Science.gov

Sample records for pan evaporation rates

  1. Differences in evaporation between a floating pan and class a pan on land

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, J.R.; Stannard, D.I.; Christenson, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop a method for obtaining floating pan evaporation rates in a small (less than 10,000 m2) wetland, lagoon, or pond. Floating pan and land pan evaporation data were collected from March 1 to August 31, 2005, at a small natural wetland located in the alluvium of the Canadian River near Norman, Oklahoma, at the U.S. Geological Survey Norman Landfill Toxic Substances Hydrology Research Site. Floating pan evaporation rates were compared with evaporation rates from a nearby standard Class A evaporation pan on land. Floating pan evaporation rates were significantly less than land pan evaporation rates for the entire period and on a monthly basis. Results indicated that the use of a floating evaporation pan in a small free-water surface better simulates actual physical conditions on the water surface that control evaporation. Floating pan to land pan ratios were 0.82 for March, 0.87 for April, 0.85 for May, 0.85 for June, 0.79 for July, and 0.69 for August. ?? 2008 American Water Resources Association.

  2. PenPan: A general tool for the attribution of changing pan evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, G. D.; Hobbins, M. T.; Roderick, M. L.; Rotstayn, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    Evaporative demand is routinely measured using the evaporation of water from standardised pans. The most common are Class A pans: they are metal dishes 4 feet in diameter and 10 inches deep sitting on a wooden platform. Because of the practical importance in agriculture and engineering, there is a wealth of pan evaporation data. Analysis has shown that in most places, pan evaporation has declined over the last 30 to 50 years despite the well documented increases in near-surface air temperature. It is important to understand why this has occurred. Using generic principles of mass and energy balance, we developed the PenPan model of evaporation from a class A pan for attribution purposes. In this talk we briefly describe the PenPan model and then demonstrate its application at 41 sites, broadly scattered across Australia, for the period 1975-2004. We found that the decline in Australian pan evaporation was mostly due to declining wind speed with some regional contributions from declining radiation. In general, the observed changes in vapour pressure deficit and air temperature were too small to have an appreciable impact on pan evaporation rates. By a comparative analysis, we show that the general global trends of declining evaporative demand are most due to various combination of declining radiation and/or wind.

  3. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  4. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  5. Early Pan-African evolution of the basement around Elat, Israel, and the Sinai Peninsula revealed by single-zircon evaporation dating, and implications for crustal accretion rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kroener, A. ); Eyal, M.; Eyal, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors report {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb single-zircon evaporation ages for early Pan-African rocks from southern Israel and the northeastern Sinai Peninsula, the northernmost extension of the Arabian-Nubian shield. The oldest rocks are metamorphic schists of presumed island-arc derivation; detrital zircons date the source terrain at ca. 800-820 Ma. A major phase of tonalite-trondhjemite plutonism occurred at ca. 760-780 Ma; more evolved granitic rocks were emplaced at about 745 Ma. A metagabbro-metadiorite complex reflects the youngest igneous phase at ca. 640 Ma. We find no evidence for pre-Pan-African crust, and our data document important crust-forming events that correlate with similar episodes elsewhere in the shield. The widespread presence of early Pan-African juvenile rocks (i.e., ca. 760-850 Ma) in many parts of the Arabian-Nubian shield makes this period the most important in the magmatic history of the shield and supports earlier suggestions for unusually high crust-production rates.

  6. Groundwater evaporation from salt pans: Examples from the eastern Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Stephan; Horovitz, Marcel; Rausch, Randolf; Michelsen, Nils; Mallast, Ulf; Köhne, Maximilian; Siebert, Christian; Schüth, Christoph; Al-Saud, Mohammed; Merz, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    The major groundwater resources of the Arabian Peninsula are stored in the large sedimentary basins in its eastern part. Evaporation from continental salt pans (playas) is an important process in water resources assessments of its upper principal aquifers - the Upper Mega Aquifer system - as it constitutes a significant sink. However, literature values on evaporation rates vary widely and usually report about coastal salt pans where seawater evaporation is assumed. The present study applies different methods to provide a comprehensive picture of groundwater evaporation from salt pans of the Upper Mega Aquifer system. A remote sensing approach provided the spatial distribution and total salt pan area of about 36,500 km2. Hydrochemical and isotopic investigations revealed that from about 10% (3600 km2 ± 1600 km2) of the mapped salt pan area seawater evaporates. To estimate the groundwater evaporation rate from continental salt pans a laboratory column experiment was set up, implying a mean annual evaporation rate of about 42 mm ± 13 mm. In-situ analysis of water table fluctuations in the field suggested about 3 mm a-1 originate from recently infiltrated rainwater leading to an annual net groundwater evaporation of 39 mm ± 13 mm. Relating this number to the mapped salt pan area, from which groundwater evaporates, provides a total annual groundwater loss of 1.3 km3 ± 0.5 km3 for the Upper Mega Aquifer system.

  7. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk products for the purpose of concentrating the solids should comply with the requirements of the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  8. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk products for the purpose of concentrating the solids should comply with the requirements of the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  9. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk products for the purpose of concentrating the solids should comply with the requirements of the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  10. Modeling monthly pan evaporations using fuzzy genetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kişi, Özgür; Tombul, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    SummaryThis study investigates the ability of fuzzy genetic (FG) approach in estimation of monthly pan evaporations. Various monthly climatic data, that are, solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed from two stations, Antalya and Mersin, in Mediterranean Region of Turkey, were used as inputs to the FG technique so as to estimate monthly pan evaporations. In the first part of the study, FG models were compared with neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS), artificial neural networks (ANNs) and Stephens-Stewart (SS) methods in estimating pan evaporations of Antalya and Mersin stations, separately. Comparison of the models revealed that the FG models generally performed better than the ANFIS, ANN and SS models. In the second part of the study, models were compared to each other in two different applications. In the first application the input data of Antalya Station were used as inputs to the models to estimate pan evaporation data of Mersin Station. The pan evaporation data of Mersin Station were estimated using the input data of Antalya and Mersin stations in the second application. Comparison results indicated that the FG models performed better than the ANFIS and ANN models. Comparison of the accuracy of the applied models in estimating total pan evaporations showed that the FG model provided the closest estimate. It was concluded that monthly pan evaporations could be successfully estimated by the FG approach.

  11. Evolutionary neural networks for monthly pan evaporation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kişi, Özgür

    2013-08-01

    Estimating pan evaporation is very important for monitoring, survey and management of water resources. This study proposes the application evolutionary neural networks (ENN) for modeling monthly pan evaporations. Solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and pan evaporation data from two stations, Antalya and Mersin, in Mediterranean Region of Turkey are used in the study. In the first part of the study, ENN models are compared with those of the fuzzy genetic (FG), neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS), artificial neural networks (ANN) and Stephens-Stewart (SS) methods in estimating pan evaporations of Antalya and Mersin stations, separately. Comparison results indicate that the ENN models generally perform better than the FG, ANFIS, ANN and SS models. In the second part of the study, models are compared with each other in estimating Mersin’s pan evaporations using input data of both stations. Results reveal that the ENN models performed better than the FG, ANFIS and ANN models. It was concluded that monthly pan evaporations can be successfully estimated by the ENN method. The performance of the ENN model with full weather data as inputs presents 0.749 and 0.759 mm of mean absolute error for the Antalya and Mersin stations, respectively.

  12. 7 CFR 58.217 - Evaporators and/or vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaporators and/or vacuum pans. 58.217 Section 58.217....217 Evaporators and/or vacuum pans. Evaporators or vacuum pans or both, with open type condensers... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. When enclosed type...

  13. 7 CFR 58.217 - Evaporators and/or vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaporators and/or vacuum pans. 58.217 Section 58.217....217 Evaporators and/or vacuum pans. Evaporators or vacuum pans or both, with open type condensers... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans. When enclosed type...

  14. From evaporating pans to transpiring plants (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The name of the original inventor of irrigated agriculture is lost to antiquity. Nevertheless, one can perhaps imagine an inquisitive desert inhabitant noting the greener vegetation along a watercourse and putting two and two together. Once water was being supplied and food was being produced it would be natural to ask a further question: how much water can we put on? No doubt much experience was gained down through the ages, but again, one can readily imagine someone inverting a rain gauge, filling it with water and measuring how fast the water evaporated. The inverted rain gauge measures the demand for water by the atmosphere. We call it the evaporative demand. I do not know if this is what actually happened but it sure makes an interesting start to a talk. Evaporation pans are basically inverted rain gauges. The rain gauge and evaporation pan measure the supply and demand respectively and these instruments are the workhorses of agricultural meteorology. Rain gauges are well known. Evaporation pans are lesser known but are in widespread use and are a key part of several national standardized meteorological networks. Many more pans are used for things like scheduling irrigation on farms or estimating evaporation from lakes. Analysis of the long records now available from standardized networks has revealed an interesting phenomenon, i.e., pan evaporation has increased in some places and decreased in other but when averaged over large numbers of pans there has been a steady decline. These independent reports from, for example, the US, Russia, China, India, Thailand, are replicated in the southern hemisphere in, for example, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. One often hears the statement that because the earth is expected to warm with increasing greenhouse gas emissions then it follows that water will evaporate faster. The pan evaporation observations show that this widely held expectation is wrong. When expectations disagree with observations, it is the observations that win. That is the basis of science. In this Dalton Medal lecture we first examine pan evaporation observations and show why pan evaporation has declined. Armed with that knowledge we then investigate the consequences for plant water use and how this is directly coupled to the catchment water balance.

  15. Monthly pan evaporation modeling using linear genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Aytac; Kisi, Ozgur

    2013-10-01

    This study compares the accuracy of linear genetic programming (LGP), fuzzy genetic (FG), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), artificial neural networks (ANN) and Stephens-Stewart (SS) methods in modeling pan evaporations. Monthly climatic data including solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and pan evaporation from Antalya and Mersin stations, in Turkey are used in the study. The study composed of two parts. First part of the study focuses the comparison of LGP models with those of the FG, ANFIS, ANN and SS models in estimating pan evaporations of Antalya and Mersin stations, separately. From the comparison results, the LGP models are found to be better than the other models. Comparison of LGP models with the other models in estimating pan evaporations of the Mersin Station by using both stations' inputs is focused in the second part of the study. The results indicate that the LGP models better accuracy than the FG, ANFIS, ANN and SS models. It is seen that the pan evaporations can be successfully estimated by the LGP method.

  16. Application of thermal model for pan evaporation to the hydrology of a defined medium, the sponge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, M. H.; Artley, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A technique is presented which estimates pan evaporation from the commonly observed values of daily maximum and minimum air temperatures. These two variables are transformed to saturation vapor pressure equivalents which are used in a simple linear regression model. The model provides reasonably accurate estimates of pan evaporation rates over a large geographic area. The derived evaporation algorithm is combined with precipitation to obtain a simple moisture variable. A hypothetical medium with a capacity of 8 inches of water is initialized at 4 inches. The medium behaves like a sponge: it absorbs all incident precipitation, with runoff or drainage occurring only after it is saturated. Water is lost from this simple system through evaporation just as from a Class A pan, but at a rate proportional to its degree of saturation. The contents of the sponge is a moisture index calculated from only the maximum and minium temperatures and precipitation.

  17. Isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture from pan water evaporation measurements.

    PubMed

    Devi, Pooja; Jain, Ashok Kumar; Rao, M Someshwer; Kumar, Bhishm

    2015-01-01

    A continuous and reliable time series data of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture is an important requirement for the wider applicability of isotope mass balance methods in atmospheric and water balance studies. This requires routine sampling of atmospheric moisture by an appropriate technique and analysis of moisture for its isotopic composition. We have, therefore, used a much simpler method based on an isotope mass balance approach to derive the isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture using a class-A drying evaporation pan. We have carried out the study by collecting water samples from a class-A drying evaporation pan and also by collecting atmospheric moisture using the cryogenic trap method at the National Institute of Hydrology, Roorkee, India, during a pre-monsoon period. We compared the isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture obtained by using the class-A drying evaporation pan method with the cryogenic trap method. The results obtained from the evaporation pan water compare well with the cryogenic based method. Thus, the study establishes a cost-effective means of maintaining time series data of the isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture at meteorological observatories. The conclusions drawn in the present study are based on experiments conducted at Roorkee, India, and may be examined at other regions for its general applicability. PMID:26332982

  18. Trends in Thailand pan evaporation from 1970 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limjirakan, Sangchan; Limsakul, Atsamon

    2012-05-01

    One of the expected consequences of an anthropogenically warmed climate is the increase in evaporation. Paradoxically, terrestrial observations across the world show that the rates of pan evaporation (Epan) have been steadily decreasing since 1950s. In this study, we present a trend in Thailand Epan based on quality-controlled data from 28 weather stations from 1970 to 2007. Results indicated that, despite the annual mean air temperature increased by 0.91 C over the past 38 years (0.024 C per annum), the trend in annual Epan has steadily declined on average by ~ 7.7 mm a-2 (i.e. mm per annum per annum). By comparing, this change is larger than those previously reported for several countries. A further examination by Kendal's rank correlation and stepwise regression analysis based on some available weather data showed that reduction in wind speed and, to a lesser degree, sunshine duration were the likely causative meteorological factors affecting the Epan decrease in Thailand over the past 38 years. The findings of this study highlight local changes in aerodynamic and radiative drivers of the hydrological cycle, and their linkages to climate change could have important implications for Thailand's nature and society.

  19. Early Pan-African evolution of the basement around Elat, Israel,and the Sinai Peninsula revealed by single-zircon evaporation dating, and implications for crustal accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, A.; Eyal, M.; Eyal, Y.

    1990-06-01

    We report 207Pb/206Pb single-zircon evaporation ages for early Pan-African rocks from southern Israel and the northeastern Sinai Peninsula, the northernmost extension of the Arabian-Nubian shield. The oldest rocks are metamorphic schists of presumed island-arc derivation; detrital zircons date the source terrain at ca. 800-820 Ma. A major phase of tonalite-trondhjemite plutonism occurred at ca. 760-780 Ma; more evolved granitic rocks were emplaced at about 745 Ma. A metagabbro-metadiorite complex reflects the youngest igneous phase at ca. 640 Ma. We find no evidence for pre-Pan-African crust, and our data document important crust-forming events that correlate with similar episodes elsewhere in the Shield. The widespread presence of early Pan-African juvenile rocks (i.e., ca. 760-850 Ma) in many parts of the Arabian-Nubian shield makes this period the most important in the magmatic history of the shield and supports earlier suggestions for unusually high crust-production rates.

  20. Applicability of a User-Oriented Evaporation Pan for Low frequency Irrigation of Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evaporation pan is one field device used to support irrigation scheduling. This device integrates environmental effects and measures evaporation to give an indication of crop water use. However, conventional evaporation pans are sometimes difficult to set up, interpret, and access for field read...

  1. Modeling Pan Evaporation for Kuwait by Multiple Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    Almedeij, Jaber

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation is an important parameter for many projects related to hydrology and water resources systems. This paper constitutes the first study conducted in Kuwait to obtain empirical relations for the estimation of daily and monthly pan evaporation as functions of available meteorological data of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The data used here for the modeling are daily measurements of substantial continuity coverage, within a period of 17 years between January 1993 and December 2009, which can be considered representative of the desert climate of the urban zone of the country. Multiple linear regression technique is used with a procedure of variable selection for fitting the best model forms. The correlations of evaporation with temperature and relative humidity are also transformed in order to linearize the existing curvilinear patterns of the data by using power and exponential functions, respectively. The evaporation models suggested with the best variable combinations were shown to produce results that are in a reasonable agreement with observation values. PMID:23226984

  2. Evaporation variability under climate warming in five reanalyses and its association with pan evaporation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tao; Feng, Taichen; Feng, Guolin

    2015-08-01

    With the motivation to identify actual evapotranspiration (AE) variability under climate warming over China, an assessment is made from five sets of reanalysis data sets [National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR), NCEP-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE), Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), Interim Reanalysis, and Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55)]. Based on comparison with AE estimates calculated using the Budyko equation, all five reanalysis data sets reasonably reproduce the spatial patterns of AE over China, with a clearly southeast-northwest gradient. Overall, JRA-55 (NCEP-DOE) gives the lowest (highest) reanalysis evaporation (RE) values. From 1979 to 2013, dominant modes of RE among five reanalyses are extracted using multivariate empirical orthogonal function analysis. Accordingly, the interdecadal variation of RE is likely driven by the change of temperature, and the interannual variation is constrained by the water supply conditions. Under climate warming, RE increase in the Northwest China, Yangtze-Huaihe river basin, and South China, while they decrease in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and northern and Northeast China. Moreover, the relationship between RE and pan evaporation (PE) are comprehensively evaluated in space-time. Negative correlations are generally confirmed in nonhumid environments, while positive correlations exist in the humid regions. Our analysis supports the interpretation that the relationship between PE and AE was complementary with water control and proportional with energy control. In view of data availability, important differences in spatial variability and the amount of RE can be found in Northwest China, the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and the Yangtze River Basin. Generally speaking, NCEP-NCAR and MERRA have substantial problems on describing the long-term change of RE; however, there are some inaccuracies in the JRA-55 estimates when focusing on the year-to-year variation.

  3. Temporal and spatial characteristics of pan evaporation trends and their attribution to meteorological drivers in the Three-River Source Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Qingming; Zhao, Yong; Li, Haihong; Zhai, Jiaqi; Shang, Yizi

    2015-07-01

    Pan evaporation is an important indicator of atmospheric evaporative demand, and its long-term variation is of much concern in studies of climate change. Based on data from 33 meteorological stations from 1962 to 2012, this work considered the temporal and spatial trends of pan evaporation and the meteorological variables that affect them in the Three-River Source Region (TRSR) of southwestern China. Pan evaporation in the TRSR has decreased significantly since 1988 with an obvious abrupt change from 1993 to 2003. Furthermore, a 27 year period of oscillation has existed over the past 51 years. Pan evaporation reflects the combined effects of four meteorological variables: net radiation (Rn), wind speed (u2), actual vapor pressure (ea), and air temperature (Ta). Based on this research, a number of conclusions were drawn. (1) The pace of climate change increased after 1980 and pan evaporation decreased at a rate of -13.3 mm/a2 from 1980 to 2012, which is much faster than the rate of -1.2 mm/a2 from 1962 to 1979. (2) For the decrease of pan evaporation from 1980 to 2012, the quantifying contributions of Rn, u2, ea, and Ta were -8.7, -6.4, -1.8, and +3.6 mm/a2, respectively. Thus, it was established for the TRSR that "global dimming" was the main reason, and "wind stilling" was a close second to global dimming for the decrease in pan evaporation. (3) Different regions of the TRSR are affected differently by the effects of the meteorological variables. Low-elevation regions in the TRSR are more susceptible to the effects of net radiation and wind speed, whereas high-elevation regions are affected more by actual vapor pressure and air temperature.

  4. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  5. Long-Term Trends of Pan Evaporation and an Analysis of Its Causes in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroizumi, T.; Ito, N.; Koskiaho, J.; Tattari, S.

    2014-12-01

    The recent global warming affects the evapotranspiration which is an important factor of hydrologic cycle and water resources management. Many of the previous studies have reported the decreasing trends of pan evaporation in the area of the continental climate of the middle latitude. However, few studies in the region in a high latitude area such as Finland haven't been carried out so far. The purpose of this study is to investigate the long term variations of pan evaporation in Finland located in high latitude using a trend analysis. The causes of the trends of pan evaporation were discussed from two points of view: a complementary relationship and Penman's equation (1948). The results were summarized as follows: (1) The variations of pan evaporation showed decreasing trends at 5 stations and increasing ones at 2 stations. (2) The mechanistic causes for the decreasing trends at 5 stations were mainly the increases of precipitation and the aerodynamic term in Penman's equation. (3) The mechanistic causes for the increasing trends at 2 stations couldn't be revealed. H. L. Penman. 1948. Natural evaporation from open water, bare soil and grass, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A, Mathematical and Physical Science, 193, 1032, 129-145.

  6. A spatial neural fuzzy network for estimating pan evaporation at ungauged sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C.-H.; Chiang, Y.-M.; Chang, F.-J.

    2011-11-01

    Evaporation is an essential reference to the management of water resources. In this study, a hybrid model that integrates a spatial neural fuzzy network with the kringing method is developed to estimate pan evaporation at ungauged sites. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) can extract the nonlinear relationship of observations, while kriging is an excellent geostatistical interpolator. Three-year daily data collected from nineteen meteorological stations covering the whole of Taiwan are used to train and test the constructed model. The pan evaporation (Epan) at ungauged sites can be obtained through summing up the outputs of the spatially weighted ANFIS and the residuals adjusted by kriging. Results indicate that the proposed AK model (hybriding ANFIS and kriging) can effectively improve the accuracy of Epan estimation as compared with that of empirical formula. This hybrid model demonstrates its reliability in estimating the spatial distribution of Epan and consequently provides precise Epan estimation by taking geographical features into consideration.

  7. A spatial neural fuzzy network for estimating pan evaporation at ungauged sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C.-H.; Chiang, Y.-M.; Chang, F.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation is an essential reference to the management of water resources. In this study, a hybrid model that integrates a spatial neural fuzzy network with the kringing method is developed to estimate pan evaporation at ungauged sites. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) can extract the nonlinear relationship of observations, while kriging is an excellent geostatistical interpolator. Three-year daily data collected from nineteen meteorological stations covering the whole of Taiwan are used to train and test the constructed model. The pan evaporation (Epan) at ungauged sites can be obtained through summing up the outputs of the spatially weighted ANFIS and the residuals adjusted by kriging. Results indicate that the proposed AK model (hybriding ANFIS and kriging) can effectively improve the accuracy of Epan estimation as compared with that of empirical formula. This hybrid model demonstrates its reliability in estimating the spatial distribution of Epan and consequently provides precise Epan estimation by taking geographical features into consideration.

  8. Estimating actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation using standard meteorological data: a pragmatic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, T. A.; Peel, M. C.; Lowe, L.; Srikanthan, R.; McVicar, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    This guide to estimating daily and monthly actual, potential, reference crop and pan evaporation covers topics that are of interest to researchers, consulting hydrologists and practicing engineers. Topics include estimating actual evaporation from deep lakes and from farm dams and for catchment water balance studies, estimating potential evaporation as input to rainfall-runoff models, and reference crop evapotranspiration for small irrigation areas, and for irrigation within large irrigation districts. Inspiration for this guide arose in response to the authors' experiences in reviewing research papers and consulting reports where estimation of the actual evaporation component in catchment and water balance studies was often inadequately handled. Practical guides using consistent terminology that cover both theory and practice are not readily available. Here we provide such a guide, which is divided into three parts. The first part provides background theory and an outline of the conceptual models of potential evaporation of Penman, Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor, as well as discussions of reference crop evapotranspiration and Class-A pan evaporation. The last two sub-sections in this first part include techniques to estimate actual evaporation from (i) open-surface water and (ii) landscapes and catchments (Morton and the advection-aridity models). The second part addresses topics confronting a practicing hydrologist, e.g. estimating actual evaporation for deep lakes, shallow lakes and farm dams, lakes covered with vegetation, catchments, irrigation areas and bare soil. The third part addresses six related issues: (i) automatic (hard wired) calculation of evaporation estimates in commercial weather stations, (ii) evaporation estimates without wind data, (iii) at-site meteorological data, (iv) dealing with evaporation in a climate change environment, (v) 24 h versus day-light hour estimation of meteorological variables, and (vi) uncertainty in evaporation estimates. This paper is supported by a Supplement that includes 21 sections enhancing the material in the text, worked examples of many procedures discussed in the paper, a program listing (Fortran 90) of Morton's WREVAP evaporation models along with tables of monthly Class-A pan coefficients for 68 locations across Australia and other information.

  9. Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Samuel L; Patra, Manas K

    2011-08-12

    Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem. PMID:21902381

  10. Utility of coactive neuro-fuzzy inference system for pan evaporation modeling in comparison with multilayer perceptron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabari, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh Talaee, P.; Abghari, Hirad

    2012-05-01

    Estimation of pan evaporation ( E pan) using black-box models has received a great deal of attention in developing countries where measurements of E pan are spatially and temporally limited. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) and coactive neuro-fuzzy inference system (CANFIS) models were used to predict daily E pan for a semi-arid region of Iran. Six MLP and CANFIS models comprising various combinations of daily meteorological parameters were developed. The performances of the models were tested using correlation coefficient ( r), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and percentage error of estimate (PE). It was found that the MLP6 model with the Momentum learning algorithm and the Tanh activation function, which requires all input parameters, presented the most accurate E pan predictions ( r = 0.97, RMSE = 0.81 mm day-1, MAE = 0.63 mm day-1 and PE = 0.58 %). The results also showed that the most accurate E pan predictions with a CANFIS model can be achieved with the Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy model and the Gaussian membership function. Overall performances revealed that the MLP method was better suited than CANFIS method for modeling the E pan process.

  11. Evaporation rate of emulsion and oil-base emulsion pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of pheromone evaporation rate is critical to distribute pheromone containers effectively in the forest, orchard and field. There are several factors influencing the pheromone evaporation rate that include wind speed, container size and porosity, release area, temperature, humidity, pherom...

  12. Comparison of artificial neural network and empirical equations for daily reference evapotranspiration estimation from pan evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaedi, Abolfazl; Ghabaei S., Mohammad

    2010-05-01

    Evaporation and Evapotranspiration Process are the major components of the hydrologic cycle which play an important role in agricultural studies such as design of irrigation and drainage systems, and irrigation scheduling. Evapotranspiration is a complex non-linear phenomenon which depends on several climatologic factors. It can be measured directly by high-cost micrometeorological techniques. Hence, many mathematical models and empirical equations were developed to estimate this phenomenon. One conventional method to estimate reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) is converting the class A pan evaporation (EPan) into ETo by using a pan coefficient (KPan) according to following this equation. ETo = Kpan * Epan PIC Another alternative method to estimate ETo is the application of mathematical models like artificial neural networks (ANNs). ANNs are mathematical models whose architecture has been inspired by biological neural networks. ANNs are very appropriate for the modeling of nonlinear processes, i.e. the case of ETo.Kpan is the important factor for computation of ETo from Epan, There for several empirical equations purposed to determine KPan, using wind speed, relative humidity and fetch length conditions by many researchers. The main objective of this study was to comparison between ability of ANNs and empirical equations for estimation daily ET0 from Epan. For this object Daily measured weather data for a 16 year (from 1992 to 2007) period were obtained from the Shiraz synoptic station (latitude 29o 36' N, longitude 52o 32' E, elevation 1480 m) that located in Fars province of Iran. The climate in the study area is semi-arid with an average annual rainfall of 346 mm year-1. In This paper first, we use seven empirical equations: Cuenca (1989), Snyder (1992), Modified Snyder (1992), Doorenbos and Pruitt (1977), Pereira et al. (1995), Orang (1998) and Raghuwanshi and Wallender (1998) for estimation KPan values and second then we use ANNs for converting Epan to estimate ET0 as a function of the wind speed and relative humidity for the mentioned station. The comparisons and performance of both ANN and the conventional method have been based on statistical error techniques, using FAO Penman Monteith method (PM56) daily ETo values as a reference. The PM56 is the standard method for the calibration of other ETo estimation equations when there is no measured lysimeter data. The results show that among the seven approaches Snayder (1992) gave a better performance values (R2=0.45 and RMSE=3.36 mm day-1) and Pereira et al. (1995) gave a poor performance under the case study. ANNs have obtained better results than the seven empirical equations values (R2=0.901 and RMSE=0.96 mm day-1). Keywords: evapotranspiration, pan evaporation, ANN, empirical equations, Shiraz

  13. PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills (and constrained baths) of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, includ...

  14. Evaluation of pan evaporation modeling with two different neural networks and weather station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwon; Singh, Vijay P.; Seo, Youngmin

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluates neural networks models for estimating daily pan evaporation for inland and coastal stations in Republic of Korea. A multilayer perceptron neural networks model (MLP-NNM) and a cascade correlation neural networks model (CCNNM) are developed for local implementation. Five-input models (MLP 5 and CCNNM 5) are generally found to be the best for local implementation. The optimal neural networks models, including MLP 4, MLP 5, CCNNM 4, and CCNNM 5, perform well for homogeneous (cross-stations 1 and 2) and nonhomogeneous (cross-stations 3 and 4) weather stations. Statistical results of CCNNM are better than those of MLP-NNM during the test period for homogeneous and nonhomogeneous weather stations except for MLP 4 being better in BUS-DAE and POH-DAE, and MLP 5 being better in POH-DAE. Applying the conventional models for the test period, it is found that neural networks models perform better than the conventional models for local, homogeneous, and nonhomogeneous weather stations.

  15. Evaporation Rates of Brine on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Chittenden, J.; Moore, S. R.; Meier, A.; Kareev, M.; Farmer, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    While Mars is now largely a dry and barren place, recent data have indicated that water has flowed at specific locations within the last approx. 10(exp 6) y. This had led to a resurgence of interest in theoretical and experimental work aimed at understanding the behavior of water on Mars. There are several means whereby the stability of liquid water on Mars could be increased, one being the presence solutes that would depress the freezing point. Salt water on Earth is about 0.5M NaCl, but laboratory experiments suggest that martian salt water is quite different. We recently began a program of laboratory measurements of the stability of liquid water, ice and ice-dust mixtures under martian conditions and here report measurements of the evaporation rate of 0.25M brine.

  16. [Optimal irrigation index for cotton drip irrigation under film mulching based on the evaporation from pan with constant water level].

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Ji-Yang; Sun, Jing-Sheng; Gao, Yang; Li, Ming-Si; Liu, Hao; Yang, Gui-Sen

    2013-11-01

    A field experiment with two irrigation cycles and two irrigating water quotas at squaring stage and blossoming-boll forming stage was conducted in Urumqi of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, Northwest China in 2008-2009, aimed to explore the high-efficient irrigation index of cotton drip irrigation under film mulching. The effects of different water treatments on the seed yield, water consumption, and water use efficiency (WUE) of cotton were analyzed. In all treatments, there was a high correlation between the cotton water use and the evaporation from pan installed above the plant canopy. In high-yield cotton field (including the treatment T4 which had 10 days and 7 days of irrigation cycle with 30.0 mm and 37.5 mm of irrigating water quota at squaring stage and blossoming-boll forming stage, respectively in 2008, and the treatment T1 having 7 days of irrigation cycle with 22.5 mm and 37.5 mm of irrigating water quota at squaring stage and blossoming-boll forming stage, respectively in 2009), the pan-crop coefficient (Kp) at seedling stage, squaring stage, blossoming-boll forming stage, and boll opening stage was 0.29-0.30, 0.52-0.53, 0.74-0.88, and 0.19-0.20, respectively. As compared with the other treatments, T4 had the highest seed cotton yield (5060 kg x hm(-2)) and the highest WUE (1.00 kg x m(-3)) in 2008, whereas T1 had the highest seed cotton yield (4467 kg x hm(-2)) and the highest WUE (0.99 kg x m(-3)) in 2009. The averaged cumulative pan evaporation in 7 days and 10 days at squaring stage was 40-50 mm and 60-70 mm, respectively, and that in 7 days at blossoming-boll forming stage was 40-50 mm. It was suggested that in Xinjiang cotton area, irrigating 45 mm water for seedling emergence, no irrigation both at seedling stage and at boll opening stage, and irrigation was started when the pan evaporation reached 45-65 mm and 45 mm at squaring stage and blossoming-boll stage, respectively, the irrigating water quota could be determined by multiplying cumulative pan evaporation with Kp (the Ko was taken as 0.5, 0.75, 0.85, and 0.75 at squaring stage, early blossoming, full-blossoming, and late blossoming stage, respectively), which could be the high efficient irrigation index to obtain high yield and WUE in drip irrigation cotton field and to save irrigation water resources. PMID:24564144

  17. Evaporation rate and vapor pressure of selected polymeric lubricating oils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    A recently developed ultrahigh-vacuum quartz spring mass sorption microbalance has been utilized to measure the evaporation rates of several low-volatility polymeric lubricating oils at various temperatures. The evaporation rates are used to calculate the vapor pressures by the Langmuir equation. A method is presented to accurately estimate extended temperature range evaporation rate and vapor pressure data for polymeric oils, incorporating appropriate corrections for the increases in molecular weight and the change in volatility of the progressively evaporating polymer fractions. The logarithms of the calculated data appear to follow linear relationships within the test temperature ranges, when plotted versus 1000/T. These functions and the observed effusion characteristics of the fluids on progressive volatilization are useful in estimating evaporation rate and vapor pressure changes on evaporative depletion.

  18. Instructions for measuring the rate of evaporation from water surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1898-01-01

    The ·rate of evaporation from water surfaces varies with the temperature of the water, the velocity of the wind at the water surface, and the dryness of the air. Consequently, the rate of evaporation from rivers, lakes, canals, or reservoirs varies widely in different localities and for the same locality in different seasons.

  19. Utility of Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor, reference evapotranspiration, and pan evaporation methods to estimate pasture evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Jacobs, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was measured at 30-min resolution over a 19-month period (September 28, 2000-April 23, 2002) from a nonirrigated pasture site in Florida, USA, using eddy correlation methods. The relative magnitude of measured ETa (about 66% of long-term annual precipitation at the study site) indicates the importance of accurate ET a estimates for water resources planning. The time and cost associated with direct measurements of ETa and the rarity of historical measurements of ETa make the use of methods relying on more easily obtainable data desirable. Several such methods (Penman-Monteith (PM), modified Priestley-Taylor (PT), reference evapotranspiration (ET 0), and pan evaporation (Ep)) were related to measured ETa using regression methods to estimate PM bulk surface conductance, PT ??, ET0 vegetation coefficient, and Ep pan coefficient. The PT method, where the PT ?? is a function of green-leaf area index (LAI) and solar radiation, provided the best relation with ET a (standard error (SE) for daily ETa of 0.11 mm). The PM method, in which the bulk surface conductance was a function of net radiation and vapor-pressure deficit, was slightly less effective (SE=0.15 mm) than the PT method. Vegetation coefficients for the ET0 method (SE=0.29 mm) were found to be a simple function of LAI. Pan coefficients for the Ep method (SE=0.40 mm) were found to be a function of LAI and Ep. Historical or future meteorological, LAI, and pan evaporation data from the study site could be used, along with the relations developed within this study, to provide estimates of ETa in the absence of direct measurements of ETa. Additionally, relations among PM, PT, and ET0 methods and ETa can provide estimates of ETa in other, environmentally similar, pasture settings for which meteorological and LAI data can be obtained or estimated. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting evaporation rates and times for spills of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L

    2001-08-01

    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills and constrained baths of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, including liquid-phase non-idealities as expressed through the UNIFAC method for activity coefficients. A group-contribution method is also used to estimate vapor-phase diffusion coefficients, which makes the method completely predictive. The predictions are estimates that require professional judgement in their application. One application that the evaporation time calculations suggest is a method for labeling chemical containers that allows one to quickly assess the time for complete evaporation of spills of both pure components and mixtures. The labeling would take the form of an evaporation time that depends on the local environment. For instance, evaporation time depends on indoor or outdoor conditions and the amount of each chemical among other parameters. This labeling would provide rapid information and an opportunity to premeditate a response before a spill occurs. PMID:11513793

  1. Simulation of temporal and spatial distribution of required irrigation water by crop models and the pan evaporation coefficient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan-min; Yang, Yonghui; Han, Shu-min; Hu, Yu-kun

    2009-07-01

    Hebei Plain is the most important agricultural belt in North China. Intensive irrigation, low and uneven precipitation have led to severe water shortage on the plain. This study is an attempt to resolve this crucial issue of water shortage for sustainable agricultural production and water resources management. The paper models distributed regional irrigation requirement for a range of cultivated crops on the plain. Classic crop models like DSSAT- wheat/maize and COTTON2K are used in combination with pan-evaporation coefficient method to estimate water requirements for wheat, corn, cotton, fruit-trees and vegetables. The approach is more accurate than the static approach adopted in previous studies. This is because the combination use of crop models and pan-evaporation coefficient method dynamically accounts for irrigation requirement at different growth stages of crops, agronomic practices, and field and climatic conditions. The simulation results show increasing Required Irrigation Amount (RIA) with time. RIA ranges from 5.08×109 m3 to 14.42×109 m3 for the period 1986~2006, with an annual average of 10.6×109 m3. Percent average water use by wheat, fruit trees, vegetable, corn and cotton is 41%, 12%, 12%, 11%, 7% and 17% respectively. RIA for April and May (the period with the highest irrigation water use) is 1.78×109 m3 and 2.41×109 m3 respectively. The counties in the piedmont regions of Mount Taihang have high RIA while the central and eastern regions/counties have low irrigation requirement.

  2. Urban evaporation rates for water-permeable pavements.

    PubMed

    Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

    2010-01-01

    In urban areas the natural water balance is disturbed. Infiltration and evaporation are reduced, resulting in a high surface runoff and a typical city climate, which can lead to floods and damages. Water-permeable pavements have a high infiltration rate that reduces surface runoff by increasing the groundwater recharge. The high water retention capacity of the street body of up to 51 l/m(2) and its connection via pores to the surface lead to higher evaporation rates than impermeable surfaces. A comparison of these two kinds of pavements shows a 16% increase in evaporation levels of water-permeable pavements. Furthermore, the evaporation from impermeable pavements is linked directly to rain events due to fast-drying surfaces. Water-permeable pavements show a more evenly distributed evaporation after a rain event. Cooling effects by evaporative heat loss can improve the city climate even several days after rain events. On a large scale use, uncomfortable weather like sultriness or dry heat can be prevented and the urban water balance can be attenuated towards the natural. PMID:20818060

  3. Rates of collapse and evaporation of globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hut, Piet; Djorgovski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Observational estimates of the dynamical relaxation times of Galactic globular clusters are used here to estimate the present rate at which core collapse and evaporation are occurring in them. A core collapse rate of 2 +/- 1 per Gyr is found, which for a Galactic age of about 12 Gyr agrees well with the fact that 27 clusters have surface brightness profiles with the morphology expected for the postcollapse phase. A destruction and evaporation rate of 5 +/- 3 per Gyr is found, suggesting that a significant fraction of the Galaxy's original complement of globular clusters have perished through the combined effects of mechanisms such as relaxation-driven evaporation and shocking due to interaction with the Galactic disk and bulge.

  4. Ultra-high cooling rate utilizing thin film evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fengmin; Ma, Hongbin; Han, Xu; Chen, Hsiu-hung; Tian, Bohan

    2012-09-01

    This research introduces a cell cryopreservation method, which utilizes thin film evaporation and provides an ultra-high cooling rate. The microstructured surface forming the thin film evaporation was fabricated from copper microparticles with an average diameter of 50 μm. Experimental results showed that a cooling rate of approximately 5×104 °C/min was achieved in a temperature range from 10 °C to -187 °C. The current investigation will give birth to a cell cryopreservation method through vitrification with relatively low concentrations of cryoprotectants.

  5. Calculation of Reactive-evaporation Rates of Chromia

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01

    A methodology is developed to calculate Cr-evaporation rates from Cr2O3 with a flat planar geometry. Variables include temperature, total pressure, gas velocity, and gas composition. The methodology was applied to solid-oxide, fuel cell conditions for metallic interconnects and to advanced-steam turbines conditions. The high velocities and pressures of the advanced steam turbine led to evaporation predictions as high as 5.18 9 10-8 kg/m2/s of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760 °C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.080 mm per year of solid Cr loss. Chromium evaporation is expected to be an important oxidation mechanism with the types of nickel-base alloys proposed for use above 650 °C in advanced-steam boilers and turbines. It is shown that laboratory experiments, with much lower steam velocities and usually much lower total pressure than found in advanced steam turbines, would best reproduce chromium-evaporation behavior with atmospheres that approach either O2 + H2O or air + H2O with 57% H2O.

  6. Correlation of chemical evaporation rate with vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; van Wesenbeeck, Ian

    2014-09-01

    A new one-parameter correlation is developed for the evaporation rate (ER) of chemicals as a function of molar mass (M) and vapor pressure (P) that is simpler than existing correlations. It applies only to liquid surfaces that are unaffected by the underlying solid substrate as occurs in the standard ASTM evaporation rate test and to quiescent liquid pools. The relationship has a sounder theoretical basis than previous correlations because ER is correctly correlated with PM rather than P alone. The inclusion of M increases the slope of previous log ER versus log P regressions to a value close to 1.0 and yields a simpler one-parameter correlation, namely, ER (?g m(-1) h(-1)) = 1464P (Pa) M (g mol(-1)). Applications are discussed for the screening level assessment and ranking of chemicals for evaporation rate, such as pesticides, fumigants, and hydrocarbon carrier fluids used in pesticide formulations, liquid consumer products used indoors, and accidental spills of liquids. The mechanistic significance of the single parameter as a mass-transfer coefficient or velocity is discussed. PMID:25105222

  7. Studying biofuel aerosol evaporation rates with single particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, S.; Miles, R. E. H.; Reid, J. P.; Kiefer, J.; McGloin, D.

    2014-09-01

    The significant increase in the air pollution, and the impact on climate change due to the burning of fossil fuel has led to the research of alternative energies. Bio-ethanol obtained from a variety of feedstocks can provide a feasible solution. Mixing bio-ethanol with gasoline leads to a reduction in CO emission and in NOx emissions compared with the use of gasoline alone. However, adding ethanol leads to a change in the fuel evaporation. Here we present a preliminary investigation of evaporation times of single ethanol-gasoline droplets. In particular, we investigated the different evaporation rate of the droplets depending on the variation in the percentage of ethanol inside them. Two different techniques have been used to trap the droplets. One makes use of a 532nm optical tweezers set up, the other of an electrodynamics balance (EDB). The droplets decreasing size was measured using video analysis and elastic light scattering respectively. In the first case measurements were conducted at 293.15 K and ambient humidity. In the second case at 280.5 K and a controlled environment has been preserved by flowing nitrogen into the chamber. Binary phase droplets with a higher percentage of ethanol resulted in longer droplet lifetimes. Our work also highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each technique for such studies. In particular it is challenging to trap droplets with low ethanol content (such as pure gasoline) by the use of EDB. Conversely such droplets are trivial to trap using optical tweezers.

  8. A comparison of methods for estimating open-water evaporation in small wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; Stannard, David I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared evaporation measurements from a floating pan, land pan, chamber, and the Priestley-Taylor (PT) equation. Floating pan, land pan, and meteorological data were collected from June 6 to July 21, 2005, at a small wetland in the Canadian River alluvium in central Oklahoma, USA. Evaporation measured with the floating pan compared favorably to 12 h chamber measurements. Differences between chamber and floating pan rates ranged from −0.2 to 0.3 mm, mean of 0.1 mm. The difference between chamber and land pan rates ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 mm, mean of 1.5 mm. The mean chamber-to-floating pan ratio was 0.97 and the mean chamber-to-land pan ratio was 0.73. The chamber-to-floating pan ratio of 0.97 indicates the use of a floating pan to measure evaporation in small limited-fetch water bodies is an appropriate and accurate method for the site investigated. One-sided Paired t-Tests indicate daily floating pan rates were significantly less than land pan and PT rates. A two-sided Paired t-Test indicated there was no significant difference between land pan and PT values. The PT equation tends to overestimate evaporation during times when the air is of low drying power and tends to underestimate as drying power increases.

  9. Evaporation rate of graphite liquid marbles: comparison with water droplets.

    PubMed

    Dandan, Merve; Erbil, H Yildirim

    2009-07-21

    Liquid marbles are liquid drops made completely nonwetting by encapsulating the drop with a hydrophobic powder. The absence of contact with the substrate avoids contamination problems and produces high marble displacement velocities. Liquid marbles behave as microreservoirs of liquids able to move without any leakage and are promising candidates to be applied in biomedical and genetic analysis where 2D microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip methods are used. The lifetime of a liquid marble depends on the chemical nature and particle size of the hydrophobic powder as well as the liquid used to form it. There is a need for chemically inert liquid marbles, which can be used over sufficiently long periods for industrial applications. In this work, we successfully synthesized graphite liquid marbles for the first time by encapsulating graphite micropowder on water droplets and determined their evaporation periods and useful lifetimes in constant relative humidity and temperature conditions in a closed chamber. The evaporation rates of graphite liquid marbles were compared with the rates of pure water droplets in the same conditions, and it was found that they had nearly twice the lifetime of pure water droplets. The use of chemically inert graphite particles having electrical conductivity and dry lubrication properties to form a liquid marble may be a starting point for their successful use in microfluidics, genetic analysis, antifouling, wear-free micromachine, electromechanical actuator, and valve applications. PMID:19499944

  10. Pan evaporation modeling using least square support vector machine, multivariate adaptive regression splines and M5 model tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisi, Ozgur

    2015-09-01

    Pan evaporation (Ep) modeling is an important issue in reservoir management, regional water resources planning and evaluation of drinking-water supplies. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the accuracy of least square support vector machine (LSSVM), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) and M5 Model Tree (M5Tree) in modeling Ep. The first part of the study focused on testing the ability of the LSSVM, MARS and M5Tree models in estimating the Ep data of Mersin and Antalya stations located in Mediterranean Region of Turkey by using cross-validation method. The LSSVM models outperformed the MARS and M5Tree models in estimating Ep of Mersin and Antalya stations with local input and output data. The average root mean square error (RMSE) of the M5Tree and MARS models was decreased by 24-32.1% and 10.8-18.9% using LSSVM models for the Mersin and Antalya stations, respectively. The ability of three different methods was examined in estimation of Ep using input air temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind speed data from nearby station in the second part of the study (cross-station application without local input data). The results showed that the MARS models provided better accuracy than the LSSVM and M5Tree models with respect to RMSE, mean absolute error (MAE) and determination coefficient (R2) criteria. The average RMSE accuracy of the LSSVM and M5Tree was increased by 3.7% and 16.5% using MARS. In the case of without local input data, the average RMSE accuracy of the LSSVM and M5Tree was respectively increased by 11.4% and 18.4% using MARS. In the third part of the study, the ability of the applied models was examined in Ep estimation using input and output data of nearby station. The results reported that the MARS models performed better than the other models with respect to RMSE, MAE and R2 criteria. The average RMSE of the LSSVM and M5Tree was respectively decreased by 54% and 3.4% using MARS. The overall results indicated that the LSSVM could be successfully used in estimating Ep by using local input and output data while the MARS model performed better than the LSSVM in the case of without local input and outputs.

  11. Evaporation rates of pasture-mesquite vegetation in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, E. G.; Escobar, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    The semiarid highlands of Queretaro, in central Mexico, are characterized by booming urban and industrial developments with increasing demand for water. Agriculture takes place in the valleys and the surrounding hills have different types of xeric to subtropical rangeland. Hills are unfit for agriculture and usually are managed for cattle production and fuelwood. However, recent studies suggest that some hill areas are important for groundwater recharge and if they are not protected, important water shortages are envisioned. A critical question involves the effects of land management practices on rangeland hydrologic processes. Evaporation (E), which includes plant and soil evaporation is the largest water loss from rangelands and few data are available for central Mexico. The objective of this study was to estimate E from a mesquite (Prosopis sp.) dominated vegetation using the eddy correlation and the Pennman-Monteith models. Measurements were made during 24 summer days of 2004 at a piedmont site at Amascala, Queretaro (1919 m, 20° 41' N, 100° 16' W). Long term annual rainfall is 568 ± 137 mm. Shrub density was 770 plants per hectare and mean height was 1.8 m. The understory was composed by a mixture of annual and perennial grasses but their biomass was negligible. Agroforestry was the current land use of the site. Shrubs were pruned every 2 or 3 years to maintain its height and promote leafty regrowth. Goats usually browsed the mesquite canopy, but during the time of the study they were excluded from the area.The rainy season started on 15 May and measurements initiated on 1 June, five days after a severe hail storm. Although the mesquite canopy had a full developed canopy with leaf area index of 3.2 by this time, they lost approximately 70% of leaf area. May and June rainfall was 146 mm and 46 mm occurred during the measuring period. Throughout the measurement period E was coupled to global radiation and total evaporation was 73.8 mm. On cloudy days E ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 mm d-1, maximum E was 4.3 mm d-1 on sunny days and the average E was 3.1 mm d-1. Average daily E increased during the measuring period at a rate of 0.05 mm d-1 (r2=0.2, p<0.05). Data suggest that evaporation from a pasture-mesquite vegetation is an important component in the water balance considering the limited rainfall occurring.

  12. On the remote measurement of evaporation rates from bare wet soil under variable cloud cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S.

    1976-01-01

    Evaporation rates from a natural wet soil surface are calculated from an energy balance equation at 0.1-hour intervals. A procedure is developed for calculating the heat flux through the soil surface from a harmonic analysis of the surface temperature curve. The evaporation integrated over an entire 24-hour period is compared with daily evaporation rates obtained from published models.

  13. Effect of Concentration on Evaporation Rate for Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in a Falling Film Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Akira; Ide, Tetsuo

    Experiments on evaporation for lithium bromide aqueous solution (0-55 wt% LiBr) were made in Summary a externally heated wetted-wall column under reduced pressures. The evaporation rates of 5 and 8 wt% LiBr-water solutions were similar to those of water. The evaporation rates, however, owered with further increase of the concentration of LiBr, and at low feed rates the evaporation rates lowered with decrease of the feed rate because the temperature of the falling film rose. On the other hand, at high feed rates the evaporation rates lowered with increase of feed rates because the heat transfer coefficients of the falling film decreased. Therefore, a maximum evaporation rate existed and it was supposed that there is the optimum feed rate. The experimental data agreed with the values that were calculated numerically based on the unidirectional model that lithium bromide didn't move through falling film.

  14. Trends in evaporation of a large subtropical lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Wang, Yongwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Piao, Meihua; Xiao, Wei; Lee, Xuhui

    2016-03-01

    How rising temperature and changing solar radiation affect evaporation of natural water bodies remains poor understood. In this study, evaporation from Lake Taihu, a large (area 2400 km2) freshwater lake in the Yangtze River Delta, China, was simulated by the CLM4-LISSS offline lake model and estimated with pan evaporation data. Both methods were calibrated against lake evaporation measured directly with eddy covariance in 2012. Results show a significant increasing trend of annual lake evaporation from 1979 to 2013, at a rate of 29.6 mm decade-1 according to the lake model and 25.4 mm decade-1 according to the pan method. The mean annual evaporation during this period shows good agreement between these two methods (977 mm according to the model and 1007 mm according to the pan method). A stepwise linear regression reveals that downward shortwave radiation was the most significant contributor to the modeled evaporation trend, while air temperature was the most significant contributor to the pan evaporation trend. Wind speed had little impact on the modeled lake evaporation but had a negative contribution to the pan evaporation trend offsetting some of the temperature effect. Reference evaporation was not a good proxy for the lake evaporation because it was on average 20.6 % too high and its increasing trend was too large (56.5 mm decade-1).

  15. Strengthened PAN-based carbon fibers obtained by slow heating rate carbonization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-A; Jang, Dawon; Tejima, Syogo; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Hwan Chul; Lee, Sungho; Endo, Morinobu

    2016-01-01

    Large efforts have been made over the last 40 years to increase the mechanical strength of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CFs) using a variety of chemical or physical protocols. In this paper, we report a new method to increase CFs mechanical strength using a slow heating rate during the carbonization process. This new approach increases both the carbon sp(3) bonding and the number of nitrogen atoms with quaternary bonding in the hexagonal carbon network. Theoretical calculations support a crosslinking model promoted by the interstitial carbon atoms located in the graphitic interlayer spaces. The improvement in mechanical performance by a controlled crosslinking between the carbon hexagonal layers of the PAN based CFs is a new concept that can contribute further in the tailoring of CFs performance based on the understanding of their microstructure down to the atomic scale. PMID:27004752

  16. Strengthened PAN-based carbon fibers obtained by slow heating rate carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-A.; Jang, Dawon; Tejima, Syogo; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Hwan Chul; Lee, Sungho; Endo, Morinobu

    2016-03-01

    Large efforts have been made over the last 40 years to increase the mechanical strength of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CFs) using a variety of chemical or physical protocols. In this paper, we report a new method to increase CFs mechanical strength using a slow heating rate during the carbonization process. This new approach increases both the carbon sp3 bonding and the number of nitrogen atoms with quaternary bonding in the hexagonal carbon network. Theoretical calculations support a crosslinking model promoted by the interstitial carbon atoms located in the graphitic interlayer spaces. The improvement in mechanical performance by a controlled crosslinking between the carbon hexagonal layers of the PAN based CFs is a new concept that can contribute further in the tailoring of CFs performance based on the understanding of their microstructure down to the atomic scale.

  17. Strengthened PAN-based carbon fibers obtained by slow heating rate carbonization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-A; Jang, Dawon; Tejima, Syogo; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Hwan Chul; Lee, Sungho; Endo, Morinobu

    2016-01-01

    Large efforts have been made over the last 40 years to increase the mechanical strength of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CFs) using a variety of chemical or physical protocols. In this paper, we report a new method to increase CFs mechanical strength using a slow heating rate during the carbonization process. This new approach increases both the carbon sp3 bonding and the number of nitrogen atoms with quaternary bonding in the hexagonal carbon network. Theoretical calculations support a crosslinking model promoted by the interstitial carbon atoms located in the graphitic interlayer spaces. The improvement in mechanical performance by a controlled crosslinking between the carbon hexagonal layers of the PAN based CFs is a new concept that can contribute further in the tailoring of CFs performance based on the understanding of their microstructure down to the atomic scale. PMID:27004752

  18. On the effect of marangoni flow on evaporation rates of heated water drops.

    PubMed

    Girard, F; Antoni, M; Sefiane, K

    2008-09-01

    In this letter we show that the Marangoni flow contribution to the evaporation rate of small heated water droplets resting on hot substrates is negligible. We compare data of evaporating droplet experiments with numerical results and assess the effect of Marangoni flow and its contribution to the evaporation process. We demonstrate that heat conduction inside these water droplets is sufficient to give an accurate estimate of evaporation rates. Although convection in evaporating water droplets remains an open problem, our aim in this study is to demonstrate that these effects can be neglected in the investigation of evaporation rate evaluation. It is worth noting that the presented results apply to volatile heated drops which might differ from spontaneously evaporating cases. PMID:18671417

  19. Subjective assessment of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) personality: reliability and stability of trait ratings.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Diane M

    2008-10-01

    A 46-item rating scale was used to obtain personality ratings from 75 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from 7 zoological parks. Factor analysis revealed five personality dimensions similar to those found in previous research on primate personality: Agreeableness, Dominance, Neuroticism, Extraversion and Intellect. There were significant sex and age differences in ratings on these dimensions, with males rated more highly on Dominance and older chimpanzees rated as more agreeable but less extraverted than younger chimpanzees. Interobserver agreement for most individual trait items was high, but tended to be less reliable for trait terms expressing more subtle social or cognitive abilities. Personality ratings for one zoo were found to be largely stable across a 3-year period, but highlighted the effects of environmental factors on the expression of personality in captive chimpanzees. PMID:18668303

  20. Effect of the Heat Flux Density on the Evaporation Rate of a Distilled Water Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Konstantin; Orlova, Evgeniya; Feoktistov, Dmitry

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the experimental dependence of the evaporation rate of a nondeaerated distilled water drop from the heat flux density on the surfaces of non-ferrous metals (copper and brass). A drop was placed on a heated substrate by electronic dosing device. To obtain drop profile we use a shadow optical system; drop symmetry was controlled by a high-speed video camera. It was found that the evaporation rate of a drop on a copper substrate is greater than on a brass. The evaporation rate increases intensively with raising volume of a drop. Calculated values of the heat flux density and the corresponding evaporation rates are presented in this work. The evaporation rate is found to increase intensively on the brass substrate with raising the heat flux density.

