanate hydrochloride. However, T. tabaci infestations were managed well when methomyl and formetanate hydrochloride were applied after a one larva per leaf threshold. T. tabaci infestations were never controlled using lambda-cyhalothrin, regardless of the AT used. None of the products reduced T. tabaci populations to an acceptable level when applied at a five larvae per leaf threshold. Implications of adjusting ATs based on efficacy of different insecticides are discussed. PMID:20857743

Nault, Brian A; Shelton, Anthony M

2010-08-01

35

Thysanoptera (thrips) within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, and species on vines and ground cover plants.  

PubMed

Seven citrus orchards on reduced to no pesticide spray programs were sampled for Thysanoptera in central and south central Florida. Inner and outer canopy leaves, fruits, twigs, trunk scrapings, vines and ground cover plants were sampled monthly between January 1995 and January 1996. Thirty-six species of thrips were identified from 2,979 specimens collected from within citrus tree canopies and 18,266 specimens from vines and ground cover plants within the seven citrus orchards. The thrips species included seven predators [Aleurodothrips fasciapennis (Franklin), Karnyothrips flavipes (Jones), K. melaleucus (Bagnall), Leptothrips cassiae (Watson), L. macroocellatus (Watson), L. pini (Watson), and Scolothrips sexmaculatus (Pergande)] 21 plant feeding species [Anaphothrips n. sp., Arorathrips mexicanus (Crawford), Aurantothrips orchidaceous (Bagnall), Baileyothrips limbatus (Hood), Chaetanaphothrips orchidii (Moulton), Danothrips trifasciatus (Sakimura), Echinothrips americanus (Morgan), Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan), F. cephalica (Crawford), F. fusca (Hinds), F. gossypiana (Hood), Frankliniella sp. (runneri group), Haplothrips gowdeyi (Franklin), Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis (Bouché), Leucothrips piercei (Morgan), Microcephalothrips abdominalis (Crawford), Neohydatothrips floridanus (Watson), N. portoricensis (Morgan), Pseudothrips inequalis (Beach), Scirtothrips sp., and Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan)]; and eight fungivorous feeding species [Adraneothrips decorus (Hood), Hoplandrothrips pergandei (Hinds), Idolothripinae sp., Merothrips floridensis (Watson), M. morgani (Hood), Neurothrips magnafemoralis (Hinds), Stephanothrips occidentalis Hood and Williams, and Symphyothrips sp.]. Only F. bispinosa, C. orchidii, D. trifasciatus, and H. haemorrhoidalis have been considered economic pests on Florida citrus. Scirtothrips sp. and T. hawaiiensis were recovered in low numbers within Florida citrus orchards. Both are potential pest species to citrus and possibly other crops in Florida. The five most abundant thrips species collected within citrus tree canopies were: A. fasciapennis, F. bispinosa, C. orchidii, K. flavipes, and D. trifasciatus. In comparison, the following five thrips species were most abundant on vines or ground cover plants: F. bispinosa, H. gowdeyi, F. cephalica, M. abdominalis, and F. gossypiana. Fifty-eight species of vines or ground cover plants in 26 families were infested with one or more of 27 species of thrips. PMID:20233100

Childers, Carl C; Nakahara, Sueo

2006-01-01

36

The fine structure of the female reproductive system of Zorotypus caudelli Karny (Zoraptera).  

PubMed

The general structure of the female genital system of Zorotypus caudelli is described. The ovarioles are of the panoistic type. Due to the reduction of the envelope (tunica externa) the ovarioles are in direct contact with the hemolymph like in some other insect groups, Plecoptera included. The calices are much larger in Z. caudelli then in Zorotypus hubbardi and their epithelial cells produce large amounts of secretions, probably protecting the surface of the eggs deposited on the substrate. Eggs taken from the calyx bear a series of long fringes, which are missing in the eggs found in the ovariole, and in other zorapteran species. The long sperm of Z. caudelli and the long spermathecal duct are likely related to a sexual isolating mechanism (cryptic female choice), impeding female re-mating. The apical receptacle and the spermathecal duct - both of ectodermal origin - consist of three cell types. In addition to the cells beneath the cuticle lining the lumen, two other cell types are visible: secretory and canal cells. The cytoplasm of the former is rich in rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns and Golgi complexes, which produce numerous discrete dense secretory bodies. These products are released into the receiving canal crossing the extracellular cavity of secretory cells, extending over a series of long microvilli. The secretion is transported towards the lumen of the apical receptacle of the spermatheca or to that of the spermathecal duct by a connecting canal formed by the canal cells. It is enriched by material produced by the slender canal cells. Before mating, the sperm cells are enveloped by a thick glycocalyx produced at the level of the male accessory glands, but it is absent when they have reached the apical receptacle, and also in the spermathecal duct lumen. It is likely removed by secretions of the spermatheca. The eggs are fertilized at the level of the common oviduct where the spermathecal duct opens. Two micropyles at the dorsal side of the equator level possibly facilitate fertilization. The presence of these two micropyles is a presumably derived feature shared with Phasmatodea. The fine structure of the female reproductive system of Z. caudelli does not allow to assess the phylogenetic position at the present stage of knowledge. The enlarged calyx and the temporary presence of long fringes on the eggs are potential autapomorphies of Z. caudelli or may indicate relationships with other Zorotypus species. PMID:21996134

Dallai, R; Mercati, D; Gottardo, M; Machida, R; Mashimo, Y; Beutel, R G

2012-01-01

37

New synonymy in the wheat thrips, Haplothrips tritici (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae).  

PubMed

The wheat thrips, Haplothrips tritici, is known from across eastern Europe and adjoining areas of Asia into western Europe and north Africa, and is widely regarded as a pest of cultivated cereal crops, particularly of Triticum but also of Hordeum (Özsisli 2011). The identity of this thrips species is not in doubt, but a closely similar species, Haplothrips cerealis, was described from Egypt (Priesner 1939), and subsequently recorded between southeastern Europe and Iran (see Minaei & Mound 2008). Priesner based this species on an unspecified number of specimens of both sexes, collected from the ears of cultivated wheat at "Wadi Gederât, Sinai", and did not designate a holotype. Minaei and Mound (2010) indicated that they considered the records of cerealis from Iran to be based on misidentifications of tritici, but they suggested that further studies were required to determine if there is any evidence that these names represent different species in other countries. The problems arise because the published descriptions of, and comparisons between, the two species are confusing and sometimes contradictory. The objective of this report is to examine the published literature, and to consider this in relation to observed structural variation in recently collected samples as well as specimens in museums that are variously labeled as one or other of these two species.   PMID:24871030

Minaei, Kambiz; Mound, Laurence

2014-01-01

38

A new species of Haplothrips from southern Iran (Thysanoptera, Phlaeothripidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Haplothrips herajius sp. n. is described from leaves and flowers of a species of Suaeda in the south of Fars Province, Iran. This is the second Iranian species of Haplothrips with the unusual character state of extra setae on the metanotum. Information on variation in color and structure of the new species is provided. The similarities and host plant associations of this new species and Haplothrips kermanensis are discussed,as both are phytophagous on species of Chenopodiaceae.

Minaei, Kambiz; Aleosfoor, Maryam

2013-01-01

39

Color preference, seasonality, spatial distribution and species composition of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in northern highbush blueberries  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated color preference, seasonal abundance, spatial distribution and species composition of thrips in northern highbush blueberries, Vaccinium corymbosum L., in New Jersey (USA). White sticky traps were more attractive to thrips compared with yellow or blue traps. Thrips captures using white sticky traps showed that their flight activity begins 20–30 d after the onset of flowering, with 10, 50 and

C. R. Rodriguez-Saona; S. Polavarapu; J. D. Barry; D. Polk; R. Jörnsten; P. V. Oudemans; O. E. Liburd

2010-01-01

40

The risk of exotic and native plants as hosts for four pest thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripinae).  

PubMed

Interactions among insect pests, crops and weeds are well recognised. In fact, the elimination of weed hosts outside of the crop is a common practice to control many insect-vectored viruses. However, little is known about interactions among insect pests, crops and native vegetation, and whether native plants may be used to revegetate areas where weed hosts have been eliminated as part of horticultural management regimes. We used the Northern Adelaide Plains horticultural region (South Australia, Australia) as a model system to study the potential of various plant taxa in hosting four pest thrips (three exotic, one native; Frankliniella occidentalis, F. schultzei, Thrips tabaci and T. imaginis) when located adjacent to, and distant from, horticultural crops. Flower funnels were used for standardised sampling of thrips on flowers from 19 exotic weed and 12 native plant species, representing 13 and three families, respectively. Flowers were sampled monthly over a year, and statistical analyses were performed to identify significant determinants of probability of thrips occurrence and density. Plant family was found to significantly influence both measures for each thrips species. In addition, crop proximity influenced the probability of occurrence for the two Frankliniella species (but only influenced density of the key pest F. occidentalis), and season influenced density of all four pest thrips. All native plant species tested had a low likelihood of hosting the three exotic thrips species. Overall, results suggest that judicious choice of surrounding vegetation has potential to be an important component of integrated pest management (IPM) while increasing biodiversity conservation. PMID:20569517

Schellhorn, N A; Glatz, R V; Wood, G M

2010-10-01

41

Comparison of life history parameters of two Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) strains in New Zealand.  

PubMed

Two strains of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), are reputedly found in New Zealand. One strain was recorded in 1934, and it is most common in flowers of Lupinus arboreus outdoors (lupin strain); the other strain was first recorded in New Zealand in 1992 and is found mostly indoors on greenhouse crops (greenhouse strain). Laboratory studies were conducted to compare the life history parameters of these two strains. Thrips from each strain were fed sucrose solution and capsicum or lupin pollen and reared at 25 degrees C, >60% RH, and 16 L:8 D photoperiod. Significant differences in life history parameters were found. Preoviposition time was significantly shorter, and oviposition rate and fecundity were markedly higher (four-fold) for the greenhouse than for the lupin strain. The lupin strain performed significantly better on the capsicum pollen, laying more than twice as many eggs than on the lupin pollen over a 14-d period. The greenhouse strain development time from larvae to adult was marginally faster (0.7-1.1 d less) than the lupin strain because of a shorter prepupal and a marginally shorter pupal development time. Females of the greenhouse strain lived on average 69% longer than females from the lupin strain. Large differences in the intrinsic growth rate (r(m)) were found, with r(m) being 1.4-1.8 times higher for the greenhouse strain than the lupin strain, depending on pollen source. The results are discussed in relation to different ecological requirements and pest status of the two strains. PMID:20388257

Nielsen, M-C; Teulon, D A J; Chapman, R B; Butler, R C; Drayton, G M; Philipsen, H

2010-04-01

42

Population dynamics and within-plant distribution of Frankliniella spp. thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in cotton.  

PubMed

Thrips cause damage to seedling cotton, and they are associated with the spread of Fusarium hardlock, a serious disease affecting cotton bolls that reduces lint yield in the southern United States. The population dynamics and within-plant distribution of Frankliniella spp. thrips in cotton were determined in 2005, 2006, and 2007 in Quincy and in 2006 and 2007 in Marianna, FL. Frankliniella tritici (Fitch) was >98% of the adult thrips collected. The adults of F. bispinosa (Morgan), F. occidentalis (Pergande), and F. fusca (Hinds) also were collected. Populations of F. fusca inhabited the cotton leaves of vegetative-stage cotton. The other species were highly anthophilic, primarily inhabiting cotton during its reproductive growth stages. Densities of these species peaked during mid-season, which also coincided with peak bloom. The adult F. tritici and the thrips larvae were aggregated in the flowers over the other plant parts, with more collected in the upper than the lower canopies. These patterns of aggregation were observed at each location each year, and the numerical differences usually were significant (P < 0.05). Densities of adult F. tritici were low on the leaves, squares, and bolls. The population dynamics and with-plant distribution of individual thrips species has not previously been determined for cotton in the southern United States. PMID:19689901

Osekre, Enoch A; Wright, David L; Marois, James J; Funderburk, Joe

2009-08-01

43

Cross-resistance and baseline susceptibility of spirotetramat in Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is an economically important pest all over the world. New products against thrips are necessary, as there are few effective compounds exhibiting cross-resistance among them. Lethal effects, cross-resistance, and baseline susceptibility to spirotetramat were evaluated in this study. A new bioassay method for testing thrips against spirotetramat was developed. Spirotetramat showed a significant mortality effect on larvae after 7 d of exposure, but a low effect was observed on adults. Baseline results for larval instars showed LC50 values ranging from 11.59 to 49.81 mg AI/liter, with a low natural variability (3.2-fold). Cross-resistance studies showed overlapping confidence limits of the LC50 values for laboratory-selected (against acrinathrin, methiocarb, formetanate, and spinosad) resistant and susceptible strains, and low resistance factors, from 0.5 to 1.9, suggesting no cross-resistance to conventional insecticides previously used. A slight ovicidal effect (21-40% reduction) was also detected. Despite presenting low effects on adults, spirotetramat showed high but slow efficacy on F. occidentalis larvae. Field populations in southeast Spain showed a consistent susceptibility to spirotetramat. Given the scarcity of effective products and the lack of cross-resistance to other insecticides, spirotetramat can be considered as a good chemical tool to control F. occidentalis. PMID:25026688

Guillén, Juan; Navarro, Miguel; Bielza, Pablo

2014-06-01

44

Efficacy of pesticide mixtures against the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) under laboratory and greenhouse conditions.  

PubMed

Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande is a commonly encountered and economically important insect pest of greenhouses. Greenhouse producers typically apply pesticides as mixtures to mitigate western flower thrips populations; however, there is limited information available on the compatibility and efficacy of commonly used pesticide mixtures. This study assessed nine binary and three tertiary pesticide mixtures used in greenhouses which included pesticides containing abamectin, acephate, azadirachtin, bifenazate, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, imidacloprid, novaluron, pymetrozine, and spinosad. Compatibility was determined for the binary pesticide mixtures using jar tests. In addition, the binary mixtures were applied to nine horticultural plant species to determine phytotoxicity based on visual appearance assessed 7 d after treatment. Bean-dip bioassays were performed in a laboratory using green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to determine LC50 values for each individual pesticide and the mixtures to establish whether the mixtures were synergistic, antagonistic, or there was no effect. The mortality of western flower thrips was assessed after 24 h, and LC50 values were calculated. Furthermore, semifield bioassays were performed in greenhouses for binary and tertiary mixtures to evaluate the efficacy (based on percent mortality) of the pesticide mixtures against western flower thrips. Results indicated that all binary mixtures were visibly compatible, and not phytotoxic to any of the plant species evaluated. Combination index calculations based on laboratory results indicated most of the binary mixtures were synergistic; however, the mixture containing spinosad + bifenazate appeared to be antagonistic against western flower thrips. The semifield bioassays demonstrated significantly reduced efficacy associated with mixtures containing azadirachtin, however, all binary mixtures provided approximately 80% western flower thrips mortality. PMID:23448038

Willmott, Amy L; Cloyd, Raymond A; Zhu, Kun Yan

2013-02-01

45

EVOLUTION OF ASEXUALITY VIA DIFFERENT MECHANISMS IN GRASS THRIPS (THYSANOPTERA: Aptinothrips).  

PubMed

Asexual lineages can derive from sexual ancestors via different mechanisms and at variable rates, which affects the diversity of the asexual population and thereby its ecological success. We investigated the variation and evolution of reproductive systems in Aptinothrips, a genus of grass thrips comprising four species. Extensive population surveys and breeding experiments indicated sexual reproduction in A. elegans, asexuality in A. stylifer and A. karnyi, and both sexual and asexual lineages in A. rufus. Asexuality in A. stylifer and A. rufus coincides with a worldwide distribution, with sexual A. rufus lineages confined to a limited area. Inference of molecular phylogenies and antibiotic treatment revealed different causes of asexuality in different species. Asexuality in A. stylifer and A. karnyi has most likely genetic causes, while it is induced by endosymbionts in A. rufus. Endosymbiont-community characterization revealed presence of Wolbachia, and lack of other bacteria known to manipulate host reproduction. However, only 69% asexual A. rufus females are Wolbachia-infected, indicating that either an undescribed endosymbiont causes asexuality in this species or that Wolbachia was lost in several lineages that remained asexual. These results open new perspectives for studies on the maintenance of mixed sexual and asexual reproduction in natural populations. PMID:24627993

van der Kooi, Casper J; Schwander, Tanja

2014-07-01

46

Evaluation of Beauveria bassiana for management of citrus thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in California blueberries.  

