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Sample records for pancreas imaging findings

  1. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  2. Pancreas transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It functions to produce digestive enzymes which are delivered to ... of the most important hormones produced by the pancreas is insulin. Insulin is produced by specialized cells ...

  3. Clinical imaging of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    May, G.; Gardiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Featuring more than 300 high-quality radiographs and scan images, clinical imaging of the pancreas systematically reviews all appropriate imaging modalities for diagnosing and evaluating a variety of commonly encountered pancreatic disorders. After presenting a succinct overview of pancreatic embryology, anatomy, and physiology, the authors establish the clinical indications-including postoperative patient evaluation-for radiologic examination of the pancreas. The diagnostic capabilities and limitations of currently available imaging techniques for the pancreas are thoroughly assessed, with carefully selected illustrations depicting the types of images and data obtained using these different techniques. The review of acute and chronic pancreatitis considers the clinical features and possible complications of their variant forms and offers guidance in selecting appropriate imaging studies.

  4. US Findings in Patients at Risk for Pancreas Transplant Failure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Tara A; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Harbell, Jack; Kornak, John; Stock, Peter G; Feldstein, Vickie A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine if ultrasonographic (US) findings, including Doppler US findings, are associated with subsequent pancreas transplant failure. Materials and Methods A cohort of adult patients who underwent pancreas transplantation at a tertiary institution over the course of 10 years (from 2003 to 2012) was retrospectively evaluated for failure, which was defined as return to insulin therapy or surgical graft removal. The institutional review board provided a waiver of informed consent. All US images obtained within the 1st postoperative year were reviewed for three findings: arterial flow (presence or absence of intraparenchymal forward diastole flow), splenic vein thrombus, and edema. These findings were correlated with pancreas graft failure within 1-year after surgery by using Cox proportional hazards models and hazard ratios. Results A total of 228 transplants were included (mean patient age, 41.6 years; range, 19-57 years; 122 men, 106 women). Absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow was identified in nine of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 45%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23, 68) and in 15 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 93% [193 of 208]; 95% CI: 89, 96). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 6.2 (95% CI: 3.1, 12.4). Splenic vein thrombus was identified in 10 of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 50%; 95% CI: 27, 73) and in 25 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 88% [183 of 208]; 95% CI: 83, 92). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.4, 7.4). Edema had the lowest specificity (Cox proportional hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.9). In the multivariate analysis, only absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow remained significantly associated with transplant failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.6; 95% CI: 1.0, 12.8; P = .045). Conclusion Absent or reversed diastolic arterial Doppler flow has a stronger association with transplant failure than does splenic vein thrombus or edema. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26807892

  5. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  6. Microendoscopes for imaging of the pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Angelique L.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Kroto, Shona M.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2004-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have a 5-year survival rate of only 3%. Endoscopic imaging of the pancreas is limited by the small size of the pancreatic duct, which has an average size of 3 mm. To improve imaging capabilities for the pancreatic duct, two small catheter-based imaging systems have been developed that will fit through the therapeutic channel of a clinical endoscope and into the pancreatic duct. One is a miniature endoscope designed to provide macro-imaging of tissue with both white light reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. The 1.75 mm diameter catheter consists of separate illumination and imaging channels. At a nominal focal distance of 10 mm, the field of view of the system is ~ 10 mm, and the corresponding in-plane resolution is 60 microns. To complement the broadfield view of the tissue, a confocal microendoscope with 2 micron lateral resolution over a field of view of 450 microns and 25 micron axial resolution has been developed. With an outer diameter of 3 mm, the catheter in this system will also fit through the therapeutic channel and into the pancreatic duct. Images of tissue with both the miniature endoscope and confocal microendoscope are presented.

  7. Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Prentice, M A; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Even though pancreas transplant numbers have steadily declined over the past decade, new listings increased in 2014 compared with the previous year, notably for pancreas transplant alone (PTA) and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant. The number of new PTAs also increased over the past two years. Whether this is a sustainable trend remains to be seen. Significant events in 2014 included implementation of a new pancreas allocation system and development of a proposed uniform definition of pancreas graft failure. Meanwhile, overall pancreas transplant rates and outcomes continued to improve. Substantial decline in pancreas after kidney transplants remains a serious concern. SRTR has not published pancreas graft failure data in the program-specific reports for the past two years. While this will not change in the near future, the acceptance of a uniform definition of graft failure is a crucial first step toward resuming graft failure reporting. Continued improvements and innovation, both surgical and immunological, will be critical to keep pancreas transplant as a viable option for treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. As alternative therapies for diabetes such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas are evolving, improved outcomes with minimizations of complications are more important than ever. PMID:26755263

  8. Imaging of Pancreas Transplantation and Its Complications.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ryan B; Moshiri, Mariam; Osman, Sherif; Menias, Christine O; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-03-01

    Whole pancreas transplantation is an effective treatment for obtaining euglycemic status in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and is usually performed concurrent with renal transplantation in the affected patient. This article discusses complex surgical anatomical details of pancreas transplantation including surgical options for endocrine and exocrine drainage pathways. It then describes several possible complications related to surgical factors in the immediate post operative period followed by other complications related to systemic issues, vasculature, and the pancreatic parenchyma. PMID:26896223

  9. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cells, where it can be used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas ... and kidney for the rest of your life. Alternative Names Transplant - pancreas; Transplantation - pancreas Images Endocrine glands ...

  10. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  11. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support. PMID:23471751

  13. Pancreas-Targeted NIR Fluorophores for Dual-Channel Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hyun, Hoon; Vargas, Christina; Gravier, Julien; Park, GwangLi; Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V.; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pancreas-related complications are some of the most serious ones in abdominal surgery. The goal of this study was to develop and validate novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores that would enable real-time pancreas imaging to avoid the intraoperative pancreatic injury. Design: After initial screening of a large NIR fluorophore library, the performance of 3 selected pancreas-targeted 700 nm NIR fluorophores, T700-H, T700-F, and MB, were quantified in mice, rats, and pigs. Dose ranging using 25 and 100 nmol, and 2.5 µmol of T700-F, and its imaging kinetics over a 4 h period were tested in each species. Three different 800 nm NIR fluorophores were employed for dual-channel FLARE™ imaging in pigs: 2 μmol of ZW800-1 for vessels and kidney, 1 μmol of ZW800-3C for lymph nodes, and 2 μmol of ESNF31 for adrenal glands. Results: T700-F demonstrated the highest signal to background ratio (SBR), with peak SBR at 4 h postinjection in mice. In pigs, T700-F produced an SBR ≥ 2 against muscle, spleen, and lymph nodes for up to 8 h after a single intravenous injection. The combination of T700-F with each 800 nm NIR fluorophore provided simultaneous dual-channel intraoperative imaging of pancreas with surrounding organs in real time. Conclusion: Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores combined with the FLARE dual-channel imaging system enable the real-time intraoperative pancreas imaging which helps surgeons perform safer and more curative abdominal surgeries. PMID:25553094

  14. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm-16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6-49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image. PMID:27610132

  15. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm–16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6–49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image. PMID:27610132

  16. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. PMID:20155272

  17. In vivo imaging of VMAT2 in pancreas using a 18F epoxide derivative of tetrabenazine

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hank F.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhi-Ping; Oya, Shunichi; Kung, Mei-Ping; Choi, Seok Rye; Poessl, Karl; Blankemeyer, Eric; Hou, Catherine; Skovronsky, Daniel; Kilbourn, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Development of imaging agents for pancreatic beta cell mass may provide tools for studying insulin-secreting beta cells and their relationship with diabetes mellitus. In this paper a new imaging agent, [18F](+)-2-oxiranyl-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-2,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[2,1-a]isoquinoline [18F](+)4, which displays properties targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) binding sites of beta cells in the pancreas, was evaluated as a PET (positron emission tomography) agent for estimating beta cell mass in vivo. The hydrolyzable epoxide group of (+)4 may provide a mechanism for shifting biodistribution from liver to kidney thus, reducing the background signal. Methods Both 18F and 19F labeled (+) and (−) isomers of 4 were synthesized and evaluated. Organ distribution was carried out in normal rats. Uptake of [18F](+)4 in pancreas of normal rats was measured and correlated with blocking studies using competing drugs, (+)dihydrotetrabenazine, (+)-DTBZ or 9-fluoropropyl-(+)dihydro tetrabenazine (FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2). Results In vitro binding study of VMAT2 using rat brain striatum showed a Ki value of 0.08 and 0.15 nM for the (+)4 and (±)4, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution of [18F](+)4 in rats showed the highest uptake in the pancreas (2.68 %ID/g at 60 min post-injection). In vivo competition experiments with cold FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2, (3.5 mg/kg, 5 min iv pretreatment) led to a significant reduction of pancreas uptake (85 % blockade at 60 min). The inactive isomer [18F](−)4 showed significantly lower pancreas uptake (0.22 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection). Animal PET imaging studies of [18F](+)4 in normal rats demonstrated an avid pancreatic uptake in rats. Conclusion The preliminary results suggest that the epoxide, [18F](+)4, is highly selective in binding to VMAT2 and it has an excellent uptake in the pancreas of rats. The liver uptake was significantly reduced through the use of the epoxide group. Therefore, it

  18. MR imaging findings of endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Cornelius, Rebecca; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Golnik, Karl; Morales, Humberto

    2016-04-01

    Endophthalmitis is a sight-threatening ophthalmologic emergency. The clinical diagnosis is often challenging, and delayed diagnosis may exacerbate the poor visual prognosis. B-scan ultrasonography or spectral domain optical coherence tomography are imaging aids at the clinician's office. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and particularly MRI can also help in the assessment of disease extent or complications. MR imaging findings are rarely described in the literature. Here, we discuss the spectrum of imaging findings of endophthalmitis and correlate them with key anatomic and pathophysiologic details of the globe. Early disease is often subtle on MR imaging with thick uveal enhancement, while advanced disease demonstrates retinal/choroidal detachment, vitreal exudates and peribulbar inflammation. Other noninfectious inflammatory diseases of the globe can show similar findings; however, MR diffusion-weighted images help identify infectious exudates and evaluate response to therapy. Knowledge of the spectrum of imaging findings of this disease is important for radiologists and help in the management decision process. PMID:26915896

  19. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Endocrinology: Imaging of the Adrenals and the Endocrine Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kann, Peter Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging of adrenal glands and its application to diagnostic procedures of adrenal diseases has been reported since 1998. It can be considered a relevant advantage in the field of adrenal diseases. Indeed, EUS allows the detection of adrenal lesions (even very small ones) and their characterization, the assessment of malignancy criteria, the early detection of neoplastic recurrences, the preoperative identification of morphologically healthy parts of the glands, the differentiation of extra-adrenal from adrenal tumors, and of the pathological entities associated with adrenal insufficiency, and the fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) of suspicious lesions. At the same time, its clinical relevance depends on the experience of the endosonographer. Moreover, EUS is also by far the best and most sensitive imaging technique to detect and assess the follow-up of pancreatic manifestation of MEN1 disease. It furthermore enables the preoperatively localization of insulinomas and critical structures in their neighborhood, and may be relevant in planning surgical strategy. A positive EUS in a case of insulinoma furthermore confirms the endocrine diagnosis, especially considering the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia factitia by oral antidiabetics. It can be supplemented by EUS-FNA. Again, it has to be considered that EUS may reveal false positive and false negative results, and the quality of the findings largely depends on the endosonographer's skills and experience. The most important technical details together with the advantages and limitations of EUS, and the pathognomonic characteristic of benign and malignant disorders of the adrenals and pancreas are presented here. PMID:27003412

  20. Distinct patterns of peritumoral histological findings in subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Michihiro; Imada, Hiroki; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Maetani, Iruru; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2015-10-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are primary pancreatic neoplasms that can act as precursors to invasive adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The peritumoral stroma has been increasingly recognized to play an important role in many types of tumors. Therefore, to investigate the clinicopathological significance of the peritumoral stroma in IPMNs, we examined the histological features of the peritumoral stroma in each subtype and histological grade of IPMNs. Eighty-two patients with IPMN, who underwent surgical resection, were reviewed clinicopathologically. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (86 lesions in total) were histologically subclassified into gastric (n = 51), intestinal (n = 22), pancreatobiliary (n = 11), and oncocytic (n = 2) subtypes. Peritumoral histological features between the gastric and intestinal subtypes were evaluated by each histological grade. The results showed that subepithelial edema and inflammatory cell infiltration were more commonly observed in the gastric subtype (74% and 79%, respectively) than in the intestinal subtype (12% and 25%, respectively) of low-grade IPMNs. On the other hand, mucus lakes were more commonly observed in the intestinal subtype (100%) than in the gastric subtype (0%) of high-grade IPMNs. In addition, pancreatobiliary subtype IPMNs tended to exhibit acute inflammation such as neutrophil predominance. This study showed that peritumoral histological features differed among subtypes of IPMNs from low-grade tumors. These differences suggest the possibility that each subtype of IPMNs has a distinct mechanism from an early stage of tumor progression, which is reflected in the properties of the peritumoral stroma. PMID:26265194

  1. Imaging Findings of Congestive Hepatopathy.

    PubMed

    Wells, Michael L; Fenstad, Eric R; Poterucha, Joseph T; Hough, David M; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-01-01

    Congestive hepatopathy (CH) refers to hepatic abnormalities that result from passive hepatic venous congestion. Prolonged exposure to elevated hepatic venous pressure may lead to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Liver dysfunction and corresponding clinical signs and symptoms typically manifest late in the disease process. Recognition of CH at imaging is critical because advanced liver fibrosis may develop before the condition is suspected clinically. Characteristic findings of CH on conventional images include dilatation of the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins; retrograde hepatic venous opacification during the early bolus phase of intravenous contrast material injection; and a predominantly peripheral heterogeneous pattern of hepatic enhancement due to stagnant blood flow. Extensive fibrosis can be seen in chronic or severe cases. Hyperenhancing regenerative nodules that may retain hepatobiliary contrast agents are often present. Magnetic resonance (MR) elastography can show elevated liver stiffness and may be useful in evaluation of fibrosis in CH because it can be incorporated easily into routine cardiac MR imaging. Preliminary experience with MR elastography suggests its future use in initial evaluation of patients suspected of having CH, for monitoring of disease, and for assessment after therapy. To facilitate appropriate workup and treatment, radiologists should be familiar with findings suggestive of CH at radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, MR imaging, and MR elastography. In addition, knowledge of underlying pathophysiology, comparative histologic abnormalities, and extrahepatic manifestations is useful to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and suggest appropriate additional diagnostic testing. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27284758

  2. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  3. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreas from a donor into a person with diabetes. Pancreas transplants give the person a chance to ... used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough, or sometimes ...

  4. Development of gamma emitting receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Final technical progress report, March 1, 1988--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This document give paragraph synopses of results in research on brain and pancreas imaging, using radiotracers. General catagories of research included chemistry, pharmacology, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling. A list of publications is included

  5. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  6. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  7. "Biliary Diseases with Pancreatic Counterparts": Cross-sectional Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Flaherty, Erin M; Dasyam, Anil K; Menias, Christine O; Riddle, Nicole D; Lath, Narayan; Kozaka, Kazuto; Matsui, Osamu; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the similarities in the histopathologic findings and the clinical-biologic behaviors of select biliary and pancreatic conditions, a new disease concept, "biliary diseases with pancreatic counterparts," has been proposed. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic pathologic conditions of the biliary tract have their counterparts in the pancreas. Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing cholangitis is the biliary manifestation of IgG4-related sclerosing disease, and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is its pancreatic counterpart. People with chronic alcoholism can develop peribiliary cysts and fibrosis as well as pancreatic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis simultaneously. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and mucinous cystic neoplasm are considered pancreatic counterparts for the biliary neoplasms of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract, and hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, respectively. The anatomic proximity of the biliary tract and the pancreas, the nearly simultaneous development of both organs from the endoderm of the foregut, and the presence of pancreatic exocrine acini within the peribiliary glands surrounding the extrahepatic bile ducts are suggested as causative factors for these similarities. Interestingly, these diseases show "nearly" identical findings at cross-sectional imaging, an observation that further supports this new disease concept. New information obtained with regard to biliary diseases can be used for evaluation of pancreatic abnormalities, and vice versa. In addition, combined genetic and molecular studies may be performed to develop novel therapeutic targets. For both biliary and pancreatic diseases, imaging plays a pivotal role in initial diagnosis, evaluation of treatment response, efficacy testing of novel drugs, and long-term surveillance. PMID:26824512

  8. Magnetic resonance image-guided photodynamic therapy of xenograft pancreas tumors with verteporfin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer generally has very poor prognosis, with less than 4% survival at 5 years after diagnosis. This dismal survival rate is in part due to the aggressive nature of the adenocarcinoma, leading to a late-stage at diagnosis and exhibits resistance to most therapies. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a model cellular and vascular therapy agent, which uses light activation of the delivered drug to photosensitize the local cellular millieu. We suggest that interstitial verteporfin (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A) PDT has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy to the commonly used Gemcitabine chemotherapy. In the current study, an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (Panc-1) has undergone interstitial verteporfin PDT (40 J/cm with verteporfin and 40 J/cm without verteporfin). Prior to PDT, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to determine the location and size of the tumor within the pancreas, allowing accurate placement of the diffusing fiber. The success of therapy was monitored in vivo by assessing the total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes 24 hours pre- and 48 hours post-PDT. Total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes were determined using T2 weighted (T2W) and Gd-DTPA difference T1 weighted (T1W) turbo spin echo (TSE) MR imaging sequences, respectively. The validity of the in vivo imaging for therapeutic response was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and histological staining of frozen tissue sections. The ex vivo DiOC7(3) fluorescence analysis correlates well with the information provided from the MR images, indicating that MR imaging will be a successful surrogate marker for interstitial PDT.

  9. Annular pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  10. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  11. Polycystic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, Amey D; Amarapurkar, Deepak N; Amarapurkar, Anjali D

    2016-04-01

    Polycystic disease of the pancreas is a very rare entity with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a symptomatic case of polycystic pancreas associated with pheochromocytoma that was treated surgically. PMID:27144204

  12. Polycystic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Amarapurkar, Deepak N.; Amarapurkar, Anjali D.

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic disease of the pancreas is a very rare entity with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a symptomatic case of polycystic pancreas associated with pheochromocytoma that was treated surgically. PMID:27144204

  13. Early findings of prospective anti-HLA donor specific antibodies monitoring study in pancreas transplantation: Indiana University Health Experience.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Muhammad A; Fridell, Jonathan A; Higgins, Nancy; Sharfuddin, Asif A; Yaqub, Muhammad S; Kandula, Praveen; Chen, Jeanne; Mishler, Dennis P; Lobashevsky, Andrew; Book, Benita; Powelson, John; Taber, Tim E

    2012-01-01

    The significance of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) is not well known in the setting of pancreas transplantation. Since December 2009, we prospectively followed pancreas transplant patients with single-antigen-luminex-bead testing at one, two, three, six, and then every six months for the first two yr. Thirty-five of the 92 patients that underwent pancreas transplantation (13 pancreas-alone [PTA], 20 with a kidney [SPK], and two after a kidney [PAK]) agreed to participate in study. Median age at transplant was 45 yr and follow-up was 23 months. Majority were Caucasian (n = 33) and male (n = 18). Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin induction was used. Median HLA-mismatch was 4.2 ± 1.1. Eight patients (7SPK, 1PAK) developed post-transplant DSA at median follow-up of 76 d (26-119), 1 SPK had pre-formed DSA. Seven patients had both class I and class II DSA, one with class I and one with class II only. Mean peak class I DSA-MFI was 3529 (±1456); class II DSA-MFI was 5734 (±3204) whereas cumulative DSA MFI (CI + CII) was 9264 (±4233). No difference was observed in the patient and donor demographics among patients with and without DSA. One patient in non-DSA group developed acute cellular rejection of pancreas. From our data it appears that post-transplant DSA in pancreas allograft recipients may not impact the early-pancreatic allograft outcomes. The utility of prospective DSA monitoring in pancreatic transplant patients needs further evaluation and long-term follow-up. PMID:22938159

  14. Association of body mass index and risk of death from pancreas cancer in Asians: findings from the Asia Cohort Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingsong; Fu, Rong; Grant, Eric; Chen, Yu; Lee, Jung Eun; Gupta, Prakash C; Ramadas, Kunnambath; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ozasa, Kotaro; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kakizaki, Masako; Tanaka, Hideo; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yoo, Keun-Young; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Ahsan, Habibul; Pednekar, Mangesh S; Sauvaget, Catherine; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yang, Gong; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Ohishi, Waka; Watanabe, Takashi; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Matsuo, Keitaro; You, San-Lin; Park, Sue K; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Parvez, Faruque; Rolland, Betsy; McLerran, Dale; Sinha, Rashmi; Boffetta, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Thornquist, Mark; Feng, Ziding; Kang, Daehee; Potter, John D

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. The data for this pooled analysis included 883 529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5-19.9, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥ 30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5-24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and a history of diabetes. We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to the risk of mortality in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and a history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI less than 18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; hazard ratio=2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.00) (P for interaction=0.07). The data do not support an association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations. PMID:23044748

  15. Association of body mass index and risk of death from pancreas cancer in Asians: findings from the Asia Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingsong; Fu, Rong; Grant, Eric; Chen, Yu; Lee, Jung Eun; Gupta, Prakashi C.; Ramadas, Kunnambath; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ozasa, Kotaro; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kakizaki, Masako; Tanaka, Hideo; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yoo, Keun-Young; Ahn, Yoon-OK; Ahsan, Habibul; Pednekar, Mangesh S.; Sauvaget, Catherine; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yang, Gong; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Ohishi, Waka; Watanabe, Takashi; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; You, San-Lin; Park, Sue K.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Parvez, Faruque; Rolland, Betsy; McLerran, Dale; Sinha, Rashmi; Boffetta, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Thornquist, Mark; Feng, Ziding; Kang, Daehee; Potter, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. Methods The data for this pooled-analysis included 883,529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5–19.9, 20.0–22.4, 22.5–24.9, 25.0–27.4, 27.5–29.9, ≥30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5–24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and history of diabetes. Results We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to mortality risk in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI<18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; HR = 2.01(95%CI: 1.01–4.00) (p for interaction=0.07). Conclusion The data do not support an association between BMI and risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations. PMID:23044748

  16. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreas Function of the Pancreas What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a long flattened gland located ... controller of blood sugar levels. Where is the pancreas? The pancreas is located deep in the abdomen. ...