  1. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  2. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  3. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  4. Water budgets of Italian and Dutch gravel pit lakes: a study using a fen as a natural evaporation pan, stable isotopes and conservative tracer modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nella Mollema, Pauline; Antonellini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Gravel pits are excavated in aquifers to fulfill the need for construction materials. Flow-through lakes form where the gravel pits are below the water table and fill with groundwater. Their presence changes the drainage patterns, water- and hydrochemical budgets of a watershed. We have studied the water budget of two gravel pit lakes systems using stable H and O isotopes of water as well as conservative tracer (Cl) modeling. The Dutch gravel pit lakes are a fluvial fresh water system of 70 lakes along the Meuse River and the Italian gravel pit lakes are a brackish system along the Adriatic coast. Surface water evaporation from the gravel pit lakes is larger than the actual evapotranspiration of the grass land and forests that were replaced. The ratio of evaporation to total flow into the Dutch lakes was determined by using a Fen as a natural evaporation pan: the isotope content of the Tuspeel Fen, filled with rain water and sampled in a dry and warm summer period (August 2012), is representative for the limiting isotopic enrichment under local hydro meteorological conditions. The Local Evaporation line (LEL) was determined δ2 H = 4.20 δ 18O - 14.10 (R² = 0.99) and the ratio of total inflow to evaporation for three gravel pit lakes were calculated to be 22.6 for the De Lange Vlieter lake used for drinking water production, 11.3 for the Boschmolen Lake and 8.9 for the Anna's Beemd lake showing that groundwater flow is much larger than evaporation. The Italian gravel pit lakes are characterized by high salinity (TDS = 4.6-12.3 g L-1). Stable isotope data show that these latter gravel pit lakes are fed by groundwater, which is a mix between fresh Apennine River water and brackish (Holocene) Adriatic Sea water. The local evaporation line is determined: δ2H = 5.02 δ18O - 10.49. The ratio of total inflow to evaporation is 5. Conservative tracer modeling indicates that the chloride concentration in the Italian gravel pit lakes stabilizes after a short period of rapid increase, because water leaving the lake via groundwater flow, driven by the drainage system, removes part of the Cl that accumulates in the lake due to evapo-concentration. Under climate change, rising sea levels and continuing land subsidence as well as increasing precipitation would increase the need for drainage which would enhance groundwater flow through the lake. The resulting steady-state Cl concentration of the lakes could become less than the current Cl concentration. This effect would be larger than increasing evapo- concentration. Both gravel pit lake systems have a large flux of groundwater into and out of the lakes driven by evaporation and (artificial) drainage with important consequences for the water- and hydrochemical budgets of the whole watershed and in particular on freshwater quantity and groundwater salinity.

  5. Evaporation of Liquid Droplet in Nano and Micro Scales from Statistical Rate Theory.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fei; He, Bin; Wei, Tao

    2015-04-01

    The statistical rate theory (SRT) is applied to predict the average evaporation flux of liquid droplet after the approach is validated in the sessile droplet experiments of the water and heavy water. The steady-state experiments show a temperature discontinuity at the evaporating interface. The average evaporation flux is evaluated by individually changing the measurement at a liquid-vapor interface, including the interfacial liquid temperature, the interfacial vapor temperature, the vapor-phase pressure, and the droplet size. The parameter study shows that a higher temperature jump would reduce the average evaporation flux. The average evaporation flux can significantly be influenced by the interfacial liquid temperature and the vapor-phase pressure. The variation can switch the evaporation into condensation. The evaporation flux is found to remain relative constant if the droplet is larger than a micro scale, while the smaller diameters in nano scale can produce a much higher evaporation flux. In addition, a smaller diameter of droplets with the same liquid volume has a larger surface area. It is suggested that the evaporation rate increases dramatically as the droplet shrinks into nano size. PMID:26353528

  6. Absolute evaporation rates of non-rotating neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montillaud, J.; Joblin, C.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as candidates for evaporating very small grains, which are thought to be precursors of free-flying PAHs. Evaporation rates have been calculated so far only for species containing up to a few 100-C atoms, whereas interstellar PAH clusters could contain up to ~1000 C atoms. Aims: We present a method that generalises the calculation of the statistical evaporation rate of large PAH clusters and provides rates for species containing up to ~1000 C-atoms. Methods: The evaporation of non-rotating neutral homo-molecular PAH clusters containing up to 12 molecules from a family of highly symmetric compact PAHs is studied. Statistical calculations were performed and completed with molecular dynamics simulations at high internal energies to provide absolute values for the evaporation rate and distributions of kinetic energy released. The calculations used explicit atom-atom Lennard-Jones potentials in the rigid molecule approximation. A new method is proposed to take both inter- and intra-molecular vibrations into account. Results: Without any parameter adjustment, the calculated evaporation rates agree well with available experimental data. We find that the non-rotation assumption has a limited impact on the evaporation rates. The photostability of PAH clusters increases dramatically with the size of molecules in the clusters, and to a lesser extent with the number of molecules in the clusters. For values of the UV radiation field that are typical of the regions where evaporating very small grains are observed, the smallest clusters in this study (~50 C-atoms) are found to be quickly photo-evaporated, whereas the largest clusters (~1000 C-atoms) are photostable. Conclusions: Our results support the idea that large PAH clusters are good candidates for evaporating very small grains.

  7. Effects on evaporation rates from different water-permeable pavement designs.

    PubMed

    Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

    2011-01-01

    The urban water balance can be attenuated to the natural by water-permeable pavements (WPPs). Furthermore, WPPs have a 16% higher evaporation rate than impermeable pavements, which can lead to a better urban climate. Evaporation rates from pavements are influenced by the pavement surface and by the deeper layers. By a compared evaporation measurement between different WPP designs, the grain size distribution of the sub-base shows no influence on the evaporation rates in a significant way. On the contrary, a sub-base made of a twin-layer decreases the evaporation by 16% compared to a homogeneous sub-base. By a change in the colour of the paving stone, 19% higher evaporation rates could be achieved. A further comparison shows that the transpiration-effect of the grass in grass pavers increases the evaporation rates more than threefold to pervious concrete pavements. These high evapotranspiration rates can not be achieved with a pervious concrete paving stone. In spite of this, the broad field of application of the pervious concrete paving stone increases the importance in regard to the urban climate. PMID:22049757

  8. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilde, M.; Zardini, A. A.; Hong, J.; Tschiskale, M.; Emanuelsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using thermodynamic modeling. Results are presented and discussed in context of atmospheric gas to particle partitioning.

  9. A model to predict evaporation rates in habitats used by container-dwelling mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Bartlett-Healy, Kristen; Healy, Sean P; Hamilton, George C

    2011-05-01

    Container-dwelling mosquitoes use a wide variety of container habitats. The bottle cap is often cited as the smallest container habitat used by container species. When containers are small, the habitat conditions can greatly affect evaporation rates that in turn can affect the species dynamics within the container. An evaporation rate model was adapted to predict evaporation rates in mosquito container habitats. In both the laboratory and field, our model was able to predict actual evaporation rates. Examples of how the model may be applied are provided by examining the likelihood of Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes aegypti (L.), and Culex pipiens pipiens (L.) completing their development within small-volume containers under typical environmental conditions and a range of temperatures. Our model suggests that under minimal direct sunlight exposure, both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus could develop within a bottle cap before complete evaporation. Our model shows that under the environmental conditions when a plastic field container was sampled, neither Ae. albopictus or Cx. p. pipiens could complete development in that particular container before the water evaporated. Although rainfall could replenish the habitat, the effects of evaporation would increase larval density, which could in turn further decrease developmental rates. PMID:21661337

  10. Atmospheric evaporative demand observations, estimates and driving factors in Spain (1961-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; McVicar, Tim R.; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Revuelto, Jesús; El Kenawy, Ahmed; Martín-Hernández, Natalia; Tomas-Burguera, Miquel

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed the spatio-temporal evolution of evaporation observations from Piché atmometers (1961-2011; 56 stations) and Pan evaporimeters (1984-2011; 21 stations) across Spain, and compared both measurements with evaporation estimates obtained by four physical models: i.e., Food and Agricultural Organization-56 Penman-Monteith, Food and Agricultural Organization-Pan, PenPan and Penman, based on climate data. In this study we observed a positive and statistically significant correlation between Piché and Pan evaporation measurements during the common period (1984-2011; 19 stations), mainly in summer. When evaporation observations and estimates were compared, we detected positive and statistically significant correlations with the four methods, except for winter. Among the four physical models, the FAO-Pan showed the best fitting to both Piché and Pan evaporation measurements; the PenPan model overestimated evaporation rates; and the FAO-Penman-Monteith and Penman methods underestimated evaporation observations. We also observed a better spatial agreement between Pan evaporation and estimates than that obtained by Piché measurements. Annual and seasonal trends of evaporation estimates show a statistically significant increase for 1961-2011, which do not agree with long-term Piché evaporation trends; e.g. a discontinuity was found around the 1980s. Radiative and aerodynamic driving factors suggest that this discontinuity, and the observed evaporation trends across Spain could be associated with the abrupt increase in air temperature observed during last few decades (i.e., global warming). Further investigations using available Piché evaporation observations for other regions are needed to better understand physical components influencing long-term trends of evaporation.

  11. Evaporation Loss of Light Elements as a Function of Cooling Rate: Logarithmic Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Yong-Liang; Hewins, Roger H.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about the evaporation loss of light elements is important to our understanding of chondrule formation processes. The evaporative loss of light elements (such as B and Li) as a function of cooling rate is of special interest because recent investigations of the distribution of Li, Be and B in meteoritic chondrules have revealed that Li varies by 25 times, and B and Be varies by about 10 times. Therefore, if we can extrapolate and interpolate with confidence the evaporation loss of B and Li (and other light elements such as K, Na) at a wide range of cooling rates of interest based upon limited experimental data, we would be able to assess the full range of scenarios relating to chondrule formation processes. Here, we propose that evaporation loss of light elements as a function of cooling rate should obey the logarithmic law.

  12. Modeling the evaporation rate of cesium off tungsten based controlled porosity dispenser photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Jensen, K. L.

    2013-04-01

    The evaporation of cesium from a tungsten surface is modeled using an effective one-dimensional potential well representation of the binding energy. The model accounts for both local and global interactions of cesium with the surface metal as well as with other cesium atoms. The theory is compared with the data of Taylor and Langmuir [Phys. Rev. 44, 423 (1933), 10.1103/PhysRev.44.423] comparing evaporation rates to sub-monolayer surface coverage of cesium, gives good agreement, and reproduces the nonlinear behavior of evaporation with varying coverage and temperature.

  13. Reservoir evaporation in central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, N.E.; Ruddy, B.C.

    1983-01-01

    Evaporation losses from seven reservoirs operated by the Denver Water Department in central Colorado were determined during various periods from 1974 to 1980. The reservoirs studies were Ralston, Cheesman, Antero, Williams Fork, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross. Energy-budget and mass-transfer methods were used to determine evaporation. Class-A pan data also were collected at each reservoir. The energy-budget method was the most accurate of the methods used to determine evaporation. At Ralston, Cheesman, Antero, and Williams Fork Reservoirs the energy-budget method was used to calibrate the mass-transfer coefficients. Calibrated coefficients already were available for Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross Reservoirs. Using the calibrated coefficients, long-term mass-transfer evaporation rates were determined. Annual evaporation values were not determined because the instrumentation was not operated for the entire open-water season. Class-A pan data were used to determine pan coefficients for each season at each reservoir. The coefficients varied from season to season and between reservoirs, and the seasonal values ranged from 0.29 to 1.05. (USGS)

  14. Surface composition and barium evaporation rate of ``pedigreed'' impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes during accelerated life testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomich, D. H.; Mescher, J. A.; Grant, J. T.

    1987-03-01

    A study has been made of the surface composition and barium evaporation rate of "pedigreed" impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes. The effect of air exposure on coated cathodes was examined and was found to have no significant effect on barium evaporation rate although in some cases longer reactivation times were required. No changes in surface topography were apparent following air exposure and reactivation. Life testing was done at 100°C above the typical operating temperature for the cathode, where the typical operating temperature was taken to be 950°C for coated cathodes and 1050°C for uncoated cathodes. The cathodes were examined at different stages of life testing, up to 1200 h. Significant decreases in barium evaporation rates were found after as few as 500 h of life testing. After 1000 h the evaporation rate had decreased more than an order of magnitude. Changes in surface composition were also found. The effects of tungsten particle size, used in manufacture of the billet, on barium evaporation rate were also studied but no correlation was found.

  15. The evaporative requirement for heat balance determines whole-body sweat rate during exercise under conditions permitting full evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-01-01

    Although the requirements for heat dissipation during exercise are determined by the necessity for heat balance, few studies have considered them when examining sweat production and its potential modulators. Rather, the majority of studies have used an experimental protocol based on a fixed percentage of maximum oxygen uptake (%). Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the independent contribution of the evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) and % to whole-body sweat rate (WBSR) during exercise. We hypothesised that WBSR would be determined by Ereq and not by %. A total of 23 males performed two separate experiments during which they exercised for 90 min at different rates of metabolic heat production (200, 350, 500 W) at a fixed air temperature (30°C, n= 8), or at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (290 W) at different air temperatures (30, 35, 40°C, n= 15 and 45°C, n= 7). Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured by direct calorimetry and used to calculate absolute WBSR in grams per minute. The conditions employed resulted in a wide range of Ereq (131–487 W) and % (15–55%). The individual variation in non-steady-state (0–30 min) and steady-state (30–90 min) WBSR correlated significantly with Ereq (P < 0.001). In contrast, % correlated negatively with the residual variation in WBSR not explained by Ereq, and marginally increased (∼2%) the amount of total variability in WBSR described by Ereq alone (non-steady state: R2= 0.885; steady state: R2= 0.930). These data provide clear evidence that absolute WBSR during exercise is determined by Ereq, not by %. Future studies should therefore use an experimental protocol which ensures a fixed Ereq when examining absolute WBSR between individuals, irrespective of potential differences in relative exercise intensity. PMID:23459754

  16. The influence of droplet evaporation on fuel-air mixing rate in a burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komiyama, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Heywood, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments involving combustion of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels in a simple atmospheric pressure burner were used to evaluate the role of droplet evaporation in the fuel/air mixing process in liquid fuel spray flames. Both air-assist atomization and pressure atomization processes were studied; fuel/air mixing rates were determined on the basis of cross-section average oxygen concentrations for stoichiometric overall operation. In general, it is concluded that droplets act as point sources of fuel vapor until evaporation, when the fuel jet length scale may become important in determining nonuniformities of the fuel vapor concentration. In addition, air-assist atomizers are found to have short droplet evaporation times with respect to the duration of the fuel/air mixing process, while for the pressure jet atomizer the characteristic evaporation and mixing times are similar.

  17. A generalized complementary relationship between actual and potential evaporation defined by a reference surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    The definition of potential evaporation remains widely debated despite its centrality for hydrologic and climatic models. We employed an analytical pore-scale representation of evaporation from terrestrial surfaces to define potential evaporation using a hypothetical steady state reference temperature that is common to both air and evaporating surface. The feedback between drying land surfaces and overlaying air properties, central in the Bouchet (1963) complementary relationship, is implicitly incorporated in the hypothetical steady state where the sensible heat flux vanishes and the available energy is consumed by evaporation. Evaporation rates predicted based on the steady state reference temperature hypothesis were in good agreement with class A pan evaporation measurements suggesting that evaporation from pans occurs with negligible sensible heat flux. The model facilitates a new generalization of the asymmetric complementary relationship with the asymmetry parameter b analytically predicted for a wide range of meteorological conditions with initial tests yielding good agreement between measured and predicted actual evaporation.

  18. Morphological Evolution of Gyroid-Forming Block Copolymer Thin Films with Varying Solvent Evaporation Rate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lo, Ting-Ya; She, Ming-Shiuan; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we aim to examine the morphological evolution of block copolymer (BCP) nanostructured thin films through solvent evaporation at different rates for solvent swollen polystyrene-block-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA). Interesting phase transitions from disorder to perpendicular cylinder and then gyroid can be found while using a partially selective solvent for PS to swell PS-PLLA thin film followed by solvent evaporation. During the transitions, gyroid-forming BCP thin film with characteristic crystallographic planes of (111)G, (110)G, and (211)G parallel to air surface can be observed, and will gradually transform into coexisting (110)G and (211)G planes, and finally transforms to (211)G plane due to the preferential segregation of constituted block to the surface (i.e., the thermodynamic origin for self-assembly) that affects the relative amount of each component at the air surface. With the decrease on the evaporation rate, the disorder phase will transform to parallel cylinder and then directly to (211)G without transition to perpendicular cylinder phase. Most importantly, the morphological evolution of PS-PLLA thin films is strongly dependent upon the solvent removal rate only in the initial stage of the evaporation process due to the anisotropy of cylinder structure. Once the morphology is transformed back to the isotropic gyroid structure after long evaporation, the morphological evolution will only relate to the variation of the surface composition. Similar phase transitions at the substrate can also be obtained by controlling the ratio of PLLA-OH to PS-OH homopolymers to functionalize the substrate. As a result, the fabrication of well-defined nanostructured thin films with controlled orientation can be achieved by simple swelling and deswelling with controlled evaporation rate. PMID:26151809

  19. Peter Pan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storr, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Offers a contemporary view of J. M. Barrie's life and his classic story, "Peter Pan." Suggests that "Peter Pan" does not really speak for today's children and that the time for Peter Pan's retirement has come. (PRA)

  20. PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-0988 Smith*, R.L. Predicting Evaporation Rates and Times for Spills of Chemical Mixtures. The Annals of Occupational Hygiene (Ogden, T. (Ed.), Elsevier) 45 (6):437-445 (2001). EPA/600/J-00/125. 03/16/2000 Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for p...

  1. EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON EVAPORATIVE HEAT LOSS IN THE MICROWAVE-EXPOSED MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male CBA/J mice were administered heat loads of 0-28 J. per g at specific absorption rates (SARs) of either 47 or 93 W. per kg by exposure to 2,450-MHz microwave radiation at an ambient temperature of 30 C while evaporative heat loss (EHL) was continuously monitored with dew-poin...

  2. Estimating steady-state evaporation rates from bare soils under conditions of high water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; Rubin, J.; Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure that combines meteorological and soil equations of water transfer makes it possible to estimate approximately the steady-state evaporation from bare soils under conditions of high water table. Field data required include soil-water retention curves, water table depth and a record of air temperature, air humidity and wind velocity at one elevation. The procedure takes into account the relevant atmospheric factors and the soil's capability to conduct 'water in liquid and vapor forms. It neglects the effects of thermal transfer (except in the vapor case) and of salt accumulation. Homogeneous as well as layered soils can be treated. Results obtained with the method demonstrate how the soil evaporation rates·depend on potential evaporation, water table depth, vapor transfer and certain soil parameters.

  3. The effect of ambient pressure on the evaporation rate of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Russell, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    A simple expression is obtained using a diffusion model for the effect of ambient pressure on the outgassing or evaporation rate of materials. The correctness of the expression is demonstrated by comparing the estimates from this expression with actual weight loss measurements. It is shown that the rate of mass loss is governed by the ratio of mean free path to the characteristic dimension of the surface in question.

  4. Evaporation Rates for Liquid Water and Ice Under Current Martian Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Moore, S. R.; Meier, A.; Chittenden, J.; Kareev, M.; Farmer, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    A number of studies have been concerned with the evaporation rates under martian conditions in order to place limits on the possible survival time of both liquid water and ice exposed on the surface of Mars. Such studies also aid in assessing the efficacy of an overlying layer of dust or loose regolith material in providing a barrier to free evaporation and thus prolong the lifetime of water in locations where its availability to putative living organisms would be significant. A better quantitative understanding of the effects of phase changes of water in the near surface environment would also aid the evaluation of the possible role of water in the formation of currently observed features, such as gullies in cliff walls and relatively short-term changes in the albedo of small surface areas ('dark stains'). Laboratory measurements aimed at refinement of our knowledge of these values are described here. The establishment of accurate values for evaporation rates and their dependence on the physical conditions of temperature, pressure and energy input, is an important benchmark for the further investigation of the efficacy of barriers to free evaporation in providing a prolonged period of survival of the water, particularly as a liquid.

  5. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius comparable with that of the cylinder. It is found that the losses are less than 5 percent. It is concluded that such losses are, in general, very small (less than 1 percent) in the case of smaller obstacles (of icing-rate measurement- cylinder size); the motional dynamics are such, however, that exceptions will occur by reason of failure of very small droplets (moving along stagnation lines) to impinge upon obstacle surfaces. In such cases, the droplets will evaporate completely.

  6. Mechanical tuning of the evaporation rate of liquid on crossed fibers.

    PubMed

    Boulogne, Franois; Sauret, Alban; Soh, Beatrice; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2015-03-17

    We investigate experimentally the drying of a small volume of perfectly wetting liquid on two crossed fibers. We characterize the drying dynamics for the three liquid morphologies that are encountered in this geometry: drop, column, and a mixed morphology, in which a drop and a column coexist. For each morphology, we rationalize our findings with theoretical models that capture the drying kinetics. We find that the evaporation rate significantly depends upon the liquid morphology and that the drying of the liquid column is faster than the evaporation of the drop and the mixed morphology for a given liquid volume. Finally, we illustrate that shearing a network of fibers reduces the angle between them, changes the morphology toward the column state, and therefore, enhances the drying rate of a volatile liquid deposited on it. PMID:25716158

  7. Friction, Wear, and Evaporation Rates of Various Materials in Vacuum to 10(exp -7) mm Hg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max; Johnson, Robert L.

    1961-01-01

    The requirements for bearings and seals to operate in the environment of space dictate a new area for lubrication research. The low ambient pressures encountered in space can be expected to influence the behavior of oil, grease, and solid-film lubricants. The property of these materials most significantly affected by low ambient pressures is the evaporation rate. Various investigators have therefore measured the evaporation rates of oils and greases in vacuum as one method of establishing their relative merit for space applications (1-3). The results of this work have given some indication as to the oils and greases with the greatest stability at reduced ambient pressures. Only limited experimental work, however, has been reported in the literature for inorganic solids and soft metals which have potential use as solid lubricant films or coatings for hard alloy substrates [e.g. Reference ( 4 )]. In general, the evaporation rates of these materials would be lower than those of oils and greases. These films might therefore be very attractive as lubricants for high vacuum service.

  8. Effects Of Evaporation Rate of Some Common Organic Contaminants on Hydraulic Conductivity of Aquifer Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saud, Q. J.; Hasan, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    As part of a larger study to investigate potential effects of hydrocarbons on the geotechnical properties of aquifer solids, a series of laboratory experiments were carried out to ascertain the influence of evaporation rate of some common and widespread organic contaminants on the hydraulic conductivity of aquifer sand. Gasoline and its constituent chemicals-benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), isooctane- and trichloroethylene (TCE) were used to contaminate sand samples collected from the aquifer and vadose zone, at varying concentrations for extended periods of time. The goal was to study any change in the chemical makeup of the contaminants and its control on hydraulic conductivity of the sand. It was found that: (a) gasoline breaks down into constituent compounds when subjected to evaporation, e.g. during oil spills and leaks; and (b) lighter compounds volatilize faster and in the following order: TCE> benzene > isooctane > toluene > gasoline> ethylbenzene > xylene. In addition, these contaminants also caused a decrease in hydraulic conductivity of sand by up to 60% as compared to the uncontaminated sand. The inherent differences in the chemical structure of contaminating chemicals influenced hydraulic conductivity such that the observed decrease was greater for aliphatic than aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The presentation includes details of the experimental set up; evaporation rate, and geotechnical tests; X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope studies; and data analyses and interpretation. Rate of evaporation test indicates that residual LNAPLs will occupy a certain portion of the pores in the soil either as liquid or vapor phase in the vadose zone, and will create a coating on the adjacent solid mineral grains in the aquifer. Replacement of air by the LNAPLs along with grain coatings and the intramolecular forces would impede groundwater movement, thus affecting overall permeability of contaminated aquifers. Keywords: aquifer sand, hydraulic conductivity, BTEX, gasoline, LNAPLs, isooctane

  9. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  10. Does metabolic rate and evaporative water loss reflect differences in migratory strategy in sexually dimorphic hoverflies?

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Sean; Menz, Myles H M

    2015-12-01

    A typical explanation for ecologically stable strategies that apply to only a proportion of a population, is bet hedging, where increased reproductive success offsets reduced reproductive rate. One such is partial migration, where only a proportion of a population moves seasonally to avoid inclement climatic conditions. Bet hedging may overlook unseen costs to maintain broad physiological resilience, implied by encountering a breadth of environmental conditions. We investigated the physiological correlates of partial migration by measuring standard metabolic rates, and rates of evaporative water loss, and then estimating upper and lower thermal tolerance in males and females of two hoverfly species, Episyrphus balteatus and Eristalis tenax. In central Europe, females of these species may either migrate or overwinter, whereas males may migrate south to the Mediterranean, but have not been found overwintering. Both species were sexually dimorphic; female Ep. balteatus were lighter than males, but female Er. tenax were heavier than males. While allometrically- corrected metabolic rate in both species increased with temperature, the most parsimonious models included no sex-specific differences in metabolic rate for either species. Evaporative water loss of both species also increased with temperature, but was higher for females of both species than males. Assuming that resting metabolism is congruent with the activity requirements of migration, highly consistent thermal tolerance and metabolic rate suggests that any given fly could migrate, although water loss patterns suggest that females may be less well-adapted to Mediterranean climates. We infer that partial migration probably results from the imperatives of their reproductive strategies. PMID:26384457

  11. In situ measurement and dynamic control of the evaporation rate in vapor diffusion crystallization of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zhan-Yong; Gong, Hai-Yun; Bi, Ru-Chang

    1998-08-01

    A special device with a weight-sensitive facility was designed for monitoring and controlling the water evaporation in vapor diffusion protein crystallization. The device made it possible to measure the weight of the drop in real time while the crystallization experiment was going on normally. The precise water equilibration curves under different crystallization conditions could be obtained automatically. By monitoring and controlling the evaporation rate, the crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme and trichosanthin, a plant protein from Chinese herb, was optimized by regulating the reservoir solution dynamically. The experimental results of these two proteins indicate both the feasibility of the device and the usefulness of dynamic control technique. Compared with traditional crystallization experiments, dynamically controlled crystallization can reduce the number of nuclei, increase the crystal size and save experimental time effectively.

  12. Vapor pressure and evaporation rate of certain heat-resistant compounds in a vacuum at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolgar, A. S.; Verkhoglyadova, T. S.; Samsonov, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure and evaporation rate of borides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome; and of strontium and carbides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome, molybdenum silicide; and nitrides of titanium, niobium, and tantalum in a vacuum were studied. It is concluded that all subject compounds evaporate by molecular structures except AlB sub 12' which dissociates, losing the aluminum.

  13. Controlling Dopant Profiles in Hyperdoped Silicon by Modifying Dopant Evaporation Rates During Pulsed Laser Melting

    SciTech Connect

    Recht, D.; Sullivan, J. T.; Reedy, R.; Buonassisi, T.; Aziz, M. J.

    2012-03-12

    We describe a method to control the sub-surface dopant profile in 'hyperdoped' silicon fabricated by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting. Dipping silicon ion implanted with sulfur into hydrofluoric acid prior to nanosecond pulsed laser melting leads to a tenfold increase in the rate of sulfur evaporation from the surface of the melt. This results in an 80% reduction of the near-surface dopant concentration, effectively embedding the hyperdoped region in a layer up to 180 nm beneath the surface. This method should facilitate the development of blocked impurity band devices.

  14. Hypotheses of calculation of the water flow rate evaporated in a wet cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Bourillot, C.

    1983-08-01

    The method developed by Poppe at the University of Hannover to calculate the thermal performance of a wet cooling tower fill is presented. The formulation of Poppe is then validated using full-scale test data from a wet cooling tower at the power station at Neurath, Federal Republic of Germany. It is shown that the Poppe method predicts the evaporated water flow rate almost perfectly and the condensate content of the warm air with good accuracy over a wide range of ambient conditions. The simplifying assumptions of the Merkel theory are discussed, and the errors linked to these assumptions are systematically described, then illustrated with the test data.

  15. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 {times} 10{sup 5}pc{sup {minus}3}yr{sup {minus}1} at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  16. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 [times] 10[sup 5]pc[sup [minus]3]yr[sup [minus]1] at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  17. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  18. Experimental Study of the Thermophoretic Force and Evaporation Rates for Single Microparticles in Knudsen Regime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanguang

    Elastic and inelastic light scattering techniques were used to explore the processes of Knudsen evaporation, thermophoresis and gas/droplet reaction related to single microparticles. The reaction between single titanium ethoxide (TTE) droplets with water vapor was investigated. It was found that the fast surface reaction led to the formation of a coated microsphere consisting of a TiO_2 shell and an unreacted core. The thermophoretic force was measured over a wide range of Knudsen number (Kn = lambda/a) for dioctyl phthalate (DOP) droplets and microspheres of polystyrene latex (PSL), glass and nickel in air, helium and carbon dioxide. The data in the transition regime were used to examine existing theories for the thermophoretic force. It was found that the numerical solutions of Loyalka (1992) and the theory of Brock (1962) are in good agreement with measurements in air and carbon dioxide. The results in helium were found to be somewhat higher than most theoretical solutions for monatomic gasses. The effects of the thermal properties of the gases and particles on the thermophoretic force were also investigated. It was found that the force strongly depends on the thermal conductivity of gas and weakly on the thermal conductivity of particle. The effects of surface charge on force were studied in this research for the first time. Negatively -charged particles receive a larger force than those positively -charged. Knudsen evaporation measurements were made for single dioctyl phthalate droplets in air in the temperature regime 263-302 K. The evaporation rates near room temperature (297.7K) were used to evaluate the theories of Loyalka et al. (1989), Fuchs and Sutugin (1970) and Sitarski and Nowakowski (1979). The agreement between the measurements and the solutions of Loyalka et al. (1989) and Fuchs and Sutugin (1970) was good for all values of Kn, but the solution of Sitarski and Nowakowski (1979) did not agree with the experiments at large Kn.

  19. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carramiñana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ∼5.0 × 1014 g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV-TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  20. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; et al

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 × 10¹⁴ g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV – TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 tomore » 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.« less

  1. Estimation of barium evaporation rate from emission measurement of dispenser cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, M.; Bhat, K. S.

    2003-06-01

    Dispenser cathodes of type M (Os-Ru coated) have been fabricated in the laboratory and tested for their emission characteristics in a sealed glass bulb in a closely spaced diode configuration. It is observed that the pulsed emission current in the temperature limited region decreased with time during the first few hours of operation and later stabilized at a constant value. This initial fall of emission current is attributed to the back bombardment of barium atoms from the anode resulting in an increase in the effective work function of the cathode surface. The decrease in emission current with time was found to follow a t1/2 relation. It was also observed that when the anode was baked at about 800 °C B for a few minutes the original emission current was restored, thus suggesting that the barium evaporated on the anode was responsible for such a behavior. A theoretical model has been suggested for estimation of barium evaporation rate from the above time dependent emission phenomenon observed.

  2. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carraminana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De Len, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Daz-Vlez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; Gonzlez, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. Leon; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martnez-Castro, J.; J. A.J. Matthews; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafa, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Perez-Perez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Riviere, C.; Rosa-Gonzalez, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villasenor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 10? g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  3. Milagro Limits and HAWC Sensitivity for the Rate-Density of Evaporating Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B.T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Hays, E.

    2014-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of approximately 5.0 x 10 (sup 14) grams should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the gigaelectronvolt - teraelectronvolt energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90 percent duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 teraelectronvolt gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  4. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carraminana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. Leon; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; J. A.J. Matthews; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafa, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Perez-Perez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Riviere, C.; Rosa-Gonzalez, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villasenor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 × 10¹⁴ g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV – TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  5. Simulation of lake ice and its effect on the late-Pleistocene evaporation rate of Lake Lahontan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    A model of lake ice was coupled with a model of lake temperature and evaporation to assess the possible effect of ice cover on the late-Pleistocene evaporation rate of Lake Lahontan. The simulations were done using a data set based on proxy temperature indicators and features of the simulated late-Pleistocene atmospheric circulation over western North America. When a data set based on a mean-annual air temperature of 3?? C (7?? C colder than present) and reduced solar radiation from jet-stream induced cloud cover was used as input to the model, ice cover lasting ??? 4 months was simulated. Simulated evaporation rates (490-527 mm a-1) were ??? 60% lower than the present-day evaporation rate (1300 mm a-1) of Pyramid Lake. With this reduced rate of evaporation, water inputs similar to the 1983 historical maxima that occurred in the Lahontan basin would have been sufficient to maintain the 13.5 ka BP high stand of Lake Lahontan. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Environmental and Groundwater Controls on Evaporation Rates of A Shallow Saline Lake in the Western Sandhills Nebraska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peake, C.; Riveros-Iregui, D.; Lenters, J. D.; Zlotnik, V. A.; Ong, J.

    2013-12-01

    The western Sand Hills of Nebraska exhibit many shallow saline lakes that actively mediate groundwater-lake-atmospheric exchanges. The region is home to the largest stabilized dune field in the western hemisphere. Most of the lakes in the western Sand Hills region are saline and support a wide range of ecosystems. However, they are also highly sensitive to variability in evaporative and groundwater fluxes, which makes them a good laboratory to examine the effects of climate on the water balance of interdunal lakes. Despite being semiarid, little is known about the importance of groundwater-surface water interactions on evaporative rates, or the effects of changes in meteorological and energy forcings on the diel, and seasonal dynamics of evaporative fluxes. Our study is the first to estimate evaporation rates from one of the hundreds of shallow saline lakes that occur in the western Sand Hills region. We applied the energy balance Bowen ratio method at Alkali Lake, a typical saline western Sand Hills lake, over a three-year period (2007-2009) to quantify summer evaporation rates. Daily evaporation rates averaged 5.5 mm/day from July through September and were largely controlled by solar radiation on a seasonal and diel scales. Furthermore, the range of annual variability of evaporation rates was low. Although less pronounced, groundwater level effects on evaporation rates were also observed, especially from August through October when solar radiation was lower. The lake exhibits significant fluctuation in lake levels and combined with a shallow lake bed, large changes in lake surface area are observed. Our findings also show that with the onset of summer conditions, lake surface area can change very rapidly (e.g. 24% of its surface area or ~16.6 hectares were lost in less than ~2 months). In every year summer evaporation exceeded annual rainfall by an average of 28.2% suggesting that groundwater is a significant component of the lake water balance, it is important for sustaining life of surrounding ecosystems, and during the growing season it is transiently stored in the lake before it is rapidly lost to the atmosphere.

  7. Evaporation mitigation using floating modular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. Mahmudul; Peirson, William Leslie; Neyland, Bryce M.; Fiddis, Nicholas McQuistan

    2015-11-01

    Reducing evaporation losses from open water storages is of paramount importance in the improvement of water security in arid countries, including Australia. Widespread adoption of evaporation mitigation techniques has been prevented by their high capital and maintenance or operating costs. The use of clean, floating recycled materials to mitigate evaporation technique has been investigated systematically at sites within both the coastal and semi-arid zones of Australia. Evaporation reduction systematically increases with the proportion of covered surface. Evaporation is reduced by 43% at coastal site and 37% at arid zone site at the maximum packing densities achievable for a single layer of floating devices. The study highlights the importance of both long-term investigations and the climatic influences in the robust quantification of evaporation mitigation. The effects of solar radiation, temperature, wind speed and relative humidity on the evaporation rate at both study sites have been determined in terms of both the classical Penman model and FAO Penman Monteith model with corresponding pan coefficients quantified. FAO Penman Monteith model better estimates evaporation from the open reference tank.

  8. Waking to drink: rates of evaporative water loss determine arousal frequency in hibernating bats.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hamo, Miriam; Muoz-Garcia, Agust; Williams, Joseph B; Korine, Carmi; Pinshow, Berry

    2013-02-15

    Bats hibernate to cope with low ambient temperatures (T(a)) and low food availability during winter. However, hibernation is frequently interrupted by arousals, when bats increase body temperature (T(b)) and metabolic rate (MR) to normothermic levels. Arousals account for more than 85% of a bat's winter energy expenditure. This has been associated with variation in T(b), T(a) or both, leading to a single testable prediction, i.e. that torpor bout length (TBL) is negatively correlated with T(a) and T(b). T(a) and T(b) were both found to be correlated with TBL, but correlations alone cannot establish a causal link between arousal and T(b) or T(a). Because hydration state has also been implicated in arousals from hibernation, we hypothesized that water loss during hibernation creates the need in bats to arouse to drink. We measured TBL of bats (Pipistrellus kuhlii) at the same T(a) but under different conditions of humidity, and found an inverse relationship between TBL and total evaporative water loss, independent of metabolic rate, which directly supports the hypothesis that hydration state is a cue to arousal in bats. PMID:23364570

  9. Laboratory studies in planetary science and quantitative analysis of evaporation rates under current Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Shauntae

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory measurements have been performed that are intended to shed light on several problems in planetary science. Thermoluminescence measurements of ordinary chondrites have been performed as part of an effort to identify the most primitive materials in the solar system. Experiments to study the fractionation of metal and silicate grains on asteroid surfaces have been performed on NASA's microgravity facility because of its relevance to meteorite origins and the exploration of asteroids by robotic spacecraft. The results of these studies are presented in this thesis as a conference presentation whose summary appeared in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science and a paper that appeared in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The rest of the thesis describes measurements on the stability of water on the surface of Mars and is submitted in normal thesis format, although at the time of submission some of this work has appeared in Geophysical Research Letters and some has been submitted to the journal Astrobiology. The thermoluminescence studies were used to derive petrologic classifications for several type 3 ordinary chondrites from North Africa, some of which are very low and have the potential to provide new insights to the early solar system and its formation. The metal-silicate fractionation work suggests that the differences in composition observed among the major chondrite groups, the H, L and LL chondrites, could be the result of processes occurring on the surface of the meteorite parent body, probably an asteroid. They also suggest that minor disturbances of the surface will cause separation of components in the asteroid regolith and this should be borne in mind in robotics exploration of asteroids. The stability of water on Mars was investigated by measuring the evaporation rate of liquid water in a Mars-like environment produced in a large chamber on Earth. The evaporation rates measured are in good agreement with model-dependent theoretical treatments described in the literature in which Fick's Law is adjusted to allow for the greater buoyancy of water relative to carbon dioxide, the major constituent of the martian atmosphere. The results have implications for possible locations of water on Mars.

  10. Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Guido D; Gentine, Pierre

    2013-04-16

    The ability to predict terrestrial evapotranspiration (E) is limited by the complexity of rate-limiting pathways as water moves through the soil, vegetation (roots, xylem, stomata), canopy air space, and the atmospheric boundary layer. The impossibility of specifying the numerous parameters required to model this process in full spatial detail has necessitated spatially upscaled models that depend on effective parameters such as the surface vapor conductance (C(surf)). C(surf) accounts for the biophysical and hydrological effects on diffusion through the soil and vegetation substrate. This approach, however, requires either site-specific calibration of C(surf) to measured E, or further parameterization based on metrics such as leaf area, senescence state, stomatal conductance, soil texture, soil moisture, and water table depth. Here, we show that this key, rate-limiting, parameter can be estimated from an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and E. The relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than would occur for increased or decreased evaporation rates, suggesting that land-atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance. It is found to hold over a wide range of climate conditions (arid-humid) and limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, energy). With this relation, estimates of E and C(surf) can be obtained globally from widely available meteorological measurements, many of which have been archived since the early 1900s. In conjunction with precipitation and stream flow, long-term E estimates provide insights and empirical constraints on projected accelerations of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:23576717

  11. Evaporation Rate of Water as a Function of a Magnetic Field and Field Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air. PMID:23443127

  12. Pan-Svalbard growth rate variability and environmental regulation in the Arctic bivalve Serripes groenlandicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael L.; Ambrose, William G.; Levin, Benjamin S.; Locke V, William L.; Henkes, Gregory A.; Hop, Haakon; Renaud, Paul E.

    2011-11-01

    Growth histories contained in the shells of bivalves provide continuous records of environmental and biological information over lifetimes spanning decades to centuries, thereby linking ecosystem responses to both natural and anthropogenic climatic variations over a range of scales. We examined growth rates and temporal growth patterns of 260 individuals of the circumpolar Greenland Smooth Cockle ( Serripes groenlandicus) collected between 1997 and 2009 from 11 sites around the Svalbard Archipelago. These sites encompass a range of oceanographic and environmental conditions, from strongly Atlantic-influenced conditions on the west coast to high-Arctic conditions in northeast Svalbard. Absolute growth was up to three times greater at the most strongly Atlantic-influenced locations compared to the most Arctic-influenced areas, and growth performance was highest at sites closest to the West Spitsbergen Current. We also developed growth chronologies up to 34 years in length extending back to 1974. Standardized growth indices (SGI) exhibited substantial inter-site variability, but there were also common temporal features including steadily increasing growth from the late 1980's to the mid-1990's followed by a marked shift from relatively greater to poorer growth in the mid-1990's and from 2004 to 2008. This pattern was consistent with phase-shifts in large-scale climatic drivers. Interannual variability in SGI was also related to local manifestations of the large-scale drivers, including sea temperature and sea ice extent. The temporal growth pattern at Rijpfjorden, on northeast Svalbard, was broadly representative (R = 0.81) of the entire dataset. While there were site-related differences in the specific relationships between growth and environmental parameters, the aggregated dataset indicated an overriding regional driver of bivalve growth: the Arctic Climate Regime Index (ACRI). These results demonstrate that sclerochronological proxies can be useful retrospective analytical tools for establishing baselines of ecosystem variability and for identifying key ecosystem drivers across spatial and temporal scales.

  13. Is the Evaporation Rate of Methane from Titan's Lakes Greatly Overestimated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2012-10-01

    The only certain and known source of methane for the atmosphere of Titan on short timescales is the volatile organic lake reservoirs. In general, there will be a turbulent exchange of methane and sensible heat between the atmosphere and the surface of these lakes. The turbulent fluxes of methane and heat are controlled by a variety of factors that includes: the temperature of the lake and atmosphere, the molar fraction of methane in the lake, the methane vapor pressure of the air, the wind speed, the atmospheric stability, and the solar and infrared heat available to drive the system. In addition, the dynamics of both the lake and the atmosphere influence how the turbulent fluxes evolve over time. We present results from numerical simulations that explicitly calculate the turbulent fluxes of methane and energy at a lake surface under a variety of conditions. Results show that evaporative cooling of the lakes results in the production of a low level atmospheric inversion that drastically diminishes the magnitude of the fluxes by suppressing turbulent winds and lowering the bulk exchange coefficient. These results suggest that the rate at which lakes can supply methane to the atmosphere has been greatly overestimated. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NNX10AB97G.

  14. Out of the frying pan into the air--emersion behaviour and evaporative heat loss in an amphibious mangrove fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel J; Sylvester, Emma V A; Turko, Andy J; Tattersall, Glenn J; Wright, Patricia A

    2015-10-01

    Amphibious fishes often emerse (leave water) when faced with unfavourable water conditions. How amphibious fishes cope with the risks of rising water temperatures may depend, in part, on the plasticity of behavioural mechanisms such as emersion thresholds. We hypothesized that the emersion threshold is reversibly plastic and thus dependent on recent acclimation history rather than on conditions during early development. Kryptolebias marmoratus were reared for 1 year at 25 or 30°C and acclimated as adults (one week) to either 25 or 30°C before exposure to an acute increase in water temperature. The emersion threshold temperature and acute thermal tolerance were significantly increased in adult fish acclimated to 30°C, but rearing temperature had no significant effect. Using a thermal imaging camera, we also showed that emersed fish in a low humidity aerial environment (30°C) lost significantly more heat (3.3°C min(-1)) than those in a high humidity environment (1.6°C min(-1)). In the field, mean relative humidity was 84%. These results provide evidence of behavioural avoidance of high temperatures and the first quantification of evaporative cooling in an amphibious fish. Furthermore, the avoidance response was reversibly plastic, flexibility that may be important for tropical amphibious fishes under increasing pressures from climatic change. PMID:26490418

  15. Comparison of diurnal dynamics in evaporation rate between bare soil and moss-crusted soil within a revegetated desert ecosystem of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya-Feng; Wang, Xin-Ping; Pan, Yan-Xia; Hu, Rui

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological soil crusts (BSCs) on soil evaporation is quite controversial in literature, being either facilitative or inhibitive, and therein few studies have actually conducted direct evaporation measurements. Continuous field measurements of soil water evaporation were conducted on two microlysimeters, i.e., one with sand soil collected from bare sand dune area and the other with moss-crusted soil collected from an area that was revegetated in 1956, from field capacity to dry, at the southeastern edge of the Tengger Desert. We mainly aimed to quantify the diurnal variations of evaporation rate from two soils, and further comparatively discuss the effects of BSCs on soil evaporation after revegetation. Results showed that in clear days with high soil water content (Day 1 and 2), the diurnal variation of soil evaporation rate followed the typical convex upward parabolic curve, reaching its peak around mid-day. Diurnal evaporation rate and the accumulated evaporation amount of moss-crusted soil were lower (an average of 0.90 times) than that of sand soil in this stage. However, as soil water content decreased to a moderately low level (Day 3 and 4), the diurnal evaporation rate from moss-crusted soil was pronouncedly higher (an average of 3.91 times) than that of sand soil, prolonging the duration of this higher evaporation rate stage; it was slightly higher in the final stage (Day 5 and 6) when soil moisture was very low. We conclude that the effects of moss crusts on soil evaporation vary with different evaporation stages, which is closely related to soil water content, and the variation and transition of evaporation rate between bare soil and moss-crusted soil are expected to be predicted by soil water content.

  16. Effects of Carbonyl Bond and Metal Cluster Dissociation and Evaporation Rates on Predictions of Nanotube Production in HiPco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the co-formation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO due to its lower bond energy as compared with that ofNiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

  17. Headspace analysis study of evaporation rate of perfume ingredients applied onto skin.

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, C; Flament, I; Sauvegrain, P

    1995-04-01

    Synopsis Diffusion of perfume ingredients from skin or hair is measured using an original method based on dynamic headspace technology. This has been used for pure odorants, fine fragrances, as well as for perfumed cosmetic applications such as soaps, creams or shampoos, in order to characterize diffusion processes and air/skin or air/hair partitioning. Accordingly, a special collection system, applied on the inner face of the forearm, has been developed, allowing the adsorption of diffusing organic vapours from skin onto Tenax (poly-diphenyl phenylene oxide) with a controlled air flow rate. A simple model composition containing eleven volatile synthetic odorants was prepared in an alcoholic matrix and the solution was applied onto the skin. The diffusion rate of the different components was measured by determining the concentration of each in the gas phase versus time. Conversely, the same experiment was effected by the application of an alcoholic solution of each individual component. In this manner, the relative diffusion from skin of the components alone or mixed was compared using the same experimental technique. The effect of a musky component was also tested. Both compositions (with and without musk) were then applied in a soap base. Thus, following a rigorous protocol, the forearm was washed with the perfumed soap and rinsed with water before collection of the headspace. The results show the different diffusion rates of the individual odorants. In particular, components evaporate slower from the skin when they have been applied from a soap bar compared to when they have been applied from alcoholic solution. We also present results describing the characterization of skin types using a panel comprised of 80 people (40 females and 40 males); amount of sebum, hydration and pH were systematically measured on different parts of the face, the neck as well as the outer and inner faces of the forearm. The panelists were then classified into different sub-groups taking into account these parameters. It should be noted that the foregoing results were obtained on an 'average'skin type. PMID:19250472

  18. A New Approach to Measure Contact Angle and Evaporation Rate with Flow Visualization in a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The contact angle and the spreading process of sessile droplet are very crucial in many technological processes, such as painting and coating, material processing, film-cooling applications, lubrication, and boiling. Additionally, as it is well known that the surface free energy of polymers cannot be directly, measured for their elastic and viscous restraints. The measurements of liquid contact angle on the polymer surfaces become extremely important to evaluate the surface free energy of polymers through indirect methods linked with the contact angle data. Due to the occurrence of liquid evaporation is inevitable, the effects of evaporation on the contact angle and the spreading become very important for more complete understanding of these processes. It is of interest to note that evaporation can induce Marangoni-Benard convection in sessile drops. However, the impacts of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes are not clear. The experimental methods used by previous investigators cannot simultaneously measure the spreading process and visualize the convection inside. Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the present author, a very simple optical procedure has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, the evaporation rate, and to visualize inside convection of a sessile drop simultaneously. Two CCD cameras were used to synchronously record the real-time diameter of the sessile drop, which is essential for determination of both spreading speed and evaporation rate, and the shadowgraphic image magnified by the sessile drop acting as a thin plano-convex lens. From the shadowgraph, the inside convection of the drop can be observed if any and the image outer diameter, which linked to the drop profile, can be measured. Simple equations have been derived to calculate the drop profile, including the instantaneous contact angle, height, and volume of the sessile drop, as well as the evaporation rate. The influence of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes can be figured out through comparison of the drop profiles with and without inside convection when the sessile drop is placed at different evaporation conditions.

  19. Adjuvant Effects on Evaporation Rates and Wetted Area of Droplets on Waxy Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of an appropriate adjuvant for pesticide applications is a critical process to improve spray deposit characteristics on waxy leaves and to reduce off-target losses. After deposition and evaporation, residue patterns of 500 µm sessile droplets that incorporated four classes of adjuvants on fi...

  20. Evaporation from a small water reservoir: Direct measurements and estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanny, J.; Cohen, S.; Assouline, S.; Lange, F.; Grava, A.; Berger, D.; Teltch, B.; Parlange, M. B.

    2008-03-01

    SummaryKnowing the rate of evaporation from surface water resources such as channels and reservoirs is essential for precise management of the water balance. However, evaporation is difficult to measure experimentally over water surfaces and several techniques and models have been suggested and used in the past for its determination. In this research, evaporation from a small water reservoir in northern Israel was measured and estimated using several experimental techniques and models during the rainless summer. Evaporation was measured with an eddy covariance (EC) system consisting of a three-dimensional sonic anemometer and a Krypton hygrometer. Measurements of net radiation, air temperature and humidity, and water temperature enabled estimation of other energy balance components. Several models and energy balance closure were evaluated. In addition, evaporation from a class-A pan was measured at the site. EC evaporation measurements for 21 days averaged 5.48 mm day -1. Best model predictions were obtained with two combined flux-gradient and energy balance models (Penman-Monteith-Unsworth and Penman-Brutsaert), which with the water heat flux term, gave similar daily average evaporation rates, that were up to 3% smaller than the corresponding EC values. The ratio between daily pan and EC evaporation varied from 0.96 to 1.94. The bulk mass transfer coefficient was estimated using a model based on measurements of water surface temperature, evaporation rate and absolute humidity at 0.9 and 2.9 m above the water surface, and using two theoretical approaches. The bulk transfer coefficient was found to be strongly dependent on wind speed. For wind speeds below 5 m s -1 the estimated coefficient for unstable conditions was much larger than the one predicted for neutral conditions.

  1. The Effects of Film Thickness and Evaporation Rate on Si-Cu Thin Films for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Polat, B Deniz; Keles, Ozgul

    2015-12-01

    The reversible cyclability of Si based composite anodes is greatly improved by optimizing the atomic ratio of Si/Cu, the thickness and the evaporation rates of films fabricated by electron beam deposition method. The galvanostatic test results show that 500 nm thick flim, having 10%at. Cu-90%at. Si, deposited with a moderate evaporation rate (10 and 0.9 Å/s for Si and Cu respectively) delivers 2642.37 mAh g(-1) as the first discharge capacity with 76% Coulombic efficiency. 99% of its initial capacity is retained after 20 cycles. The electron conductive pathway and high mechanical tolerance induced by Cu atoms, the low electrical resistivity of the film due to Cu3Si particles, and the homogeneously distributed nano-sized/amorphous particles in the composite thin film could explain this outstanding electrochemical performance of the anode. PMID:26682413

  2. Effects of viscosity, surface tension, and evaporation rate of solvent on dry colloidal structures: a lattice Boltzmann study.

    PubMed

    Munekata, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Takahisa; Yamakawa, Shunsuke; Asahi, Ryoji

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of how colloidal solution properties and drying processes result in dry colloidal structures is essential for industrial applications such as paint, ceramics, and electrodes. In this study, we develop a computational method to simulate the drying process of colloidal suspensions containing solid particles and polymers. The method consists of a solvent evaporation model, a fluid particle dynamics method, and a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method. We determine that a high-viscosity solvent, small surface tension, and a high evaporation rate of the solvent lead to a structure with dispersed particles and interconnected pores. When these conditions are not present, the particles agglomerate and the pores are disconnected. PMID:24329271

  3. Measuring forest evaporation and transpiration rates with fibre optic temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Wim; Hessels, Tim; de Kloe, Arjan; Elbers, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Evaporation is one of the most important fluxes of the water balance as it accounts for 55-80% of the precipitation. However, measuring evaporation remains difficult and requires sophisticated and expensive equipment. In this paper we propose a new measuring technique based on the existing Bowen ratio method. With a fibre optic cable a temperature and a vapour pressure profile can be measured by the principle of a psychrometer and combined with the net radiation (and ground heat flux) the latent heat can be calculated. Compared to the conventional Bowen ratio method the advantages of this method is that the profiles are measured with a single sensor (resulting in a smaller error), and contain more measuring points in the vertical and therefore give more insight into the developed profiles. The method also allows to measure through a forest canopy. Applying the Bowen ratio above and below the canopy an estimation of the transpiration flux can be obtained. As a first test, we compared in a pine forest in The Netherlands (Loobos) the transpiration estimates of the fibre optic cable with sapflow measurements, and eddy covariance measurements above and below the canopy. The experiment was carried out on three days in September 2013 and the preliminary results show reasonable correlation with the eddy covariance estimates, but not with the sapflow observations. To explain the differences further investigation is needed and a longer measuring period is required.