PubMed

Citrus thrips, Scirtothrips citri (Moulton), is a plant-feeding pest most widely recognized for causing damage to citrus and mango fruits. This insect has broadened its host range to become a significant pest of commercial blueberries grown in the San Joaquin Valley of California. We evaluated Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) for control of citrus thrips in blueberries grown under two watering regimes (drip irrigation with and without overhead sprinklers) and using two fungal formulations (commercially available spores in suspension vs. colonized seed) over two sampling periods, that is, for two 3-d periods after treatment. We found significant differences in thrips densities as a function of water regime treatment and fungal formulation. Thrips levels were reduced significantly with both fungal treatments at 3 d after treatment, but at 6 d, only results with colonized seed differed from the control treatment. These data suggest entomopathogenic fungi might be useful for control of citrus thrips on blueberries in particular situations (in organic production or as a resistance management tool) but that traditional pesticides will likely remain the preferred management option. PMID:24224239

Zahn, Deane K; Haviland, David R; Stanghellini, M E; Morsel, Joseph G

2013-10-01

47

Population abundance of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and natural enemies on plant hosts in central Chile.  

PubMed

Populations of the invasive Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) are serious pests of agricultural crops in the Aconcagua Valley of central Chile. An extensive survey was conducted of 55 plant species in 24 families to identify plant hosts of F. occidentalis and to determine its relative abundance on each host during each season. A more intensive study was conducted on selected plant species serving as reproductive hosts to determine the population dynamics of F. occidentalis and to evaluate the potential importance of Orius species and other natural enemies for controlling F. occidentalis. Adults of F. occidentalis were active during each season of the year inhabiting the flowers of 91% of the sampled plant species in 22 families, and 86% of these plant species in 19 families served as reproductive hosts. The number of host plant species used was greatest in the spring and least in the winter. All of the hosts except Medicago sativa L. were used only when flowering. Populations of F. occidentalis were significantly aggregated in M. sativa in the terminal buds over the leaves when the host was not flowering, and in the flowers, followed by the terminal buds, followed by the leaves when the host was flowering. Larvae were 1.3-2.3 times more abundant on dates when M. sativa was flowering. There were no identifiable patterns in plant hosts based on endemicity or plant family. Most of the plant species used by F. occidentalis were inferior quality hosts where populations either declined or were stable. Populations of F. occidentalis on low-quality hosts generally escaped predation by Orius species and competition by other species of thrips. Only 25% of the food hosts and 28% of the reproductive hosts for F. occidentalis in the extensive survey, respectively, were host plants for Orius. Parasitoids and other predators were not found to be important in suppressing thrips on any of the plant hosts. Populations of F. occidentalis increased on only a few hosts, including M. sativa and Sisymbrium officinale L. Scop. These apparently are major sources of F. occidentalis adults invading crops. We conclude that F. occidentalis is established in central Chile and that it has replaced and possibly displaced the native Frankliniella australis (Morgan) as the most common thrips species. PMID:19389281

Ripa, Renato; Funderburk, Joe; Rodriguez, Fernando; Espinoza, Fernanda; Mound, Laurence

2009-04-01

48

Integrated management tactics for Frankliniella thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in field-grown pepper.  

PubMed

In a 2-yr study, the impacts of different plastic soil mulches, insecticides, and predator releases on Frankliniella thrips and their natural enemies were investigated in field-grown peppers. Ultraviolet light (UV)-reflective mulch significantly reduced early season abundance of adult thrips compared with standard black plastic mulch. This difference diminished as the growing seasons progressed. Late season abundance of thrips larvae was higher in UV reflective mulch compared with black mulch plots. The abundance of the predator Orius insidiosus (Say) was significantly lower in UV-reflective mulch compared with black mulch treatments. Infection of plants with tomato spotted wilt virus, a pathogen vectored by Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), was <6%. In the year with the higher disease incidence (2000), UV-reflective mulch plots had significantly less disease (1.9%) compared with black mulch plots (4.4%). Yield was significantly higher in UV-reflective mulch (24,529 kg/ha) compared with black mulch (15,315 kg/ha) during this year. Effects of insecticides varied with species of thrips. Spinosad reduced abundance of F. occidentalis, but not Frankliniella tritici. In contrast, esfenvalerate and acephate reduced numbers of F. tritici and Frankliniella bispinosa, but resulted in higher populations of F. occidentalis. Spinosad was the least disruptive insecticide to populations of O. insidiosus. Releases of O. insidiosus and Geocoris punctipes (Say) reduced populations of thrips immediately after releases; naturally occurring predators probably provided late season control of thrips. Our results suggest that UV-reflective mulch, combined with early season applications of spinosad, can effectively reduce abundance of thrips in field-grown pepper. PMID:14503592

Reitz, Stuart R; Yearby, Erika L; Funderburk, Joseph E; Stavisky, Julianne; Momol, M Timur; Olson, Steve M

2003-08-01

49

Evaluation of medium treatments for management of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thripidae: Thysanoptera) and Bradysia coprophila (Diptera: Sciaridae).  

PubMed

Two greenhouse experiments, each comprising two trials, were conducted to evaluate medium drenches of insect growth regulators and conventional insecticides to reduce emergence of adult western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), and fungus gnats, Bradysia coprophila (Lintner) from the medium. In the insect growth regulator trials, diflubenzuron and pyriproxyfen provided the greatest reduction in thrips emergence, and fenoxycarb, pyriproxyfen and azadirachtin resulted in the most significant reduction of fungus gnat emergence. Treatments with the contact insecticides, methiocarb and chlorpyrifos, resulted in the greatest reduction of thrips and fungus gnat populations. These data suggest that fungus gnats are susceptible to many compounds used in commercial greenhouse production. Even though medium drenches are not currently used for thrips management, drenches with diflubenzuron, pyriproxyfen, methiocarb and chlorpyrifos could aid in reducing thrips populations in greenhouse management programs. PMID:11802598

Ludwig, S W; Oetting, R D

2001-12-01

50

The Poaceae-associated genus Bamboosiella (Thysanoptera, Phlaeothripidae) from India with one new species.  

PubMed

Bamboosiella venkataramani sp. n. is described from India based on specimens collected on grass clumps from the Karnataka State of India. A key is provided for identification of seven Indian species of the genus Bamboosiella. PMID:24870460

Kumar, Vikas; Tyagi, Kaomud

2014-01-01

51

Antixenotic resistance of cabbage to onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). I. Light reflectance.  

PubMed

Onion thrips (Thrips tabaci Lindeman) has become a significant pest of cabbage (Brasssica oleracea L.) in regions with a dry continental climate. Thrips-resistant cabbage varieties have been developed in breeding programs, but the mechanisms ofresistance remain largely unknown. Antixenosis, one of the three resistance mechanisms, may play a role but no plant trait has been identified as a source of antixenosis. A series of studies were conducted to identify resistance mechanisms in this insect- crop interaction and to seek plant traits that were correlated to resistance. In this first article of the series, the result of studying antixenosis and overall resistance of cabbage and the correlation between antixenosis and light reflectance characteristics are reported. There were distinct differences in the overall resistance to thrips between the six cabbage varieties studied. There were more pronounced differences between varieties based on the number of damaged head leaves compared with the use of damage ratings as a measure of overall resistance. Varieties also differed in their level of antixenosis; proportional abundance of thrips adults on head-forming leaves was more closely correlated to overall resistance of cabbage than actual thrips numbers. Some of the variables computed from the recorded reflectance spectra of cabbage were correlated to thrips abundance on head-forming leaves only in the first but not in the second year of this study, suggesting that either spectral characteristics do not affect antixenosis or other variables may affect thrips' responses to spectral cues. Furthermore, multiple spray applications of a kaolin particle-based product significantly changed the light reflectance characteristics of cabbage, but it did not reduce the actual thrips abundance on head-forming leaves. PMID:24498763

Fail, József; Deutschlander, Mark E; Shelton, Anthony M

2013-12-01

52

Spatial and temporal variation in Chaetanaphothrips orchidii Moulton (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) population and its damage on lemon.  

PubMed

Chaetanaphothrips orchidii Moulton has recently been detected in lemon (Citrus limon) orchards in northwest Argentina, causing high levels of damage on fruits. Severe damage results in the rejection of fruit for export, which must then be sold in the industry. However, the restrictions imposed by the citrus industry on insecticide residues sometimes also result in fruit rejection. Here, we studied the ecology and behavior of C. orchidii in order to propose a pest management strategy that could meet both export and industry demands. Seasonal occurrence and canopy distribution of C. orchidii in lemon orchards were evaluated, and field experimental manipulations of thrips populations were performed to analyze how the length (45, 100, 130, and 200 days) and timing (January, February, or March) of C. orchidii activity related with fruit damage. Lemons harvested during summer showed lower infestation levels (?0.64 individual per fruit) than those harvested in winter (?1.88 individuals per fruit). Higher proportions of damaged fruits were recorded in the lower part of the tree. Changes in the population levels of C. orchidii were closely associated with fruit phenology. The longer the lemon fruits were exposed to the thrips, the higher was the damage. However, the time of infestations did not affect fruit damage. Our data provide a first step towards understanding the factors that determine the severity of fruit damage caused by C. orchidii in northwest Argentina. PMID:23949715

Goane, L; Casmuz, A; Salas, H; Lizondo, M; Gastaminza, G; Vera, M T

2013-02-01

53

A New Species of Charassothrips Hood from Colombia (Insecta, Thysanoptera, Thripidae) with an Updated Key to the Known Species  

PubMed Central

Charassothrips macroseta sp.n. is described and illustrated from Colombia. A key is provided to the five species now recognised in the Neotropical genus Charassothrips, each of which has the head and pronotum, mesonotum and metanotum prominently sculptured and the abdominal tergites with a craspedum on the posterior margins.

Goldarazena, Arturo; Mound, Laurence

2010-01-01

54

Impact of neonicotinoid seed treatments on thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and soybean yield in Virginia and North Carolina.  

PubMed

Currently there are several neonicotinoid insecticide seed treatments registered for use on soybean (Glycine max L.), with disparity in adoption rates in the eastern United States. A complex of seedling insect pests is found in mid-south soybean, but thrips are the primary early season pest of soybean in Virginia and North Carolina. Published knowledge regarding their impact on soybean yield is minimal, as is the impact of thrips on soybean yield; thrips species composition is also understudied. In 2008 through 2010, nine field experiments in Virginia and North Carolina were conducted to evaluate the impact on thrips population dynamics; the influence on yield of neonicotinoid seed treatments, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, was reported from nine of these experiments. Moreover, thrips species abundance was recorded in three of these experiments. Both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam reduced thrips densities compared with untreated soybean. Thiamethoxam was more effective than imidacloprid in reducing adult thrips densities at 5 wk after planting. Adult densities peaked at 3 wk after planting, followed by larval densities, which peaked at 4 wk after planting. The most abundant thrips species was Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), followed by Neohydatothrips variabilis (Beach). Other common species included F. occidentalis (Pergande) and F. tritici (Fitch). In general, F. fusca was more common earlier in the season, while N. variabilis was more common later in the season. There were no significant differences in yield among any of the treatments or in the untreated controls. Although neonicotinoid insecticides reduced thrips abundance, data collected in these studies demonstrated that there was no positive yield response. PMID:22812126

Reisig, Dominic D; Herbert, D Ames; Malone, Sean

2012-06-01

55

[Thermal requirements and estimate of the annual number of generations of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on strawberry crop].  

PubMed

Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is one of the major strawberry pests in southern Brazil. The insect causes russeting and wither in flowers and fruits reducing commercial value. In this work, the thermal requirements of the eggs, larvae and pupae of F. occidentalis were estimated. Thrips development was studied in folioles of strawberry plants at six constant temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 degrees C) in controlled conditions (70 +/- 10% R.H. and 12:12 L:D). The number of annual generations of F. occidentalis was estimated for six strawberry production regions of Rio Grande do Sul State based on its thermal requirements. Developmental time of each F. occidentalis stages was proportional to the temperature increase. The best development rate was obtained when insects were reared at 25 masculineC and 28 masculineC. The lower threshold and the thermal requirements for the egg to adult stage were 9.9 masculineC and 211.9 degree-days, respectively. Considering the thermal requirements of F. occidentalis, 10.7, 12.6, 13.1, 13.6, 16.5 and 17.9 generations/year were estimated, respectively, for Vacaria, Caxias do Sul, Farroupilha, Pelotas, Porto Alegre and Taquari producing regions located in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. PMID:19169551

Nondillo, Aline; Redaelli, Luiza R; Botton, Marcos; Pinent, Silvia M J; Gitz, Rogério

2008-01-01

56

Bell and banana pepper exhibit mature-plant resistance to tomato spotted wilt Tospovirus transmitted by Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Tomato spotted wilt virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Tospovirus, TSWV) causes annual economic losses in pepper, Capsicum annuum L., across the southern United States and is transmitted by several species of thrips, including the tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds). Reduced virus transmission and symptom severity as plant age increases is known as mature-plant resistance. TSWV transmission to pepper plants was examined in three and four age classes in field and greenhouse trials, respectively. In the field trial, 'Camelot' bell pepper plants were exposed to potentially viruliferous F. fusca 37, 51, or 65 d postsowing. Two greenhouse trials of Camelot bell and one trial each of 'Bounty' and 'Pageant' banana pepper plants were exposed to potentially viruliferous F. fusca, 43, 57, 71, or 85; 48, 62, 75, or 90; 42, 56, 70, or 84; and 43, 57, 71, or 85 d postsowing, respectively. Linear and hyperbolic regressions of percentage of infected plants per block on days postsowing indicated mature-plant resistance in all trials. All models were significant, but hyperbolic curves better fit the data than linear models. Hyperbolic models were used to calculate the number of days posttransplant at which a 50% decrease from the predicted percentage of infected plants at transplant age (42 d postsowing) was expected. This was referred to as days posttransplant-50 (DPT50). DPRT50 occurred within 9 days posttransplant age for all trials, indicating that early TSWV management in pepper is critical. PMID:19253614

Beaudoin, A L P; Kahn, N D; Kennedy, G G

2009-02-01

57

Ultralow oxygen treatment for postharvest control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), on iceberg lettuce  

Microsoft Academic Search

Iceberg lettuce stored under normal atmosphere and controlled atmosphere (CA) with about 3% oxygen at low temperature for 1 week was compared with fresh lettuce for their response to 2d ultralow oxygen (ULO) treatment with 0.003% oxygen at 10°C for control of western flower thrips. Lettuce which had been stored for 1 week under normal or CA tolerated ULO treatment

Yong-Biao Liu

2008-01-01

58

Ultralow oxygen treatment for postharvest control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), on iceberg lettuce  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultralow oxygen (ULO) treatments with different oxygen levels, treatment times, and temperatures were studied to determine effects on western flower thrips mortality and postharvest quality of iceberg lettuce. Thrips mortality increased with reduced oxygen level and increased treatment time and temperature. At 0.003% oxygen, over 99.6% mortality rates of thrips were achieved in three ULO treatments of 2, 3, and

Yong-Biao Liu

2008-01-01

59

The genus Ctenothrips from India (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)
with description of one new species and one new record.
 

PubMed

Ctenothrips barapatharensis sp.n. is described from specimens collected on ferns from Himachal Pradesh state of India. This is the only species in this genus having dark thickenings attached to fore ocellus. Ctenothrips niger Kudô is newly recorded from India, and the brachypterous form is described for the first time. A key to the three species of Ctenothrips from India is provided. PMID:24989741

Tyagi, Kaomud; Ghosh, Biswatosh; Kumar, Vikas

2014-01-01

60

Epizootiological study of Neozygites parvispora (Zygomycota: Entomophthoraceae) in a population of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on pepper in sicily  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an epizootic of the entomopathogenic fungusNeozygites parvispora occurring in a population ofFrankliniella occidentalis in a pepper crop under plastic-house, in south-eastern Sicily (Italy). The progress of the epizootic in the thrips population\\u000a was monitored weekly, from December 1990 to April 1991. Infections ofN. parvispora caused up to more than 60% mortality of the mobile developmental stages of

V. Vacante; S. O. Cacciola; A. M. Pennisi

1994-01-01

61

Tomato plant and leaf age effects on the probing and settling behavior of Frankliniella fusca and Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

The effect of tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L., plant and leaf age on the probing and settling behavior of Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) and F. occidentalis (Pergande) was studied using electrical penetration graph technique and whole plant bioassays. Male and female F. fusca probed and ingested more and for longer periods of time on 3- and 4-wk-old plants compared with 6- and 8-wk-old plants. Female F. fusca probed and ingested more frequently than males in the plant age experiment, but not in the leaf age experiment. F. fusca probed and ingested more frequently on 2- and 4-wk-old leaves compared with 1-wk-old leaves. Plant age did not affect the probing frequency or duration of F. occidentalis; however, males probed and ingested longer than females in the plant age experiment and on the oldest leaf in the leaf age experiment. Both thrips species preferred to settle on 3-wk-old plants. F. fusca preferred to settle on 4-wk-old leaves after settling randomly for an hour. F. occidentalis showed no settling preference relative to leaf age. The preference of F. fusca for young plants suggests that this species could attack tomato plants at a very early stage, which is important for understanding its role as a vector in the transmission of Tospovirus in the field. PMID:18348813

Joost, P Houston; Riley, David G

2008-02-01

62

Effectiveness of different emulsifiers for neem oil against the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera, Thripidae) and the warehouse moth (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae).  