  17. Imaging findings of mimickers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunchae; Jang, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC in high-risk patients by typical imaging findings alone is widely adopted in major practice guidelines for HCC. While imaging techniques have markedly improved in detecting small liver lesions, they often detect incidental benign liver lesions and non-hepatocellular malignancy that can be misdiagnosed as HCC. The most common mimicker of HCC in cirrhotic liver is nontumorous arterioportal shunts that are seen as focal hypervascular liver lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging. Rapidly enhancing hemangiomas can be easily misdiagnosed as HCC especially on MR imaging with liver-specific contrast agent. Focal inflammatory liver lesions mimic HCC by demonstrating arterial-phase hypervascularity and subsequent washout on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. It is important to recognize the suggestive imaging findings for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC) as the management of CC is largely different from that of HCC. There are other benign mimickers of HCC such as angiomyolipomas and focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules. Recognition of their typical imaging findings can reduce false-positive HCC diagnosis. PMID:26770920

  18. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    ... to form the pancreas. Each part has a tube, called a duct. When the parts join together, a final duct, called the pancreatic duct, is formed. Fluid and digestive juices (enzymes) produced by the pancreas normally flow through this duct. If the ducts do not ...

  19. Deconstructing Pancreas Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Cecil M.; Goodyer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless nature and increasing prevalence of human pancreatic diseases, in particular, diabetes mellitus and adenocarcinoma, has motivated further understanding of pancreas organogenesis. The pancreas is a multifunctional organ whose epithelial cells govern a diversity of physiologically vital endocrine and exocrine functions. The mechanisms governing the birth, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, maturation, and maintenance of the endocrine and exocrine components in the pancreas have been discovered recently with increasing tempo. This includes recent studies unveiling mechanisms permitting unexpected flexibility in the developmental potential of immature and mature pancreatic cell subsets, including the ability to interconvert fates. In this article, we describe how classical cell biology, genetic analysis, lineage tracing, and embryological investigations are being complemented by powerful modern methods including epigenetic analysis, time-lapse imaging, and flow cytometry-based cell purification to dissect fundamental processes of pancreas development. PMID:22587935

  20. SU-E-J-226: Propagation of Pancreas Target Contours On Respiratory Correlated CT Images Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.

  1. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  2. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor. PMID:20616180

  3. Imaging findings in patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Guermazi, A; de Kerviler, E; Cazals-Hatem, D; Zagdanski, A M; Frija, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the wide range of radiological abnormalities in myelofibrosis. Myelofibrosis, also called myeloid metaplasia, is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. The common imaging findings in patients with myelofibrosis are osteosclerosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and lymphadenopathies. In addition, extramedullary hematopoiesis may develop in multiple sites such as chest, abdomen, pelvis, and central nervous system, simulating malignant disease. Selected plain-film, CT, and MR images in patients with myelofibrosis are shown as pictorial essay to allow ready recognition of the most common imaging abnormalities of the disease. PMID:10460376

  4. Insulin-like genes in ascidians: findings in Ciona and hypotheses on the evolutionary origins of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin plays an extensively characterized role in the control of sugar metabolism, growth and homeostasis in a wide range of organisms. In vertebrate chordates, insulin is mainly produced by the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas, while in non-chordate animals insulin-producing cells are mainly found in the nervous system and/or scattered along the digestive tract. However, recent studies have indicated the notochord, the defining feature of the chordate phylum, as an additional site of expression of insulin-like peptides. Here we show that two of the three insulin-like genes identified in Ciona intestinalis, an invertebrate chordate with a dual life cycle, are first expressed in the developing notochord during embryogenesis and transition to distinct areas of the adult digestive tract after metamorphosis. In addition, we present data suggesting that the transcription factor Ciona Brachyury is involved in the control of notochord expression of at least one of these genes, Ciona insulin-like 2. Lastly, we review the information currently available on insulin-producing cells in ascidians and on pancreas-related transcription factors that might control their expression. PMID:25378051

  5. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  6. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  7. Organ Facts: Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Pancreas Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Pancreas Facts The pancreas is a five to six inch ...

  8. Pneumoconiosis: Comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.; Lee, K.S.; Chung, M.J.; Han, J.H.; Kwon, O.J.; Kim, T.S.

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  9. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Semin Chong; Kyung Soo Lee; Myung Jin Chung; Joungho Han; O. Jung Kwon; d Tae Sung Kim

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  10. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  11. Imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Ghadirpour, Ali; Ataie-Oskuie, Reza; Kontzialis, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl was referred to a dentist complaining of parageusia, bad taste in the mouth, which started 9 months ago. Panoramic X-ray and non-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple bilateral unilocular cysts in the mandible and maxilla, along with calcification of anterior part of the falx cerebri. She was eventually diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome based on imaging and histopathologic finding of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:25610614

  12. Intraosseous Lipoma of the Femor: Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Hadi Rokni; Rasouli, Bahman; Borhani, Ali; Noorollahi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous lipoma is a rare benign bone disease. Long and cancellous bones are the most locationsthat can be affected. Almost all lesions were discovered incidentally on imaging modalities that were done during an unrelated investigation. As it is rare, it may be mistaken for nonossifying fibroma, aneurismal bone cyst, simple bone cyst, bone infarct or chondroid tumors. Recently with the high quality imaging modalities such as CT scan and/or MR imaging, the diagnosis of intramedullary lipoma and some other bone lesions can be done without the need for bone biopsy and surgery. Case Report: We’re reporting a rare case of intraosseous lipoma of the distal femur. Plain film radiography showed barely visible medullary expansion and lucency in the distal left femoral diaphysis. The patient underwent further evaluation with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI). According to the MRI and CT scan findings, intraosseous lipoma was confirmed and the need for more diagnostic tests were eliminated. Conclusion: Although Intraosseous lipoma doesn’t have any manifestations clinically but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone pains. MRI has an important role in characterization of soft tissue and bone marrow lesions therefore non-surgical approach for most of the patients with intraosseous lipoma would be beneficial. PMID:27298943

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of intramammary metastases.

    PubMed

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Herzog, Aimee; Kinner, Sonja; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of intramammary metastases (IM). We identified 8 cases with IM, which were investigated by breast MRI (1.5T). In every case, the diagnosis of IM was proven histopathologically on breast biopsy specimens. Overall, 187 IM were identified. IM had inconsistent MRI features, which cannot be clearly classify as benign or malignant. IM should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of breast lesions to avoid possible misinterpretations. PMID:27133668

  14. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: Gadofluorine P and Gd-DOTA

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye Rim; Lee, Youkyung; Doble, Philip; Bishop, David; Hare, Dominic; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Choi, Seung Hong; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the performance of Gadofluorine P-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the diagnosis of diabetes in a streptozotocin (STZ) -induced diabetic rat model. METHODS: Fischer 344 rats were treated with STZ. Rats not treated with STZ served as controls. T1-weighted MRI was performed using a 3T scanner before and after the injection of Gd-DOTA or Gadofluorine P (6 diabetic rats, 5 controls). The normalized signal intensity (SI) and the enhancement ratio (ER) of the pancreas were measured at each time point, and the values were compared between the normal and diabetic rats using the Mann-Whitney test. In addition, the values were correlated with the mean islet number. Optimal cut-off values were calculated using a positive test based on receiver operating characteristics. Intrapancreatic Gd concentration after the injection of each contrast media was measured using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in a separate set of rats (4 diabetic rats, 4 controls for Gadofluorine P; 2, 2 for Gd-DOTA). RESULTS: The normalized SI and ER of the pancreas using Gd-DOTA were not significantly different between diabetic rats and controls. With Gadofluorine P, the values were significantly higher in the diabetic rats than in the control rats 30 min after injection (P < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve that differentiated diabetic rats from the control group was greater for Gadofluorine P than for Gd-DOTA (0.967 vs 0.667, P = 0.085). An increase in normalized SI 30 min after Gadofluorine P was correlated with a decrease in the mean number of islets (r2 = 0.510, P = 0.014). Intra-pancreatic Gd was higher in rats with Gadofluorine P injection than Gd-DOTA injection (Gadofluorine P vs Gd-DOTA, 7.37 vs 0.00, P < 0.01). A significant difference in the concentration of intrapancreatic Gd was observed between the control and diabetic animals that were sacrificed 30 min after Gadofluorine P injection (control vs

  16. Optical Range-Finding from Image Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckler, Paul Reese

    Scope of the study. Much of the labor-intensive work in agriculture consists of reaching out, grasping an object, and then placing the object in a desired position. This repetitious work exploits the unsurpassed hand-eye coordination in human beings. Substitution of machines for manual labor will require simulation of human hand-eye coordination. Most robots in agricultural applications will need the ability to recognize and manipulate three-dimensional objects. With present technology, this requirement makes agricultural robotic systems uneconomical, except for special applications. A method for gauging the distance from a video camera to an object of interest was investigated. By using a calibrated camera-lens system, range was related to focus. Optimum focus of the image was determined by maximizing the high -frequency content of the Fourier transform of the object image. The Walsh-Hadamard transform was investigated as an alternative focusing function. Software was developed to determine optimum image focus and control a motorized camera lens. Findings and conclusions. Range values from the video camera to target objects were calculated by the system. Calculated values were compared with measured distances. Differences between calculated and actual distance averaged less than 0.5%. The Walsh-Hadamard transform provided focus information comparable to the Fourier transform. Using double precision floating-point arithmetic, the Walsh-Hadamard transform executed more than three times faster than the Fourier transform. Distance values calculated using the Walsh -Hadamard transform differed from values calculated with the Fourier transform by less than 1%. This system used a passive, non-triangulation technique to obtain the distance from the machine vision camera to the object of interest. A passive non-triangulation system was the simplest image acquisition requirements, since it does not require a second camera, structured lighting, camera movement, or time

  17. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1586x1534 View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows ...

  18. A Preliminary Investigation of Normal Pancreas and Acute Pancreatitis Elasticity Using Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Juan; Zou, Liling; Yao, Minghua; Xu, Guang; Zhao, Lixia; Xu, Huixiong; Wu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the use of elastometry in healthy volunteers and patients with acute pancreatitis using virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) imaging technology performed on the pancreas. Material/Methods We enrolled 210 healthy volunteers and 44 acute pancreatitis patients in the study between March 2012 and June 2013. Healthy subjects were divided into 3 groups: young (18–30 years), middle-aged (30–50 years), and elderly (>50 years). VTQ was performed on the pancreatic head and body regions to obtain shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements, which were used to evaluate the elasticity values of tissues. Results The pancreatic head SWV value in the whole healthy group was 1.18±0.23 m/s, and that in the pancreatic body was 1.21±0.20 m/s. In patients with acute pancreatitis, the mean SWV measurements at the head were 1.18±0.20 m/s, compared to 1.25±0.19 m/s in the pancreatic body. There was no statistically significant difference between whole healthy volunteers and the acute pancreatitis group. Conclusions VTQ is a new method that shows promise for the quantification of pancreatic elasticity, but further studies are warranted. PMID:26062803

  19. Computer Vision Tools for Finding Images and Video Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Computer vision offers a variety of techniques for searching for pictures in large collections of images. Appearance methods compare images based on the overall content of the image using certain criteria. Finding methods concentrate on matching subparts of images, defined in a variety of ways, in hope of finding particular objects. These ideas…

  20. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Johannes H. M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3–5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. PMID:20725831

  1. Document imaging finding niche in petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cisco, S.L.

    1992-11-09

    Optical disk-based document imaging systems can reduce operating costs, save office space, and improve access to necessary information for petroleum companies that have extensive records in various formats. These imaging systems help solve document management problems to improve technical and administrative operations. Enron Gas Pipeline Group has installed a document imaging system for engineering applications to integrate records stored on paper, microfilm, or computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems. BP Exploration Inc. recently implemented a document imaging system for administrative applications. The company is evaluating an expansion of the system to include engineering and technical applications. The petroleum industry creates, acquires, distributes, and retrieves enormous amounts of data and information, which are stored on multiple media, including paper, microfilm, and electronic formats. There are two main factors responsible for the immense information storage requirements in the petroleum industry.

  2. NASA Technology Finds Uses in Medical Imaging

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA software has been incorporated into a new medical imaging device that could one day aid in the interpretation of mammograms, ultrasounds, and other medical imagery. The new MED-SEG system, dev...

  3. Find Your Image between the Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel Singer

    2004-01-01

    Librarians' unfortunate fixation on image as a defining generational characteristic also makes them just as guilty of promoting misconceptions as nonlibrarians. Can the profession stand another article in the general press that trumpets the amazing new discovery that librarians can be young, trendy, stylish? The level of our colleagues'…

  4. Imaging of haemodialysis: renal and extrarenal findings.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Ferruccio; Quaia, Emilio; Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-06-01

    Electrolyte alterations and extra-renal disorders are quite frequent in patients undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The native kidneys may be the site of important pathologies in patients undergoing dialysis, especially in the form of acquired renal cystic disease with frequent malignant transformation. Renal neoplasms represents an important complication of haemodialysis-associated acquired cystic kidney disease and imaging surveillance is suggested. Extra-renal complications include renal osteodistrophy, brown tumours, and thoracic and cardiovascular complications. Other important fields in which imaging techniques may provide important informations are arteriovenous fistula and graft complications. Teaching points • Renal neoplasms represent a dreaded complication of haemodialysis.• In renal osteodystrophy bone resorption typically manifests along the middle phalanges.• Brown tumours are well-defined lytic lesions radiographically, possibly causing bone expansion.• Vascular calcifications are very common in patients undergoing haemodialysis.• Principal complications of the AV fistula consist of thrombosis, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25680325

  5. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases. PMID:27141135

  6. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses*

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases. PMID:27141135

  7. Images of Retirement: Finding the Purpose and the Passion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savishinsky, Joel

    2001-01-01

    Compares cultural stereotypes and images of retirement with the life choices of actual adults. Finds that centrality of purpose and a sense of passion are basic to these adults' image of life in retirement. (SK)

  8. Cost finding in the diagnostic imaging service.

    PubMed

    Mobilia, G

    1998-01-01

    The experience with control and reporting system at the "Policlinico A. Gemelli" based on the integrated use of cost and service information drawn from all applications of Hospital Information System, are described. Cost accounting for services based on about 500 operating units and monthly reporting system, inclusive of all management information communicated to all managers, is analyzed. The system design, based on the specific features of Diagnostic Imaging Service especially for internal handling, staff of operating rooms and of emergency service, is described. PMID:9689857

  9. Finding maximum JPEG image block code size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhani, Gopal

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of JPEG baseline coding. It aims to determine the minimum storage needed to buffer the JPEG Huffman code bits of 8-bit image blocks. Since DC is coded separately, and the encoder represents each AC coefficient by a pair of run-length/AC coefficient level, the net problem is to perform an efficient search for the optimal run-level pair sequence. We formulate it as a two-dimensional, nonlinear, integer programming problem and solve it using a branch-and-bound based search method. We derive two types of constraints to prune the search space. The first one is given as an upper-bound for the sum of squares of AC coefficients of a block, and it is used to discard sequences that cannot represent valid DCT blocks. The second type constraints are based on some interesting properties of the Huffman code table, and these are used to prune sequences that cannot be part of optimal solutions. Our main result is that if the default JPEG compression setting is used, space of minimum of 346 bits and maximum of 433 bits is sufficient to buffer the AC code bits of 8-bit image blocks. Our implementation also pruned the search space extremely well; the first constraint reduced the initial search space of 4 nodes down to less than 2 nodes, and the second set of constraints reduced it further by 97.8%.

  10. Possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Kin, Tatsuya; Korbutt, Gregory S.; Shapiro, A.M. James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the incidental observation of ectopic pancreas in a donor for islet cell transplantation. The donor’s clinical and imaging presentation was definitive for holoprosencephaly. This case report discusses a possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly. PMID:22688061

  11. SU-E-J-42: Evaluation of Fiducial Markers for Ultrasound and X-Ray Images Used for Motion Tracking in Pancreas SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, SK; Armour, E; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Wong, J; Ding, K; Iordachita, I; Sen, H Tutkun; Kazanzides, P; Bell, M Lediju

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Ultrasound tracking of target motion relies on visibility of vascular and/or anatomical landmark. However this is challenging when the target is located far from vascular structures or in organs that lack ultrasound landmark structure, such as in the case of pancreas cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate visibility, artifacts and distortions of fusion coils and solid gold markers in ultrasound, CT, CBCT and kV images to identify markers suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment. Methods Two fusion coils (1mm × 5mm and 1mm × 10 mm) and a solid gold marker (0.8mm × 10mm) were embedded in a tissue–like ultrasound phantom. The phantom (5cm × 12cm × 20cm) was prepared using water, gelatin and psyllium-hydrophilic-mucilloid fiber. Psylliumhydrophilic mucilloid acts as scattering medium to produce echo texture that simulates sonographic appearance of human tissue in ultrasound images while maintaining electron density close to that of water in CT images. Ultrasound images were acquired using 3D-ultrasound system with markers embedded at 5, 10 and 15mm depth from phantom surface. CT images were acquired using Philips Big Bore CT while CBCT and kV images were acquired with XVI-system (Elexta). Visual analysis was performed to compare visibility of the markers and visibility score (1 to 3) were assigned. Results All markers embedded at various depths are clearly visible (score of 3) in ultrasound images. Good visibility of all markers is observed in CT, CBCT and kV images. The degree of artifact produced by the markers in CT and CBCT images are indistinguishable. No distortion is observed in images from any modalities. Conclusion All markers are visible in images across all modalities in this homogenous tissue-like phantom. Human subject data is necessary to confirm the marker type suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment.

  12. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects. PMID:26743286

  13. Histiocytic disorders of the chest: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jitesh; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Cristopher A; Pipavath, Sudhakar N J; Schmidt, Rodney A; Swanson, Jonathan O; Godwin, J David

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders of the chest comprise a broad spectrum of diseases. The lungs may be involved in isolation or as part of systemic disease. Some of these disorders are primary and have unknown etiology, and others result from a histiocytic response to a known cause. Among primary histiocytic disorders, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is the most common; others include Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Adult PLCH occurs almost exclusively in adults aged 20-40 years who smoke. Pediatric PLCH is extremely rare and typically occurs as part of multisystemic disease. Erdheim-Chester disease affects middle-aged and older adults; thoracic involvement usually occurs as part of systemic disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease affects children and young adults and manifests as painless cervical lymphadenopathy. Examples of secondary histiocytic disorders are storage diseases such as Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick disease, and Fabry disease; pneumoconiosis such as silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and infections such as Whipple disease and malakoplakia. These disorders are characterized at histopathologic examination on the basis of infiltration of alveoli or the pulmonary interstitium by histiocytes, which are a group of cells that includes macrophages and dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a heterogeneous group of nonphagocytic antigen-presenting immune cells. Immunohistochemical markers help to distinguish among various primary histiocytic disorders. Characteristic radiologic findings in the appropriate clinical context may obviate biopsy to establish a correct diagnosis. However, in the absence of these findings, integration of clinical, pathologic, and radiologic features is required to establish a diagnosis. PMID:25763722

  14. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get a ...