  4. Weak ac field-induced patterns in vertical deposition of colloids at various evaporation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, R.; Pichumani, M.; Gonzlez-Vias, W.

    2015-03-01

    Pattern formation in colloids by weak ac fields in vertical deposition-like configuration at different temperatures has been studied experimentally. At low evaporation (room temperature), the effect of the field leads to the evolution of a one-dimensional array of clusters along the contact line and columnar colloidal dried deposits are obtained at higher evaporation. We investigate the flow dynamics involved in this pattern formation. Homogeneous variation of the contact angle by electrowetting effect becomes unstable and breaks the translational symmetry at the meniscus. Electrokinetic forces together with capillary forces result in the accumulation of particles for pattern formation. The movement of electrically charged colloidal particles is controlled by weak ac electric field even at higher temperatures. We observe the effect of increasing initial particle concentration on the behavior of the clusters for various field frequencies. The average distance between clusters increase monotonically with an increase in the initial particle concentration. We also observe that the average width of columns increases according to the applied field strength.

  5. On laboratory simulation and the effect of small temperature oscillations about the freezing point and ice formation on the evaporation rate of water on Mars.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shauntae R; Sears, Derek W G

    2006-08-01

    We report measurements of the evaporation rate of water under Mars-like conditions (CO2 atmosphere at 7 mbar and approximately 0 degrees C) in which small temperature oscillations about the freezing point repeatedly formed and removed a thin layer of ice. We found that the average evaporation at 2.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C without an ice layer (corrected for the difference in gravity on Earth and on Mars) was 1.24 +/- 0.12 mm/h, while at -2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C with an ice layer the average evaporation rate was 0.84 +/- 0.08 mm/h. These values are in good agreement with those calculated for the evaporation of liquid water and ice when it is assumed that evaporation only depends on diffusion and buoyancy. Our findings suggest that such differences in evaporation rates are entirely due to the temperature difference and that the ice layer has little effect on evaporation rate. We infer that the formation of thin layers of ice on pools of water on Mars does not significantly increase the stability of water on the surface of Mars. PMID:16916288

  6. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  7. Metabolic rate, evaporative water loss and thermoregulatory state in four species of bats in the Negev desert.

    PubMed

    Muoz-Garcia, Agust; Larran, Paloma; Ben-Hamo, Miriam; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo; Williams, Joseph B; Pinshow, Berry; Korine, Carmi

    2016-01-01

    Life in deserts is challenging for bats because of their relatively high energy and water requirements; nevertheless bats thrive in desert environments. We postulated that bats from desert environments have lower metabolic rates (MR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) than their mesic counterparts. To test this idea, we measured MR and TEWL of four species of bats, which inhabit the Negev desert in Israel, one species mainly restricted to hyper-arid deserts (Otonycteris hemprichii), two species from semi-desert areas (Eptesicus bottae and Plecotus christii), and one widespread species (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We also measured separately, in the same individuals, the two components of TEWL, respiratory water loss (RWL) and cutaneous evaporative water loss (CEWL), using a mask. In all the species, MR and TEWL were significantly reduced during torpor, the latter being a consequence of reductions in both RWL and CEWL. Then, we evaluated whether MR and TEWL in bats differ according to their geographic distributions, and whether those rates change with Ta and the use of torpor. We did not find significant differences in MR among species, but we found that TEWL was lowest in the species restricted to desert habitats, intermediate in the semi-desert dwelling species, and highest in the widespread species, perhaps a consequence of adaptation to life in deserts. Our results were supported by a subsequent analysis of data collected from the literature on rates of TEWL for 35 bat species from desert and mesic habitats. PMID:26459985

  8. Quantifying the feedback of evaporation and transpiration rates to soil moisture dynamics and meteorological condition changes by a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ye; Shao, Wei; Vlček, Lukáš; Langhammer, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    Evapotranspiration drives the hydrological process through energy-driven water-phase changes between systems of soil-vegetation-atmosphere. Evapotranspiration performs a rather complex process attributable to the spatial and temporal variation of soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. For vegetation-covered land surfaces, the transpiration process is governed by the stomatal behavior and water uptake from the root zone, and evaporation is related with the interception of rainfall and radiation on the canopy and soil surface. This study is emphasized on describing the hydrological process and energy cycle in a basic hydrological response unit, a hillslope. The experimental hillslope is located in an experimental catchment of the Bohemian Forest Mountains' headwaters in the Czech Republic, where is mostly covered by dead Norway spruce forest (Picea abies) stands caused by balk beetle outbreak. High-frequency monitoring network of the hydro-climatic data, soil pore water pressure and soil temperature has been launched since 2012. To conceptualize the land-surface energy and water fluxes in a complex hillslope, a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transport (SVAT) model, coupled with a multi-phase soil physics process (i.e. the water, vapor and heat flow transport) is used. We selected an 8-week basis dataset from 2013 as a pilot for partitioning the evapotranspiration into three interactive components: transpiration (Et), canopy interception evaporation (Ei), and soil evaporation (Es), by using this numerical model. Within such model framework, the sensitive feedback of evapotranspiration rates to rainfall intensity, soil moisture, and solar radiation will be examined by conducting numerical experiments to better understand the mechanism of evapotranspiration process under various influencing factors. Such application study and followed numerical simulations provide a new path for quantifying the behaviors of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system.

  9. Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.

    PubMed

    Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed. PMID:16539249

  10. 14. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum Pan. Manufactured by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum Pan. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: In the sorghum pan, heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. The pan was set on a slope so that the juice would move through the compartments by gravity. The hand-lever sluice valves in the partition walls between the compartments permitted the sugar boiler to regulate the movement of batches of cane juice flowing through the pan. The metal fins projecting from the bottom of the pan imparted a circuitous route to the juice as it flowed through the pan--this made it flow over a much greater heated surface. The fins also supplemented the pan's heating surface by ... - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  11. Soil Evaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil evaporation can significantly influence energy flux partitioning of partially vegetated surfaces, ultimately affecting plant transpiration. While important, quantification of soil evaporation, separately from canopy transpiration, is challenging. Techniques for measuring soil evaporation exis...

  12. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  13. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  14. Global distribution of moisture, evaporation-precipitation, and diabatic heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Global archives were established for ECMWF 12-hour, multilevel analysis beginning 1 January 1985; day and night IR temperatures, and solar incoming and solar absorbed. Routines were written to access these data conveniently from NASA/MSFC MASSTOR facility for diagnostic analysis. Calculations of diabatic heating rates were performed from the ECMWF data using 4-day intervals. Calculations of precipitable water (W) from 1 May 1985 were carried out using the ECMWF data. Because a major operational change on 1 May 1985 had a significant impact on the moisture field, values prior to that date are incompatible with subsequent analyses.

  15. Calculations of evaporative losses using stable water isotope composition in dry climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Mydlowski, Adam; Dogramaci, Shawan; Hedley, Paul; Gibson, John; Grierson, Pauline

    2014-05-01

    Evaporative loss from surface waters is a major component of the hydrological cycle in arid zones, restricting recharge to aquifers and limiting the persistence of surface water bodies. Calculation of evaporative loss is founded on the so-called Craig-Gordon model (C-G), and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of water can be successfully used to estimate progressive evaporation. The advantage of this approach is that it does not require monitoring of water levels, inflow and outflow rates. However, the precision and reliability of calculations in very hot and dry climates can be compromised by variable isotope composition of air moisture, which thus needs to be calibrated for C-G model calculations. In this study, we tested the range of uncertainty in the estimation of evaporative losses by cross-validating a simplified stable isotope model with field pan evaporation experiments. The use of standardized pans (1.2 m diameter, max volume 300 dm3) allowed simulation of fast evaporation from shallow water bodies in hot and dry climates (mean daily temperature 29° C and relative humidity between 19 and 26% RH during an 11 day experiment). The stable isotope composition of water in pans changed from -8.23o (δ18O) and -56o (δ2H) to approximately +6.0o (δ18O) and +2.4o (δ2H), reflecting evaporative losses of 56% in sun and 53% in shade. The maximum difference between observed (measured in the field) and calculated evaporative losses was

  16. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  17. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  18. Daily Energy-Budget and Penman Evaporation From Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, K. D.; Cummings, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    To better constrain the hydrologic budget of Upper Klamath Lake, open-water evaporation rates were calculated on a daily basis from 7-June-03 to 30-September-03 using the energy-budget method. Results show evaporation rates to range from as low as -0.8 mm d-1 to as high as 10.2 mm d-1 with an overall average of 4.5 mm d-1. Monthly evaporation totals compared to land-pan evaporation produced pan-to-lake coefficients of 0.66, 0.70, 0.52 and 0.47 for the months of June through September. Total energy-budget evaporation over the entire period was 525 mm or 14,200 ha-m (0.53 ha-m ha-1) and was 46 percent of total inflow to the lake. Continuous measurements of hydrologic and atmospheric conditions at the lake used to calculate energy-budget evaporation rates were also used to calculate evaporation rates using the modified Penman method. Results from the two methods were compared in order to evaluate the efficacy of the Penman method to estimate open-water evaporation in a semi-arid, high-steppe climate. Penman evaporation rates overestimated energy-budget evaporation rates by an average of 1.0 ±0.6 mm d-1 (root mean square error of 1.2 mm d-1) and were greater than previously determined for lakes in more humid, less windy settings. Overestimates by the Penman method were greatest at Upper Klamath Lake on days with greater wind speeds and larger vapor pressure deficits suggesting that the mass transfer component of the Penman method is too sensitive to drier, windier conditions. Total Penman evaporation was 641 mm or 17,400 ha-m (0.64 ha-m ha-1) and was 56 percent of total inflow to the lake. Incorporating meteorological data from land-based weather stations near the lake and using more practical methodologies led to energy-budget evaporation rates that overestimated best estimates by an average of 0.1 ±0.7 mm d-1.

  19. Evaporation estimates from the Dead Sea and their implications on its water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroud, Ibrahim M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea (DS) is a terminal hypersaline water body situated in the deepest part of the Jordan Valley. There is a growing interest in linking the DS to the open seas due to severe water shortages in the area and the serious geological and environmental hazards to its vicinity caused by the rapid level drop of the DS. A key issue in linking the DS with the open seas would be an accurate determination of evaporation rates. There exist large uncertainties of evaporation estimates from the DS due to the complex feedback mechanisms between meteorological forcings and thermophysical properties of hypersaline solutions. Numerous methods have been used to estimate current and historical (pre-1960) evaporation rates, with estimates differing by ˜100%. Evaporation from the DS is usually deduced indirectly using energy, water balance, or pan methods with uncertainty in many parameters. Accumulated errors resulting from these uncertainties are usually pooled into the estimates of evaporation rates. In this paper, a physically based method with minimum empirical parameters is used to evaluate historical and current evaporation estimates from the DS. The more likely figures for historical and current evaporation rates from the DS were 1,500-1,600 and 1,200-1,250 mm per annum, respectively. Results obtained are congruent with field observations and with more elaborate procedures.

  20. Evaporation from seven reservoirs in the Denver water-supply system, central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficke, John F.; Adams, D. Briane; Danielson, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    Seven reservoirs in central Colorado, operated by the Denver Board of Water Commissioners, were studied during 1967-73 to determine evaporation losses. These reservoirs, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, Gross, Antero, Cheesman, Williams Fork, and Ralston, are located on both sides of the Continental Divide. Methods for computing evaporation include energy-budget, mass-transfer, and pan relationships. Three reservoirs, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross, had mass-transfer coefficients calibrated by energy-budget studies. At the remaining reservoirs, an empirical technique was used to estimate the mass-transfer coefficient. The enery-budget-calibrated methods give the most accurate evaporation values; the empirical coefficients give only a best estimate of evaporation. All reservoirs should be calibrated by energy-budget studies. The pan method of computing evaporation is the least reliable method because of problems of advected energy through the sides of the pan, representative pan exposure , and the irregularity of ratios of reservoir to pan evaporation. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Effects of carbonyl bond, metal cluster dissociation, and evaporation rates on predictions of nanotube production in high-pressure carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the conformation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO because of its lower bond energy as compared with that of NiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

  2. Comparison of energy-budget evaporation losses from two morphometrically different Florida seepage lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sacks, L.A.; Lee, T.M.; Radell, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Evaporation was computed by the energy-budget method for two north Florida lakes with similar surface areas but different depths, for the period May 1989 to December 1990. Lake Barco, in north-central Florida, is shallow, with an average depth of 3 m; Lake Five-O, in the Florida panhandle, is considerably deeper, with an average depth of 9.5 m. As a result, the thermal regime and seasonal evaporation rates of the lakes are different. Evaporation from the shallower lake was higher than that from the deeper lake in the winter and spring. In the late summer and autumn, however, the situation is reversed. Evaporation from the shallow lake is directly related to the amount of incoming shortwave radiation because of its limited ability to store energy. The lag in evaporation at the deeper lake is a function of the greater amount of heat that it seasonally stores and releases. The difference in annual evaporation between Lake Barco (151 cm year-1) and Lake Five-O (128 cm year-1) is related to differences in regional climatic conditions between the two sites. Additionally, higher than normal evaporation rates at the two lakes are probably related to drought conditions experienced in north Florida during 1990, which resulted in higher temperatures and more incoming radiation. Monthly evaporation at Lake Barco could usually be estimated within 10% of the energy-budget evaporation using a constant pan coefficient. This lake may be representative of other shallow lakes that do not store considerable heat. Monthly evaporation at Lake Five-O, however, could not be estimated accurately by using an annual pan coefficient because of the large seasonal influence of change in stored heat. Monthly mass-transfer evaporation compared well with energy-budget evaporation at Lake Barco, but did not compare well at Lake Five-O. These errors may also be associated with changes in heat storage. Thus, the thermal regime of the lake must be considered to estimate accurately the seasonal evaporation rates from a deep lake. ?? 1994.

  3. Determination of an upper limit for the water outgassing rate of the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PanSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, L.; Snodgrass, C.; de Val-Borro, M.; Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Hsieh, H.; Teyssier, D.; Fernandez, Y.; Küppers, M.; Micheli, M.; Hartogh, P.

    2014-07-01

    A new main-belt comet (MBC) P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) was discovered on 2012 October 6, approximately one month after its perihelion, by the Pan-STARRS1 survey based in Hawaii (Wainscoat et al. 2012). It displayed cometary activity upon its discovery with one hypothesis being that the activity was driven by sublimation of ices; as a result, we searched for emission assumed to be driven by the sublimation of subsurface ices. Our search was of the H_{2}O 1_{10}-1_{01} ground-state rotational line at 557 GHz from P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI; de Graauw et al. 2010) onboard the Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al. 2010) on 2013 January 16, when the object was at a heliocentric distance of 2.504 au and a distance from Herschel of 2.059 au. Perihelion was in early September 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 2.411 au. To analyze the data, we used a molecular excitation model equivalent to that utilized to analyze both Herschel and ground-based cometary observations (Hartogh et al. 2010, 2011; de Val-Borro et al. 2010, 2012ab). While no H_{2}O line emission was detected in our observations, we were able to derive sensitive 3-σ upper limits for the water production rate and column density of < 7.63 × 10^{25} molecules s^{-1} and of < 1.61 × 10^{11} cm^{-2}, respectively. An observation taken on 2013 January 15 using the Very Large Telescope found the MBC to be active during the Herschel observation, suggesting that any ongoing sublimation due to subsurface ice was lower than our upper limit.

  4. Electrochemical treatment of evaporated residue of soak liquor generated from leather industry.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, R; Sekaran, G

    2013-09-15

    The organic and suspended solids present in soak liquor, generated from leather industry, demands treatment. The soak liquor is being segregated and evaporated in solar evaporation pans/multiple effect evaporator due to non availability of viable technology for its treatment. The residue left behind in the pans/evaporator does not carry any reuse value and also faces disposal threat due to the presence of high concentration of sodium chloride, organic and bacterial impurities. In the present investigation, the aqueous evaporated residue of soak liquor (ERSL) was treated by electrochemical oxidation. Graphite/graphite and SS304/graphite systems were used in electrochemical oxidation of organics in ERSL. Among these, graphite/graphite system was found to be effective over SS304/graphite system. Hence, the optimised conditions for the electrochemical oxidation of organics in ERSL using graphite/graphite system was evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). The mass transport coefficient (km) was calculated based on pseudo-first order rate kinetics for both the electrode systems (graphite/graphite and SS304/graphite). The thermodynamic properties illustrated the electrochemical oxidation was exothermic and non-spontaneous in nature. The calculated specific energy consumption at the optimum current density of 50 mA cm(-2) was 0.41 kWh m(-3) for the removal of COD and 2.57 kWh m(-3) for the removal of TKN. PMID:23770619

  5. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, Shi T.; Nerney, S.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of slow plasma heating near the tops of streamers where the plasma is only weakly contained by the magnetic field. The form it takes is the slow opening of field lines at the top of the streamer and transient formation of new solar wind. It was discovered in polytropic model calculations, where due to the absence of other energy loss mechanisms in magnetostatic streamers, its ultimate endpoint is the complete evaporation of the streamer. This takes, for plausible heating rates, weeks to months in these models. Of course streamers do not behave this way, for more than one reason. One is that there are losses due to thermal conduction to the base of the streamer and radiation from the transition region. Another is that streamer heating must have a characteristic time constant and depend on the ambient physical conditions. We use our global Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model with thermal conduction to examine a few examples of the effect of changing the heating scale height and of making ad hoc choices for how the heating depends on ambient conditions. At the same time, we apply and extend the analytic model of streamers, which showed that streamers will be unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than about 2xl0(exp 6) K. Slow solar wind is observed to come from streamers through transient releases. A scenario for this that is consistent with the above physical process is that heating increases the near-cusp temperature until field lines there are forced open. The subsequent evacuation of the flux tubes by the newly forming slow wind decreases the temperature and heating until the flux tubes are able to reclose. Then, over a longer time scale, heating begins to again refill the flux tubes with plasma and increase the temperature until the cycle repeats itself. The calculations we report here are first steps towards quantitative evaluation of this scenario.

  6. 3. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum pan and boiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum pan and boiling range flue. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: South side of sorghum pan and boiling range flue. In the sorghum pan heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. Hot gasses moved through the flue underneath the entire copper bottom of the sorghum pan from the furnace (east) end to the smokestack (west) end of the boiling range. The sorghum pan sides are of redwood. The flue is built of fire-brick, masonry, and portland cement. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  7. PanDAR: a wide-area, frame-rate, and full color lidar with foveated region using backfilling interpolation upsampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Kim, Kyungnam; Owechko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    LIDAR devices for on-vehicle use need a wide field of view and good fidelity. For instance, a LIDAR for avoidance of landing collisions by a helicopter needs to see a wide field of view and show reasonable details of the area. The same is true for an online LIDAR scanning device placed on an automobile. In this paper, we describe a LIDAR system with full color and enhanced resolution that has an effective vertical scanning range of 60 degrees with a central 20 degree fovea. The extended range with fovea is achieved by using two standard Velodyne 32-HDL LIDARs placed head to head and counter rotating. The HDL LIDARS each scan 40 degrees vertical and a full 360 degrees horizontal with an outdoor effective range of 100 meters. By positioning them head to head, they overlap by 20 degrees. This creates a double density fovea. The LIDAR returns from the two Velodyne sensors do not natively contain color. In order to add color, a Point Grey LadyBug panoramic camera is used to gather color data of the scene. In the first stage of our system, the two LIDAR point clouds and the LadyBug video are fused in real time at a frame rate of 10 Hz. A second stage is used to intelligently interpolate the point cloud and increase its resolution by approximately four times while maintaining accuracy with respect to the 3D scene. By using GPGPU programming, we can compute this at 10 Hz. Our backfilling interpolation methods works by first computing local linear approximations from the perspective of the LIDAR depth map. The color features from the image are used to select point cloud support points that are the best points in a local group for building the local linear approximations. This makes the colored point cloud more detailed while maintaining fidelity to the 3D scene. Our system also makes objects appearing in the PanDAR display easier to recognize for a human operator.

  8. Evaporation and reference evapotranspiration trends in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Wild, Martin; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Calbó, Josep; Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Moran-Tejeda, Enrique; Martín-Hernández, Natalia; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-04-01

    Interest is growing in the trends of atmospheric evaporation demand, increasing the need for long-term time series. In this study, we first describe the development of a dataset on evaporation in Spain based on long-term series of Piché and pan measurement records. Piché measurements have been reported for >50 stations since the 1960s. Measurements of pan evaporation, which is a much more widely studied variable in the literature, are also available, but only since 1984 for 21 stations. Particular emphasis was placed on the homogenization of this dataset (for more details, we refer to Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2014, Clim Res, 61: 269-280). Both the mean annual Piché and pan series over Spain showed evaporative increases during the common study period (1985-2011). Furthermore, using the annual Piché records since the 1960s, an evaporation decline was detected from the 1960s to the mid-1980s, which resulted in a non-significant trend over the entire 1961-2011 period. Our results indicate agreement between the decadal variability of reference evapotranspiration (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2014, Glob Planet Chang, 121: 26-40) and surface solar radiation (Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013, Glob Planet Chang, 100: 343-352) and the evaporation from Piché and pan measurements since the mid-1980s, especially during summer. Nevertheless, this agreement needs attention, as Piché evaporimeters are inside meteorological screens and not directly exposed to radiation. Thus, as Piché readings are mainly affected by the aerodynamic term in Penman's evaporation equation and pan records are affected by both the heat balance and aerodynamic terms, the results suggest that both terms must be highly and positively correlated in Spain. In order to check this hypothesis, the radiative and aerodynamic components were estimated using the Penman's equation. The results show that the relationship with the radiative components is weaker than that with the aerodynamic component for both pan and Piché evaporation measurements. In addition, both component series show an increase during the period 1985-2011, but the aerodynamic term is larger than the radiative term. These results indicate that the increase in evaporation over Spain since the mid-1980s can be related to changes in both terms of the Penman's equation, especially the aerodynamic component, possibly due to a strong decrease in relative humidity in the last decades and a noticeable increase in air temperature (Vicente-Serrano et al. 2014, Water Resour Res 50: 8458-8480)

  9. Evaluation of Pan Coefficients for Estimating Reference Evapotranspiration in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H.

    2006-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important process of water transfer in the hydrosphere and atmosphere, which plays an active role in the hydrological cycle. Evaporation pan (Epan) data are often used to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ETref) for use in water resource planning. Generally, ETref is estimated as the product of the Epan data and a pan coefficient (Kpan). However, reliable estimation of ETref using Epan depends on the accurate determination of pan coefficients Kpan. Many different methods for estimating ETref have been developed, among which the Penman-Monteith method is demonstrated to be especially excellent by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In this study, the Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration, pan evaporation, and pan coefficient are calculated, compared and regionally mapped at nine meteorological stations during 1990-2004 in Southern Taiwan. The results show the reference evapotranspiration and pan evaporation have similar regional distribution patterns in the southern Taiwan both with the highest values being in the lower region and the lowest values being in the upper region. In addition, the pan coefficient, Kpan, varies both regionally and seasonally. Smallest Kpan values are found in the upper reach of the southern Taiwan, meaning that the relative difference between the reference evapotranspiration and pan evaporation is the biggest in the region, the largest Kpan values are obtained in the western area of southern Taiwan. This distribution pattern provides valuable information for regional hydrological studies since it is one of the most important factors determining regional actual evapotranspiration.

  10. Operational estimates of lake evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, F. I.

    1983-10-01

    The complementary relationship between areal and potential evapotranspiration takes into account the changes in the temperature and humidity of the air as it passes from a land environment to a lake environment. Minor changes convert the latest version of the complementary relationship areal evapotranspiration (CRAE) models to a complementary relationship lake evaporation (CRLE) model. The ability of the CRLE model to produce reliable estimates of annual lake evaporation from monthly values of temperature, humidity and sunshine duration (or global radiation) observed in the land environment with no locally optimized coefficients is tested against comparable water-budget estimates for 11 lakes in North America and Africa. Maps of annual lake evaporation and annual net reservoir evaporation (i.e. the difference between lake evaporation and areal evapotranspiration) for the part of Canada to the east of the Pacific Divide and for the southern U.S.A. are presented. An approximate routing technique, which takes into account the effects of depth and salinity on the seasonal pattern of monthly lake evaporation, is formulated and tested against comparable water-budget estimates for 10 lakes in North America and Africa. The results indicate that the CRLE model, with its associated routing technique, is much superior to the other techniques in current use that rely on climatological or pan observations in the land environment.

  11. The pipes of pan.

    PubMed

    Chalif, David J

    2004-12-01

    The pipes of pan is the crowning achievement of Pablo Picasso's neoclassical period of the 1920s. This monumental canvas depicts a mythological Mediterranean scene in which two sculpted classical giants stare out, seemingly across the centuries, toward a distant and lost Arcadia. Picasso was influenced by Greco-Roman art during his travels in Italy, and his neoclassical works typically portray massive, immobile, and pensive figures. Pan and his pipes are taken directly from Greek mythological lore by Picasso and placed directly into 20th century art. He frequently turned to various mythological figures throughout his metamorphosing periods. The Pipes of Pan was also influenced by the painter's infatuation with the beautiful American expatriate Sara Murphy, and the finished masterpiece represents a revision of a previously conceived neoclassical work. The Pipes of Pan now hangs in the Musee Picasso in Paris. PMID:15574231

  12. Effect of argon gas flow rate on properties of film electrodes prepared by thermal vacuum evaporation from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} source

    SciTech Connect

    Sabli, Nordin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hilal, Hikmat S.; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2014-03-05

    This work describes a new technique to enhance photoresponse of metal chalcogenide-based semiconductor film electrodes deposited by thermal vacuum evaporation under argon gas flow from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} sources. SnSe formation with Cu-doped was obtained under higher argon gas flow rate (V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min). Higher value of photoresponse was observed for films deposited under V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min which was 9.1%. This finding indicates that Cu atoms inside the SnSe film were important to increase carrier concentrations that promote higher photoresponse.

  13. EFFECTS OF ADDITION RATE AND ACID MATRIX ON THE DESTRUCTION OF AMMONIUM BY THE SEMI-CONTINUOUS ADDITION OF SODIUM NITRITE DURING EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2007-08-27

    The destruction of ammonium by the semi-continuous addition of sodium nitrite during acidic evaporation can be achieved with a wide range of waste compositions. The efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction was observed to vary from less than 20% to 60% depending on operating conditions. The effects of nitric acid concentration and nitrite addition rate are dominant factors that affect the efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction. Reducing the acid concentration by performing acid recovery via steam stripping prior to performing nitrite destruction of ammonium will require more nitrite due to the low destruction efficiency. The scale-up of the baseline rate nitrite addition rate from the 100 mL to the 1600 gallon batch size has significant uncertainty and poses the risk of lower efficiency at the plant scale. Experience with plant scale processing will improve confidence in the application of nitrite destruction of ammonium to different waste streams.

  14. 15. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum pan and boiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum pan and boiling range flue. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: North side of sorghum pan and boiling range flue, with furnace-end in background. In the sorghum pan heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. Hot gasses moved through the flue underneath the entire copper bottom of the sorghum pan from the furnace end (in background) to the smokestack end (in foreground). After the hot cane juice moved through the separate compartments until it reached the final compartment (now missing two sides) where it was drawn out from the copper lip in the corner. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  15. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr•m2, respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr•m2 is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance.

  16. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr∙m(2), respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr∙m(2) is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance. PMID:26150329

  17. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2015-07-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr•m2, respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr•m2 is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance.

  18. Effects of measurement duration on the determination of basal metabolic rate and evaporative water loss of small marsupials: how long is long enough?

    PubMed

    Cooper, C E; Withers, P C

    2009-01-01

    We examined the time course for measurement of basal metabolic rate (BMR; measured as O(2) consumption and CO(2) production) and standard evaporative water loss (EWL) for six species of small marsupial to determine the minimum time required to achieve basal/standard values. There was a highly significant effect of measurement duration on measured physiological variables with values for O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, and EWL decreasing with time for all species. The time required to attain values statistically indistinguishable from minimal differed significantly between species, but in general O(2) consumption rate reached basal values after 4.3 h, CO(2) production after 4.5 h, and evaporative water loss after 5.2 h. For 16 BMR measurements of small marsupial species in the literature, with experimental duration provided, 10 were for less than 4 h, suggesting that their BMR values might be overestimates. For EWL, three of the four published values for small marsupials may be overestimates. It is clear that appropriate experimental duration is an important component of the measurement protocol for both BMR and standardized water loss, which needs to be rigorously observed in future studies. PMID:19653857

  19. A Graphical Representation of the Evaporation Solution Space and the Complementary Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Complementary Relationship (CR) between regional evapotranspiration E and potential or pan evaporation Ep can be written as Ep-E0 = b(E0-E), where E0 is the evaporation rate if the entire regional surface was wet. The CR corresponds to the idea that reduced evaporation due to drying of the land surface results in increased sensible heat fluxes and an increased potential for evaporation. Recent (2009) contributions to the theory behind the CR by Pettijohn and Salvucci and by Szilagyi and Jozsa led to a much clearer grasp of the physics behind the CR by examining the role of two-dimensional heat and vapor transport. Recent papers such as those mentioned above have questioned the traditional idea that b=1, while at the same time raising questions about the proper representations of E0 and Ep. As a result, the conceptual simplicity of the original CR models by Bouchet, Morton, and Brutsaert and Stricker is no longer obvious. The goal of this work was to provide a visual representation of local evaporation as defined by the Penman-Monteith equation, and to illustrate different CR models by highlighting those parts of the Penman-Monteith evaporation solution-space that are also part of a CR model solution-space. Specifically, EF is found for a wide range of values of rs/ra and EA/Qn, where EF=E/Qn, Qn is the available energy, rs is the stomatal resistance, ra is the aerodynamic resistance, and EA is the drying power of the air. These results are used to create a 3-dimensional EF surface as a function of rs/ra and EA/Qn. Representations of several CR models based on different values of b, E0 and Ep are represented as curves drawn on the 3-D EF surface. Variations in models include those for which b=1 or b=5; for which E0 is defined with the Priestley Taylor α=1 or α=1.26; and for which Ep is found from Penman's equation or from simulated pan evaporation. Differences in the curves for different versions of the CR are noted. One conclusion is that, while b tends to be in the range of 3 to 6 for Ep determined from pan evaporation, a close reading of the paper by Pettijohn and Salvucci suggests it is much closer to 1 for Ep from the Penman equation. This helps to reconcile the generally good results that have been found in the literature using the Advection-Aridity approach, with the more recent reports of strong asymmetry in the CR (that is, of values of b much larger than 1).

  20. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of heating near the top of streamers in ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, where the plasma is weakly contained by the magnetic field. Heating causes slow opening of field lines and release of new solar wind. It was discovered in simulations and, due to the absence of loss mechanisms, the ultimate end point is the complete evaporation of the streamer. Of course streamers do not behave in this way because there are losses by thermal conduction and radiation. Physically, heating is also expected to depend on ambient conditions. We use our global MHD model with thermal conduction to examine the effect of changing the heating scale height. We also apply and extend an analytic model of streamers developed by Pneuman (1968) to show that steady streamers are unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than approximately 2 x 10(exp 6) K.

  1. Reservoir evaporation in Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Ayala, Rolando A.

    2014-03-01

    The role of reservoir surface evaporation in river/reservoir water budgets and water management is explored using a modeling system that combines historical natural hydrology with current conditions of water resources development and management. The long-term mean evaporation from the 3415 reservoirs in the Texas water rights permit system is estimated to be 7.53 billion m3/year, which is equivalent to 61% of total agricultural or 126% of total municipal water use in the state during the year 2010. Evaporation varies with the hydrologic conditions governing reservoir surface areas and evaporation rates. Annual statewide total evaporation volumes associated with exceedance probabilities of 75%, 50%, and 25% are 7.07, 7.47, and 7.95 billion m3/year, respectively. Impacts of evaporation are greatest during extended severe droughts that govern water supply capabilities.

  2. Skeletal development in Pan paniscus with comparisons to Pan troglodytes.

    PubMed

    Bolter, Debra R; Zihlman, Adrienne L

    2012-04-01

    Fusion of skeletal elements provides markers for timing of growth and is one component of a chimpanzee's physical development. Epiphyseal closure defines bone growth and signals a mature skeleton. Most of what we know about timing of development in chimpanzees derives from dental studies on Pan troglodytes. Much less is known about the sister species, Pan paniscus, with few in captivity and a wild range restricted to central Africa. Here, we report on the timing of skeletal fusion for female captive P. paniscus (n = 5) whose known ages range from 0.83 to age 11.68 years. Observations on the skeletons were made after the individuals were dissected and bones cleaned. Comparisons with 10 female captive P. troglodytes confirm a generally uniform pattern in the sequence of skeletal fusion in the two captive species. We also compared the P. paniscus to a sample of three unknown-aged female wild P. paniscus, and 10 female wild P. troglodytes of known age from the Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. The sequence of teeth emergence to bone fusion is generally consistent between the two species, with slight variations in late juvenile and subadult stages. The direct-age comparisons show that skeletal growth in captive P. paniscus is accelerated compared with both captive and wild P. troglodytes populations. The skeletal data combined with dental stages have implications for estimating the life stage of immature skeletal materials of wild P. paniscus and for more broadly comparing the skeletal growth rates among captive and wild chimpanzees (Pan), Homo sapiens, and fossil hominins. PMID:22331605

  3. Thermal evaporation-induced anhydrous synthesis of Fe3O4-graphene composite with enhanced rate performance and cyclic stability for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yucheng; Ma, Ruguang; Hu, Mingjun; Cheng, Hua; Yang, Qingdan; Li, Yang Yang; Zapien, Juan Antonio

    2013-05-21

    We present a high-yield and low cost thermal evaporation-induced anhydrous strategy to prepare hybrid materials of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and graphene as an advanced anode for high-performance lithium ion batteries. The ~10-20 nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles are densely anchored on conducting graphene sheets and act as spacers to keep the adjacent sheets separated. The Fe3O4-graphene composite displays a superior battery performance with high retained capacity of 868 mA h g(-1) up to 100 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g(-1), and 539 mA h g(-1) up to 200 cycles when cycling at 1000 mA g(-1), high Coulombic efficiency (above 99% after 200 cycles), good rate capability, and excellent cyclic stability. The simple approach offers a promising route to prepare anode materials for practical fabrication of lithium ion batteries. PMID:23558566

  4. Analysis of energy use in tomato evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, T.; Conant, T.

    1980-01-01

    Field performance data for four tomato product evaporators are presented and analyzed. Steam and feed flow rates along with steam economies were measured and are compared to steady state theoretical evaporator models.

  5. The Pan Zhichang Incident

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuchen, Zhu

    2007-01-01

    This article examines why Pan Zhichang, a well-known professor and Ph.D. candidate supervisor at Nanjing University, has repeatedly been accused of plagiarism. It may not be difficult to check whether he has committed plagiarism, but seeking the deeper social and systemic reasons for a person's repeated "negligence" is indeed a thought-provoking…

  6. Novel approaches to the calculation and comparison of thermoregulatory parameters: Non-linear regression of metabolic rate and evaporative water loss in Australian rodents.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Sean

    2016-04-01

    The calculation and comparison of physiological characteristics of thermoregulation has provided insight into patterns of ecology and evolution for over half a century. Thermoregulation has typically been explored using linear techniques; I explore the application of non-linear scaling to more accurately calculate and compare characteristics and thresholds of thermoregulation, including the basal metabolic rate (BMR), peak metabolic rate (PMR) and the lower (Tlc) and upper (Tuc) critical limits to the thermo-neutral zone (TNZ) for Australian rodents. An exponentially-modified logistic function accurately characterised the response of metabolic rate to ambient temperature, while evaporative water loss was accurately characterised by a Michaelis-Menten function. When these functions were used to resolve unique parameters for the nine species studied here, the estimates of BMR and TNZ were consistent with the previously published estimates. The approach resolved differences in rates of metabolism and water loss between subfamilies of Australian rodents that haven't been quantified before. I suggest that non-linear scaling is not only more effective than the established segmented linear techniques, but also is more objective. This approach may allow broader and more flexible comparison of characteristics of thermoregulation, but it needs testing with a broader array of taxa than those used here. PMID:27033039

  7. Pan-Tetris: an interactive visualisation for Pan-genomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Large-scale genome projects have paved the way to microbial pan-genome analyses. Pan-genomes describe the union of all genes shared by all members of the species or taxon under investigation. They offer a framework to assess the genomic diversity of a given collection of individual genomes and moreover they help to consolidate gene predictions and annotations. The computation of pan-genomes is often a challenge, and many techniques that use a global alignment-independent approach run the risk of not separating paralogs from orthologs. Also alignment-based approaches which take the gene neighbourhood into account often need additional manual curation of the results. This is quite time consuming and so far there is no visualisation tool available that offers an interactive GUI for the pan-genome to support curating pan-genomic computations or annotations of orthologous genes. Results We introduce Pan-Tetris, a Java based interactive software tool that provides a clearly structured and suitable way for the visual inspection of gene occurrences in a pan-genome table. The main features of Pan-Tetris are a standard coordinate based presentation of multiple genomes complemented by easy to use tools compensating for algorithmic weaknesses in the pan-genome generation workflow. We demonstrate an application of Pan-Tetris to the pan-genome of Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Pan-Tetris is currently the only interactive pan-genome visualisation tool. Pan-Tetris is available from http://bit.ly/1vVxYZT PMID:26328606

  8. Computing Evaporation Using Meteorological Data for Hydrological Budget of Lake Wapalanne in NJ School of Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J. J.; Barrett, K. R.; Galster, J. C.; Ophori, D. U.; Flores, D.; Kelly, S. A.; Lutey, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lake Wapalanne is small manmade lake about 5.4 hectares in northwest New Jersey in the Highlands Physiographic province within permanently protected land. The lake's surrounding area consists of forested vegetation and is relatively unoccupied which minimizes human influence. The lake's small size, minimal external influence, geographic isolation, and protected status provide an optimal research environment to record meteorological data used in calculation of potential evaporation. Between July 7h and August 3rd meteorological data was collected from a professional weather station placed on an island directly in the center of Lake Wapalanne. The Vantage Pro2 weather station provided accurate readings of temperate, humidity, wind-speed and direction, precipitation, and atmospheric pressure. A bathometric survey of the lake was conducted to determine the surface area with variations in depth of the lake's water level. Using the collected weather station data, a rate of potential evaporation was determined with several evaporation equations. A quantified volume was then derived from the rate and surface area of the lake. Using small scale evaporation measurements of known volumes of water within small pans placed in the lake water and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration evaporation stations near the experiment site, a comparison and validation of the calculated potential evaporation accuracy and regional evaporation is achieved. This three year study is part of an ongoing NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project that encompasses additional topics of lake research; see abstract from Kelly et al. AGU 2011 for more information on the lake's hydrologic budget. The results and methods of this study will be of use in future forecasting and baseline measurements of hydrologic budgets for lakes and reservoirs within regional proximity, which provide drinking water to over five million people in the State of New Jersey.

  9. Characterization and Compatibility Studies of Different Rate Retardant Polymer Loaded Microspheres by Solvent Evaporation Technique: In Vitro-In Vivo Study of Vildagliptin as a Model Drug

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Irin; Islam, Swarnali; Rana, Md. Sohel

    2015-01-01

    The present study has been performed to microencapsulate the antidiabetic drug of Vildagliptin to get sustained release of drug. The attempt of this study was to formulate and evaluate the Vildagliptin loaded microspheres by emulsion solvent evaporation technique using different polymers like Eudragit RL100, Eudragit RS100, Ethyl cellulose, and Methocel K100M. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out in 0.1 N HCl for 8 hours according to USP paddle method. The maximum and minimum drug release were observed as 92.5% and 68.5% from microspheres, respectively, after 8 hours. Release kinetics were studied in different mathematical release models to find out the linear relationship and release rate of drug. The SEM, DSC, and FTIR studies have been done to confirm good spheres and smooth surface as well as interaction along with drug and polymer. In this experiment, it is difficult to explain the exact mechanism of drug release. But the drug might be released by both diffusion and erosion as the correlation coefficient (R2) best fitted with Korsmeyer model and release exponent (n) was 0.45–0.89. At last it can be concluded that all in vitro and in vivo experiments exhibited promising result to treat type II diabetes mellitus with Vildagliptin microspheres. PMID:26640713

  10. Characterization and Compatibility Studies of Different Rate Retardant Polymer Loaded Microspheres by Solvent Evaporation Technique: In Vitro-In Vivo Study of Vildagliptin as a Model Drug.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Irin; Islam, Swarnali; Rana, Md Sohel

    2015-01-01

    The present study has been performed to microencapsulate the antidiabetic drug of Vildagliptin to get sustained release of drug. The attempt of this study was to formulate and evaluate the Vildagliptin loaded microspheres by emulsion solvent evaporation technique using different polymers like Eudragit RL100, Eudragit RS100, Ethyl cellulose, and Methocel K100M. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out in 0.1 N HCl for 8 hours according to USP paddle method. The maximum and minimum drug release were observed as 92.5% and 68.5% from microspheres, respectively, after 8 hours. Release kinetics were studied in different mathematical release models to find out the linear relationship and release rate of drug. The SEM, DSC, and FTIR studies have been done to confirm good spheres and smooth surface as well as interaction along with drug and polymer. In this experiment, it is difficult to explain the exact mechanism of drug release. But the drug might be released by both diffusion and erosion as the correlation coefficient (R (2)) best fitted with Korsmeyer model and release exponent (n) was 0.45-0.89. At last it can be concluded that all in vitro and in vivo experiments exhibited promising result to treat type II diabetes mellitus with Vildagliptin microspheres. PMID:26640713

  11. High-rate and low-temperature growth of ZnO:Ga thin films by steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chih-Hao; Wang, Wei-Lin; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films with various thicknesses (120-520 nm) are deposited on the glass substrate at a high growth rate of 220 nm/min and a low temperature of 120 °C by a steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation (steered CAPE). The growth mechanism, microstructure, residual stress, surface morphology, electrical and optical properties, chemical states, electron transport behaviors and thickness effect of the GZO films are investigated. The film stress is gradually relaxed from -0.516 GPa to -0.090 GPa with thickness increasing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the GZO microstructure consists of c-axis textured columnar grains accompanied by some embedded nanodroplets. The droplet size is significantly reduced when a high-melting-point (1975 °C) GZO ceramic target is adopted. High-resolution TEM image shows the GZO crystallites nucleated directly onto the amorphous substrate. The electrical properties improve with increasing thickness. The lowest resistivity (4.72 × 10-4 Ω cm) is achieved at the thickness of 520 nm, with a corresponding transmittance of 89% in the visible region. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements show that metal-semiconductor transition temperature increases from 136 K to 225 K when decreasing the thickness, which is due to the increasing the localized states caused by the defects and chemisorbed oxygen in thinner film.

  12. Multileg Heat-Pipe Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.; Haslett, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Parallel pipes provide high heat flow from small heat exchanger. Six parallel heat pipes extract heat from overlying heat exchanger, forming evaporator. Vapor channel in pipe contains wick that extends into screen tube in liquid channel. Rods in each channel hold wick and screen tube in place. Evaporator compact rather than extended and more compatible with existing heat-exchanger geometries. Prototype six-pipe evaporator only 0.3 m wide and 0.71 m long. With ammonia as working fluid, transports heat to finned condenser at rate of 1,200 W.

  13. An eye on small reservoirs: remote sensing of storage volumes, their use as remotely sensed runoff gauges, and evaporation losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebe, J. R.; van de Giesen, N.; Andreini, M. S.; Walter, M. T.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2009-04-01

    Small reservoirs are important sources of water supply for the scattered rural population in semi-arid areas. Due to their small size, and their existence in large numbers, such reservoirs have not been studied much. Little is known about their storage volumes, their impact on their watershed's contribution to runoff downstream, and their evaporation losses are frequently stated to be prohibitive. Satellite remote sensing can be used to assess and monitor small reservoirs' storage volumes with regional area-volume equations. Radar remote sensing of small reservoirs was found suitable especially during the rainy season due to its capability to penetrate clouds, but is affected by wind and lack of vegetation context during the dry season. Reservoirs were extracted most often successfully with a quasi-manual classification approach, as stringent classification rules often failed under less than optimal conditions. Especially wind speeds above 2.6 m s-1 at the time of image acquisition were detrimental (Bragg scattering) to the extraction of reservoirs. Due to lower wind speeds, the use of night time acquisitions was more effective than the use of daytime images. With a time series of radar images, small reservoirs were used as remotely sensed runoff gauges, and to calibrate hydrological rainfall-runoff models. Eight small reservoirs in the Upper East Region of Ghana, and Togo, were monitored to calibrate modified Thornthwaite-Mather models, in which increasing precipitation leads to exponentially increasing contributing areas. Model results indicate that the reservoirs captured, on the average, 34% of the quick flow, and 15% of overall runoff from their watersheds. Reservoir evaporation losses were measured directly with a floating evaporation pan and were compared to evaporation rates determined from the reservoir's energy budget, and Penman's equation. The direct pan measurements were generally lower than the evaporation determined with the energy budget or Penman. Compared to land based potential evaporation, the reservoir evaporation was not excessive. Regional wind patterns influence evaporation dynamics from the reservoir. Northeast winds with a high saturation deficit lead to significant evaporation losses, while the evaporation losses under moister, more prevalent southwest winds were moderate.

  14. Evaporation variability of Nam Co Lake in the Tibetan Plateau and its role in recent rapid lake expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Szilagyi, Jozsef; Niu, Guo-Yue; Zhang, Yinsheng; Zhang, Teng; Wang, Binbin; Wu, Yanhong

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the majority of the lakes in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) started to expand rapidly since the late 1990s. However, the causes are still not well known. For Nam Co, being a closed lake with no outflow, evaporation (EL) over the lake surface is the only way water may leave the lake. Therefore, quantifying EL is key for investigating the mechanism of lake expansion in the TP. EL can be quantified by Penman- and/or bulk-transfer-type models, requiring only net radiation, temperature, humidity and wind speed for inputs. However, interpolation of wind speed data may be laden with great uncertainty due to extremely sparse ground meteorological observations, the highly heterogeneous landscape and lake-land breeze effects. Here, evaporation of Nam Co Lake was investigated within the 1979-2012 period at a monthly time-scale using the complementary relationship lake evaporation (CRLE) model which does not require wind speed data. Validations by in-situ observations of E601B pan evaporation rates at the shore of Nam Co Lake as well as measured EL over an adjacent small lake using eddy covariance technique suggest that CRLE is capable of simulating EL well since it implicitly considers wind effects on evaporation via its vapor transfer coefficient. The multi-year average of annual evaporation of Nam Co Lake is 635 mm. From 1979 to 2012, annual evaporation of Nam Co Lake expressed a very slight decreasing trend. However, a more significant decrease in EL occurred during 1998-2008 at a rate of -12 mm yr-1. Based on water-level readings, this significant decrease in lake evaporation was found to be responsible for approximately 4% of the reported rapid water level increase and areal expansion of Nam Co Lake during the same period.

  15. Evaporation effects in elastocapillary aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjittofis, Andreas; Lister, John R.; Singh, Kiran; Vella, Dominic

    2016-04-01

    We consider the effect of evaporation on the aggregation of a number of elastic objects due to a liquid's surface tension. In particular, we consider an array of spring--block elements in which the gaps between blocks are filled by thin liquid films that evaporate during the course of an experiment. Using lubrication theory to account for the fluid flow within the gaps, we study the dynamics of aggregation. We find that a non-zero evaporation rate causes the elements to aggregate more quickly and, indeed, to contact within finite time. However, we also show that the number of elements within each cluster decreases as the evaporation rate increases. We explain these results quantitatively by comparison with the corresponding two-body problem and discuss their relevance for controlling pattern formation in elastocapillary systems.

  16. Evaporation of multicomponent drop arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Annamalai, K.; Ryan, W.; Chandra, S. )

    1993-08-01

    The present paper deals with the evaporation of multicomponent fuel droplets in an array using the recently developed point source method (PSM). First, the quasisteady (QS) evaporation of an isolated, multicomponent droplet is briefly analyzed. The resultant governing equations, along with Raoult's law and the Cox-Antoine relation, constitute the set of equations needed to arrive at the solutions for: (1) the droplet surface temperature, (2) the evaporation rate of each species, and (3) the vapor mass fraction of each species at the droplet surface. The PSM, which treats the droplet as a point mass source and heat sink, is then adopted to obtain an analytic expression for the evaporation rate of a multicomponent droplet in an array of liquid droplets. Defining the correction factor ([eta]) as a ratio of the evaporation of a drop in an array to the evaporation rate of a similar isolated multicomponent drop, an expression for the correction factor is obtained. The results of the point source method (PSM) are then compared with those obtained elsewhere for a three-drop array that uses the method of images (MOI). Excellent agreement is obtained. The treatment is then extended to a binary drop array to study the effect of interdrop spacing on vaporization. 20 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Rainfall interception modelling: Is the wet bulb approach adequate to estimate mean evaporation rate from wet/saturated canopies in all forest types?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. L.; Valente, F.; David, J. S.; Jackson, N.; Minunno, F.; Gash, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Penman-Monteith equation has been widely used to estimate the maximum evaporation rate (E) from wet/saturated forest canopies, regardless of canopy cover fraction. Forests are then represented as a big leaf and interception loss considered essentially as a one-dimensional process. With increasing forest sparseness the assumptions behind this big leaf approach become questionable. In sparse forests it might be better to model E and interception loss at the tree level assuming that the individual tree crowns behave as wet bulbs ("wet bulb approach"). In this study, and for five different forest types and climate conditions, interception loss measurements were compared to modelled values (Gash's interception model) based on estimates of E by the Penman-Monteith and the wet bulb approaches. Results show that the wet bulb approach is a good, and less data demanding, alternative to estimate E when the forest canopy is fully ventilated (very sparse forests with a narrow canopy depth). When the canopy is not fully ventilated, the wet bulb approach requires a reduction of leaf area index to the upper, more ventilated parts of the canopy, needing data on the vertical leaf area distribution, which is seldom-available. In such cases, the Penman-Monteith approach seems preferable. Our data also show that canopy cover does not per se allow us to identify if a forest canopy is fully ventilated or not. New methodologies of sensitivity analyses applied to Gash's model showed that a correct estimate of E is critical for the proper modelling of interception loss.

  18. Marangoni Convection and Deviations from Maxwells' Evaporation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, P. N.; Snell, E. H.; Adamek, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the convective dynamics of evaporating pools of volatile liquids using an ultra-sensitive thermal imaging camera. During evaporation, there are significant convective flows inside the liquid due to Marangoni forces. We find that Marangoni convection during evaporation can dramatically affect the evaporation rates of volatile liquids. A simple heat balance model connects the convective velocities and temperature gradients to the evaporation rates.

  19. Estimation of evaporation from open water - A review of selected studies, summary of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers data collection and methods, and evaluation of two methods for estimation of evaporation from five reservoirs in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwell, Glenn R.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations responsible for the management of water resources, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are tasked with estimation of evaporation for water-budgeting and planning purposes. The USACE has historically used Class A pan evaporation data (pan data) to estimate evaporation from reservoirs but many USACE Districts have been experimenting with other techniques for an alternative to collecting pan data. The energy-budget method generally is considered the preferred method for accurate estimation of open-water evaporation from lakes and reservoirs. Complex equations to estimate evaporation, such as the Penman, DeBruin-Keijman, and Priestley-Taylor, perform well when compared with energy-budget method estimates when all of the important energy terms are included in the equations and ideal data are collected. However, sometimes nonideal data are collected and energy terms, such as the change in the amount of stored energy and advected energy, are not included in the equations. When this is done, the corresponding errors in evaporation estimates are not quantifiable. Much simpler methods, such as the Hamon method and a method developed by the U.S. Weather Bureau (USWB) (renamed the National Weather Service in 1970), have been shown to provide reasonable estimates of evaporation when compared to energy-budget method estimates. Data requirements for the Hamon and USWB methods are minimal and sometimes perform well with remotely collected data. The Hamon method requires average daily air temperature, and the USWB method requires daily averages of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. Estimates of annual lake evaporation from pan data are frequently within 20 percent of energy-budget method estimates. Results of evaporation estimates from the Hamon method and the USWB method were compared against historical pan data at five selected reservoirs in Texas (Benbrook Lake, Canyon Lake, Granger Lake, Hords Creek Lake, and Sam Rayburn Lake) to evaluate their performance and to develop coefficients to minimize bias for the purpose of estimating reservoir evaporation with accuracies similar to estimates of evaporation obtained from pan data. The modified Hamon method estimates of reservoir evaporation were similar to estimates of reservoir evaporation from pan data for daily, monthly, and annual time periods. The modified Hamon method estimates of annual reservoir evaporation were always within 20 percent of annual reservoir evaporation from pan data. Unmodified and modified USWB method estimates of annual reservoir evaporation were within 20 percent of annual reservoir evaporation from pan data for about 91 percent of the years compared. Average daily differences between modified USWB method estimates and estimates from pan data as a percentage of the average amount of daily evaporation from pan data were within 20 percent for 98 percent of the months. Without any modification to the USWB method, average daily differences as a percentage of the average amount of daily evaporation from pan data were within 20 percent for 73 percent of the months. Use of the unmodified USWB method is appealing because it means estimates of average daily reservoir evaporation can be made from air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation data collected from remote weather stations without the need to develop site-specific coefficients from historical pan data. Site-specific coefficients would need to be developed for the modified version of the Hamon method.

  20. Simulations of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN) Photochemistry in the Arctic Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassau, T. M.; Ford, K. M.; Shepson, P. B.; Bottenheim, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is a reservoir compound of NOx_ that has the ability to transport NOx_ to remote environments, allowing for NOx_ photochemistry and/or deposition of nitrogen to these clean locations. Measurements of PAN have been made at Alert, Nunavut and Summit, Greenland aimed at understanding the nitrogen budget at each site. These measurements show concentrations of PAN that are only slowly varying, even during ozone depletion events at sunrise. However, calculations of [PAN], using its primary sources and sinks, indicate a dramatic production rate for PAN when the surface is sunlit. This is inconsistent with the measurement data, illustrating that we are missing an important sink for atmospheric PAN above snow-covered surfaces. We performed a zero-dimensional model of PAN photochemistry at Alert, Nunavut and Summit, Greenland, which simulated the known gas-phase chemistry of each region, to discern the predicted PAN behavior in each environment. We then adjusted the model sinks to simulate the ambient PAN data, in order to determine the magnitude of the missing PAN sink. Ambient data from Alert, Nunavut (1998 and 2000), and Summit, Greenland (1999) will be presented, as well as the original model simulations based upon the known gas-phase chemistry of each environment. In addition, we will discuss the magnitude of the missing sink, and the potential for PAN interaction with the snowpack.