PubMed

The neem tree produces highly specified acting insecticides mainly in its seeds. By pressurizing or extracting the seeds an insecticide oil can be manufactured. For successful application emulsifiers are needed to render the oil soluble in water. The heavy oil has to be stable in emulsion, but on the other hand the surfactant should not reduce the ecological property of the neem oil. The emulsifiers Lutensol TO10, Emulan ELP, Rimulgan and Tween 80 and for comparison the formulation NeemAzal-T/S were tested in their emulsion stability, as well as in their insecticidal effects towards two different insect pests: The western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and the ware house moth Ephestia elutella. The emulsifiers were applied purely, and in different contents mixed in neem oil. Data showed significant differences of mortality and development on the tested pests. Lutensol TO10 and Emulan ELP caused spontaneous mortality on the western flower thrips and an additive efficacy when mixed with neem oil. Rimulgan led to mortality of the larvae of the warehouse moth. NeemAzal showed in both bioassays the highest efficacy of 95% mortality. PMID:12425067

Schroer, S; Sermann, H; Reichmuth, C; Büttner, C

2001-01-01

63

Novel cytochrome P450 genes, CYP6EB1 and CYP6EC1, are over-expressed in acrinathrin-resistant Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

Control of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is a serious problem for agriculture all over the world because of the limited range of insecticides that are available. Insecticide resistance in F. occidentalis has been reported for all major insecticide groups. Our previous studies showed that cytochrome P450-mediated detoxification is a major mechanism responsible for insecticide resistance in this pest. Degenerate polymerase chain reaction was used to identify P450 genes that might be involved in acrinathrin resistance, in a laboratory population of F. occidentalis. Associated sequences were classified as belonging to the CYP4 and CYP6 families. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that two genes, CYP6EB1 and CYP6EC1, were over-expressed in adults and L2 larvae of the resistant population, when compared with the susceptible population, suggesting their possible involvement in resistance to acrinathrin. PMID:22812142

Cifuentes, D; Chynoweth, R; Guillén, J; De la Rúa, P; Bielza, P

2012-06-01

64

Winter weeds as inoculum sources of tomato spotted wilt virus and as reservoirs for its vector, Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in farmscapes of Georgia.  

PubMed

Thrips-transmitted Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has a broad host range including crops and weeds. In Georgia, TSWV is known to consistently affect peanut, tomato, pepper, and tobacco production. These crops are grown from March through November. In the crop-free period, weeds are presumed to serve as a green bridge for thrips and TSWV. Previous studies have identified several winter weeds as TSWV and thrips hosts. However, their ability to influence TSWV transmission in crops is still not completely understood. To further understand these interactions, population dynamics of two prevalent vectors, viz., Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) and Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), on selected winter weeds were monitored from October through April in four counties from 2004 to 2008. Peak populations were typically recorded in March. F. fusca and F. occidentalis adults were found on winter weeds and their percentages ranged from 0 to 68% in comparison with other adults. Immatures outnumbered all adults. Microcosm experiments indicated that the selected winter weeds differentially supported F. fusca reproduction and development. The time required to complete one generation (adult to adult) ranged from 11 to 16 d. Adult recovery ranged from 0.97 to 2.2 per female released. In addition, transmission assays revealed that thrips efficiently transmitted TSWV from peanut to weeds, the incidence of infection ranged from 10 to 55%. Back transmission assays with thrips from TSWV-infected weeds resulted in up to 75% TSWV infection in peanut. These whole-plant transmission and back transmission assays provide the basis for TSWV persistence in farmscapes year round. PMID:24612539

Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Riley, David; Diffie, Stan; Shrestha, Anita; Culbreath, Albert

2014-04-01

65

Low-temperature phosphine fumigation of chilled lettuce under insulated cover for postharvest control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pallet-scale phosphine fumigations were conducted on pre-chilled iceberg lettuce under an insulated cover to determine efficacy against western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, and phytotoxicity to lettuce. Vacuum-cooled commercial iceberg lettuce at 3°C was sealed in a plastic bag, covered with double-bubble foil insulation, and then fumigated with 484±17ppm phosphine for 18h under storage at 20°C. Lettuce temperature increased from 4.5°C

Yong-Biao Liu

2011-01-01

66

Genetic and host-associated differentiation within Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and its links to Tomato spotted wilt virus-vector competence.  

PubMed

Of eight thelytokous populations of onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) collected from potato (three populations), onion (four) or Chrysanthemum (one) hosts from various regions of Australia, only those from potato were capable of transmitting Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in controlled transmission experiments. Genetic differentiation of seven of these eight populations, and nine others not tested for TSWV vector competence, was examined by comparison of the DNA sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene. All Australian populations of T. tabaci grouped within the European 'L2' clade of Brunner et al. (2004). Within this clade the seven populations from potato, the three from onion, and the four from other hosts (Chrysanthemum, Impatiens, lucerne, blackberry nightshade) clustered as three distinct sub-groupings characterised by source host. Geographical source of thrips populations had no influence on genetic diversity. These results link genetic differentiation of thelytokous T. tabaci to source host and to TSWV vector capacity for the first time. PMID:23632893

Westmore, G C; Poke, F S; Allen, G R; Wilson, C R

2013-09-01

67

The distribution and abundance of phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on citrus in southern Africa and their possible value as predators of citrus thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

On citrus in Zimbabwe, Swaziland and South Africa, predacious mites of the subfamily Amblyseiinae are more common and found in greater numbers than phytoseiids of the subfamily Phytosciinae. The author's survey and other collection data indicated that within the Amblyseiinae the genus Euseius Wainstein is the most widely distributed. Seven Euseius spp. have been recorded on citrus in the above

T. G. Grout

1994-01-01

68

Voracity and prey preference of insidious flower bug (hemiptera: anthocoridae) for immature stages of soybean aphid (hemiptera: aphididae) and soybean thrips (thysanoptera: thripidae).  

PubMed

The generalist predator, Orius insidiosus (Say), is an important natural enemy of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura. Soybean thrips, Neohydatothrips variabilis (Beach), serve as an important prey resource for O. insidiosus in soybeans, sustaining the predator's population before the arrival of the soybean aphid. Although generalist predators can forage on a broad range of prey, they may show distinct preferences for particular prey, attacking prey at levels disproportionate to their relative numbers. To assess the preference of O. insidiosus for soybean aphid and soybean thrips, attack rates of nymphal and adult O. insidiosus were measured in the laboratory. For both adults and nymphs, the number of prey attacked increased as more prey were provided. For nymphs, the total number of prey attacked increased as the predator matured. In general, the number of prey attacked by adult predators was relatively constant as the predator aged. Both O. insidiosus nymphs and adults displayed a preference for soybean thrips, by disproportionately attacking soybean thrips over soybean aphid regardless of the relative densities of the two prey. We discuss implications of this preference on O. insidiosus life history characteristics and the potential impact on O. insidiosus-prey dynamics in the field. PMID:18801262

Butler, Casey D; O'Neil, Robert J

2008-08-01

69

Modelling population dynamics of Orius laevigatus and O. albidipennis (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) to optimize their use as biological control agents of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).  

PubMed

ORIUS LAEVIGATUS: (Fieber) and O. albidipennis (Reuter) play an important role in the control of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) in crops and natural vegetation in the Mediterranean area. The biological parameters of the two anthocorids were studied and modelled in relation to temperature to optimize their use in thrips control programmes. Development times and reproductive parameters of O. laevigatus and O. albidipennis were determined at 20, 25, 30 and 35 degrees C. Pre-imaginal development times ranged from 34.6 and 37.2 days at 20 degrees C to 12.3 and 10.2 days at 35 degrees C in O. laevigatus and O. albidipennis, respectively. The lower thermal development threshold was significantly higher for O. albidipennis (14.2 +/- 0.9 degrees C) than for O. laevigatus (11.3 +/- 0.7 degrees C). No significant differences in fecundities between the two anthocorids were observed at 20, 25 and 30 degrees C. At 35 degrees C, O. albidipennis had a significantly higher fecundity than O. laevigatus. Non-linear models were used to explain reproduction and female survivorship in relation to temperature. The upper reproductive thresholds were estimated at 40.9 +/- 0.3 and 35.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C for O. albidipennis and O. laevigatus, respectively. The different optimum temperatures may explain, at least in part, the different distributions of the two species in the Palaeartic region and their population dynamics in greenhouses and natural vegetation in the south of Spain. The estimation of rm as a function of temperature showed high variability between years. Three release rates of 0.75-0.25 Orius per plant are recommended from early March to mid May to deal with thrips outbreaks in pepper crops. PMID:12020365

Sanchez, J A; Sanchez, J A; Lacasa, A

2002-02-01

70

The Highly Rearranged Mitochondrial Genome of the Plague Thrips, Thrips imaginis (Insecta: Thysanoptera): Convergence of Two Novel Gene Boundaries and an Extraordinary Arrangement of rRNA Genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

for the evolution of duplicate control regions and for the gene translocations, but intramitochondrial recombination may account for the gene inversions in T. imaginis. All the 18 genes between control regions #1 and #2 have translocated and\\/or inverted, whereas only six of the 20 genes outside this region have translocated and\\/or inverted. Moreover, the extra tRNA gene and the two

Renfu Shao; Stephen C. Barker

2003-01-01

71

Lack of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 upregulates basal thermogenesis but causes hypothermia in a cold environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) is a microsomal enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of oleate and palmi- toleate. Mice with a targeted disruption of the SCD1 iso- form (SCD1 ? \\/ ? ) exhibit reduced adiposity and increased energy expenditure. To address whether the energy expen- diture is attributable to increased thermogenesis, we investi- gated the effect of SCD1 deficiency on basal

Seong-Ho Lee; Agnieszka Dobrzyn; Pawel Dobrzyn; Shaikh Mizanoor Rahman; Makoto Miyazaki; James M. Ntambi

2004-01-01

72

Orthopterological notes I : On the Lesini of the Leiden Museum (Tettigoniidae, Copiphorinae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

When rearranging a part of the collections of Orthoptera in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden I found a number of specimens belonging to this tribus, which by former authors is considered as a separate subfamily with the name Eumegalodontinae (Kirby, 1906, p. 289; Caudell, 1927, p. 30). With Karny I think it justified to let it retain its

Jong de C

1942-01-01

73

From Carboniferous to Recent: wing venation enlightens evolution of thysanopteran lineage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent Thysanoptera are characterized by two pairs of slender wings fringed by long hairs and with reduced venation. Fossils presenting more complete venation have been used in earlier studies to link Thysanoptera to ‘Zoropsocinae’, which formwith\\u000d\\u000a‘Lophioneurinae’ the ‘Lophioneuridae’, an extinct family of the superorder Thripida. On the basis of one new Carboniferous fossil described herein, Westphalothripides oudardi sp. nov.

Patricia Nel; Dany Azar; Jakub Prokop; Patrick Roques; Gilbert Hodebert; André Nel

2012-01-01

74

Stable transfection of fatty acid translocase (CD36) in a rat heart muscle cell line (H9c2)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fatty acid translocase (FAT\\/CD36) is a mem- brane protein putatively involved in the transmembrane transport of long-chain fatty acids. We tested the hypothesis that expression of this protein in H9c2, a rat heart cell line normally not expressing FAT, would increase cellular palmi- tate uptake. We were able to stably transfect H9c2 cells with FAT, yielding 15 cell lines showing

Frans A. Van Nieuwenhoven; Joost J. F. P. Luiken; Yvonne F. De Jong; Paul A. Grimaldi; Ger J. Van der Vusse; Jan F. C. Glatz

75

Using DNA barcodes to confirm the presence of a new invasive cockroach pest in New York City.  

PubMed

Recently, specimens of a Periplaneta sp. were discovered in New York, NY, that did not match the typical morphology of Periplaneta americana L., the ubiquitous American cockroach. Here, we used DNA barcoding and morphological identification to confirm that this newly invasive pest species was indeed Periplaneta japonica Karny, 1908. We discuss this recent invasion in light of known life history traits of this species, with specific predictions for its impact in the urban northeastern United States. PMID:24498724

Evangelista, Dominic; Buss, Lyle; Ware, Jessica L

2013-12-01

76

Taxonomic, bioacoustic and faunistic data on a collection of Tettigonioidea from Eastern Congo (Insecta: Orthoptera).  

PubMed

During a 14-day excursion in March 1990, 28 species of tettigonioids were found at Irangi (1ş54'S, 28ş27'E), ca.100 km north west of Bukavu at Lake Kivu (Democratic Republic of the Congo, formerly Zaire), and at other localities near Bukavu. One species -Arantia (Arantia) gracilicercata Heller sp. n. - is new to science, another one-Pantecphyllus helleri Schmidt et al. 2004-was already described as new in a generic revision. All our specimens of the morphologically quite diverse and sexually dimorphic phaneropterine genus Arantia were studied using molecular methods. We propose a new subgenus Arantia (Euarantia) Heller subgen. n. based on relative tegmen width. Songs and stridulatory organs were studied in 9 species. Two phaneropterines, Horatosphaga leggei and Pardalota asymmetrica, showed remarkable calling songs lasting more than 10 s and produced by quite complicated stridulatory movements. The song of the large phaneropterine Zeuneria biramosa is noteworthy because of its unusually low carrier frequency of 3.7 kHz. Based on the examination of other specimens and species, some taxonomic changes are proposed (Phaneropteridae Burmeister, 1838 stat. rev.; Afromecopoda monroviana (Karsch, 1886) stat. rev.; Leproscirtus ebneri Karny, 1919, syn. n., Leproscirtus karschi Karny, 1919, syn. n., Leproscirtus granulosus aptera Karny, 1919, syn. n., all synonyms of Leproscirtus granulosus (Karsch, 1886); Lanistoides Sjöstedt, 1913 stat. rev.; Plastocorypha cabrai Griffini, 1909 stat. n.). PMID:24872232

Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Hemp, Claudia; Liu, Chunxiang; Volleth, Marianne

2014-01-01

77

Plant odours with potential for a push-pull strategy to control the onion thrips (Thrips tabaci)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared the efficacy of four plant essential oils to repel onion thrips, Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), in the presence of an attractive odour, ethyl iso-nicotinate in a pasture field. Four horizontal white sticky plates were placed adjacent to (directions: N, S, E, W) a central horizontal white plate (C). After 24 h, in the treatment combination where the

Tol van R. W. H. M; D. E. James; Kogel de W. J; D. A. J. Teulon

2007-01-01

78

Purification and partial characterization of a midgut membrane-bound ?-glucosidase from Quesada gigas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adults of Quesada gigas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) have a major ?-glucosidase bound to the perimicrovillar membranes, which are lipoprotein membranes that surround the midgut cell microvilli in Hemiptera and Thysanoptera. Determination of the spatial distribution of ?-glucosidases in Q. gigas midgut showed that this activity is not equally distributed between soluble and membrane-bound isoforms. The major membrane-bound enzyme was solubilized in

Fábio V. Fonseca; José R. Silva; Richard I. Samuels; Renato A. DaMatta; Walter R. Terra; Carlos P. Silva

2010-01-01

79

Expression and Characterization of a Soluble Form of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Glycoprotein GN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a member of the Tospovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae, is an econom- ically important plant pathogen with a worldwide distribution. TSWV is transmitted to plants via thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), which transmit the virus in a persistent propagative manner. The envelope glycoproteins, GN and GC, are critical for the infection of thrips, but they are not

Anna E. Whitfield; Diane E. Ullman; Thomas L. German

2004-01-01

80

Characteristic time-stepping or local preconditioning of the Euler equations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A derivation is presented of a local preconditioning matrix for multidimensional Euler equations, that reduces the spread of the characteristic speeds to the lowest attainable value. Numerical experiments with this preconditioning matrix are applied to an explicit upwind discretization of the two-dimensional Euler equations, showing that this matrix significantly increases the rate of convergence to a steady solution. It is predicted that local preconditioning will also simplify convergence-acceleration boundary procedures such as the Karni (1991) procedure for the far field and the Mazaheri and Roe (1991) procedure for a solid wall.

Van Leer, Bram; Lee, Wen-Tzong; Roe, Philip L.