  15. Ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma by percutaneous ethanol injection: Imaging findings

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Christoph D.; Grossholz, Marianne; Mentha, Gilles; Roth, Arnaud; Giostra, Emiliano; Schneider, Pierre-Alain; Terrier, Francois

    1997-05-15

    Summary. Since PEI is a treatment based on imaging techniques, the radiologist should be familiar with the various findings that may be observed after PEI on US, CT, and MR images immediately after treatment and during later follow-up. Although US is well suited for performing PEI, contrast-enhanced CT currently is the most commonly used imaging method to evaluate the effect of PEI. Residual, nodular areas of contrast enhancement correlate well with residual tumor and warrant additional treatment. Although the findings on MR images obtained after PEI are more complex, MR imaging may be used as an alternative to CT.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis Pain Pattern and Severity are Independent of Abdominal Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C. Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Tian, Ye; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Lewis, Michele D.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, David C.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    differ among clinically relevant groups of imaging findings. Conclusions Mechanisms that determine patterns and severity of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis are largely independent of structural variants observed by abdominal imaging techniques. Pancreas-relevant quantitative and qualitative pain measures should be included in the evaluation of patients with chronic pancreatitis, to assess pain severity independently of imaging findings. PMID:25424572

  17. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  18. Precocious puberty in children: A review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Faizah, MZ; Zuhanis, AH; Rahmah, R; Raja, AA; Wu, LL; Dayang, AA; Zulfiqar, MA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This review was aimed at determining the imaging findings in patients with precocious puberty. Results: Within a period of 8 years (from 2002 to 2010) there were 53 patients diagnosed with precocious puberty. Out of the 53 patients, 37 had undergone diagnostic imaging to detect the possible organic causes of precocious puberty. Imaging findings were positive in 31 patients and out of that, 3 patients had 2 findings each (34 abnormalities). Of the patients with positive imaging findings, central precocious puberty (gonadotrophin-dependent) was more common (81%; 25/31) and the causes included: tuber cinereum hamartoma (n = 10), glioma (n = 6), pineal gland tumour (n = 4), hydrocephalous (n = 3), arachnoid cyst (n = 2) and others (n = 3). Peripheral precocious puberty (gonadotrophin-independent) causes included: testicular adrenal rest tumour (n = 3), adrenal carcinoma (n = 1), ovarian granulosa thecal cell tumour (n = 1), and tuberous sclerosis (n = 1). Conclusion: Positive imaging findings were observed in 84% (31/37) of the subjects. Hypothalamic hamartoma was the most common imaging finding in central precocious puberty while testicular adrenal rest tumour was the most common imaging finding in peripheral precocious puberty. PMID:22970062

  19. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  20. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  1. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  2. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group which was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future. PMID:26078050

  3. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis. PMID:25825535

  4. Reduced Field-of-View Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pancreas: Comparison with Conventional Single-Shot Echo-Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the image quality (IQ) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of reduced field-of-view (FOV) di-ffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of pancreas in comparison with full FOV DWI. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, 2 readers independently performed qualitative analysis of full FOV DWI (FOV, 38 × 38 cm; b-value, 0 and 500 s/mm2) and reduced FOV DWI (FOV, 28 × 8.5 cm; b-value, 0 and 400 s/mm2). Both procedures were conducted with a two-dimensional spatially selective radiofrequency excitation pulse, in 102 patients with benign or malignant pancreatic diseases (mean size, 27.5 ± 14.4 mm). The study parameters included 1) anatomic structure visualization, 2) lesion conspicuity, 3) artifacts, 4) IQ score, and 5) subjective clinical utility for confirming or excluding initially considered differential diagnosis on conventional imaging. Another reader performed quantitative ADC measurements of focal pancreatic lesions and parenchyma. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare qualitative scores and ADCs between DWI sequences. Mann Whitney U-test was used to compare ADCs between the lesions and parenchyma. Results On qualitative analysis, reduced FOV DWI showed better anatomic structure visualization (2.76 ± 0.79 at b = 0 s/mm2 and 2.81 ± 0.64 at b = 400 s/mm2), lesion conspicuity (3.11 ± 0.99 at b = 0 s/mm2 and 3.15 ± 0.79 at b = 400 s/mm2), IQ score (8.51 ± 2.05 at b = 0 s/mm2 and 8.79 ± 1.60 at b = 400 s/mm2), and higher clinical utility (3.41 ± 0.64), as compared to full FOV DWI (anatomic structure, 2.18 ± 0.59 at b = 0 s/mm2 and 2.56 ± 0.47 at b = 500 s/mm2; lesion conspicuity, 2.55 ± 1.07 at b = 0 s/mm2 and 2.89 ± 0.86 at b = 500 s/mm2; IQ score, 7.13 ± 1.83 at b = 0 s/mm2 and 8.17 ± 1.31 at b = 500 s/mm2; clinical utility, 3.14 ± 0.70) (p < 0.05). Artifacts were significantly improved on reduced FOV DWI (2.65 ± 0.68) at b = 0 s/mm2 (full FOV DWI, 2.41 ± 0.63) (p < 0.001). On quantitative analysis, there were

  5. Sub-branch and mixed-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Zafer; Aktas, Fatma; Okan, İsmail; Özsoy, Zeki; Arıcı, Akgül

    2016-03-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) is one of the cystic neoplasias of the pancreas. The imaging findings provide that these tumors are differentiated from the other cystic lesions of the pancreas, especially from the chronic pancreatitis, where the treatment protocol is completely different. Therefore, the correct diagnosis and classification of the IPMN ensures that the patient receives the correct approach and the appropriate surgery, if necessary. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the imaging findings of the different types of the IPMN and the changes in the management protocol of the patients according to these radiological findings. PMID:26973726

  6. Imaging findings in megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballisty, Marianne M; Braithwaite, Kiery A; Shehata, Bahig M; Dickson, Paula N

    2013-04-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare and frequently lethal form of severe functional intestinal obstruction more commonly found in girls. Imaging features characteristic of this disease include a large dilated bladder, microcolon and intestinal dysmotility. Additional imaging findings may include intestinal malrotation, hydronephrosis and vesicoureteral reflux. It is usually fatal in the first year of life. Because presenting clinical and imaging features can mimic other causes of neonatal bowel obstruction, we compiled examples of this disorder to help the pediatric radiologist recognize imaging findings associated with MMIHS and aid in the development of a long-term management plan and in counseling the family regarding implications of this disorder. We reviewed recent and historical literature relevant to MMIHS and present the imaging and clinical features of four patients with MMIHS treated at our institution as examples of this uncommon disorder. PMID:22926452

  7. Brain CT and MRI: differential diagnosis of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C; Gadhia, Rajan; Faridar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Following a traditional approach, in Chapters 5 and 14-29 in the previous volume, diverse brain diseases are listed and their imaging findings described in detail. In this chapter the approach is from the imaging finding to the disease: for instance, what list of diseases can give rise to a contrast-enhancing mass in the cerebellopontine angle? Imaging findings that are reviewed in succession include the location of the lesion, its multiplicity and symmetry, its volume, ranging from atrophy to mass effect, its homogeneity, its density, measurable by computed tomography (CT), its appearance on T1, T2, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, finally, its characteristics after the infusion of intravenous contrast. A differential diagnosis for each finding is provided. While the approach adopted in this chapter is unconventional, we hope that it will be most helpful to anyone reading images. Furthermore, it could serve as the basis to create or complete image databases to guide in the interpretation of brain CT and MRI. PMID:27430457

  8. Intracranial hydatid cyst: imaging findings of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Darwish, Houssein

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting for a few months. The mass was totally excised, with no postoperative complications. We present MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this operatively proven case of hydatid cyst of the brain. We discuss imaging findings, in particular the findings on MRS, which is rarely reported in the literature. PMID:27620198

  9. Assessment of Islet Function Following Islet and Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Emily C.; Harlan, David M.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas and islet transplant recipients are monitored using various metabolic and imaging methods. The inaccessibility of the transplanted whole pancreas and of the isolated islets poses specific problems (eg, all assessment techniques are indirect). Although successful pancreas transplantation typically restores normal glucose homeostasis, islet transplantation into the liver does not completely normalize islet hormone secretion and glucose metabolism. Development of better testing strategies, such as direct islet imaging, will significantly advance the field. PMID:16879785

  10. Radiohybridization PET imaging of KRAS G12D mRNA expression in human pancreas cancer xenografts with [(64)Cu]DO3A-peptide nucleic acid-peptide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, A; Zhang, K; Aruva, M R; Cardi, C A; Opitz, A W; Wagner, N J; Thakur, M L; Wickstrom, E

    2007-06-01

    There is a compelling need to image pancreas cancer at an early stage. Human pancreas cancer cells display elevated levels of KRAS protein due to high copy numbers of KRAS mRNA, and elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. Therefore we hypothesized that pancreas cancer could be detected in vivo with a single probe that targets both KRAS mRNA and IGF1R. Because positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive imaging technique, we designed a probe incorporating the positron-emitting nuclide (64)Cu. The KRAS-specific hybridization probe consisted of 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethylaza)cyclododecane-10-aza-acetyl (DO3A) on the N-terminus of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) hybridization sequence (GCCATCAGCTCC) linked to a cyclized IGF1 peptide analog (d-Cys-Ser-Lys-Cys) on the C-terminus, for IGF1R-mediated endocytosis. A series of such KRAS radiohybridization probes with 0, 1, 2 or 3 mismatches to KRAS G12D mRNA, including exact matches to wild type KRAS mRNA and KRAS G12V mRNA, along with a double d(Ala) replacement IGF1 peptide control, were assembled by continuous solid phase synthesis. To test the hypothesis that KRAS-IGF1 dual probes could specifically image KRAS mRNA expression noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing AsPC1 pancreas cancer xenografts in immunocompromised mice, [(64)Cu]PNA radiohybridization probes and controls were administered by tail vein. The [(64)Cu]KRAS-IGF1 radiohybridization probe yielded strong tumor contrast in PET images, 8.6 +/- 1.4-fold more intense in the center of human pancreas cancer xenografts than in the contralateral muscle at 4 h post-injection. Control experiments with single base KRASmismatches, an IGF1 peptide mismatch, and a breast cancer xenograft lacking KRAS activation yielded weak tumor contrast images. These experiments are consistent with our hypothesis for noninvasive PET imaging of KRAS oncogene expression in pancreas cancer xenografts. Imaging oncogene m

  11. Patellar tendinitis: the significance of magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M; Almekinders, L C

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the significance of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with patellar tendinitis. Midline sagittal magnetic resonance images were taken of 12 knees from 10 patients and of 17 knees from 15 age- and activity-matched subjects who underwent imaging for reasons other than patellar tendinitis. Of the 12 magnetic resonance imaging scans of knees with clinical patellar tendinitis, 3 (25%) exhibited no defect and only 7 (58%) had unequivocal intratendinous lesions. Among the 17 scans of subjects without clinical patellar tendinitis, 5 (34%) showed no defect and 4 (24%) had unequivocal intratendinous lesions. Proximal tendon width was significantly larger for the tendinitis patient group (5.0 +/- 1.7 mm versus 3.9 +/- 1.0 mm), although considerable overlap was present. All subjects with unequivocal intratendinous signal changes had a significantly longer nonarticular inferior patellar pole and were significantly older (38.1 years versus 26.8 years). Only Blazina stage III lesions were associated with abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging. As a whole, the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging was 75% and 29%, respectively. In younger patients with relatively mild symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging did not show significant changes; in older, active patients changes may be present in asymptomatic knees. PMID:10352771

  12. Renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Leonardou, Polytimi; Semelka, Richard C; Mastropasqua, Maria; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Woosley, John T

    2003-07-01

    We report the MR findings of a 42-year-old man who developed renal cell carcinoma in an allograft kidney, 10 years after transplantation. The lower pole of the transplant kidney showed a solid lesion which was well shown on the post gadolinium fat suppressed images as a heterogeneously enhancing 2 cm mass lesion. PMID:12915202

  13. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated. PMID:26614136

  14. Imaging findings of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Sabriye Sennur; Toprak, Huseyin; Seker, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    In our study, in a 52-year-old man, specific and nonspecific findings of Schistosoma infestation were examined using ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. On computed tomography, capsular and septal calcifications and contrast enhancement of the liver capsule were seen. On T1-weighted magnetic resonance images diffuse hypointensity was seen in periportal spaces; on T2-weighted images in the same spaces, diffuse hyperintensity was seen. On dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, in these same spaces marked contrast enhancement was manifested in the late venous phase. These signal changes indicate edema due to periportal fibrotic tissue inflammation and are accepted as pathognomonic for a liver infested by Schistosoma. PMID:27594939

  15. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Qing-yu; Cao, Yun; Zhong, Jin-shuang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP), with a view to improving the diagnosis of this kind of tumor. A total of 27 cases of histopathologically confirmed DFSP were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 18 patients underwent a CT scan and 9 patients underwent an MRI. All patients underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations; 1 patient underwent multiphrase CT enhancement examination. Imaging characteristics, including location, shape, size, number, edge, and attenuation or intensity of each lesion, both unenhanced and contrast enhanced, were analyzed. Of the 27 cases, 24 were solitary, 2 had 2 nodules, and 1 had multiple confluent tumors. The lesion with multiple confluent tumors was ill defined and irregular; the other lesions were oval or round, well-defined nodules or masses. The unenhanced CT images showed 19 homogenous isodense lesions. There was no calcification in any of the patients. The contrast-enhanced CT images showed intermediate and marked nonhomogeneous enhancement in 13 lesions, intermediate homogeneous enhancement in 4 lesions, and a mild heterogeneous enhancement in 2 lesions. MR T1-weighted images revealed 1 ill-defined and 9 well-defined homogeneous isointense lesions. T2-weighted images showed homogeneous hyperintensity to the muscles in 6 lesions, 3 mild hyperintense lesions with hypointense lesions, and 1 mixed, mild hyperintense and isointense lesion. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated intermediate and marked nonhomogeneous enhancement in 9 lesions and intermediate homogeneous enhancement in 1 lesion. DFSP is characterized by a subcutaneous well-defined soft tissue nodule or mass on plain CT/MR scans, and shows intermediate-to-marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. The imaging findings for DFSP are nonspecific, but may help to define the diagnosis in an appropriate clinical setting

  16. Breast MR Imaging for Equivocal Mammographic Findings: Help or Hindrance?

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Chikarmane, Sona A; Sippo, Dorothy A; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2016-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, because of its extremely high sensitivity in detecting invasive breast cancers, is sometimes used as a diagnostic tool to evaluate equivocal mammographic findings. However, breast MR imaging should never substitute for a complete diagnostic evaluation or for biopsy of suspected, localizable suspicious mammographic lesions, whenever possible. The modality's high cost, in addition to only moderate specificity, mandate that radiologists use it sparingly and with discrimination for problematic mammographic findings. It is rare that the reality or significance of a noncalcified mammographic finding remains equivocal or problematic at diagnostic mammography evaluation, which usually includes targeted ultrasonography (US). There are several reasons for this infrequent occurrence: (a) an asymmetry may persist on diagnostic views but be visible only on craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique projections, precluding three-dimensional localization for US or biopsy, or a lesion may persist on some diagnostic spot views but dissipate or efface on others; (b) uncertainty may exist as to whether apparent change is clinically important or owing to technical factors such as compression or positioning differences; or (c) a lesion may be suspected but biopsy options are limited owing to lack of a US correlate and lesion inaccessibility for stereotactic biopsy, or biopsy of a vague or questionably real lesion has been attempted unsuccessfully. This article will discuss the indications for problem-solving MR imaging for equivocal mammographic findings, present cases illustrating appropriate and inappropriate uses of problem-solving MR imaging, and present false-positive and false-negative cases affecting the specificity of breast MR imaging. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27284757

  17. PYNPOINT: an image processing package for finding exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Adam; Quanz, Sascha P.

    2012-12-01

    We present the scientific performance results of PYNPOINT, our Python-based software package that uses principal component analysis to detect and estimate the flux of exoplanets in two-dimensional imaging data. Recent advances in adaptive optics and imaging technology at visible and infrared wavelengths have opened the door to direct detections of planetary companions to nearby stars, but image processing techniques have yet to be optimized. We show that the performance of our approach gives a marked improvement over what is presently possible using existing methods such as LOCI. To test our approach, we use real angular differential imaging (ADI) data taken with the adaptive optics-assisted high resolution near-infrared camera NACO at the VLT. These data were taken during the commissioning of the apodizing phase plate (APP) coronagraph. By inserting simulated planets into these data, we test the performance of our method as a function of planet brightness for different positions on the image. We find that in all cases PYNPOINT has a detection threshold that is superior to that given by our LOCI analysis when assessed in a common statistical framework. We obtain our best improvements for smaller inner working angles (IWAs). For an IWA of ˜0.29 arcsec we find that we achieve a detection sensitivity that is a factor of 5 better than LOCI. We also investigate our ability to correctly measure the flux of planets. Again, we find improvements over LOCI, with PYNPOINT giving more stable results. Finally, we apply our package to a non-APP data set of the exoplanet β Pictoris b and reveal the planet with high signal-to-noise. This confirms that PYNPOINT can potentially be applied with high fidelity to a wide range of high-contrast imaging data sets.

  18. Incidental extraspinal findings on magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Turanlı, Sevim; Saltas, Hakan; Karabacak, Osman Raif; Damar, Cagrı; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to evaluate pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations that were incidentally detected on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of intervertebral discs, to find the frequencies of these incidental findings, and to emphasise the clinical importance of them. Material and methods A retrospective study including 1031 consecutive patients (730 females and 301 males, with a median age of 46 years) was conducted by evaluating a total of 1106 MRI examinations of intervertebral discs. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T MRI unit. Incidental findings were classified as pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations. Results The percentages of incidental extraspinal pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations were 16.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.4–18.8) and 3.7% (95% CI: 2.6–4.3), respectively. The percentage of incidental extraspinal pathological findings on cervical spinal MRI was 25.7% (95% CI: 20.1–31.7), thyroid nodules being the most common incidental findings. On thoracic spinal MRI (n = 19), inferior pole thyroid nodules were demonstrated as incidental extraspinal pathological findings, with a percentage of 10.5% (95% CI: 9.6–11.5). On lumbar spinal MRI, incidental pathological findings were detected with a percentage of 14.2% (95% CI: 11.9–16.6), while the percentage of congenital anomalies/anatomical variations was 4.8% (95% CI: 3.4–6.3). Eventually, 6.5% (95% CI: 2.6–9.4) of all cases with incidental extraspinal pathological findings underwent surgery. Conclusions On MRI examination of intervertebral discs, paying attention to incidentally detected pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations is very important due to the fact that they can alter the treatment of the patient or affect the patient's life. PMID:25276162

  19. Gene expression profiles for the human pancreas and purified islets in Type 1 diabetes: new findings at clinical onset and in long-standing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Planas, R; Carrillo, J; Sanchez, A; Ruiz de Villa, M C; Nuñez, F; Verdaguer, J; James, R F L; Pujol-Borrell, R; Vives-Pi, M

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by the selective destruction of the insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas by an autoimmune response. Due to ethical and practical difficulties, the features of the destructive process are known from a small number of observations, and transcriptomic data are remarkably missing. Here we report whole genome transcript analysis validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR) and correlated with immunohistological observations for four T1D pancreases (collected 5 days, 9 months, 8 and 10 years after diagnosis) and for purified islets from two of them. Collectively, the expression profile of immune response and inflammatory genes confirmed the current views on the immunopathogenesis of diabetes and showed similarities with other autoimmune diseases; for example, an interferon signature was detected. The data also supported the concept that the autoimmune process is maintained and balanced partially by regeneration and regulatory pathway activation, e.g. non-classical class I human leucocyte antigen and leucocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B1 (LILRB1). Changes in gene expression in islets were confined mainly to endocrine and neural genes, some of which are T1D autoantigens. By contrast, these islets showed only a few overexpressed immune system genes, among which bioinformatic analysis pointed to chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) and chemokine (CXC motif) receptor 4) (CXCR4) chemokine pathway activation. Remarkably, the expression of genes of innate immunity, complement, chemokines, immunoglobulin and regeneration genes was maintained or even increased in the long-standing cases. Transcriptomic data favour the view that T1D is caused by a chronic inflammatory process with a strong participation of innate immunity that progresses in spite of the regulatory and regenerative mechanisms. PMID:19912253

  20. Incidental findings in imaging diagnostic tests: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, B; Donat, L; Hernández-Aguado, I

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to summarise the available evidence on the frequency and management of incidental findings in imaging diagnostic tests. Original articles were identified by a systematic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library Plus databases using appropriate medical headings. Extracted variables were study design; sample size; type of imaging test; initial diagnosis; frequency and location of incidental findings; whether clinical follow-up was performed; and whether a definitive diagnosis was made. Study characteristics were assessed by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Any disagreement was solved by consensus. The relationship between the frequency of incidental findings and the study characteristics was assessed using a one-way ANOVA test, as was the frequency of follow-up of incidental findings and the frequency of confirmation. 251 potentially relevant abstracts were identified and 44 articles were finally included in the review. Overall, the mean frequency of incidental findings was 23.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 15.8–31.3%). The frequency of incidental findings was higher in studies involving CT technology (mean 31.1%, 95% CI 20.1–41.9%), in patients with an unspecific initial diagnosis (mean 30.5, 95% CI 0–81.6) and when the location of the incidental findings was unspecified (mean 33.9%, 95% CI 18.1–49.7). The mean frequency of clinical follow-up was 64.5% (95% CI 52.9–76.1%) and mean frequency of clinical confirmation was 45.6% (95% CI 32.1–59.2%). Although the optimal strategy for the management of these abnormalities is still unclear, it is essential to be aware of the low clinical confirmation in findings of moderate and major importance. PMID:20335439

  1. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25850824

  2. A comprehensive review of imaging findings in human cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Bargavee; Aggarwal, Neeti; Makhaik, Sushma; Sood, Ramgopal

    2016-04-01

    Cysticercosis is a zoonotic disease most commonly affecting brain, eye and muscles, causing significant morbidity. Transmitted by faeco-oral route, this disease was endemic in many developing countries; it is now seen worldwide due to globalisation. Manifestations are produced by the mass effect of the parasite and by the immune response mounted by the host on the parasite. There are myriad clinical features and imaging findings. Radiological features depend on the number, stage and location of the parasite and associated complications. Knowledge of radiological findings is necessary to make an accurate diagnosis of this pleomorphic disease. PMID:26903229

  3. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399242

  4. Susac syndrome: a case report and PET imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Dielman, Charlotte; Laureys, Guy; Meurs, Alfred; Bissay, Veronique; Ebinger, Guy

    2009-09-01

    We describe the case of a twenty-year-old woman with subacute encephalopathy, who subsequently developed hearing loss and ophtalmopathy. The clinical triad and typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis led to the diagnosis of Susac syndrome. Brain positron emission tomography showed abnormalities which are comparable with other types of central nervous system vasculitis, and distinct from those found in multiple sclerosis. PMID:19902818

  5. Placenta accreta: spectrum of US and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Baughman, W Christopher; Corteville, Jane E; Shah, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Placenta accreta (PA) encompasses various types of abnormal placentation in which chorionic villi attach directly to or invade the myometrium. PA is a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality and is now the most common reason for emergent postpartum hysterectomy. Its prevalence has risen tenfold in the United States over the past 50 years, primarily due to the increasing percentage of pregnant patients undergoing primary and repeat cesarean sections. Placenta previa and previous cesarean section are the two most important known risk factors for PA. Accurate prenatal identification of affected pregnancies allows optimal obstetric management. Ultrasonography (US) remains the diagnostic standard, and routine US examination at 18-20 weeks gestation affords an ideal opportunity to screen for the disorder. Placental lacunae and abnormal color Doppler imaging patterns are the most helpful US markers for PA. In recent years, there has been increased interest in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the evaluation of PA, since it can provide information on depth of invasion and more clearly depict posterior placentas. The most reliable MR imaging findings are uterine bulging, heterogeneous placenta, and placental bands. Focal interruptions in the hypointense myometrial border may also be helpful. PA is a clinical and diagnostic challenge that is being encountered with increasing frequency. Clinicians should be aware of the clinical issues, risk factors, and imaging findings associated with PA to facilitate optimal case management. PMID:19001647

  6. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  7. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  8. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP.