  1. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder Insurance Pan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Weller, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) obtained a full panorama of the Sagan Memorial Station landing site on Sol 2, before the IMP mast was deployed. The images in this panorama were taken in 4 filters (including stereo) and losslessly compressed to provide a high-quality multispectral survey of the landing site even if the IMP mast did not successfully deploy; this data set was therefore called the Insurance Pan. It was completed late in the afternoon of Sol 2, just before the IMP mast was (successfully) deployed. The data were stored in memory and returned to Earth after it became clear that downlink rates were higher than expected. The Insurance Pan horizontal (azimuth) coverage is nearly complete, with gaps caused by pointing errors and data packet losses. Stereo data were acquired in the blue (445 nm) filter, as well as right-eye green (531 nm), orange (600 nm), and near-infrared (752 nm) data.

  2. Evaporation Rate and Development of Wetted Area of Water Droplets with and without Surfactant at Different Locations on Waxy Leaf Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evaporation and formation of deposit patterns from single droplets deposited at various locations on waxy leaves were investigated under controlled conditions. Leaf locations included the interveinal area, midrib and secondary vein on both adaxial and abaxial surfaces. Tests were conducted with ...

  3. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J. Gerken, A. V. Thomas, N. Koratkar and M. A. Oehlschlaeger, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, vol. 74, no. 1, pp. 263-268, July 2014. W. J. Gerken, M. A. Oehlschlaeger, "Nanofluid Pendant Droplet Evaporation", in Proceedings of the ASME 2013 Summer Heat Transfer Conference, Minneapolis, MN, 2013, pp. V001T03A018.

  4. Changes in the atmospheric evaporative demand in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustin Brena-Naranjo, Jose; Pedrozo-Acua, Adrian; Laverde-Barajas, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    An important driver of the hydrological cycle is the atmospheric evaporative demand (AED). Previous studies using measurements of evaporation in pans have found evidence that AED has been declining over the second half of the 20th century. Such trends have been mostly attributed to a global decline in near surface wind speed (mainly driven by changes in land cover such as the terrestrial surface roughness) whereas other variables controlling AED such as the vapor pressure deficit, solar radiation and air temperature having a more limited role (such changes are driven by long-term climatic variations). The objective of this work is to assess the temporal and spatial observed changes in pan evaporation in 151 meteorological stations located across Mexico for the period 1961-2010. The stations were located on a climatic gradient, with aridity indexes ranging between 0.3 and 10. The radiative and aerodynamic controls attributed to the observed trends are analyzed with outputs by the Noah model from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). The results show a consistent decline in annual pan evaporation between 1961 and 1992 whereas the trend was reverted from 1992 until 2010. Statistically significant negative changes using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test were found in 43% of the stations for the 1961-1992 and 20% for 1992-2010, respectively. Among the climatological variables extracted from GLDAS, it was the annual wind speed that gave the highest statistical correlation. This work agrees with previous studies in other regions of the world suggesting that pan evaporation has been on average declining until 1990 followed by a slightly positive trend during the last twenty years. Finally, we show that the magnitude of change in those regions dominated by wind and those dominated by radiative processes are strongly different.

  5. The Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to z ? 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lihwai; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Jian, Hung-Yu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Norberg, Peder; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Draper, P.; Heinis, Sebastien; Phleps, Stefanie; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Burgett, William; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; and others

    2014-02-10

    Using a large optically selected sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS), we present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate (SSFR)stellar mass (M {sub *}) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M {sub *} relation in different environments. While both the SSFR and the quiescent fraction depend strongly on stellar mass, the environment also plays an important role. Using this large galaxy sample, we confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments (M > 10{sup 14} M {sub ?}), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star-forming sequence of 17% at 4? confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass, although deeper and larger data from the full PS1/MDS will be required to draw firm conclusions. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar massthe mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent galaxies for more massive galaxies, while less massive galaxies are quenched mostly through the environmental effect, with the transition mass around 1-2 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} in the group/cluster environment.

  6. Evaporation in space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    'Normal evaporation' equations for predicting the compositional changes with time and temperature have been developed and correlated with actual experimental data. An evaporative congruent temperature is defined and used to explain, predict, or plan space experiments on anomalous constitutional melting (on cooling) or solidification (on heating). Uneven evaporation causes reactive jetting forces capable of initiating new convection currents, nongravitational accelerations, surface vibrations, or other disturbances. Applications of evaporation to space manufacturing are described concerning evaporative purification, surface cooling, specimen selection, particles splitting, freezing data interpretation, material loss and dimensional control, and surface contamination or compositional changes.

  7. Development of PAN-based absorbers for treating waste problems at U.S. DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sebesta, F.; John, J.; Motl, A.; Watson, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) can be used to bind together very small particles of absorbers into porous aggregates that can be used conveniently in packed columns. While binding the small particles together, the PAN allows substantial diffusion and even flow through the aggregates to give high effective mass transfer rates. Although PAN has been used or proposed for several applications, its capabilities for use with the US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes have not been determined. This paper summaries studies at the Czech Technical University on the stability of PAN-based absorbers under the radiation, chemical, and physical conditions needed for DOE wastes and assessments of their potential performance with selected US wastes.

  8. Salt stains from evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F L; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  9. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F. L.; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  10. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Rest, A.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Metcalfe, N.; Stubbs, C. W.

    2013-12-10

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ∼ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ≳ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(τ ∼ 0.5 hr) ≲ 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ≲ 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ∼1 day is R {sub FOT} ≲ 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ≈ –10 to ≈ – 14 mag for a timescale of ∼0.5 hr to ∼1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ≲ 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –10 mag), ≲ 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –14 mag), and ≲ 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova, and gamma-ray burst rates, respectively, indicating that much larger surveys are required to provide meaningful constraints. Motivated by the results of our search, we discuss strategies for identifying fast optical transients in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope main survey, and reach the optimistic conclusion that the veil of foreground contaminants can be lifted with the survey data, without the need for expensive follow-up observations.

  11. A CIMS Technique for Fast Time Response PAN Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, D. L.; Tanner, D. J.; Huey, G.

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS) technique for detecting atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) utilizing I- chemistry. I- is a very selective reagent ion because it is unreactive with most atmospheric species including ozone, nitric acid, and water. It is synthesized by dissociative electron attachment to CF3I. Ambient air is sampled into the CIMS through heated 0.375" o.d. PFA Teflon tubing. PAN thermally dissociates in the Teflon tube to form CH3C(O)O2 (PA) and NO2. The CH3C(O)O2 reacts with I- in the CIMS flow tube at the gas kinetic rate [Villalta and Howard, 1996] to form CH3C(O)O- and IO, thus allowing for selective and sensitive detection of PAN. Preliminary data suggest that our sensitivity is at least one Hz/pptv of PAN. We routinely observed 1000-2000 Hz of CH3C(O)O- in room air this summer in Atlanta with a background of <50 Hz. The background was determined by either cooling the inlet or adding excess NO to the inlet to react away the peroxyacetyl radical before it entered the CIMS. These results indicate that a detection limit of less than 20 pptv for a one second integration period is feasible with this technique. A potential problem with this technique is destruction of the PA radicals via reaction with ambient NO. However, due to a very short effective reaction time in the inlet (5-10 ms), we estimate that reaction of PA with NO decreases the measured PAN level by less than 10% at a NO mixing ratio of 40 ppbv. Complications due to self reaction of the PA radical should also be insignificant for PAN levels less than 40 ppbv. Potential interferences from water, acetone, and other species will be addressed. Correlations of PAN with ozone and NOx measured in Atlanta will also be presented.

  12. Electrically controllable artificial PAN muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpoor, Karim; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Mojarrad, Mehran

    1996-02-01

    Artificial muscles made with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers are traditionally activated in electrolytic solution by changing the pH of the solution by the addition of acids and/or bases. This usually consumes a considerable amount of weak acids or bases. Furthermore, the synthetic muscle (PAN) itself has to be impregnated with an acid or a base and must have an appropriate enclosure or provision for waste collection after actuation. This work introduces a method by which the PAN muscle may be elongated or contracted in an electric field. We believe this is the first time that this has been achieved with PAN fibers as artificial muscles. In this new development the PAN muscle is first put in close contact with one of the two platinum wires (electrodes) immersed in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride. Applying an electric voltage between the two wires changes the local acidity of the solution in the regions close to the platinum wires. This is because of the ionization of sodium chloride molecules and the accumulation of Na+ and Cl- ions at the negative and positive electrode sites, respectively. This ion accumulation, in turn, is accompanied by a sharp increase and decrease of the local acidity in regions close to either of the platinum wires, respectively. An artificial muscle, in close contact with the platinum wire, because of the change in the local acidity will contract or expand depending on the polarity of the electric field. This scheme allows the experimenter to use a fixed flexible container of an electrolytic solution whose local pH can be modulated by an imposed electric field while the produced ions are basically trapped to stay in the neighborhood of a given electrode. This method of artificial muscle activation has several advantages. First, the need to use a large quantity of acidic or alkaline solutions is eliminated. Second, the use of a compact PAN muscular system is facilitated for applications in active musculoskeletal structures. Third, the PAN muscles become electrically controllable and therefore the use of such artificial muscles in robotic structures and applications becomes more feasible. A muscle is designed such that it is exposed to either Na+ or Cl- ions effectively. Muscle contraction or expansion characteristics under the effect of the applied electric field are discussed.

  13. The Pan-STARRS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter Chambers, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The 4 year Pan-STARRS1 Science Mission has now completed and the data will be publicly release by the time of the IAU Assembly. The full data set, including catalogs (100TB database), images (2PB), and metadata, will be available from the STScI MAST archive. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) The 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) The Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints (7 sq deg each) spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey of the ecliptic optimized for the discovery of Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey in the galactic bulge; and (5) a time domain Survey of M31.The characteristics of the Pan-STARRS Surveys will be presented, including image quality, depth, cadence, and coverage. Science results span most fields of astronomy from Near Earth Objects to cosmology.The 2nd mission, the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey, is currently underway on PS1 and it will be supplemented by PS2 as it becomes fully operational. PS2 is currently undergoing commissioning and is expected to begin full time science observations with an functional capability similar to PS1 by summer of 2015. The status of PS2 and commissioning data from PS2 will be presented along with a full description of the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey. The prospects for future (beyond 2017) wide field surveys in the Northern Hemisphere will also be discussed.The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii; the Pan-STARRS Project Office; the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes: the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching; The Johns Hopkins University; Durham University; the University of Edinburgh; Queen's University Belfast; the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated; the National Central University of Taiwan; the Space Telescope Science Institute; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant Nos. NNX08AR22G, NNX12AR65G, and NNX14AM74G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate; the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-1238877; the University of Maryland; the Eotvos Lorand University; and the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. African Drum and Steel Pan Ensembles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunkett, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how to develop both African drum and steel pan ensembles providing information on teacher preparation, instrument choice, beginning the ensemble, and lesson planning. Includes additional information for the drum ensembles. Lists references and instructional materials, sources of drums and pans, and common note layout/range for steel pan

  15. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    PubMed Central

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vaporliquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly. PMID:19861551

  16. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  17. Laboratory prototype flash evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

  18. The Pan-STARRS Moving Object Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Grav, Tommy; Granvik, Mikael; Kubica, Jeremy; Milani, Andrea; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard; Chang, Daniel; Pierfederici, Francesco; Kaiser, N.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Price, P. A.; Myers, Jonathan; Kleyna, Jan; Hsieh, Henry; Farnocchia, Davide; Waters, Chris; Sweeney, W. H.; Green, Denver; Bolin, Bryce; Burgett, W. S.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, John L.; Hodapp, K. W.; Chastel, Serge; Chesley, Steve; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Holman, Matthew; Spahr, Tim; Tholen, David; Williams, Gareth V.; Abe, Shinsuke; Armstrong, J. D.; Bressi, Terry H.; Holmes, Robert; Lister, Tim; McMillan, Robert S.; Micheli, Marco; Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, William H.; Scotti, James V.

    2013-04-01

    We describe the Pan-STARRS Moving Object Processing System (MOPS), a modern software package that produces automatic asteroid discoveries and identifications from catalogs of transient detections from next-generation astronomical survey telescopes. MOPS achieves >99.5% efficiency in producing orbits from a synthetic but realistic population of asteroids whose measurements were simulated for a Pan-STARRS4-class telescope. Additionally, using a nonphysical grid population, we demonstrate that MOPS can detect populations of currently unknown objects such as interstellar asteroids. MOPS has been adapted successfully to the prototype Pan-STARRS1 telescope despite differences in expected false detection rates, fill-factor loss, and relatively sparse observing cadence compared to a hypothetical Pan-STARRS4 telescope and survey. MOPS remains highly efficient at detecting objects but drops to 80% efficiency at producing orbits. This loss is primarily due to configurable MOPS processing limits that are not yet tuned for the Pan-STARRS1 mission. The core MOPS software package is the product of more than 15 person-years of software development and incorporates countless additional years of effort in third-party software to perform lower-level functions such as spatial searching or orbit determination. We describe the high-level design of MOPS and essential subcomponents, the suitability of MOPS for other survey programs, and suggest a road map for future MOPS development.

  19. An electronic pan/tilt/zoom camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, Steve; Martin, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    A small camera system is described for remote viewing applications that employs fisheye optics and electronics processing for providing pan, tilt, zoom, and rotational movements. The fisheye lens is designed to give a complete hemispherical FOV with significant peripheral distortion that is corrected with high-speed electronic circuitry. Flexible control of the viewing requirements is provided by a programmable transformation processor so that pan/tilt/rotation/zoom functions can be accomplished without mechanical movements. Images are presented that were taken with a prototype system using a CCD camera, and 5 frames/sec can be acquired from a 180-deg FOV. The image-tranformation device can provide multiple images with different magnifications and pan/tilt/rotation sequences at frame rates compatible with conventional video devices. The system is of interest to the object tracking, surveillance, and viewing in constrained environments that would require the use of several cameras.

  20. Vapor compression evaporator concentrates, recovers alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.N.; Robe, K.; Bacchetti, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    This article focuses on presenting a solution to the high energy cost of operating a steam heated, single effect evaporator used by Monsanto Industrial Chemical Company at a plant in Seattle, Wash., to produce vanillin from pulp and paper mill sulfite. Use of the single effect flash evaporator resulted in high energy usage due not only to the ''single effect'' use of steam, but also because energy consumption was reduced only slightly at low operating rates. The solution to this problem was the replacement of the single effect evaporator with a vapor recompression evaporator. Operating for over 1 1/2 years, the vapor recompression evaporator system has had no significant maintenance problems. The system operates with only 1/60th the steam consumption and 15% of the total energy consumption of the previous evaporator and has had no tube fouling. Also, since the distillate is condensed within the evaporator, less cooling water is required, allowing two heat exchangers to be taken out of service. When operating at less than design capacity, the energy consumption drops almost linearly with the feed rate. At low feed rates, a by-pass valve unloads the compressor to reduce energy consumption. Total energy consumption, now 15% of the previous level, results in an estimated pay-back of less than three years.

  1. Measurements of Evaporation Kinetics of Aqueous Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Shih, O.; Liu, F.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    The rates of water evaporation and condensation govern the growth, size distribution, and number concentration of cloud droplets, yet the details of these fundamental processes remain poorly understood. In this work, the effect of acetic acid on the evaporation rate of water is studied using a liquid microjet technique. A collimated train of micron-sized droplets containing 1M acetic acid is injected into a vacuum chamber, and their temperature is measured at various distances from the jet nozzle using Raman thermometry. The data are compared to an evaporative cooling model to determine the evaporation coefficient, γ. In previous studies, γ was determined for pure water, D2O, 3M ammonium sulfate, and 4M sodium perchlorate to be 0.62 ±0.09, 0.57 ±0.06, 0.58 ±0.05, and 0.47 ±0.02, respectively. It is hypothesized that more surface-active species have a greater effect on evaporation rates. Acetic acid has been shown to be surface-active and is therefore representative of the small, surfactant-like molecules often found in aerosols. Preliminary results show a slight reduction in the evaporation coefficient for acetic acid compared to pure water. These experimental findings are being compared with calculations from the Chandler group at UC Berkeley in order to better understand the molecular mechanism of water evaporation.

  2. The Pan-STARRS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Pan-STARRS Team

    2016-01-01

    The 4 year Pan-STARRS1 Science Mission has now completed and the final data processing and database ingest is underway. We expect to have the public release of the PS1 Survey data at approximately the time of the AAS Meeting. The full data set, including catalogs (150 Terabyte database), images (2 Petabytes), and metadata, will be available from the STScI MASTarchive. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) The 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) The Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints (7 sq deg each) spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey of the ecliptic optimized for the discovery of Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey in the galactic bulge; and (5) a time domain Survey of M31. The characteristics of the Pan-STARRS1 Surveys will be presented, including image quality, depth, cadence, and coverage. Science results span most fields of astronomy from Near Earth Objects to cosmology. The 2nd mission, the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey, is currently underway on PS1 and it will be supplemented by PS2 observations as PS2 becomes fully operational. We will also report on the status of PS2 and the prospects for future wide field surveys in the Northern Hemisphere. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii; the Pan-STARRS Project Office; the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes: the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching; The Johns Hopkins University; Durham University; the University of Edinburgh; Queen's University Belfast; the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated; the National Central University of Taiwan; the Space Telescope Science Institute; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate; the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-1238877; the University of Maryland; the Eotvos Lorand University; and the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  3. Effects of nanoparticles on nanofluid droplet evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruey-Hung; Phuoc, Tran X.; Martello, Donald

    2010-09-01

    Laponite, Fe2O3 and Ag nanoparticles were added to deionized water to study their effect of evaporation rates. The results show that these nanofluid droplets evaporate at different rates (as indicated by the evaporation rate constant K in the well known D2-law) from the base fluid. Different particles lead to different values of K. As the particle concentration increases due to evaporation. K values of various Ag and Fe2O3 nanofluids go through a transition from one value to another, further demonstrating the effect of increasing nanoparticle concentration. The implication for the heat of vaporization (hfg) is discussed.

  4. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  5. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  6. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The

  7. The Effect of Nitrogen Gas Flow Rate on the Properties of TiN-COATED High-Speed Steel (hss) Using Cathodic Arc Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (pvd) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, Ali; Hamzah, Esah Binti; Mohd Toff, Mohd Radzi Hj.; Hashim, Abdul Hakim Bin

    Cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) is a widely-used technique for generating highly ionized plasma from which hard and wear resistant physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings can be deposited. A major drawback of this technique is the emission of micrometer-sized droplets of cathode material from the arc spot, which are commonly referred to as "macroparticles." In present study, titanium nitride (TiN) coatings on high-speed steel (HSS) coupons were produced with a cathodic arc evaporation technique. We studied and discussed the effect of various nitrogen gas flow rates on microstructural and mechanical properties of TiN-coated HSS coupons. The coating properties investigated in this work included the surface morphology, thickness of deposited coating, adhesion between the coating and substrate, coating composition, coating crystallography, hardness and surface characterization using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) with glazing incidence angle (GIA) technique, scratch tester, hardness testing machine, surface roughness tester, and atomic force microscope (AFM). An increase in the nitrogen gas flow rate showed decrease in the formation of macro-droplets in CAE PVD technique. During XRD-GIA studies, it was observed that by increasing the nitrogen gas flow rate, the main peak [1,1,1] shifted toward the lower angular position. Surface roughness decreased with an increase in nitrogen gas flow rate but was higher than the uncoated polished sample. Microhardness of TiN-coated HSS coupons showed more than two times increase in hardness than the uncoated one. Scratch tester results showed good adhesion between the coating material and substrate. Considerable improvement in the properties of TiN-deposited thin films was achieved by the strict control of all operational steps.

  8. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  9. THE ROLE OF AQUEOUS THIN FILM EVAPORATIVE COOLING ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR-WATER EXCHANGE UNDER TEMPERATURE DISEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical conununity has only recently addressed the role of atmospheric temperature variations on rates of air-water vapor phase toxicant exchange. The technical literature has documented that: 1) day time rates of elemental mercury vapor phase air-water exchange can exceed ...

  10. Influence of monolayer amounts of HNO3 on the evaporation rate of H2O over ice in the range 179 to 208 K: a quartz crystal microbalance study.

    PubMed

    Delval, Christophe; Rossi, Michel J

    2005-08-18

    The evaporation flux J(ev) of H2O from thin H2O ice films containing between 0.5 and 7 monolayers of HNO3 has been measured in the range 179 to 208 K under both molecular and stirred flow conditions in isothermal experiments. FTIR absorption of the HNO3/H2O condensate revealed the formation of metastable alpha-NAT (HNO(3).3H2O) converting to stable beta-NAT at 205 K. After deposition of HNO3 for 16-80 s on a 1 mum thick pure ice film at a deposition rate in the range (6-60) x 10(12) molecules s(-1) the initial evaporative flux J(ev)(H2O) was always that of pure ice. J(ev)(H2O) gradually decreased with the evaporation of H2O and the concomitant increase of the average mole fraction of HNO3, chi(HNO3), indicating the presence of an amorphous mixture of H2O/HNO3 that is called complexed or (c)-ice whose vapor pressure is that of pure ice. The final value of J(ev) was smaller by factors varying from 2.7 to 65 relative to pure ice. Depending on the doping conditions and temperature of the ice film the pure ice thickness d(D) of the ice film for which J(ev) < 0.85J(ev)(pure ice) varied between 130 and 700 nm compared to the 1000 nm thick original ice film at 208 and 191 K, respectively, in what seems to be an inverse temperature dependence. There exist three different types of H2O molecules under the present experimental conditions, namely (a) free H2O corresponding to pure ice, (b) complexed H2O or c-ice, and (c) H2O molecules originating from the breakup of NAT or amorphous H2O/HNO3 mixtures. The significant decrease of J(ev)(H2O) with increasing chi(HNO3) leads to an increase of the evaporative lifetime of atmospheric ice particles in the presence of HNO3 and may help explain the occurrence of persistent and/or large contaminated ice particles at certain atmospheric conditions. PMID:16834079

  11. THE FLAMMABILITY ANALYSIS AND TIME TO REACH LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT CALCULATIONS ON THE WASTE EVAPORATION AT 242-A EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HU TA

    2007-10-31

    This document describes the analysis of the waste evaporation process on the flammability behavior. The evaluation calculates the gas generation rate, time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), and minimum ventilation rates for the 242-A Evaporator facility during the normal evaporation process and when vacuum is lost. This analysis performs flammability calculations on the waste currently within all 28 double-shell tanks (DST) under various evaporation process conditions to provide a wide spectrum of possible flammable gas behavior. The results of this analysis are used to support flammable gas control decisions and support and upgrade to Documented Safety Analysis for the 242-A Evaporator.

  12. Multiple equilibria and evaporation in elastocapillary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kiran; Taroni, Michele; Vella, Dominic; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-11-01

    In this talk we consider the coalescence of microscopic flexible beams caused by the surface tension of an intervening liquid. Our work is motivated by the coalescence observed in the manufacture of MEMS devices. We develop a model coupling the elastic deflection of the beams, lubrication-type flow and surface tension; we also investigate the role played by the evaporation of the liquid. In the absence of evaporation, multiple equilibrium states exist. We characterize these states and determine their stability. We consider the effect of evaporation and show that sufficiently high evaporation rates can suppress the tendency of beams to stick together. Finally, we consider some extensions of our models showing how the interaction between multiple beams may delay the rate of evolution and discuss the way in which heating the beams is even more effective in suppressing sticking.

  13. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  14. Influence of random point defects introduced by proton irradiation on the flux creep rates and magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J c of co-evaporated GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, N.; Kim, Jeehoon; Suárez, S.; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    We report the influence of random point defects introduced by 3 MeV proton irradiation (doses of 0.5 × 1016, 1 × 1016, 2 × 1016 and 6 × 1016 cm-2) on the vortex dynamics of co-evaporated 1.3 μm thick, GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors. Our results indicate that the inclusion of additional random point defects reduces the low field and enhances the in-field critical current densities J c. The main in-field J c enhancement takes place below 40 K, which is in agreement with the expectations for pinning by random point defects. In addition, our data show a slight though clear increase in flux creep rates as a function of irradiation fluence. Maley analysis indicates that this increment can be associated with a reduction in the exponent μ characterizing the glassy behavior.

  15. CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

  16. The simultaneous mass and energy evaporation (SM2E) model.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Rehan; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the Simultaneous Mass and Energy Evaporation (SM2E) model is presented. The SM2E model is based on theoretical models for mass and energy transfer. The theoretical models systematically under or over predicted at various flow conditions: laminar, transition, and turbulent. These models were harmonized with experimental measurements to eliminate systematic under or over predictions; a total of 113 measured evaporation rates were used. The SM2E model can be used to estimate evaporation rates for pure liquids as well as liquid mixtures at laminar, transition, and turbulent flow conditions. However, due to limited availability of evaporation data, the model has so far only been tested against data for pure liquids and binary mixtures. The model can take evaporative cooling into account and when the temperature of the evaporating liquid or liquid mixture is known (e.g., isothermal evaporation), the SM2E model reduces to a mass transfer-only model. PMID:26595699

  17. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  18. Mixed feed evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Vakil, Himanshu B.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1982-01-01

    In the preparation of the gaseous reactant feed to undergo a chemical reaction requiring the presence of steam, the efficiency of overall power utilization is improved by premixing the gaseous reactant feed with water and then heating to evaporate the water in the presence of the gaseous reactant feed, the heating fluid utilized being at a temperature below the boiling point of water at the pressure in the volume where the evaporation occurs.

  19. Increased evaporation kinetics of sessile droplets by using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan A H; Nguyen, Anh V

    2012-12-11

    The effect of nanoparticles on the evaporation of a sessile droplet into air is still controversial. Unlike insoluble surfactants which reduce the droplet evaporation rate, here we show that the presence of nanoparticles and the increase of their concentration lead to an increase in the overall rate of diffusive evaporation and, consequently, a decrease of the droplet lifetime. The nanoparticles accumulating at the droplet edge due to the well-known coffee-ring effect pin the three-phase contact line for an extended time and maintain a large air-water interface area, leading to the increased evaporation rate. We provide a full analytical prediction for the lifetime of a sessile droplet evaporating by the combined pinned-receding mode. A master equation and a master diagram for the droplet lifetime of the combined mode are obtained and experimentally validated, and explain the effect of nanoparticles on increasing the global evaporation rate and decreasing the droplet lifetime. PMID:23171287

  20. Polarization (ellipsometric) measurements of liquid condensate deposition and evaporation rates and dew points in flowing salt/ash-containing combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    An application of an optical polarization technique in a combustion environment is demonstrated by following, in real-time, growth rates of boric oxide condensate on heated platinum ribbons exposed to seeded propane-air combustion gases. The results obtained agree with the results of earlier interference measurements and also with theoretical chemical vapor deposition predictions. In comparison with the interference method, the polarization technique places less stringent requirements on surface quality, which may justify the added optical components needed for such measurements.

  1. The Pan-STARRS search for Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, Richard; Weryk, Robert; Schunova, Eva; Carter Chambers, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The two Pan-STARRS telescopes, located on Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii, are 1.8-meter diameter telescopes equipped with 1.4 Gigapixel cameras that deliver 7 square degree fields of view. The first of these telescopes, Pan-STARRS1 (PS1), is now conducting a dedicated survey for Near-Earth Objects. The second telescope, Pan-STARRS2 (PS2) is being commissioned.The PS1+PS2 surveys now extend south to -47.5 degrees declination. The image quality in the deep southern sky from Haleakala is good, and the new southern extension to the survey area has been very productive.PS1 discovered more than half of the larger NEOs and PHAs in 2014, and has become the leading NEO discovery telescope. PS1 delivers excellent astrometry and photometry. PS1 continues to discover a significant number of large (> 1km) NEOs.The Pan-STARRS telescopes are very efficient at detecting cometary activity. PS1 discovered almost half of the new comets in 2014, and discovered 10 comets in 10 nights in November 2014.The discovery rate of NEO candidates by PS1 is now overwhelming the external NEO follow-up resources, particularly for fainter NEOs. It has required that PS1 repeat fields to recover NEO candidates. As PS2 matures, and when G96 has its new camera, the combination of these three telescopes will facilitate a higher NEO discovery rate, and a better census of the NEOs in the sky. This will in turn lead to a better understanding of the size and orbit distribution of NEOs, and the corresponding hazard to Earth. The Pan-STARRS NEO survey is also likely to discover asteroids suitable for the NASA asteroid redirect mission.

  2. A parameterization of the evaporation of rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Michael E.; Oh, Jai-Ho; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    A general theoretical expression for the rainfall rate and the total evaporation rate as a function of the distance below cloud base is developed, and is then specialized to the gamma raindrop size distribution. The theoretical framework is used to analyze the data of Rosenfeld and Mintz (1988) on the radar observations of the rainfall rate as a function of the distance below cloud base, for rain falling from continental convective cells in central South Africa, obtaining a parameterization for the evaporation of rainfall.

  3. Evaluation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a binding polymer for absorbers used to treat liquid radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Sebesta, F.; John, J.; Motl, A.; Stamberg, K.

    1995-11-01

    The chemical and radiation stability of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in the form of beads (B-PAN), similar to the beads of composite absorbers, and one selected composite absorber (ammonium molybdophosphate, the active component in PAN binder [AMP-PAN], a prospective candidate for the treatment of acidic wastes) were studied. Aqueous 1M HNO{sub 3} + 1M NaNO{sub 3}, 1M NaOH + 1M NaNO{sub 3}, and 1M NaOH were chosen as simulants of DOE acidic and alkaline wastes. In addition,radiation stability was determined indistilled water. The chemical stability of B-PAN and AMP-PAN beads was tested for a period up to one month of contact with the solution at ambient temperature. The radiation stability of the beads was checked in a radiation dose range 10{sup 3}--10{sup 6} Gy (10{sup 5}--10{sup 8} rads). In acidic solutions the stability of PAN binder was proved not to be limited by either chemical or radiation decomposition. PAN binder may thus be used for preparing composite absorbers for treatment of acid wastes from DOE facilities. The same conclusion is valid for alkaline solutions with pH up to 13. In highly alkaline solutions (concentration of NAOH higher than I M) and in the presence of NaNO{sub 3}, the stability of the tested polyacrylonitrile polymer was sufficient for applications not extending over 10 days. Cross-linking of the polymer caused by ionizing radiation was found to have a positive influence on chemical stability. This effect enables a longer period of applicability of PAN-based composite absorbers. Because of the high sorption rate achievable with PAN-based absorbers, the stability achieved is sufficient for most applications in the DOE complex. The chemical stability of binding polymer may also be further improved by testing another, more suitable type of polymer from the broad family of polyacrylonitrile polymers.

  4. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  5. IMPACT OF EVAPORATION ON AQUEOUS TEAR LOSS

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, James P.; Uchiyama, Eduardo; Aronowicz, Joel D.; Butovich, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of evaporation on preocular aqueous tear (AT) loss in normal subjects (controls) and patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Methods Eighteen patients (32 eyes) with KCS with or without associated meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and 11 sex-matched controls had AT evaporation determined between relative humidity (RH) of 20% and 45% using an evaporometer. AT volume, flow, and turnover were determined with a fluorophotometer. Results Evaporative rates increased significantly when the RH was changed from 40%–45% to 20%–25% (P < .001). This change was similar in all groups and on average accounted for a 99.43% increase. There were no statistically significant differences in evaporative rate between controls, the KCS alone group, and the KCS/MGD group. Dry eye patients exhibited a decreased tear turnover when compared to controls. Evaporative contribution to tear loss at 40%–45% RH was 23.47% for controls, 30.99% for “classic” KCS patients, and 25.44% for KCS/MGD patients. At 20%–25% RH, the evaporative contribution was 41.66% for controls, 57.67% for classic KCS patients, and 50.28% for KCS/MGD patients. Conclusions RH significantly impacts evaporation regardless of the presence of dry eye disease and probably accounts for the increased dry eye symptoms in people (controls and dry eye patients) in conditions of low RH (eg, deserts, airplane cabins, cold dry seasons). Contribution of evaporation to tear loss tends to be higher than previously described. The percent contribution is dependent on environmental conditions such as RH. There was a trend toward increased contribution to AT loss in dry eye patients vs controls, but statistical significance was not reached. PMID:17471332

  6. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  7. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Bok; Yoon, Joong-Sup; Jung, Kweon; Eom, Seok-Won; Chae, Young-Zoo; Cho, Seog-Ju; Kim, Shin-Do; Sohn, Jong Ryeul; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in air has been well known as the indicator of photochemical smog due to its frequent occurrences in Seoul metropolitan area. This study was implemented to assess the distribution characteristics of atmospheric PAN in association with relevant parameters measured concurrently. During a full year period in 2011, PAN was continuously measured at hourly intervals at two monitoring sites, Gwang Jin (GJ) and Gang Seo (GS) in the megacity of Seoul, South Korea. The annual mean concentrations of PAN during the study period were 0.64±0.49 and 0.57±0.46 ppb, respectively. The seasonal trends of PAN generally exhibited dual peaks in both early spring and fall, regardless of sites. Their diurnal trends were fairly comparable to each other. There was a slight time lag (e.g., 1 h) in the peak occurrence pattern between O3 and PAN, as the latter trended to peak after the maximum UV irradiance period (16:00 (GJ) and 17:00 (GS)). The concentrations of PAN generally exhibited strong correlations with particulates. The results of this study suggest that PAN concentrations were affected sensitively by atmospheric stability, the wet deposition of NO2, wind direction, and other factors. PMID:23838043

  8. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans ...

  9. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans ...

  10. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans ...

  11. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans ...

  12. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans ...

  13. African Drum and Steel Pan Ensembles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunkett, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how to develop both African drum and steel pan ensembles providing information on teacher preparation, instrument choice, beginning the ensemble, and lesson planning. Includes additional information for the drum ensembles. Lists references and instructional materials, sources of drums and pans, and common note layout/range for steel pan…

  14. A Hundred Years of Peter Pan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollindale, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The centenary of the first performance of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan was celebrated in December 2004. Taking account of the various events in Britain to mark the occasion--newspaper articles, radio and television programmes, retrospects in the original theatre--this article examines the status and popularity of Peter Pan after a hundred years. The…

  15. Pan-derived isotopic composition of atmospheric vapour in a Mediterranean wetland (Rhône River Delta, France).

    PubMed

    Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Cartapanis, Olivier; Radakovitch, Olivier; Sonzogni, Corinne; Pichaud, Marc

    2010-03-01

    A continuous record of atmospheric vapour isotopic composition (delta(A)) can be derived from the isotope mass balance of a water body submitted to natural evaporation. In this paper, we present preliminary results of the application of this method to a drying evaporation pan, located in a Mediterranean wetland, during a two-month summer period. Results seem consistent with few atmospheric vapour data based on the assumption of isotopic equilibrium with precipitation, but we observed a shift between pan-derived delta(A) and the composition of vapour samples collected by cold trapping. These results suggest that further investigations are necessary to evaluate the effect of diurnal variations of atmospheric conditions on the applicability of the pan-evaporation method, and on the representative of grab atmospheric samples. We also propose a sensitivity analysis for evaluating the impact of the different measured components on delta(A) calculation, and show an improvement in the method efficiency as the pan is drying. PMID:20099185

  16. An evaporation based digital microflow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, C.; Frijns, A. J. H.; Mandamparambil, R.; Zevenbergen, M. A. G.; den Toonder, J. M. J.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present a digital microflow meter operating in the range 30-250 nl min-1 for water. The principle is based on determining the evaporation rate of the liquid via reading the number of wetted pore array structures in a microfluidic system, through which continuous evaporation takes place. A proof-of-principle device of the digital flow meter was designed, fabricated, and tested. The device was built on foil-based technology. In the proof-of-principle experiments, good agreement was found between set flow rates and the evaporation rates estimated from reading the number of wetted pore structures. The measurement range of the digital flow meter can be tuned and extended in a straightforward manner by changing the pore structure of the device.

  17. How do drops evaporate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa; Kondic, Lou

    2007-11-01

    The problem of evaporating drops with non-pinned contact line, although seemingly trivial, so far lacks satisfactory theoretical description. In particular, there has been much discussion regarding appropriate evaporative mass flux model. We make an attempt to resolve this issue by comparing our experimental data with the results of several mathematical models for evaporating drops. After describing experimental procedure, we propose several models for mass flux and develop a governing equation for evolution of drop's thickness. Two-dimensional numerical results are then compared to the experimental results, and the most appropriate mass flux model is identified. Finally, we propose the governing equation for the full 3D system and present some new numerical results related to curious phenomena, where so-called ``octopus-shaped'' instabilities appear ahead of the contact line of volatile dropsootnotetextY. Gotkis, I. Ivanov, N. Murisic, L. Kondic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 186101 (2006)..

  18. Evaporation in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, Hiroko

    1993-01-01

    Evaporation experiments were conducted for SiO2 in three different conditions: in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas. Evaporation rate in vacuum is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that in equilibrium, which is consistent with previous works. The rate in hydrogen gas changes depending on hydrogen pressure. The rate at 10 exp -7 bar of hydrogen pressure is as small as that of free evaporation, but at 10 exp -5 bar of hydrogen pressure it is larger than that in equilibrium. In equilibrium and in vacuum, the evaporation rate is limited by decomposition of SiO2 on the crystal surface, but it is limited by a diffusion process for evaporation in hydrogen gas. Therefore, evaporation rate of minerals in the solar nebula can be shown neither by that in equilibrium nor by that in vacuum. The maximum temperature of the solar nebula at the midplane at 2-3 AU where chondrites are believed to have originated is calculated to be as low as 150 K, 1500 K, or in between them. The temperature is, in any case, not high enough for total evaporation of the interstellar materials. Therefore, evaporation of interstellar materials is one of the most important processes for the origin and fractionation of solid materials. The fundamental process of evaporation of minerals has been intensively studied for these several years. Those experiments were carried out either in equilibrium or in vacuum; however, evaporation in the solar nebula is in hydrogen (and much smaller amount of helium) gas. In order to investigate evaporation rate and compositional (including isotopic) fractionation during evaporation, vaporization experiments for various minerals in various conditions are conducted. At first, SiO2 was adopted for a starting material, because thermochemical data and its nature of congruent vaporization are well known. Experiments were carried out in a vacuum furnace system.

  19. Optimization of evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.; Bradley, C. C.; Hulet, R. G.

    1997-05-01

    Recent experiments have used forced evaporative cooling to produce Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases. The evaporative cooling process can be optimized to provide the maximum phase-space density with a specified number of atoms remaining. We show that this global optimization is approximately achieved by locally optimizing the cooling efficiency at each instant. We discuss how this method can be implemented, and present the results for our 7Li trap. The predicted behavior of the gas is found to agree well with experiment.

  20. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  1. Determining long and short hyporheic flow paths in Antarctic streams by comparing evaporative enrichment of D and 18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, M. N.; McKnight, D. M.

    2001-12-01

    In glacial meltwater streams of the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, streambeds are composed of porous alluvium, allowing the development of extensive, well-defined hyporheic zones. Stream water and subsurface water from the adjoining saturated alluvium were sampled for major ions and stable isotopes (D and 18O) in order to discritize the hyporheic zone based on variations in residence times. Subsurface water was more enriched in heavier isotopes and had higher solute content than water in the stream. Downstream surface water D and 18O enrichment rates were greater than could be accounted for by direct surface water evaporation, based on data from an evaporation pan experiment. Subsurface samples collected from wells farther from the edge of the open channel, at the upland edge of the hyporheic zone were the most enriched in D and 18O. These results suggest greater fractionation in lateral hyporheic water due to longer residence times at the edges of the hyporheic zone, and that hyporheic mixing may account for the stream water enrichment rates. Inverse modeling results using OTIS confirm the influence of exchange on stream water. These findings show that the hyporheic zones have areas of rapid stream water exchange, where "fast" biogeochemical reactions may influence water chemistry, and areas of very slow exchange in which any magnitude of chemical reaction rate may affect water chemistry.

  2. Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

    1994-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

  3. Studies on droplet evaporation and combustion in high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, J.

    1993-01-01

    High pressure droplet evaporation and combustion have been studied up to 15 MPa under normal and microgravity fields. From the evaporation studies, it has been found that in the supercritical environments, the droplet evaporation rate and lifetime take a maximum and a minimum at an ambient pressure over the critical pressure. Its maximum and minimum points move toward the lower ambient pressures if the ambient temperature is increased. It has been found from the combustion studies that the burning life time takes a minimum at an ambient pressure being equal to the critical pressure. It is attributable to both the pressure dependency of the diffusion rate and the droplet evaporation characteristics described above.

  4. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chuanhua; Karnik, Rohit; Lu, Ming-Chang; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. Although widely studied in bulk and microscale-confined liquids, cavitation in the nanoscale is generally believed to be energetically unfavorable and has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here we report evaporation-induced cavitation in water-filled hydrophilic nanochannels under enormous negative pressures up to -7MPa. As opposed to receding menisci observed in microchannel evaporation, the menisci in nanochannels are pinned at the entrance while vapor bubbles form and expand inside. Evaporation in the channels is found to be aided by advective liquid transport, which leads to an evaporation rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that governed by Fickian vapor diffusion in macro- and microscale evaporation. The vapor bubbles also exhibit unusual motion as well as translational stability and symmetry, which occur because of a balance between two competing mass fluxes driven by thermocapillarity and evaporation. Our studies expand our understanding of cavitation and provide new insights for phase-change phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:22343530

  5. TANK 32 EVAPORATOR FEED PUMP TRANSFER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Richard Dimenna, R; Si Lee, S

    2009-01-27

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 32 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, with the supernate surface at a minimum height of approximately 74.4 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer with a flow rate of 110 gpm. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank toward the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results shows that, for the minimum tank liquid level of 105 inches above the tank bottom (which corresponds to a liquid depth of 74.4 inches above the sludge layer), the evaporator feed pump will contain less than 0.1 wt% sludge solids in the discharge stream, which is an order of magnitude less than the 1.0 wt% undissolved solids (UDS) loading criteria to feed the evaporator. Lower liquid levels with respect to the sludge layer will result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased plunging jet velocity from the downcomer disturbing the sludge layer.

  6. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chuanhua; Karnik, Rohit; Lu, Ming-Chang; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-03-01

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. Although widely studied in bulk and microscale-confined liquids, cavitation in the nanoscale is generally believed to be energetically unfavorable and has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here we report evaporation-induced cavitation in water-filled hydrophilic nanochannels under enormous negative pressures up to -7 MPa. As opposed to receding menisci observed in microchannel evaporation, the menisci in nanochannels are pinned at the entrance while vapor bubbles form and expand inside. Evaporation in the channels is found to be aided by advective liquid transport, which leads to an evaporation rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that governed by Fickian vapor diffusion in macro- and microscale evaporation. The vapor bubbles also exhibit unusual motion as well as translational stability and symmetry, which occur because of a balance between two competing mass fluxes driven by thermocapillarity and evaporation. Our studies expand our understanding of cavitation and provide new insights for phase-change phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:22343530

  7. Optimized evaporation technique for leachate treatment: Small scale implementation.

    PubMed

    Benyoucef, Fatima; Makan, Abdelhadi; El Ghmari, Abderrahman; Ouatmane, Aziz

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces an optimized evaporation technique for leachate treatment. For this purpose and in order to study the feasibility and measure the effectiveness of the forced evaporation, three cuboidal steel tubs were designed and implemented. The first control-tub was installed at the ground level to monitor natural evaporation. Similarly, the second and the third tub, models under investigation, were installed respectively at the ground level (equipped-tub 1) and out of the ground level (equipped-tub 2), and provided with special equipment to accelerate the evaporation process. The obtained results showed that the evaporation rate at the equipped-tubs was much accelerated with respect to the control-tub. It was accelerated five times in the winter period, where the evaporation rate was increased from a value of 0.37 mm/day to reach a value of 1.50 mm/day. In the summer period, the evaporation rate was accelerated more than three times and it increased from a value of 3.06 mm/day to reach a value of 10.25 mm/day. Overall, the optimized evaporation technique can be applied effectively either under electric or solar energy supply, and will accelerate the evaporation rate from three to five times whatever the season temperature. PMID:26826455

  8. The continuous similarity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    The continuous similarity model of evaporation is described. In it, evaporation is conceptualized as a two stage process. For an initially moist soil, evaporation is first climate limited, but later it becomes soil limited. During the latter stage, the evaporation rate is termed evaporability, and mathematically it is inversely proportional to the evaporation deficit. A functional approximation of the moisture distribution within the soil column is also included in the model. The model was tested using data from four experiments conducted near Phoenix, Arizona; and there was excellent agreement between the simulated and observed evaporation. The model also predicted the time of transition to the soil limited stage reasonably well. For one of the experiments, a third stage of evaporation, when vapor diffusion predominates, was observed. The occurrence of this stage was related to the decrease in moisture at the surface of the soil. The continuous similarity model does not account for vapor flow. The results show that climate, through the potential evaporation rate, has a strong influence on the time of transition to the soil limited stage. After this transition, however, bulk evaporation is independent of climate until the effects of vapor flow within the soil predominate.

  9. Kinetic Limited Water Evaporation in Hydrophilic Nanofluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinxiao; Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Capillary evaporation is one of the most efficient approaches for heat and mass transfer, but the interfacial resistance in capillary evaporation governed by the kinetic theory has remained poorly understood. Here we report experimental studies of the kinetic-limited water capillary evaporation in 2-D hydrophilic nanochannels. A novel hybrid nanochannel design is employed to guarantee sufficient water supply to the liquid/vapor evaporation interface and to enable precise evaporation rate measurements. We study the effects of confinement (16 ~ 105nm), temperature (20 ~ 40 °C), and relative humidity (0% ~ 60%) on the evaporation rate and the evaporation coefficient. A maximum evaporation flux of 21287 micron/s is obtained in 16-nm nanochannels at 40°C and RH =0%, which corresponds to a heat flux of 4804 W/cm°. The evaporation coefficient is found to be independent on geometrical confinement, but shows a clear dependence on temperature, decreasing from 0.55 at 20°C to 0.5 at 40 °C. These findings have implications for understanding heat and mass transport in nanofluidic devices and porous media, and shed light on further development of evaporation-based technologies for thermal management, membrane purification and lab-on-a-chip devices. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  10. Pan coefficient ( K p) estimation under uncertainty on fetch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, M.; Ghahraman, B.; Davary, K.; Liaghat, A. M.; Bannayan, M.

    2012-07-01

    The FAO Penman-Monteith (F-PM) method is a frequently applied approach for calculating the daily reference evapotranspiration (ET0). This method requires long records of meteorological data, which makes it quite hard to employ in locations with no or limited available data. Evaporation pans are widely used to estimate the reference ET0, but this method requires reliable estimates of the pan coefficient ( K p). The objectives of this study were to determine the proper values of monthly and annual K p, as well as the best method among those available for the estimation of K p values in the study area. Measured weather data from 1992 to 2006 were obtained from 18 stations in the North and Northwest of Iran. Daily ET0 calculated using methods by Bernardo et al. and Pereira et al. were compared with those calculated by the F-PM method. The employed methods at all stations, except those located in the north of the study area with high relative humidity, overestimated the ET0 compared to the F-PM method. The constant parameters of these methods were optimized by a trial and error scheme to minimize the root mean square error. The results indicated that modified K p coefficients from Bernardo et al.'s method ranged between 0.41 and 0.87 and the optimal coefficient of Pereira et al.'s method ranged between 0.49 and 0.95. Modified monthly K p from Bernardo et al.'s method ranged between 0.3 and 1.07 and those from Pereira et al.'s method ranged between 0.4 and 1.18. Modified K p of the methods by Bernardo et al. and Pereira et al. showed the higher estimation accuracy of daily ET0 values. In general, the performance of the modified K p of Bernardo et al.'s method was higher than Pereira et al.'s method for all stations. Thus, in the study region and under the same climatic conditions [in areas with only pan evaporation ( E p) records], the use of climatic monthly modified K p to calculate ET0 based on class A E p is recommended.

  11. Structuring of polymer solutions upon solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; van der Schoot, P; Michels, J J

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of solution-cast, phase-separated polymers becomes finer with increasing solvent evaporation rate. We address this observation theoretically for a model polymer where demixing is induced by steady solvent evaporation. In contrast to what is the case for a classical, thermal quench involving immiscible blends, the spinodal instability initially develops slowly and the associated length scale is not time invariant but decreases with time as t(-1/2). After a time lag, phase separation accelerates. Time lag and characteristic length exhibit power-law behavior as a function of the evaporation rate with exponents of -2/3 and -1/6. Interestingly, at later stages the spinodal structure disappears completely while a second length scale develops. The associated structure coarsens but does not follow the usual Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner kinetics. PMID:25768523

  12. Early science from the Pan-STARRS1 Optical Galaxy Survey (POGS): Maps of stellar mass and star formation rate surface density obtained from distributed-computing pixel-SED fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David A.; Vinsen, K.; Galaxy Properties Key Project, PS1

    2014-01-01

    To measure resolved galactic physical properties unbiased by the mask of recent star formation and dust features, we are conducting a citizen-scientist enabled nearby galaxy survey based on the unprecedented optical (g,r,i,z,y) imaging from Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). The PS1 Optical Galaxy Survey (POGS) covers 3π steradians (75% of the sky), about twice the footprint of SDSS. Whenever possible we also incorporate ancillary multi-wavelength image data from the ultraviolet (GALEX) and infrared (WISE, Spitzer) spectral regimes. For each cataloged nearby galaxy with a reliable redshift estimate of z < 0.05 - 0.1 (dependent on donated CPU power), publicly-distributed computing is being harnessed to enable pixel-by-pixel spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, which in turn provides maps of key physical parameters such as the local stellar mass surface density, crude star formation history, and dust attenuation. With pixel SED fitting output we will then constrain parametric models of galaxy structure in a more meaningful way than ordinarily achieved. In particular, we will fit multi-component (e.g. bulge, bar, disk) galaxy models directly to the distribution of stellar mass rather than surface brightness in a single band, which is often locally biased. We will also compute non-parametric measures of morphology such as concentration, asymmetry using the POGS stellar mass and SFR surface density images. We anticipate studying how galactic substructures evolve by comparing our results with simulations and against more distant imaging surveys, some of which which will also be processed in the POGS pipeline. The reliance of our survey on citizen-scientist volunteers provides a world-wide opportunity for education. We developed an interactive interface which highlights the science being produced by each volunteer’s own CPU cycles. The POGS project has already proven popular amongst the public, attracting about 5000 volunteers with nearly 12,000 participating computers, and is growing rapidly.

  13. Evaporation over fresh and saline water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrady, Ahmed; Timmermans, Joris; Vekerdy, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation over large water bodies has a crucial role in the global hydrological cycle. Evaporation occurs whenever there is a vapor pressure deficit between a water surface and the atmosphere, and the available energy is sufficient. Salinity affects the density and latent heat of vaporization of the water body, which reflects on the evaporation rate. Different models have been developed to estimate the evaporation process over water surfaces using earth observation data. Most of these models are concerned with the atmospheric parameters. However these models do not take into account the influence of salinity on the evaporation rate; they do not consider the difference in the energy needed for vaporization. For this purpose an energy balance model is required. Several energy balance models that calculate daily evapotranspiration exist, such as the surface energy balance system (SEBS). They estimate the heat fluxes by integration of satellite data and hydro-meteorological field data. SEBS has the advantage that it can be applied over a large scale because it incorporates the physical state of the surface and the aerodynamic resistances in the daily evapotranspiration estimation. Nevertheless this model has not used over water surfaces. The goal of this research is to adapt SEBS to estimate the daily evaporation over fresh and saline water bodies. In particular, 1) water heat flux and roughness of momentum and heat transfer estimation need to be updated, 2) upscaling to daily evaporation needs to be investigated and finally 3) integration of the salinity factor to estimate the evaporation over saline water needs to be performed. Eddy covariance measurements over the Ijsselmeer Lake (The Netherlands) were used to estimate the roughness of momentum and heat transfer at respectively 0.0002 and 0.0001 m. Application of these values over Tana Lake (freshwater), in Ethiopia showed latent heat to be in a good agreement with the measurements, with RMSE of 35.5 Wm-2and rRMSE of 4.7 %. Afterwards the validity of salinity adapted model was tested over different study areas using ECMWF data. It was found that for the original SEBS model and salinity-adapted model over Great Salt Lake, the RMSE were 0.62 and 0.24 mm respectively and the rRMSE 19% and 24%. The evaporation reduction of the Great Salt Lake and the oceans are 27% and 1 %, respectively. In conclusion, SEBS model is adapted to calculate the daily evaporation over fresh water and salt water by integration the salinity factor in the model.

  14. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenso, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Cupples, Scott

    2011-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust non-venting system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's lithium chloride Heat Pump Radiator (HPR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. The SEAR is evacuated at the onset of operations and thereafter, the water vapor absorption rate of the HPR maintains a low pressure environment for the SWME to evaporate effectively. This water vapor captured by solid LiCl in the HPR with a high enthalpy of absorption, results in sufficient temperature lift to reject most of the heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the HPR would be heated up in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A one-fourth scale prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The HPR was able to stably reject 60 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  15. Evaporation-induced self-assembled silica colloidal particle-assisted nanoporous structural evolution of poly(ethylene terephthalate) nonwoven composite separators for high-safety/high-rate lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ran; Won, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Sang-Young

    2012-10-01

    A facile approach to the fabrication of nanoporous structure-tuned nonwoven composite separators is demonstrated for application in high-safety/high-rate lithium-ion batteries. This strategy is based on the construction of silica (SiO2) colloidal particle-assisted nanoporous structure in a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nonwoven substrate. The nanoparticle arrangement arising from evaporation-induced self-assembly of SiO2 colloidal particles allows the evolution of the unusual nanoporous structure, i.e. well-connected interstitial voids formed between close-packed SiO2 particles adhered by styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) binders. Meanwhile, the PET nonwoven serves as a mechanical support that contributes to suppressing thermal shrinkage of the nonwoven composite separator. The aforementioned structural novelty of the nonwoven composite separator plays a key role in providing the separator with advantageous characteristics (specifically, good electrolyte wettability, high ionic conductivity, and benign compatibility with electrodes), which leads to the better cell performance than a commercialized polyethylene (PE) separator.