1991-01-01

81

Characteristic time-stepping or local preconditioning of the Euler equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A derivation is presented of a local preconditioning matrix for multidimensional Euler equations, that reduces the spread of the characteristic speeds to the lowest attainable value. Numerical experiments with this preconditioning matrix are applied to an explicit upwind discretization of the two-dimensional Euler equations, showing that this matrix significantly increases the rate of convergence to a steady solution. It is predicted that local preconditioning will also simplify convergence-acceleration boundary procedures such as the Karni (1991) procedure for the far field and the Mazaheri and Roe (1991) procedure for a solid wall.

van Leer, Bram; Lee, Wen-Tzong; Roe, Philip L.

82

Time-limited consolidation and task interference: no direct link.  

PubMed

Perceptual skills improve with daily practice (Fahle and Poggio, 2002; Fine and Jacobs, 2002). Practice induces plasticity in task-relevant brain regions during an "offline" consolidation period thought to last several hours, during which initially fragile memory traces become stable (Karni, 1996; Dudai, 2004). Impaired retention of a task if followed by training in another task is considered evidence for the instability of memory traces during consolidation (Dudai, 2004). However, it remains unknown when after training memory traces become stable and resistant against interference, where in the brain the neuronal mechanisms responsible for interference are localized, and how these mechanisms produce interference. Here, we show in human participants strong interference between two visual skill-learning tasks for surprisingly long time intervals between training periods (up to 24 h). Interference occurred during asymptotic learning, but only when stimuli were similar between tasks. This supports a strong contribution to interference of low-level visual cortical areas (Karni and Bertini, 1997; Ahissar and Hochstein, 2004), where similar stimuli recruit overlapping neuronal populations. Our finding of stimulus-dependent and time-independent interference reveals a fundamental limit in cortical plasticity that constrains the simultaneous representation of multiple skills in a single neuronal population, rather than a time-limited consolidation process. PMID:22016527

Been, Marin; Jans, Bert; De Weerd, Peter

2011-10-19

83

Associations between Frankliniella spp. and Orius niger populations in cotton  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of theFrankliniella speciesF. occidentalis (Pergande) andF. intonsa (Trybom) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and of the predatory bugOrius niger (Wolff) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae), in various organs of the cotton plant, as well as prey — predator interactions between\\u000a thrips andO. niger, were investigated over 6 years in cotton fields in the eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey. The highest number of larvae\\u000a ofFrankliniella

Ekrem Atakan

2006-01-01

84

The molecular action of the novel insecticide, Pyridalyl  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pyridalyl is a recently discovered insecticide that exhibits high insecticidal activity against Lepidoptera and Thysanoptera. Pyridalyl action requires cytochrome P450 activity, possibly for production of a bioactive derivative, Pyridalyl metabolism being prevented by general P450 inhibitors. Apoptosis is apparently not involved in the cytotoxicity. Continuous culture of Spodoptera frugiperda Sf21 cells in sub-lethal doses of Pyridalyl, results in a Pyridalyl-resistant

Gerard F. Powell; Deborah A. Ward; Mark C. Prescott; David G. Spiller; Michael R. H. White; Phillip C. Turner; Fergus G. P. Earley; Janet Phillips; Huw H. Rees

2011-01-01

85

Euseius addoensis addoensis , an effective predator of citrus thrips, Scirtothrips aurantii , in the eastern Cape Province of South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The predacious mite,Euseius addoensis addoensis (McMurtry) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), significantly (PCitrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, caused by the citrus thrips,Scirtothrips aurantii Faure (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). A chemical exclusion method employing dicofol was used to determine the effect of the predator and numbers ofS. aurantii were monitored on sticky yellow traps. At two sites where numbers of citrus thrips and predacious mites were high,

T. G. Grout; G. I. Richards

1992-01-01

86

Host plant preference of aphids, thrips and spider mites on GNA-expressing and control potatoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin: GNA) expression on host-plant preference was examined with a two-choice disc test. Discrimination between a transgenic\\u000a potato [Solanum tuberosum (Solanaceae)] capable of synthesizing GNA, and an isogenic cultivar, was studied under laboratory conditions using the glasshouse\\u000a potato aphidAulacorthum solani (Hemiptera: Aphididae), the onion thripThrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and the two-spotted spider miteTetranychus

Gabriela Zemková Rovenská; Rostislav Zemek

2006-01-01

87

Laminar Heat Transfer With Viscous Dissipation and Fluid Axial Heat Conduction for Modified Power Law Fluids Flowing in Parallel Plates With One Plate Moving  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the fully developed laminar velocity distributions obtained by applying the modified power-law model proposed by Irvine and Karni, the thermal-entrance-region heat transfer of non-Newtonian fluids flowing in parallel plates with one plate moving is investigated taking into account both viscous dissipation and fluid axial heat conduction for two kinds of thermal boundary conditions, namely, constant temperature and constant heat flux at the moving wall. The energy equation subject to a constant temperature at upstream infinity, fully developed temperature profile at downstream infinity and the appropriate thermal boundary conditions at the upper and lower walls is numerically solved by the finite difference method as an elliptic type problem. The effects of the moving plate velocity, rheological properties, Brinkman number and Peclet number on the temperature distribution and Nusselt numbers are discussed for both Newtonian and pseudoplastic fluids.

Shigechi, Toru; Davaa, Ganbat; Momoki, Satoru; Jambal, Odgerel

88

Innate responses to putative ancestral hosts: is the attraction of Western flower thrips to pine pollen a result of relict olfactory receptors?  

PubMed

Pollinophagy is widely documented in the order Thysanoptera, with representative individuals from six of the nine divergent families known to feed on pollen. Various pollens of the genus Pinus increase the development time, fecundity, longevity, and settling preference of Western Flower Thrips (WFT), Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Certain species of flower thrips discriminate among pollen types, but no studies have elucidated the olfactory cues that play a role in their pollen preferences. In this study, the volatile organic compounds emitted by pollens of the genus Pinus were elucidated. Various chemicals from pollen headspace elicited electrophysiological responses from WFT antennae. The compound (S)-(-)-verbenone, identified in pollen headspace, attracted WFT in a 4-arm olfactometer. This compound has potential for use in integrated pest management programs against the pest. We present the hypothesis that this polyphagous insect may have retained ancestral 'relict' olfactory receptors through the course of evolution, to explain this attraction to pine pollen. This attraction has allowed the insect to find and exploit an unusual nutrient source that significantly increases its fitness. The study demonstrates how fossil record analysis and subsequent evolutionary knowledge can aid in explaining possibilities as to why some insects sense and respond to chemicals that would otherwise seem peculiar to their ecology, allowing insight into the evolutionary forces that may shape insect olfactory systems over time. PMID:24879603

Abdullah, Zayed S; Ficken, Katherine J; Greenfield, Bethany P J; Butt, Tariq M

2014-06-01

89

A male-predominant cuticular hydrocarbon, 7-methyltricosane, is used as a contact pheromone in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis.  

PubMed

In a laboratory bioassay, adult female Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) spent more time near filter paper disks that had been exposed to adult males than near unexposed disks; this effect was not observed on disks exposed to adult females. The response could only partly be explained by the known male-produced aggregation pheromone, neryl (S)-2-methylbutanoate, suggesting the presence of an unknown male-produced compound. In gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses, 7-methyltricosane was detected on disks exposed to males, but not on disks exposed to females. Extracts of cuticular lipids also showed relatively large amounts of 7-methyltricosane on males, whereas only trace amounts were found on females and none on larvae. Bioassays of synthetic 7-methyltricosane showed that adults responded only after contact. The response to this compound was clearly different from that to n-tricosane or hexane-only controls. Females that contacted 7-methyltricosane on glass beads stayed in the vicinity and frequently raised the abdomen, a behavior that rejects mating attempts by males. Males stayed in the vicinity and wagged the abdomen sideways, a behavior used in fighting between males. This is the first identification of a contact pheromone in the order Thysanoptera. PMID:23519504

Olaniran, Oladele A; Sudhakar, Akella V S; Drijfhout, Falko P; Dublon, Ian A N; Hall, David R; Hamilton, James G C; Kirk, William D J

2013-04-01

90

A Smoothness Indicator for Adaptive Algorithms for Hyperbolic Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation of shock waves in solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws calls for locally adaptive numerical solution algorithms and requires a practical tool for identifying where adaption is needed. In this paper, a new smoothness indicator (SI) is used to identify "rough" solution regions and is implemented in locally adaptive algorithms. The SI is based on the weak local truncation error of the approximate solution. It was recently reported in S. Karni and A. Kurganov, Local error analysis for approximate solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws, where error analysis and convergence properties were established. The present paper is concerned with its implementation in scheme adaption and mesh adaption algorithms. The SI provides a general framework for adaption and is not restricted to a particular discretization scheme. The implementation in this paper uses the central-upwind scheme of A. Kurganov, S. Noelle, and G. Petrova, SIAM J. Sci. Comput.23, 707 (2001). The extension of the SI to two space dimensions is given. Numerical results in one and two space dimensions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed SI and its potential in reducing computational costs and improving the resolution of the solution.

Karni, Smadar; Kurganov, Alexander; Petrova, Guergana

2002-05-01

91

Torsional Electromechanics of Carbon Nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon nanotubes are known to be distinctly metallic or semiconducting depending on their diameter and chirality. Here we show that continuously varying the chirality by mechanical torsion can induce conductance oscillations, which can be attributed to metal-semiconductor periodic transitions. The phenomenon is observed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where both the torque and the current are shown to be carried predominantly by the outermost wall. The oscillation period with torsion is consistent with the theoretical shifting of the corners of the first Brillouin zone of graphene across different subbands allowed in the nanotube. Beyond a critical torsion, the conductance irreversibly drops due to torsional failure, allowing us to determine the torsional strength of carbon nanotubes. Our experiments indicate that carbon nanotubes could be used as self-sensing torsional springs for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). [1] E. Joselevich, Twisting nanotubes: From torsion to chirality, ChemPhysChem 2006, 7, 1405. [2] T. Cohen-Karni, L. Segev, O. Srur-Lavi, S. R. Cohen, E. Joselevich, Torsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes, Nature Nanotechnology, 2006, 1, 36.

Joselevich, Ernesto; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Segev, Lior; Srur-Lavi, Onit; Cohen, Sidney R.

2007-03-01

92

A flux-split algorithm applied to conservative models for multicomponent compressible flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we consider a conservative extension of the Euler equations for gas dynamics to describe a two-component compressible flow in Cartesian coordinates. It is well known that classical shock-capturing schemes applied to conservative models are oscillatory near the interface between the two gases. Several authors have addressed this problem proposing either a primitive consistent algorithm [J. Comput. Phys. 112 (1994) 31] or Lagrangian ingredients (Ghost Fluid Method by Fedkiw et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 152 (1999) 452] and [J. Comput. Phys. 169 (2001) 594]). We solve directly this conservative model by a flux-split algorithm, due to the first author (see [J. Comput. Phys. 125 (1996) 42]), together with a high-order (WENO5) flux reconstruction [J. Comput. Phys. 115 (1994) 200; 83 (1989) 32]. This algorithm seems to reduce the oscillations near the interfaces in a way that does not affect the physics of the experiments. We validate our algorithm with the numerical simulation of the interaction of a Mach 1.22 shock wave impinging a helium bubble in air, under the same conditions studied by Haas and Sturtevant [J. Fluid Mech. 181 (1987) 41] and successfully simulated by Quirk and Karni [J. Fluid Mech. 318 (1996) 129].

Marquina, Antonio; Mulet, Pep

2003-02-01

93

Annotated list of Ensifera (Orthoptera) and further records on Caelifera (Orthoptera) of Mt Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.  

PubMed

A list of the Tettigoniidae and Gryllacrididae (Orthoptera: Ensifera) of Mt Kilimanjaro is presented. A total number of 63 Ensifera was recorded for this mountain, of which 25 species belonged to Phaneropterinae, 18 to Conocephalinae, 6 to Hetrodinae and three to Pseudophyllinae. The subfamily Meconematinae contributed two species while only one species of the subfamilies Hexacentrinae, Mecopodinae and Saginae was found. Gryllacrididae contributed six species. Three spe-cies recorded in literature were not found again during the research period. 15 species are newly recorded for Mt Kiliman-jaro in this study and one species of Agraeciini newly described. Two new genera, Afroanthracites Hemp & Ingrisch n. gen. (type species: Anthracites montium Sjöstedt, 1910) and Afroagraecia Ingrisch & Hemp n. gen. (type species: Agrae-cia sansibara Redtenbacher, 1891), are erected on African Agraeciini (Conocephalinae). Anthracites kilimandjaricus Sjöstedt, 1910 is snonymized with A. montium Sjöstedt, 1910. Agraecia sansibara (Redtenbacher, 1891), Anthracites bloyeti Brongniart, 1897 and Anelytra panteli Karny are transferred to Afroagraecia. Aethiomerus stenorhinus Saussure, 1899 is synonymised with Afroagraecia sansibara (Redtenbacher, 1891). In Caelifera two Catantopinae (Acrididae) spe-cies are newly recorded for Mt Kilimanjaro and one pyrgomorphid species, Maura lurida (Fabricius, 1781), recovered again for the area. PMID:24698921

Hemp, Claudia

2013-01-01

94

Effects of pine pollen supplementation in an onion diet on Frankliniella fusca reproduction.  

PubMed

A micro-cage bioassay was developed to test the effect of slash pine pollen (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) supplementation to a whole onion plant (Allium cepa L. variety Pegasus) diet on thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) reproductive parameters. Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) females were placed on two to three-leaf stage onion seedling under a treatment of either slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) pollen dusting (a pollen supplement) or no pollen treatment. Adult survival, net oviposition, and offspring produced over a series of ten 2-d intervals were recorded. From these values, l(x), l(x)m(x), and R(0) values were constructed. A trimodal distribution of oviposition was observed with the pollen supplement. Increased oviposition rates led to higher female offspring production per female and to a four-fold increase in F. fusca net reproduction on pollen-treated onions. PMID:20388281

Angelella, G M; Riley, D G

2010-04-01

95

Leaf chemistry and foliage avoidance by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis in glasshouse collections.  

PubMed

Observational studies on foliage avoidance by the polyphagous thrips species Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) and Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis (Bouché) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) identified six non-host species (Allagopappus dichotomus (Asteraceae), Gardenia posoquerioides (Rubiaceae), Plectranthus aff. barbatus, Plectranthus strigosus, Plectranthus zuluensis (Lamiaceae), and Sclerochiton harveyanus (Acanthaceae) among plants growing within a major glasshouse botanical collection. The effects of sequentially obtained acetone and aqueous methanol leaf extracts on mortality in first instar Frankliniella occidentalis were assessed. The acetone leaf extract of Sclerochiton harveyanus, which had the highest activity against the thrips, yielded four new iridoids, sclerochitonosides A-C, and sclerochitonoside B 4'-methyl ether. Mortality of F. occidentalis was increased on exposure to all four iridoids, and the most active iridoid was sclerochitonoside A (8-epiloganic acid 4'-hydroxyphenylethyl ester). Choice experiments demonstrated that this compound did not significantly deter H. haemorrhoidalis from treated leaf surfaces. The significance of iridoids in the defense mechanism of plants against thrips is discussed. PMID:21331569

Brown, Alison S Scott; Veitch, Nigel C; Simmonds, Monique S J

2011-03-01

96

Prey preference of the predatory mite, Amblyseius swirskii between first instar western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and nymphs of the twospotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae.  

PubMed

The prey preference of polyphagous predators plays an important role in suppressing different species of pest insects. In this study the prey preference of the predatory mite, Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) was examined between nymphs of the twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and first instar larvae of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), as well as between active and chrysalis spider mite protonymphs and active and chrysalis spider mite deutonymphs. The study was done in the laboratory on bean leaf discs at 25 ± 1° C and 70 ± 5% RH. Amblyseius swirskii had a clear preference for thrips compared to both spider mite protonymphs and deutonymphs. About twice as many thrips as spider mites were consumed. Amblyseius swirskii did not show a preference between active and chrysalis stages of spider mites. PMID:21070175

Xu, Xuenong; Enkegaard, Annie

2010-01-01

97

Prey Preference of the Predatory Mite, Amblyseius swirskii between First Instar Western Flower Thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and Nymphs of the Twospotted Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae  

PubMed Central

The prey preference of polyphagous predators plays an important role in suppressing different species of pest insects. In this study the prey preference of the predatory mite, Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) was examined between nymphs of the twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and first instar larvae of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), as well as between active and chrysalis spider mite protonymphs and active and chrysalis spider mite deutonymphs. The study was done in the laboratory on bean leaf discs at 25 ± 1° C and 70 ± 5% RH. Amblyseius swirskii had a clear preference for thrips compared to both spider mite protonymphs and deutonymphs. About twice as many thrips as spider mites were consumed. Amblyseius swirskii did not show a preference between active and chrysalis stages of spider mites.