    PubMed

    Lath, Chinar O; Agrawal, Dilpesh S; Timins, Michael E; Wein, Melissa M

    2015-12-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  9. Incidental Findings in Imaging Research: Evaluating Incidence, Benefit and Burden

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Nicholas M.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Siddiki, Hassan A.; Harmsen, W. Scott; O’Byrne, Megan M.; Port, John D.; Tremaine, William J.; Pitot, Henry C.; McFarland, Beth; Robinson, Marguerite E.; Koenig, Barabara A.; King, Bernard F.; Wolf, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Context Little information exists concerning the frequency of clinically significant incidental findings (IFs) identified in the course of imaging research across a broad spectrum of imaging modalities and body regions. Objective To estimate the frequency with which research imaging IFs generate further clinical action, and the medical benefit/burden of identifying these IFs. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective review of subjects undergoing a research imaging exam that was interpreted by a radiologist for IFs in the first quarter of 2004, with 3-year clinical follow-up. An expert panel reviewed IFs generating clinical action to determine medical benefit/burden based on predefined criteria. Main Outcome Measures Frequency of (1) IFs that generated further clinical action by modality, body part, age, gender, and (2) IFs resulting in clear medical benefit or burden. Results 1376 patients underwent 1426 research imaging studies. 40% (567/1426) of exams had at least one IF (1055 total). Risk of an IF increased significantly by age (OR=1.5; [1.4–1.7=95% C.I.] per decade increase). Abdominopelvic CT generated more IFs than other exams (OR=18.9 compared with ultrasound; 9.2% with subsequent clinical action), with CT Thorax and MR brain next (OR=11.9 and 5.9; 2.8% and 2.2% with action, respectively). Overall 6.2% of exams (35/567) with an IF generated clinical action, resulting in clear medical benefit in 1.1% (6/567) and clear medical burden in 0.5% (3/567). In most instances, medical benefit/burden was unclear (4.6%; 26/567). Conclusions The frequency of IFs in imaging research exams varies significantly by imaging modality, body region and age. Research imaging studies at high risk for generating IFs can be identified. Routine evaluation of research images by radiologists may result in identification of IFs in a substantial number of cases and subsequent clinical action to address them in much smaller number. Such clinical action can result in medical

  10. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys is to remove waste from the body through the production of urine. They also help to regulate blood pressure, blood volume and the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five ...

  11. Cystic Lymphangioma of Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Rajesh, S; Arora, Ankur; Arora, Asit; Kumar, Nikhil

    2016-03-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign hamartomatous malformations which can arise either from congenitally sequestered lymphatic channels or due to acquired obstruction caused by fibrosis of lymph channels. They are common in the pediatric age group in the soft tissue of neck and the axilla. Abdominal lymphangiomas are rare; even rarer is the primary involvement of pancreas. It occurs more frequently in females and is often located in the distal pancreas. The authors report the case of cystic lymphangioma of pancreas in a 26-year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain that was treated with laparoscopic cyst excision. Although exceptionally rare, lymphangioma of the pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions, especially in young women. PMID:27065694

  12. Surgical transposition of the ovaries: Imaging findings in 14 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.; Chambers, S.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Pelvic radiation therapy for cervical or vaginal cancer often leads to ovarian failure. To remove the ovaries from the radiation portal and preserve their function, they can be transposed to the lateral abdomen. Serial imaging studies in 14 patients who had undergone ovarian transposition (five bilateral, nine unilateral) were reviewed. Images obtained included 32 CT scans, 20 sonograms, and one MR image. Most transposed ovaries were located along the paracolic gutters near the iliac crests, creating an extrinsic mass effect on adjacent bowel. Detection of surgical clips on the ovary on CT scans allowed confident recognition of all 19 transposed ovaries. Cysts in the transposed ovaries, noted on most imaging studies, did not correlate with complications of pain or hormonal dysfunction. In one case, a large physiologic cyst in a transposed ovary distorted the cecum and was mistaken for a mucocele of the appendix. In another case, a large ovarian cyst was thought to be tumor recurrence or a lymphocele. These findings indicate that although the transposed ovaries can be recognized on CT scans by the surgical clips attached to the ovaries, the appearance of the ovary does not predict reliably the development of complications.

  13. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas. PMID:27232353

  14. Cystic lesions of the pancreas: challenging issues in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Hwang, Chang Yun; Lee, Tae Yoon; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo

    2008-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are being recognized with increasing frequency and have become a common finding in clinical practice. Cystic lesions of the pancreas display a wide spectrum of histopathology and biologic behavior. Differentiating among lesions and choosing an optimal therapy is challenging, and evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, management, and follow-up for cystic lesions of the pancreas are needed. This review describes the epidemiology and typical features of cystic lesions of the pancreas, including a summary of commonly used descriptive terms, as well as the primary issues in the differential diagnosis and management of these lesions. PMID:18076739

  15. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 49,XXXXY Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Trevor L.; Vossough, Arastoo; Ficicioglu, Can; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is a chromosomal disorder characterized by one or more supernumerary X chromosomes, in addition to the normal 46,XY male karyotype. Whereas classic Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) occurs in 1:400 births, the most severe Klinefelter variant (49,XXXXY) occurs in only 1:85,000 births. The degree of cognitive impairment, specific skeletal changes, and genital abnormalities in Klinefelter syndrome variants is thought to correlate with the number of additional X-chromosomes present. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in individuals with classic Klinefelter syndrome show smaller brain volumes, but magnetic resonance imaging data are lacking for individuals with rarer and more severe Klinefelter variants. We present case reports and magnetic resonance imaging studies on 3 individuals with 49,XXXXY. All 3 patients exhibited varying degrees of volume loss and abnormalities in white matter. Changes in white matter may represent a specific finding in patients with severe Klinefelter variants such as 49,XXXXY, and karyotype analysis should be considered in patients with unexplained white-matter disease, especially when developmental delay or genital abnormalities are present. PMID:18486832

  16. The Feasibility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Quantification of Liver, Pancreas, Spleen, Vertebral Bone Marrow, and Renal Cortex R2* and Proton Density Fat Fraction in Transfusion-Related Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    İdilman, İlkay S.; Gümrük, Fatma; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of quantification of liver, pancreas, spleen, vertebral bone marrow, and renal cortex R2* and magnetic resonance imaging-proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) and to evaluate the correlations among them in patients with transfusion-related iron overload. Materials and Methods: A total of 9 patients (5 boys, 4 girls) who were referred to our clinic with suspicion of hepatic iron overload were included in this study. All patients underwent T1-independent volumetric multi-echo gradient-echo imaging with T2* correction and spectral fat modeling. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5 T MRI system. Results: All patients had hepatic iron overload. Severe hepatic iron overload was recorded in 5/9 patients (56%), and when we evaluated the PDFF maps of these patients, we observed an extensive patchy artifact in the liver in 4 of 5 patients (R2* greater than 671 Hz). When we performed MRI-PDFF measurements despite these artifacts, we observed artifactual high MRI-PDFF values. There was a close correlation between average pancreas R2* and average pancreas MRI-PDFF (p=0.003, r=0.860). There was a significant correlation between liver R2* and average pancreas R2* (p=0.021, r=0.747), liver R2* and renal cortex R2* (p=0.020, r=0.750), and average pancreas R2* and renal cortex R2* (p=0.003, r=0.858). There was a significant negative correlation between vertebral bone marrow R2* and age (p=0.018, r=-0.759). Conclusion: High iron content of the liver, especially with a T2* value shorter than the first echo time can spoil the efficacy of PDFF calculation. Fat deposition in the pancreas is accompanied by pancreatic iron overload. There is a significant correlation between hepatic siderosis and pancreatic siderosis. Renal cortical and pancreatic siderosis are correlated, too. PMID:26376710

  17. CT and MR Imaging Findings of Pancreatic Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Xu, Shunliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies on pancreatic paraganglioma, a rare neoplasm, have primarily reported its ultrasound and routine and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence findings of pancreatic paraganglioma. A male patient, ages 41 years, was admitted to our hospital due to a pancreatic space-occupying lesion that had been present for more than 10 days. The patient had no obvious discomfort. He had a history of hypertension and hyperthyroidism. Physical examination revealed upper abdominal tenderness without a palpable mass. Routine and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a soft tissue mass at the pancreatic head/uncinate process, with patchy calcification within the lesion. On a contrast-enhanced CT scan, severe enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase was noted, as was slightly reduced but still marked enhancement in the venous phase. The celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery segment were wrapped by the tumor. Thickened, tortuous vessels were observed at the lesion edges, around which there were multiple enlarged lymph nodes. The main pancreatic duct was markedly dilated. Routine and contrast-enhanced pancreatic MRI demonstrated an abnormal nodular signal in the pancreatic head/uncinate process that was approximately 4.3 × 6.4 cm2 in size. T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) revealed hypointensity, whereas T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) revealed nonhomogeneous, slight hyperintensity. Patchy hypointensity on both T1WI and T2WI was observed within the lesion. DWI showed slight hyperintensity. Grossly heterogeneous enhancement of the mass was observed on a contrast-enhanced MRI scan, with the tumor wrapped around the adjacent vasculature, and multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed peripherally. After preoperative preparation, the patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy. Histopathology and

  18. Findings from Structural MR Imaging in Military Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Riedy, Gerard; Senseney, Justin S; Liu, Wei; Ollinger, John; Sham, Elyssa; Krapiva, Pavel; Patel, Jigar B; Smith, Alice; Yeh, Ping-Hong; Graner, John; Nathan, Dominic; Caban, Jesus; French, Louis M; Harper, Jamie; Eskay, Victoria; Morissette, John; Oakes, Terrence R

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To describe the initial neuroradiology findings in a cohort of military service members with primarily chronic mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from blast by using an integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center institutional review board and is compliant with HIPAA guidelines. All participants were military service members or dependents recruited between August 2009 and August 2014. There were 834 participants with a history of TBI and 42 participants in a control group without TBI (not explicitly age- and sex-matched). MR examinations were performed at 3 T primarily with three-dimensional volume imaging at smaller than 1 mm(3) voxels for the structural portion of the examination. The structural portion of this examination, including T1-weighted, T2-weighted, before and after contrast agent administrtion T2 fluid attenuation inversion recovery, and susceptibility-weighted images, was evaluated by neuroradiologists by using a modified version of the neuroradiology TBI common data elements (CDEs). Incident odds ratios (ORs) between the TBI participants and a comparison group without TBI were calculated. Results The 834 participants were diagnosed with predominantly chronic (mean, 1381 days; median, 888 days after injury) and mild (92% [768 of 834]) TBI. Of these participants, 84.2% (688 of 817) reported one or more blast-related incident and 63.0% (515 of 817) reported loss of consciousness at the time of injury. The presence of white matter T2-weighted hyperintense areas was the most common pathologic finding, observed in 51.8% (432 of 834; OR, 1.75) of TBI participants. Cerebral microhemorrhages were observed in a small percentage of participants (7.2% [60 of 834]; OR, 6.64) and showed increased incidence with TBI severity (P < .001, moderate and severe vs mild). T2-weighted hyperintense areas and microhemorrhages did not collocate by visual

  19. Ectopic Pancreas in the Wall of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jose Salvador; Stauffer, John A

    2016-07-01

    Ectopic pancreas is an uncommon and benign finding. However, these lesions can cause symptoms including abdominal pain and often require removal. We present the case of a 27-year-old patient with long-standing vague abdominal symptoms eventually found to have ectopic pancreas tissue in the proximal jejunum. PMID:26892166

  20. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  1. Imaging findings of juvenile xanthogranuloma of the penis.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Ray K; Choudhary, Arabinda K

    2009-02-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare benign self-limiting lesion presenting in early childhood. It is the commonest variant of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis and usually presents as a cutaneous mass. It might have a systemic component and also might be associated with other conditions, notably neurofibromatosis and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia. Penile masses are unusual in childhood and we describe a case of JXG involving the penis. Although four cases of JXG of the penis have been reported in the literature, this is the first with imaging of the penile lesion. We discuss the clinical and radiological findings, differential diagnosis and management of these cases. High awareness of these lesions in the differential diagnosis of penile masses presenting in early childhood is important to avoid potentially unnecessary ablative genital surgery. Careful assessment should also be made for any systemic involvement and for associated pathologies. PMID:19011852

  2. Finding your voice: a singing lesson from functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah J; Abbott, David F; Lusher, Dean; Gentle, Ellen C; Jackson, Graeme D

    2011-12-01

    Vocal singing (singing with lyrics) shares features common to music and language but it is not clear to what extent they use the same brain systems, particularly at the higher cortical level, and how this varies with expertise. Twenty-six participants of varying singing ability performed two functional imaging tasks. The first examined covert generative language using orthographic lexical retrieval while the second required covert vocal singing of a well-known song. The neural networks subserving covert vocal singing and language were found to be proximally located, and their extent of cortical overlap varied with singing expertise. Nonexpert singers showed greater engagement of their language network during vocal singing, likely accounting for their less tuneful performance. In contrast, expert singers showed a more unilateral pattern of activation associated with reduced engagement of the right frontal lobe. The findings indicate that singing expertise promotes independence from the language network with decoupling producing more tuneful performance. This means that the age-old singing practice of 'finding your singing voice' may be neurologically mediated by changing how strongly singing is coupled to the language system. PMID:21162043

  3. Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, JINGQI; YANG, ZHANGWEI; TANG, GUANGYU; WANG, ZHONGQIU

    2015-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are rare mesenchymal tumors that originate outside the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present study was to investigate the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of EGISTs and analyze the correlations between radiological findings and pathological features. CT and MRI images of 24 patients with EGISTs were reviewed retrospectively. Patient demographics and tumor characteristics, including localization, size, contours, borders, cystic-necrotic components, calcification, hemorrhage, tumor vessels, attenuation and intensity, degree and pattern of enhancement, ascites, tumor invasion, lymphadenopathy and distant metastasis were recorded. Statistical analyses to compare the radiological characteristics of low- and high-grade EGISTs were performed with χ2 or Fisher’s exact tests. The mean patient age at the time of presentation was 53 years. A total of 24 EGISTs were detected, originating in the omentum (n=4), mesentery (n=19) and retroperitoneum (n=1), respectively. The EGISTs displayed a predominantly spindle cell subtype (87.5%; 21/24). The majority of the EGISTs appeared as large (>10 cm; 70.8%; 17/24), round or oval (66.7%; 16/24), cystic-solid (87.5%; 21/24) and ill-defined (66.7%; 16/24) soft-tissue masses. The EGISTs were hypodense (69.6%; 16/23) or isodense (30.4%; 7/23) on CT images, hypointense (50%; 3/6), isointense (33.3%; 2/6) or hyperintense (16.7%; 1/6) on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), and hyperintense on T2WI (100%; 6/6) and diffusion-WI (DWI; 100%; 6/6). A total of 54.2% (13/24) of the EGISTs displayed tumor vessels. Overall, 95.8% (23/24) of the masses showed marked enhancement and 87.5% (21/24) demonstrated heterogeneous enhancement. Calcification, hemorrhage, ascites and lymphadenopathy were rare characteristics in the EGISTs. Distant metastases were present in 10 patients (41.7%). The size, borders, tumor vessels and distant metastasis correlated with high

  4. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPF raises and directs funds to support exemplary research projects in the field of pancreas disease Fellows Symposium A three-day symposium pairing together world class physicians and scientists with medical fellows. ... Research Grant Application Research History Grant Review Committee ...

  5. Myocardial Fatty Foci in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Rop, Baiywo; Derrick, Edward; Armaly, Jamil; Siddiqui, Usman

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic syndrome. The hallmark of the disease is multiple hamartomatous lesions in multiple organ systems. Common cardiac manifestations of TSC are rhabdomyomas, which are a benign tumor of striated muscle. In some patients with TSC, myocardial fatty foci (MFF) deposition has been described with or without the presence of rhabdomyomas. We present the case of a 24-year-old female with TSC and refractory seizures, who was evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for an intracardiac right ventricular mass thought to be rhabdomyoma on echocardiography and for multiple areas of myocardial fatty deposition. Myocardial fatty deposition is a common finding in patients at cardiac imaging. In patients with TSC, it is critical that fatty deposits and lipomas are clearly distinguished from rhabdomyoma. CMR is an integral part of characterizing cardiac masses as it has superior soft tissue characterization and a wider field of view compared to echocardiography. A positive correlation has been shown between the number of MFF and the degree of extracardiac tuberous sclerosis (TS) manifestations suggesting that MFF may indicate more severe multiorgan disease in patients with TSC. Cardiac MR is superior to echocardiogram in evaluating and distinguishing intracardiac lipomas and fatty deposits from rhabdomyomas. Published studies have indicated that in patients with TSC, the presence of MFF correlates with the severity of multiorgan disease as was seen in our case. PMID:27555991

  6. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  7. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  8. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: (1) describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, (2) outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, (3) illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and (4) highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory, and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with brain

  9. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  10. Pediatric Abdominal Organ Transplantation: Current Indications, Techniques, and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, A Luana; Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Chang, Patricia T; Lee, Edward Y; Phillips, Grace S

    2016-03-01

    The anatomy, normal postoperative radiological appearance, and imaging features of common postoperative complications of pediatric abdominal transplants are reviewed, including renal, liver, and intestinal transplants. Doppler ultrasound is the mainstay of imaging after transplantation. Computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography, MR imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, MR cholangiopancreatography, conventional angiography, and nuclear medicine imaging may be used for problem-solving in pediatric transplant patients. Accurate and timely radiological diagnosis of transplant complications facilitates appropriate treatment and minimizes morbidity and mortality. PMID:26896225

  11. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  12. CT imaging findings of a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, M; Geetha, P; Lakshmi Kavitha, N

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT), also known as a Pindborg tumour, with local aggressive behaviour. CT imaging showed a large expansile bone-forming lesion in the mandible, which showed the exact extent and nature of the lesion. We briefly discuss the imaging features of CEOT and the relevant literature. PMID:22190756

  13. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  14. Solid tumors of the pancreas can put on a mask through cystic change

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Solid pancreatic tumors such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT), and pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) may occasionally manifest as cystic lesions. In this study, we have put together our accumulated experience with cystic manifestations of various solid tumors of the pancreas. Methods From 2000 to 2006, 376 patients with pancreatic solid tumor resections were reviewed. Ten (2.66%) of these tumors appeared on radiological imaging studies as cystic lesions. We performed a retrospective review of medical records and pathologic findings of these 10 cases. Results Of the ten cases in which solid tumors of the pancreas manifested as cystic lesions, six were PDAC with cystic degeneration, two were SPT undergone complete cystic change, one was cystic PET, and one was a cystic schwannoma. The mean tumor size of the cystic portion in PDAC was 7.3 cm, and three patients were diagnosed as 'pseudocyst' with or without cancer. Two SPT were found incidentally in young women and were diagnosed as other cystic neoplasms. One cystic endocrine tumor was preoperatively suspected as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm or mucinous cystic neoplasm. Conclusions Cystic changes of pancreas solid tumors are extremely rare. However, the possibility of cystic manifestation of pancreas solid tumors should be kept in mind. PMID:21771323

  15. [The pancreas and alcohol].