  16. Raman Thermometry Measurements of Free Evaporation from LiquidWater Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jared D.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ron ald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2006-05-22

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of evaporation have suggested that on average, molecules in the higher-energy tail of the Boltzmann distribution are more readily transferred into the vapor during evaporation. To test these conclusions, the evaporative cooling rates of a droplet train of liquid water injected into vacuum have been studied via Raman thermometry. The resulting cooling rates are fit to an evaporative cooling model based on Knudsen's maximum rate of evaporation, in which we explicitly account for surface cooling. We have determined that the value of the evaporation coefficient ({gamma}{sub e}) of liquid water is 0.62 {+-} 0.09, confirming that a rate-limiting barrier impedes the evaporation rate. Such insight will facilitate the formulation of a microscopic mechanism for the evaporation of liquid water.

  17. Planetary evaporation by UV & X-ray radiation: basic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Jackson, Alan P.

    2012-10-01

    We consider the evaporation of close-in planets by the star's intrinsic extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray radiation. We calculate evaporation rates by solving the hydrodynamical problem for planetary evaporation including heating from both X-ray and EUV radiation. We show that most close-in planets (a < 0.1 au) are evaporating hydrodynamically, with the evaporation occurring in two distinct regimes: X-ray driven, in which the X-ray heated flow contains a sonic point, and EUV driven, in which the X-ray region is entirely sub-sonic. The mass-loss rates scale as LX/a2 for X-ray driven evaporation, and as Φ*1/2/a for EUV driven evaporation at early times, with mass-loss rates of the order of 1010-1014 g s-1. No exact scaling exists for the mass-loss rate with planet mass and planet radius; however, in general evaporation proceeds more rapidly for planets with lower densities and higher masses. Furthermore, we find that in general the transition from X-ray driven to EUV driven evaporation occurs at lower X-ray luminosities for planets closer to their parent stars and for planets with lower densities. Coupling our evaporation models to the evolution of the high-energy radiation - which falls with time - we are able to follow the evolution of evaporating planets. We find that most planets start off evaporating in the X-ray driven regime, but switch to EUV driven once the X-ray luminosity falls below a critical value. The evolution models suggest that while 'hot Jupiters' are evaporating, they are not evaporating at a rate sufficient to remove the entire gaseous envelope on Gyr time-scales. However, we do find that close in Neptune mass planets are more susceptible to complete evaporation of their envelopes. Thus we conclude that planetary evaporation is more important for lower mass planets, particularly those in the 'hot Neptune'/'super Earth' regime.

  18. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPAs MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  19. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPA’s MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  20. An investigation of electrochemomechanical actuation of conductive Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mark A.; Walter, Wayne W.

    2014-03-01

    A polymer-based nanofiber composite actuator designed for contractile actuation was fabricated by electrospinning, stimulated by electrolysis, and characterized by electrochemical and mechanical testing to address performance limitations and understand the activation processing effects on actuation performance. Currently, Electroactive polymers (EAPs) have provided uses in sensory and actuation technology, but have either low force output or expand rather than contract, falling short in capturing the natural kinetics and mechanics of muscle needed to provide breakthroughs in the bio-medical and robotic fields. In this study, activated Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers have demonstrated biomimetic functionalities similar to the sarcomere contraction responsible for muscle function. Activated PAN has also been shown to contract and expand by electrolysis when in close vicinity to the anode and cathode, respectively. PAN nanofibers (~500 nm) especially show faster response to changes in environmental pH and improved mechanical properties compared to larger diameter fibers. Tensile testing was conducted to examine changes in mechanical properties between annealing and hydrolysis processing. Voltage driven transient effects of localized pH were examined to address pHdefined actuation thresholds of PAN fibers. Electrochemical contraction rates of the PAN/Graphite composite actuator demonstrated up to 25%/min. Strains of 58.8%, ultimate stresses up to 77.1 MPa, and moduli of 0.21 MPa were achieved with pure PAN nanofiber mats, surpassing mechanical properties of natural muscles. Further improvements, however, to contraction rates and Young's moduli were found essential to capture the function and performance of skeletal muscles appropriately.

  1. Inundation and groundwater dynamics for quantification of evaporative water loss in tropical wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtfeger, J.; Johnson, M. S.; Couto, E. G.; Amorim, R. S. S.; Sanches, L.; Campelo, J. H., Jr.; Weiler, M.

    2014-11-01

    Characterizing hydrological processes within tropical wetlands is challenging due to their remoteness, complexity and heterogeneity. In particular, estimates of evaporative water loss are inherently uncertain. In view of the large influence on the local and regional climate, the quantification of evaporation is essential for the determination of the water balance of permanent and intermittent water bodies. Data for tropical wetlands are scarce where their remoteness impedes direct evaporation measurements. Seasonal inundation dynamics affect evaporation processes in tropical wetlands, which can be analysed in two stages: the first stage during the wet season and the second stage during the dry season. As yet no adequate method exists for determining second-stage evaporation in a data-scarce environment that additionally allows for a transfer of simulated actual evaporation (AET) to other locations. Our study aimed at developing a process-based model to simulate first- and second-stage evaporation in tropical wetlands. We selected a set of empirical potential evaporation (PET) models of varying complexity, each based on different assumptions and available data sets, and evaluated the models with pan evaporation observations in the Pantanal of South America, one of the largest tropical wetlands in the world. We used high-resolution measurements of surface and groundwater levels at different locations to determine the water available for evaporation. AET was derived by constraining simulated PET based on available water. The model of best fit was applied to different types of water bodies with varying hydroperiods to capture first- and second-stage evaporation across a range of wetland types. With our new model we could quantify evaporative water loss in the dry and the wet season for different locations in the Pantanal. This new spatially explicit approach represents an improvement in our understanding of the role of evaporation in the water balance of the Pantanal. We recommend the application of this model in other remote tropical wetlands, since only a minimum of input data is necessary.

  2. Inundation and groundwater dynamics for quantification of evaporative water loss in tropical wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtfeger, J.; Johnson, M. S.; Couto, E. G.; Amorim, R. S. S.; Sanches, L.; Campelo Júnior, J. H.; Weiler, M.

    2014-04-01

    The remoteness, complexity and heterogeneity of tropical wetlands make the characterisation of their hydrological processes challenging. In particular estimates of evaporative water loss are inherently uncertain. In view of the large influence on the local and regional climate, the quantification of evaporation is essential for the determination of the water balance of permanent and intermittent water bodies. Data for tropical wetlands are scarce where their remoteness impedes direct evaporation measurements. Seasonal inundation dynamics affect evaporation processes in tropical wetlands, which can be analysed in two stages: the first stage during the wet season and the second stage during the dry season. As yet no adequate method exists for determining second stage evaporation without soil moisture data, which are usually unavailable for the remote tropical wetlands. Our study aimed at developing a process-based model to simulate first and second stage evaporation in tropical wetlands. We selected a set of empirical potential evaporation (PET) models of varying complexity, each based on different assumptions and available datasets, and evaluated the models with pan evaporation observations in the Pantanal of South America, one of the largest tropical wetlands in the world. We used high-resolution measurements of surface and groundwater levels at different locations to determine the water available for evaporation. Actual evaporation (AET) was derived by constraining simulated PET based on available water. The model of best fit was applied to different types of water bodies with varying inundation durations and captured first and second stage evaporation. With our new model we could quantify evaporative water loss in the dry and the wet season for different locations in the Pantanal. This new spatially-explicit approach represents an improvement in our understanding of the role of evaporation in the water balance of the Pantanal. We recommend the application of this model in other remote tropical wetlands, since only a minimum of input data is necessary.

  3. Vertical counterflow evaporative cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Callaway, Duncan

    2005-01-25

    An evaporative heat exchanger having parallel plates that define alternating dry and wet passages. A water reservoir is located below the plates and is connected to a water distribution system. Water from the water distribution system flows through the wet passages and wets the surfaces of the plates that form the wet passages. Air flows through the dry passages, mixes with air below the plates, and flows into the wet passages before exiting through the top of the wet passages.

  4. Effects of growth temperature and target material on the growth behavior and electro-optical properties of ZnO:Al films deposited by high-rate steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chih-Hao; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2015-04-01

    ZnO:Al (AZO) films were deposited using high-rate (215 nm/min) steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation with a ceramic AZO target at various deposition temperatures (Td = 80-400 °C). AZO films were also prepared with a Zn-Al target at various Td values for comparison. The high-melting-point (1975 °C) AZO target significantly reduced the droplet size to ∼150 nm. In contrast, opaque Zn-Al microdroplets (several μm) were incorporated into the film deposited using the Zn-Al target. The incorporation of large microdroplets resulted in a rough surface and a nonuniform distribution of film thickness due to the self-shadowing effect. Using a combination of a ceramic AZO target and a steered arc to deposit AZO films significantly reduces the droplet size and maintains a high growth rate. The ratio of c- and a-axes lattice constants (c/a ratio) decreased with increasing Td. A higher c/a ratio facilitates strain relaxation via the formation of basal-plane stacking faults. The Al3+ doping efficiency was improved by increasing Td; however, the Al segregated to the grain boundary at high Td (>300 °C). The films deposited with an AZO target at 200 °C had the highest figure of merit (2.21 × 10-2 Ω-1), with a corresponding average transmittance of 87.7% and resistivity of 5.48 × 10-4 Ω cm.

  5. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  6. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons for the production of trappable antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.; Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Friesen, T.; Hydomako, R.; and others

    2013-03-19

    We describe the implementation of evaporative cooling of charged particles in the ALPHA apparatus. Forced evaporation has been applied to cold samples of antiprotons held in Malmberg-Penning traps. Temperatures on the order of 10 K were obtained, while retaining a significant fraction of the initial number of particles. We have developed a model for the evaporation process based on simple rate equations and applied it succesfully to the experimental data. We have also observed radial re-distribution of the clouds following evaporation, explained by simple conservation laws. We discuss the relevance of this technique for the recent demonstration of magnetic trapping of antihydrogen.

  7. Pan-information Location Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. Y.; Guo, W.; Huang, L.; Hu, T.; Gao, W. X.

    2013-11-01

    A huge amount of information, including geographic, environmental, socio-economic, personal and social network information, has been generated from diverse sources. Most of this information exists separately and is disorderly even if some of it is about the same person, feature, phenomenon or event. Users generally need to collect related information from different sources and then utilize them in applications. An automatic mechanism, therefore, for establishing a connection between potentially-related information will profoundly expand the usefulness of this huge body of information. A connection tie is semantic location describing semantically concepts and attributes of locations as well as relationships between locations, since 80% of information contains some kind of geographic reference but not all of geographic reference has explicit geographic coordinates. Semantic location is an orthogonal form of location representation which can be represented as domain ontology or UML format. Semantic location associates various kinds of information about a same object to provide timely information services according to users' demands, habits, preferences and applications. Based on this idea, a Pan-Information Location Map (PILM) is proposed as a new-style 4D map to associates semantic location-based information dynamically to organize and consolidate the locality and characteristics of corresponding features and events, and delivers on-demand information with a User-Adaptive Smart Display (UASD).

  8. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons to cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-07-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal. PMID:20867439

  9. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Wilding, D.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.

    2010-07-02

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  10. Contemporary estimates of Pan-Arctic freshwater discharge from GRACE and reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, T. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Zlotnicki, V.; Rodell, M.

    2007-10-01

    Streamflow from Arctic river basins has been increasing in recent decades in response to warming climate. In addition to being a sensitive indicator of global change, Arctic discharge is a critical component of the freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean, where increasing freshwater flows may slow rates of North Atlantic Deep Water formation and heat transport by the thermohaline circulation. However, quantifying rates of freshwater discharge from the entire Pan-Arctic drainage has been troublesome using traditional stream gauging methods. Here we use satellite measurements of variations in continental water storage from the GRACE mission to present first estimates of monthly freshwater discharge from the entire Pan-Arctic for the period 2003-2005. Results show that rates of Pan-Arctic discharge for this time period (3588 +/- 257 km3 yr-1) are significantly larger than those suggested by gauge-based estimates (3238 km3 yr-1), and furthermore, may indicate that discharge rates are accelerating.

  11. The Pan-STARRS discovery machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2014-11-01

    The Pan-STARRS System has proven to be a remarkable machine for discovery. The PS1 Science Mission has drawn to a close, and the second Pan-STARRS survey, optimized for NEO's has begun. PS2 is in the commissioning stages and will eventually support NEO discovery as well. The performance of the PS1 system, sky coverage, cadence, and data quality of the Pan-STARRS1 Surveys will be presented as well as progress in reprocessing of the data taken to date and the plans for the public release of all Pan-STARRS1 data products in the spring of 2015. Science results related to planetary studies and the dust will be presented. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys (PS1) have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy, the University of Hawaii, the Pan-STARRS Project Office, the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, The Johns Hopkins University, Durham University, the University of Edinburgh, Queen's University Belfast, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated, the National Central University of Taiwan, the Space Telescope Science Institute, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate, the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-1238877, the University of Maryland, and Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE).

  12. Pan-tropical monitoring of deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, F.; DeFries, R.; Eva, H.; Hansen, M.; Mayaux, P.; Stibig, H.-J.

    2007-10-01

    This paper reviews the technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation from a pan-tropical perspective in response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process, which is studying the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries. The successful implementation of such policies requires effective forest monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented from national to pan-tropical levels. Remotely sensed data, supported by ground observations, are crucial to such efforts. Recent developments in global to regional monitoring of forests can contribute to reducing the uncertainties in estimates of emissions from deforestation. Monitoring systems at national levels in developing countries can also benefit from pan-tropical and regional observations, mainly by identifying hot spots of change and prioritizing areas for monitoring at finer spatial scales. A pan-tropical perspective is also required to ensure consistency between different national monitoring systems. Data sources already exist to determine baseline periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Key requirements for implementing such monitoring programs, both at pan-tropical and at national scales, are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standardized, consensus protocols for data interpretation and analysis.

  13. Structural basis for Pan3 binding to Pan2 and its function in mRNA recruitment and deadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jana; Valkov, Eugene; Allen, Mark D; Meineke, Birthe; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Olsen, Tayla M; Robinson, Carol V; Bycroft, Mark; Stewart, Murray; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-01-01

    The conserved eukaryotic Pan2–Pan3 deadenylation complex shortens cytoplasmic mRNA 3′ polyA tails to regulate mRNA stability. Although the exonuclease activity resides in Pan2, efficient deadenylation requires Pan3. The mechanistic role of Pan3 is unclear. Here, we show that Pan3 binds RNA directly both through its pseudokinase/C-terminal domain and via an N-terminal zinc finger that binds polyA RNA specifically. In contrast, isolated Pan2 is unable to bind RNA. Pan3 binds to the region of Pan2 that links its N-terminal WD40 domain to the C-terminal part that contains the exonuclease, with a 2:1 stoichiometry. The crystal structure of the Pan2 linker region bound to a Pan3 homodimer shows how the unusual structural asymmetry of the Pan3 dimer is used to form an extensive high-affinity interaction. This binding allows Pan3 to supply Pan2 with substrate polyA RNA, facilitating efficient mRNA deadenylation by the intact Pan2–Pan3 complex. PMID:24872509

  14. An electronic pan/tilt/zoom camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, Steve; Martin, H. Lee

    1991-01-01

    A camera system for omnidirectional image viewing applications that provides pan, tilt, zoom, and rotational orientation within a hemispherical field of view (FOV) using no moving parts was developed. The imaging device is based on the effect that from a fisheye lens, which produces a circular image of an entire hemispherical FOV, can be mathematically corrected using high speed electronic circuitry. An incoming fisheye image from any image acquisition source is captured in memory of the device, a transformation is performed for the viewing region of interest and viewing direction, and a corrected image is output as a video image signal for viewing, recording, or analysis. As a result, this device can accomplish the functions of pan, tilt, rotation, and zoom throughout a hemispherical FOV without the need for any mechanical mechanisms. A programmable transformation processor provides flexible control over viewing situations. Multiple images, each with different image magnifications and pan tilt rotation parameters, can be obtained from a single camera. The image transformation device can provide corrected images at frame rates compatible with RS-170 standard video equipment.

  15. Evaporation determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Likens, G.E.; Sturrock, A.M., Jr.; Mau, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Evaporation was determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake during the open water periods of 1982-1987. For all years, evaporation rates were low in spring and fall and highest during the summer. However, the times of highest evaporation rates varied during the 6 yr. Evaporation reached maximum rates in July for three of the years, in June for two of the years, and in August for one of the years. The highest evaporation rate during the 6-yr study was 0.46 cm d-1 during 27 May-4 June 1986 and 15-21 July 1987. Solar radiation and atmospheric radiation input to the lake and long-wave radiation emitted from the lake were by far the largest energy fluxes to and from the lake and had the greatest effect on evaporation rates. Energy advected to and from the lake by precipitation, surface water, and ground water had little effect on evaporation rates. In the energy-budget method, average evaporation rates are determined for energy-budget periods, which are bounded by the dates of thermal surveys of the lake. Our study compared evaporation rates calculated for short periods, usually ???1 week, with evaporation rates calculated for longer periods, usually ???2 weeks. The results indicated that the shorter periods showed more variability in evaporation rates, but seasonal patterns, with few exceptions, were similar.

  16. Intensification of evaporation processes using surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifullin, V. N.; Sharifullin, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of a group of low molecular surfactants on the evaporation rate during nucleate boiling of water is investigated. It is found that the vaporization rate and heat flux from the heater increase by 4-8% in an electric boiler with surfactants. The analysis of the process based on the model of the phase contact surface restoration made it possible to formulate the mechanism of the effect of considered surfactants.

  17. Monthly evaporation forecasting using artificial neural networks and support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezel, Gulay; Buyukyildiz, Meral

    2015-02-01

    Evaporation is one of the most important components of the hydrological cycle, but is relatively difficult to estimate, due to its complexity, as it can be influenced by numerous factors. Estimation of evaporation is important for the design of reservoirs, especially in arid and semi-arid areas. Artificial neural network methods and support vector machines (SVM) are frequently utilized to estimate evaporation and other hydrological variables. In this study, usability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) (multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function network (RBFN)) and ?-support vector regression (SVR) artificial intelligence methods was investigated to estimate monthly pan evaporation. For this aim, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and precipitation data for the period 1972 to 2005 from Beysehir meteorology station were used as input variables while pan evaporation values were used as output. The Romanenko and Meyer method was also considered for the comparison. The results were compared with observed class A pan evaporation data. In MLP method, four different training algorithms, gradient descent with momentum and adaptive learning rule backpropagation (GDX), Levenberg-Marquardt (LVM), scaled conjugate gradient (SCG), and resilient backpropagation (RBP), were used. Also, ?-SVR model was used as SVR model. The models were designed via 10-fold cross-validation (CV); algorithm performance was assessed via mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and coefficient of determination (R 2). According to the performance criteria, the ANN algorithms and ?-SVR had similar results. The ANNs and ?-SVR methods were found to perform better than the Romanenko and Meyer methods. Consequently, the best performance using the test data was obtained using SCG(4,2,2,1) with R 2 = 0.905.

  18. Monthly evaporation forecasting using artificial neural networks and support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezel, Gulay; Buyukyildiz, Meral

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation is one of the most important components of the hydrological cycle, but is relatively difficult to estimate, due to its complexity, as it can be influenced by numerous factors. Estimation of evaporation is important for the design of reservoirs, especially in arid and semi-arid areas. Artificial neural network methods and support vector machines (SVM) are frequently utilized to estimate evaporation and other hydrological variables. In this study, usability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) (multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function network (RBFN)) and ɛ-support vector regression (SVR) artificial intelligence methods was investigated to estimate monthly pan evaporation. For this aim, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and precipitation data for the period 1972 to 2005 from Beysehir meteorology station were used as input variables while pan evaporation values were used as output. The Romanenko and Meyer method was also considered for the comparison. The results were compared with observed class A pan evaporation data. In MLP method, four different training algorithms, gradient descent with momentum and adaptive learning rule backpropagation (GDX), Levenberg-Marquardt (LVM), scaled conjugate gradient (SCG), and resilient backpropagation (RBP), were used. Also, ɛ-SVR model was used as SVR model. The models were designed via 10-fold cross-validation (CV); algorithm performance was assessed via mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and coefficient of determination (R 2). According to the performance criteria, the ANN algorithms and ɛ-SVR had similar results. The ANNs and ɛ-SVR methods were found to perform better than the Romanenko and Meyer methods. Consequently, the best performance using the test data was obtained using SCG(4,2,2,1) with R 2 = 0.905.

  19. The Pan-STARRS search for Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, Richard J.; Chambers, Kenneth; Lilly, Eva; Weryk, Robert; Chastel, Serge; Denneau, Larry; Micheli, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The two Pan-STARRS telescopes, located on Haleakala, Hawaii, are 1.8-meter diameter telescopes equipped with 1.4 Gigapixel cameras that deliver 7 square degree fields of view. The first telescope, Pan-STARRS1 (PS1), has been conducting a survey for Near-Earth Objects. The second telescope, Pan-STARRS2 (PS2) is nearing completion. The telescope was commissioned using an incomplete focal plane with only 18 good detectors (60 required). The camera is presently being upgraded, and will be operated from October 2015 with 60 detectors (some engineering grade). A final upgrade to the camera in early 2016 will make the telescope fully operational.The two telescopes survey much of the sky accessible from Haleakala multiple times each lunation. The area surveyed ranges from +90 degrees in the north down to -47.5 degrees declination in the south. The “sweet spots” close to the Sun have been productive in discovery of large objects.The PS1 survey is becoming more mature and productive, having discovered more than half of all NEOs in 2015 to date, and more than 60% of the larger NEOs and PHAs discovered in 2015. Both PS1 and PS2 deliver excellent astrometry and photometry. PS1 continues to discover a significant number of large (> 1km) NEOs. PS1 has become the leading discover of comets, discovering more than half of the new comets in both 2014 and 2015.In good weather conditions, the discovery rate of NEO candidates by PS1 overwhelms the external NEO followup resources. particularly for fainter NEOs. As a result, we needed to repeat fields to recover NEO candidates. As PS2 matures, with a complete focal plane, and when the G96 camera upgrade is complete, the combination of these three telescopes will facilitate a higher NEO discovery rate, a better census of the NEOs in the sky, and better orbits for NEOs. This will in turn lead to a better understanding of the size and orbit distribution of NEOs. The Pan-STARRS NEO survey is also likely to discover asteroids suitable for the NASA asteroid retrieval mission.Some early science highlights from the Pan-STARRS survey will be discussed.

  20. Method of evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, Eugene R.

    1987-01-01

    Liquids, such as juices, milk, molten metal and the like are concentrated by forming uniformly-sized, small droplets in a precision droplet forming assembly and deploying the droplets in free fall downwardly as a central column within an evacuated column with cool walls. A portion of the solvent evaporates. The vapor flows to the wall, condenses, and usually flows down the wall as a film to condensate collector and drain. The vertical column of freely falling droplets enters the splash guard. The condensate can be collected, sent to other towers or recycled.

  1. Kepler Planets: A Tale of Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ~0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R ⊕. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ~0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M ⊕ and the majority of them should have core masses of a few Earth masses.

  2. KEPLER PLANETS: A TALE OF EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ∼0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R{sub ⊕}. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ∼0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M{sub ⊕} and the majority of them should have core masses of a few Earth masses.

  3. Catastrophic evaporation of rocky planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    Short-period exoplanets can have dayside surface temperatures surpassing 2000 K, hot enough to vaporize rock and drive a thermal wind. Small enough planets evaporate completely. We construct a radiative hydrodynamic model of atmospheric escape from strongly irradiated, low-mass rocky planets, accounting for dust-gas energy exchange in the wind. Rocky planets with masses ≲ 0.1 M⊕ (less than twice the mass of Mercury) and surface temperatures ≳2000 K are found to disintegrate entirely in ≲10 Gyr. When our model is applied to Kepler planet candidate KIC 12557548b - which is believed to be a rocky body evaporating at a rate of dot{M} gtrsim 0.1 M_{{{oplus }}} Gyr-1 - our model yields a present-day planet mass of ≲ 0.02 M⊕ or less than about twice the mass of the Moon. Mass-loss rates depend so strongly on planet mass that bodies can reside on close-in orbits for Gyr with initial masses comparable to or less than that of Mercury, before entering a final short-lived phase of catastrophic mass-loss (which KIC 12557548b has entered). Because this catastrophic stage lasts only up to a few per cent of the planet's life, we estimate that for every object like KIC 12557548b, there should be 10-100 close-in quiescent progenitors with sub-day periods whose hard-surface transits may be detectable by Kepler - if the progenitors are as large as their maximal, Mercury-like sizes (alternatively, the progenitors could be smaller and more numerous). According to our calculations, KIC 12557548b may have lost ˜70 per cent of its formation mass; today we may be observing its naked iron core.

  4. Infrared thermography of evaporative fluxes and dynamics of salt deposition on heterogeneous porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, Uri; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani; Dragila, Maria; Weisbrod, Noam

    2011-12-01

    Evaporation of saline solutions from porous media, common in arid areas, involves complex interactions between mass transport, energy exchange and phase transitions. We quantified evaporation of saline solutions from heterogeneous sand columns under constant hydraulic boundary conditions to focus on effects of salt precipitation on evaporation dynamics. Mass loss measurements and infrared thermography were used to quantify evaporation rates. The latter method enables quantification of spatial and temporal variability of salt precipitation to identify its dynamic effects on evaporation. Evaporation from columns filled with texturally-contrasting sand using different salt solutions revealed preferential salt precipitation within the fine textured domains. Salt precipitation reduced evaporation rates from the fine textured regions by nearly an order of magnitude. In contrast, low evaporation rates from coarse-textured regions (due to low capillary drive) exhibited less salt precipitation and consequently less evaporation rate suppression. Experiments provided insights into two new phenomena: (1) a distinct increase in evaporation rate at the onset of evaporation; and (2) a vapor pumping mechanism related to the presence of a salt crust over semidry media. Both phenomena are related to local vapor pressure gradients established between pore water and the surface salt crust. Comparison of two salts: NaCl and NaI, which tend to precipitate above the matrix surface and within matrix pores, respectively, shows a much stronger influence of NaCl on evaporation rate suppression. This disparity reflects the limited effect of NaI precipitation on matrix resistivity for solution and vapor flows.

  5. A stochastic assessment of climate change impacts on precipitation and potential evaporation in Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchyshyn, I.; Wheater, H. S.; Chun, K.

    2012-12-01

    In many climate change investigations, changes in precipitation are projected under various scenarios; however, changes in evaporation have received relatively less attention. For irrigation and water resources management, the difference between potential evaporation and precipitation can provide better quantification of local water availability and drought conditions. Therefore, projecting joint variations in precipitation and potential evaporation can provide better information for climate change adaptation. A stochastic approach based on a Generalised Linear Model (GLM) framework is proposed to study these together at a station scale. Eight stations in Alberta are selected for which historical pan evaporation records and up-to-date meteorological information are available. Results show that potential evaporation estimated from Global Circulation Models directly can be unreliable. The evaporation ensemble simulated by the GLM approach can represent observed evaporation more realistically and provide better uncertainty quantification. If only simulated precipitation is considered, the projected drought conditions in the 2080s are likely to be less severe than that in the 2000s. However, the projected difference between precipitation and evaporation (water deficit) shows that the future drought conditions may be higher or lower, varying between the stations. Implications of the results and further development of the proposed approach to address spatial dependence between stations are also discussed.

  6. Evaporation of Liquid Hydrocarbon Mixtures on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Chevrier, V. F.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Singh, S.; Roe, L. A.; Wagner, A.

    2013-10-01

    Besides Earth, Titan is the only other known planetary body with proven stable liquids on its surface. The hydrological cycle of these liquid hydrocarbon mixtures is critical in understanding Titan’s atmosphere and surface features. Evaporation of liquid surface bodies has been indirectly observed as shoreline changes from measurements by Cassini ISS and RADAR (Hayes et al. 2011, Icarus 211, 655-671; Turtle et al. 2011, Science 18, 1414-1417.), but the long seasons of Saturn strongly limit the time span of these observations and their validity over the course of an entire Titan year. Using a novel Titan simulation chamber, the evaporation rate of liquid methane and dissolved nitrogen mixture under Titan surface conditions was derived (Luspay-Kuti et al. 2012, GRL 39, L23203), which is especially applicable to low latitude transient liquids. Polar lakes, though, are expected to be composed of a variety of hydrocarbons, primarily a mixture of ethane and methane (e.g. Cordier et al. 2009, ApJL 707, L128-L131). Here we performed laboratory simulations of ethane-methane mixtures with varying mole fraction under conditions suitable for the polar regions of Titan. We will discuss results specifically addressing the evaporation behavior as the solution becomes increasingly ethane dominated, providing quantitative values for the evaporation rate at every step. These laboratory results are relevant to polar lakes, such as Ontario Lacus, and can shed light on their stability.

  7. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA) measurements by iodide chemical ionisation mass spectrometry: first analysis of results in the boreal forest and implications for the measurement of PAN fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G. J.; Pouvesle, N.; Thieser, J.; Schuster, G.; Axinte, R.; Fischer, H.; Williams, J.; Lelieveld, J.; Crowley, J. N.

    2012-08-01

    We describe measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3C(O)O2NO2, PAN) and peroxyacetic acid (CH3C(O)OOH, PAA) in the Boreal forest using iodide chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ICIMS). The measurements were made during the Hyytiälä United Measurement of Photochemistry and Particles - Comprehensive Organic Particle and Environmental Chemistry (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010) measurement intensive. Mixing ratios of PAN and PAA were determined by measuring the acetate ion signal (CH3C(O)O2-, m/z 59) resulting from reaction of CH3C(O)O2 (from the thermal dissociation of PAN) or CH3C(O)OOH with iodide ions using alternatively heated and ambient temperature inlet lines. During conditions of high temperature and low NOx, PAA mixing ratios were similar to, or exceeded those of PAN and thus contributed a significant fraction of the total acetate signal. PAA is thus a potential interference for ICIMS measurements of PAN, and especially eddy covariance flux measurements in environments where the PAA flux is likely to be a significant proportion of the short timescale acetate ion variability. Within the range of mixing ratios of NOx measured during HUMPPA-COPEC, the ratio of PAA-to-PAN was found to be sensitive to temperature (through the thermal decomposition rate of PAN) and the HO2 mixing ratio, thus providing some constraint to estimates of photochemical activity and oxidation rates in the Boreal environment.

  8. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA) measurements by iodide chemical ionisation mass spectrometry: first analysis of results in the boreal forest and implications for the measurement of PAN fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G. J.; Pouvesle, N.; Thieser, J.; Schuster, G.; Axinte, R.; Fischer, H.; Williams, J.; Lelieveld, J.; Crowley, J. N.

    2013-02-01

    We describe measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3C(O)O2NO2, PAN) and peroxyacetic acid (CH3C(O)OOH, PAA) in the Boreal forest using iodide chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ICIMS). The measurements were made during the Hyytiälä United Measurement of Photochemistry and Particles - Comprehensive Organic Particle and Environmental Chemistry (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010) measurement intensive. Mixing ratios of PAN and PAA were determined by measuring the acetate ion signal (CH3C(O)O-, m/z = 59) resulting from reaction of CH3C(O)O2 (from the thermal dissociation of PAN) or CH3C(O)OOH with iodide ions using alternatively heated and ambient temperature inlet lines. During some periods of high temperature (~ 30 °C) and low NOx (< 1 ppbv), PAA mixing ratios were similar to, or exceeded those of PAN and thus contributed a significant fraction of the total acetate signal. PAA is thus a potential interference for ICIMS measurements of PAN, and especially eddy covariance flux measurements in environments where the PAA flux is likely to be a significant proportion of the (short timescale) acetate ion variability. Within the range of mixing ratios of NOx measured during HUMPPA-COPEC, the modelled ratio of PAA-to-PAN was found to be sensitive to temperature (through the thermal decomposition rate of PAN) and the HO2 mixing ratio, thus providing some constraint to estimates of photochemical activity and oxidation rates in the Boreal environment.

  9. Pan-STARRS Moving Object Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, R.; Denneau, L.; Grav, T.; Heasley, J.; Kubica, Jeremy; Pan-STARRS Team

    2005-12-01

    The Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii is developing a large optical astronomical surveying system - the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS). The Moving Object Processing System (MOPS) client of the Pan-STARRS image processing pipeline is developing software to automatically discover and identify >90% of near-Earth objects (NEOs) 300m in diameter and >80% of other classes of asteroids and comets. In developing its software, MOPS has created a synthetic solar system model (SSM) with over 10 million objects whose distributions of orbital characteristics matches those expected for objects that Pan-STARRS will observe. MOPS verifies its correct operation by simulating the survey and subsequent discovery of synthetically generated objects. MOPS also employs novel techniques in handling the computationally difficult problem of linking large numbers of unknown asteroids in a field of detections. We will describe the creation and verification of the Pan-STARRS MOPS SSM, demonstrate synthetic detections and observations by the MOPS, describe the MOPS asteroid linking techniques, describe accuracy and throughput of the entire MOPS system, and provide predictions regarding the numbers and kinds of objects, including as yet undiscovered "extreme objects", that the MOPS expects to find over its 10-year lifetime. Pan-STARRS is funded under a grant from the U.S. Air Force.

  10. Energy conservation in existing caustic evaporator house

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, B.S.; Mathur, T.N.S.

    1983-12-01

    Process industries consume a major portion of the total energy used in industrial sector. Amongst the many other process industries 'Caustic Soda Manufacture' is the one which is highly energy-intensive. As a matter of fact it consumes fuel worth many millions of rupees in a year. Over the years the mercury cells have been replaced by diaphragm cells. One of the important factors contributing to this has been the availability of power and steam at cheap rates. In the diaphragm cells, the caustic soda produced comes out mixed with unelectrolysed salt and water known as cell liquor. The cell liquor contains varying percentage of NaOH, NaCl and water. It has a large amount of water (about 75% of the cell liquor) which is subsequently evaporated by steam in the multiple effect evaporator system depending upon the end-product concentration. Due to the large quantities of the water to be evaporated the cost of steam required for evaporation becomes so large that it controls the cost of caustic soda manufacture. Owing to many-fold escalation in the cost of fuel, over the last decade, the contribution of steam cost on the total cost of the product has further enhanced. This calls for a fresh look on the existing evaporators in order to reduce the steam consumption per tonne of caustic soda. In this paper, the important factors contributing to reduce the steam consumption for the economic operation of caustic evaporator from cell liquor concentration to 50% NaOH concentration are analysed.

  11. An evaporation model of colloidal suspension droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Li\\ Nán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2009-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of polymers in water or other solvents are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry to coat tablets with different agents. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or physical appearance. The coating is performed by simultaneously spraying and drying the tablets with the colloidal suspension at moderately high temperatures. The spreading of the coating on the pills surface depends on the droplet Webber and Reynolds numbers, angle of impact, but more importantly on the rheological properties of the drop. We present a model for the evaporation of a colloidal suspension droplet in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the carrier fluid. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface, a compacting front advances into the droplet faster than the liquid surface regresses, forming a shell of a porous medium where the particles reach their maximum packing density. While the surface regresses, the evaporation rate is determined by both the rate at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and the rate at which liquid vapor is diffused away from it. This regime continues until the compacting front reaches the center of the droplet, at which point the evaporation rate is drastically reduced.

  12. Evaporation Dynamics of Moss and Bare Soil in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, S.; Young, J. M.; Barron, C. G.; Bolton, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation dynamics of mosses is a critical process in boreal and arctic systems and represents a key uncertainty in hydrology and climate models. At this point, moss evaporation is not well quantified at the plot or landscape scale. Relative to bare soil or litter evaporation, moss evaporation can be challenging to predict because the water flux is not isolated to the moss surface. Evaporation can originate from nearly 10 cm below the surface. Some mosses can wick moisture from even deeper than 10 cm, which subsequently evaporates. The goal of this study was to use field measurements to quantify the moss evaporation dynamics in a coniferous forest relative to bare ground or litter evaporation dynamics in a deciduous forest in Interior Alaska. Measurements were made in two ecosystem types within the boreal forest of Interior Alaska: a deciduous forest devoid of moss and a coniferous forest with a thick moss layer. A small clear chamber was attached to a LiCor 840 infrared gas analyzer in a closed loop system with a low flow rate. Water fluxes were measured for ~ 90 seconds on each plot in dry and wet soil and moss conditions. Additional measurements included: soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, barometric pressure, dew point, relative humidity, and wind speed. Thermal infrared images were also captured in congruence with water flux measurements to determine skin temperature. We found that the moss evaporation rate was over 100% greater than the soil evaporation rate (0.057 g/min vs. 0.024 g/min), and evaporation rates in both systems were most strongly driven by relative humidity and surface temperature. Surface temperature was lower at the birch site than the black spruce site because trees shade the surface beneath the birch. High fluxes associated with high water content were sustained for a longer period of time over the mosses compared to the bare soil. The thermal IR data showed that skin temperature lagged the evaporation flux, such that the evaporation would peak immediately following wetting of the surface but the skin temperatures responded by decreasing 20 minutes later. This study shows the evaporation dynamics of moss and bare ground, which will be incorporated into a hydrology model evaluating freshwater generation from the boreal forest.

  13. Pattern formation in evaporating drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang-I.

    The redistribution of organic solutes during drop evaporation is a nanoscale self assembly process with relevance to technologies ranging from inkjet printing of organic displays to synthesis of bio-smart interfaces for sensing and screening. Atomic force microscopy studies comparing the behavior of different generation dendrimers with different surface chemistry in two solvent alcohols on mica substrates confirm that the detailed morphologies of condensed dendrimer ring structures resulting from micro-droplet evaporation sensitively depend on the surface chemistry, the solute evaporation rate and the dendrimer generation. For the dilute concentration studied here the presence of periodically 'scalloped' molecular rings is ubiquitous. The instability wavelength of the scalloped rings is found to be proportional to the width of the ring, similar to observations of the rim instability in dewetting holes. The effect of the surface chemistry of the dendrimer molecules is obvious in the detailed structure of the self assembled rings. Varying the chain length of solvent alcohol leads to modification of ring patterns. The influence of dendrimer generation on ring structure primarily reflects the increase in dendrimer density with generation number. The evolution of G2-50%C12 -pentanol rings as a function of dendrimer concentration is also described. High surface mobility and phase transformation phenomena in condensed, micro-scale dendrimer structures are documented, again using atomic force microscopy. Stratified dendrimer rings undergo dramatic temperature, time and dendrimer generation dependent morphological changes associated with large-scale molecular rearrangements and partial melting. These transformations produce ring structures consisting of a highly stable first monolayer of the scalloped structure in equilibrium with spherical cap shaped dendrimer islands that form at the center of each pre-existing scallop (creating a 'pearl necklace' structure). Analysis of the dendrimer island shapes reveals a dependence of island contact angle on contact line curvature (island size) that varies systematically with dendrimer generation. The morphological transformations in this system indicate the potential for creating complex, dendrimer-based multilevel structures and macroscopic scale arrays using, for example, droplet-on-demand or dip pen nanolithography techniques, coupled with appropriate annealing and stabilizing treatments.

  14. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  15. Thermocapillary transport of energy during water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Fei; Badam, V. K.; Durst, F.; Ward, C. A.

    2005-11-01

    When evaporation occurs at a spherical water-vapor interface maintained at the circular mouth of a small funnel, studies of the energy transport have indicated that thermal conduction alone does not provide enough energy to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate. If the Gibbs model of the interface is adopted and the “surface-thermal capacity” is assigned a value of 30.6±0.8kJ/(m2K) , then for evaporation experiments with the interfacial temperature in the range -10°C⩽TLV⩽3.5°C and Marangoni number (Ma) in the range 100evaporated at cylindrical interfaces that were, on average, 4.4 times larger in area than that of the spherical interfaces used to measure the surface-thermal capacity initially. It is shown that using the value of the surface-thermal capacity determined at a spherical interface, the energy transported by thermocapillary convection and thermal conduction at a cylindrical interface is sufficient to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate. Knowing the value of the surface-thermal capacity also allows the local evaporation flux to be calculated from the measured temperature profiles in the liquid and vapor phases. The calculated local evaporation flux can then be used with statistical rate theory to calculate the vapor-phase pressure along the interface. The predicted mean vapor-phase pressure is in close agreement with that measured, and the predicted pressure gradient is consistent with that expected when thermocapillary convection is present.

  16. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  17. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-02-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N 2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  18. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Pan-STARRS1 is approaching the completion of the PS1 Science Mission. Operations of the PS1 System include the Observatory, Telescope, 1.4 Gigapixel Camera, Image Processing Pipeline , PSPS relational database and reduced science product software servers. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) A 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) A Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey optimized for Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey; and (5) a Deep Survey of M31. The PS1 3pi Survey has now covered the sky north of dec=-30 with more than 12 visits in five bands: g,r,i,z and y or over ~60 epochs per 0.25 arcsec resolution element on the sky. The performance of the PS1 system, sky coverage, cadence, and data quality of the Pan-STARRS1 Surveys will be presented as well as progress in reprocessing of the data taken to date and the plans for the public release of all Pan-STARRS1 data products in the spring of 2015. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys (PS1) have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy, the University of Hawaii, the Pan-STARRS Project Office, the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, The Johns Hopkins University, Durham University, the University of Edinburgh, Queen's University Belfast, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated, the National Central University of Taiwan, the Space Telescope Science Institute, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate, the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-1238877, the University of Maryland, and Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE).

  19. Ten years of pan-genome analyses.

    PubMed

    Vernikos, George; Medini, Duccio; Riley, David R; Tettelin, Herv

    2015-02-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have engendered a genome sequence data deluge in public databases. Genome analyses have transitioned from single or few genomes to hundreds to thousands of genomes. Pan-genome analyses provide a framework for estimating the genomic diversity of the dataset at hand and predicting the number of additional whole genomes sequences that would be necessary to fully characterize that diversity. We review recent implementations of the pan-genome approach, its impact and limits, and we propose possible extensions, including analyses at the whole genome multiple sequence alignment level. PMID:25483351

  20. 7 CFR 58.217 - Evaporators and/or vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall be equipped with an automatic condenser water level control, barometric leg, or so constructed so as to prevent water from entering the product. New or replacement units shall comply with the 3-A... are used, no special controls are needed to prevent water from entering the product. Water...

  1. 7 CFR 58.217 - Evaporators and/or vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall be equipped with an automatic condenser water level control, barometric leg, or so constructed so as to prevent water from entering the product. New or replacement units shall comply with the 3-A... are used, no special controls are needed to prevent water from entering the product. Water...

  2. 7 CFR 58.217 - Evaporators and/or vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION... water with entrained solids to the waste water system. “Cow water” shall not be used for acidified...

  3. Evaporation and skin penetration characteristics of mosquito repellent formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Reifenrath, W.G.; Hawkins, G.S.; Kurtz, M.S.

    1989-03-01

    Formulations of the mosquito repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (deet) in combination with a variety of additives were developed to control repellent evaporation and percutaneous penetration. Deet was also formulated with the repellent dimethyl phthalate to study the interaction of the two compounds on the skin. The evaporation and penetration processes were evaluated on whole and split-thickness pig skin using radiolabeled repellents with an in vitro apparatus. Under essentially still air and air flow conditions, one of the deet formulations resulted in significantly reduced total evaporation and percutaneous penetration of deet as compared to unformulated repellent. When deet and dimethyl phthalate were combined, neither repellent affected the total amount of evaporation and penetration of the other compound. However, initial percutaneous penetration and evaporation rates were slightly less and decayed less rapidly than when both chemicals were tested separately at the same dose. These results indicated a degree of competition of the two compounds for the same avenues of loss.

  4. Crystallization of proteins by dynamic control of evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. G.; Bray, T. L.; Suddath, F. L.

    1991-03-01

    It is expected that the kinetics of supersaturation, which is directly related to the evaporation of solvent from a crystallization solution, will greatly affect both nucleation and crystal growth processes. Therefore, a novel device has been developed which allows computer regulation of the flow of N 2(g) over a hanging drop to dynamically control the evaporation of solvent. A thermal conductivity detector is used to monitor the amount of water vapor transferred from the drop to the gas stream and provides closed loop control of the evaporation process. Data acquisition and control are accomplished using a custom program written with LabVIEW software (National Instruments) on a Macintosh II microcomputer. Quantitation of several evaporation protocols has been accomplished using both the thermal conductivity detector and a novel conductance cell that allows continuous measurement of solution analyte concentrations. Crystals of hen egg white lysozyme have been grown at different evaporation rates and analyzed according to size and number of single crystals.

  5. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Bue, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust nonventing system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. This water vapor is then captured by solid LiCl in the LCAR with a high enthalpy of absorption, resulting in sufficient temperature lift to reject heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the LCAR would be heated up and dried in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A engineering development prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The LCAR was able to stably reject 75 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  6. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Qumner, Goulven; Bohn, John L; Ye, Jun

    2012-12-20

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling, which led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. More recently, substantial progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases. Their permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate systems with varied and controllable phases, dynamics and chemistry. However, although advances have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far. This is due to unfavourable ratios of elastic to inelastic scattering and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. Here we report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of neutral hydroxyl (OH()) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least one order of magnitude in temperature, and a corresponding increase in phase-space density by three orders of magnitude, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and a sufficiently large initial population, much colder temperatures are possible; even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical (or anything else it can sympathetically cool) may be within reach. PMID:23257881

  7. Thermal modeling of flow in the San Diego Aqueduct, California, and its relation to evaporation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal balance of the 26-kilometer long concrete-lined San Diego Aqueduct, a canal in southern California, was studied to determine the coefficients in a Dalton type evaporation formula. Meteorologic and hydraulic variables, as well as water temperature, were monitored continuously for a 1-year period. A thermal model was calibrated by use of data obtained during a 28-day period to determine the coefficients which best described the thermal balance of the canal. The coefficients applicable to the San Diego Aqueduct are similar to those commonly obtained from lake evaporation studies except that a greater evaporation at low windspeeds is indicated. The model was verified by use of data obtained during 113 days which did not include the calibration data. These data verified that the derived wind function realistically represents the canal evaporation. An annual evaporation of 2.08 meters was computed which is about 91 percent of the amount of water evaporated annually from nearby class A evaporation pans. (Kosco-USGS)

  8. EVAPORATION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

    PubMed Central

    Cruess, W. V.

    1921-01-01

    More and more the world is utilizing dried fruits and vegetables, the war having given impetus to the preparation of the latter. Here are plain statements of processes and values deduced from scientific institution investigations. Evaporation is in its infancy while sun drying is very ancient. Evaporated products are better looking but more costly. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:18010426

  9. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  10. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  11. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  12. Modeling Treated LAW Feed Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    DANIEL, WE

    2004-07-08

    This task examines the potential of the treated waste feed blends to form sodium-aluminum silicate precipitates when evaporated using the zeolite database. To investigate the behavior of the blended pretreated waste feed, an OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI ESP) model of the treated low activity waste (LAW) evaporator was built. A range of waste feed compositions representative of Envelope A, B, and C were then fed into the OLI model to predict various physical and chemical properties of the evaporator concentrates. Additional runs with treated LAW evaporator were performed to compare chemical and physical property model predictions and experimental results for small-scale radioactive tests of the treated feed evaporation process.

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Usui, Kota; Bonn, Mischa

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor, and is a key step in Earth's water cycle. At the molecular level, evaporation requires breaking at least one very strong intermolecular bond between two water molecules at the interface. Despite the importance of this process the molecular mechanism by which an evaporating water molecule gains sufficient energy to escape from the surface has remained elusive. Here, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations at the water-air interface with polarizable classical force field models, that the high kinetic energy of the evaporated water molecule is enabled by a well-timed making and breaking of hydrogen bonds involving at least three water molecules at the interface, the recoil of which allows one of the molecules to escape. The evaporation of water is thus enabled by concerted, ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics of interfacial water, and follows one specific molecular pathway.

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Water Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Usui, Kota; Bonn, Mischa

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor, and is a key step in Earth's water cycle. At the molecular level, evaporation requires breaking at least one very strong intermolecular bond between two water molecules at the interface. Despite the importance of this process the molecular mechanism by which an evaporating water molecule gains sufficient energy to escape from the surface has remained elusive. Here, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations at the water-air interface with polarizable classical force field models, that the high kinetic energy of the evaporated water molecule is enabled by a well-timed making and breaking of hydrogen bonds involving at least three water molecules at the interface, the recoil of which allows one of the molecules to escape. The evaporation of water is thus enabled by concerted, ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics of interfacial water, and follows one specific molecular pathway. PMID:26684127

  15. Experimental Investigation of Microstructured Evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibel, W.; Westermann, S.; Maikowske, S.; Brandner, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have become more and more popular over the last decades [1]. Cooling is a topic where microstructures offer significant advantages compared to conventional techniques due the much higher possible surface to volume ratios and short heat transfer lengths. By evaporating of a fluid in microchannels, compact, fast and powerful cooling devices become possible [2]. Experimental results for different designs of microstructured evaporators are presented here. They have been obtained either using water as evaporating coolant or the refrigerant R134a (Tetrafluoroethane). A new microstructured evaporator design consisting of bended microchannels instead of straight channels for a better performance is shown and compared to previous results [2] for the evaporation of R134a in straight microchannels.

  16. Imitation in Neonatal Chimpanzees ("Pan Troglodytes")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Tomonaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence for imitative abilities in neonatal chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes"), our closest relatives. Two chimpanzees were reared from birth by their biological mothers. At less than 7 days of age the chimpanzees could discriminate between, and imitate, human facial gestures (tongue protrusion and mouth opening). By the time…

  17. Imitation in Neonatal Chimpanzees ("Pan Troglodytes")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Tomonaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence for imitative abilities in neonatal chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes"), our closest relatives. Two chimpanzees were reared from birth by their biological mothers. At less than 7 days of age the chimpanzees could discriminate between, and imitate, human facial gestures (tongue protrusion and mouth opening). By the time

  18. THE Pan-STARRS1 PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Shivvers, I. S.; Lykke, K. R.; Doherty, P.; Price, P. A.

    2012-05-10

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is collecting multi-epoch, multi-color observations of the sky north of declination -30 Degree-Sign to unprecedented depths. These data are being photometrically and astrometrically calibrated and will serve as a reference for many other purposes. In this paper, we present our determination of the Pan-STARRS1 photometric system: g{sub P1}, r{sub P1}, i{sub P1}, z{sub P1}, y{sub P1}, and w{sub P1}. The Pan-STARRS1 photometric system is fundamentally based on the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec spectrophotometric observations, which in turn are fundamentally based on models of white dwarf atmospheres. We define the Pan-STARRS1 magnitude system and describe in detail our measurement of the system passbands, including both the instrumental sensitivity and atmospheric transmission functions. By-products, including transformations to other photometric systems, Galactic extinction, and stellar locus, are also provided. We close with a discussion of remaining systematic errors.

  19. The PAN-DA data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Petravick, D.; Berg, D.; Berman, E.; Bernett, M.; Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Dorries, T.; Haire, M.; Kaczar, K; MacKinnon, B.; Moore, C.; Nicinski, T.; Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Votava, M.; White, V.

    1989-05-01

    The Online and Data Acquisition software groups at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have extended the VAXONLINE data acquisition package to include a VME based data path. The resulting environment, PAN-DA, provides a high throughput for logging, filtering, formatting and selecting events. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Rotatable prism for pan and tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Compact, inexpensive, motor-driven prisms change field of view of TV camera. Camera and prism rotate about lens axis to produce pan effect. Rotating prism around axis parallel to lens produces tilt. Size of drive unit and required clearance are little more than size of camera.

  1. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  2. 75 FR 19181 - Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-8672 Filed 4-13-10; 8:45 am... earthquakes in Haiti and Chile demonstrates the enduring strength of Pan American solidarity. As we...

  3. The Pan-STARRS search for Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, Richard J.; Bolin, Bryce; Chambers, Kenneth; Chastel, Serge; Denneau, Larry; Micheli, Marco; Schunova, Eva; Veres, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The two Pan-STARRS telescopes, located on Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii, are 1.8-meter diameter telescopes equipped with 1.4 Gigapixel cameras that deliver 7 square degree fields of view. The first of these telescopes, Pan-STARRS1 (PS1), is now conducting a dedicated survey for Near-Earth Objects. The second telescope, Pan-STARRS2 (PS2) is being commissioned. It will initially supplement the PS1 search by targeting Near Earth Objects (NEO) candidates from PS1. As its efficiency grows, PS2 also will search for NEOs, and will increase the sky coverage and cadence.PS1 is cooperating with the G96 telescope of the Catalina Sky Survey in terms of field selection. Between declinations of -30 and +40 degrees, the telescopes alternate 1 hour-wide RA stripes each night. This strategy has led to increased productivity, and eliminated accidental repeats of fields. The PS1 survey area has been extended south to -47.5 degrees declination. The image quality in the deep south sky from Haleakala is good, and the new southern extension to the survey area has been very productive.PS1 has discovered more than half of the larger NEOs and PHAs in 2014 to date, and has become the leading NEO discovery telescope. PS1 delivers excellent astrometry and photometry. PS1 continues to discover a significant number of large (> 1km) NEOs.The present discovery rate of NEO candidates by PS1 is now overwhelming the external NEO followup resources. particularly for fainter NEOs. It has required that PS1 repeat fields to recover NEO candidates. As PS2 matures, and when G96 has its new camera, the combination of these three telescopes will facilitate a higher NEO discovery rate, and a better census of the NEOs in the sky. This will in turn lead to a better understanding of the size and orbit distribution of NEOs. The Pan-STARRS NEO survey is also likely to discover asteroids suitable for the NASA asteroid retrieval mission.