Xu, Xuenong; Enkegaard, Annie

2010-01-01

98

Development of a ribosomal DNA ITS2 marker for the identification of the thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis.  

PubMed

The thrips Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is an invasive pest that poses a significant economical threat to U.S. agriculture and trade. In this study, DNA sequence data and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were utilized to develop a molecular diagnostic marker for S. dorsalis. The DNA sequence variation from the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was analyzed from various thrips species, including S. dorsalis. A primer set and polymerase chain reaction cycling parameters were designed for the amplification of a single marker fragment of S. dorsalis ITS2 rDNA. Specificity tests performed on ten thrips species, efficacy tests performed on fifteen S. dorsalis populations, and tests on primer sensitivity and robustness all demonstrated the diagnostic utility of this marker. This diagnostic PCR assay provides a quick, simple, and reliable molecular technique to be used in the identification of S. dorsalis. PMID:20578948

Farris, R E; Ruiz-Arce, R; Ciomperlik, M; Vasquez, J D; Deleón, R

2010-01-01

99

Floral scent compounds of Amazonian Annonaceae species pollinated by small beetles and thrips.  

PubMed

Chemical analysis (GC-MS) yielded a total of 58 volatile compounds in the floral scents of six species of Annonaceae distributed in four genera (Xylopia, Anaxagorea, Duguetia, and Rollinia), Xylopia aromatica is pollinated principally by Thysanoptera and secondarily by small beetles (Nitidulidae and Staphylinidae), whereas the five other species were pollinated by Nitidulidae and Staphylinidae only. Although the six Annonaceae species attract a similar array of pollinator groups, the major constituents of their floral scents are of different biochemical origin. The fragrances of flowers of Anaxagorea brevipes and Anaxagorea dolichocarpa were dominated by esters of aliphatic acids (ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl 3-methylbutanoate), which were not detected in the other species. Monoterpenes (limonene, p-cymene, alpha-pinene) were the main scent compounds of Duguetia asterotricha, and naphthalene prevailed in the scent of Rollinia insignis flowers. The odors of X. aromatica and Xylopia benthamii flowers were dominated by high amounts of benzenoids (methylbenzoate, 2-phenylethyl alcohol). PMID:11130664

Jürgens, A; Webber, A C; Gottsberger, G

2000-11-01

100

Development and Characterization of 18 Novel EST-SSRs from the Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande)  

PubMed Central

The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is an invasive species and the most economically important pest within the insect order Thysanoptera. For a better understanding of the genetic makeup and migration patterns of F. occidentalis throughout the world, we characterized 18 novel polymorphic EST-derived microsatellites. The mutational mechanism of these EST-SSRs was also investigated to facilitate the selection of appropriate combinations of markers for population genetic studies. Genetic diversity of these novel markers was assessed in 96 individuals from three populations in China (Harbin, Dali, and Guiyang). The results showed that all these 18 loci were highly polymorphic; the number of alleles ranged from 2 to 15, with an average of 5.50 alleles per locus. The observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosities ranged from 0.072 to 0.707 and 0.089 to 0.851, respectively. Furthermore, only two locus/population combinations (WFT144 in Dali and WFT50 in Guiyang) significantly deviated from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Pairwise FST analysis showed a low but significant differentiation (0.026 < FST < 0.032) among all three pairwise population comparisons. Sequence analysis of alleles per locus revealed a complex mutational pattern of these EST-SSRs. Thus, these EST-SSRs are useful markers but greater attention should be paid to the mutational characteristics of these microsatellites when they are used in population genetic studies.

Yang, Xian-Ming; Sun, Jing-Tao; Xue, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Wen-Chao; Hong, Xiao-Yue

2012-01-01

101

The Diversity and Abundance of Small Arthropods in Onion, Allium cepa, Seed Crops, and their Potential Role in Pollination  

PubMed Central

Onion, Allium cepa L. (Asparagales: Amaryllidaceae), crop fields grown for seed production require arthropod pollination for adequate seed yield. Although many arthropod species visit A. cepa flowers, for most there is little information on their role as pollinators. Small flower visiting arthropods (body width < 3 mm) in particular are rarely assessed. A survey of eight flowering commercial A. cepa seed fields in the North and South Islands of New Zealand using window traps revealed that small arthropods were highly abundant among all except one field. Insects belonging to the orders Diptera and Thysanoptera were the most abundant and Hymenoptera, Collembola, Psocoptera, Hemiptera, and Coleoptera were also present. To test whether small arthropods might contribute to pollination, seed sets from umbels caged within 3 mm diameter mesh cages were compared with similarly caged, hand-pollinated umbels and uncaged umbels. Caged umbels that were not hand-pollinated set significantly fewer seeds (average eight seeds/umbel, n = 10) than caged hand-pollinated umbels (average 146 seeds/umbel) and uncaged umbels (average 481 seeds/umbel). Moreover, sticky traps placed on umbels within cages captured similar numbers of small arthropods as sticky traps placed on uncaged umbels, suggesting cages did not inhibit the movement of small arthropods to umbels. Therefore, despite the high abundance of small arthropods within fields, evidence to support their role as significant pollinators of commercial A. cepa seed crops was not found.

Walker, M. K.; Howlett, B. G.; Wallace, A. R.; Mccallum, J. A.; Teulon, D. A. J.

2011-01-01

102

Development and Characterization of 18 Novel EST-SSRs from the Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande).  

PubMed

The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is an invasive species and the most economically important pest within the insect order Thysanoptera. For a better understanding of the genetic makeup and migration patterns of F. occidentalis throughout the world, we characterized 18 novel polymorphic EST-derived microsatellites. The mutational mechanism of these EST-SSRs was also investigated to facilitate the selection of appropriate combinations of markers for population genetic studies. Genetic diversity of these novel markers was assessed in 96 individuals from three populations in China (Harbin, Dali, and Guiyang). The results showed that all these 18 loci were highly polymorphic; the number of alleles ranged from 2 to 15, with an average of 5.50 alleles per locus. The observed (H(O)) and expected (H(E)) heterozygosities ranged from 0.072 to 0.707 and 0.089 to 0.851, respectively. Furthermore, only two locus/population combinations (WFT144 in Dali and WFT50 in Guiyang) significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Pairwise F(ST) analysis showed a low but significant differentiation (0.026 < F(ST) < 0.032) among all three pairwise population comparisons. Sequence analysis of alleles per locus revealed a complex mutational pattern of these EST-SSRs. Thus, these EST-SSRs are useful markers but greater attention should be paid to the mutational characteristics of these microsatellites when they are used in population genetic studies. PMID:22489130

Yang, Xian-Ming; Sun, Jing-Tao; Xue, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Wen-Chao; Hong, Xiao-Yue

2012-01-01

103

Phytophagous arthropods and a pathogen sharing a host plant: evidence for indirect plant-mediated interactions.  

PubMed

In ecological systems, indirect interactions between plant pathogens and phytophagous arthropods can arise when infestation by a first attacker alters the common host plant so that although a second attacker could be spatially or temporally separated from the first one, the former could be affected. The induction of plant defense reactions leading to the production of secondary metabolites is thought to have an important role since it involves antagonistic and/or synergistic cross-talks that may determine the outcome of such interactions. We carried out experiments under controlled conditions on young rose plants in order to assess the impact of these indirect interactions on life history traits of three pests: the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae), the aphid Rhodobium porosum Sanderson (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Our results indicated (i) a bi-directional negative interaction between B. cinerea and R. porosum, which is conveyed by decreased aphid growth rate and reduced fungal lesion area, as well as (ii) an indirect negative effect of B. cinerea on insect behavior. No indirect effect was observed between thrips and aphids. This research highlights several complex interactions that may be involved in structuring herbivore and plant pathogen communities within natural and managed ecosystems. PMID:21611161

Mouttet, Raphaëlle; Bearez, Philippe; Thomas, Cécile; Desneux, Nicolas

2011-01-01

104

Analysis of expressed sequence tags for Frankliniella occidentalis, the western flower thrips.  

PubMed

Thrips are members of the insect order Thysanoptera and Frankliniella occidentalis (the western flower thrips) is the most economically important pest within this order. F. occidentalis is both a direct pest of crops and an efficient vector of plant viruses, including Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Despite the world-wide importance of thrips in agriculture, there is little knowledge of the F. occidentalis genome or gene functions at this time. A normalized cDNA library was constructed from first instar thrips and 13 839 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. Our EST data assembled into 894 contigs and 11 806 singletons (12 700 nonredundant sequences). We found that 31% of these sequences had significant similarity (E< or = 10(-10)) to protein sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant (nr) protein database, and 25% were functionally annotated using Blast 2GO. We identified 74 sequences with putative homology to proteins associated with insect innate immunity. Sixteen sequences had significant similarity to proteins associated with small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways (RNA interference; RNAi), including the antiviral pathway (short interfering RNA-mediated pathway). Our EST collection provides new sequence resources for characterizing gene functions in F. occidentalis and other thrips species with regards to vital biological processes, studying the mechanism of interactions with the viruses harboured and transmitted by the vector, and identifying new insect gene-centred targets for plant disease and insect control. PMID:20522119

Rotenberg, D; Whitfield, A E

2010-08-01

105

Arthropods, plants, and transmission lines in Arizona: secondary succession in a Sonoran Desert habitat  

SciTech Connect

Overall arthropod densities were low at this site, but the arthropod densities on the disturbed areas appeared to be enhanced after several years. No taxa were found to be statistically different in density between control and disturbed plots. Diversity decreased on the disturbed area after construction. Arthropod community similarity (C) was lower after construction, but C values appear to be related to presence or absence of annual herbs and grasses and not to total cover. Except for globe mallow, there were no pioneer plant species on the experimental plot. Effects of powerline construction on the experimental plant community were a brief reduction in total cover and a slight increase in cover of herbs and annual grasses. The 1976 and 1977 samples exhibit comparable cover values of these plants on both experimental and control plots. The dominant arthropod taxa on the experimental area (especially Thysanoptera, Cicadellidae, Coccinellidae, and Melyridae) appear to be responding numerically to the annual herbs and grasses which are becoming established on the plot.

Johnson, C.D.; Ditsworth, T.M.; Beley, J.R.

1981-09-01

106

Intra-guild vs extra-guild prey: effect on predator fitness and preference of Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) and Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) (Acari: Phytoseiidae).  

PubMed

The relationships between the predatory mites, Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) and Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), and their prey, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), were investigated to determine the effects of predation on intra-guild or extra-guild prey and predator preference. Life history characteristics of both predatory mites were measured when fed eggs and larvae of the other predator species and compared to data obtained when the predators were fed thrips larvae. In addition, choice tests were conducted to determine if the predators had a preference for different prey or if they were indiscriminate predators. Amblyseius swirskii appears to be an important intra-guild predator of N. cucumeris juveniles because of a high predation rate and a preference for N. cucumeris juveniles over thrips. Neoseiulus cucumeris is also an intra-guild predator of A. swirskii juveniles; however, it has a lower predation rate than A. swirskii. Contrary to intra-guild predation theory, intra-guild prey was an equally good or better food source than thrips (extra-guild prey) for both predators, based on high oviposition rates and fast development times. The results of this study indicate a high potential for negative interactions between A. swirskii and N. cucumeris when used together in biological control of thrips. PMID:19419591

Buitenhuis, R; Shipp, L; Scott-Dupree, C

2010-04-01

107

Effect of Different Temperatures on Consumption of Two Spotted Mite, Tetranychus urticae, Eggs by the Predatory Thrips, Scolothrips longicornis  

PubMed Central

Environmental variables such as temperature are important factors affecting the efficacy of biological control agents. This study evaluated the predation rate of the predatory thrips Scolothrips longicornis Priesner (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) against the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) under laboratory conditions. Based on daily and total prey consumption of different life stages of S. longicornis on spider mite eggs at temperatures covering the range suitable for development and survival of the predator (15° C to 37° C, 60 ± 10% RH, 16:8 L:D), there was a significant effect of temperature on prey consumption. The number of prey consumed daily by first and second instar larvae increased linearly with increasing temperature from 15 °C to 37 °C, whereas daily consumption of preovipositing and postovipositing females was uninfluenced by temperature. Lower temperature thresholds for consumption by first and second instar larvae of S. longicornis was estimated to be 6.8 ± 0.04° C and 4.6 ± 0.03° C, respectively. The daily consumption of ovipositing females followed a nonlinear pattern, with maximum daily predation estimated at 32.8° C. From the model used to describe consumption of ovipositing females, an upper threshold for consumption of 41.4° C was estimated. The performance of S. longicornis at the different temperatures is discussed in relation to its practical use in integrated pest control programs.

Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

2012-01-01

108

Influence of native flowering plant strips on natural enemies and herbivores in adjacent blueberry fields.  

PubMed

Conservation plantings of native wildflowers were established adjacent to highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) fields to test the hypothesis that provision of resources for natural enemies increases their abundance in adjacent crop fields without increasing the abundance of pest insects. For two growing seasons, natural enemies and herbivorous insects were sampled in fields with flowering borders and in control fields where growers maintained standard mown grass perimeters. Insects were categorized according to their trophic level and their potential pest status, and their abundance was compared between years and between treatments. Syrphid flies (Diptera: Syrphidae) were significantly more abundant in fields with conservation strips, as were plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae), thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and hoppers (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha). Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae), thrips, fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae), and pirate bugs (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) decreased significantly in abundance from 2007 to 2008. Beneficial insect abundance in crop fields increased in the latter half of the season in both years and this increase was more pronounced in fields adjacent to conservation plantings. We discuss the implications of these findings for pest management and conservation of biodiversity in farmland. PMID:22251649

Walton, Nathaniel J; Isaacs, Rufus

2011-06-01

109

Alkaloid metabolism in thrips-Papaveraceae interaction: recognition and mutual response.  

PubMed

Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), the Western Flower Thrips (WFT), is a polyphagous and highly adaptable insect of the order Thysanoptera. It has a broad host range but is rarely found on Papaveraceae, which might be due to deterrent effects of alkaloids present in most species of this family. In order to test the adaptive potential of WFT, we investigated its interaction with two Papaveraceae offered as sole feeding source. We found that WFT are able to live and feed on leaves of Eschscholzia californica and Chelidonium majus. Both plants respond to thrips feeding by the enhanced production of benzophenanthridine alkaloids. Furthermore, cell cultures of E. californica react to water insoluble compounds prepared from adult thrips with enhanced alkaloid production. During feeding, WFT take up benzophenanthridine alkaloids from either plant and from an artificial feeding medium and convert them to their less toxic dihydroderivatives. This was shown in detail with sanguinarine, the most cytotoxic benzophenanthridine. A similar conversion is used in plants to prevent self-intoxication by their own toxins. We conclude that WFT causes a phytoalexin-like response in Papaveraceae, but is able to adapt to such host plants by detoxification of toxic alkaloids. PMID:24331426

Schütz, Ingeborg; Moritz, Gerald B; Roos, Werner

2014-01-15

110

Perception of solar UVB radiation by phytophagous insects: Behavioral responses and ecosystem implications  

PubMed Central

Most of our present knowledge about the impacts of solar UVB radiation on terrestrial ecosystems comes from studies with plants. Recently, the effects of UVB on the growth and survival of consumer species have begun to receive attention, but very little is known about UVB impacts on animal behavior. Here we report that manipulations of the flux of solar UVB received by field-grown soybean crops had large and consistent effects on the density of the thrips (Caliothrips phaseoli, Thysanoptera: Thripidae) populations that invaded the canopies, as well as on the amount of leaf damage caused by the insects. Solar UVB strongly reduced thrips herbivory. Thrips not only preferred leaves from plants that were not exposed to solar UVB over leaves from UVB-exposed plants in laboratory and field choice experiments, but they also appeared to directly sense and avoid exposure to solar UVB. Additional choice experiments showed that soybean leaf consumption by the late-season soybean worm Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was much less intense in leaves with even slight symptoms of an early thrips attack than in undamaged leaves. These experiments suggest that phytophagous insects can present direct and indirect behavioral responses to solar UVB. The indirect responses are mediated by changes in the plant host that are induced by UVB and, possibly, by other insects whose behavior is affected by UVB.

Mazza, Carlos A.; Zavala, Jorge; Scopel, Ana L.; Ballare, Carlos L.