    PubMed

    Singer, M V

    1985-07-20

    The action of acute and chronic administration of ethanol on pancreatic exocrine secretion in humans and several animal species is reviewed. If the data concerning the secretory action of ethanol on the pancreas are to the property assessed, several experimental variables have to be considered. Acute intravenous administration of ethanol inhibits basal and hormonally stimulated pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate and protein in nonalcoholic humans and most species of animals tested. Oral or intraduodenal ethanol causes moderate stimulation of pancreatic bicarbonate and enzyme secretion. Since anticholinergic agents and truncal vagotomy diminish the ethanol-induced inhibition of pancreatic secretion in the intact animal, it is possible that the action of ethanol on the pancreas is at least partly mediated by inhibitory cholinergic mechanisms. The action of ethanol on the pancreas may also be mediated by release of gastrointestinal hormones. Intravenous and oral administration of ethanol releases gastrin in dogs but not in humans. Pancreatic polypeptide is unlikely to be the hormonal mediator of the ethanol-induced inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans and dogs, since ethanol does not release pancreatic polypeptide. The main secretory changes induced by chronic alcoholism in humans and dogs are increased basal secretion of pancreatic enzymes and decreased basal bicarbonate output, and these secretory changes may favour the occurrence of protein precipitates which are believed to be the first lesion of chronic pancreatitis in man. A decrease in the concentration of "pancreatic stone protein" in pancreatic juice may favour the development of protein precipitates in chronic alcoholic patients. PMID:3901251

  16. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  18. Finding corner point correspondence from wavelet decomposition of image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohar, Mareboyana; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    A time efficient algorithm for image registration between two images that differ in translation is discussed. The algorithm is based on coarse-fine strategy using wavelet decomposition of both the images. The wavelet decomposition serves two different purposes: (1) its high frequency components are used to detect feature points (corner points here) and (2) it provides coarse-to-fine structure for making the algorithm time efficient. The algorithm is based on detecting the corner points from one of the images called reference image and computing corresponding points from the other image called test image by using local correlations using 7x7 windows centered around the corner points. The corresponding points are detected at the lowest decomposition level in a search area of about 11x11 (depending on the translation) and potential points of correspondence are projected onto higher levels. In the subsequent levels the local correlations are computed in a search area of no more than 3x3 for refinement of the correspondence.

  19. Intraocular lymphoma after cardiac transplantation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging. PMID:23323042

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, N M; Morgan, M L; Almarzouqi, S J; Lee, A G

    2016-05-01

    PurposeGiant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis that affects medium-to-large-caliber arteries. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential as involvement of the ophthalmic artery or its branches may cause blindness. Radiographic findings may be variable and non-specific leading to delay in diagnosis. We conducted a review of the literature on neuroimaging findings in GCA and present a retrospective case series from tertiary-care ophthalmic referral centers of three patients with significant neuroimaging findings in biopsy-proven GCA.MethodsRetrospective case series of biopsy-proven GCA cases with neuroimaging findings at the Department of Ophthalmology, Blanton Eye Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital between 2010-2015 were included in this study. Literature search was conducted using Google Scholar and Medline search engines between the years 1970 and 2015.ResultsWe report findings of optic nerve enhancement, optic nerve sheath enhancement, and the first description in the English-language ophthalmic literature, to our knowledge, of chiasmal enhancement in biopsy-proven GCA. We describe four main categories of neuroimaging findings that may be seen in GCA from our series and from past cases in the literature.DiscussionIt is essential that clinicians be aware of the possible radiographic findings in GCA. Appropriate and prompt treatment should not be delayed based upon these findings. PMID:26915748

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jeong A; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection. PMID:27587946

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jeong A; Lee, In Sook; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection. PMID:27587946

  3. Imaging diagnosis-paraganglioma of the cauda equina: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Duconseille, Anne-Carole; Louvet, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging features of a cauda equina paraganglioma in a 5-year-old dog are described. Imaging revealed a well-defined, strongly contrast-enhancing mass invading the adjacent vertebral body and infiltrating the intervertebral foramen bilaterally. Flow void, compatible with increased drainage veins around the mass, and macroscopically visible neovessels in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, as reported in numerous human studies, were not visible in this single case. The tumor recurred despite aggressive surgery and radiotherapy. This neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cauda equina abnormalities in dogs. PMID:24320842

  4. Decidualized Ovarian Endometrioma in a Pregnant Woman Mimicking Ovarian Malignancy: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasonographic Findings.

    PubMed

    Izza Rozalli, Faizatul; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Boylan, Colm; Deb, Pratima

    2015-10-01

    Decidualized ovarian endometrioma is a rare phenomenon in pregnancy, which can mimic ovarian malignancy in imaging and often poses a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of a large ruptured decidualized ovarian endometrioma in a 15 weeks gestation patient, and we will describe the imaging characteristics (ultrasonography and MR imaging findings) and the histopathological findings (macro- and microscopically). PMID:26715980

  5. Decidualized Ovarian Endometrioma in a Pregnant Woman Mimicking Ovarian Malignancy: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasonographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Izza Rozalli, Faizatul; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Boylan, Colm; Deb, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    Decidualized ovarian endometrioma is a rare phenomenon in pregnancy, which can mimic ovarian malignancy in imaging and often poses a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of a large ruptured decidualized ovarian endometrioma in a 15 weeks gestation patient, and we will describe the imaging characteristics (ultrasonography and MR imaging findings) and the histopathological findings (macro- and microscopically). PMID:26715980

  6. Statistical techniques to find similar objects in images

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K

    2003-10-16

    One problem in similarity-based object retrieval (SBOR) is how to define and estimate the similarity between two objects. In this paper we present a shape similarity measure based on thin-plate splines, and compare its performance with several other measures used in SBOR. We evaluate the methods on both artificial and real images.

  7. Sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of neurocutaneous melanosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Woodley-Cook, Joel; Sgro, Michael; Bharatha, Aditya

    2016-03-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis is a rare nonfamilial phakomatosis characterized by large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi plus the presence of central nervous system melanosis or melanoma. We report a case of a male infant with a giant posteroaxial nevus and evidence of intracranial melanosis on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26973729

  8. Sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of neurocutaneous melanosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Woodley-Cook, Joel; Sgro, Michael; Bharatha, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis is a rare nonfamilial phakomatosis characterized by large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi plus the presence of central nervous system melanosis or melanoma. We report a case of a male infant with a giant posteroaxial nevus and evidence of intracranial melanosis on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26973729

  9. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes. PMID:26395141

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pericardium: normal and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Higgins, C.B.; Lanzer, P.; Lipton, M.J.; Schiller, N.; Crooks, L.E.; Botvinick, E.B.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-02-01

    Twenty normal subjects and ten patients with pericardial abnormalities underwent ECG-gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thorax using a 0.35-tesla superconducting system. The patients with pericardial abnormalities were also evaluated with serial chest radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, and/or angiography. ECG gating was necessary to identify the normal pericardium, which was visualized as a 1- to 2-mm-wide curvilinear structure of low signal intensity. Pericardial thickening in constrictive pericarditis was clearly delineated on gated MR images. Pericardial inflammation caused a marked increase in signal intensity as well as thickening of the pericardium. Pericardial effusions and pericardial adhesions were also demonstrated. A simple pericardial cyst and a complex pericardial mass were identified and differentiated from pericardial fat and diaphragmatic eventration. MR appears to be an important modality for the evaluation of pericardial disease.

  11. Presacral myelolipoma: a case report and review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kevin S; Lee, Dwight; Huang, Mingqian; Gould, Elaine S

    2012-01-01

    Extra-adrenal myelolipoma is a relatively rare entity, with fewer than 50 cases reported in literature. We present a case of a 79 year-old female who presented for evaluation of hip fracture following trauma, where a lobulated presacral mass with mixed fat/soft tissue attenuation was incidentally seen on initial bone algorithm pelvic CT. Subsequent MRI showed signal characteristics of a lesion with mixed fat and soft tissue composition. The lesion demonstrated stability on follow-up imaging. An elective surgical resection was performed which yielded a grossly fatty mass. The diagnosis of presacral myelolipoma was confirmed on microscopic examination. Following description of our case, we conduct a literature review of the imaging characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment of presacral myelolipoma. PMID:23378876

  12. Journals Find Many Images in Research Are Faked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Kristin Roovers was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania with a bright career ahead of her--a trusted member of a research laboratory at the medical school studying the role of cell growth in diabetes. When an editor of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" did a spot-check on one of her images for an article in 2005, Roovers'…

  13. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X; Cooper, D; Lachaine, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  14. Pineal region masses--imaging findings and surgical approaches.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Forrester D; Abele, Travis A; Sivakumar, Walavan; Taussky, Philipp; Shah, Lubdha M; Salzman, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the pineal region is complex. Despite advances in surgical techniques since the first reported successful pineal region surgery in the early 20th century, pineal region surgery remains challenging owing to the proximity of deep cerebral veins and dorsal midbrain structures critical for vision. In this article, we review the relevant surgical anatomy of the pineal region and discuss historically important and current surgical approaches. We describe specific imaging features of pineal region masses that may affect surgical planning and review neoplastic and nonneoplastic masses that occur in the pineal region. PMID:25027864

  15. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the relatively uniform pathology and the unyielding dismal outcome associated with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of gross and microscopic pathologies, and a range of clinical outcomes. The common cystic lesions of the pancreas are reviewed with emphasis on practical tips for distinguishing between the main entities. PMID:20953247

  16. (Development of gamma-emitting, receptor-binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas): Progress report, October 1, 1987--October 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Our objectives as stated in the last removal submission were to synthesize a radioiodinated derivative of 4IQNB with a partition coefficient 10-fold less than that of 4IQNB, i.e., similar to that of QNB; to characterize the interaction of 4IQNB with the m-AChR isolated from pancreas; and to synthesize a high affinity analogue of QNB radiolabeled with F-18. Since the submission of the competitive renewal, we have prepared and submitted three manuscripts relating to studies on the muscarinic receptor. 2 tabs.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Childhood Period Nasopharynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Elif; Sahin, Burcu; Ciledag, Nazan; Arda, Kemal Niyazi; Caglar, Emrah; Ilhan, Inci Ergurhan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a rarely seen tumor in childhood. It is mostly detected late as the clinical features are similar to other childhood tumors which affect the nasopharynx and adenoidal hypertrophy. Therefore, the radiological features of childhood tumors of the nasopharynx must be well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of MR imaging features of childhood nasopharynx cancer. Material/Methods The study included 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients under the age of 18 years who presented at hospital between February 2008 and March 2014 and who had tissue diagnosis and MRI of the nasopharynx region. The MRI scans were evaluated by two radiologists. Loco-regional spread, asymmetry, signal intensity of the tumors, and lymph nodes were evaluated. Results In all the patients there was a mass which narrowed the nasopharynx. In all cases, unilateral mastoid opacification was observed. In 9 cases (90%), parapharyngeal extension was found. In 8 cases (80%), the mass showed an extension into the nasal cavity or oropharynx. In 5 cases (50%), there was an involvement of the skull base. In 3 patients (30%), an extension to the masticator space and pterygopalatine fossa was found. There were enlarged cervical lymph nodes bilaterally in 10 cases (100%). In 4 cases (40%), a lateral retropharyngeal lymph node was detected. Conclusions Childhood nasopharyngeal cancers are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. MR imaging can be helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of childhood nasopharynx cancer from other diseases of the nasopharynx. PMID:26767071

  18. Retroperitoneal Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma: Imaging Findings and Transarterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Huojun Yang Jijin Lu Jianping; Sheng Jin; Yuan Min; Jiang Xu; Li Yuxiao; Gupta, Sanjay

    2010-04-15

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (EOS) is an uncommon and usually highly aggressive mesenchymal tumor. Retroperitoneal extraskeletal osteosarma (REOS) is exceedingly rare. Due to the rare nature of the disease, both the diagnosis and the management of REOS can be challenging. We present the clinical history, CT findings, angiographic manifestations, and use of transarterial chemoembolization for treatment in a case of REOS. To our knowledge, the angiographic features of and attempt at transarterial treatment of REOS have not been reported in the literature.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neck. Part II. Pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Moss, A.A.; Gamsu, G.; Clark, O.H.; Gooding, G.A.W.; Webb, W.R.

    1984-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the neck were obtained in 14 patients with thyroid, parathyroid, lymph node, or laryngeal lesions. Tumors and lymph nodes were more easily differentiated from muscle and blood vessels with MR than with CT because of the superior soft tissue contrast of MR. Tissue characterization allowed MR differentiation of thyroid nodules, thyroid cysts, and parathyroid tumors from normal thyroid tissue; however, nonspecifically increased T1 and T2 relaxation times overlapped for a variety of neoplastic and inflammatory conditions. Thyroid cyst fluid had the greatest water content and longest T1 and T2 times of all tissues studied. Parathyroid hyperplasia could not be differentiated from parathyroid adenoma; however, parathyroid tumors had slightly longer T1 and T2 times than thyroid nodules or lymph nodes. With further experience, MR tissue characterization may become a useful technique for evaluating neck masses.

  20. Clinical and Imaging Findings in an Infant With Zika Embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Culjat, Marko; Darling, Stephen E; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Ching, Natascha; Kumar, Mukesh; Min, Sarah K; Wong, Rupa; Grant, Leon; Melish, Marian E

    2016-09-15

    Recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks have been associated with an increased incidence of neonatal microcephaly. Subsequently, tropism for the brain was established in human fetal brain tissue. We present the first congenital ZIKV infection in the United States, confirmed by high ZIKV immunoglobulin M antibody titers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The phenotypic characteristics of the patient fall within fetal brain disruption sequence, suggesting impaired brain development in the second half of gestation. Brain imaging revealed an almost agyric brain with diffuse parenchymal calcifications, hydrocephalus ex vacuo, and cerebellar hypoplasia. Ophthalmologic examination revealed macular pigment stippling and optic nerve atrophy. Liver, lungs, heart, and bone marrow were not affected. The patient had progressive neurologic deterioration in the first month of life. The discovery of ZIKV infection in human fetal brain tissue along with serologic confirmation proves the vertical transmission of ZIKV. Therefore, ZIKV has joined the group of congenital infections. PMID:27193747

  1. Venous compression syndromes: clinical features, imaging findings and management

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R; Oliveira, G R; Ganguli, S; Kalva, S

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic venous compression is caused by compression of the veins in tight anatomic spaces by adjacent structures, and is seen in a number of locations. Venous compression syndromes, including Paget–Schroetter syndrome, Nutcracker syndrome, May–Thurner syndrome and popliteal venous compression will be discussed. These syndromes are usually seen in young, otherwise healthy individuals, and can lead to significant overall morbidity. Aside from clinical findings and physical examination, diagnosis can be made with ultrasound, CT, or MR conventional venography. Symptoms and haemodynamic significance of the compression determine the ideal treatment method. PMID:23908347

  2. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hunter, Jill V; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R; Wu, Trevor C; McCauley, Stephen R; Vogt, Gregory S; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian; Levin, Harvey S

    2016-04-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p < 0.04). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by tractography did not significantly differ between groups. However, DTI metrics were significantly correlated with declarative memory (e.g., left ventral striatum ADC with delayed recall, r = -0.74; p = 0.02) and with RT to the repeating number sequence (r = 0.70; p = 0.04) in the boxers. Years of boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from -0.65 for the right ventral striatum to -0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = -0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = -0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed. PMID:26414735

  3. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  4. CT Imaging Findings after Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Olga R.; Thornton, Eavan; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Mahadevan, Anand; Raptopoulos, Vassilious; Brook, Alexander; Najarian, Robert; Sheiman, Robert; Siewert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study radiological response to stereotactic radiotherapy for focal liver tumors. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study CTs of 68 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy for liver tumors between 01/2006 and 01/2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Two independent reviewers evaluated lesion volume and enhancement pattern of the lesion and of juxtaposed liver parenchyma. Results. 36 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 25 with liver metastases, and seven with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) were included in study. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 ± 7.1 months for HCC, 6.4 ± 5.1 months for metastases, and 10.1 ± 4.8 months for the CCC. Complete response was seen in 4/36 (11.1%) HCCs and 1/25 (4%) metastases. Partial response (>30% decrease in long diameter) was seen in 25/36 (69%) HCCs, 14/25 (58%) metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Partial response followed by local recurrence (>20% increase in long diameter from nadir) occurred in 2/36 (6%) HCCs and 4/25 (17%) metastases. Liver parenchyma adjacent to the lesion demonstrated a prominent halo of delayed enhancement in 27/36 (78%) of HCCs, 19/21 (91%) of metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Conclusion. Sustainable radiological partial response to stereotactic radiotherapy is most frequent outcome seen in liver lesions. Prominent halo of delayed enhancement of the adjacent liver is frequent finding. PMID:26221135

  5. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN SMALL RUMINANTS WITH BRAIN DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, Katrin; Oevermann, Anna; Precht, Christina; Lauper, Josiane; Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Brain disease is an important cause of neurologic deficits in small ruminants, however few MRI features have been described. The aim of this retrospective, case series study was to describe MRI characteristics in a group of small ruminants with confirmed brain disease. A total of nine small ruminants (six sheep and three goats) met inclusion criteria. All had neurologic disorders localized to the brain and histopathologic confirmation. In animals with toxic-metabolic diseases, there were bilaterally symmetric MRI lesions affecting either the gray matter (one animal with polioencephalomalacia) or the white matter (two animals with enterotoxemia). In animals with suppurative inflammation, asymmetric focal brainstem lesions were present (two animals with listeric encephalitis), or lesions typical of an intra-axial (one animal) or dural abscess (one animal), respectively. No MRI lesions were detected in one animal with suspected viral cerebellitis and one animal with parasitic migration tracts. No neoplastic or vascular lesions were identified in this case series. Findings from the current study supported the use of MRI for diagnosing brain diseases in small ruminants. PMID:26776819

  6. The unicornuate uterus and its variants: clinical presentation, imaging findings, and associated complications.

    PubMed

    Khati, Nadia J; Frazier, Aletta A; Brindle, Kathleen A

    2012-02-01

    This article will describe the different variants of the unicornuate uterus, their clinical presentation and imaging findings, as well their associated complications. We will also review the associated renal anomalies. Patients' symptoms and their imaging findings will vary depending on the unicornuate subtype. Radiologic evaluation includes a combination of hysterosalpingography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Complications include obstetric ones related to the small uterine size and endometriosis and ectopic pregnancies when a cavitary rudimentary uterine horn is present. Radiologists should be familiar with all variants of the unicornuate uterus as well as their clinical presentation and associated imaging findings. PMID:22298877

  7. Hip arthropathy in a patient with primary hemochromatosis: MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Mohana-Borges, Aurea V R; Campell, Loretta; Trudell, Debra; Haghighi, Parviz; Resnick, Donald

    2005-03-01

    Arthropathy is a major clinical manifestation in primary hemochromatosis, typically affecting the metacarpophalangeal joints. Hip arthropathy is not uncommon, with radiologic features resembling osteoarthritis or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease. We describe the MR imaging findings of the hip in a patient with severe hip arthropathy and primary hemochromatosis and correlate them with the histopathologic findings. MR imaging showed severe degenerative changes, with large subchondral cysts and subchondral sclerosis in the femoral head and acetabulum. There was conspicuous correlation between MR imaging and pathologic findings of the resected femoral head. However, MR imaging failed to reveal intra-articular iron. PMID:15316682

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile spondyloarthropathy and effects of treatment observed on subsequent imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to diagnose and monitor treatment effects of juvenile spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Our objective was to describe MRI findings in juvenile SpA and determine predictors of active sacroiliitis and response to treatment. Methods Children who had MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints and were referred to the pediatric rheumatology clinic from 2009 to 2012 were retrospectively studied. The clinical parameters, laboratory studies and findings on MRI were collected and a composite score ratio (CR) was calculated for both SI joints on each MRI study based on a semi-quantitative scale that included evaluation of bone marrow edema (BME), synovial enhancement (SE), and erosions (ER). The findings on MRI were correlated with clinical and laboratory values. Results 50 subjects who underwent 76 MRI for suspected or known SpA were included in the study. Sacroiliitis was seen in 48 MRIs in 32 subjects. Of the subjects with sacroiliitis, mean age ± standard deviation was 13.7 ± 2.6 years, 71% were male and 41% were HLA B27 positive. SE without BME was seen in 31% cases of sacroiliitis. In subjects with sacroiliitis, 79% also had hip arthritis and 41% had enthesitis of the pelvic region on MRI. In 38% of subjects with sacroiliitis, physical exam was not indicative of sacroiliitis or hip arthritis. Longitudinal data were available for 13 subjects. Sacroiliitis on MRI improved in 9 subjects with the greatest improvement in MRI composite score ratio after initiation of etanercept therapy. CR improvement was due to improvement of BME and SE components, while the ER score remained the same or worsened in all but 1 subject. Conclusion History, physical exam or laboratory data may not predict sacroiliitis in children. Magnetic resonance imaging plays a valuable role in the initial evaluation and later treatment monitoring of children with spondyloarthropathy. Synovial enhancement is significantly reduced after treatment, and

  9. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  10. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Katsourakis, Anastasios; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Noussios, Georgios; Chatzis, Iosiph; Chatzitheoclitos, Efthimios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  11. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Noussios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  12. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease becomes more chronic, patients can develop malnutrition and weight loss. If the pancreas becomes destroyed ... with these disorders may have chronic pain, diarrhea, malnutrition, or diabetes. Treatment focuses on pain control and ...

  13. Allograft pancreas: pale acinar nodules.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Drachenberg, Cinthia

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic pale-staining acinar nodules were characterized in native pancreas in the 1980s under a variety of names but have been infrequently reported since. We retrospectively studied the frequency and characteristics of pale acinar nodules in allograft pancreas biopsies, as compared to a sampling of native pancreas specimens at our center. Pale acinar nodules were present in 13% (9/69) of allograft biopsies from 22% (7/32) of transplant patients, and 23% (5/22) of native pancreas surgical specimens, although more nodules per pancreas area were present in allograft needle biopsies. Acinar nodules had size of 100 to 700 μm, were periodic acid-Schiff pale, were synaptophysin negative, stained more weakly with keratin CAM 5.2 compared to surrounding parenchyma, and had a low proliferative rate. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed paucity of zymogen granules with dilated cistern-like structures. In our experience, pale acinar nodules have similar features in allograft and native pancreas specimens, yet remain of uncertain etiology and significance. PMID:27063474

  14. Pancreas Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Guney, Michelle A.; Gannon, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by decreased function of insulin-producing insulin β cells and insufficient insulin output resulting from an absolute (Type 1) or relative (Type 2) inadequate functional β cell mass. Both forms of the disease would greatly benefit from treatment strategies that could enhance β cell regeneration and/or function. Successful and reliable methods of generatingβ cells or whole islets from progenitor cells in vivo or in vitro could lead to restoration of β cell mass in individuals with Type 1 diabetes and enhanced β cell compensation in Type 2 patients. A thorough understanding of the normal developmental processes that occur during pancreatic organogenesis, e.g., transcription factors, cell signaling molecules, and cell-cell interactions that regulate endocrine differentiation from the embryonic pancreatic epithelium, is required in order to successfully reach these goals. This review summarizes our current understanding of pancreas development, with particular emphasis on factors intrinsic or extrinsic to the pancreatic epithelium that are involved in regulating the development and differentiation of the various pancreatic cell types. We also discuss the recent progress in generating insulin-producing cells from progenitor sources. PMID:19750517

  15. [Intraoperative pancreas puncture cytology].