  4. Student-Centered Designs of Pan-African Literature Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Baye, Babacar

    2010-01-01

    A student-centered teaching methodology is an essential ingredient of a successful Pan-African literary course. In this article, the author defines Pan-Africanism and how to go about designing a Pan-African literature course. The author combines reading assignments with journals, film presentations, and lectures in a productive learning…

  5. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  6. Analysis of the effects of evaporative cooling on the evaporation of liquid droplets using a combined field approach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Liran

    2015-01-01

    During liquid evaporation, the equations for the vapor concentration in the atmosphere and for the temperature in the liquid are coupled and must be solved in an iterative manner. In the present paper, a combined field approach which unifies the coupled fields into one single hybrid field and thus makes the iteration unnecessary is proposed. By using this approach, the influences of the evaporative cooling on the evaporation of pinned sessile droplets are investigated, and its predictions are found in good agreement with the previous theoretical and experimental results. A dimensionless number Ec which can evaluate the strength of the evaporative cooling is then introduced, and the results show that both the evaporation flux along the droplet surface and the total evaporation rate of the droplet decrease as the evaporative cooling number Ec increases. For drying droplets, there exists a critical value EcCrit below which the evaporative cooling effect can be neglected and above which the significance of the effect increases dramatically. The present work may also have more general applications to coupled field problems in which all the fields have the same governing equation. PMID:25721987

  7. The evaporative function of cockroach hygroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Insect hygroreceptors associate as antagonistic pairs of a moist cell and a dry cell together with a cold cell in small cuticular sensilla on the antennae. The mechanisms by which the atmospheric humidity stimulates the hygroreceptive cells remain elusive. Three models for humidity transduction have been proposed in which hygroreceptors operate either as mechanical hygrometers, evaporation detectors or psychrometers. Mechanical hygrometers are assumed to respond to the relative humidity, evaporation detectors to the saturation deficit and psychrometers to the temperature depression (the difference between wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures). The models refer to different ways of expressing humidity. This also means, however, that at different temperatures these different types of hygroreceptors indicate very different humidity conditions. The present study tested the adequacy of the three models on the cockroach's moist and dry cells by determining whether the specific predictions about the temperature-dependence of the humidity responses are indeed observed. While in previous studies stimulation consisted of rapid step-like humidity changes, here we changed humidity slowly and continuously up and down in a sinusoidal fashion. The low rates of change made it possible to measure instantaneous humidity values based on UV-absorption and to assign these values to the hygroreceptive sensillum. The moist cell fitted neither the mechanical hygrometer nor the evaporation detector model: the temperature dependence of its humidity responses could not be attributed to relative humidity or to saturation deficit, respectively. The psychrometer model, however, was verified by the close relationships of the moist cell's response with the wet-bulb temperature and the dry cell's response with the dry-bulb temperature. Thus, the hygroreceptors respond to evaporation and the resulting cooling due to the wetness or dryness of the air. The drier the ambient air (absolutely) and the higher the temperature, the greater the evaporative temperature depression and the power to desiccate. PMID:23342058

  8. The Evaporative Function of Cockroach Hygroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Insect hygroreceptors associate as antagonistic pairs of a moist cell and a dry cell together with a cold cell in small cuticular sensilla on the antennae. The mechanisms by which the atmospheric humidity stimulates the hygroreceptive cells remain elusive. Three models for humidity transduction have been proposed in which hygroreceptors operate either as mechanical hygrometers, evaporation detectors or psychrometers. Mechanical hygrometers are assumed to respond to the relative humidity, evaporation detectors to the saturation deficit and psychrometers to the temperature depression (the difference between wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures). The models refer to different ways of expressing humidity. This also means, however, that at different temperatures these different types of hygroreceptors indicate very different humidity conditions. The present study tested the adequacy of the three models on the cockroach’s moist and dry cells by determining whether the specific predictions about the temperature-dependence of the humidity responses are indeed observed. While in previous studies stimulation consisted of rapid step-like humidity changes, here we changed humidity slowly and continuously up and down in a sinusoidal fashion. The low rates of change made it possible to measure instantaneous humidity values based on UV-absorption and to assign these values to the hygroreceptive sensillum. The moist cell fitted neither the mechanical hygrometer nor the evaporation detector model: the temperature dependence of its humidity responses could not be attributed to relative humidity or to saturation deficit, respectively. The psychrometer model, however, was verified by the close relationships of the moist cell’s response with the wet-bulb temperature and the dry cell’s response with the dry-bulb temperature. Thus, the hygroreceptors respond to evaporation and the resulting cooling due to the wetness or dryness of the air. The drier the ambient air (absolutely) and the higher the temperature, the greater the evaporative temperature depression and the power to desiccate. PMID:23342058

  9. The desorptivity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Available models of bulk evaporation from a bare-surfaced soil are difficult to apply to field conditions where evaporation is complicated by two main factors: rate-limiting climatic conditions and redistribution of soil moisture following infiltration. Both factors are included in the "desorptivity model', wherein the evaporation rate during the second stage (the soil-limiting stage) of evaporation is related to the desorptivity parameter, A. Analytical approximations for A are presented. The approximations are independent of the surface soil moisture. However, calculations using the approximations indicate that both soil texture and soil moisture content at depth significantly affect A. Because the moisture content at depth decreases in time during redistribution, it follows that the A parameter also changes with time. Consequently, a method to calculate a representative value of A was developed. When applied to field data, the desorptivity model estimated cumulative evaporation well. The model is easy to calculate, but its usefulness is limited because it requires an independent estimate of the time of transition between the first and second stages of evaporation. The model shows that bulk evaporation after the transition to the second stage is largely independent of climatic conditions.

  10. Pan-Planets: Searching for hot Jupiters around cool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, C.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Henning, Th.; Bender, R.; Kodric, M.; Deacon, N.; Riffeser, A.; Burgett, W.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 h. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters Teff and log g of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60 000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find 3.0+3.3-1.6 hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least 0.17b(+0.67-0.04) %, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, 0.14 (+0.15-0.076) %. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of 0.11 (+0.37-0.02) % in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. This limit is a significant improvement over previous estimates where the lowest limit published so far is 1.1% found in the WFCAM Transit Survey. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower occurrence rate for cool stars. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  11. Evaporation from groundwater discharge playas, Estancia Basin, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menking, Kirsten M.; Anderson, Roger Y.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Allen, Bruce D.; Ellwein, Amy L.; Loveland, Thomas A.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2000-01-01

    Bowen ratio meteorological stations have been deployed to measure rates of evaporation from groundwater discharge playas and from an adjacent vegetated bench in the Estancia Basin, in central New Mexico. The playas are remnants of late Pleistocene pluvial Lake Estancia and are discharge areas for groundwater originating as precipitation in the adjacent Manzano Mts. They also accumulate water during local precipitation events. Evaporation is calculated from measured values of net radiation, soil heat flux, atmospheric temperature, and relative humidity. Evaporation rates are strongly dependent on the presence or absence of standing water in the playas, with rates increasing more than 600% after individual rainstorms. Evaporation at site E-12, in the southeastern part of the playa Complex, measured 74 cm over a yearlong period from mid-1997 through mid-1998. This value compares favorably to earlier estimates from northern Estancia playas, but is nearly three times greater than evaporation at a similar playa in western Utah. Differences in geographical position, salt crust composition, and physical properties may explain some of the difference in evaporation rates in these two geographic regions.

  12. Externally Induced Evaporation of Young Stellar Disks in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, D.; Hollenbach, D.; Shu, F.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model for the evaporation of disks around young low-mass stars by external sources of high energy photons. Two evaporation techniques are possible. Lyman continuum radiation can ionize hydrogen at the disk surface powering a steady thermal ionized disk-wind, or FUV radiation can heat the disk through photo-electric grain processes powering a slower thermal neutral disk-wind. Applying these two models to the evaporating objects in the Trapezium produces a satisfactory solution to both the mass-loss rate and size of the ionized envelopes.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence of barium evaporating from a dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemyan, S. M.

    1982-03-01

    A continuous wave dye laser is used to induce resonance fluorescence in Ba atoms evaporating from a thermionic dispenser cathode. The laser is tuned to the 553.5 microns Ba I line by making use of the optogalvanic effect in a hollow cathode discharge tube. Photon counting equipment is used to measure the Ba fluorescent intensity as a function of cathode temperature and laser power. Ba concentrations and evaporation rates as functions of temperature are derived from the fluorescent intensity. Laser induced fluorescence is established as a technique for examining various species evaporating from cathodes. The technique can be used in attempts to determine cathode failure mechanisms.

  14. Kinetic approach to the evaporation and condensation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, M.; Oshima, K.

    1974-01-01

    In the paper, the Boltzmann equation governing the evaporation and condensation phenomena is solved by the Monte Carlo method. Based on the kinetic theory of gas the role of the non-equilibrium Knudsen layer and the growth of the hydrodynamic region outside the layer as time proceeds are simulated. Results show two possible types of transient developments in the vapor phase. The effects of the molecular absorption coefficient of the phase surface are examined. Except in the case of very strong evaporation the kinematic effects of binary collisions among vapor molecules on the mass flux rate are not serious. The limiting case of the quasi-steady evaporation and the maximal value of the evaporation rate are obtained.

  15. Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

  16. Trends in evaporation and surface cooling in the Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Dunne, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    A synthesis of available data for the Mississippi River basin (area 3 ?? 106 km2) reveals an upward trend in evaporation during recent decades, driven primarily by increases in precipitation and secondarily by human water use. A cloud-related decrease in surface net radiation appears to have accompanied the precipitation trend. Resultant evaporative and radiative cooling of the land and lower atmosphere quantitatively explains downward trends in observed pan evaporation. These cooling tendencies also reconcile the observed regional atmospheric cooling with the anticipated regional "greenhouse warming." If recent high levels of precipitation (which correlate with the North Atlantic Oscillation) are mainly caused by an internal climatic fluctuation, an eventual return to normal precipitation could reveal heretofore-unrealized warming in the basin. If, instead, they are caused by some unidentified forcing that will continue to grow in the future, then continued intensification of water cycling and suppression of warming in the basin could result.

  17. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity. PMID:25818089

  18. Gel polymer electrolyte based on LiBOB and PAN for the application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arof, A. K.; Jun, H. K.; Sim, L. N.; Kufian, M. Z.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-11-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been fabricated using metal complex N3 dye coupled with LiBOB and PAN-based gel polymer electrolyte (GPE). Conductivity of the GPE at room temperature was 1.2 × 10-2 S cm-1. The deconvoluted vibration spectra at different temperatures between 1000 and 970 cm-1 show the existence of ion pairs and free ions. Overall efficiency and fill factor of the DSSC with LiBOB-BMII-PAN-I2 GPE system is 0.65% and 48% respectively. The cell with LiBOB-BMII-PAN-I2 GPE system appears to be stable under varied light intensity attributed to the presence of redox couple mediator in the GPE. Impedance measurements show that the DSSC with LiBOB-BMII-PAN-I2 GPE has longer electron lifetime which suggests a lower electron recombination rate.

  19. A linear approximation to black hole evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, D. W.

    2006-08-01

    An evaporating Schwarzschild black hole is analysed including back reaction in a linear approximation. The analysis assumes a massless scalar field propagating in a spacetime consisting of two Vaidya metrics corresponding respectively to outgoing radiation and an infalling negative energy flux. For times late relative to the collapse but early relative to the lifetime of the hole, the standard rate is reproduced and has the correct time dependence. The event horizon shrinks at the expected rate. These results are independent of the exact location of the boundary between the regions. The magnitude of the quantum fluxes at various radii suggests that most of the pair production occurs far from the horizon.

  20. PAN/PS elctrospun fibers for oil spill cleanup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qiao; Lili, Zhao; Haixiang, Sun; Peng, Li

    2014-08-01

    A high-capacity oil sorbent was fabricated by electrospinning using PS/PAN blend. Morphology, contact angle and oil adsorption of PAN/PS fiber and PP nonwoven fabric were studied. It was found that the PAN/PS fiber had a smaller diameter than PP, and the maximum sorption capacities of the PAN/PS sorbent for pump oil, peanut oil, diesel, and gasoline were 194.85, 131.7, 66.75, and 43.38 g/g, which were far higher than those of PP. The sorbent PS/PAN fiber showed a contact angle of water144.32° and diesel oil 0°. The sorption kinetics of PAN/PS and PP sorbent were also investigated. Compared with the commercial PP fabric, the PAN/PS fiber seems to have the ability to be used in oil-spill cleanup application.

  1. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the comprehensive model developed here. PMID:24320680

  2. An extremum principle of evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingfeng; Salvucci, Guido D.; Bras, Rafael L.

    2004-09-01

    It is proposed, on the basis of an argument of thermodynamic equilibrium, that land-atmosphere interactive processes lead to thermal and hydrologic states of the land surface that maximize evaporation in a given meteorological environment. The extremum principle leads to general equations linking surface energy fluxes to surface temperature and soil moisture. The hypothesis of maximum evaporation has been tested with data from three field experiments. We found strong evidence suggesting that evaporation is maximized and furthermore that it is determined by the state variables (temperature, soil moisture, and sensible heat flux into the atmosphere) and relatively insensitive to water vapor pressure deficit. The theory allows an independent estimate of the coefficient in the Priestley-Taylor formula for potential evaporation, which is consistent with the widely accepted value of 1.26.

  3. How do Black Holes evaporate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbinot, Roberto

    1984-03-01

    The study of a two dimensional model suggests the possibility that Black Hole evaporation may become a dynamically driven process even before Planck era is reached. On leave from the Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Italy.

  4. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-01-04

    An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

  5. Evaporation Tower With Prill Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tower more efficient than conventional evaporation equipment. Liquids such as milk and fruit juice concentrated by passing them through tiny nozzle to form droplets, then allowing droplets to fall through evacuated tower with cooled walls.

  6. The evaporative vector: Homogeneous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klots, C.E.

    1987-05-01

    Molecular beams of van der Waals molecules are the subject of much current research. Among the methods used to form these beams, three-sputtering, laser ablation, and the sonic nozzle expansion of neat gases - yield what are now recognized to be ''warm clusters.'' They contain enough internal energy to undergo a number of first-order processes, in particular that of evaporation. Because of this evaporation and its attendant cooling, the properties of such clusters are time-dependent. The states of matter which can be arrived at via an evaporative vector on a typical laboratory time-scale are discussed. Topics include the (1) temperatures, (2) metastability, (3) phase transitions, (4) kinetic energies of fragmentation, and (5) the expression of magical properties, all for evaporating homogeneous clusters.

  7. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  8. Experimental simulations of CH4 evaporation on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay-Kuti, A.; Chevrier, V. F.; Wasiak, F. C.; Roe, L. A.; Welivitiya, W. D. D. P.; Cornet, T.; Singh, S.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first experimental results on the evaporation of liquid CH4 under simulated Titan surface conditions similar to those observed at the Huygens landing site. An average evaporation rate of (3.1 ± 0.6) × 10-4 kg s-1 m-2 at 94 K and 1.5 bar was measured. While our results are generally higher than previous models based on energy balance, they show an excellent match with a theoretical mass transfer approach. Indeed, we find that evaporation in the Titan environmental chamber is predominantly diffusion driven and affected by the buoyancy of lighter CH4 in the heavier N2 atmosphere. After correcting for the difference in gravity of Earth and Titan, the resulting evaporation rate is (1.6 ± 0.3) × 10-4 kg s-1m-2 (or 1.13 ± 0.3 mm hr-1). Using our experimental evaporation rates, we determine that the low-latitude storm recently observed by Cassini ISS would have resulted in a maximum evaporated mass of (5.4 ± 1.2) × 1010 kg of CH4 equivalent to a 2.4 ± 0.5 m thick layer over 80 days. Based on our results, a sufficient amount of CH4 can accumulate in the otherwise arid equatorial regions to produce transient ponds and liquid flows.

  9. BRDF of Salt Pan Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Butler, James J.; King, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurements of salt pan regolith samples are presented in this study in an effort to understand the role of spatial and spectral variability of the natural biome. The samples were obtained from Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.20 deg S, 15.93 deg E, alt. 1100 m). It is shown how the BRDF depends on the measurement geometry - incident and scatter angles and on the sample particle sizes. As a demonstration of the application of the results, airborne BRDF measurements acquires with NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) over the same general site where the regolith samples were collected are compared with the laboratory results. Good agreement between laboratory measured and field measured BRDF is reported.

  10. Modeling of solvent evaporation from polymer jets in electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Salkovskiy, Yury; Dzenis, Yuris A.

    2011-05-01

    Solvent evaporation plays a critical role in nanofiber formation in electrospinning. Here, we present a nonlinear mass diffusion-transfer model describing the drying process in dilute polymer solution jets. The model is used to predict transient solvent concentration profiles in polyacrylonitrile/N,N-dimethylformamide (PAN/DMF) jets with the initial radii ranging from 50 μm down to 100 nm. Numerical simulations demonstrate high transient inhomogeneity of solvent concentration over the jet cross-section in microscopic jets. The degree of inhomogeneity decreases for finer, submicron jets. The simulated jet drying time decreases rapidly with the decreasing initial jet radius, from seconds for microjets to single milliseconds for nanojets. The results demonstrate the need for further improved coupled multiphysics models of electrospinning jets.

  11. Estimation of evaporative loss based on the stable isotope composition of water using Hydrocalculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Mydłowski, Adam; Dogramaci, Shawan; Hedley, Paul; Gibson, John J.; Grierson, Pauline F.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate quantification of evaporative losses to the atmosphere from surface water bodies is essential for calibration and validation of hydrological models, particularly in remote arid and semi-arid regions, where intermittent rivers are generally minimally gauged. Analyses of the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of water can be used to estimate evaporative losses from individual pools in such regions in the absence of instrumental data but calculations can be complex, especially in highly variable systems. In this study, we reviewed and combined the most recent equations required for estimation of evaporative losses based on the revised Craig-Gordon model. The updated procedure is presented step-by-step, increasing ease of replication of all calculations. The main constraints and sources of uncertainties in the model were also evaluated. Based on this procedure we have designed a new software, Hydrocalculator, that allows quick and robust estimation of evaporative losses based on isotopic composition of water. The software was validated against measures of field pan evaporation under arid conditions in northwest Australia as well as published data from other regions. We found that the major factor contributing to the overall uncertainty in evaporative loss calculations using this method is uncertainty in estimation of the isotope composition of ambient air moisture.

  12. Marangoni instability induced convection in an evaporating liquid droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, An-Ti; Rashidnia, N.; Arpaci, V. S.

    1992-01-01

    The processes occurring when a liquid drop undergoes evaporation are described. When a liquid drop undergoes evaporation, its surface temperature decreases. If the droplet is free floating in a microgravity environment, the heat transfer process inside the droplet is initially condition controlled. As the process continues, a radial temperature gradient builds up at the free surface until the critical Marangoni number is exceeded. Then the onset of instability induces thermocapillary convective flows, which in turn speed up the evaporation. The convective flows will subside when the interior of the droplet reaches a certain equilibrium temperature, and the process will return to the diffusion controlled mode. Both preliminary modeling and recent laboratory data have confirmed that Marangoni instability induced convection can and does occur in the droplet evaporation process. Mathematical models representing Marangoni instability in an evaporating liquid drop are presented. An ideal space experiment to study and characterize the onset of Marangoni instability in an evaporating liquid droplet and to establish the effect of Marangoni instability induced convection on the droplet evaporation rate is outlined and the need for conducting such experiments in space is highlighted. However, before an opportunity to conduct experiments in space arises, ground based experiments have to be conducted to study feasibility issues and proof of concept. A ground based experiment of this type is outlined.

  13. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to aluminum oxide during the evaporation process. The following recommendations were made: Recycle from the DWTT should be metered in slowly to the ''typical'' recycle streams to avoid spikes in solids content to allow consistent processing and avoid process upsets. Additional studies should be conducted to determine acceptable volume ratios for the HEME dissolution and decontamination solutions in the evaporator feed. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam should be evaluated for use to control foaming. Additional tests are required to determine the concentration of antifoam required to prevent foaming during startup, the frequency of antifoam additions required to control foaming during steady state processing, and the ability of the antifoam to control foam over a range of potential feed compositions. This evaluation should also include evaluation of the degradation of the antifoam and impact on the silicon and TOC content of the condensate. The caustic HEME dissolution recycle stream should be neutralized to at least pH of 7 prior to blending with the acidic recycle streams. Dow Corning 2210 should be used during the evaporation testing using the radioactive recycle samples received from DWPF. Evaluation of additional antifoam candidates should be conducted as a backup for Dow Corning 2210. A camera and/or foam detection instrument should be included in the evaporator design to allow monitoring of the foaming behavior during operation. The potential for foam formation and high solids content should be considered during the design of the evaporator vessel.

  14. Characterization of probiotic Escherichia coli isolates with a novel pan-genome microarray

    PubMed Central

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Hallin, Peter F; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2007-01-01

    Background Microarrays have recently emerged as a novel procedure to evaluate the genetic content of bacterial species. So far, microarrays have mostly covered single or few strains from the same species. However, with cheaper high-throughput sequencing techniques emerging, multiple strains of the same species are rapidly becoming available, allowing for the definition and characterization of a whole species as a population of genomes - the 'pan-genome'. Results Using 32 Escherichia coli and Shigella genome sequences we estimate the pan- and core genome of the species. We designed a high-density microarray in order to provide a tool for characterization of the E. coli pan-genome. Technical performance of this pan-genome microarray based on control strain samples (E. coli K-12 and O157:H7) demonstrated a high sensitivity and relatively low false positive rate. A single-channel analysis approach is robust while allowing the possibility for deriving presence/absence predictions for any gene included on our pan-genome microarray. Moreover, the array was highly sufficient to investigate the gene content of non-pathogenic isolates, despite the strong bias towards pathogenic E. coli strains that have been sequenced so far. Conclusion This high-density microarray provides an excellent tool for characterizing the genetic makeup of unknown E. coli strains and can also deliver insights into phylogenetic relationships. Its design poses a considerably larger challenge and involves different considerations than the design of single strain microarrays. Here, lessons learned and future directions will be discussed in order to optimize design of microarrays targeting entire pan-genomes. PMID:18088402

  15. Evaporation Kinetics of Laboratory Generated Secondary Organic Aerosols at Elevated Relative Humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semi-solid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at 0%, 50% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30% to 70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 hours, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at 0% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses, with aging at elevated RH leading to more significant effect. In all cases, SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent, providing direct evidence that oligomers play a crucial role in determining the evaporation kinetics.

  16. Evaporated Lithium Surface Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Bel, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.

    2009-04-09

    Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: 1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; 2) suppression of ELMs; 3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; 4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; 5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; 6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; 7) reduced SOL plasma density; and 8) reduced edge neutral density.

  17. A model of the biogeographical journey from Proto-pan to Pan paniscus.

    PubMed

    Myers Thompson, Jo A

    2003-04-01

    Pan paniscus is unique in the group of African apes because of its range south of the Congo River. Examination of the bio-geographical journey of the genus Pan to the species P. paniscus is important when discussing the evolution of African apes. This paper is a review of the paleo-geographic events, the zoogeography, and faunal sorting which influenced P. paniscus divergence from the Proto-pan ancestor within the recent Miocene through Pliocene Epochs, approximately 10-2 MYA. Finally, by elucidating modern day evidence of food plant forms in the southern periphery exploited by P. paniscus in the forest/savanna mosaic habitat, we are able to conclude with those extrinsic events that most influenced the occurrence and distribution of P. paniscus. PMID:12687485

  18. The interaction of evaporative and convective instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, O.

    Evaporative convection arises in a variety of natural and industrial processes, such as drying of lakebeds, heat pipe technology and dry-eye syndrome. The phenomenon of evaporative convection leads to an interfacial instability where an erstwhile flat surface becomes undulated as a control variable, such as temperature drop, exceeds a critical value. This instability has been investigated by others assuming that the vapor phase is infinitely deep and passive, i.e. vapor fluid dynamics has been ignored. However, when we look at some engineering processes, such as distillation columns, heat pipes and drying technologies where phase change takes place we might imagine that the assumption of an infinitely deep vapor layer or at least that of a passive vapor is inappropriate. Previous work on convection in bilayer systems with no phase-change suggests that active vapor layers play a major role in determining the stability of an interface. Hence, for the case of convection with phase-change, we will address this issue and try to answer the question whether the infinitely deep and passive vapor layer is a valid assumption. We have also investigated, theoretically, the gravity and surface tension gradient-driven instabilities occurring during the evaporation of a liquid into its own vapor taking into account the fluid dynamics of both phases and the finiteness of the domains of each phase, i.e. the liquid and its vapor are assumed to be confined between two horizontal plates, and different heating arrangements are applied. The effects of fluid layer depths, the evaporation rate and the temperature gradient applied across the fluids on the stability of the interface are studied. The modes of the flow pattern are determined for each scenario. The physics of the instability are explained and a comparison is made with the results of similar, yet physically different problems.

  19. Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning: Parametric Analysis and Design; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a parametric analysis using a numerical model of a new concept in desiccant and evaporative air conditioning. The concept consists of two stages: a liquid desiccant dehumidifier and a dew-point evaporative cooler. Each stage consists of stacked air channel pairs separated by a plastic sheet. In the first stage, a liquid desiccant film removes moisture from the process (supply-side) air through a membrane. An evaporatively-cooled exhaust airstream on the other side of the plastic sheet cools the desiccant. The second-stage indirect evaporative cooler sensibly cools the dried process air. We analyze the tradeoff between device size and energy efficiency. This tradeoff depends strongly on process air channel thicknesses, the ratio of first-stage to second-stage area, and the second-stage exhaust air flow rate. A sensitivity analysis reiterates the importance of the process air boundary layers and suggests a need for increasing airside heat and mass transfer enhancements.

  20. EVAPORATION OF ICY PLANETESIMALS DUE TO BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Miura, Hitoshi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-02-20

    We present the novel concept of evaporation of planetesimals as a result of bow shocks associated with planetesimals orbiting with supersonic velocities relative to the gas in a protoplanetary disk. We evaluate the evaporation rates of the planetesimals based on a simple model describing planetesimal heating and evaporation by the bow shock. We find that icy planetesimals with radius {approx}>100 km evaporate efficiently even outside the snow line in the stage of planetary oligarchic growth, where strong bow shocks are produced by gravitational perturbations from protoplanets. The obtained results suggest that the formation of gas giant planets is suppressed owing to insufficient accretion of icy planetesimals onto the protoplanet within the {approx}<5 AU disk region.

  1. Structural and evaporative evolutions in desiccating sessile drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, B.; Brutin, D.

    2011-07-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the drying of a deposited drop of whole blood. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation, and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter, leading to a final typical pattern. Two distinct regimes of evaporation are highlighted: the first is driven by convection, diffusion, and gelation in a liquid phase, whereas the second, with a much slower rate of evaporation, is characterized by the mass transport of the liquid left over in the gellified biocomponent matter. A diffusion model of the drying process allows a prediction of the transition between these two regimes of evaporation. Moreover, the formation of cracks and other events occurring during the drying are examined and shown to be driven by critical solid mass concentrations.

  2. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and small contact angle from jump to jump; the result is a large evaporation rate leading to faster evaporation. PMID:26950673

  3. Pan Eurasian Experiment (PEEX): a new research initiative focused on the Northern Pan-Eurasian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Lappalainen, Hanna; Zaytseva, Nina; Shvidenko, Anatoli; Kujansuu, Joni; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Viisanen, Yrjö; Kotlyakov, Vladimir; Kasimov, Nikolai; Bondur, Valery; Matvienko, Gennadi; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    The increasing human activities are changing the environment and the humanity is we are pushing the safe boundaries of the globe. It is of utmost importance to gauge with a comprehensive research program on the current status of the environment, particularly in the most vulnerable locations. Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) is a new multidisciplinary research approach aiming at resolving the major uncertainties in the Earth system science and global sustainability questions in the Arctic and boreal Pan-Eurasian regions. The PEEX program aims (i) to understand the Earth system and the influence of environmental and societal changes in pristine and industrialized Pan-Eurasian environments, (ii) to establish and sustain long-term, continuous and comprehensive ground-based airborne and seaborne research infrastructures, and to utilize satellite data and multi-scale model frameworks, (iii) to contribute to regional climate scenarios in the northern Pan-Eurasia and determine the relevant factors and interactions influencing human and societal wellbeing (iv) to promote the dissemination of PEEX scientific results and strategies in scientific and stake-holder communities and policy making, (v) to educate the next generation of multidisciplinary global change experts and scientists, and (vi) to increase the public awareness of climate change impacts in the Pan-Eurasian region. The development of PEEX research infrastructure will be one of the first activities of PEEX. PEEX will find synergies with the major European land-atmosphere observation infrastructures such as ICOS a research infrastructure to decipher the greenhouse gas balance of Europe and adjacent regions, ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network-project), and ANAEE (The experimentation in terrestrial ecosystem research) networks and with the flag ship stations like the SMEARs (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) when design, re-organizing and networking existing stations networks in the Northern Pan-Eurasian region.

  4. Removal of aluminium from aqueous solutions using PAN-based adsorbents: characterisation, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Zaynab; Graulet, Adrien; Scales, Nicholas; Hanley, Tracey

    2014-03-01

    Economic adsorbents in bead form were fabricated and utilised for the adsorption of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, PAN powder and the thermally treated PAN beads (250 °C/48 h/Ar and 600 °C/48 h/Ar-H2) were characterised using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface analysis (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), thermogravimetric analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy. Effects of pH, contact time, kinetics and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were investigated in batch mode experiments. Aluminium kinetic data best fit the Lagergren pseudo-second-order adsorption model indicating a one-step, surface-only, adsorption process with chemisorption being the rate limiting step. Equilibrium adsorption data followed a Langmuir adsorption model with fairly low monolayer adsorption capacities suitable for freshwater clean-up only. Various constants including thermodynamic constants were evaluated from the experimental results obtained at 20, 40 and 60 °C. Positive values of ΔH° indicated that the adsorption of Al(3+) onto all three adsorbents was endothermic with less energy input required for PAN powder compared to PAN beads and low-temperature thermally treated PAN. Negative ΔG° values indicated that the aluminium adsorption process was spontaneous for all adsorbents examined. PMID:24297464

  5. Evaporation of volatile organic compounds from human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Rachna M; Miller, Matthew A; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-08-01

    The specific evaporation rates of 21 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from either human skin or a glass substrate mounted in modified Franz diffusion cells were determined gravimetrically. The diffusion cells were positioned either on a laboratory bench top or in a controlled position in a fume hood, simulating indoor and outdoor environments, respectively. A data set of 54 observations (34 skin and 20 glass) was assembled and subjected to a correlation analysis employing 5 evaporative mass transfer relationships drawn from the literature. Models developed by Nielsen et al. (Prediction of isothermal evaporation rates of pure volatile organic compounds in occupational environments: a theoretical approach based on laminar boundary layer theory. Ann Occup Hyg 1995;39:497-511.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Peress, Estimate evaporative losses from spills. Chem Eng Prog 2003; April: 32-34.) were found to be the most effective at correlating observed and calculated evaporation rates under the various conditions. The U.S. EPA model was selected for further use based on its simplicity. This is a turbulent flow model based only on vapor pressure and molecular weight of the VOC and the effective air flow rate u. Optimum values of u for the two laboratory environments studied were 0.23 m s(-1) (bench top) and 0.92 m s(-1) (fume hood). PMID:23609116

  6. Constraints in calculations of evaporative losses in arid climates using the stable isotope composition of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, G.; Mydlowski, A.; Dogramaci, S.; Hedley, P.; Gibson, J. J.; Grierson, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate quantification of evaporative losses to the atmosphere from surface water bodies is essential for calibration and validation of hydrological models, particularly in remote arid and semi-arid regions, where rivers and lakes are generally minimally gauged. In this study, we reviewed and combined the most recent equations for estimation of evaporative losses based on the revised Craig-Gordon model. We designed new software, called Hydrocalculator, which allows quick and robust estimation of evaporative losses based on the isotopic composition of water. We validated Hydrocalculator by testing the range of uncertainty in the estimation of evaporative losses in arid climates by cross-validating a simplified stable isotope model with field pan evaporation experiments. The use of standardized pans (1.2 m diameter, volume 300 dm3) in hot and dry climates (temperature 29°C and relative humidity between 19 and 26%) allowed simulation of fast evaporation from shallow water bodies. Several factors may contribute to the uncertainty in the evaporative loss calculations. The analytical uncertainty in the determination of the stable isotope composition of water may contribute to ~0.6% for δ18O and ~1.4% for δ2H. The model is less sensitive to uncertainty in climatic variables and an uncertainty of 1°C in air temperature will result only in the ~0.1% uncertainty in δ18O and δ2H. However, uncertainty in relative humidity of 10% will result in an uncertainty in the final outcome of 0.4% (δ18O) and 1.0% (δ2H). Significantly higher uncertainty in evaporative loss estimation is thus associated with uncertainty in ambient air moisture estimation or analysis. An error of 20‰ in δ2H and 5.0‰ in δ18O will result in a maximum difference of 2.4% (δ2H) and 1.7% (δ18O) in the final calculations. Hydrocalculator can thus provide accurate, rapid and cost-effective insight into the water balance of surface water pools. We used the new software to determine the origin of surface water and the progress of evaporation in pools along several dryland rivers in northern Western Australia.

  7. Modelling sub-daily evaporation from a small reservoir.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGloin, Ryan; McGowan, Hamish; McJannet, David; Burn, Stewart

    2013-04-01

    Accurate quantification of evaporation from small water storages is essential for water management and is also required as input in some regional hydrological and meteorological models. Global estimates of the number of small storages or lakes (< 0.1 kilometers) are estimated to be in the order of 300 million (Downing et al., 2006). However, direct evaporation measurements at small reservoirs using the eddy covariance or scintillometry techniques have been limited due to their expensive and complex nature. To correctly represent the effect that small water bodies have on the regional hydrometeorology, reliable estimates of sub-daily evaporation are necessary. However, evaporation modelling studies at small reservoirs have so far been limited to quantifying daily estimates. In order to ascertain suitable methods for accurately modelling hourly evaporation from a small reservoir, this study compares evaporation results measured by the eddy covariance method at a small reservoir in southeast Queensland, Australia, to results from several modelling approaches using both over-water and land-based meteorological measurements. Accurate predictions of hourly evaporation were obtained by a simple theoretical mass transfer model requiring only over-water measurements of wind speed, humidity and water surface temperature. An evaporation model that was recently developed for use in small reservoir environments by Granger and Hedstrom (2011), appeared to overestimate the impact stability had on evaporation. While evaporation predictions made by the 1-dimensional hydrodynamics model, DYRESM (Dynamic Reservoir Simulation Model) (Imberger and Patterson, 1981), showed reasonable agreement with measured values. DYRESM did not show any substantial improvement in evaporation prediction when inflows and out flows were included and only a slighter better correlation was shown when over-water meteorological measurements were used in place of land-based measurements. Downing, J. A., Y. T. Prairie, J. J. Cole, C. M. Duarte, L. J. Tranvik, R. G. Striegl, W. H. McDowell, P. Kortelainen, N. F. Caraco, J. M. Melack and J. J. Middelburg (2006), The global abundance and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and impoundments, Limnology and Oceanography, 51, 2388-2397. Granger, R.J. and N. Hedstrom (2011), Modelling hourly rates of evaporation from small lakes, Hydrological and Earth System Sciences, 15, doi:10.5194/hess-15-267-2011. Imberger, J. and J.C. Patterson (1981), Dynamic Reservoir Simulation Model - DYRESM: 5, In: Transport Models for Inland and Coastal Waters. H.B. Fischer (Ed.). Academic Press, New York, 310-361.

  8. Star Formation Histories from Pan-Chromatic Infrared Continuum Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    One of the currently most disputed issues in Star Formation is the timeline of the whole process. Is it a slow process of cloud assembly which, mediated by magnetic fields, evolve toward turbulence-supported clumps which are eventually super-critical to collapse, e.g. McKee & Tan (2003)? Or do clumps originate in already super-critical state in the post-shock regions of large-scale Galactic converging flows, e.g. Hartmann et al. (2001) with a rapid collapse in a crossing time or so (Elmegreen 2000)? A pan-chromatic 1?m-1mm continuum view of cluster forming regions in their early stages offers access to the most massive members longward of 5-10?m, as well as the low-mass members which instead dominate the emission in the near-IR, offering an interesting potential in stimulating advances in theoretical modelling of clustered star formation, its history and rate.

  9. Evaporation of pure liquid sessile and spherical suspended drops: a review.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2012-01-15

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by a contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of a sessile drop in an ambient gas is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many scientific applications such as controlling the deposition of particles on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, drop wise cooling, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials in the last decades. This paper presents a review of the published articles for a period of approximately 120 years related to the evaporation of both sessile drops and nearly spherical droplets suspended from thin fibers. After presenting a brief history of the subject, we discuss the basic theory comprising evaporation of micrometer and millimeter sized spherical drops, self cooling on the drop surface and evaporation rate of sessile drops on solids. The effects of drop cooling, resultant lateral evaporative flux and Marangoni flows on evaporation rate are also discussed. This review also has some special topics such as drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, determination of the receding contact angle from drop evaporation, substrate thermal conductivity effect on drop evaporation and the rate evaporation of water in liquid marbles. PMID:22277832

  10. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  11. Control methods and systems for indirect evaporative coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Jason; Kozubal, Erik

    2015-09-22

    A control method for operating an indirect evaporative cooler to control temperature and humidity. The method includes operating an airflow control device to provide supply air at a flow rate to a liquid desiccant dehumidifier. The supply air flows through the dehumidifier and an indirect evaporative cooler prior to exiting an outlet into a space. The method includes operating a pump to provide liquid desiccant to the liquid desiccant dehumidifier and sensing a temperature of an airstream at the outlet of the indirect evaporative cooler. The method includes comparing the temperature of the airstream at the outlet to a setpoint temperature at the outlet and controlling the pump to set the flow rate of the liquid desiccant. The method includes sensing space temperature, comparing the space temperature with a setpoint temperature, and controlling the airflow control device to set the flow rate of the supply air based on the comparison.

  12. Study of falling-jet flash evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Olson, D.A.; Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.

    1982-11-01

    Experimental results of flash evaporation from sheets of water, 3.2 mm and 6.3 mm thick and 27.9 cm wide, falling freely in the presence of their own vapor, are reported. With no flashing the jets fall in coherent sheets, but with flashing the jets were observed to spread and break up into droplets. Flashing was characterized by an effectiveness parameter, which was found to increase with increasing water temperature and jet length. Variations in water flow rate and heat flux did not influence the effectiveness appreciably.

  13. Modeling of two-layer liquid-gas flow with account for evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, O. N.; Rezanova, E. V.; Lyulin, Yu. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    Two-layer gas-liquid flows and evaporation intensity at the interface were studied. The influence of gas flow rate, longitudinal gradient of temperature, the Soret effect on the nature of flow and transfer processes was demonstrated. Experimental and theoretical results were compared; they show dependence of evaporation at the interface on gas flow rates.

  14. 22. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum Pan. Manufactured by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum Pan. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: Historical view, 1934, T.T. Waterman Collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association, Oahu, Hawaii. View looking toward east end of sorghum pan and interior of east end of the boiling house. Walls and final compartment of the sorghum pan are still intact. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  15. Detection and Behavior of Pan Wakes in Saturn's A Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Showalter, M. R.; Russell, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    Six previously unseen Pan wakes are found interior and exterior to the Encke gap in Saturn's A ring, one in the Voyager 2 photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultation data and five in the Voyager 1 radio science (RSS) Earth occultation data. Pan orbits at the center of the Encke gap and maintains it...The detection of Pan wakes at longitudes greater than 360(deg) demonstrates that wakes persist for much longer than originally hypothesized and may interact with one another.

  16. Pan-STARRS NEO surveying: The preliminary orbit problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahr, T.; Chesley, S.; Heasley, J.; Jedicke, R.

    2004-11-01

    The University of Hawaii's Pan-STARRS project will be a deep (R ˜ 24) wide field ( ˜ 7 deg2) survey, with the goal of cataloging 90% of Potentially Hazardous Objects that are larger than about 300m diameter. It will be capable of surveying 6000 deg2/night enabling discovery rates almost two orders of magnitude greater than all existing surveys combined. No existing PHO follow-up facility can match the expected depth and discovery rate. With this in mind, it is important to select an intelligent discovery and follow-up cadence, not only for easy night-to-night linking, but also for high-quality orbit determination and efficient use of telescope time. With these concerns, we simulated a typical set of Pan-STARRS NEO observations using the Bottke et al. [1] NEO model, 0".1 RMS astrometry, and standard horizon and magnitude limits for Mauna Kea. Various cadences were investigated, including 2, 3, and 4-night data sets, with each observation night separated by four days. In addition, we varied the number of observations each night between 2 and 3 visits, with visits separated by 30 minutes. The impact of these choices on preliminary orbit determination, post-fit element uncertainties, and sky-plane uncertainties was studied. These simulations indicate that 3 observations per night is largely unnecessary, and that orbit determination using only two nights of data is not acceptable for our needs. Pairs of observations spaced by 30 minutes, and 3 or 4 separate nights of data over the corresponding 8 or 12-night interval provide well-determined orbital elements and small sky-plane uncertainties. [1] W.F. Bottke, R. Jedicke, A. Morbidelli, J.-M. Petit, B. Gladman, Science, 288, 2190-2194 (2000).

  17. Global sources and significance of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Payer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) serves as a thermally unstable reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NO and NO2, collectively termed NOx). PAN permits NOx to impact the global distribution of the two most important atmospheric oxidants, ozone (O3) and the OH radical. PAN is also a critical channel through which climate-driven changes to the biosphere will affect atmospheric composition, notably through biogenic NMVOC emissions and fires. We use a 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) constrained by a global suite of observations to evaluate the sources and significance of PAN. We quantify individual NMVOC and NOX contributions to PAN formation, and we identify where PAN has a significant impact on remote O3, OH and nitrogen deposition. We find that a simulation with improved budgets for key NMVOCs (ethane, acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetone and select aromatic species) is able to reproduce the main features of the global PAN distribution. We also show that the treatment of PAN formation in fires plays an important role in determining the global impact of this PAN source. The contributions of acetaldehyde, acetone and methylglyoxal to PAN formation reflect the sources and lifetimes of these immediate precursors. Acetaldehyde, which is emitted directly from biogenic sources and formed via hydrocarbon oxidation, is the most important peroxyacetyl radical precursor globally. Methylglyoxal, an oxidation product of both isoprene and aromatic species, is responsible for about a third of peroxyactyl radical formation in the lower troposphere. Isoprene oxidation products, other than methylglyoxal, are also significant for the global PAN budget. With updated (lower) photolysis yields, acetone is less important for PAN formation than previously thought. It is responsible for less peroxyactyl radical formation globally than each of the other immediate precursors below 200 hPa. Lightning contributes to a uniform upper tropospheric PAN distribution in the southern hemisphere tropics where it is the most important NOx source for PAN formation. We estimate that PAN acts to increase lower tropospheric summertime O3 over the remote oceans by ~15% at mid-latitudes. The impact of PAN on remote OH is complex. The direction and magnitude of the impact varies geographically and vertically.

  18. Studbook of Pan paniscus Schwarz, 1929.

    PubMed

    Guzen, A

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of information provided by various zoos who have, or used to have, Pan paniscus in their collections, as well as information in the International Zoo Yearbook or in the literature, an approximate outline has been given of our knowledge of this animal since the description given in 1929 by Schwarz. The status of species is preferred to that of subspecies. The question whether the bonobo should be regarded as a true dwarf form is considered. It is, however, emphasized that the majority of researchers - and for different reasons - consider the species to be the primate closest to man. PMID:1163394

  19. Slow-blue PanSTARRS transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Bruce, Alastair; Lawrence, Andy; Ward, Martin; Collinson, James; Elvis, Martin; Gezari, Suvi; Smartt, Steven; Smith, Ken; Wright, Darryl; Fraser, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 50 blue, nuclear "transients" in PanSTARRS-1 has revealed different types of extremely variable AGN. The majority show a gradual brightening by ~2 mag from the SDSS observation a decade ago and may represent a new class of AGN microlensed by foreground galaxies. Spectra from the William Herschel Telescope identify these as z~1 AGN with atypical spectroscopic properties. We present an analysis of their photometric and spectroscopic variability in an effort to constrain the detailed structure of the source AGN.

  20. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time.

  1. Insights into the Maize Pan-Genome and Pan-Transcriptome[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Candice N.; Foerster, Jillian M.; Johnson, James M.; Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Muttoni, German; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Lindquist, Erika; Pedraza, Mary Ann; Barry, Kerrie; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Buell, C. Robin

    2014-01-01

    Genomes at the species level are dynamic, with genes present in every individual (core) and genes in a subset of individuals (dispensable) that collectively constitute the pan-genome. Using transcriptome sequencing of seedling RNA from 503 maize (Zea mays) inbred lines to characterize the maize pan-genome, we identified 8681 representative transcript assemblies (RTAs) with 16.4% expressed in all lines and 82.7% expressed in subsets of the lines. Interestingly, with linkage disequilibrium mapping, 76.7% of the RTAs with at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) could be mapped to a single genetic position, distributed primarily throughout the nonpericentromeric portion of the genome. Stepwise iterative clustering of RTAs suggests, within the context of the genotypes used in this study, that the maize genome is restricted and further sampling of seedling RNA within this germplasm base will result in minimal discovery. Genome-wide association studies based on SNPs and transcript abundance in the pan-genome revealed loci associated with the timing of the juvenile-to-adult vegetative and vegetative-to-reproductive developmental transitions, two traits important for fitness and adaptation. This study revealed the dynamic nature of the maize pan-genome and demonstrated that a substantial portion of variation may lie outside the single reference genome for a species. PMID:24488960

  2. An Investigation of Electrochemomechanical Actuation of Conductive Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) Nanofiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mark A.

    A polymer-based nanofiber composite actuator designed for linear actuation was fabricated by electrospinning, actuated by electrolysis, and characterized by electrical and mechanical testing to address performance limitations and understand the activation processing effects on actuation performance. Currently, Electroactive polymers (EAPs) have provided uses in sensory and actuation technology, but have either low force output or expand rather than contract, falling short in capturing the natural motion and function of muscle desperately needed to provide breakthroughs in the bio-medical and robotic fields. Previous research has shown activated Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers having biomimetic functionalities similar to the sarcomere contraction responsible for muscle function. Activated PAN is also known to contract and expand by electrolysis when in close vicinity to the anode and cathode, respectively. PAN nanofibers especially show faster response to changes in environmental pH and improved mechanical properties over larger diameter fibers. Conductive additives were introduced to the electrospinning solution and activated in an attempt to create composite PAN nanofiber gel actuators with improved conductivity and eliminate the need of stiff electrodes. Tensile testing was conducted to examine changes in mechanical properties between annealing and hydrolysis processing. Introducing conductive additives did not show a significant increase in conductivity and created unusable samples, requiring alternative electrode materials. Electrochemical contraction rates up to 25%/ min were achieved. Strains of 58.8%, ultimate stresses up to 77.1 MPa, and moduli of 0.21 MPa were achieved with pure PAN nanofiber mats, surpassing mechanical properties of natural muscles. Improvements to contraction rates and young's moduli are necessary to capture the function and performance of skeletal muscles properly.

  3. Token transfers among great apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan paniscus, and Pan troglodytes): species differences, gestural requests, and reciprocal exchange.

    PubMed

    Pelé, Marie; Dufour, Valérie; Thierry, Bernard; Call, Josep

    2009-11-01

    Great apes appear to be the nonhuman primates most capable of recognizing trading opportunities and engaging in transfers of commodities with conspecifics. Spontaneous exchange of goods between them has not yet been reported. We tested gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in a token-exchange task involving two conspecifics and a human experimenter. Tested in pairs, subjects had to exchange tokens with a partner to obtain food from the experimenter. We observed 4, 5, 264, and 328 transfers of tokens in gorillas, chimpanzees, orangutans, and bonobos, respectively. Most gifts were indirect in gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos, whereas most were direct in orangutans. The analysis showed no evidence of calculated reciprocity in interactions. A main finding of the study was the high rate of repeated gifts and begging gestures recorded in orangutans. This raises the question of the meaning of pointing in great apes and their ability to understand the communicative intent of others. PMID:19929106

  4. Simultaneously Maintaining the Complementary Relationship and the Conservation of Evaporative Fraction During the Daytime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Complementary Relationship CR between actual and potential evaporation and the self-preservation of the evaporative fraction EF during the daytime have both been extensively explored and applied. The CR says that increases in potential evaporation Ep (e.g., pan evaporation or evaporation from Penman's equation) above the wet surface value E0, indicate decreases in actual regional evaporation E. That is, as the regional surface dries, regional evaporation E decreases, leading to drier, warmer air and higher potential evaporation Ep. This fact can be used (e.g., in the Advection-Aridity approach, AA) to estimate regional evaporation E knowing only available energy (Rn-G, where Rn is net radiation and G is ground heat flux) and measurements at one height of wind speed, temperature and humidity. Self-preservation of EF means that EF [LE/(Rn-G), where LE is the latent heat flux] tends to remain relatively constant during much of the daytime on a single day. Thus a single daytime estimate of EF can be used to estimate daily or daytime total evaporation if daytime available energy is known. CR and self-preservation of EF are both supported by substantial empirical evidence under a range of 'typical' conditions. Yet, no definitive proof of either concept has been found--they remain intuitive concepts. Their usefulness as concepts is that they help researchers to develop a mental framework of the evaporation process, at the same time providing a powerful way to leverage sparse data. To explore how the two concepts work together on a single day, a 3-dimensional surface representing dimensionless E is developed based on the Penman-Monteith equation. Lines corresponding to constant EF and to the AA equation can be traced along the evaporation surface. Since these two lines do not follow the same trajectory, simultaneously following the AA trajectory and maintaining a constant EF during a day on which weather conditions are constantly changing seems problematic. However, a slightly different graph shows that trajectories exist for which EF is constant and the AA equation is maintained, even as weather conditions change. Thus, conservation of EF and the CR are compatible concepts. A case study using field data illustrates these concepts.

  5. Summertime distributions of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN) in Beijing: Understanding the sources and major sink of PAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gen; Mu, Yujing; Zhou, Lingxi; Zhang, Chenglong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Fang, Shuangxi; Yao, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), a major secondary pollutant in the atmosphere, has received much concern for its particular importance in atmospheric chemistry and adverse effects on human and plants. Atmospheric PAN and PPN were measured by using a gas chromatograph equipped with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) from June to September 2010, and the source and major sink for PAN were firstly studied in Beijing. The distinct diurnal variations of PAN and PPN with maximum in the afternoon were observed, and the mean and maximum values were 2.61 ± 2.57 ppbv (N = 839) and 12.5 ppbv for PAN and 0.52 ± 0.38 ppbv (N = 152) and 2.16 ppbv for PPN during the measuring period, respectively. Good correlation (R = 0.85) between PAN and PPN with a slope (ΔPPN/ΔPAN) of 0.134 indicated that anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) dominated the photochemical formation of PANs in Beijing. Further, we found acetaldehyde was the predominant carbonyl precursor of PAN with the contribution of 59.7% to the total peroxyacetyl (PA) radical. Methyl glyoxal, methacrolein, acetone, methyl vinyl ketone, and biacetyl contributed 7.1%, 8.8%, 19.7%, 3.4%, and 1.3% to total PA radical, respectively. Anti-correlation between PAN concentrations and the NO/NO2 ratios was found during the whole investigating period. In addition, the amount of PAN lost by thermal decomposition (TPAN) accounted for remarkable fractions of PAN observed under high temperature during both daytime and nighttime.

  6. Evaporation control research, 1959-60

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1963-01-01

    Two hundred and forty-five dispersions of long-chain alkanols were formulated by using various emulsifiers and alkanols. The dispensing and spreading ability of each of these formulations was tested. The most promising emulsifier that could be used with any of the alkanols was glyceryl monostearate (self-emulsifying). However, the concentration of the alkanol in the dispersion form varied somewhat: with the length of the carbon chain. A maximum concentration of 16 percent was obtained using the longer chain alkanols in the dispersion form without losing any of the properties of a fluid. Nine field tests were undertaken on small stock tanks. The retardant materials used in these tests were dodecanol, hexadecanol, and octadecanol. These materials were applied in either liquid or dispersion form. Four types of dispensing equipment were tested. The first type used a pressure system which sprayed a liquid onto the surface of the water. An anemometer and wind-controlled vane, operated by an electrical system, determined the length End frequency of application. The second type was similar to the first except that gravity was utilized to force the liquid onto the surface. The third type. used a drip system with rates of about 10 drops per minute. The fourth type used a gravity feed and a wind-controlled valve which allowed the dispersion material to flow onto the surface of the water when the wind was in the proper direction. In the field tests, the best reduction in evaporation was obtained using octadecanol in dispersion form and dispensed with the wind-controlled valve and gravity feed system. The maximum reduction in evaporation for a 2-week period was 27 percent. However, the economics of suppressing evaporation from stock tanks is questionable because of the short travel time across the tank by the film. There are still many problems unsolved. Some of these can be resolved in the laboratory whereas others can be resolved only in the field. Some of the more serious problems are the effect of impurities in the alkanols; the rate of cooling of the alkanol from a liquid to a solid state ; the effect of the film on the exchange of water molecules between the air and water; whether the film remains effective in suppressing evaporation for any rate of movement downwind; and the possible use of dodecanol and eicosanol as suppressants.

  7. Characteristics and treatment outcomes of pan-urothelial cell carcinoma: a descriptive analysis of 45 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Liu, Pei; Li, Xuesong; Xiong, Gengyan; Zhang, Lei; Singla, Nirmish; Zhao, Guangzhi; He, Qun; He, Zhisong; Zhou, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pan-urothelial cell carcinoma (panUCC), which refers to the presence of both bilateral (UTUC) and bladder tumor (BT), is relatively low. However, the profile of a panUCC cohort of patients remains to be elucidated. We reviewed the data of consecutive UTUC patients who received treatment at our center from 1999 to 2012. Overall, 45 patients were included in this study, with a median age of 64.5 years. Fourteen patients initially presented with unilateral UTUC, 11 initially with BT, and the remainder with multiple tumors. Patients with UTUC were more likely to manifest higher rates of muscle invasion and larger-sized tumors. Five patients were treated with complete urinary tract exenteration (CUTE), and most patients (73.3%) received combined management with conservative and radical surgery. After a median follow-up of 77 months, 18 patients (40%) died including 15 (33.3%) due to cancer. Higher tumor stage was the only risk factor predictive of worse survival. Nineteen patients experienced local recurrence after conservative surgery. This study indicated that PanUCC involves either synchronous or metachronous presentation of tumors with a high risk of tumor recurrence, progression, and dissemination after conservative surgery. PMID:26657777

  8. Sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to 100 years of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, R. P.; Stagge, J. H.; Tallaksen, L. M.; Witte, J. P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrological modeling frameworks require an accurate representation of evaporation fluxes for appropriate quantification of, e.g., the water balance, soil moisture budget, recharge and groundwater processes. Many frameworks have used the concept of potential evaporation, often estimated for different vegetation classes by multiplying the evaporation from a reference surface ("reference evaporation") by crop-specific scaling factors ("crop factors"). Though this two-step potential evaporation approach undoubtedly has practical advantages, the empirical nature of both reference evaporation methods and crop factors limits its usability in extrapolations under non-stationary climatic conditions. In this paper, rather than simply warning about the dangers of extrapolation, we quantify the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates for different vegetation classes using the two-step approach when calibrated using a non-stationary climate. We used the past century's time series of observed climate, containing non-stationary signals of multi-decadal atmospheric oscillations, global warming, and global dimming/brightening, to evaluate the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to the choice and length of the calibration period. We show that using empirical coefficients outside their calibration range may lead to systematic differences between process-based and empirical reference evaporation methods, and systematic errors in estimated potential evaporation components. Quantification of errors provides a possibility to correct potential evaporation calculations and to rate them for their suitability to model climate conditions that differ significantly from the historical record, so-called no-analog climate conditions.