1999-01-01

111

Occurrence of Entomopathogenic Fungi from Agricultural and Natural Ecosystems in Saltillo, M?xico, and their Virulence Towards Thrips and Whiteflies  

PubMed Central

Entomopathogenic fungi were collected from soil in four adjacent habitats (oak forest, agricultural soil, pine reforestation and chaparral habitat) in Saltillo, México using the insect bait method with Tenebrio molitor (L.) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae as bait. Overall, of the larvae exposed to soil, 171 (20%) hosted Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae), 25 (3%) hosted Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and 1 (0.1%) hosted lsaria (=Paecilomyces) sp. (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae). B. bassiana was significantly more frequent on larvae exposed to oak forest soil. M. anisopliae was significantly more frequent on larvae exposed to agricultural soil. From the infected bait insects, 93 isolates of B. bassiana and 24 isolates of M. anisopliae were obtained. Strains were tested for their infectivity against Cuban laurel thrips, Gynaikothrips uzeli Zimmerman (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) and the greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). B. bassiana isolates caused the highest mortality on thrips (some causing 88% mortality after 6 days); both fungal species caused similarly high mortality levels against whiteflies (75%) after 6 days. Large amounts of germplasm of entomopathogenic fungi, fundamentally B. bassiana and M. anisopliae, exist in the habitats sampled; pathogenicity varied among strains, and some strains possessed significant virulence. Soils in these habitats are reservoirs of diverse strains with potential for use in biocontrol.

Sanchez-Pena, Sergio R.; Lara, Jorge San-Juan; Medina, Raul F.

2011-01-01

112

Phytophagous Arthropods and a Pathogen Sharing a Host Plant: Evidence for Indirect Plant-Mediated Interactions  

PubMed Central

In ecological systems, indirect interactions between plant pathogens and phytophagous arthropods can arise when infestation by a first attacker alters the common host plant so that although a second attacker could be spatially or temporally separated from the first one, the former could be affected. The induction of plant defense reactions leading to the production of secondary metabolites is thought to have an important role since it involves antagonistic and/or synergistic cross-talks that may determine the outcome of such interactions. We carried out experiments under controlled conditions on young rose plants in order to assess the impact of these indirect interactions on life history traits of three pests: the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae), the aphid Rhodobium porosum Sanderson (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Our results indicated (i) a bi-directional negative interaction between B. cinerea and R. porosum, which is conveyed by decreased aphid growth rate and reduced fungal lesion area, as well as (ii) an indirect negative effect of B. cinerea on insect behavior. No indirect effect was observed between thrips and aphids. This research highlights several complex interactions that may be involved in structuring herbivore and plant pathogen communities within natural and managed ecosystems.

Mouttet, Raphaelle; Bearez, Philippe; Thomas, Cecile; Desneux, Nicolas

2011-01-01

113

Seasonality of Litter Insects and Relationship with Rainfall in a Wet Evergreen Forest in South Western Ghats  

PubMed Central

The seasonality of litter insect abundance and its relationship with rainfall was analyzed in a wet evergreen forest on the windward side of south Western Ghats. Monthly litter samples were collected using Berlese funnels during 4 seasons of a year: southwest monsoon season June—August), northeast monsoon season (September—November), summer (March -May) and pre-summer season (December—February). Insect fauna as a whole showed no seasonal variation in abundance, however, some individual insect orders showed significant seasonal variation. Overall insect fauna and individual orders were distributed independently relative to rainfall. All insect orders with the exception of Psocoptera were present during all four seasons. Coleoptera (42%) was the dominant group in all seasons followed by Formicidae (12.3%), insect larvae (10.1%), Collembola (9.2%) and Thysanoptera (8.9%). Exceptionally high abundance of Ptiliidae contributed to the unprecedented abundance of litter Coleoptera. The aseasonality of litter insect fauna as a whole is attributed to year-round availability of rainfall and the absence of severe summer conditions.

Anu, Anto; Sabu, Thomas K; Vineesh, PJ

2009-01-01

114

The effect of latitudinal gradient on the species diversity of Chinese litter-dwelling thrips  

PubMed Central

Abstract To understand the global distribution patterns of litter-dwelling thrips, a total 150 leaf litter samples were collected from 6 natural reserves located in three climatic regions, temperate, subtropical and tropical. The results showed the relative abundance of Thysanoptera was over 3.0% in 4 natural reserves from subtropical and tropical zone, and reached 5.9% in one tropical reserve, only less than Acarina and Collembola. In contrast it was only 0.3% in the warm temperate natural reserves, and no thrips were collected in a mid temperate reserve. The order on the average species numbers per plot of litter thrips was tropic > subtropics > temperate (n=25, p<0.05). Mean density of litter thrips per plots in the tropics and subtropics was significantly higher than that in the temperate region (n=25, p<0.05), but the average density was not significantly different between tropical and subtropical zones (n=25, p>0.05). The diversity of litter thrips in the tropics and subtropics was much higher than that in the temperate area based on comparsions of Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H’), Pielou eveness index (J), and Simpson dominance index (D). All of these results indicated that litter-dwelling thrips lived mainly in tropical and subtropical regions; meanwhile, species number and relative abundance increased with decreasing latitude.

Wang, Jun; Tong, Xiaoli; Wu, Donghui

2014-01-01

115

Discovery of the new proton emitter ^144Tm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proton emitter studies enable precise probing of the composition of the wave function of nuclei beyond the proton dripline. In a decay of proton radioactive odd-odd nuclei excited levels in the (even-Z,odd-N) daughters can be populated allowing us to deduce the properties of single particle neutron states. So far, fine structure in proton emission was observed for only one odd-odd emitter, ^146Tm [1]. The neighbouring odd-odd isotope ^144Tm is an obvious candidate to exhibit similar decay pattern . Its decay should be dominated by a large ?h_11/2 component present in the ground and isomeric state wavefunction, as it was observed for ^146Tm[1] and ^145Tm[2]. The admixture of the 2^+ řtimes ?f_7/2 component or of the mirror [?h_11/2 ?s_1/2] proton-neutron configuration can cause the fine structure in proton emission. Evidence for the proton decay of ^144Tm was found in an experiment at the Recoil Mass Spectrometer [3] at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ^144Tm events were found in a weak (? ? 10 nb) p5n channel of the fusion reaction of ^58Ni beam at 340 MeV on a ^92Mo target. The observed decay energy of about 1.8 MeV and the half-life of the order of ? 1 ?s suggest proton emission from the dominant ?h_11/2 part of the wave function. The detection of this very short proton emitter was made possible by use of a double-sided silicon strip detector connected to a fast Digital-Signal-Processing-based acquisition system [4]. [1] T.N. Ginter et al., Phys. Rev.C68, 034330 (2003). [2] M. Karny et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 012502 (2003). [3] C. J. Gross et al., Nucl.Instrum.Methods A450, 12 (2000). [4] R. Grzywacz, Nucl. Instrum. MethodsB204, 649 (2003).

Grzywacz, Robert

2004-11-01

116

Experience-dependent phase-reversal of hippocampal neuron firing during REM sleep.  

PubMed

The idea that sleep could serve a cognitive function has remained popular since Freud stated that dreams were "not nonsense" but a time to sort out experiences [S. Freud, Letter to Wilhelm Fliess, May 1897, in The Origins of Psychoanalysis - Personal Letters of Sigmund Freud, M. Bonaparte, A. Freud, E. Kris (Eds.), Translated by E. Mosbacher, J. Strachey, Basic Books and Imago Publishing, 1954]. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is associated with dream reports, is now known to be is important for acquisition of some tasks [A. Karni, D. Tanne, B.S. Rubenstein, J.J.M. Askenasy, D. Sagi, Dependence on REM sleep of overnight improvement of a perceptual skill, Science 265 (1994) 679-682; C. Smith, Sleep states and learning: a review of the animal literature, Biobehav. Rev. 9 (1985) 157-168]; although why this is so remains obscure. It has been proposed that memories may be consolidated during REM sleep or that forgetting of unnecessary material occurs in this state [F. Crick, G. Mitchison, The function of dream sleep, Nature 304 (1983) 111-114; D. Marr, Simple memory: a theory for archicortex, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B. 262 (1971) 23-81]. We studied the firing of multiple single neurons in the hippocampus, a structure that is important for episodic memory, during familiar and novel experiences and in subsequent REM sleep. Cells active in familiar places during waking exhibited a reversal of firing phase relative to local theta oscillations in REM sleep. Because firing-phase can influence whether synapses are strengthened or weakened [C. Holscher, R. Anwyl, M.J. Rowan, Stimulation on the positive phase of hippocampal theta rhythm induces long-term potentiation that can be depotentiated by stimulation on the negative phase in area CA1 in vivo, J. Neurosci. 15 (1977) 6470-6477; P.T. Huerta, J.E. Lisman, Bidirectional synaptic plasticity induced by a single burst during cholinergic theta oscillation in CA1 in vitro, Neuron 15 (1995) 1053-1063; C. Pavlides, Y.J. Greenstein, M. Grudman, J. Winson, Long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus is induced preferentially on the positive phase of theta-rhythm, Brain Res. 439 (1988) 383-387] this experience-dependent phase shift, which developed progressively over multiple sessions in the environment, is consistent with the hypothesis that circuits may be restructured during REM sleep by selectively strengthening recently acquired memories and weakening older ones. PMID:10650147

Poe, G R; Nitz, D A; McNaughton, B L; Barnes, C A

2000-02-01

117

Can Mass Trapping Reduce Thrips Damage and Is It Economically Viable? Management of the Western Flower Thrips in Strawberry  

PubMed Central

The western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is a cosmopolitan, polyphagous insect pest that causes bronzing to fruit of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). The main aim of this study was to test whether mass trapping could reduce damage and to predict whether this approach would be economically viable. In semi-protected strawberry crops, mass trapping of F. occidentalis using blue sticky roller traps reduced adult thrips numbers per flower by 61% and fruit bronzing by 55%. The addition of the F. occidentalis aggregation pheromone, neryl (S)-2-methylbutanoate, to the traps doubled the trap catch, reduced adult thrips numbers per flower by 73% and fruit bronzing by 68%. The factors affecting trapping efficiency through the season are discussed. Damage that would result in downgrading of fruit to a cheaper price occurred when bronzing affected about 10% of the red fruit surface. Cost-benefit analysis using this threshold showed that mass trapping of thrips using blue sticky roller traps can be cost-effective in high-value crops. The addition of blue sticky roller traps to an integrated pest management programme maintained thrips numbers below the damage threshold and increased grower returns by a conservative estimate of Ł2.2k per hectare. Further work is required to develop the F. occidentalis aggregation pheromone for mass trapping and to determine the best timing for trap deployment. Mass trapping of thrips is likely to be cost-effective in other countries and other high-value crops affected by F. occidentalis damage, such as cucumber and cut flowers.

Sampson, Clare; Kirk, William D. J.

2013-01-01

118

Host plant effects on the behaviour and performance of Amblyseius swirskii (Acari: Phytoseiidae).  

PubMed

Biological control in ornamental crops is challenging due to the wide diversity of crops and cultivars. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that trichome density on different host plants influences the behavior and performance of the predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae). Behavioural observations of this predator in the presence or absence of prey (western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) were done on leaf squares of ornamental plant species differing in trichome density (rose, chrysanthemum and gerbera) and compared to a smooth surface (plastic). Tomato leaves were used to observe the influence of glandular trichomes. The performance of A. swirskii was assessed by measuring predation and oviposition rate. Behaviour of A. swirskii was influenced by plant species. Up to a certain density of trichomes, trichome number had a negative effect on walking speed. It was highest on plastic, followed by rose. No differences were found among chrysanthemum, gerbera and tomato. Walking speed was slightly higher on disks without prey. Proportion of time spent walking was the same on leaf disks of all plant species, with and without prey. No effect of glandular trichomes on tomato leaves was seen. Most thrips were killed and consumed on gerbera, and least on rose. Predation rates on chrysanthemum and plastic were intermediate. In contrast, no differences in oviposition rate were found among plant species. The results of this study indicate that trichome density can explain some of the variability in efficacy of A. swirskii on different crops. Release rates of A. swirskii may need to be adjusted depending on the crop in which it is used. PMID:24037505

Buitenhuis, Rosemarije; Shipp, Les; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia; Brommit, Angela; Lee, Wonhyo

2014-02-01

119

Expression and Characterization of a Soluble Form of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Glycoprotein GN  

PubMed Central

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a member of the Tospovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae, is an economically important plant pathogen with a worldwide distribution. TSWV is transmitted to plants via thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), which transmit the virus in a persistent propagative manner. The envelope glycoproteins, GN and GC, are critical for the infection of thrips, but they are not required for the initial infection of plants. Thus, it is assumed that the envelope glycoproteins play important roles in the entry of TSWV into the insect midgut, the first site of infection. To directly test the hypothesis that GN plays a role in TSWV acquisition by thrips, we expressed and purified a soluble, recombinant form of the GN protein (GN-S). The expression of GN-S allowed us to examine the function of GN in the absence of other viral proteins. We detected specific binding to thrips midguts when purified GN-S was fed to thrips in an in vivo binding assay. The TSWV nucleocapsid protein and human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B did not bind to thrips midguts, indicating that the GN-S-thrips midgut interaction is specific. TSWV acquisition inhibition assays revealed that thrips that were concomitantly fed purified TSWV and GN-S had reduced amounts of virus in their midguts compared to thrips that were fed TSWV only. Our findings that GN-S binds to larval thrips guts and decreases TSWV acquisition provide evidence that GN may serve as a viral ligand that mediates the attachment of TSWV to receptors displayed on the epithelial cells of the thrips midgut.

Whitfield, Anna E.; Ullman, Diane E.; German, Thomas L.

2004-01-01

120

The efficacy of spinosad against the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, and its impact on associated biological control agents on greenhouse cucumbers in southern Ontario.  

PubMed

Insecticides are the most commonly used tactic to control western flower thrips (WFT), Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), on greenhouse cucumber. However, WFT has developed resistance to several of the insecticides presently in use. In addition, some of these insecticides adversely affect greenhouse biological control agents used to control WFT, resulting in subsequent pest resurgence. Therefore, there is a need to identify novel insecticides with unique modes of action for use in integrated pest management (IPM) programs to effectively control WFT with minimal impact on associated biological control agents. In laboratory bioassays conducted in 2001, immature and adult WFT and three associated greenhouse biological control agents: Amblyseius cucumeris Oudemans (Acarina: Phytoseiidae), Orius insidiosus Say (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) and Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) were exposed to direct, direct/residual, and residual contact applications of the novel biopesticide, spinosad (Conserve 120 SC), and the industry standard for whitefly control, endosulfan (Thiodan 50 WP). In all three types of assay, spinosad was effective against immature and adult WFT life stages. It showed low toxicity to A. cucumeris, moderate toxicity to O. insidiosus and high toxicity to E formosa. Greenhouse studies involving exposure of immature and adult WFT and adult biological control agents to cucumber leaves sprayed previously with spinosad supported the laboratory data. Spinosad showed low toxicity to A. cucumeris exposed to leaves 1 day after treatment (DAT), moderate toxicity to O. insidiosus 1 and 8 DAT, and high toxicity to E. formosa up to 28 DAT. These data, along with spinosad's unique mode of action, suggest it would be a valuable reduced-risk control agent for greenhouse cucumber IPM programs. PMID:15619719

Jones, Terri; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia; Harris, Ron; Shipp, Les; Harris, Brenda

2005-02-01

121

Silicon reduces impact of plant nitrogen in promoting stalk borer (Eldana saccharina) but not sugarcane thrips (Fulmekiola serrata) infestations in sugarcane  

PubMed Central

The stalk borer Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a major limiting factor in South African sugarcane production, while yield is also reduced by sugarcane thrips Fulmekiola serrata Kobus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Borer management options include appropriate nitrogen (N) and enhanced silicon (Si) nutrition; the effect of N on sugarcane thrips is unknown. We tested the effects of these nutrients, in combination with resistant (N33) and susceptible (N27) sugarcane cultivars, on E. saccharina and F. serrata infestation. Two pot trials with three levels of N (60, 120, and 180 kg ha-1) and two levels each of calcium silicate and dolomitic lime (5 and 10 t ha-1) were naturally infested with thrips, then artificially water stressed and infested with borer. Higher N levels increased borer survival and stalk damage, while Si reduced these compared with controls. Silicon significantly reduced stalk damage in N27 but not in N33; hence, Si provided relatively greater protection for susceptible cultivars than for resistant ones. High N treatments were associated with greater thrips numbers, while Si treatments did not significantly influence thrips infestation. The reduction in borer survival and stalk damage by Si application at all N rates indicates that under field conditions, the opportunity exists for optimizing sugarcane yields through maintaining adequate N nutrition, while reducing populations of E. saccharina using integrated pest management (IPM) tactics that include improved Si nutrition of the crop and reduced plant water stress. Improved management of N nutrition may also provide an option for thrips IPM. The contrasting effects of Si on stalk borer and thrips indicate that Si-mediated resistance to insect herbivores in sugarcane has mechanical and biochemical components that are well developed in the stalk tissues targeted by E. saccharina but poorly developed in the young leaf spindles where F. serrata occurs.