    PubMed

    Eggert, A; Lattmann, E; Kopf, R; Pfeiffer, M; Klöppel, G

    1984-01-01

    In the case of 10 to 15% of surgical patients with a pancreatic disorder an intraoperative diagnosis had to be made when a preoperative diagnosis had not yielded a definite result. Fine needle aspiration biopsy ( FNAB ) of the pancreas provided the basis for intraoperative differentiation of malignant and benign pancreatic processes. 244 pancreatic biopsies were carried out in 100 patients. It was possible to make a statement in 99% of the cases, with 65 malignant and 35 benign changes. In 83% the cytological diagnosis was correct; the method yielded incorrect-negative results in 7% of the cases. In 9% the presence of tumour cells was only suspected. There were no incorrect positive cancer diagnoses. FNAB caused no postoperative complications. Intraoperative bleeding after FBAB had to be stopped with a suture in one case. Transitory, asymptomatic hyperamylasemy must be expected in 25% of the patients after FNAB . This diagnostic technique is recommended in preference to the histological tissue removal methods because of its low risk factor. At least 2 biopsies of the suspect area with 2 smears are required, as a training in this diagnostic technique. PMID:6730761

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of progesterone receptors in endocrine cells of the human pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Gambacorta, M.; Zamboni, G.; Coggi, G.; Viale, G.

    1990-01-01

    Progesterone receptors (PgR) have been immunocytochemically localized in the nuclei of several (40% to 75%) endocrine cells of the human pancreas and in a more variable number of neoplastic cells of 7 of 18 endocrine pancreatic tumors. Conversely the exocrine epithelial cells of the pancreas did not exhibit any PgR immunoreactivity in normal as well as in different pathologic conditions, including pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Estrogen receptors were not detected in any of the pancreatic samples investigated. Double immunocytochemical experiments have documented that PgR immunoreactivity in normal Langerhans islets is a consistent feature of most (75%) glucagon-producing A cells, of approximately 5% to 20% of insulin-producing B cells, and of a variable percentage of pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-producing cells, ranging from 5% to 70%. These figures were not affected by the sex, age, or underlying disease of the patients. The reported findings corroborate previous clinical and experimental evidence indicating that sex steroid hormones may have some regulatory effects on the functional activity of the endocrine pancreas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2240168

  17. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP. In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.

  18. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP.more » In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.« less

  19. Severe neurologic impairment and uncommon magnetic resonance imaging findings after carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Clément; Bouix, Julien; Poyat, Chrystelle; Alhanati, Laure; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Falzone, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of fatal poisoning worldwide and can lead to severe brain damages. We report a delayed encephalopathy after a severe carbon monoxide poisoning with uncommon magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:26078257

  20. A Review of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shenton, ME; Hamoda, HM; Schneiderman, JS; Bouix, S; Pasternak, O; Rathi, Y; M-A, Vu; Purohit, MP; Helmer, K; Koerte, I; Lin, AP; C-F, Westin; Kikinis, R; Kubicki, M; Stern, RA; Zafonte, R

    2013-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also referred to as concussion, remains a controversial diagnosis because the brain often appears quite normal on conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Such conventional tools, however, do not adequately depict brain injury in mTBI because they are not sensitive to detecting diffuse axonal injuries (DAI), also described as traumatic axonal injuries (TAI), the major brain injuries in mTBI. Furthermore, for the 15 to 30% of those diagnosed with mTBI on the basis of cognitive and clinical symptoms, i.e., the “miserable minority,” the cognitive and physical symptoms do not resolve following the first three months post-injury. Instead, they persist, and in some cases lead to long-term disability. The explanation given for these chronic symptoms, i.e., postconcussive syndrome, particularly in cases where there is no discernible radiological evidence for brain injury, has led some to posit a psychogenic origin. Such attributions are made all the easier since both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are frequently co-morbid with mTBI. The challenge is thus to use neuroimaging tools that are sensitive to DAI/TAI, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in order to detect brain injuries in mTBI. Of note here, recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, such as DTI, make it possible to characterize better extant brain abnormalities in mTBI. These advances may lead to the development of biomarkers of injury, as well as to staging of reorganization and reversal of white matter changes following injury, and to the ability to track and to characterize changes in brain injury over time. Such tools will likely be used in future research to evaluate treatment efficacy, given their enhanced sensitivity to alterations in the brain. In this article we review the incidence of mTBI and the importance of characterizing this patient population using objective radiological measures. Evidence

  1. Multi-centre analysis of incidental findings on low-resolution CT attenuation correction images

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, R; Kane, T; Elias, M; Howes, A; Birchall, J; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review new incidental findings detected on low-resolution CT attenuation correction (CTAC) images acquired during single-photon emission CT (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and to determine whether the CTAC images had diagnostic value and warrant reporting. Methods: A multicentre study was performed in four UK nuclear medicine departments. CTAC images acquired as part of MPI performed using SPECT were evaluated to identify incidental findings. New findings considered to be clinically significant were evaluated further. Positive predictive value (PPV) was determined at the time of definitive diagnosis. Results: Of 1819 patients studied, 497 (27.3%) had a positive CTAC finding. 51 (2.8%) patients had findings that were clinically significant at the time of the CTAC report and had not been previously diagnosed. Only four (0.2%) of these were potentially detrimental to patient outcome. Conclusion: One centre had a PPV of 0%, and the study suggests that these CTAC images should not be reported. Two centres with more modern equipment had low PPVs of 0% and 6%, respectively, and further research is suggested prior to drawing a conclusion. The centre with best quality CT had a PPV of 67%, and the study suggests that CTAC images from this equipment should be reported. Advances in knowledge: This study is unique compared with previous studies that have reported only the potential to identify incidental findings on low-resolution CT images. This study both identifies and evaluates new clinically significant incidental findings, and it demonstrates that the benefit of reporting the CTAC images depends on the type of equipment used. PMID:25135310

  2. Cystic Neoplasms of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ribaux, C.; Schnyder, P.

    1990-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and their diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. This report details 7 patients who had histologically proven serous cystadenoma4, mucinous cystadenoma2 and cystadeno carcinoma1. Computed tomography and sonography allowed excellent preoperative assessment but to attempt a distinction between the histological variants may be hazardous. Two tumours were only autopsy findings and 5 patients underwent laparotomy. It is confirmed that potentially malignant mucinous cystadenomas and cytadenocarcinomas should be resected whenever possible; serous cystadenomas are always benign and should therefore be resected only when the diagnosis is doubtful or if they cause symptoms. PMID:2278913

  3. Attempted suicide by insulin injection treated with artificial pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gin, H; Larnaudie, B; Aubertin, J

    1983-01-01

    An elderly woman with longstanding insulin dependent diabetes tried to commit suicide by injecting 400 units of insulin subcutaneously (usual total daily dose 56 units). She was admitted to hospital within the hour and treated with the aid of an artificial pancreas. This avoided the usual difficulty of the physician having to cope with rapid and substantial fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations and 67 hours after the overdose insulin was reinstituted. Using an artificial pancreas in insulin overdose is an important advance in management and may avoid the need for surgical intervention such as excising the site of injection. Images p250-a PMID:6409269

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a patient with struma ovarii.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tohru; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Maebayashi, Tetunori; Doh, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Mniki, Yumo

    2014-06-01

    In this report, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of struma ovarii (SO) in a patient who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the pelvis and subsequent histological analysis is described. The solid portion of SO showed a high apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, indicating unrestricted diffusion, and each loculus of SO showed different ADC values due to the different viscosity of the cyst contents in each loculus. These unique and characteristic DWI findings may serve as a helpful sign in making the correct diagnosis of SO when DWI findings are interpreted in conjunction with conventional MRI findings. PMID:25272567

  5. Imaging diagnosis--magnetic resonance imaging findings in a dog with sequential brain infarction.

    PubMed

    Major, Alison C; Caine, Abby; Rodriguez, Sue B; Cherubini, Giunio B

    2012-01-01

    An adult greyhound was evaluated on three occasions for acute, intracranial neurologic signs. Based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, there were T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense, noncontrast enhancing lesions in the cerebellum, and brain stem. Using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), the lesions were characterized initially by restricted water diffusion. The presumptive diagnosis on each occasion was acute ischemic cerebrovascular accident leading to infarction. This allowed us to characterize the changes in appearance of infarcted neural tissue on the standard MR sequences over time, and to confirm that the DWI could be successfully used in low-field imaging. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound. PMID:22731883

  6. Imaging diagnosis-magnetic resonance imaging findings of an intracranial epidural tuberculoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Ródenas, Sergio; Foradada, Laia; Lloret, Albert; Pérez de Val, Bernat; Añor, Sònia

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is highly sensitive for detecting tuberculomas in human patients but the specificity of the MR imaging features is low. Misdiagnosis with intracranial neoplasia is common, especially with dural-based lesions or lesions located in the epidural space. We describe the MR imaging characteristics of an intracranial epidural tuberculoma caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a dog. The intracranial mass and skull flat bone lysis and erosion are similar to those described in human caseating tuberculomas and can mimic intracranial neoplastic disease. PMID:22702644

  7. Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  8. In Vitro Pancreas Organogenesis from Dispersed Mouse Embryonic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells 1. The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development 2-4. These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  9. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  10. MR imaging of the pelvis: a guide to incidental musculoskeletal findings for abdominal radiologists.

    PubMed

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Girish, Gandikota; Kaza, Ravi K; Jacobson, Jon; Fessell, David; Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David

    2014-08-01

    Occasionally patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging for presumed pelvic disease demonstrate unexpected musculoskeletal imaging findings in the imaged field. Such incidental findings can be challenging to the abdominal radiologist, who may not be familiar with their appearance or know the appropriate diagnostic considerations. Findings can include both normal and abnormal bone marrow, osseous abnormalities such as Paget's disease, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, stress and insufficiency fractures, and athletic pubalgia, benign neoplasms such as enchondroma and bone island, malignant processes such as metastasis and chondrosarcoma, soft tissue processes such as abscess, nerve-related tumors, and chordoma, joint- and bursal-related processes such as sacroiliitis, iliopsoas bursitis, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and labral tears, and iatrogenic processes such as bone graft or bone biopsy. Though not all-encompassing, this essay will help abdominal radiologists to identify and describe this variety of pelvic musculoskeletal conditions, understand key radiologic findings, and synthesize a differential diagnosis when appropriate. PMID:24682526

  11. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  12. Additional Resection of the Pancreas Body Prevents Postoperative Pancreas Fistula in Patients with Portal Annular Pancreas Who Undergo Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Jun; Mano, Yohei; Harada, Noboru; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is a rare variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body and surrounds the portal vein or superior mesenteric vein. Upon pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), when the pancreas is cut at the neck, two cut surfaces are created. Thus, the cut surface of the pancreas becomes larger than usual and the dorsal cut surface is behind the portal vein, therefore pancreatic fistula after PD has been reported frequently. We planned subtotal stomach-preserving PD in a 45-year-old woman with underlying insulinoma of the pancreas head. When the pancreas head was dissected, the uncinate process was extended and fused to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body. Additional resection of the pancreas body 1 cm distal to the pancreas tail to the left side of the original resection line was performed. The new cut surface became one and pancreaticojejunostomy was performed as usual. No postoperative complications such as pancreatic fistula occurred. Additional resection of the pancreas body may be a standardized procedure in patients with PAP in cases of pancreas cut surface reconstruction. PMID:22532811

  13. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  14. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions. PMID:26172167

  15. MR Imaging Findings of a Leiomyosarcoma of the Thoracic Spine: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tahara, K; Yamashita, K; Hiwatashi, A; Togao, O; Kikuchi, K; Endo, M; Otsuka, H; Oda, Y; Honda, H

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the thoracic spine. Primary leiomyosarcoma is a malignant connective tissue tumor originating from smooth muscle cells. Leiomyosarcoma frequently occurs in the uterus, retroperitoneal space, gastrointestinal tract, and deep soft tissues; primary leiomyosarcoma of the bone is rare. The MR imaging including intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging findings of the current case indicated a low diffusion coefficient and high blood flow, which were in concurrence with high cell density on histology and increased vascularity by angiography. Although some benign tumors such as osteoblastoma and giant cell tumor would show similar findings on IVIM imaging, these additional imaging features may narrow the differential diagnosis of spinal tumors. PMID:26170221

  16. Start Your Search Engines. Part 2: When Image is Everything, Here are Some Great Ways to Find One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Anna; Mowers, Helen

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that Google is great for finding images. Simply head to its home page, click the "Images" link, enter criteria in the search box, and--voila! In this article, the authors share some of their other favorite search engines for finding images. To make sure the desired images are available for educational use, consider searching for…

  17. Clinician's Guide to Imaging and Pathologic Findings in Benign Breast Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Lonzetta; Tortorelli, Cindy L.; Nassar, Aziza

    2010-01-01

    The discussion of abnormal results of breast imaging and abnormal pathologic findings can be challenging for health care professionals and often is stressful for patients. Although most imaging findings and biopsy results are negative and do not infer a substantial increase in breast cancer risk, the subsequent conversation between the patient and her practitioner is more effective and informative with a thorough review of the pathologic results and an appreciation of the importance of radiologic-histologic concordance. This article provides insight into and understanding of breast imaging and biopsy techniques and of histologic findings as a means to timely and appropriate decision making and action by the patient and her health care professional. PMID:20194153

  18. Clinician's guide to imaging and pathologic findings in benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Neal, Lonzetta; Tortorelli, Cindy L; Nassar, Aziza

    2010-03-01

    The discussion of abnormal results of breast imaging and abnormal pathologic findings can be challenging for health care professionals and often is stressful for patients. Although most imaging findings and biopsy results are negative and do not infer a substantial increase in breast cancer risk, the subsequent conversation between the patient and her practitioner is more effective and informative with a thorough review of the pathologic results and an appreciation of the importance of radiologic-histologic concordance. This article provides insight into and understanding of breast imaging and biopsy techniques and of histologic findings as a means to timely and appropriate decision making and action by the patient and her health care professional. PMID:20194153

  19. C5 and C6 human dermatomes: a clinical, electromyographical, imaging and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Faleiros, Antonio Tadeu de Souza; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima; Zanini, Marco Antonio; Castro, Heloisa Amélia de Lima; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2009-06-01

    There is substantial controversy in literature about human dermatomes. In this work, C5 and C6 superior limb dermatomes were studied. The method consisted of comparing clinical signs and symptoms with conduction studies, electromyographical data, neurosurgical findings, and imaging findings obtained by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), for each patient. Data analysis from superior members in 18 patients suggests that C5 is located in the lateral aspect of the shoulder and arm, and C6 in the lateral aspect of the forearm and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd fingers. To our knowledge this is the first time that C5 and C6 human dermatomes have been studied by all the following methods together: clinical, electromyographical, CT and MR imaging, and surgical findings. PMID:19547819

  20. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the head of the pancreas with anorexia and vomiting in a 69-year-old man: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Bu, Xianmin; Tian, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare condition of unclear etiology that is commonly observed in the lung but rarely in the pancreas. WHO classified IMT as a potentially malignant or aggressive tumor. In the present report, the case of a 69-year-old male patient with an IMT in the head of the pancreas, who experienced anorexia, nausea and vomiting, is presented. The patient's clinical symptoms were nonspecific, and the imaging findings revealed a hypovascularized pancreatic mass with stenosis of the descending duodenum. The electronic endoscopy findings revealed protruding lesions in the duodenal bulb and the descending duodenum. Biopsies of the mass were conducted with an electronic endoscope, but were not diagnostic. Subsequent duodenopancreatectomy aided in determining a pathological diagnosis of IMT, based on the histology and immunohistochemistry results. The patient experienced a recovery without further incident, as observed during a regular follow-up 3 years later. IMT in the head of the pancreas is rare, particularly in adults. In the present study, an extremely rare case of IMT involving the head of the pancreas in an adult patient is presented, and the therapeutic options for this condition are discussed. PMID:27446468

  1. Intrapelvic chronic expanding hematoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Jun; Akaki, Shiro; Yonezawa, Masaru; Horiguchi, Ikuyo; Nakamura, Satoko; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is rare and occasionally misdiagnosed as malignant neoplasm. We describe a case in the female pelvis and correlate findings from pathology and magnetic resonance imaging. On diffusion-weighted images (DWI), our patient's hematoma showed 2 different signal intensities, which corresponded to pathological features of fresh and altered blood components. DWI can distinguish between such pathological features of a chronic expanding hematoma. PMID:20585198

  2. Incidental findings in emergency imaging: frequency, recommendations, and compliance with consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tarek N; Shekhani, Haris; Zygmont, Matthew E; Kerchberger, James Matthew; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of incidental findings (IFs) in emergency department (ED) imaging reports and evaluate the adherence of imaging recommendations to consensus societal guidelines for IFs. A retrospective review of consecutive ED computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) reports from two university-affiliated EDs over a 2-month period was performed. Each imaging report was reviewed in its entirety, and incidental findings were documented along with recommendations for additional imaging. Imaging recommendations were compared to published societal guidelines from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Fleischner Society. Three thousand one hundred thirty-one total cases consisting of 1967 CTs and 1164 US contained 514 incidental findings (16.4 %), with 329 CT IFs (64 %) and 185 US IFs (36 %). The ovary was the most common organ for an IF (n = 214, 42 %). Of all IFs, 347 (67.5 %) recommendations were concordant with societal guidelines and 167 (32.5 %) were discordant. 39.8 % of CT recommendations were discordant, while 19.5 % of US recommendations were discordant (p < 0.0001). Incidental findings are commonly encountered in the emergent setting. Variable adherence to societal guidelines is noted. Targeted radiologist education and technological solutions may decrease rates of discordance. PMID:26842832

  3. Quantification of neuropathological findings by image data for the diagnosis of dementia in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mio; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Matsusue, Aya; Waters, Brian; Hara, Kenji; Ikematsu, Natsuki; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify neuropathological findings using image analysis software for the diagnosis of dementia in deceased who underwent forensic autopsy. Of the autopsies performed within 48 hours of death and excluding those of patients with head injury, thermal injury, heat stroke, or intracranial lesions, 8 were of autopsy cases clinically diagnosed with dementia and thus included in the dementia group (D). The non-dementia group (non-D) consisted of 6 deceased without dementia. To compare the D and non-D groups, 6 regions and 7 types of pathological findings were observed semi-quantitatively using 4 conventional stainings. Quantitative analysis of collected image data was performed using image analysis software. Semiquantitative analysis of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles was performed with Bielschowsky-Hirano's silver staining image data. An easy, simple, and effective quantification method of the pathological findings was achieved. However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups, and diagnosis of dementia by the quantification of pathological findings was not successful. Diagnosis of dementia using image data may be possible in future studies with an increased number of autopsies, and by utilizing staining techniques with higher specificity and sensitivity, such as immunohistochemical staining. PMID:27040064

  4. A Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of the Head of Pancreas: A Rare Case Report Diagnosed by Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Archana Hemant; Chhadi, Shyam Atmaram; Kumbhalkar, Dinkar T; Raut, Waman K

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPPT) is a distinctive tumour of low malignant potential with a striking and unexplained predilection for adolescent girls and young women. Hence it is important to distinguish this rare tumour from other pancreatic tumours with similar cytomorphologic features because an accurate preoperative diagnosis is highly desirable since these patients can have long survival with adequate surgery. We report a case of the rare SPPT of the pancreas in a young girl who presented with nonspecific pain in the abdomen. Radiological investigations revealed a solid cystic mass in relation to the uncinate process of pancreas and third part of duodenum. The mass was diagnosed to be a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas on ultrasound guided FNAC. Surgical removal of the pancreatic tumour and detailed histologic study confirmed the cytologic diagnosis. We present this case because, to date, there are few case reports on the cytological diagnosis of this tumour, about 60 cases, diagnosed by Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) are reported in the literature. With widespread availability of high-quality imaging systems and a better understanding of its pathology, the number of cases reported in the literature has been steadily increasing in recent years. In our case, the cytological diagnosis was done even before the detailed imaging findings were available, the cytological features of this tumour are highly characteristic and it is possible to differentiate it from other pancreatic tumours with relative ease. PMID:27504299

  5. An Integrated Centroid Finding and Particle Overlap Decomposition Algorithm for Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An integrated algorithm for decomposing overlapping particle images (multi-particle objects) along with determining each object s constituent particle centroid(s) has been developed using image analysis techniques. The centroid finding algorithm uses a modified eight-direction search method for finding the perimeter of any enclosed object. The centroid is calculated using the intensity-weighted center of mass of the object. The overlap decomposition algorithm further analyzes the object data and breaks it down into its constituent particle centroid(s). This is accomplished with an artificial neural network, feature based technique and provides an efficient way of decomposing overlapping particles. Combining the centroid finding and overlap decomposition routines into a single algorithm allows us to accurately predict the error associated with finding the centroid(s) of particles in our experiments. This algorithm has been tested using real, simulated, and synthetic data and the results are presented and discussed.