  9. Evaporation and energy budget in Lake Vegoritis, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianniou, Soultana K.; Antonopoulos, Vassilis Z.

    2007-10-01

    SummaryEvaporation is one of the main components in both the energy and water budgets of lakes and a primary process of water loss for most of them. A one-dimensional, eddy diffusion model of lake's water temperature distribution is used to evaluate daily evaporation values as a residual of the energy budget in Lake Vegoritis in Northern Greece and for the year of 1993. Lake Vegoritis has been under a continuous deficit in the water balance for up to three decades. The water temperature model, calibrated with measured values from two different years, is used reversely to evaluate the evaporation through the energy budget. The equilibrium temperature approach for the surface boundary condition is used in the model, as well as the simplification of Bowen ratio in the energy budget. Evaporation values estimated by the model are used for determining a mass transfer-based evaporation equation for Lake Vegoritis. Estimated evaporation rates show a characteristic annual cycle with low values at spring and the highest values at summer. The energy stored in the lake at spring and early summer is released to the environment later in the year as sensible and mainly as latent heat.

  10. How to Pan-Sharpen Images Using the Gram-Schmidt Pan-Sharpen Method - a Recipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, T.

    2013-05-01

    Since its publication in 1998 (Laben and Brower, 2000), the Gram-Schmidt pan-sharpen method has become one of the most popular algorithms to pan-sharpen multispectral (MS) imagery. It outperforms most other pan-sharpen methods in both maximizing image sharpness and minimizing color distortion. It is, on the other hand, also more complex and computationally expensive than most other methods, as it requires forward and backward transforming the entire image. Another complication is the lack of a clear recipe of how to compute the sensor dependent MS to Pan weights that are needed to compute the simulated low resolution pan band. Estimating them from the sensor's spectral sensitivity curves (in different ways), or using linear regression or least square methods are typical candidates which can include other degrees of freedom such as adding a constant offset or not. As a result, most companies and data providers do it somewhat differently. Here we present a solution to both problems. The transform coefficients can be computed directly and in advance from the MS covariance matrix and the MS to Pan weights. Once the MS covariance matrix is computed and stored with the image statistics, any small section of the image can be pan-sharpened on the fly, without having to compute anything else over the entire image. Similarly, optimal MS to Pan weights can be computed directly from the full MS-Pan covariance matrix, guaranteeing optimal image quality and consistency.

  11. Evaporation Mechanism of Cu from Liquid Fe Containing C and S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Youn-Bae

    2016-02-01

    A number of liquid-gas experiments were carried out in order to elucidate evaporation mechanism of Cu from liquid Fe containing C and S. Rate of Cu evaporation in liquid Fe droplets at 1873 K (1600 °C) was determined using electromagnetic levitation equipment. Evaporation rate of the Cu under various conditions (flow rate of gas mixtures, initial C, and S concentrations) was examined. It was found from a series of kinetic analyses of the experimental data that Cu evaporates in forms of Cu(g) and CuS(g). As was reported for the Sn evaporation from liquid iron (Jung et al. Met. Mater. Trans. 46B, 250-258, 2014), S plays two roles for the evaporation of Cu: accelerating the rate by forming CuS(g) and decelerating the rate by blocking evaporation sites. As a result of these combinatorial effects, the evaporation of Cu is decelerated at low S content, but is accelerated at high S content. Based on the elucidated mechanism, an evaporation model equation for Cu was developed in the present study, which takes into account (1) evaporation of Cu in the two forms (Cu(g) and CuS(g)), (2) surface blocking by S using ideal Langmuir adsorption, and (3) effect of C. The obtained rate constant of a reaction Cu i + S i = CuS i (g), k {CuS/R}, is 1.37 × 10-9 m4 mol-1 s-1, and the residual rate constant, k {CuS/r}, is 4.11 × 10-10 m4 mol-1 s-1 at 1873 K (1600 °C). Both of them were found to be one order lower than those for Sn evaporation.

  12. Simulation of a refrigerant evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermeer, Jakob Stefanus

    A computer model for the design and optimization of the compressor refrigeration cycle especially with respect to dynamic behavior was developed. A steady state version was also developed. The model describing the refrigerant is divided into the evaporation and superheating regions. A mechanism based on empirics corrects the model for the influence of transportation times in the evaporation region. The mass balance of the refrigerant in the superheat region is regarded as quasi-static, because of the small mass of the vapor. The energy balance accounts for a distributed model and is represented by the steady state solution of the partial differential equation which describes this area for the steady conditions. A correction for the dynamical effects was added to this solution, for all influencing parameters, according to the analytical dynamic solution for the case of the evaporation temperature as input parameter. The expansion device model was worked out for the usual type of device in combination with a dry evaporator, the thermostatic expansion valve. Validation tests are described.

  13. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  14. Evaporation of drops on two parallel fibers: influence of the liquid morphology and fiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Duprat, Camille; Bick, Alison D; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2013-06-25

    We investigate experimentally the evaporation of liquid accumulated on a pair of parallel fibers, rigid or flexible. The liquid wetting the fibers can adopt two distinct morphologies: a compact drop shape, whose evaporation dynamics is similar to that of an isolated aerosol droplet, or a long liquid column of constant cross-section, whose evaporation dynamics depends upon the aspect ratio of the column. We thus find that the evaporation rate is constant for drops, while it increases strongly for columns as the interfiber distance decreases, and we propose a model to explain this behavior. When the fibers are flexible, the transition from drops to columns can be induced by the deformation of the fibers because of the capillary forces applied by the drop. Thus, we find that the evaporation rate increases with increasing flexibility. Furthermore, complex morphology transitions occur upon drying, which results in spreading of the drop as it evaporates. PMID:23705986

  15. Characteristic behavior of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in Seoul megacity, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gangwoong; Jang, Yuwoon; Lee, Heayoung; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Lee, Meehye

    2008-09-01

    We measured the concentrations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and other photochemically reactive species, including O3, NO2, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), in the Seoul Metropolitan area (SMA) during May through June in 2004 and 2005. PAN was determined using a fast chromatograph with luminol-based chemiluminescence detection. Mixing ratios of PAN ranged from below the detection limit (0.1ppbv) to 10.4ppbv with an average of 0.8ppbv. O3 concentrations ranged from 0 to 141ppbv. The average PAN/O3 ratio of 0.07 was higher than that observed in cities of Europe and North America (0.02) where control strategies have been enforced to reduce hydrocarbon emissions through extensively reformulated gasoline programs. Strong positive correlations between daily PAN and O3 maxima during the day demonstrate that similar photochemical factors controlled the production of these two chemicals. However, relationships between PAN and its precursors, NO2 and NMHCs, suggest that PAN production was more sensitive to NO2 than NMHCs levels whereas O3 production was limited by the overall availability of NMHCs. It is likely that the compositions of NMHCs in SMA were favorable for PAN production because of the low fractions of oxygenated compounds in automobile fuels. PAN maxima were observed around noon, which was 2-3h earlier than the much broader O3 maxima that occurred in the midafternoon. After reaching the maximum, PAN concentrations rapidly dropped within a few hours, which could be largely due to thermal destruction and to limited production under the typically low NO2 levels that occurred in the early afternoon. The heterogeneous destruction of particulate matter could be an additional sink for PAN in SMA. PMID:18632134

  16. Evaporation Estimation of Rift Valley Lakes: Comparison of Models

    PubMed Central

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Abtew, Wossenu; Dessalegne, Tibebe

    2009-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) accounts for a substantial amount of the water flux in the arid and semi-arid regions of the World. Accurate estimation of ET has been a challenge for hydrologists, mainly because of the spatiotemporal variability of the environmental and physical parameters governing the latent heat flux. In addition, most available ET models depend on intensive meteorological information for ET estimation. Such data are not available at the desired spatial and temporal scales in less developed and remote parts of the world. This limitation has necessitated the development of simple models that are less data intensive and provide ET estimates with acceptable level of accuracy. Remote sensing approach can also be applied to large areas where meteorological data are not available and field scale data collection is costly, time consuming and difficult. In areas like the Rift Valley regions of Ethiopia, the applicability of the Simple Method (Abtew Method) of lake evaporation estimation and surface energy balance approach using remote sensing was studied. The Simple Method and a remote sensing-based lake evaporation estimates were compared to the Penman, Energy balance, Pan, Radiation and Complementary Relationship Lake Evaporation (CRLE) methods applied in the region. Results indicate a good correspondence of the models outputs to that of the above methods. Comparison of the 1986 and 2000 monthly lake ET from the Landsat images to the Simple and Penman Methods show that the remote sensing and surface energy balance approach is promising for large scale applications to understand the spatial variation of the latent heat flux. PMID:22303142

  17. Transpiration and evaporation from heather Moorland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, A. C.; Jarvis, P. G.; Grace, J.

    1984-03-01

    The energy balance of an upland heath dominated by heather ( Calluna vulgaris) was measured in dry and wet weather. Median values of both transpiration and evaporation rates were ca. 2 mm hr-1. The median Bowen ratio for the dry canopy was 2.0 and for the wet canopy 0.6. On dry days the median value of the saturation deficit was only 3.8 mb and that of the climatological resistance was 30 s m-1. The bulk stomatal resistance increased from ca. 50 s m -2 in the morning to over 290 s m-1 in the afternoon with an overall median value of 110 s m-1. Transpiration from the dry canopy was controlled by a combination of small saturation deficits and large stomatal resistances. The median value of the boundary-layer resistance of the canopy was 22 s m-1 and was low partly because of a large low-level drag coefficient. Saturation deficits on wet days were close to zero and evaporation of intercepted water proceeded at close to the equilibrium rate, being largely limited by the low fluxes of available energy. The water loss from heather was compared with simulated losses from coniferous forest, herbaceous crops and grassland in the same conditions to evaluate the effects of vegetation on water loss from catchments.

  18. Low-Volatility Compound Evaporation from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in April-August 2010 provided an unusual opportunity to study secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on a large scale. Chemicals with differing volatility, evaporating at different rates, were spatially separated and released to the atmosphere at different locations. The resulting distribution of vapor and aerosol phase organic compounds were measured during research flights of the NOAA WP-3D aircraft over the Gulf in June 2010 (de Gouw et al., 2011). Known volatile SOA precursors (C8 to C11 hydrocarbons) were measured in a thin plume downwind of DWH. SOA was measured in a much wider plume, indicating contributions from less volatile compounds evaporating further from the source. Estimates of semi- and intermediate- volatile compound evaporation rates from the oil spill have been improved using a component-wise first-order kinetics model in which the evaporation rate of a compound is proportional to both its vapor pressure and mole fraction. The model was validated through proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer measurements of evaporating South Louisiana crude oil and calibration mixtures of aromatic compounds. These new evaporation rate estimates highlight several concepts important to a revised interpretation of the June 2010 aerosol measurements. The rates of evaporation (and thus atmospheric concentrations) of low-volatility compounds did not necessarily reflect surface distribution. Low volatility compounds reached peak evaporation rates at appreciable distances from the source, and the area from which significant amounts of chemical were emitted was larger than previously thought.

  19. Correlations for Saturation Efficiency of Evaporative Cooling Pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, J. K.; Hindoliya, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental investigations to obtain correlations for saturation efficiency of evaporative cooling pads. Two commonly used materials namely aspen and khus fibers along with new materials namely coconut fibers and palash fibers were tested in a laboratory using suitably fabricated test setup. Simple mathematical correlations have been developed for calculating saturation efficiency of evaporating cooling pads which can be used to predict their performance at any desired mass flow rate. Performances of four different pad materials were also compared using developed correlations. An attempt was made to test two new materials (i.e. fibers of palash wood and coconut) to check their suitability as wetted media for evaporative cooling pads. It was found that Palash wood fibers offered highest saturation efficiency compared to that of other existing materials such as aspen and khus fibers at different mass flow rate of air.

  20. Water addition, evaporation and water holding capacity of poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Mark W; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Litter moisture content has been related to ammonia, dust and odour emissions as well as bird health and welfare. Improved understanding of the water holding properties of poultry litter as well as water additions to litter and evaporation from litter will contribute to improved litter moisture management during the meat chicken grow-out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how management and environmental conditions over the course of a grow-out affect the volume of water A) applied to litter, B) able to be stored in litter, and C) evaporated from litter on a daily basis. The same unit of measurement has been used to enable direct comparison-litres of water per square metre of poultry shed floor area, L/m(2), assuming a litter depth of 5cm. An equation was developed to estimate the amount of water added to litter from bird excretion and drinking spillage, which are sources of regular water application to the litter. Using this equation showed that water applied to litter from these sources changes over the course of a grow-out, and can be as much as 3.2L/m(2)/day. Over a 56day grow-out, the total quantity of water added to the litter was estimated to be 104L/m(2). Litter porosity, water holding capacity and water evaporation rates from litter were measured experimentally. Litter porosity decreased and water holding capacity increased over the course of a grow-out due to manure addition. Water evaporation rates at 25°C and 50% relative humidity ranged from 0.5 to 10L/m(2)/day. Evaporation rates increased with litter moisture content and air speed. Maintaining dry litter at the peak of a grow-out is likely to be challenging because evaporation rates from dry litter may be insufficient to remove the quantity of water added to the litter on a daily basis. PMID:26367067

  1. Understanding the Pan Asian Client: A Handbook for Helping Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Union of Pan Asian Communities, San Diego, CA.

    This booklet provides background information and suggestions to those who find themselves providing human care services to Pan Asian clients (Cambodians, Chinese, Guamanians, Hawaiians, Japanese, Koreans, Laotians, Pilipinos, Samoans, Thais, Vietnamese). Included is historical, cultural, and social information about the various Pan Asian groups in

  2. Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): a global budget and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Millet, D. B.; Mao, J.; Paulot, F.; Singh, H. B.; Roiger, A.; Ries, L.; Talbot, R. W.; Dzepina, K.; Pandey Deolal, S.

    2014-03-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2). PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44% of the global source), methylglyoxal (30%), acetone (7%), and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19%). A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37%) and alkanes (14%). Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.

  3. Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): a global budget and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Millet, D. B.; Mao, J.; Paulot, F.; Singh, H. B.; Roiger, A.-E.; Ries, L.; Talbot, R. W.; Dzepina, K.; Pandey Deolal, S.

    2013-10-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2). PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44% of the global source), methylglyoxal (30%), acetone (7%), and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19%). A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37%) and alkanes (14%). Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.

  4. Instability of evaporation fronts in the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-12-10

    The neutral component of the interstellar medium is segregated into the cold neutral medium (CNM) and warm neutral medium (WNM) as a result of thermal instability. It was found that a plane-parallel CNM-WNM evaporation interface, across which the CNM undergoes thermal expansion, is linearly unstable to corrugational disturbances, in complete analogy with the Darrieus-Landau instability (DLI) of terrestrial flames. We perform a full linear stability analysis as well as nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations of the DLI of such evaporation fronts in the presence of thermal conduction. We find that the DLI is suppressed at short length scales by conduction. The length and time scales of the fastest growing mode are inversely proportional to the evaporation flow speed of the CNM and its square, respectively. In the nonlinear stage, the DLI saturates to a steady state where the front deforms to a finger-like shape protruding toward the WNM, without generating turbulence. The evaporation rate at nonlinear saturation is larger than the initial plane-parallel value by a factor of ∼2.4 when the equilibrium thermal pressure is 1800 k {sub B} cm{sup –3} K. The degrees of front deformation and evaporation-rate enhancement at nonlinear saturation are determined primarily by the density ratio between the CNM and WNM. We demonstrate that the Field length in the thermally unstable medium should be resolved by at least four grid points to obtain reliable numerical outcomes involving thermal instability.

  5. Evaporation from Lake Mead, Arizona and Nevada, 1997-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenburg, Craig L.; DeMeo, Guy A.; Tanko, Daron J.

    2006-01-01

    Lake Mead is one of a series of large Colorado River reservoirs operated and maintained by the Bureau of Reclamation. The Colorado River system of reservoirs and diversions is an important source of water for millions of people in seven Western States and Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, conducted a study from 1997 to 1999 to estimate evaporation from Lake Mead. For this study, micrometeorological and hydrologic data were collected continually from instrumented platforms deployed at four locations on the lake, open-water areas of Boulder Basin, Virgin Basin, and Overton Arm and a protected cove in Boulder Basin. Data collected at the platforms were used to estimate Lake Mead evaporation by solving an energy-budget equation. The average annual evaporation rate at open-water stations from January 1998 to December 1999 was 7.5 feet. Because the spatial variation of monthly and annual evaporation rates was minimal for the open-water stations, a single open-water station in Boulder Basin would provide data that are adequate to estimate evaporation from Lake Mead.

  6. Falling film and spray evaporation enhancement using electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Darabi, J.; Ohadi, M.M.; Dessiatoun, S.V.

    1999-07-01

    Falling film evaporation process has been widely employed in various industries such as, refrigeration/HVAC, chemical processing, petroleum refineries, desalination, and food processing. Falling film evaporation on horizontal tubes has also been used recently for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion systems (OTEC). The effect of electric field on the falling-film evaporation of refrigerant R-134a on a vertical, electrically heated flat plate was investigated experimentally. The test section is 25.4 mm wide and 76.2 mm long. Experiments are conducted in both falling film and spray evaporation modes. The Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) enhancement mechanism involved is described and the effects of various parameters such as heat flux, refrigerant mass flow rate, electrode gap, and applied voltage are investigated. It is found that in the presence of an applied electric field, the maximum enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient for both falling film and spray evaporation modes is nearly the same. A maximum enhancement of 4-fold in the heat transfer coefficient is obtained. The EHD power consumption for the worst case is less than 0.12% of the total energy exchange rate in the test section.

  7. Biogeomorphically driven salt pan formation in Sarcocornia-dominated salt-marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, Mauricio; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Salt-marshes are under increasing threat, particularly from sea-level rise and increased wave action associated with climate change. The development and stability of these valuable habitats largely depend on complex interactions between biotic and abiotic processes operating at different scales. Also, interactions between biotic and abiotic processes drive internal morphological change in salt-marshes. In this paper we used a biogeomorphological approach to assess the impact of biological activities and interactions on salt pan formation in Sarcocornia-dominated salt marshes. Salt pans represent a key physiographic feature of salt-marshes and recent studies hypothesized that biogeomorphic processes could be related to salt pan formation in SW Atlantic salt-marshes. The glasswort Sarcocornia perennis is one of the dominant plants in the salt-marshes of the Bahía Blanca Estuary (Argentina) where they form patches up to 8 m in diameter. These salt-marshes are also inhabited in great densities by the burrowing crab Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata whose bioturbation rates are among the highest reported for salt-marshes worldwide. A set of biological interactions between N. granulata and S. perennis appears to be responsible for salt pan development in these areas which has not been described elsewhere. The main objective of this work was to determine the ecological interactions occurring between plants and crabs that lead to salt pan formation by using field-based sampling and manipulative experiments. Our results showed that S. perennis facilitated crab colonization of the salt-marsh by buffering otherwise stressful physical conditions (e.g., temperature, desiccation). Crabs preferred to construct burrows underneath plants and, once they reach high densities (up to 40 burrows m- 2), the sediment reworking caused plant die-off in the central area of patches. At this state, the patches lose elevation and become depressed due to the continuous bioturbation by crabs. Thus, salt pans are generated in this case by a set of biogeomorphic processes that include pure ecological interactions such as plant facilitation of crab settlement and also indirect negative effects of crabs on plant survival. Furthermore, crab bioturbation affects sediment structure due to concentration of burrowing activity under plant canopies promoting elevation loss and leading, after a few years, to salt pan formation in a previously vegetated substrate.

  8. Isotopic Compositions of Evaporative Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Lauder, A. M.; Kopec, B. G.; Dade, W. B.; Virginia, R. A.; Posmentier, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a one-dimensional model, originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965) and further developed and adapted to different natural settings (such as transpiration, open surface evaporation, etc.) by various investigators. These models have two distinguishing characteristics. First, there exists a laminar layer where molecular diffusion away from the water-air interface causes kinetic isotopic fractionation. The magnitude of this fractionation is controlled by the diffusion/transport coefficient of each vapor isotopologue in air and their concentration gradients, the latter being controlled by relative humidity, isotopic ratios of ambient air, and turbulent conditions (such as wind and surface roughness). Second, the horizontal variations are ignored. In particular, the effect of horizontal advection on isotopic variations in the ambient air is not considered. The research reported here addresses the effects of relinquishing the simplifying assumptions in both of these areas. We developed a model, in which the simplification of a purely laminar layer is dropped. Instead, we express the vertical transport coefficient as the sum of the molecular diffusivity, that differs for each water isotopologue, and the turbulent diffusivity that increases linearly with height but does not vary among water isotopologues. With this model, the kinetic isotopic effect reduces with height in the vicinity of the water surface, and the net isotopic fractionation through the boundary layer can be integrated. The advantage of this conceptualization is that the magnitude of kinetic isotopic fractionation can be assessed directly with changing environmental conditions, such as humidity and wind speed, rather than approximated by discontinuous empirical functions of the environmental conditions, as in the conventional models mentioned above. To address the effect of lateral heterogeneity, we expanded the model to 2-D and incorporated horizontal advection. The effect of advection was tested and modeled with data collected at several lakes located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. As predicted by the model, we observed both vertical as well as horizontal gradients as relatively dry and isotopically depleted air advects over a lake surface. Compared to the standard 1-D model, the 2-D model produced more realistic but significantly depleted isotopic fluxes of evaporation within 500 meters from the upwind shore. This is because of the time and/or distance needed for the dry air to equilibrate with vapor evaporated from the lake. The results suggest that the 1-D model is not adequate for simulating evaporation when the fetch over the water surface is small. This result is important for lake hydrological studies and for understanding and modeling isotopic fluxes of evaporation from sea ice leads that are of limited fetch.

  9. The Pan-STARRS search for Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, Richard; Chambers, Ken; Lilly, Eva; Weryk, Robert; Chastel, Serge; Denneau, Larry; Micheli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The two Pan-STARRS telescopes, located on Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii, are 1.8-meter diameter telescopes equipped with 1.4 Gigapixel cameras that deliver 7 square degree fields-of-view. The first of these telescopes, Pan-STARRS1, is conducting a search for Near Earth Objects, and is currently the leading discoverer of Near Earth Objects. The second telescope, Pan-STARRS2, is nearing the end of its commissioning, and is becoming more productive. Pan-STARRS has become the leading survey for Near Earth Objects, responsible for approximately half of the NEO discoveries to date in 2015. Pan-STARRS is also the leading discoverer of new comets.

  10. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  11. Modelling evaporation fronts with reactive Riemann solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Le Metayer, O. . E-mail: olivier.lemetayer@polytech.univ-mrs.fr; Massoni, J. . E-mail: jacques.massoni@polytech.univ-mrs.fr; Saurel, R. . E-mail: richard.saurel@polytech.univ-mrs.fr

    2005-05-20

    This work deals with the modelling of permeable fronts and the building of a numerical method allowing the multi-dimensional propagation of such fronts. A particular attention is given to evaporation waves that appear in cavitating systems. These ones are considered as discontinuities through which a non-equilibrium liquid turns to a liquid-vapor mixture at thermodynamic equilibrium. Such transformation occurs at finite rate. In order to determine this kinetics, the evaporation front is assumed to propagate at the maximum admissible speed corresponding to the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration point [J.R., Simoes-Moreira, J.E., Shepherd, Evaporation waves in superheated dodecane, J. Fluid Mech. 382 (1999) 63-86]. Using this particular kinetic relation, Rankine-Hugoniot relations are closed at such fronts. Then it is possible to solve the associated reactive Riemann problem. However, another difficulty is present to solve the multi-dimensional propagation of permeable fronts. This kind of front is subsonic and a conventional averaging scheme (such as Godunov scheme) is inappropriate. To overcome this difficulty, the reactive Riemann problem solution is embedded into the discrete equations method (DEM) [R., Abgrall, R., Saurel, Discrete equations for physical and numerical compressible multiphase mixtures, J. Comp. Phys. 186 (2003) 361-396; R., Saurel, S., Gavrilyuk, F., Renaud, A multiphase model with internal degrees of freedom: application to Shock-Bubble Interaction, J. Fluid. Mech., 495 (2003) 283-321]. This numerical method necessitates deep extensions that are detailed herein. Numerical results are shown and validated over experimental data. Some examples show that the same method may be applied to the propagation of detonation fronts.

  12. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  13. Dynamics of complete wetting liquid under evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C.-T.; Berteloot, G.; Lequeux, F.; Limat, L.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of a contact line under evaporation and total-wetting conditions is studied taking into account van der Waals interactions and the divergent nature of evaporation near the border of the liquid . The existence of a precursor film at the edge of the liquid is shown analytically and numerically. Its length is controlled by the Hamacker constant and evaporative flux. Past the precursor film, Tanner's law is generalized accounting for evaporative effects.

  14. Piagetian liquid conservation in the great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, and Pongo pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Suda, Chikako; Call, Josep

    2004-09-01

    An understanding of Piagetian liquid conservation was investigated in 4 bonobos (Pan paniscus), 5 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and 5 orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). The apes were tested in the ability to track the larger of 2 quantities of juice that had undergone various kinds of transformations. The accuracy of the apes' judgment depended on the shape or number of containers into which the larger quantity was transferred. The apes made their choice mainly on the basis of visual estimation but showed modest success when the quantities were occluded. The results suggest that the apes rely to a greater extent on visual information, although they might have some appreciation of the constancy of liquid quantities. PMID:15482054

  15. Studies for the staggered pans core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Fieg, G.; Moeschke, M.; Werle, H.

    1995-09-01

    Special devices (core catchers) might be required in the future to prevent containment failure by basemat erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce the release of radioactivity. A configuration is investigated that consists essentially of a stack of vertically superimposed melt-resistant ceramic pans and that makes use of the vertical extension of small-diameter cavities to provide a sufficiently large spreading area such that the core melt freezes quickly. Tests with {approximately}100 kg of molten iron and aluminium oxide generated by the thermite reaction give some information on the resistance of various materials against the mixed metal/oxide melt and on the flow and distribution of metallic and oxide melts in such a core-catcher configuration.

  16. Evaporation by mechanical vapor recompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, C. H.; Coury, G. E.

    1980-04-01

    Progress in the development of a study of the application of the technologies of mechanical vapor recompression and falling film evaporation as applied to the beet sugar industry is reported. Progress is reported in the following areas: technical literature search; report on visit to European factories using these technologies; energy balance studies of factories offered by the industry as candidates for the demonstration plants; and report on energy balance studies and the recommendations as to the site for the demonstration plant.

  17. Numerical modeling of water flow and salt transport in bare saline soil subjected to evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2015-05-01

    A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to evaporation, which was simulated using the bulk aerodynamic formulation. As evaporation was assumed to depend on the pore moisture, the evaporation flux evolved gradually causing a gradual increase in the pore salinity. This is in contrast to prior studies where the high salinity was imposed instantaneously on the ground surface. Key factors likely affecting subsurface hydrodynamics were investigated, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, relative humidity in the air, and surrounding groundwater replenishment. The simulations showed two temporal regimes where the first consists of rapid evaporation for a duration of hours followed by slow evaporation, until evaporation ceases. In the absence of surrounding groundwater replenishment, evaporation-induced density gradient generated an upward water flow initially, and then the flow decreased at which time a high density salt "finger" formed and propagated downwards. Capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. The results also suggested that the presence of subsurface water replenishment to the evaporation zone tended to produce a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface.

  18. The fate of evaporated water from the Ganges basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuinenburg, O. A.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Kabat, P.

    2012-01-01

    This research studies river basin moisture recycling rates in order to determine the atmospheric part of the water cycle and the influence of the land surface there on. For river basins in India (Ganges and Indus), the fraction of evaporation that falls again as precipitation in the same river basin (the moisture recycling) is determined. Furthermore, the seasonal variance of moisture recycling and the fraction of precipitation that originates from evaporation from the same river basin is quantified. Using a quasi-isentropic moisture tracking scheme, evaporation from land surfaces in India is tracked through the atmosphere until precipitation brings it back to the land surface. This scheme is forced with ERA-Interim reanalysis data from 1990 to 2009. With the information about the atmospheric paths of water vapor, the distance between evaporation and precipitation location is determined. To get an approximation of the influence of land use on the atmospheric moisture budget, the atmospheric paths of water vapor from two bordering areas with different evaporative regimes are compared. Results show a strong annual cycle in the recycling ratio. For the Ganges basin, the recycling ranges from 5% during the winter months (November-March) to 60% during the June-July-August season. The comparison of two focus areas in the Ganges basin with a difference in March-August evaporation shows that during the premonsoon months (March-May), up to 70% of the evaporation difference between the two areas recycles within the Ganges basin. Analysis of the soil moisture nudging terms in ERA-Interim compared to independent irrigation data strongly suggest this evaporation difference can be attributed to large-scale irrigation. The importance of basin moisture recycling for precipitation shows an annual cycle as well. An annual average of 4.5% of Ganges precipitation originates from water evaporating in the Ganges basin. During the dry winter monsoon, any precipitation originates from sources outside the basin. During March-April-May and October-November, 10% of the precipitation originates from evaporation within the basin. During the summer monsoon season, the large influx of moisture from the Indian Ocean dominates the precipitation, and recycling is 5% of precipitation.

  19. Evaluating The Reliability of Point Estimates of Wetland Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, H.; Agnew, C. T.

    The Penman-Monteith formulation of evaporation has been criticised for its reliance upon point estimates raising concerns that areal estimates of wetland evaporation based upon single weather stations can be misleading. Typically wetlands are composed of a complex mosaic of land cover types each of which can produce different evaporative rates. The need to account for wetland patches when monitoring hydrological fluxes has been noted, while Morton (1983) has long argued for a fundamentally different approach to the calculation of regional evaporation. This paper presents the work carried out at wet grassland in Southern England that was monitored with several automatic weather stations (AWS) and a bowen ratio station to investigate microclimate variations. The significance of fetch was examined using the approach adopted by Gash (1986) based upon surface roughness to estimate the fraction of evaporation sensed from a specific distance upwind of the monitoring station. This theoretical analysis reveals that the fraction of evaporation contributed by the surrounding area steadily increases to a value of 77% at a distance of 224m and thereafter declines rapidly, under stable atmospheric conditions. Thus point climate observations may not reflect surface conditions at greater distances. This result was tested through the deployment offour AWS around the wetland. The data yielded a different response, suggesting that homogeneous conditions prevailed and the central AWS did provide reliable areal estimates of evaporation. The apparent contradiction is a result of not accounting for wind speeds found in wetlands that lead to widespread atmospheric mixing. These findings are typical of moist conditions whereas for example Guo and Scheupp (1994) found that a patchwork of dry fields and wet ditches, characteristic of the study site in summer, could produce differences of up to 50% in evaporation. The paper will also present the initial results of an investigation of the role of dry patches upon wetland evaporation estimates. Morton, F.I. 1983 Operational estimates of evapotranspiration and their significance to the science and practice of hydrology. Journal of Hydrology 66 1:76. Gash, J.H.C. 1986 A note on estimating the effect of limited fetch on micrometeorological evaporation measurements. Boundary Layer Meteorology 35: 409-413. Guo, Y. Schuepp, P.H. 1994a On surface energy balance over the northern wetlands 1. The effects of small-scale temperature and wetness heterogeneity. Journal of Geophysical Research 99 (D1) 1601-1612.

  20. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  1. SEWAGE DISPOSAL BY EVAPORATION-TRANSPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the methods for on-site disposal of wastewater from individual homes is by evaporation. Two types of evaporative disposal systems have been investigated in this study; evapo-transpiration (ET) beds and mechanical evaporation units. Twenty nine test lysimeters of 0.22 cubic...

  2. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.130 Evaporated milk. (a) Description. Evaporated milk is the liquid food obtained by partial removal of water only from milk....

  3. Public Release of Pan-STARRS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather; Consortium, panstarrs

    2015-08-01

    Pan-STARRS 1 is a 1.8 meter survey telescope, located on Haleakala, Hawaii, with a 1.4 Gigapixel camera, a 7 square degree field of view, and 5 filters (g,r,i,z,y). The public release of data, which is available to everyone, consists of 4 years of data taken between May 2010 and April 2014. Two of the surveys available in the public release are the 3pi survey and the Medium Deep (MD) survey. The 3pi survey has roughly 60 epochs (12 per filter) covering 3/4 of the sky and everything north of -30 degrees declination. The MD survey consists of 10 fields, observed in a couple of filters each night, usually 8 exposures per filter per field, for about 4000 epochs per MD field. The available data product are accessed through the “Postage Stamp Server” and through the Published Science Products Subsystem (PSPS), both of these are available through the Pan-STARRS Science Interface (PSI). The Postage Stamp Server provides images and catalogs for different stages of processing on single exposures, stack images, difference images, and forced photometry. The PSPS is a SQLServer database that can be queried via script or web interface, with a database for each MD field and a large database for the 3pi survey. This database has relative photometry and astrometry and object associations, making it easy to do searches across the entire sky as well as tools to generate lightcurves of individual objects as a function of time.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Youth with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS): Recommendations from the 2013 PANS Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Frankovich, Jennifer; Cooperstock, Michael; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Murphy, Tanya K.; Pasternack, Mark; Thienemann, Margo; Williams, Kyle; Walter, Jolan; Swedo, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract On May 23 and 24, 2013, the First PANS Consensus Conference was convened at Stanford University, calling together a geographically diverse group of clinicians and researchers from complementary fields of pediatrics: General and developmental pediatrics, infectious diseases, immunology, rheumatology, neurology, and child psychiatry. Participants were academicians with clinical and research interests in pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcus (PANDAS) in youth, and the larger category of pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). The goals were to clarify the diagnostic boundaries of PANS, to develop systematic strategies for evaluation of suspected PANS cases, and to set forth the most urgently needed studies in this field. Presented here is a consensus statement proposing recommendations for the diagnostic evaluation of youth presenting with PANS. PMID:25325534

  5. Brief communication: dental development timing in captive Pan paniscus with comparisons to Pan troglodytes.

    PubMed

    Bolter, Debra R; Zihlman, Adrienne L

    2011-08-01

    Dental eruption provides markers of growth and is one component of a chimpanzee's physical development. Dental markers help characterize transitions between life stages, e.g., infant to juvenile. Most of what we know about the timing of development in chimpanzees derives from Pan troglodytes. Much less is known about the sister species, Pan paniscus, with few in captivity and a restricted wild range in central Africa. Here we report on the dental eruption timing for female captive P. paniscus (n = 5) from the Milwaukee and San Diego Zoos whose ages are known and range from birth to age 8.54 years. Some observations were recorded in zoo records on the gingiva during life; others were made at death on the gingiva and on the skeleton. At birth, P. paniscus infants have no teeth emerged. By 0.83 years, all but the deciduous second molars (dm(2) ) (when both upper and lower dentitions are referenced collectively, no super or subscript notation is used) and canines (dc) are emerged. For permanent teeth, results show a sequence polymorphism for an early P4 eruption, not previously described for P. paniscus. Comparisons between P. paniscus and P. troglodytes document absolute timing differences of emergence in upper second incisors (I(2) ), and upper and lower canines (C) and third molars (M3). The genus Pan encompasses variability in growth not previously recognized. These preliminary data suggest that physical growth in captive P. paniscus may be accelerated, a general pattern found in captive P. troglodytes. PMID:21541924

  6. Experimental investigation of liquid drop evaporation on a heated solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. A.; Feoktistov, D. V.; Zaitsev, D. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Evaporation of a water drop was studied experimentally at a temperature difference between the solid surface and surrounding atmosphere from 30 to 60 °C. The studies were performed on the substrates with micro- and nanocoatings with different wettability. The features of evaporation were studied for the pinned, partially pinned, and depinned three-phase contact line (solid-liquid-gas interface). It is shown that with a decrease in the water drop volume, the specific evaporation rate (mass flow per unit of surface area) increases, particularly at the last stage of evaporation.

  7. Influence of Oil on Refrigerant Evaporator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong-Soo, Kim; Nagata, Katsuya; Katsuta, Masafumi; Tomosugi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kouichiro; Horichi, Toshiaki

    To explore the quantitative effect of the lubrication oil on the thermal and hydraulic evaporator performance, the detailed structure of two-phase refrigerant (R11) and lubrication oil (Suniso 5GS) flow has been investigated. Experiment has been performed using a transparent tube 20mm in inner diameter and 2600mm in total length as main test section, which was heated by surrounding hot water bath. This water bath also functioned as the visual observation section of the transition of two-phase flow pattern. Oil mass concentration was controlled initially, and circulated into the system. The void fraction at the main test section was measured by direct volume measurement using so-called "Quick Closing Valve" method. Since the effect of oil on the transition of two-phase flow pattern is emphasized at the low flow rate, operation was made at relatively low mass velocity, 50 and 100 kg/m2·s, five different oil concentrations were taken. Throughout the experiment, the evaporation pressure was kept at 105 kPa. In general, when contamination of the lubrication oil happened, the void fraction was decreasing due to the change of viscosity and surface tension and the occurence of the foaming. To correlate the void fraction as function of quality, Zivi's expression was modified to include the effect of oil concentration. The agreement between the data and this proposed correlation was favorable. Finally, to take into account the effect of lubrication oil, the new flow pattern diagram was proposed.

  8. Evaporation of Molten Salts by Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putvinski, S.; Agnew, S. F.; Chamberlain, F.; Freeman, R. L.; Litvak, A.; Meekins, M.; Schwedock, T.; Umstadter, K. R.; Yung, S.; Bakharev, V.; Dresvin, S.; Egorov, S.; Feygenson, O.; Gabdullin, P.; Ivanov; Kizevetter, D.; Kostrukov, A.; Kuteev, B.; Malugin, V.; Zverev, S.

    2003-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group is developing a plasma nuclear waste separation technology, called the Plasma Mass Filter. The experimental results on thermal evaporation of molten NaOH based surrogates for the Filter are presented. The main goal of the experiments was the study of high-density plasma discharges in NaOH vapor with the aim to minimize injection of additional working gas in the plasma torch. In these experiments NaOH vapor has been produced either by evaporation of the melt from a crucible introduced inside the plasma torch, or by injection of the melt droplets inside the torch. In the latter case, the melt was first atomized by an ultrasonic nebulizer at a flow rate of up to 2g/s with a droplet size of ˜50um. Plasma composition has been monitored by optical measurements. An optical diagnostic for droplet size measurement is presented together with results of the measurements of the size spectrum of the NaOH droplets.

  9. Role of entrapped vapor bubbles during microdroplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Shawn A.; Byrd, Larry W.; Briones, Alejandro M.; Hanchak, Michael S.; Ervin, Jamie S.; Jones, John G.

    2012-08-01

    On superheated surfaces, the air bubble trapped during impingement grows into a larger vapor bubble and oscillates at the frequency predicted for thermally induced capillary waves. In some cases, the entrapped vapor bubble penetrates the droplet interface, leaving a micron-sized coffee-ring pattern of pure fluid. Vapor bubble entrapment, however, does not influence the evaporation rate. This is also true on laser heated surfaces, where a laser can thermally excite capillary waves and induce bubble oscillations over a broad range of frequencies, suggesting that exciting perturbations in a pinned droplets interface is not an effective avenue for enhancing evaporative heat transfer.

  10. Aerogel Materials by Evaporative Drying: Potential for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plawsky, Joel L.

    1999-01-01

    Aerogel wafers were made using an evaporative drying procedure. The main steps were sol formulation, gelation, aging, capping, and drying. Of these, the most critical step was drying. Both the rate of evaporation and temperature of the system must be controlled for best results. Aerogel materials should be benchmarked against more traditional foams and current systems may have to be redesigned to make best use of aerogel strengths. Finally, the flexibility of this procedure lends itself to producing aerogel materials for many uses other than insulation. Such uses may include catalysis, sensing, and composite materials.

  11. Clogging of Manifolds with Evaporatively Frozen Propellants. Part 2; Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmon, J. A.; Gift, R. D.; Spurlock, J. M.

    1966-01-01

    The mechanisms of evaporative freezing of leaking propellant and the creation of flow stoppages within injector manifolds is discussed. A quantitative analysis of the conditions, including the existence of minimum and maximum leak rates, for the accumulation of evaporatively frozen propellant is presented. Clogging of the injector manifolds of the Apollo SPS and the Gemini OAMS engines by the freezing of leaking propellant is predicted and the seriousness of the consequences are discussed. Based on the analysis a realistic evaluation of selected techniques to eliminate flow stoppages by frozen propellant is made.

  12. Alpha particles induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in primary human lymphocytes mediated through ATM.

    PubMed

    Horn, Simon; Brady, Darren; Prise, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The use of high linear energy transfer radiations in the form of carbon ions in heavy ion beam lines or alpha particles in new radionuclide treatments has increased substantially over the past decade and will continue to do so due to the favourable dose distributions they can offer versus conventional therapies. Previously it has been shown that exposure to heavy ions induces pan-nuclear phosphorylation of several DNA repair proteins such as H2AX and ATM in vitro. Here we describe similar effects of alpha particles on ex vivo irradiated primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Following alpha particle irradiation pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, but not DNA-PK and 53BP1, was observed throughout the nucleus. Inhibition of ATM, but not DNA-PK, resulted in the loss of pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in alpha particle irradiated lymphocytes. Pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX signal was rapidly lost over 24h at a much greater rate than foci loss. Surprisingly, pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX intensity was not dependent on the number of alpha particle induced double strand breaks, rather the number of alpha particles which had traversed the cell nucleus. This distinct fluence dependent damage signature of particle radiation is important in both the fields of radioprotection and clinical oncology in determining radionuclide biological dosimetry and may be indicative of patient response to new radionuclide cancer therapies. PMID:26116906

  13. Dynamics of Soil Water Evaporation during Soil Drying: Laboratory Experiment and Numerical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3. PMID:24489492

  14. Wind effects on leaf transpiration challenge the concept of "potential evaporation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2015-06-01

    Transpiration is commonly conceptualised as a fraction of some potential rate, driven by so-called "atmospheric evaporative demand". Therefore, atmospheric evaporative demand or "potential evaporation" is generally used alongside with precipitation and soil moisture to characterise the environmental conditions that affect plant water use. Consequently, an increase in potential evaporation (e.g. due to climate change) is believed to cause increased transpiration and/or vegetation water stress. In the present study, we investigated the question whether potential evaporation constitutes a meaningful reference for transpiration and compared sensitivity of potential evaporation and leaf transpiration to atmospheric forcing. A physically-based leaf energy balance model was used, considering the dependence of feedbacks between leaf temperature and exchange rates of radiative, sensible and latent heat on stomatal resistance. Based on modelling results and supporting experimental evidence, we conclude that stomatal resistance cannot be parameterised as a factor relating transpiration to potential evaporation, as the ratio between transpiration and potential evaporation not only varies with stomatal resistance, but also with wind speed, air temperature, irradiance and relative humidity. Furthermore, the effect of wind speed in particular implies increase in potential evaporation, which is commonly interpreted as increased "water stress", but at the same time can reduce leaf transpiration, implying a decrease in water demand at leaf scale.

  15. Pan1 is an intrinsically disordered protein with homotypic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, B. D.; Toptygin, D.; Wendland, B.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast scaffold protein Pan1 contains two EH domains at its N-terminus, a predicted coiled-coil central region, and a C-terminal proline-rich domain. Pan1 is also predicted to contain regions of intrinsic disorder, characteristic of proteins that have many binding partners. In vitro biochemical data suggest that Pan1 exists as a dimer, and we have identified amino acids 705–848 as critical for this homotypic interaction. Tryptophan fluorescence was used to further characterize Pan1 conformational states. Pan1 contains four endogenous tryptophans, each in a distinct region of the protein: Trp312 and Trp642 are each in an EH domain, Trp957 is in the central region, and Trp1280 is a critical residue in the Arp2/3 activation domain. To examine the local environment of each of these tryptophans, three of the four tryptophans were mutagenized to phenylalanine to create four proteins, each with only one tryptophan residue. When quenched with acrylamide, these single tryptophan mutants appeared to undergo collisional quenching exclusively and were moderately accessible to the acrylamide molecule. Quenching with iodide or cesium, however, revealed different Stern-Volmer constants due to unique electrostatic environments of the tryptophan residues. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data confirmed structural and disorder predictions of Pan1. Further experimentation to fully develop a model of Pan1 conformational dynamics will assist in a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of endocytosis. PMID:23801378

  16. Summertime PAN on boundary layer over the Northern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, D.; Lee, S.; Lee, G.; Rhee, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of SHIPPO ( Shipborne Pole to Pole Observation), peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO2 have been measured at aboard the R/V Araon during the ship track from Inchon, South Korea to Norm, Alaska, USA from July 14th to 30th, 2012. PAN and NO2 were sampled every 2 minute by a fast chromatograph with luminol-based chemiluminescence detection. In order to assure their detections in remote background airs, we successfully reduced random noise mainly from PMT using ensemble averaging from the 2 min chromatograms in each one hour time interval. With this post-processing analysis, we were able to lower detection limits to 0.01 ppbv and 0.04 ppbv for PAN and NO2, respectively. The preliminary results indicate that the background values ranged from the below the detection limit to 0.37 ppbv (average of 0.06 ppbv) for PAN and 2.05 ppbv (average of 0.24 ppbv) for NO2. It was confirmed that PAN was significant portions of reactive nitrogens in remote marine boundary airs. Occasional enhancements of PAN and NO2 were mainly attributed to the air masses originated from nearby source regions in the Northestern Asia and influenced by ships exhausts. We were able to observe the shifting of equilibrium between PAN and NO2 according to air temperature changes in very clean air masses.

  17. Multispectral remote sensing contribution to land surface evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    The global water cycle is perhaps the most important of all the biogeochemical cycles and evaporation, which is a significant component of the water cycle, is also linked with the energy and carbon cycles. Long-term evaporation over large areas has generally been computed as the difference of precipitation and river runoff. Analysis of short-term evaporation rate and its spatial pattern, however, is extremely complex, and multispectral remotely sensed data could aid in such analysis. Multispectral data considered here are visible and near-infrared reflectances, infrared surface temperature and the 37 GHz brightness temperatures. These observations are found to be not totally independent of each other. A few of their relationships are established and discussed considering physically-based models.

  18. Influence of electron evaporative cooling on ultracold plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Truman; Chen, Wei-Ting; Roberts, Jacob

    2013-07-15

    The expansion of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCP) is driven primarily by the thermal pressure of the electron component and is therefore sensitive to the electron temperature. For typical UCP spatial extents, evaporative cooling has a significant influence on the UCP expansion rate at lower densities (less than 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}). We studied the effect of electron evaporation in this density range. Owing to the low density, the effects of three-body recombination were negligible. We modeled the expansion by taking into account the change in electron temperature owing to evaporation as well as adiabatic expansion and found good agreement with our data. We also developed a simple model for initial evaporation over a range of ultracold plasma densities, sizes, and electron temperatures to determine over what parameter range electron evaporation is expected to have a significant effect. We also report on a signal calibration technique, which relates the signal at our detector to the total number of ions and electrons in the ultracold plasma.

  19. Numerical Study of a Hydrodynamic Instability Driven by Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Zapata, Sergio; Romo-Cruz, Julio Cesar Ruben; Lopez-Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    The study of hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid layers produced by evaporation has several applications on industry and technology. In this work we study numerically the conditions under which a liquid layer becomes unstable when evaporation in the vapor-liquid interphase is present. The evaporation process follows the Hertz-Knudsen law (the evaporation rate is proportional to the difference between the saturated vapor pressure at the liquid layer temperature and the vapor partial pressure in the environment). Additionally to the usual boundary conditions on solid walls (for example, the non-slip condition for the velocity), we analyze the boundary conditions in the vapor-liquid interphase where the momentum and energy balances have to be taken into account and where the evaporation plays a crucial role. To solve this problem the linear theory of stability is used; that is, a small perturbation around the basic solution is applied (flow at rest and a temperature stationary field). The equations are solved using the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method. The results are compared with the more usual Rayleigh-Bnard and Marangoni mechanisms as well as with some experiments carried out by our team. Authors acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN116312, ``Vorticidad y Ondas no lineales en fluidos.''

  20. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana T; Safar, Zeinab; Loch, J P Gustav

    2014-09-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evaporation rates in arid regions, groundwater quality is not threatened and all soil contamination issues tend to be overlooked. But if soil contamination happens, where do contaminants go? This study tests the hypothesis of upward metal movement in soils when evaporation is the main transport mechanism. Laboratory evaporation tests were carried out with heavy metal spiked Saudi soil, using circulation of air as the driving force (Fig. 1). Main results show that loamy soil retains heavy metals quite well while evaporation drives heavy metals to the surface of a sandy soil. Evaporation transports heavy metals upward in sandy soils of arid regions, making them accumulate at the soil surface. Sand being the dominating type of soil in arid regions, soils can then be a potential source of contaminated aerosols and atmospheric pollution - a transboundary problem. Some other repercussions for this problem are foreseen, such as the public ingestion or inhalation of dust. PMID:24997976

  1. Membrane-Based Water Evaporator for a Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; McCann, Charles J.; O'Connell, Mary K.; Andrea, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A membrane-based water evaporator has been developed that is intended to serve as a heat-rejection device for a space suit. This evaporator would replace the current sublimator that is sensitive to contamination of its feedwater. The design of the membrane-based evaporator takes advantage of recent advances in hydrophobic micropore membranes to provide robust heat rejection with much less sensitivity to contamination. The low contamination sensitivity allows use of the heat transport loop as feedwater, eliminating the need for the separate feedwater system used for the sublimator. A cross section of the evaporator is shown in the accompanying figure. The space-suit cooling loop water flows into a distribution plenum, through a narrow annulus lined on both sides with a hydrophobic membrane, into an exit plenum, and returns to the space suit. Two perforated metal tubes encase the membranes and provide structural strength. Evaporation at the membrane inner surface dissipates the waste heat from the space suit. The water vapor passes through the membrane, into a steam duct and is vented to the vacuum environment through a back-pressure valve. The back-pressure setting can be adjusted to regulate the heat-rejection rate and the water outlet temperature.

  2. Variation of Phreatic Evaporation of Bare Soil and Integration Application in Water Allocation in Shule Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, P.; Gong, G.

    2011-12-01

    Phreatic evaporation is a key element in regional water balance, but it is hardly measured directly. Recently the development of some new technologies brings new dawn to phreatic evaporation measurement, such as eddy covariance, remote sensing ET and so on. But the new technologies have no ability to connect to groundwater yet. Conventional groundwater balance equipment was set up in Shule basin in northwestern China, with located E97°01', N45°13' , altitude 1520m, annual average precipitation 61.8mm and annual evaporation 2600mm (pan 20cm). The experiment field contains 45 lysimeters (65cm diameter). 11 different water table depths are set in the lysimeters, which are 0.5m, 0.75m, 1.0m, 1.25m, 1.5m, 2.0m, 2.5m, 3.0m, 4.0m, 5.0m and 6.0m. The water table in the lysimeter is controlled by Marriott Bottle System. The evaporation and percolation is measured for three different soil types (silt sandy soil, loam soil and clay soil) in the 11 different water table depths. Based on the data from 2006 to 2010, the influences of atmosphere evaporation capacity, phreatic water depth and soil textures are analyzed. Empirical formulae for estimating phreatic evaporation are regressed. The fitting precision of the different formulae are evaluated. The results show that, fitting effect of common empirical formulae is good in Shule river basin. For the different soil types, fitting effect of silt soil is the best, while that of clay soil is relatively low. At last, formulae fitted in other areas and phreatic evaporation tests are summarized. The reasons of difference of fitted coefficients lie in three aspects: the range of depth of groundwater, choice of the value of water evaporation, method to optimize coefficients. Physical meaning of the coefficients in empirical formulae is analyzed. The features, fitting effect and notes in application of formulae are evaluated. The results are applied in water requirement calculation of ecological conservation Dunhuang Xihu Nature Reserve. Water sources, plant transpiration, and phreatic evaporation are simulated by the groundwater numerical model and the total ET of nature reserve is calculated. The supplementary water requirement is advanced. Key words: phreatic evaporation; empirical formulae; fitting precision; Shule river basin

  3. Evaporation Mechanism of Sn and SnS from Liquid Fe: Part II: Residual Site and Evaporation Kinetics via Sn(g) and SnS(g)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Youn-Bae; Seo, Jeong-Do; Park, Joong-Kil; Choi, Joo

    2015-02-01

    Evaporation of Sn from molten steel was experimentally investigated for Fe-Sn-S alloy with low initial S (0.0007 < [pct S]0 < 0.05) or with high initial S (0.55 < [pct S]0 < 0.894) at 1873 K (1600 °C) using an electromagnetic levitation melting technique, in order to clarify the role of S on the evaporation mechanism of Sn. It was found that increasing initial S concentration, [pct S]0, decreased the second-order evaporation rate constant of Sn ( k SnS), but there was a residual rate for the evaporation even at high [pct S]0. The obtained residual rate constant, , was 1.4 × 10-9 m4 mol-1 s-1 at 1873 K (1600 °C). Evaporation of Sn under virtually no S condition ([pct S]0 = 0.0007) was also measured and corresponding first-order rate constant was determined to be 3.49 × 10-7 m s-1 at 1873 K (1600 °C). A comprehensive model for the Sn evaporation from molten Fe-Sn-S alloy was developed in the present study, under the condition where mass transfer in gas and liquid phases were fast and interfacial chemical reaction controlled the evaporation of Sn. The model equation is able to represent the evaporation of Sn in the forms of Sn(g) and SnS(g) simultaneously, from very low S melt (when there is no S) to very high S melt investigated in the present study up to ~0.9 mass pct. Gradual transition of major evaporation species from SnS(g) to Sn(g) was well accounted for by the developed model.

  4. Indirect evaporative coolers with enhanced heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, Eric; Woods, Jason; Judkoff, Ron

    2015-09-22

    A separator plate assembly for use in an indirect evaporative cooler (IEC) with an air-to-air heat exchanger. The assembly includes a separator plate with a first surface defining a dry channel and a second surface defining a wet channel. The assembly includes heat transfer enhancements provided on the first surface for increasing heat transfer rates. The heat transfer enhancements may include slit fins with bodies extending outward from the first surface of separator plate or may take other forms including vortex generators, offset strip fins, and wavy fins. In slit fin implementations, the separator plate has holes proximate to each of the slit fins, and the separator plate assembly may include a sealing layer applied to the second surface of the separator plate to block air flow through the holes. The sealing layer can be a thickness of adhesive, and a layer of wicking material is applied to the adhesive.