Keeping, Malcolm G.; Miles, Neil; Sewpersad, Chandini

2014-01-01

122

Neither insects nor wind: ambophily in dioecious Chamaedorea palms (Arecaceae).  

PubMed

Pollination of Neotropical dioecious trees is commonly related to generalist insects. Similar data for non-tree species with separated genders are inconclusive. Recent studies on pollination of dioecious Chamaedorea palms (Arecaceae) suggest that species are either insect- or wind-pollinated. However, the wide variety of inflorescence and floral attributes within the genus suggests mixed pollination mode involving entomophily and anemophily. To evaluate this hypothesis, we studied the pollination of Chamaedorea costaricana, C. macrospadix, C. pinnatifrons and C. tepejilote in two montane forests in Costa Rica. A complementary morphological analysis of floral traits was carried out to distinguish species groups within the genus according to their most probable pollination mechanism. We conducted pollinator exclusion experiments, field observations on visitors to pistillate and staminate inflorescences, and trapped airborne pollen. A cluster analysis using 18 floral traits selected for their association with wind and insect pollination syndromes was carried out using 52 Chamaedorea species. Exclusion experiments showed that both wind and insects, mostly thrips (Thysanoptera), pollinated the studied species. Thrips used staminate inflorescences as brood sites and pollinated pistillate flowers by deception. Insects caught on pistillate inflorescences transported pollen, while traps proved that pollen is wind-borne. Our empirical findings clearly suggest that pollination of dioecious Chamaedorea palms is likely to involve both insects and wind. A cluster analysis showed that the majority of studied species have a combination of floral traits that allow for both pollination modes. Our pollination experiments and morphological analysis both suggest that while some species may be completely entomophilous or anemophilous, ambophily might be a common condition within Chamaedorea. Our results propose a higher diversity of pollination mechanisms of Neotropical dioecious species than previously suggested. PMID:25068158

Rios, L D; Fuchs, E J; Hodel, D R; Cascante-Marín, A

2014-07-01

123

Invasion Genetics of the Western Flower Thrips in China: Evidence for Genetic Bottleneck, Hybridization and Bridgehead Effect  

PubMed Central

The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is an invasive species and the most economically important pest within the insect order Thysanoptera. F. occidentalis, which is endemic to North America, was initially detected in Kunming in southwestern China in 2000 and since then it has rapidly invaded several other localities in China where it has greatly damaged greenhouse vegetables and ornamental crops. Controlling this invasive pest in China requires an understanding of its genetic makeup and migration patterns. Using the mitochondrial COI gene and 10 microsatellites, eight of which were newly isolated and are highly polymorphic, we investigated the genetic structure and the routes of range expansion of 14 F. occidentalis populations in China. Both the mitochondrial and microsatellite data revealed that the genetic diversity of F. occidentalis of the Chinese populations is lower than that in its native range. Two previously reported cryptic species (or ecotypes) were found in the study. The divergence in the mitochondrial COI of two Chinese cryptic species (or ecotypes) was about 3.3% but they cannot be distinguished by nuclear markers. Hybridization might produce such substantial mitochondrial-nuclear discordance. Furthermore, we found low genetic differentiation (global FST?=?0.043, P<0.001) among all the populations and strong evidence for gene flow, especially from the three southwestern populations (Baoshan, Dali and Kunming) to the other Chinese populations. The directional gene flow was further supported by the higher genetic diversity of these three southwestern populations. Thus, quarantine and management of F. occidentalis should focus on preventing it from spreading from the putative source populations to other parts of China.

Yang, Xian-Ming; Sun, Jing-Tao; Xue, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jin-Bo; Hong, Xiao-Yue

2012-01-01

124

Variation within and between Frankliniella Thrips Species in Host Plant Utilization  

PubMed Central

Anthophilous flower thrips in the genus Frankliniella (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) exploit ephemeral plant resources and therefore must be capable of successfully locating appropriate hosts on a repeated basis, yet little is known of interspecific and intraspecific variation in responses to host plant type and nutritional quality. Field trials were conducted over two seasons to determine if the abundance of males and females of three common Frankliniella species, F. occidentalis (Pergande), F. tritici (Fitch) and F. bispinosa (Morgan), their larvae, and a key predator, Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) were affected by host plant type and plant nutritional quality. Two host plants, pepper, Capsicum annuum L. (Solanales: Solanaceae) and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L. that vary in suitability for these species were examined, and their nutritional quality was manipulated by applying three levels of nitrogen fertilization (101 kg/ha, 202 kg/ha, 404 kg/ha). F. occidentalis females were more abundant in pepper than in tomato, but males did not show a differential response. Both sexes of F. tritici and F. bispinosa were more abundant in tomato than in pepper. Larval thrips were more abundant in pepper than in tomato. Likewise, O. insidiosus females and nymphs were more abundant in pepper than in tomato. Only F. occidentalis females showed a distinct response to nitrogen fertilization, with abundance increasing with fertilization. These results show that host plant utilization patterns vary among Frankliniella spp. and should not be generalized from results of the intensively studied F. occidentalis. Given the different pest status of these species and their differential abundance in pepper and tomato, it is critical that scouting programs include species identifications for proper management.

Baez, Ignacio; Reitz, Stuart R.; Funderburk, Joseph E.; Olson, Steve M.

2011-01-01

125

Primordial Enemies: Fungal Pathogens in Thrips Societies  

PubMed Central

Microbial pathogens are ancient selective agents that have driven many aspects of multicellular evolution, including genetic, behavioural, chemical and immune defence systems. It appears that fungi specialised to attack insects were already present in the environments in which social insects first evolved and we hypothesise that if the early stages of social evolution required antifungal defences, then covariance between levels of sociality and antifungal defences might be evident in extant lineages, the defences becoming stronger with group size and increasing social organisation. Thus, we compared the activity of cuticular antifungal compounds in thrips species (Insecta: Thysanoptera) representing a gradient of increasing group size and sociality: solitary, communal, social and eusocial, against the entomopathogen Cordyceps bassiana. Solitary and communal species showed little or no activity. In contrast, the social and eusocial species killed this fungus, suggesting that the evolution of sociality has been accompanied by sharp increases in the effectiveness of antifungal compounds. The antiquity of fungal entomopathogens, demonstrated by fossil finds, coupled with the unequivocal response of thrips colonies to them shown here, suggests two new insights into the evolution of thrips sociality: First, traits that enabled nascent colonies to defend themselves against microbial pathogens should be added to those considered essential for social evolution. Second, limits to the strength of antimicrobials, through resource constraints or self-antibiosis, may have been overcome by increase in the numbers of individuals secreting them, thus driving increases in colony size. If this is the case for social thrips, then we may ask: did antimicrobial traits and microbes such as fungal entomopathogens play an integral part in the evolution of insect sociality in general?

Turnbull, Christine; Wilson, Peter D.; Hoggard, Stephen; Gillings, Michael; Palmer, Chris; Smith, Shannon; Beattie, Doug; Hussey, Sam; Stow, Adam; Beattie, Andrew

2012-01-01

126

Dynamics of the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Fauna Following Fire in a Neotropical Woodland Savanna  

PubMed Central

Fire is an important agent of disturbance in tropical savannas, but relatively few studies have analyzed how soil-and-litter dwelling arthropods respond to fire disturbance despite the critical role these organisms play in nutrient cycling and other biogeochemical processes. Following the incursion of a fire into a woodland savanna ecological reserve in Central Brazil, we monitored the dynamics of litter-arthropod populations for nearly two years in one burned and one unburned area of the reserve. We also performed a reciprocal transplant experiment to determine the effects of fire and litter type on the dynamics of litter colonization by arthropods. Overall arthropod abundance, the abundance of individual taxa, the richness of taxonomic groups, and the species richness of individual taxa (Formiciade) were lower in the burned site. However, both the ordinal-level composition of the litter arthropod fauna and the species-level composition of the litter ant fauna were not dramatically different in the burned and unburned sites. There is evidence that seasonality of rainfall interacts with fire, as differences in arthropod abundance and diversity were more pronounced in the dry than in the wet season. For many taxa the differences in abundance between burned and unburned sites were maintained even when controlling for litter availability and quality. In contrast, differences in abundance for Collembola, Formicidae, and Thysanoptera were only detected in the unmanipulated samples, which had a lower amount of litter in the burned than in the unburned site throughout most of our study period. Together these results suggest that arthropod density declines in fire-disturbed areas as a result of direct mortality, diminished resources (i.e., reduced litter cover) and less favorable microclimate (i.e., increased litter desiccation due to reduction in tree cover). Although these effects were transitory, there is evidence that the increasingly prevalent fire return interval of only 1–2 years may jeopardize the long-term conservation of litter arthropod communities.

Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Pacheco, Renata; Silva, Raphael C.; Vasconcelos, Pedro B.; Lopes, Caue T.; Costa, Alan N.; Bruna, Emilio M.

2009-01-01

127

Evaluation of Entomopathogenic Fungi Against Chilli Thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis  

PubMed Central

Commercial strains of entomopathogenic fungi were evaluated for control of chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), an invasive pest of ornamental and vegetable plants in the Caribbean and southeastern United States. In laboratory assays, LC50 values against adult S. dorsalis were 5.1 × 104 CFU/mL for Beauveria bassiana GHA, with higher values 3.1 × 105 for Metarhizium brunneum F52 and 3.8 × 105 for Isaria fumosorosea Apopka 97. Second instars were comparatively less susceptible to all isolates, ostensibly due to moulting, with LC50 values of 1.1 × 108, 7.0 × 105, and 9.9 × 105 CFU/spores per mL for GHA, F52, and Apopka 97 strains, respectively. In greenhouse cages, compared with controls, three applications of mycoinsecticides and other biorational insecticides at 7 to 14 day intervals reduced overall S. dorsalis populations on pepper plants Capsicum annuum cv. California Wonder: spinosad reduced populations by 94–99%, M. brunneum F52 by 84–93%, B. bassiana GHA by 81–94%, I. fumosorosea PFR-97 by 62–66%, and different horticultural oils by 58–85%. The proportion of marketable fruit was significantly increased by M. brunneum F52, B. bassiana GHA, and 2% SuffOil-X treatments. Slightly lower levels of control were observed in nursery tests with ornamental rose shrubs, Rosa sp. Red Double Knock Out®, during hot sunny conditions. Four applications reduced thrips populations over 10 weeks: spinosad by an average of 91%, M. brunneum F52 by an average of 81%, B. bassiana GHA by an average of 62%, SuffOil-X by an average of 50%, and I. fumosorosea PFR-97 by an average of 44%. The data show that mycoinsecticides can be used in management strategies for low to moderate populations of S. dorsalis and provide resistance management tools for the limited number of insecticides that are effective against this pest.

Arthurs, Steven Paul; Aristizabal, Luis Fernando; Avery, Pasco Bruce

2013-01-01

128

Variation within and between Frankliniella thrips species in host plant utilization.  

PubMed

Anthophilous flower thrips in the genus Frankliniella (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) exploit ephemeral plant resources and therefore must be capable of successfully locating appropriate hosts on a repeated basis, yet little is known of interspecific and intraspecific variation in responses to host plant type and nutritional quality. Field trials were conducted over two seasons to determine if the abundance of males and females of three common Frankliniella species, F. occidentalis (Pergande), F. tritici (Fitch) and F. bispinosa (Morgan), their larvae, and a key predator, Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) were affected by host plant type and plant nutritional quality. Two host plants, pepper, Capsicum annuum L. (Solanales: Solanaceae) and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L. that vary in suitability for these species were examined, and their nutritional quality was manipulated by applying three levels of nitrogen fertilization (101 kg/ha, 202 kg/ha, 404 kg/ha). F. occidentalis females were more abundant in pepper than in tomato, but males did not show a differential response. Both sexes of F. tritici and F. bispinosa were more abundant in tomato than in pepper. Larval thrips were more abundant in pepper than in tomato. Likewise, O. insidiosus females and nymphs were more abundant in pepper than in tomato. Only F. occidentalis females showed a distinct response to nitrogen fertilization, with abundance increasing with fertilization. These results show that host plant utilization patterns vary among Frankliniella spp. and should not be generalized from results of the intensively studied F. occidentalis. Given the different pest status of these species and their differential abundance in pepper and tomato, it is critical that scouting programs include species identifications for proper management. PMID:21539418

Baez, Ignacio; Reitz, Stuart R; Funderburk, Joseph E; Olson, Steve M

2011-01-01

129

Development of reference transcriptomes for the major field insect pests of cowpea: a toolbox for insect pest management approaches in west Africa.  

PubMed

Cowpea is a widely cultivated and major nutritional source of protein for many people that live in West Africa. Annual yields and longevity of grain storage is greatly reduced by feeding damage caused by a complex of insect pests that include the pod sucking bugs, Anoplocnemis curvipes Fabricius (Hemiptera: Coreidae) and Clavigralla tomentosicollis Stĺl (Hemiptera: Coreidae); as well as phloem-feeding cowpea aphids, Aphis craccivora Koch (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and flower thrips, Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Efforts to control these pests remain a challenge and there is a need to understand the structure and movement of these pest populations in order to facilitate the development of integrated pest management strategies (IPM). Molecular tools have the potential to help facilitate a better understanding of pest populations. Towards this goal, we used 454 pyrosequencing technology to generate 319,126, 176,262, 320,722 and 227,882 raw reads from A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti, respectively. The reads were de novo assembled into 11,687, 7,647, 10,652 and 7,348 transcripts for A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti, respectively. Functional annotation of the resulting transcripts identified genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, pathogen defense and immunity. Additionally, sequences that matched the primary aphid endosymbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, were identified among A. craccivora transcripts. Furthermore, 742, 97, 607 and 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were respectively predicted among A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti transcripts, and will likely be valuable tools for future molecular genetic marker development. These results demonstrate that Roche 454-based transcriptome sequencing could be useful for the development of genomic resources for cowpea pest insects in West Africa. PMID:24278221

Agunbiade, Tolulope A; Sun, Weilin; Coates, Brad S; Djouaka, Rousseau; Tamň, Manuele; Ba, Malick N; Binso-Dabire, Clementine; Baoua, Ibrahim; Olds, Brett P; Pittendrigh, Barry R

2013-01-01

130

Have the northwest Negev dunefield sands reddened since their deposition?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sand grain coating redness has been extensively both in coastal and inland desert dunes. In Israel, sand redness has been quantified by calculating a spectral redness index (RI) using single RGB bands (RI= R2/(B*G3)) from reflectance spectroscopy. The RI values have been correlated to ferric oxide mass that was dissolved from sand grain coatings (Ben Dor et al., 2006; Tsoar et al., 2008). Five main requirements have been proposed to enhance sand grain reddening: iron source from the weathering of iron-bearing minerals originating from parent rock or aeolian dust, minimum moisture content, oxidizing interstitial conditions, sediment stability and time. Thus, as many researches have suggested, when the source factors and climatic conditions are homogenous, redder sands indicate increased maturity. The northwest Negev dunefield has been classified by Tsoar et al. (2008) into 3 incursion units based upon contouring a grid of RI values for surface sand samples. The central incursion unit has been suggested to be younger due to relatively lower RI values that decrease to the east. This work tests the relationship between RI values and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of aeolian sand sampled from the near surface down to dune substrate throughout the NW Negev dunefield. Room-dried sand samples were measured in the laboratory with an ASD FieldSpec spectrometer and RI was calculated. Dune sections have been found to usually have similar RI values throughout their vertical profile despite OSL ages ranging between recent and Late Pleistocene. Along a W-E transect, RI values also tend to be similar. The central (Haluzza) part of the dunefield exhibits significantly lower RI values than RI of sands south of the Qeren Ridge. Dune base OSL ages possibly representing burial/stabilization of an initial incursion are slightly more mature in the south and may be evidence of the earliest dune incursion into the Negev. Thus the increased redness may be attributed to an older sand source but not to reddening in situ with time. Remotely sensed RI calculated from Landsat TM 5 (30 m pixel) RGB bands of bare Sinai sands also portrays the spatial RI difference between the central and southern sands. To summarize, we find no direct connection between dune sand deposition age and sand grain coating redness in the Negev dunes. It seems that stable aeolian sand and dune sections in the Negev have not reddened since their deposition. Sand grain coating redness was probably inherited during an earlier diagenetic stage in an environment different than today's. References Ben-Dor, E., Levin, N., Singer, A., Karnieli, A., Braun, O. & Kidron, G.J., 2006. Quantitative mapping of the soil rubification process on sand dunes using an airborne hyperspectral sensor. Geoderma, 131:1-21. Tsoar, H., Wenkart, R. & Blumberg, D.G., 2008. Formation and geomorphology of the north-western Negev sand dunes. In (Breckle, S.W., Yair, A.& Veste, M.) eds., Arid dunes ecosystems: The Nizzana sands in the Negev Desert. Springer pub. 475 pp.