  6. The Small Bodies Imager Browser --- finding asteroid and comet images without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, E.; Sykes, M.; Davis, D.; Neese, C.

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate accessing and downloading spatially resolved imagery of asteroids and comets in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS), we have created the Small Bodies Image Browser. It is a HTML5 webpage that runs inside a standard web browser needing no installation (http://sbn.psi.edu/sbib/). The volume of data returned by spacecraft missions has grown substantially over the last decade. While this wealth of data provides scientists with ample support for research, it has greatly increased the difficulty of managing, accessing and processing these data. Further, the complexity necessary for a long-term archive results in an architecture that is efficient for computers, but not user friendly. The Small Bodies Image Browser (SBIB) is tied into the PDS archive of the Small Bodies Asteroid Subnode hosted at the Planetary Science Institute [1]. Currently, the tool contains the entire repository of the Dawn mission's encounter with Vesta [2], and we will be adding other datasets in the future. For Vesta, this includes both the level 1A and 1B images for the Framing Camera (FC) and the level 1B spectral cubes from the Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, providing over 30,000 individual images. A key strength of the tool is providing quick and easy access of these data. The tool allows for searches based on clicking on a map or typing in coordinates. The SBIB can show an entire mission phase (such as cycle 7 of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit) and the associated footprints, as well as search by image name. It can focus the search by mission phase, resolution or instrument. Imagery archived in the PDS are generally provided by missions in a single or narrow range of formats. To enhance the value and usability of this data to researchers, SBIB makes these available in these original formats as well as PNG, JPEG and ArcGIS compatible ISIS cubes [3]. Additionally, we provide header files for the VIR cubes so they can be read into ENVI without additional processing. Finally

  7. Extra-cardiac findings in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: what the imaging cardiologist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C L; Lyen, Stephen M; Loughborough, William; Amadu, Antonio Matteo; Baritussio, Anna; Dastidar, Amardeep Ghosh; Manghat, Nathan E; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is an established non-invasive technique to comprehensively assess cardiovascular structure and function in a variety of acquired and inherited cardiac conditions. A significant amount of the neck, thorax and upper abdomen are imaged at the time of routine clinical CMR, particularly in the initial multi-slice axial and coronal images. The discovery of unsuspected disease at the time of imaging has ethical, financial and medico-legal implications. Extra-cardiac findings at the time of CMR are common, can be important and can change clinical management. Certain patient groups undergoing CMR are at particular risk of important extra-cardiac findings as several of the cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis are also risk factors for malignancy. Furthermore, the presence of certain extra-cardiac findings may contribute to the interpretation of the primary cardiac pathology as some cardiac conditions have multi-systemic extra-cardiac involvement. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the type of extra-cardiac findings that may become apparent on CMR, subdivided by anatomical location. We focus on normal variant anatomy that may mimic disease, common incidental extra-cardiac findings and important imaging signs that help distinguish sinister pathology from benign disease. We also aim to provide a framework to the approach and potential further diagnostic work-up of incidental extra-cardiac findings discovered at the time of CMR. However, it is beyond the scope of this review to discuss and determine the clinical significance of extracardiac findings at CMR. PMID:27156861

  8. Ovarian and tubal torsion: imaging findings on US, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Ana P; Swenson, David; Tubbs, Robert J; Lazarus, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of adnexal torsion is often challenging, as clinical presentation is nonspecific and the differential for pelvic pain is broad. However, prompt diagnosis and treatment is critical to good clinical outcomes and preservation of the ovary and/or fallopian tube. Ultrasound (US) imaging is most frequently used to assess torsion. However, as computed tomography (CT) utilization in the emergency setting has increased, there are times when CT is the initial imaging test. Additionally, the nonspecific clinical presentation may initially be interpreted as gastrointestinal in etiology, where CT is the preferred exam. For these reasons, it is imperative to know the findings of adnexal torsion on CT as well as US. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is helpful in cases where the diagnosis remains unclear and is particularly helpful in the young or pregnant patient with equivocal sonographic findings, as it provides excellent soft tissue contrast without ionizing radiation. This article will illustrate the findings of surgically confirmed ovarian and fallopian tube torsion on US, CT, and MRI, including those in the pregnant patient. Ovarian enlargement, adnexal mass, twisting of the vascular pedicle, edematous and heterogeneous appearance of the ovary, peripheral ovarian follicles, free fluid, uterine deviation towards the side of torsion, adnexal fat stranding, tubal dilatation, and decreased adnexal enhancement will be reviewed. Familiarity with the range of imaging findings across multiple modalities is key to improving the likelihood of timely diagnosis and therefore improved clinical outcomes. PMID:24078282

  9. Incidental parenchymal magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Wendy S.; Heier, Linda A.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Bergner, Amanda; Yohay, Kaleb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whereas T2 hyperintensities known as NF-associated bright spots are well described in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), there is a paucity of data on incidental findings in patients with neurofibromatosis type II (NF-2). We aim to characterize unexplained imaging findings in the brains of patients with NF-2. Materials and methods This study is retrospective, HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. 34 patients with NF-2 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2000 and December 2012. T2 and T1-weighted imaging characteristics, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) characteristics, and enhancement patterns were analyzed by visual inspection. Clinical information at time of imaging was available for all patients. Neuropathologic data was available for one patient. Results We found unexplained T2 hyperintensities present on initial imaging in 23/34 patients (67%). Of the 23 patients with unexplained MRI findings, 15 (65%) had wedge-shaped T2 hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter extending to the cortex suggestive of a cortical dysplasia. 3 additional cases (17%) had a lesion within the cerebellum suggestive of a neuronal migration anomaly. In one patient where the MRI was suggestive of focal cortical dysplasia, histopathologic analysis revealed dysplastic glial foci without other alterations of cortical architecture or other cytologic abnormalities. Conclusion Unexplained T2 hyperintensities occur frequently in patients with NF-2. While they may not be the NF-2 equivalent of NF-associated bright spots seen in NF-1, some of these T2 hyperintensities in patients with NF-2 may represent underlying disorders of neuronal migration. Further studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:24501699

  10. Pancreas donation for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, M A; Ruiz, P; Mansilla, J J

    2005-04-01

    Islet transplantation, though still in the experimental phase, is a therapeutic option that has opened new expectations for the control of diabetes mellitus. Initial results are encouraging for the significant advantages compared with whole pancreas transplantation for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, with or without kidney failure. However, the success of transplantation, both at centers with more experience and others with less, is limited by the difficulty in obtaining a suitable number of donors and by laboratory isolation techniques. Significant advances require changes in donor selection, perfusion, oxygenation, and transfer of the pancreas, and in the process of isolation, purification, and culture in the laboratory. Of the 32 pancreases sent to the islet isolation laboratory from different hospitals in Andalusia, a viable percentage of islets was finally available in 19. However, in only 4 (18%) procedures were the preparations considered optimal for implantation in 2 recipients. PMID:15866673

  11. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making. PMID:25726053

  12. Wearable and implantable pancreas substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Dario, Paolo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-03-01

    A lifelong-implanted and completely automated artificial or bioartificial pancreas (BAP) is the holy grail for type 1 diabetes treatment, and could be a definitive solution even for other severe pathologies, such as pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Technology has made several important steps forward in the last years, providing new hope for the realization of such devices, whose feasibility is strictly connected to advances in glucose sensor technology, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal insulin pump development, the design of closed-loop control algorithms for mechatronic pancreases, as well as cell and tissue engineering and cell encapsulation for biohybrid pancreases. Furthermore, smart integration of the mentioned components and biocompatibility issues must be addressed, bearing in mind that, for mechatronic pancreases, it is most important to consider how to recharge implanted batteries and refill implanted insulin reservoirs without requiring periodic surgical interventions. This review describes recent advancements in technologies and concepts related to artificial and bioartificial pancreases, and assesses how far we are from a lifelong-implanted and self-working pancreas substitute that can fully restore the quality of life of a diabetic (or other type of) patient. PMID:22990986

  13. Finding regions of interest in pathological images: an attentional model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Francisco; Villalón, Julio; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduces an automated method for finding diagnostic regions-of-interest (RoIs) in histopathological images. This method is based on the cognitive process of visual selective attention that arises during a pathologist's image examination. Specifically, it emulates the first examination phase, which consists in a coarse search for tissue structures at a "low zoom" to separate the image into relevant regions.1 The pathologist's cognitive performance depends on inherent image visual cues - bottom-up information - and on acquired clinical medicine knowledge - top-down mechanisms -. Our pathologist's visual attention model integrates the latter two components. The selected bottom-up information includes local low level features such as intensity, color, orientation and texture information. Top-down information is related to the anatomical and pathological structures known by the expert. A coarse approximation to these structures is achieved by an oversegmentation algorithm, inspired by psychological grouping theories. The algorithm parameters are learned from an expert pathologist's segmentation. Top-down and bottom-up integration is achieved by calculating a unique index for each of the low level characteristics inside the region. Relevancy is estimated as a simple average of these indexes. Finally, a binary decision rule defines whether or not a region is interesting. The method was evaluated on a set of 49 images using a perceptually-weighted evaluation criterion, finding a quality gain of 3dB when comparing to a classical bottom-up model of attention.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with a first recognized seizure.

    PubMed

    Kalnin, Andrew J; Fastenau, Philip S; deGrauw, Ton J; Musick, Beverly S; Perkins, Susan M; Johnson, Cynthia S; Mathews, Vincent P; Egelhoff, John C; Dunn, David W; Austin, Joan K

    2008-12-01

    This study characterized structural abnormalities associated with onset of seizures in children, using magnetic resonance imaging and a standardized classification system in a large prospective cohort. Two hundred eighty-one children aged 6-14 years completed magnetic resonance imaging within 6 months of their first recognized seizure. Most examinations were performed with a standardized, dedicated seizure protocol; all were scored using a standard scoring system. At least one magnetic resonance imaging abnormality was identified in 87 of 281 (31%) children with a first recognized seizure. Two or more abnormalities were identified in 34 (12%). The commonest abnormalities were ventricular enlargement (51%), leukomalacia/gliosis (23%), gray-matter lesions such as heterotopias and cortical dysplasia (12%), volume loss (12%), other white-matter lesions (9%), and encephalomalacia (6%). Abnormalities defined as significant, or potentially related to seizures, occurred in 40 (14%). Temporal lobe and hippocampal abnormalities were detected at a higher frequency than in previous studies (13/87). Magnetic resonance imaging and a standardized, reliable, valid scoring system demonstrated a higher rate of abnormal findings than previously reported, including findings formerly considered incidental. Practice parameters may need revision, to expand the definition of significant abnormalities and support wider use of magnetic resonance imaging in children with newly diagnosed seizures. PMID:19027586

  15. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with eosinophilic cystitis: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Gao; Chen, Ying; Qian, Zi-Hua; Yang, Li; Yu, Ri-Sheng; Zhu, Xiu-Liang; Li, Qing-Hai; Chen, Qian

    2015-03-14

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare, distinct clinical entity, and EG associated with eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is extremely rare and has not been well documented. Here, we report two cases of EG and coexistent EC along with findings from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An 18-year-old male with a history of hematuria, urgency and occasional urodynia for two weeks and a 34-year-old male with a history of abdominal distention for one week were admitted to our hospital. Abdominal contrast-enhanced CT in both patients revealed wall thickening in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract with inhomogeneous reinforcement, coexistent with local or diffuse bladder wall thickening with progressive enhancement, and also showed that the bladder mucosal lining was nondestructive. Pelvic MRI showed that the local or diffuse thickened bladder wall was iso-intense on T1-weighted images, hypo-intense on T2-weighted images, and slightly restricted on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in one case. After therapy, the thickened wall of the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder had improved markedly in the two cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the radiological imaging of EG and coexistent EC by both CT and MRI and the first with DWI findings. PMID:25780317

  16. Athletic pubalgia and "sports hernia": optimal MR imaging technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Omar, Imran M; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Koulouris, George; Bergin, Diane; Gopez, Angela G; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2008-01-01

    Groin injuries are common in athletes who participate in sports that require twisting at the waist, sudden and sharp changes in direction, and side-to-side ambulation. Such injuries frequently lead to debilitating pain and lost playing time, and they may be difficult to diagnose. Diagnostic confusion often arises from the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the pubic symphysis region, the large number of potential sources of groin pain, and the similarity of symptoms in athletes with different types or sites of injury. Many athletes with a diagnosis of "sports hernia" or "athletic pubalgia" have a spectrum of related pathologic conditions resulting from musculotendinous injuries and subsequent instability of the pubic symphysis without any finding of inguinal hernia at physical examination. The actual causal mechanisms of athletic pubalgia are poorly understood, and imaging studies have been deemed inadequate or unhelpful for clarification. However, a large-field-of-view magnetic resonance (MR) imaging survey of the pelvis, combined with high-resolution MR imaging of the pubic symphysis, is an excellent means of assessing various causes of athletic pubalgia, providing information about the location of injury, and delineating the severity of disease. Familiarity with the pubic anatomy and with MR imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and in other confounding causes of groin pain allows accurate imaging-based diagnoses and helps in planning treatment that targets specific pathologic conditions. PMID:18794316

  17. Early diagnostic imaging findings in juvenile dogs with presumed diskospondylitis: 10 cases (2008-2014).

    PubMed

    Kirberger, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe early diagnostic imaging findings in juvenile dogs with diskospondylitis. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 10 client-owned dogs < 6 months of age. PROCEDURES Medical records were searched to identify juvenile dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of diskospondylitis. Signalment, history, examination findings, diagnostic test results, and imaging procedures were reviewed. Archived diagnostic images were retrieved and retrospectively evaluated. Data analysis was descriptive. RESULTS All dogs were evaluated for signs of vertebral pain ≤ 3 weeks after treatment for blunt trauma, bite wounds, or systemic illness. The earliest radiographic change was a narrowed intervertebral disk space (found for 28 disk spaces ≤ 2 weeks after evaluation for signs of vertebral pain); subluxation of adjacent vertebrae was identified for 8 of 28 affected disks, either initially or within the following 2 weeks. Vertebral end plate lysis was not an initial radiographic feature but was evident in follow-up radiographs. Ultrasonographic and transverse, multiformatted, volume-rendered CT images were obtained for 5 and 4 dogs, respectively. Ultrasonographic changes included ventrally bulging hypoechoic material at the affected disk site and loss of typical normal reverberation artifact in 4 dogs; these were detected prior to radiographic changes in 2 dogs. Affected disks on volume-rendered CT images had altered coloration in 3 of 4 dogs, and this was identified prior to radiographic changes in 1 dog. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Juvenile dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of diskospondylitis had early imaging findings that were atypical, compared with the changes described for adult dogs with this condition. PMID:27556268

  18. Feasibility of automated pancreas segmentation based on dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gou, S; Wu, J; Liu, F; Lee, P; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: MRI-guided radiotherapy is particularly attractive for abdominal targets with low CT contrast. To fully utilize this modality for pancreas tracking, automated segmentation tools are needed. A hybrid gradient, region growth and shape constraint (hGReS) method to segment two-dimensional (2D) upper abdominal dynamic MRI (dMRI) is developed for this purpose. Methods: 2D coronal dynamic MR images of two healthy volunteers were acquired with a frame rate of 5 frames per second. The regions of interest (ROIs) included the liver, pancreas and stomach. The first frame was used as the source where the centres of the ROIs were manually annotated. These centre locations were propagated to the next dMRI frame. Four-neighborhood region transfer growth was performed from these initial seeds before refinement using shape constraints. Results from hGReS and two other automated segmentation methods using integrated edge detection and region growth (IER) and level set, respectively, were compared with manual contours using Dice's index (DI). Results: For the first patient, the hGReS resulted in the organ segmentation accuracy as a measure by the DI (0.77) for the pancreas, superior to the level set method (0.72) and IER (0.71). The hGReS was shown to be reproducible on the second subject, achieving a DI of 0.82, 0.92 and 0.93 for the pancreas, stomach and liver, respectively. Motion trajectories derived from the hGReS were highly correlated to respiratory motion. Conclusion: We have shown the feasibility of automated segmentation of the pancreas anatomy on dMRI. Advances in knowledge: Using the hybrid method improves segmentation robustness of low-contrast images. PMID:25270713

  19. Imaging findings of pulmonary infection caused by Scedosporium prolificans in a deep immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Pellón Dabén, Raúl; Marco de Lucas, Enrique; Martín Cuesta, Laura; Piedra Velasco, Tatiana; Arnaiz García, Javier; Landeras, Rosa; López Duarte, Monica; Bermúdez, Arancha

    2008-01-01

    Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging fungus that causes rapid progressive and disseminated infections in immunodepressed patients. We present a case of a 34-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia who received a bone marrow transplantation and suffered a sudden respiratory failure in +67 day. Chest radiographies showed growing bilateral patchy condensations. Computed Tomography depicted bilateral nodular condensation of alveolar space. S. prolificans was detected from sputum, but the patient died 72 h later. Imaging findings of lung scedosporiosis are nonspecific, but CT may provide a prompter diagnosis and allow to add newer antifungal treatments. This report presents the first imaging report of lung scedosporiosis. PMID:17624561

  20. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings of ovarian adenocarcinofibromas and adenofibromas.

    PubMed

    Kozawa, Eito; Inoue, Kaiji; takahashi, Masahiro; Kato, Tomomi; Yasuda, Masanori; Kimura, Fumiko

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated pelvic magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of 16 ovarian lesions (5 adenocarcinofibromas, 2 borderline adenofibromas, and 9 benign adenofibromas). All adenocarcinofibromas were detected as large solid areas of strong high signal on DWI, and seven of nine benign adenofibromas and both borderline adenofibromas demonstrated no areas of high signal or small areas of weak high signal. Solid components that appear as areas of strong high signal on DWI might represent a characteristic finding of adenocarcinofibromas. PMID:24685607

  1. Early characteristic findings in bowleg deformities: evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukai, S; Suzuki, S; Seto, Y; Kashiwagi, N; Hwang, E S

    2000-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate bowleg deformities in infancy. Twenty-five tibiae of 13 infants were examined and divided into two groups based on MRI findings: group A had high intensity area in the medial epiphyseal cartilage on T2-weighted images. Group B had depression of medial physis and abnormal signal in the perichondrial region in addition to the epiphyseal lesion. At the final follow-up, all cases in group A demonstrated normal lower leg alignments, whereas five cases in group B showed characteristic roentogenographic findings of Blount's disease. The improvement rate of metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was correlated with this classification. These findings suggested that abnormal findings in physis and perichondrial region might be preliminary findings in early stage of Blount's disease. The high intensity areas in the medial epiphyseal cartilage were commonly found among the cases with bowing deformities, which suggested that there might be a common pathomechanism between physiologic bowing and infantile Blount's disease. PMID:11008740

  2. Neurological and magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with developmental language impairment.

    PubMed

    Webster, Richard I; Erdos, Caroline; Evans, Karen; Majnemer, Annette; Saigal, Gaurav; Kehayia, Eva; Thordardottir, Elin; Evans, Alan; Shevell, Michael I

    2008-08-01

    Neurologic and radiologic findings in children with well-defined developmental language impairment have rarely been systematically assessed. Children aged 7 to 13 years with developmental language impairment or normal language (controls) underwent language, nonverbal cognitive, motor and neurological assessments, standardized assessment for subtle neurological signs, and magnetic resonance imaging. Nine children with developmental language impairment and 12 controls participated. No focal abnormalities were identified on standard neurological examination. Age and developmental language impairment were independent predictors of neurological subtle signs scores (r(2) = 0.52). Imaging abnormalities were identified in two boys with developmental language impairment and no controls (P = .17). Lesions identified were predicted neither by history nor by neurological examination. Previously unsuspected lesions were identified in almost 25% of children with developmental language impairment. Constraints regarding cooperation and sedation requirements may limit the clinical application of imaging modalities in this population. PMID:18660471

  3. Imaging findings of anaplastic astrocytoma in a child with maple syrup urine disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aw-Zoretic, Jessie; Wadhwani, Nitin R; Lulla, Rishi R; Rishi, Lulla R; Ryan, Maura E

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of branched-chain amino acid metabolism, which usually presents in childhood with encephalopathy due to cerebral edema and dysmyelination. Even with treatment, metabolic stressors may precipitate later episodes of acute decompensation. Changes related to cerebral and white matter edema have been described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging can aid in both initial diagnosis and evaluation of decompensation. To date, there are no published known reports of cancer in patients with MSUD. Here, we present the first case report of an anaplastic astrocytoma in a teenager with MSUD, with a discussion of imaging findings and the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to help distinguish between tumor and metabolic changes. PMID:26084772

  4. L4-L5-S1 human dermatomes: a clinical, electromyographical, imaging and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Faleiros, Antonio Tadeu de Souza; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima; Zanini, Marco Antonio; Castro, Heloisa Amélia de Lima; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2009-06-01

    There is substantial controversy in literature about human dermatomes. We studied L4, L5, and S1 inferior limb dermatomes by comparing clinical signs and symptoms with conduction studies, electromyographical data, neurosurgical findings, and imaging data from computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After analyzing 60 patients, we concluded that L4 is probably located in the medial aspect of the leg, L5 in the lateral aspect of the leg and foot dorsus, and S1 in the posterior aspect of the backside, tight, leg and plantar foot skin. This is the first time that these human dermatomes have been evaluated by combined analysis of clinical, electromyographical, neurosurgical, and imaging data. PMID:19547820