  5. Evaporative oxidation treatability test report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

  6. [Mineral migration from stainless steel, cast iron and soapstone (steatite) Brazilian pans to food preparations].

    PubMed

    Quintaes, Késia Diego; Farfan, Jaime Amaya; Tomazini, Fernanda Mariana; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio

    2006-09-01

    Culinary utensils may release some inorganic elements during food preparation. Mineral migration can be beneficial for as long as it occurs in amounts adequate to the needs of the consumer or no toxicological implications are involved. In this study, the migrations of Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni and Ca, along seven cooking cycles were evaluated for two food preparations (polished rice and commercial tomato sauce, the latter as an acid food), performed in unused stainless steel, cast iron and soapstone pans, taking refractory glass as a blank. Minerals were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The utensils studied exhibited different rates, patterns and variability of migration depending on the type of food. Regression analysis of the data revealed that, as a function of the number of cycles, the iron pans released increasing amounts of iron when tomato sauce was cooked (y = 70.76x + 276.75; R2 = 0.77). The soapstone pans released calcium (35 and 26 mg/kg), magnesium (25 and 15 mg/kg) into the tomato sauce and rice preparations, respectively. Additionally, the commercial tomato sauce drew manganese (3.9 and 0.6 mg/kg) and some undesirable nickel (1.0 mg/kg) from the soapstone material, whereas the stainless steel pans released nickel at a lower rate than steatite and in a diminishing fashion with the number o cooking cycles, while still transferring some iron and chromium to the food. We conclude that while cast iron and glass could be best for the consumer's nutritional health, stainless steel and steatite can be used with relatively low risk, provided acid foods are not routinely prepared in those materials. PMID:17249489

  7. Evaporation for Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in a Falling Film Heater under Reduced Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Akira; Ide, Tetsuo; Yukino, Keiji

    Experiments on evaporation for water and lithium bromide (LiBr) aqueous solution were made in a externally heated wetted-wall column under reduced pressures. For water, evaporation rate increased slightly as feed rate decreased. The heat transfer coefficients of falling film agreed with those for filmwise condensation. For LiBr solution, evaporation rate decreased and outlet temperature of LiBr solution increased as feed rate decreased. The equations of continuity, diffusion and energy which assume that only water moves to the surface and LiBr doesn't move through falling film of LiBr solution were solved numerically. Calculated values of evaporation rate and outlet temperature of solution agreed with experimental results. The results of this work were compared with pool boiling data reported previously, and it was shown that falling film heater is superior to pool boiling heater concerning heat transfer.

  8. Effect of soil type patterns on the variability of bare soil evaporation within a field: comparison of eddy covariance measurements with potential and actual evaporation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderborght, J.; Graf, A.; Steenpass, C.; Scharnagl, B.; Prolingheuer, N.; Herbst, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation was measured with the eddy-covariance method at the Selhausen field site. The site has a distinct gradient in soil texture with a considerably higher stone content at the upper part of the field. Because of this gradient, a spatial variation in evaporation fluxes in the field is expected. Because of the higher stone content at the upper part of the field, it is expected that the water that is stored in the soil surface layer and can be evaporated at a maximal evaporation rate, which is determined by the energy that is available for evaporation, is considerable smaller in the upper than in the lower part of the field. We investigated whether this hypothesis is supported by eddy covariance (EC) measurements of the evaporation fluxes at the field site. The EC measurements were combined with a footprint model that predicts the location of the soil surface that contributes to the measured evaporation flux. In this way, evaporation measurements of the two parts of the field site could be distinguished. However, since only one EC station was available, simultaneous evaporation measurements for the two field parts were not available. As a consequence, the datasets of measurements had to be interpreted and put into context of the meteorological and soil hydrological conditions. The potential evapotranspiration was calculated using the FAO method (Allen et al., 1998) to represent the meteorological conditions whereas a simple soil evaporation model (Boesten and Stroosnijder, 1986) was used to represent the influence of the precipitation and soil hydrological conditions on the actual evaporation rate. Since different soil parameters were required to describe the evaporation measurements for the upper and lower part of the plot, our starting hypothesis that more water is evaporated in the lower part of the field could be confirmed. Allen, R. G., L. S. Pereira, D. Raes, and M. Smith (1998), Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelines for computing crop water requirements, FAO, Rome (Italy). Boesten, J., and L. Stroosnijder (1986), Simple model for daily evaporation from fallow tilled soil under spring conditions in a temperate climate, Neth. J. Agric. Sci., 34(1), 75-90.

  9. Steam Oxidation and Chromia Evaporation in Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers and Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so-called ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  10. Steam oxidation and chromia evaporation in ultrasupercritical steam boilers and turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2009-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 {sup o}C and 340 atm, so-called ultrasupercritical conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  11. Enhancement of Water Evaporation on Solid Surfaces with Nanoscale Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Wang, Chunlei; Lei, Xiaoling; Zhou, Guoquan; Fang, Haiping

    2015-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the evaporation of nanoscale water on hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterned surfaces is unexpectedly faster than that on any surfaces with uniform wettability. The key to this phenomenon is that, on the patterned surface, the evaporation rate from the hydrophilic region only slightly decreases due to the correspondingly increased water thickness; meanwhile, a considerable number of water molecules evaporate from the hydrophobic region despite the lack of water film. Most of the evaporated water from the hydrophobic region originates from the hydrophilic region by diffusing across the contact lines. Further analysis shows that the evaporation rate from the hydrophobic region is approximately proportional to the total length of the contact lines.

  12. Phase 2 report on the evaluation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a binding polymer for absorbers used to treat liquid radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Sebesta, F.; John, J.; Motl, A.

    1996-05-01

    The performance of PAN-based composite absorbers was evaluated in dynamic experiments at flow rates ranging from 25--100 bed volumes (BV) per hour. Composite absorbers with active components of ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) PAN and K-Co ferrocyanide (KCoFC) PAN were used for separating Cs from a 1 M HNO{sub 3} + 1 M NaNO{sub 3} + 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M CsCl acidic simulant solution. KCoFC-PAN and two other FC-based composite absorbers were tested for separating Cs from alkaline simulant solutions containing 0.01 M to 1 M NaOH and 1 M NaNO{sub 3} + x {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M CsCl. The efficiency of the Cs sorption on the AMP-PAN absorber from acidic simulant solutions was negatively influenced by the dissolution of the AMP active component. At flow rates of 50 BV/hr, the decontamination factor of about 10{sup 3} could be maintained for treatment of 380 BV of the feed. With the KCoFC-PAN absorber, the decontamination factor of about 10{sup 3} could be maintained for a feed volume as great as 1,800 BV. In alkaline simulant solutions, significant decomposition of the active components was observed, and the best performance was exhibited by the KCoFC-PAN absorber. Introductory experiments confirmed that Cs may be washed out of the composite absorbers. Regeneration of both absorbers for repetitive use was also found to be possible. The main result of the study is that PAN was proven to be a versatile polymer capable of forming porous composite absorbers with a large number of primary absorbers. The composite absorbers proved to be capable of withstanding the harsh acidic and alkaline conditions and significant radiation doses that may be expected in the treatment of US DOE wastes. A field demonstration is proposed as a follow-on activity.

  13. 12. Level 6 gringing pans, pump above dorr thickener. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Level 6 gringing pans, pump above dorr thickener. View to west. - Kennecott Copper Corporation, Concentration Mill, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  14. Pan-STARRS PS1 Observatory, Telescope and Instrument Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, E.; Chambers, K.

    An ultimate goal for the final Pan-STARRS array (PS4) is fully robotic facility operations. To facilitate that development, PS1 is a remotely operable observatory that includes many features of the future robotic Pan-STARRS. Both remote and robotic operational concepts require sufficient knowledge of environmental conditions to support survey scheduling, and this requires an auxiliary instrumentation suite to measure meteorological and atmospheric conditions in addition to the control systems for the observatory and telescope. For the Pan-STARRS PS1 prototype, the monitoring, control, and summit subsystem coordination are handled by the HW/SW within the Observatory, Telescope, and Instrumentation Subsystem (OTIS). In this talk, we present the functional capabilities of OTIS, and the HW and SW architectures designed to meet the subsystem operational requirements. OTIS performance through early commissioning is described as well as the future plans to incorporate the Pan-STARRS scheduler into system operations.

  15. PAN's labyrinth: a multidisciplinary delayed diagnosis and patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Emma Louise; Seddon, Owen; Healy, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare, severe form of vasculitis affecting medium-sized vessels. It manifests as a multisystem syndrome, and may be associated with hepatitis B virus-associated PAN (HBV-PAN) although the incidence of this is declining with better vaccination strategies and awareness of bloodborne virus screening. We report a case in which a patient displayed many classical features of the disease, occurring separately over a period of months and leading to contact with various medical specialties. Managing each symptom in isolation led to a number of misdiagnoses (including testicular cancer) and the patient experienced considerable psychological stress and morbidity as a result. The case was complicated by acute pancreatitis developing after an initial treatment response. This may have been iatrogenic (as a consequence of either entecavir or steroids) or secondary to PAN. For our patient, this led to a protracted clinical course but eventual complete resolution of both pathologies. PMID:26733433

  16. STEREO Sees Comet Pan-STARRS - Duration: 33 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    In early March 2013, Comet PanSTARRS became visible to the naked eye in the night sky in the Northern Hemisphere, appearing with a similar shape and brightness as a star, albeit with a trailing tai...

  17. Recurrent plantar ulceration following pan metatarsal head resection.

    PubMed

    Petrov, O; Pfeifer, M; Flood, M; Chagares, W; Daniele, C

    1996-01-01

    Although the pan metatarsal head resection, since it was originally described and performed by Hoffman in 1911, has proven to be an effective and viable procedure in treating many forefoot deformities, it is not without its own complications. The authors provide an historical perspective of the pan metatarsal head resection, a discussion on the complication of recurrent plantar ulceration after the pan metatarsal head resection, and a review of their own experience with this procedure. A retrospective review was performed of all patients having undergone pan metatarsal resections between August 1980 and April 1993. Twenty procedures were performed on 12 patients with diabetic neuropathy, and 21 procedures were performed on 15 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The incidence of recurrent plantar ulceration after surgical correction was 25% and 28%, respectively. All 27 patients underwent primary healing. The authors, therefore, conclude that the complication of recurrent plantar ulceration after this procedure is a very likely and distinct possibility. PMID:8986897

  18. Photodegradation studies of silver-backed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Chugtai, A.R.; Sergides, C.A.; Schissel, P.

    1985-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) reflection-absorbance (RA) measurements have been used to characterize Ag-backed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) films and to study their photodegradation. The optical constants n and k for the polymers are determined in the mid-IR region, and the dependence of RA values on polymer functionality concentration as a function of film thickness calculated. The IR-RA values are nearly linear with the concentration of functionalities for PAN films of thicknesses up to 0.1 ..mu..m. Some oxidative photodegradation pathways have been proposed; with radiation of lambda greater than or equal to 250 nm, a polyimine structure is generated. A combination of 1.0% wt of Irganox 1010 and 0.5% wt of Irgastab 2002 in PAN films was found to significantly retard the photodegradation of the polymer without affecting the specularity of the PAN/Ag surface.

  19. Electrical conductivity of doped polyacrylonitrile (PAN). [Halogen doped polyacrylonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Teoh, H.; MacInnes, D.; Metz, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and optical absorption spectra of halogen doped PAN have been investigated. When films of PAN previously heated in vacuum to 280/sup 0/C are exposed to bromine or iodine vapor the conductivity rises suddenly. The conductivity is reduced by pumping off the vapor, but upon subsequent reheating the conductivity increases dramatically, with a transition occurring at about 270/sup 0/C. Undoped samples were previously reported to undergo a similar transition above 390/sup 0/C. All samples obey sigma ..cap alpha.. T/sup -1/4/ behavior, suggesting 3-dimensional variable range hopping as the conduction mechanism. The optical and infrared absorption spectra of doped PAN are compared to those previously reported for the undoped material. The stability of doped PAN in air is also discussed. 7 figures.

  20. Deep-sky photography - TMax or Technical Pan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martys, C. R.

    1991-08-01

    Baked Technical Pan 2415 film was compared with the new T-grain emulsions TMax 100, TMax 400 and TMax 3200 (untreated) in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the new materials for long exposure deep-sky photography.

  1. Improvements in analysis of atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Müller, Josef; Klein, Werner

    Common analytical techniques for PAN determination were modified in order to obtain a sensitive and automatic analysis system. PAN was synthesized by nitration of peracetic acid in hexane, The PAN/hexane solution was purified by water extraction. The quantification was performed determining acetate or nitrite by ion chromatography following alkaline hydrolysis. The validity was checked by liquid i.r. speetroscopy. NMR studies revealed a singulet signal at 2.27 ppm. The precision and sensitivity of the gas Chromatographic analyses were improved by the use of wide bore capillary columns coated with Carbowax 400. The developed system enables automatic and continuous PAN measurements at a 10 min sampling sequence and with a detection limit of 50 ppt.

  2. On the role of physiochemical properties on evaporation behavior of DISI biofuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorsch, Tobias; Heldmann, Markus; Zigan, Lars; Wensing, Michael; Leipertz, Alfred

    2013-06-01

    Biofuels and alternative fuels are increasingly being blended to conventional gasoline fuel to reduce the overall CO2 emissions. The effect on NOx and soot formation is still unclear as the atomization and evaporation of gasoline with biocomponents differ depending on fuel specific physiochemical properties. This work focuses on describing the biofuel evaporation behavior of gasoline sprays at homogeneous charge (early injection timing) and stratified-charge conditions (late injection timing mode) used in modern direct injection spark ignition engines (DISI). A spray plume of a 6-hole solenoid injector is analyzed in terms of liquid spray propagation, and local droplet sizes studied in an injection chamber. Depending on the operating conditions, different physiochemical properties are found to dominate the atomization and evaporation processes: For low and moderate ambient temperature and pressure, high-boiling point components show a strong influence on the spray droplet size distribution. However, at elevated temperature and pressure, the evaporation behavior changes completely. Due to a high degree of evaporation, the evaporation cooling effect dominates the local droplet sizes. Fuel mixtures owing a larger heat of vaporization show larger droplet sizes—even if these fuels have a lower boiling point. Depending on the local evaporation behavior, the different remaining droplet momentum in the spray controls the air entrainment and the subsequent progress of evaporation and mixing. Overall, it can be stated that the heat of vaporization is a dominating physiochemical property for the droplet evaporation rate at high-level supercharged conditions.

  3. Pan-STARRS-1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1, PS1) has been in full science operation since Spring 2010 and concluded the observing program for the PS1 Science Consortium (PS1SC) in early 2014. The Medium Deep Survey (MDS) component of the program regularly visited 10 fields (~7 sq. deg. each) with significant multi-wavelength overlap from previous and concurrent surveys (e.g. SDSS, DEEP2, CDFS, COSMOS, GALEX) for 25% of the total time allocation. The cadence generally includes the g,r,i,z filters for a MDS field every 3 days over the 6-8 month season the field is visible, with the y filter done primarily during bright time. The nightly stacks of eight exposures typically reach depths of r,i~23.5 mag. Development work continued to improve the single exposure processing though to deep stacks during the transient event discovery and other science consortium programs over the course of the survey, the culmination of those improvements being applied in a more uniformly reprocessed dataset used for the public data release. A summary of the MDS public data release products will be presented.For details on PS1 and the Science Collaboration, visit http://ps1sc.org/

  4. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols, Environmental. Science and Technology, 37, 2003. 5. Koponen I.K., et al.: Thermodynamic properties of malonic, succinic, and glutaric acids: Evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures. Environmental Science and Technology, 41, 2007. 4. Zardini A.A., et al.: White light Mie resonance spectroscopy used to measure very low vapor pressures of substances in aqueous solution aerosol particles. Optics Express, 14, 2006. 3. Zardini A.A. and Krieger, U.K.: Evaporation kinetics of a non-spherical, levitated aerosol particle using optical resonance spectroscopy for precision sizing. Optics Express, 17, 2009. 6. Riipinen, I., et al.: Adipic and Malonic Acid Aqueous Solutions: Surface Tensions and Saturation Vapor Pressures, J. Phys. Chem., 111, 2007.

  5. Pan-STARRS Observatory, Telescope, and Instrument Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Edward A.; Chambers, K.

    2007-05-01

    This paper discusses the architecture and design of the Pan-STARRS Observatory, Telescope, Instrument, Software system or "OTIS''. Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System), is a large optical synoptic survey telescope system being developed by The University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy. OTIS is responsible for control of the observatory, in particular, hardware control, communication between components, metadata logging, atmospheric monitoring, automated operation, user interfaces, data processing, and observation scheduling.

  6. Experimental analysis of evaporation-driven B'enard instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Fabien; Dehaeck, Sam; Colinet, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    We study experimentally the spontaneous patterns induced by evaporation of a pure liquid layer into dry air. The liquid/vapour interface temperature is lower than the substrate temperature because of the energy consumption for the phase change. This temperature difference across the liquid layer generates surface-tension-driven convection and/or buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid, depending on the layer thickness. In practice, the volatile liquid is placed in a circular dish placed in dry air under ambient conditions. During the evaporation process, the convective patterns are observed using an optical Z-type Schlieren set-up. The evaporation rate and the layer thickness are estimated from liquid weight measurements using a precision balance. Several liquids and dish diameters/heights have been tested. As could be expected, the evaporation rate remains almost constant during time, while different convective patterns are observed when the layer thickness decreases. Their phenomenology and transitions are analysed, in relation with existing theoretical models.

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigations of falling film evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Özdemir, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed for falling film evaporation in vacuum using heat transfer relations. An experimental device was designed. experimental set-up which was used was equipped with a triangular weir distribution device and it had the ability to record data up to 3 m. Experiments were performed in a single-effect process with sucrose-water solution varying from 3 to 20% concentration rate of sucrose and we used a vertical tube evaporator with the dimensions of laboratory scale. The model that was developed considers convection, shear stress, viscosity and conjugate heat transfer while most of the previous works ignored these factors. The main factors influencing the heat transfer mechanism performance of the unit were investigated and analyzed. We concluded that the experimental studies are verified by the developed model. Furthermore, it was also concluded that, the heat transfer is affected by the mass flow rate, sucrose concentration rate in solution, film thickness and pressure.

  8. A microfluidic device based on an evaporation-driven micropump.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chuan; Frijns, Arjan J H; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; den Toonder, Jaap M J

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we introduce a microfluidic device ultimately to be applied as a wearable sweat sensor. We show proof-of-principle of the microfluidic functions of the device, namely fluid collection and continuous fluid flow pumping. A filter-paper based layer, that eventually will form the interface between the device and the skin, is used to collect the fluid (e.g., sweat) and enter this into the microfluidic device. A controllable evaporation driven pump is used to drive a continuous fluid flow through a microfluidic channel and over a sensing area. The key element of the pump is a micro-porous membrane mounted at the channel outlet, such that a pore array with a regular hexagonal arrangement is realized through which the fluid evaporates, which drives the flow within the channel. The system is completely fabricated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils, which can be the backbone material for flexible electronics applications, such that it is compatible with volume production approaches like Roll-to-Roll technology. The evaporation rate can be controlled by varying the outlet geometry and the temperature. The generated flows are analyzed experimentally using Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Typical results show that with 1 to 61 pores (diameter = 250 μm, pitch = 500 μm) flow rates of 7.3 × 10(-3) to 1.2 × 10(-1) μL/min are achieved. When the surface temperature is increased by 9.4°C, the flow rate is increased by 130 %. The results are theoretically analyzed using an evaporation model that includes an evaporation correction factor. The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement. PMID:25804609

  9. Testing of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Ed; Riga, Ken; Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand is under contract with the NASA Johnson Space Center to develop a scalable, evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It is being designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current Shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. The MFE system combines both functions into a single compact package with significant weight reduction and improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. The full scale MFE prototype will be constructed with four core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A sub-scale MFE engineering development unit (EDU) has been built, and is identical to one of the four sections of a full scale prototype. The EDU has completed testing at Hamilton Sundstrand. The overall test objective was to determine the thermal performance of the EDU. The first set of tests simulated how each of the four sections of the prototype would perform by varying the chamber pressure, evaporant flow rate, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature. A second set of tests was conducted with an outlet steam header in place to verify that the outlet steam orifices prevent freeze-up in the core while also allowing the desired thermal turn-down ratio. This paper discusses the EDU tests and results.

  10. BPGA- an ultra-fast pan-genome analysis pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Narendrakumar M.; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Dutta, Chitra

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in ultra-high-throughput sequencing technology and metagenomics have led to a paradigm shift in microbial genomics from few genome comparisons to large-scale pan-genome studies at different scales of phylogenetic resolution. Pan-genome studies provide a framework for estimating the genomic diversity of the dataset, determining core (conserved), accessory (dispensable) and unique (strain-specific) gene pool of a species, tracing horizontal gene-flux across strains and providing insight into species evolution. The existing pan genome software tools suffer from various limitations like limited datasets, difficult installation/requirements, inadequate functional features etc. Here we present an ultra-fast computational pipeline BPGA (Bacterial Pan Genome Analysis tool) with seven functional modules. In addition to the routine pan genome analyses, BPGA introduces a number of novel features for downstream analyses like core/pan/MLST (Multi Locus Sequence Typing) phylogeny, exclusive presence/absence of genes in specific strains, subset analysis, atypical G + C content analysis and KEGG & COG mapping of core, accessory and unique genes. Other notable features include minimum running prerequisites, freedom to select the gene clustering method, ultra-fast execution, user friendly command line interface and high-quality graphics outputs. The performance of BPGA has been evaluated using a dataset of complete genome sequences of 28 Streptococcus pyogenes strains. PMID:27071527

  11. Area-to-point regression kriging for pan-sharpening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qunming; Shi, Wenzhong; Atkinson, Peter M.

    2016-04-01

    Pan-sharpening is a technique to combine the fine spatial resolution panchromatic (PAN) band with the coarse spatial resolution multispectral bands of the same satellite to create a fine spatial resolution multispectral image. In this paper, area-to-point regression kriging (ATPRK) is proposed for pan-sharpening. ATPRK considers the PAN band as the covariate. Moreover, ATPRK is extended with a local approach, called adaptive ATPRK (AATPRK), which fits a regression model using a local, non-stationary scheme such that the regression coefficients change across the image. The two geostatistical approaches, ATPRK and AATPRK, were compared to the 13 state-of-the-art pan-sharpening approaches summarized in Vivone et al. (2015) in experiments on three separate datasets. ATPRK and AATPRK produced more accurate pan-sharpened images than the 13 benchmark algorithms in all three experiments. Unlike the benchmark algorithms, the two geostatistical solutions precisely preserved the spectral properties of the original coarse data. Furthermore, ATPRK can be enhanced by a local scheme in AATRPK, in cases where the residuals from a global regression model are such that their spatial character varies locally.

  12. Migration of ATLAS PanDA to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graeme Andrew; Klimentov, Alexei; Koblitz, Birger; Lamanna, Massimo; Maeno, Tadashi; Nevski, Pavel; Nowak, Marcin; Emanuel De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; Wenaus, Torre

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) is a key component of the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS production jobs, and a substantial amount of user and group analysis jobs, pass through the PanDA system, which manages their execution on the grid. PanDA also plays a key role in production task definition and the data set replication request system. PanDA has recently been migrated from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), a process we describe here. We discuss how the new infrastructure for PanDA, which relies heavily on services provided by CERN IT, was introduced in order to make the service as reliable as possible and to allow it to be scaled to ATLAS's increasing need for distributed computing. The migration involved changing the backend database for PanDA from MySQL to Oracle, which impacted upon the database schemas. The process by which the client code was optimised for the new database backend is discussed. We describe the procedure by which the new database infrastructure was tested and commissioned for production use. Operations during the migration had to be planned carefully to minimise disruption to ongoing ATLAS offline computing. All parts of the migration were fully tested before commissioning the new infrastructure and the gradual migration of computing resources to the new system allowed any problems of scaling to be addressed.

  13. BPGA- an ultra-fast pan-genome analysis pipeline.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Narendrakumar M; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Dutta, Chitra

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in ultra-high-throughput sequencing technology and metagenomics have led to a paradigm shift in microbial genomics from few genome comparisons to large-scale pan-genome studies at different scales of phylogenetic resolution. Pan-genome studies provide a framework for estimating the genomic diversity of the dataset, determining core (conserved), accessory (dispensable) and unique (strain-specific) gene pool of a species, tracing horizontal gene-flux across strains and providing insight into species evolution. The existing pan genome software tools suffer from various limitations like limited datasets, difficult installation/requirements, inadequate functional features etc. Here we present an ultra-fast computational pipeline BPGA (Bacterial Pan Genome Analysis tool) with seven functional modules. In addition to the routine pan genome analyses, BPGA introduces a number of novel features for downstream analyses like core/pan/MLST (Multi Locus Sequence Typing) phylogeny, exclusive presence/absence of genes in specific strains, subset analysis, atypical G + C content analysis and KEGG &COG mapping of core, accessory and unique genes. Other notable features include minimum running prerequisites, freedom to select the gene clustering method, ultra-fast execution, user friendly command line interface and high-quality graphics outputs. The performance of BPGA has been evaluated using a dataset of complete genome sequences of 28 Streptococcus pyogenes strains. PMID:27071527

  14. Numerical Modeling of Water Flow and Salt Transport in Bare Saline Soil Subjected to Transient Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Boufadel, M.; Saleh, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    It has been found that evaporation over bare soil plays an important role in subsurface solute transport processes. A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to transient evaporation. The bulk aerodynamic formulation was adopted to simulate transient evaporation rate at ground surface. Subsurface flow pattern, moisture distribution, and salt migration were quantified. Key factors likely affecting this process, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, air humidity, and surrounding water supply, were examined. The results showed that evaporation induced an upward flow pattern, which led to a high saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. In absence of surrounding water supply, as the humidity between the ground surface and air tended to equilibrium, evaporation-induced density gradient generated pore water circulations around the plume edge and caused the salt to migrate downwards with "finger" shapes. It was found that capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. Larger capillary fringe and/or lower air humidity would allow evaporation to extract more water from the ground. It would induce a larger and denser saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. The results also suggested that the presence of the surrounding water supply (represented as a constant water table herein) could provide a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface; meanwhile, in response to the evaporation, a hydraulic gradient was formed from the water supply boundary, which induced an inclined upper saline plume with greater density far from the supply boundary.

  15. Assessment of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand has developed a scalable evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It was designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used as a heat sink from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and water based flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. This system combines both functions into a single compact package with improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. A full-scale system uses multiple core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A single-core MFE engineering development unit (EDU) was built in 2006, followed by a full scale, four-core prototype in 2007. The EDU underwent extensive thermal testing while the prototype was being built. Lessons learned from the EDU were incorporated into the prototype and proven out in check-out testing. The EDU and prototype testing proved out the MFE's ability to passively control back-pressure, avoid unwanted icing, tolerate icing if it should occur, provide a three-to-one turn down ratio in heat load and scale up efficiently. Some issues with these first designs of the MFE have limited its ability to reject heat without liquid evaporant carry-over. However, they are due to the implementation of the design rather than the fundamentals of the technology. This paper discusses the background, development and present state of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator technology and concludes with efforts underway to advance the state-of-the-art.

  16. Formation, levitation and evaporation of unsupported liquid fuel droplet clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song

    Evaporation and combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet phenomena and the behavior of complex spray systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together prior to combustion. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. In this thesis, recent works related to the single drop and droplet array evaporation and combustion, unsupported droplet and droplet cluster formation, and microgravity combustion experiments are reviewed. A unique experiment in which unsupported droplet clusters are formed in normal gravity has been developed and the design concepts and test results are presented and discussed. The results of droplet cluster formation and levitation tests and investigations of the acoustic field are also presented. The current 1-g equipment has been used to investigate the inter-droplet effects of a droplet cluster supported in an acoustic field. Droplet size, inter-droplet distance and evaporation rate were measured and compared with theoretical models. It was found that the single droplet evaporation results are consistent with previous studies and compared well with the single droplet evaporation models. Direct experimental results of multiple droplet evaporation were obtained and compared with a point source method. Based on the 1-g test results, the experimental apparatus will be incorporated into a drop tower rig where experiments can be performed in a microgravity environment.

  17. Out-of-tank evaporator demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; VanEssen, D.C.

    1998-02-01

    The project reported here was conducted to demonstrate a skid-mounted, subatmospheric evaporator to concentrate liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This waste is similar to wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River. A single-stage subatmospheric evaporator rated to produce 90 gallons of distillate per hour was procured from Delta Thermal, Inc., of Pensacola, Florida, and installed in an existing building. During the 8-day demonstration, 22,000 gal of LLLW was concentrated by 25% with the evaporator system. Decontamination factors achieved averaged 5 x 10{sup 6} (i.e., the distillate contained five million times less Cesium 137 than the feed). Evaporator performance substantially exceeded design requirements and expectations based on bench-scale surrogate test data. Out-of tank evaporator demonstration operations successfully addressed the feasibility of hands-on maintenance. Demonstration activities indicate that: (1) skid-mounted, mobile equipment is a viable alternative for the treatment of ORNL LLLW, and (2) hands-on maintenance and decontamination for movement to another site is achievable. Cost analysis show that 10% of the demonstration costs will be immediately recovered by elimination of solidification and disposal costs. The entire cost of the demonstration can be recovered by processing the inventory of Melton Valley Storage Tank waste and/or sluice water prior to solidifications. An additional savings of approximately $200,000 per year can be obtained by processing newly generated waste through the system. The results indicate that this type of evaporator system should be considered for application across the DOE complex. 25 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Pan-cancer patterns of somatic copy-number alteration

    PubMed Central

    Zack, Travis I.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Carter, Scott L.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Tabak, Barbara; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Wala, Jeremiah; Mermel, Craig H.; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Hernandez, Bryan; Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W.; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2013-01-01

    Determining how somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) promote cancer is an important goal. We characterized SCNA patterns among 4934 cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer dataset. Whole-genome doubling, observed in 37% of cancers, was associated with higher rates of every other type of SCNA, TP53 mutations, CCNE1 amplifications, and alterations of the PPP2R complex. SCNAs that were internal to chromosomes tended to be shorter than telomere-bounded SCNAs, suggesting different mechanisms of generation. Significantly recurrent focal SCNAs were observed in 140 regions, including 102 without known oncogene or tumor suppressor gene targets and 50 with significantly mutated genes. Amplified regions without known oncogenes are enriched for genes involved in epigenetic regulation. When levels of genomic disruption were accounted for, 7% of region pairs anticorrelated, and these tended to encompass genes whose proteins physically interact, suggesting related functions. These results provide insights into mechanisms of generation and functional consequences of cancer SCNAs. PMID:24071852

  19. Observations on an evaporative, elbow thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, G.S.H.; Fu, J. )

    1993-05-01

    The performance of the evaporative elbow system was found to be superior to that of the nonevaporative system, but comparable to the performance of the linear system. The parametric role of the evaporator wall temperature, the condenser wall temperature, and the vapor saturation temperature was demonstrated, each revealing a similar monotonic effect. With the evaporator upright, the data were found to be similar to, but displaced from, the upright condenser data. The upright evaporator gave the better performance, but not overwhelmingly so. The limit of performance with the condenser upright was found to be dictated by evaporator dryout. In the upright evaporator configuration, the limit may be attributed to flooding in the poorly draining condenser; this limit was indistinguishable from geyser behavior at low vapor pressures. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Evaporation from Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, March 2010 through February 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreo, Michael T.; Swancar, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation from Lake Mead was measured using the eddy-covariance method for the 2-year period starting March 2010 and ending February 2012. When corrected for energy imbalances, annual eddy-covariance evaporation was 2,074 and 1,881 millimeters (81.65 and 74.07 inches), within the range of previous estimates. There was a 9-percent decrease in the evaporation rate and a 10-percent increase in the lake surface area during the second year of the study compared to the first. These offsetting factors resulted in a nearly identical 720 million cubic meters (584,000 acre feet) evaporation volume for both years. Monthly evaporation rates were best correlated with wind speed, vapor pressure difference, and atmospheric stability. Differences between individual monthly evaporation and mean monthly evaporation were as much as 20 percent. Net radiation provided most of the energy available for evaporative processes; however, advected heat from the Colorado River was an important energy source during the second year of the study. Peak evaporation lagged peak net radiation by 2 months because a larger proportion of the net radiation that reaches the lake goes to heating up the water column during the spring and summer months. As most of this stored energy is released, higher evaporation rates are sustained during fall months even though net radiation declines. The release of stored heat also fueled nighttime evaporation, which accounted for 37 percent of total evaporation. The annual energy-balance ratio was 0.90 on average and varied only 0.01 between the 2 years, thus implying that 90 percent of estimated available energy was accounted for by turbulent energy measured using the eddy-covariance method. More than 90 percent of the turbulent-flux source area represented the open-water surface, and 94 percent of 30-minute turbulent-flux measurements originated from wind directions where the fetch ranged from 2,000 to 16,000 meters. Evaporation uncertainties were estimated to be 5 to 7 percent. A secondary evaporation method, the Bowen ratio energy budget method, also was employed to measure evaporation from Lake Mead primarily as a validation of eddy-covariance evaporation measurements at annual timescales. There was good agreement between annual corrected eddy-covariance and Bowen ratio energy budget evaporation estimates, providing strong validation of these two largely independent methods. Annual Bowen ratio energy budget evaporation was 6 and 8 percent greater than eddy-covariance evaporation for the 2 study years, and both methods indicated there was a similar decrease in evaporation from the first to the second year. Both methods produced negative sensible heat fluxes during the same months, and there was a strong correlation between monthly Bowen ratios (R2 = 0.94). The correlation between monthly evaporation (R2 = 0.65), however, was not as strong. Monthly differences in evaporation were attributed primarily to heat storage estimate uncertainty.

  1. Field trial of three different Plasmodium vivax-detecting rapid diagnostic tests with and without evaporative cool box storage in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accurate parasitological diagnosis of malaria is essential for targeting treatment where more than one species coexist. In this study, three rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) (AccessBio CareStart (CSPfPan), CareStart PfPv (CSPfPv) and Standard Diagnostics Bioline (SDBPfPv)) were evaluated for their ability to detect natural Plasmodium vivax infections in a basic clinic setting. The potential for locally made evaporative cooling boxes (ECB) to protect the tests from heat damage in high summer temperatures was also investigated. Methods Venous blood was drawn from P. vivax positive patients in Jalalabad, Afghanistan and tested against a panel of six RDTs. The panel comprised two of each test type; one group was stored at room temperature and the other in an ECB. RDT results were evaluated against a consensus gold standard based on two double-read reference slides and PCR. The sensitivity, specificity and a measure of global performance for each test were determined and stratified by parasitaemia level and storage condition. Results In total, 306 patients were recruited, of which 284 were positive for P. vivax, one for Plasmodium malariae and none for Plasmodium falciparum; 21 were negative. All three RDTs were specific for malaria. The sensitivity and global performance index for each test were as follows: CSPfPan [98.6%, 95.1%], CSPfPv [91.9%, 90.5%] and SDBPfPv [96.5%, 82.9%], respectively. CSPfPv was 16% less sensitive to a parasitaemia below 5,000/?L. Room temperature storage of SDBPfPv led to a high proportion of invalid results (17%), which reduced to 10% in the ECB. Throughout the testing period, the ECB maintained ~8C reduction over ambient temperatures and never exceeded 30C. Conclusions Of the three RDTs, the CSPfPan test was the most consistent and reliable, rendering it appropriate for this P. vivax predominant region. The CSPfPv test proved unsuitable owing to its reduced sensitivity at a parasitaemia below 5,000/?L (affecting 43% of study samples). Although the SDBPfPv device was more sensitive than the CSPfPv test, its invalid rate was unacceptably high. ECB storage reduced the proportion of invalid results for the SDBPfPv test, but surprisingly had no impact on RDT sensitivity at low parasitaemia. PMID:21696587

  2. An allometric study of the frontal sinus in Gorilla, Pan and Pongo.

    PubMed

    Blaney, S P

    1986-01-01

    There is considerable speculation about the role and significance of the paranasal sinuses in the Hominoidea, and this study aims to present new data about an old problem from cephalograms of dried crania. Measurements of frontal sinus volumes were determined for Gorilla gorilla gorilla; G. gorilla beringei and Pan troglodytes. By adopting an allometric approach it was determined that the frontal sinus volume of Gorilla is relatively smaller than that of Pan, and that the frontal sinus of G. g. gorilla is relatively smaller than that of G. g. beringei. Frontal sinus volume scales in a positive allometric fashion relative to skull length. Since the slope is steeper for Pan, frontal sinus volume is increasing at a faster rate than in Gorilla. Sexual dimorphism in frontal sinus volume is present. Thirty crania of Pongo were investigated for evidence of pneumatization of the frontal bone. In no case was secondary invasion of the frontal bone by the maxillary antrum observed. In Gorilla, the nasal cavity volume scales isometrically with skull length. The scaling relationships discussed do not support any 'functional' role of the frontal sinus associated with nasal function but suggest a 'structural' role associated with craniofacial architecture. PMID:3583154

  3. Important pharmacophoric features of pan PPAR agonists: common chemical feature analysis and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-09-01

    HipHop program was used to generate a common chemical feature hypothesis for pan Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) agonists. The top scoring hypothesis (hypo-1) was found to differentiate the pan agonists (actives) from subtype-specific and dual PPAR agonists (inactives). The importance of individual features in hypo-1 was assessed by deleting a particular feature to generate a new hypothesis and observing its discriminating ability between 'actives' and 'inactives'. Deletion of aromatic features AR-1 (hypo-1b), AR-2 (hypo-1e) and a Hydrophobic feature HYD-1 (hypo-1c) individually did not affect the discriminating power of the hypo-1 significantly. However, deletion of a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor (HBA) feature (hypo-1f) in the hydrophobic tail group was found to be highly detrimental for the specificity of hypo-1 leading to high hit rate of 'inactives'. Since hypo-1 did not produce any useful hits from the database search, hypo-1b, hypo-1c and hypo-1e were used for virtual screening leading to the identification of new potential pan PPAR ligands. The docking studies were used to predict the binding pose of the proposed molecules in PPARgamma active site. PMID:19268404

  4. Volatile Composition of Comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathan; Gibb, Erika; Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    On 2014 May 22 and 24 we characterized the volatile composition of the dynamically new Oort Cloud comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) using the long-slit, high resolution (λ/Δλ ≈ 25,000) infared echelle spectrograph (NIRSPEC) at the 10m Keck 2 telescope on Maunakea, HI. We detected fluorescent emission from six primary species (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, and CO) and prompt emission from one product species (OH* - a directory proxy for H­2O). Upper limits were derived for C2H2 and H2CO. We report rotational temperatures, production rates, and mixing ratios (relative to water). Based on the inventory of comets characterized to date, mixing ratios of trace gases in C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) are about normal - CH3OH and C2H6 are slightly enriched, CO, CH4, HCN, and H2CO are average, and C­2H2 is depleted. I will discuss C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) in the context of an emerging taxonomy for comets based on volatile composition.This work is supported through the NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium and the National Science Foundation (NSF 1211362), the NASA Astrobiology Institute through a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology (811073.02.12.03.91), and the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program (811073.02.03.03.43).

  5. Simple, low cost, and highly stable Pd evaporation source for use in UHV

    SciTech Connect

    De Cooman, B.C.; Vook, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    The design of a source for the thermal evaporation of Pd from a resistively heated W filament in UHV is presented. The source's main advantages are its simplicity, low cost, long lifetime, and stability at low deposition rates.

  6. Pan Air Geometry Management System (PAGMS): A data-base management system for PAN AIR geometry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    A data-base management system called PAGMS was developed to facilitate the data transfer in applications computer programs that create, modify, plot or otherwise manipulate PAN AIR type geometry data in preparation for input to the PAN AIR system of computer programs. PAGMS is composed of a series of FORTRAN callable subroutines which can be accessed directly from applications programs. Currently only a NOS version of PAGMS has been developed.

  7. Qubit models of black hole evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several simple quantum mechanical toy models of black hole evaporation have appeared in the literature attempting to illuminate the black hole information paradox. We present a general class of models that is large enough to describe both unitary and nonunitary evaporation, and study a few specific examples to clarify some potential confusions regarding recent results. We also generalize Mathur's bound on small corrections to black hole dynamics. Conclusions are then drawn about the requirements for unitary evaporation of black holes in this class of models. We present a one-parameter family of models that continuously deforms nonunitary Hawking evaporation into a unitary process. The required deformation is large.

  8. Apparatus and method for evaporator defrosting

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Domitrovic, Ronald E.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for warm-liquid defrosting of the evaporator of a refrigeration system. The apparatus includes a first refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands refrigerant for cooling the evaporator, a second refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands the refrigerant after the refrigerant has passed through the evaporator, and a defrosting control for the first refrigerant expansion device and second refrigerant expansion device to selectively defrost the evaporator by causing warm refrigerant to flow through the evaporator. The apparatus is alternately embodied with a first refrigerant bypass and/or a second refrigerant bypass for selectively directing refrigerant to respectively bypass the first refrigerant expansion device and the second refrigerant expansion device, and with the defrosting control connected to the first refrigerant bypass and/or the second refrigerant bypass to selectively activate and deactivate the bypasses depending upon the current cycle of the refrigeration system. The apparatus alternately includes an accumulator for accumulating liquid and/or gaseous refrigerant that is then pumped either to a refrigerant receiver or the first refrigerant expansion device for enhanced evaporator defrosting capability. The inventive method of defrosting an evaporator in a refrigeration system includes the steps of compressing refrigerant in a compressor and cooling the refrigerant in the condenser such that the refrigerant is substantially in liquid form, passing the refrigerant substantially in liquid form through the evaporator, and expanding the refrigerant with a refrigerant expansion device after the refrigerant substantially passes through the evaporator.

  9. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Paul John; Miller, Bruce G.; Wincek, Ronald T.; Decker, Glenn E.; Johnson, David K.

    2009-04-07

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  10. Evaporative air conditioning in a manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.D.; Leach, J.W.; Terry, S.D.

    1999-08-01

    A case study evaluates the economics of installing a staged evaporative cooling system in a factory in the southeastern USA. The effective temperature at the plant floor is predicted for each working hour from typical meteorological year data. The analysis accounts for internal loads and moisture evaporated by the manufacturing process. Worker productivity is estimated from the effective temperature. Several building loads and evaporative cooling system designs are considered. The results show that evaporative air conditioning can improve worker productivity and profit margins in manufacturing facilities that have high internal loads, high ventilation requirements, or other plant-specific conditions that would make conventional air conditioning uneconomical.

  11. Sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to 100 years of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Ruud; Stagge, James; Tallaksen, Lena; Witte, Jan-Philip

    2015-04-01

    Evaporation from the vegetated surface is the largest loss term in many, if not the most, water balance studies on earth. As a consequence, an accurate representation of evaporation fluxes is required for appropriate quantification of surface runoff, the soil moisture budget, transpiration, recharge and groundwater processes. However, despite being a key component of the water balance, evaporation figures are usually associated with large uncertainties, as this term is difficult to measure or estimate by modeling. Many modeling frameworks have used the concept of potential evaporation, often estimated for different vegetation classes by multiplying the evaporation from a reference surface ('reference evaporation') with crop specific scaling factors ('crop factors'). Though this two-step potential evaporation approach undoubtedly has practical advantages, the empirical nature of both reference evaporation methods and crop factors limits its usability in extrapolations under non-stationary climatic conditions. We quantified the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates for different vegetation classes using the two-step approach when calibrated using a non-stationary climate. We used the past century's time series of observed climate, containing non-stationary signals of multi-decadal atmospheric oscillations, global warming, and global dimming/brightening, to evaluate the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to the choice and length of the calibration period. We show that using empirical coefficients outside their calibration range may lead to systematic differences between process-based and empirical reference evaporation methods, and systematic errors in estimated potential evaporation components. Our hydrological models are to varying extent regression models, which limits their general applicability, and the estimation of potential evaporation is closely linked to climate variability. With our analysis, we want to raise awareness and to provide a quantification of possible systematic errors that may be introduced in estimates of potential evaporation and in hydrological modeling studies due to straightforward application of i) the common two-step approach for potential evaporation specifically, and ii) fixed instead of time-variant model parameters in general. Quantification of errors provides a possibility to correct potential evaporation calculations and to rate them for their suitability to model climate conditions that differ significantly from the historical record, so-called no-analogue climate conditions.

  12. A simple technique for modulating the output of a cw e-beam evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.; Joshi, A.; Patel, K.; Chatterjee, U. K.

    1989-03-01

    Modulation of evaporation rate is desirable as it significantly increases the signal detection capability by making it possible to use phase sensitive techniques. An easy method for achieving modulation of evaporation rate via control of focus coil current is described. This method avoids the expense as well as complexities involved in doing the same by switching the e-gun acceleration voltage (>10 kV) or switching the grid bias on the e-gun (>2 kV).

  13. Rationale and design of the Pan-African Sudden Cardiac Death survey: the Pan-African SCD study

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Aimé; Bonny, Aimé; Ngantcha, Marcus; Ndongo Amougou, Sylvie; Kane, Adama; Marrakchi, Sonia; Okello, Emmy; Taty, Georges; Gehani, Abdulrrazzak; Diakite, Mamadou; Talle, Mohammed A; Lambiase, Pier D; Houenassi, Martin; Chin, Ashley; Otieno, Harun; Temu, Gloria; Koffi Owusu, Isaac; Karaye, Kamilu M; Awad, Abdalla AM; Gregers Winkel, Bo; Priori, Silvia G; Priori, Silvia G

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The estimated rate of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in Western countries ranges from 300 000 to 400 000 annually, which represents 0.36 to 1.28 per 1 000 inhabitants in Europe and the United States. The burden of SCD in Africa is unknown. Our aim is to assess the epidemiology of SCD in Africa. Methods The Pan-Africa SCD study is a prospective, multicentre, community-based registry monitoring all cases of cardiac arrest occurring in victims over 15 years old. We will use the definition of SCD as ‘witnessed natural death occurring within one hour of the onset of symptoms’ or ‘unwitnessed natural death within 24 hours of the onset of symptoms’. After appro val from institutional boards, we will record demographic, clinical, electrocardiographic and biological variables of SCD victims (including survivors of cardiac arrest) in several African cities. All deaths occurring in residents of districts of interest will be checked for past medical history, circumstances of death, and autopsy report (if possible). We will also analyse the employment of resuscitation attempts during the time frame of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in various patient populations throughout African countries. Conclusion This study will provide comprehensive, contemporary data on the epidemiology of SCD in Africa and will help in the development of strategies to prevent and manage cardiac arrest in this region of the world. PMID:25192301

  14. PEP725 Pan European Phenological Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Elisabeth; Adler, Silke; Ungersböck, Markus; Zach-Hermann, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Europe is in the fortunate situation that it has a long tradition in phenological networking: the history of collecting phenological data and using them in climatology has its starting point in 1751 when Carl von Linné outlined in his work Philosophia Botanica methods for compiling annual plant calendars of leaf opening, flowering, fruiting and leaf fall together with climatological observations "so as to show how areas differ". The Societas Meteorologicae Palatinae at Mannheim well known for its first European wide meteorological network also established a phenological network which was active from 1781 to 1792. Recently in most European countries, phenological observations have been carried out routinely for more than 50 years by different governmental and non governmental organisations and following different observation guidelines, the data stored at different places in different formats. This has been really hampering pan European studies, as one has to address many National Observations Programs (NOP) to get access to the data before one can start to bring them in a uniform style. From 2004 to 2005 the COST-action 725 was running with the main objective to establish a European reference data set of phenological observations that can be used for climatological purposes, especially climate monitoring, and detection of changes. So far the common database/reference data set of COST725 comprises 7687248 data from 7285 observation sites in 15 countries and International Phenological Gardens (IPG) spanning the timeframe from 1951 to 2000. ZAMG is hosting the database. In January 2010 PEP725 has started and will take over not only the part of maintaining, updating the database, but also to bring in phenological data from the time before 1951, developing better quality checking procedures and ensuring an open access to the database. An attractive webpage will make phenology and climate impacts on vegetation more visible in the public enabling a monitoring of vegetation development.

  15. PEP725 Pan European Phenological Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, E.; Adler, S.; Lipa, W.; Ungersböck, M.; Zach-Hermann, S.

    2010-09-01

    Europe is in the fortunate situation that it has a long tradition in phenological networking: the history of collecting phenological data and using them in climatology has its starting point in 1751 when Carl von Linné outlined in his work Philosophia Botanica methods for compiling annual plant calendars of leaf opening, flowering, fruiting and leaf fall together with climatological observations "so as to show how areas differ". Recently in most European countries, phenological observations have been carried out routinely for more than 50 years by different governmental and non governmental organisations and following different observation guidelines, the data stored at different places in different formats. This has been really hampering pan European studies as one has to address many network operators to get access to the data before one can start to bring them in a uniform style. From 2004 to 2009 the COST-action 725 established a European wide data set of phenological observations. But the deliverables of this COST action was not only the common phenological database and common observation guidelines - COST725 helped to trigger a revival of some old networks and to establish new ones as for instance in Sweden. At the end of 2009 the COST action the database comprised about 8 million data in total from 15 European countries plus the data from the International Phenological Gardens IPG. In January 2010 PEP725 began its work as follow up project with funding from EUMETNET the network of European meteorological services and of ZAMG the Austrian national meteorological service. PEP725 not only will take over the part of maintaining, updating the COST725 database, but also to bring in phenological data from the time before 1951, developing better quality checking procedures and ensuring an open access to the database. An attractive webpage will make phenology and climate impacts on vegetation more visible in the public enabling a monitoring of vegetation development.

  16. PEP725 Pan European Phenological Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, E.; Lipa, W.; Ungersböck, M.; Zach-Hermann, S.

    2012-04-01

    PEP725 is a 5 years project with the main object to promote and facilitate phenological research by delivering a pan European phenological database with an open, unrestricted data access for science, research and education. PEP725 is funded by EUMETNET (the network of European meteorological services), ZAMG and the Austrian ministry for science & research bm:w_f. So far 16 European national meteorological services and 7 partners from different nati-onal phenological network operators have joined PEP725. The data access is very easy via web-access from the homepage www.pep725.eu. Ha-ving accepted the PEP725 data policy and registry the data download can be done by different criteria as for instance the selection of a specific plant or all data from one country. At present more than 300 000 new records are available in the PEP725 data-base coming from 31 European countries and from 8150 stations. For some more sta-tions (154) META data (location and data holder) are provided. Links to the network operators and data owners are also on the webpage in case you have more sophisticated questions about the data. Another objective of PEP725 is to bring together network-operators and scientists by organizing workshops. In April 2012 the second of these workshops will take place on the premises of ZAMG. Invited speakers will give presentations spanning the whole study area of phenology starting from observations to modelling. Quality checking is also a big issue. At the moment we study the literature to find ap-propriate methods.

  17. Evaluating evaporation from field crops using airborne radiometry and ground-based meteorological data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, R. D.; Moran, M.S.; Gay, L.W.; Raymond, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne measurements of reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation were combined with ground-based measurements of incoming solar radiation, air temperature, windspeed, and vapor pressure to calculate instantaneous evaporation (LE) rates using a form of the Penman equation. Estimates of evaporation over cotton, wheat, and alfalfa fields were obtained on 5 days during a one-year period. A Bowen ratio apparatus, employed simultaneously, provided ground-based measurements of evaporation. Comparison of the airborne and ground techniques showed good agreement, with the greatest difference being about 12% for the instantaneous values. Estimates of daily (24 h) evaporation were made from the instantaneous data. On three of the five days, the difference between the two techniques was less than 8%, with the greatest difference being 25%. The results demonstrate that airborne remote sensing techniques can be used to obtain spatially distributed values of evaporation over agricultural fields. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Charge separation at evaporation and vapor growth of ice and water

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.

    2008-11-15

    A mathematical model of the interface charging at evaporation and growth of ice and water phases from vapor is proposed. This model takes into account the competition between the two mechanisms of charge separation, one of which is based on protons and the other involves orientational defects. The first mechanism leads to the accumulation of a positive charge by ice and water during evaporation, while the second one provides negative charge accumulation. The protonic mechanism dominates at low velocities of the evaporation front with respect to the condensed phase material (lower than 10{sup -11}-10{sup -9} m/s). At high rates, the mechanism based on orientational defects is dominant. When vapor is condensed, and, correspondingly, the ice and water phases grow, the charge polarity is opposite to the polarity in the case of evaporation. The proposed model adequately describes the experimentally observed interface electric current and the signs of phase charges during evaporation and condensation.

  19. Ultrasonic monitoring of droplets' evaporation: Application to human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Laux, D; Ferrandis, J Y; Brutin, D

    2016-09-01

    During a colloidal droplet evaporation, a sol-gel transition can be observed and is described by the desiccation time τD and the gelation time τG. These characteristic times, which can be linked to viscoelastic properties of the droplet and to its composition, are classically rated by analysis of mass droplet evolution during evaporation. Even if monitoring mass evolution versus time seems straightforward, this approach is very sensitive to environmental conditions (vibrations, air flow…) as mass has to be evaluated very accurately using ultra-sensitive weighing scales. In this study we investigated the potentialities of ultrasonic shear reflectometry to assess τD and τG in a simple and reliable manner. In order to validate this approach, our study has focused on blood droplets evaporation on which a great deal of work has recently been published. Desiccation and gelation times measured with shear ultrasonic reflectometry have been perfectly correlated to values obtained from mass versus time analysis. This ultrasonic method which is not very sensitive to environmental perturbations is therefore very interesting to monitor the drying of blood droplets in a simple manner and is more generally suitable for complex fluid droplets evaporation investigation. PMID:27150753

  20. The structure of evaporating and combusting sprays: Measurements and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of particle-laden jets and nonevaporating and evaporating sprays was measured in order to evaluate models of these processes. Three models are being evaluated: (1) a locally homogeneous flow model, where slip between the phases is neglected and the flow is assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium; (2) a deterministic separated flow model, where slip and finite interphase transport rates are considered but effects of particle/drop dispersion by turbulence and effects of turbulence on interphase transport rates are ignored; and (3) a stochastic separated flow model, where effects of interphase slip, turbulent dispersion and turbulent fluctuations are considered using random sampling for turbulence properties in conjunction with random-walk computations for particle motion. All three models use a k-e-g turbulence model. All testing and data reduction are completed for the particle laden jets. Mean and fluctuating velocities of the continuous phase and mean mixture fraction were measured in the evaporating sprays.