Roskin, Joel; Tsoar, Haim; Blumberg, Dan G.; Porat, Naomi; Rozensten, Ofer

2010-05-01

131

Developmental profile and hormonal regulation of the transcription factors broad and Krüppel homolog 1 in hemimetabolous thrips.  

PubMed

In holometabolous insects, Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) and broad (br) are key players in the juvenile hormone (JH) regulation of metamorphosis: Kr-h1 is an early JH-response gene, while br is a transcription factor that directs pupal development. Thrips (Thysanoptera) are classified as hemimetabolous insects that develop directly from nymph to adult, but they have quiescent and non-feeding stages called propupa and pupa. We analyzed the developmental profiles of br and Kr-h1 in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thripidae) that has one propupal instar and one pupal instar, and Haplothrips brevitubus (Phlaeothripidae) that has one propupal instar and two pupal instars, i.e. pupa I and pupa II. In F. occidentalis, the br mRNA levels were moderate in the embryonic stage, high at the larva-propupa transition, and low in the pre-final larval instar and the pupal stage, while Kr-h1 mRNA levels were high in the embryonic stage, remained at a moderate level in the larval and propupal stages, and low in the pupal stage. The expression profiles in H. brevitubus were very similar to those in F. occidentalis, except that the increase of br expression in the final larval stage occurs more slowly in H. brevitubus, and that the mRNA levels of br and Kr-h1 remained high in pupa I of H. brevitubus and then decreased. These profiles of br and Kr-h1 were comparable to those in holometabolous insects, although br expression found in thrips' embryogenesis is reminiscent of several hemimetabolous species. Treatment with an exogenous JH mimic (JHM) in distinct developmental stages consistently resulted in lethality as pupa of F. occidentalis or pupa II of H. brevitubus. Treatment with JHM to newly molted propupae caused prolonged expression of Kr-h1 and br in both species, suggesting that Kr-h1 and br could be involved in mediating anti-metamorphic signals of JHM. PMID:21111817

Minakuchi, Chieka; Tanaka, Miho; Miura, Ken; Tanaka, Toshiharu

2011-02-01

132

Evaluation of entomopathogenic fungi against chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis.  

PubMed

Commercial strains of entomopathogenic fungi were evaluated for control of chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), an invasive pest of ornamental and vegetable plants in the Caribbean and southeastern United States. In laboratory assays, LC50 values against adult S. dorsalis were 5.1 × 10(4) CFU/mL for Beauveria bassiana GHA, with higher values 3.1 × 10(5) for Metarhizium brunneum F52 and 3.8 × 10(5) for Isaria fumosorosea Apopka 97. Second instars were comparatively less susceptible to all isolates, ostensibly due to moulting, with LC50 values of 1.1 × 10(8), 7.0 × 10(5), and 9.9 × 10(5) CFU/spores per mL for GHA, F52, and Apopka 97 strains, respectively. In greenhouse cages, compared with controls, three applications of mycoinsecticides and other biorational insecticides at 7 to 14 day intervals reduced overall S. dorsalis populations on pepper plants Capsicum annuum cv. California Wonder: spinosad reduced populations by 94-99%, M. brunneum F52 by 84-93%, B. bassiana GHA by 81-94%, I. fumosorosea PFR-97 by 62-66%, and different horticultural oils by 58-85%. The proportion of marketable fruit was significantly increased by M. brunneum F52, B. bassiana GHA, and 2% SuffOil-X treatments. Slightly lower levels of control were observed in nursery tests with ornamental rose shrubs, Rosa sp. Red Double Knock Out®, during hot sunny conditions. Four applications reduced thrips populations over 10 weeks: spinosad by an average of 91%, M. brunneum F52 by an average of 81%, B. bassiana GHA by an average of 62%, SuffOil-X by an average of 50%, and I. fumosorosea PFR-97 by an average of 44%. The data show that mycoinsecticides can be used in management strategies for low to moderate populations of S. dorsalis and provide resistance management tools for the limited number of insecticides that are effective against this pest. PMID:23895429

Arthurs, Steven Paul; Aristizábal, Luis Fernando; Avery, Pasco Bruce

2013-01-01

133

Fusarium semitectum, a potential mycopathogen against thrips and mites in chilli, Capsicum annuum.  

PubMed

In India, chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) suffers with a characteristic leaf curl symptoms due to the attack of mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Banks) (Acari: Tarsonemidae) and thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) or both. Experiments were conducted in the fields of College of Agriculture, Shimoga, India during kharif (September 2003 to January 2004) and summer (March-June) 2004. After proving its pathogenicity, the potential of the mycopathogen, Fusarium semitectum was evaluated under field conditions using the popular chilli variety "Byadagi". Different combinations of Fusarium semitectum formulations with monocrotophos (0.025% and 0.05%) were tested. Oil-emulsion and dust-water formulations (DWF) at 1x 10(8) spore/ml, DWF with monocrotophos and 5% Neem Seed Kernal Extract (NSKE) were evaluated. Population of S. dorsalis, P. latus, predatory mite Amblyseius ovalis and damage index were estimated. Populations of thrips, mite and the predatory mite were estimated at 15 days interval after 30 days of transplanting. Damage index was assessed using a visual rating method. Plant height, fruit length and dry chilli yield of each treatment were also taken. Among the treatments, oil-emulsion formulation and dust water formulation of F. semitectum in combination with monocrotophos (0.05%) reduced the population of thrips significantly over other treatments. Dust water formulation was achieved a significant decline of thrips population in chilli plants after 60 days of transplanting. This reduction of thrips population could be achieved due to the effect of second spraying, which was given at 50 days after transplanting. Chilli plant height and fruit length did not vary significantly among the treatment in both seasons. The highest dry chilli yield of 512 and 1058 kg/ha was recorded in dust water formulation in combination with monocrotophos (0.05%) followed by oil formulation (432 kg/ha and 763 kg/ha) in Kharif and summer seasons, respectively. Fusarium formulation sprayed plots were recorded low damage index than NSKE, water sprayed plots including control. Oil-emulsion formulation treated plot adjusted the highest benefit cost ratio of 6.07:1. Oil emulsion formulation (refined sunflower oil-Safola) was next best to the dust water formulation of F. semitectum. and monocrotophos combination and more-over equal to the monocrotophos 0.05% alone in suppressing the thrips and mite population. These results revealed that dust water formulation in combination with monocrotophos (0.05%) was able to suppress the population of thrips and mites and thus was able to give highest dry chilli yield. Oil emulsion formulation of F. semitectum can also be used as the next best choice in an environment friendly integrated chilli pest management programme. PMID:17385513

Mikunthan, G; Manjunatha, M

2006-01-01

134

Entomological fauna from Reserva Biológica do Atol das Rocas, RN, Brazil: I. Morphospecies composition.  

PubMed

Atol das Rocas, the unique atoll in the South-western Atlantic, is located 144 nautical miles (266 Km) northeast from the city of Natal, NE Brazil and 80 nautical miles from Arquipélago de Fernando de Noronha, with geographic co-ordinates 3 masculine51'S and 33 masculine49"W. It's of volcanic origin and coralline formation. The reef is ellipsoid, its largest axis (E-W) is approximately 3.7 km long, and the shortest (N-S) is 2.5 km. Inside the lagoon, there are two islands: the Ilha do Farol and Ilha do Cemitério, which comprehend 7.2 Km2 of emerged area. The Atol das Rocas lodges 143,000 birds, mainly by Sula dactilatra, S. leucogaster, Anous stolidus, A. minuta and Sterna fuscata. Due to their remote location, the islands remain largely undisturbed by the human activities. Aiming to a first characterization of the entomological diversity and the general trophic niches of atoll's entomofauna, three collects were made (1994, 1995 and 1996) utilizing several methods for a wide sample. One thousand six hundred and six insect specimens were collected belonging to eight orders: 1. Coleoptera - 333 individuals of Dermestidae (Dermestes cadaverinus); Tenebrionidae (Phaleria testacea and morphospecies) and Curculionidae (one morphospecies); 2. Dermaptera - 50 individuals of Carcinophoridae (Anisolabis maritima); 3. Diptera - 281 individuals of Ephydridae (Scatella sp. and Hecamede sp.) and Hippoboscidae (one morphospecies); 4. Hymenoptera - 45 individuals of Formicidae (Brachymyrmex sp.); 5. Lepidoptera - 111 individuals of Microlepidoptera (one morphospecies); 6. Mallophaga - 18 individuals in birds (two morphospecies); 7. Orthoptera - 237 individuals of Acrididae (Schistocerca cancellata), Tridactylidae (one morphospecies) and Blattidae (three morphospecies); 8. Thysanoptera -531 individuals (one morphospecies). Also were collected 112 individuals of Arachnida. The taxa of the Order Araneae were represented by the families: 1. Miturgidae (Cheiracanthium inclusum); 2. Salticidae (two morphospecies) and 3. Segestriidae (Ariadna sp.); 4. Theridiidae (Achaearanea sp. and Latrodectus geometricus). For the Order Scorpionida, only samples of Buthidae (Isometrus maculatus) were collected. Through field observations, it was concluded the most insects are detritophagous and/or necrophagous. It is suggested that which the dimension of ecological niches of the insects are a function of the droppings, trash and corpses of birds. A low diversity in the entomofauna of atoll, with its 25 morphospecies, was ascertained. PMID:10959113

Almeida; Marchon-Silva; Ribeiro; Serpa-Filho; Almeida; Costa

2000-05-01

135

Interactions of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in genetically engineered cotton with predatory heteropterans.  

PubMed

A number of cotton varieties have been genetically transformed with genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to continuously produce Bt endotoxins, offering whole plant and season-long protection against many lepidopteran larvae. Constant whole-plant toxin expression creates a significant opportunity for non-target herbivores to acquire and bio-accumulate the toxin for higher trophic levels. In the present study we investigated movement of Cry1Ac toxin from the transgenic cotton plant through specific predator-prey pairings, using omnivorous predators with common cotton pests as prey: (1) the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), with the predator Podisus maculiventris (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); (2) the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acarina: Tetranychidae), with the predatory big-eyed bug Geocoris punctipes (Heteroptera: Geocoridae) and (3) with the predatory damsel bug Nabis roseipennis (Heteropera: Nabidae); and (4) the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) with the predatory pirate bug Orius insidiosus (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae). We quantified Cry1Ac toxin in the cotton plants, and in the pests and predators, and the effects of continuous feeding on S. exigua larvae fed either Bt or non-Bt cotton on life history traits of P. maculiventris. All three herbivores were able to convey Cry1Ac toxin to their respective predators. Among the herbivores, T. urticae exhibited 16.8 times more toxin in their bodies than that expressed in Bt-cotton plant, followed by S. exigua (1.05 times), and F. occidentalis immatures and adults (0.63 and 0.73 times, respectively). Of the toxin in the respective herbivorous prey, 4, 40, 17 and 14% of that amount was measured in the predators G. punctipes, P. maculiventris, O. insidiosus, and N. roseipennis, respectively. The predator P. maculiventris exhibited similar life history characteristics (developmental time, survival, longevity, and fecundity) regardless of the prey's food source. Thus, Cry1Ac toxin is conveyed through non-target herbivores to natural enemies at different levels depending on the herbivore species, but continuous lifetime contact with the toxin by the predator P. maculiventris through its prey had no effect on the predator's life history. The results found here, supplemented with others already published, suggest that feeding on Cry1Ac contaminated non-target herbivores does not harm predatory heteropterans and, therefore, cultivation of Bt cotton may provide an opportunity for conservation of these predators in cotton ecosystems by reducing insecticide use. PMID:17570072

Torres, Jorge B; Ruberson, John R

2008-06-01

136

Study of microarthropod communities to assess soil quality in different managed vineyards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Land use type influences the abundance and diversity of soil arthropods. The evaluation of the effects of different crop managements on soil quality is commonly requested; it can be pursued by means of the determination of communities' structure of edaphic fauna. The development and application of biological indices may represent an efficient mean to assess soil quality. We evaluated the effect of crop managements (organic and Integrated Pest Management-IPM) in some vineyards in Piedmont (Italy) on soil biota in relation to some physical and chemical characteristics of the soil. The study was performed in eleven sites, including seven organic and four IPM managed vineyards located in the Costigliole d'Asti area. Samplings were carried out during the winter 2011 and the spring 2012. Soil samples were collected using a cylindrical soil core sampler (3cm diameter x 30cm height): each sample was a cylindrical soil core which was equally subdivided to study arthropod communities at different depth ranges. Additional samples were collected and analyzed for the following soil physical and chemical properties: texture (sedigraph method), pH (1:2.5 soil/water), total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (NT) and calcium carbonate (dry combustion by CN analyzer). The extraction of microarthropods was performed using the selector Berlese-Tullgren. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The influence of soil properties and of agronomic practices on the abundance of mesofauna was evaluated by multivariate analysis (MANOVA). The biological soil quality was also defined through the determination of biotic indices such as the qualitative and quantitative QBSar (Quality Biological Soil - arthropods), and biodiversity indices such as species richness and indices of Shannon-Wiener (H') and Simpson (D). Overall, more than four thousands arthropods were collected and the highest abundance was in biological management with about 2:1 ratio (biological vs conventional/IPM management). The mites represented about 50% of the arthropodofauna recorded, collembolans 30%, and 20% other microarthropods (Blattaria, Chilopoda, Coleoptera, Diplopoda, Diplura, Diptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, Isopoda, Homoptera, Pauropoda, Protura, Pseudoscopionida, Psocoptera, Symphyla, Thysanoptera). The mesofauna abundance was affected by the type of management (P=0.015) and soil texture (P=0.029). At the identification level considered, the biological indices calculated showed no substantial differences between different crop managements (H'=1.26, D=0.97 in organic vineyard, H'=1.30, D=0.89 in IPM vineyard). The analysis of microarthropod communities by QBSar, however, showed higher values in organic compared to IPM managed vineyards (QBSar 199 vs 98 in 2011 and 205 vs 188 in 2012, respectively) which are close to figures characteristic of preserved soils.

Gagnarli, Elena; Vignozzi, Nadia; Valboa, Giuseppe; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Corino, Lorenzo; Goggioli, Donatella; Guidi, Silvia; Lottero, Mariarosa; Tarchi, Franca; Simoni, Sauro

2014-05-01

137

Artificial and factitious foods support the development and reproduction of the predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii.  

PubMed

The generalist predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae) was reared on Ephestia kuehniella Zeller eggs (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), decapsulated dry cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana Kellogg (Anostraca: Artemiidae), and on meridic artificial diets (composed of honey, sucrose, tryptone, yeast extract, and egg yolk) supplemented with pupal hemolymph of the Chinese oak silkworm Antheraea pernyi (Guérin-Méneville) (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) (AD1), with E. kuehniella eggs (AD2) or with A. franciscana cysts (AD3). Development, reproduction and predation capacity of the predatory mites were assessed in the first (G1) and sixth generation (G6) of rearing on the different diets. Immature survival rates in G1 were similar on all diets (96.8-100 %). After six generations, however, survival of A. swirskii was significantly reduced on all diets except on A. franciscana cysts. Oviposition rates did not differ between generations when females were fed on E. kuehniella, AD2 or AD3. The total number of deposited eggs was similar among diets except in G6 where the females fed on A. franciscana cysts produced more eggs than those maintained on E. kuehniella eggs. On most diets the intrinsic rates of increase in G1 were superior to those in G6, except for predators supplied with A. franciscana cysts where no differences were observed among generations. Female mites did not lose their capacity to kill first instar Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) after six generations on the different diets, but predation rates in G6 on E. kuehniella were lower than in G1. In conclusion, the different factitious and artificial diets tested in the present study supported the development and reproduction of A. swirskii for a single generation but fitness losses occurred to a varying degree after several generations on E. kuehniella eggs or the artificial diets. Artificial diet enriched with A. franciscana cysts yielded better results than the other artificial diets. Amblyseius swirskii performed best on decapsulated Artemia cysts indicating their potential for use in the mass production of the predator or to sustain its populations in the crop after release. PMID:24154947

Nguyen, Duc Tung; Vangansbeke, Dominiek; De Clercq, Patrick

2014-02-01