  5. Variants of meningiomas: a review of imaging findings and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Kunimatsu, Akira; Kunimatsu, Natsuko; Kamiya, Kouhei; Katsura, Masaki; Mori, Harushi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-07-01

    Meningiomas are common neoplasms that frequently occur in the brain and spine. Among the 15 histological subtypes of meningiomas in the WHO classification, the incidence of meningothelial meningiomas is the highest, followed by fibrous and transitional meningiomas. These three subtypes account for approximately 80 % of all meningiomas, and thus could be regarded as typical meningiomas. For this reason, other uncommon histological subtypes may be considered as imaging variants, and diagnosis is often challenging for radiologists solely based on imaging features of typical meningiomas. In addition to the histological subtypes, meningiomas arising in atypical locations could be easily mistaken for other lesions more commonly observed in those locations. The purpose of this article is to review characteristic clinical and imaging findings of uncommon meningiomas, including histological variants and meningiomas occurring in relatively rare locations. PMID:27138052

  6. Postoperative imaging findings in children with auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplant (APOLT).

    PubMed

    Ayyala, Rama S; Martinez, Mercedes; Lobritto, Steven J; Kato, Tomoaki; Ruzal-Shapiro, Carrie

    2016-07-01

    Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplant (APOLT) is a treatment technique for people who have acute hepatic failure secondary to fulminant hepatic failure and might ultimately recover normal liver function. This surgical procedure is complicated, involving the placement of a liver graft while maintaining viability of the remaining native portion of the liver. This method allows the native liver to recover hepatic function, therefore eliminating the need for long-term immunosuppression, as is typically needed in post-transplant settings. Postoperative imaging in these cases can be challenging given the complex anatomy, specifically the vascular anastomosis. Therefore it is important for radiologists and clinicians to be aware of the anatomy as well as the variable imaging appearances of the liver. We review the imaging findings in children who have undergone auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplant (APOLT). PMID:26867605

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 40 dogs with histologically confirmed intracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Marti; Gaitero, Lluís; Zamora, Angels; Añor, Sònia

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 dogs with histologically confirmed primary and secondary intracranial tumours were reviewed. Forty-one tumours were diagnosed by means of MR imaging (MRI). MRI findings allowed diagnosis of a neoplastic lesion in 37/41 cases. Based on MRI features, differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions was possible in 24/27 (89%) primary brain tumours and in 13/14 (92%) secondary brain tumours. Diagnosis of tumour type based on MRI features was correct in 19/27 (70%) primary tumours and in 13/14 secondary tumours. The results of this study show that MRI is a good diagnostic imaging modality to detect neoplastic lesions and to diagnose tumour type in dogs. However, as some neoplasms show equivocal MRI features the technique has limitations in the detection of some intracranial tumours and in predicting tumour type. PMID:19914851

  8. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  9. Comparison of metabolic and receptor imaging in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma with histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Adams, S; Baum, R P; Hertel, A; Schumm-Draeger, P M; Usadel, K H; Hör, G

    1998-09-01

    Early diagnosis of metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) provides the optimal condition for curative outcome. The aim of this study was to appraise the detection of metastases in patients with recurrent MTC using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide and pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid [99mTc(V)-DMSA] in comparison with histopathological findings. Eighteen MTC patients with persistently elevated tumour marker (calcitonin, carcinoembryonic antigen) levels underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide (222 MBq) with early (4 h after injection) and delayed (24 h) whole-body scans and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. Metabolic whole-body and SPET imaging using 500 MBq 99mTc(V)-DMSA was performed 4 h after injection. Metabolic and receptor imaging revealed 51 sites of focal accumulation in the 18 patients investigated. Comparison with histological findings revealed that metabolic and receptor imaging had a sensitivity of 84% for the diagnosis of MTC. Using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide, SPET discovered four lymph node metastases in two patients in whom planar views had previously identified only one lymph node metastasis, and provided no new information in the other 16 patients. In comparison, SPET studies [using 99mTc(V)-DMSA] additionally localized eight lymph node metastases in four patients and confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic metastases (n=5) in another patient in whom conventional imaging modalities and planar views had previously detected only three liver metastases. Overall, lesion detection sensitivities for 99mTc(V)-DMSA and [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide were 69% and 29%, respectively. Five surgically removed foci were adjudged false-positive with respect to MTC metastases. False-positve results were caused by lymphadenitis, an enchondroma and a pheochromocytoma (histologically proven). The smallest lesion identified by metabolic imaging was a 6 mm in diameter lymph node

  10. Primary orbital hydatid cyst: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Öztekin, Pelin Seher; Yilmaz, Behice Kaniye; Gokharman, Fatma Dilek; Koşar, Pınar Nergis

    2014-01-01

    Orbital hydatid cyst is a rare form of hydatidosis, comprising less than 1% of all hydatid cysts reported. The first choice of treatment for orbital hydatid cyst is surgery. Preoperative diagnosis is important, so as to avoid rupture of the cyst and prevent the spread of the parasitic disease. Herein, we present the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a case of primary orbital hydatid cyst. PMID:25631981

  11. Tailgut Cyst and Perineal Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report with Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alghofaily, Khalefa Ali

    2016-01-01

    A tailgut cyst is a rare developmental lesion and usually is located in the retrorectal or presacral space. Extrahepatic hydatid disease has been reported in several locations including the pelvis and it often poses a diagnostic challenge. There are very few reported cases of primary perineal hydatid cysts. We present the multimodality imaging findings of a tailgut cyst and concurrent perineal hydatid disease in a 32-year-old male patient.

  12. Imaging findings of various talus bone tumors-clinico-radiologic features of talus bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji Young; Chung, Hye Won; Kwon, Jong Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Lee, Guen Young; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Osseous neoplasms of the foot are uncommon, accounting for only 3.3% of all primary bone tumors. Bone tumors of the talus are even rarer, and there are not many publications that comprehensively evaluate the imaging findings of talus tumors. The purpose of this article is to review the benign and malignant bone tumors affecting this uncommon site and to describe the clinical and radiologic features of each tumor. PMID:27317211

  13. Imaging findings for intravascular large B-cell lymphoma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jungmin; Park, Ha Young

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare subtype of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that most commonly involves the central nervous system and skin. To our knowledge, no state-of-the art imaging findings have been reported for hepatic IVLBCL in the English literature. We report the first case of hepatic involvement of IVLBCL along with a literature review. PMID:26523272

  14. Hepatocellular carcinoma after locoregional therapy: Magnetic resonance imaging findings in falsely negative exams

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Weidman, David; Civan, Jesse M; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Herrine, Steven K; Parker, Laurence; Mitchell, Donald G

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate causes for false negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams by identifying imaging characteristics that predict viable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in lesions previously treated with locoregional therapy when obvious findings of recurrence are absent. METHODS: This retrospective institutional review board-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study included patients who underwent liver transplantation at our center between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2012 after being treated for HCC with locoregional therapy. All selected patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI after locoregional therapy within 90 d of transplant that was prospectively interpreted as without evidence of residual or recurrent tumor. Retrospectively, 2 radiologists, blinded to clinical and pathological data, independently reviewed the pre-transplant MRIs for 7 imaging features. Liver explant histopathology provided the reference standard, with clinically significant tumor defined as viable tumor ≥ 1.0 cm in maximum dimension. Fisher’s exact test was first performed to identify significant imaging features. RESULTS: Inclusion criteria selected for 42 patients with 65 treated lesions. Fourteen of 42 patients (33%) and 16 of 65 treated lesions (25%) had clinically significant viable tumor on explant histology. None of the 7 imaging findings examined could reliably and reproducibly determine which treated lesion had viable tumor when the exam had been prospectively read as without evidence of viable HCC. CONCLUSION: After locoregional therapy some treated lesions that do not demonstrate any MRI evidence of HCC will contain viable tumor. As such even patients with a negative MRI following treatment should receive regular short-term imaging surveillance because some have occult viable tumor. The possibility of occult tumor should be a consideration when contemplating any action which might delay liver transplant. PMID:27326315

  15. An Automatic Technique for Finding Faint Moving Objects in Wide Field CCD Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, O. R.; Meech, K. J.

    1996-09-01

    The traditional method used to find moving objects in astronomical images is to blink pairs or series of frames after registering them to align the background objects. While this technique is extremely efficient in terms of the low signal-to-noise ratio that the human sight can detect, it proved to be extremely time-, brain- and eyesight-consuming. The wide-field images provided by the large CCD mosaic recently built at IfA cover a field of view of 20 to 30' over 8192(2) pixels. Blinking such images is an enormous task, comparable to that of blinking large photographic plates. However, as the data are available digitally (each image occupying 260Mb of disk space), we are developing a set of computer codes to perform the moving object identification in sets of frames. This poster will describe the techniques we use in order to reach a detection efficiency as good as that of a human blinker; the main steps are to find all the objects in each frame (for which we rely on ``S-Extractor'' (Bertin & Arnouts (1996), A&ASS 117, 393), then identify all the background objects, and finally to search the non-background objects for sources moving in a coherent fashion. We will also describe the results of this method applied to actual data from the 8k CCD mosaic. {This work is being supported, in part, by NSF grant AST 92-21318.}

  16. Computed tomography of cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Moss, A.A.; Ohtomo, K.

    1982-11-01

    Ten cases of cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas were examined by computed tomography (CT). All but one showed characteristic findings consisting of both cystic and solid components. Innumerable small cysts producing a honeycomb appearance were noticed in serous cystadenomas. A well-defined multilocular cystic mass containing thin, straight, and/or curvilinear septa or a unilocular cystic tumor with a papillary projection and locally thickened wall was present in mucinous cystadenomas. The CT findings in cystadenocarcinomas varied depending on the relative size of the cystic and solid portions and the grade of malignancy. CT was useful in detecting and diagnosing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and differentiating benign serous cystadenomas from potentially malignant cystadenomas in typical cases. However, aspiration biopsy is recommended when findings are equivocal.

  17. Adequacy of inhale/exhale breathhold CT based ITV margins and image-guided registration for free-breathing pancreas and liver SBRT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate use of breath-hold CTs and implanted fiducials for definition of the internal target volume (ITV) margin for upper abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). To study the statistics of inter- and intra-fractional motion information. Methods and materials 11 patients treated with SBRT for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) or liver cancer were included in the study. Patients underwent fiducial implantation, free-breathing CT and breath-hold CTs at end inhalation/exhalation. All patients were planned and treated with SBRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two margin strategies were studied: Strategy I uses PTV = ITV + 3 mm; Strategy II uses PTV = GTV + 1.5 cm. Both CBCT and kV orthogonal images were taken and analyzed for setup before patient treatments. Tumor motion statistics based on skeletal registration and on fiducial registration were analyzed by fitting to Gaussian functions. Results All 11 patients met SBRT planning dose constraints using strategy I. Average ITV margins for the 11 patients were 2 mm RL, 6 mm AP, and 6 mm SI. Skeletal registration resulted in high probability (RL = 69%, AP = 4.6%, SI = 39%) that part of the tumor will be outside the ITV. With the 3 mm ITV expansion (Strategy 1), the probability reduced to RL 32%, AP 0.3%, SI 20% for skeletal registration; and RL 1.2%, AP 0%, SI 7% for fiducial registration. All 7 pancreatic patients and 2 liver patients failed to meet SBRT dose constraints using strategy II. The liver dose was increased by 36% for the other 2 liver patients that met the SBRT dose constraints with strategy II. Conclusions Image guidance matching to skeletal anatomy is inadequate for SBRT positioning in the upper abdomen and usage of fiducials is highly recommended. Even with fiducial implantation and definition of an ITV, a minimal 3 mm planning margin around the ITV is needed to accommodate intra-fractional uncertainties. PMID:24401365

  18. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a “distractor”. This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion’s neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found “serious lesion in children” is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses. PMID:27610341

  19. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a "distractor". This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion's neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found "serious lesion in children" is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses. PMID:27610341

  20. Multifocal Insulinoma in Pancreas and Effect of Intraoperative Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Borazan, Ersin; Aytekin, Alper; Yilmaz, Latif; Elci, Muhsin; Karaca, Mehmet Salih; Kervancioglu, Selim; Balik, Ahmet Abdulhalik

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma is the most frequently seen functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. The incidence of multifocal insulinoma is lower than 10%. Its treatment is direct or laparoscopic excision. The present case was examined with the findings of hypoglycemia and hypercalcemia, and as there was high insulin and C-peptide levels the initial diagnosis was insulinoma. The case was investigated in terms of MEN 1. During preoperative screening for localization, there was one focus in the head of the pancreas in the abdominal tomography and two foci in endoscopic ultrasonography. No other focus was detected through intraoperative visual or manual palpation. However, five foci were detected during operation by intraoperative ultrasonography. The relation of masses with the main pancreatic canal was evaluated and they were excised by enucleation method. There was no recurrence during the postoperative 18-month follow-up of the patient. As a result, during treatment for insulinoma, it should be kept in mind that there might be multifocal foci. In all insulinomas, the whole pancreas should be evaluated with intraoperative ultrasonography because none of the current preoperative diagnostic methods are as sensitive as manual palpation of pancreas and intraoperative ultrasonography. The intraoperative detection of synchronous five foci in pancreas is quite a rare condition. PMID:26295000

  1. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ryan W.Y.; Conley, Sandra K.; Gropman, Andrea; Porter, Forbes D.; Baker, Eva H.

    2013-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by inborn errors of cholesterol metabolism resulting from mutations in 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). There are only a few studies describing the brain imaging findings in SLOS. This study examines the prevalence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in the largest cohort of patients with SLOS to date. Fifty-five individuals with SLOS (27M, 28F) between age 0.17 years and 25.4 years (mean = 6.2, SD = 5.8) received a total of 173 brain MRI scans (mean = 3.1 per subject) on a 1.5T GE scanner between September, 1998 and December, 2003, or on a 3T Philips scanner between October 2010 and September 2012; all exams were performed at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health. We performed a retrospective review of these imaging studies for both major and minor brain anomalies. Aberrant MRI findings were observed in 53 of 55 (96%) SLOS patients, with abnormalities of the septum pellucidum the most frequent (42/55, 76%) finding. Abnormalities of the corpus callosum were found in 38 of 55 (69%) patients. Other findings included cerebral atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, colpocephaly, white matter lesions, arachnoid cysts, Dandy-Walker variant, and Type I Chiari malformation. Significant correlations were observed when comparing MRI findings with sterol levels and somatic malformations. Individuals with SLOS commonly have anomalies involving the midline and para-midline structures of the brain. Further studies are required to examine the relationship between structural brain abnormalities and neurodevelopmental disability in SLOS. PMID:23918729

  2. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  3. Imaging findings and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy with right atrial embolus in 46 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Guo-Li; Chen, Dong

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the imaging findings of hepatic malignancy with right atrial (RA) embolus. METHODS: Forty-six patients with an embolus in the RA were diagnosed, including 44 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 1 patient with cholangiocellular carcinoma and 1 patient with hepatic carcinoma metastasis. The diagnosis was confirmed by clinical examination, serum α-fetoprotein and imaging. Seventeen patients underwent transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). RESULTS: On enhancement computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a nodular filling defect in the RA could be easily found, with a slight enhancement in the arterial phase. The coronal images of CT or MR showed the extent of lesion. Lipiodol entered the embolus after TACE, hence reducing the speed of embolus growth. There was a survival benefit for patients receiving anticancer treatment. CONCLUSION: Patients with HCC, showing a filling defect of the inferior vena cava (IVC), hepatic vein (HV) and RA on images, can be diagnosed with RA embolus. Encroachment of the RA is very rare in patients with hepatic malignancies. Furthermore, a prolongation of survival time is found in those patients who underwent TACE. PMID:18567087

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  5. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  6. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  7. Design of a bioartificial pancreas+

    PubMed Central

    Opara, Emmanuel C.; Mirmalek-Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Khanna, Omaditya; Moya, Monica L; Brey, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In Type 1 diabetes, the β-cells that secrete insulin have been destroyed such that daily exogenous insulin administration is required for the control of blood sugar in individuals afflicted with the disease. Following the development of reliable techniques for the isolation of islets from the human pancreas, islet transplantation has emerged as a therapeutic option, albeit, for only a few selected patients largely because there are not enough islets for the millions of patients requiring the treatment, and there is also the need to use immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection. In 1980, the concept of islet immunoisolation by microencapsulation was introduced as a technique to overcome these two major barriers to islet transplantation. Microencapsulation of islets and transplantation in the peritoneal cavity was then described as a bioartificial pancreas. However, it is difficult to retrieve encapsulated islets transplanted in the peritoneal cavity, thus making it difficult to meet all the criteria for a bioartificial pancreas. A new design of a bioartificial pancreas comprising islets co-encapsulated with angiogenic protein in perm-selective multilayer alginate-poly-L-ornithine-alginate (APA) microcapsules and transplanted in an omentum pouch is described in this paper. Materials & Methods The multilayer APA microcapsules are made with ultrapure alginate using poly-L-ornithine as a semi-permeable membrane separating the two alginate layers. The inner alginate layer is used to encapsulate the islets and the outer layer is used to encapsulate angiogenic protein, which would induce neovascularization around the graft within the omentum pouch. Results In in vitro studies, we found that both the wild-type and the heparin binding-growth associated molecule (HBGAM)-FGF-1 chimera can be encapsulated and released in a controlled and sustained manner from the outer alginate layer with a mean diameter in the range of 113–164 microns when 1

  8. Clinical and imaging findings in Parkinson disease associated with the A53E SNCA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Päivärinta, Markku; Hietala, Marja; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical features and brain imaging findings of autosomal dominant Parkinson disease (PD) associated with a recently reported mutation in SNCA. Methods: A Finnish family with PD in 3 successive generations, in accordance with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, was identified. We examined 2 available members of the family, the female proband and her daughter (both with early-onset PD), clinically and using dopamine transporter imaging ([123I]FP-CIT SPECT). A possible causative genetic defect was investigated by molecular genetic analyses. Results: A heterozygous c.158C>A (p.A53E) point mutation in SNCA was revealed in both patients. The patients presented with PD clinically characterized by severe bradykinesia but with very little tremor and early onset of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. No cognitive decline or dysautonomic features have emerged during more than 5 years of follow-up. Both patients presented with a severe striatal binding defect in dopamine transporter SPECT imaging. Conclusions: The results of this observational study add evidence to the suggestion that the p.A53E mutation in SNCA is indeed pathogenic and results in autosomal dominant PD. Bradykinesia and early onset of levodopa-induced dyskinesia are the characteristic clinical features associated with the A53E mutation, but the patients did not exhibit dementia or dysautonomia. The [123I]FP-CIT SPECT findings indicated a profound, symmetric dopaminergic defect, in contrast to those observed in patients with idiopathic PD. PMID:27066564

  9. The Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign: Deep Imaging of Stars in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth A.; Wahhaj, Z.; Liu, M.; Chun, M.; Close, L.; Ftaclas, C.; Hartung, M.; Hayward, T.; Nielsen, E.; Toomey, D.; NICI Planet-Finding Campaign Team

    2010-01-01

    The novel Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) on the 8-m Gemini South telescope combines a number of techniques to attenuate starlight and suppress superspeckles for direct detection of exoplanets: 1) Lyot coronagraphic imaging, 2) dual channel imaging for Spectral Differential Imaging (SDI) and 3) operation in a fixed Cassegrain rotator mode for Angular Differential Imaging (ADI). The combination of these techniques allows unprecedented contrasts of dmag > 14 (median value) at 1" in H band. We are currently conducting a 50 night planet-finding campaign using NICI. Although the majority of our survey targets are young (<300 Myr, so as to catch young planets while they are still self-luminous), we are also observing a subset of nearby stars in the immediate solar neighborhood. While these objects are old (and hence, planetary companions will be faint), they are still desirable targets for planet searches due to the excellent physical resolution possible around these stars. Additionally, their large proper motions also mean that planet candidates can be quickly confirmed. NICI is the first instrument with achieved star-planet contrasts high enough to image supergiant planets around these stars (M > 10 MJup). Here, we report on results from observations of 3 such nearby stars. At respective distances of 1.39 pc, 2.35 pc, and 3.8 pc, Proxima Centauri, Wolf 359, and Luyten's Star are the 1st, 3rd, and 22nd closest stars to the Sun. While our search yielded numerous candidate companions, especially around Proxima Centauri, all of these candidates were found to be background in second epoch observations.

  10. Body image of children and adolescents with cancer: a metasynthesis on qualitative research findings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yin; Mu, Pei-Fan; Tsay, Shwu-Feng; Chou, Shin-Shang; Chen, Yu-Chih; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-09-01

    Children and adolescents with cancer are confronted with many challenges. This review considered studies that used qualitative methods to examine the body image experience of children and adolescents with cancer. A systematic literature search of English and Chinese databases was undertaken, covering the period between 1960 and October 2010. Qualitative research findings were extracted and pooled using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. Eight papers met the inclusion criteria. The derived four metasyntheses included being distanced from the body, loss of self-identity, self-protective strategies and support, and getting rid of the shackles of the body. In conclusion, children and adolescents with cancer also experience various problems associated with changes in their body image. Repeated courses of treatment lead to loss of a normal, orderly life, and might even result in changes in interpersonal interactions. In response to body image change, individuals with cancer develop self-protective, coping strategies. Children and adolescents who experience life-threatening cancer come to face body image change positively, and might hold a confident attitude toward their future. PMID:22672500