Science.gov

Sample records for pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma

  1. Metastatic gallbladder adenosquamous carcinoma to the skin†

    PubMed Central

    Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Santana, André; Dias, André Roncon

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis (CM) is an uncommon manifestation of visceral malignancies. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the gallbladder is a rare variation in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), associated with worse prognosis. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with an inflamed lump on her abdominal wall. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a large mass from the gallbladder invading the abdominal wall. She underwent liver resection with regional lymphadenectomy. Pathology analysis revealed a 12-cm pT3N0 GBC. Hospital discharge occurred at post-operative Day 20. She recurred and died 10 months after surgery. Survival after the diagnosis of CM is dismal. The present case was a diagnostic trap. First, the patient's skin lesion presented as a cutaneous abscess and biopsy revealed a squamous cell cancer. A CT scan suggested a continuous mass involving the abdominal wall. CM was only suspected during surgery when no continuity between the tumour and the abdominal wall was identified. PMID:25480835

  2. Molecular profiling of lung adenosquamous carcinoma: hybrid or genuine type?

    PubMed Central

    Vassella, Erik; Langsch, Stephanie; Dettmer, Matthias S.; Schlup, Cornelia; Neuenschwander, Maja; Frattini, Milo; Gugger, Mathias; Schäfer, Stephan C.

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenosquamous carcinoma is a particular subtype of non-small cell lung carcinoma that is defined by the coexistence of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma components. The aim of this study was to assess the mutational profile in each component of 16 adenosquamous carcinoma samples from a Caucasian population by a combination of next generation sequencing using the cancer hotspot panel as well as the colon and lung cancer panel and FISH. Identified mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing of DNA from cancer cells of each component collected by Laser Capture microdissection. Mutations typical for adenocarcinoma as well as squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Driver mutations were predominantly in the trunk suggesting a monoclonal origin of adenosquamous carcinoma. Most remarkably, EGFR mutations and mutations in the PI3K signaling pathway, which accounted for 30% and 25% of tumors respectively, were more prevalent while KRAS mutations were less prevalent than expected for a Caucasian population. Surprisingly, expression of classifier miR-205 was intermediate between that of classical adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggesting that adenosquamous carcinoma is a transitional stage between these tumor types. The high prevalence of therapy-relevant targets opens new options of therapeutic intervention for adenosquamous carcinoma patients. PMID:26068980

  3. Characteristics and Outcomes of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Christine G.; Zuluaga Toro, Tania; Chan, Ellie; Feely, Michael M.; Trevino, Jose G.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCAP) is a rare histologic type of pancreatic carcinoma that constitutes 1% to 4% of all pancreatic exocrine malignancies. It has a clinical presentation similar to that of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (ACP), but may have a worse overall prognosis, with most patients surviving for less than 2 years. METHODS: This was an institutional, retrospective, cohort analysis of 237 patients who underwent resection of pancreatic cancer with curative intent. RESULTS: Of the 237 cases examined, we identified 7 (2.9%) with histologically confirmed ASCAP. Demographics, comorbidities, risk factors, presenting symptoms, survival data, tumor characteristics, and types of treatment for each patient were included in the analysis. Risk factors for development of ASCAP were not conclusive. Although human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in other squamous cell cancers, in our cohort, its involvement in ASCAP was 0%. Presurgical fine-needle aspiration failed to identify the invasive squamous cell component in all cases. In this cohort analysis, overall survival ranged from 3 to 25 months, with 2 patients surviving more than 20 months after surgical resection. With a median follow-up of 2.9 years, our data demonstrate a trend to worse median overall survival for ASCAP than for ACP (8.2 vs. 20.4 months; P = .23), with a limited number of long-term survivors. CONCLUSIONS: Although recommended, adjuvant treatment was inconsistently provided for patients in this ASCAP cohort. Published data show variability in overall survival, but our findings support that surgical resection is one of the few options for control of this rare, poorly understood pancreatic malignancy. Further research is necessary to define risk factors and adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments, to help improve patient outcomes. PMID:23936547

  4. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the floor of the mouth and lower alveolus: a radiation-induced lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Siar, C.H.; Ng, K.H.

    1987-02-01

    A case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the floor of the mouth and alveolus that occurred following radiation therapy is described. The possible role of radiation in the etiology of this lesion is discussed, and the complex histopathologic features of this neoplasm are emphasized.

  5. Mixed adenocarcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma of the prostate: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHONGFU; WANG, YADONG; ZHAO, QING; LI, GANHONG; ZHAO, XINGQI; LI, JUN; LI, XIANXIN

    2014-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) and sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC) of the prostate are rare, but highly aggressive tumors. The occurrence of mixed carcinomas in the prostate is even more rarely reported. The present study reports the case of a 62-year-old male who was diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma accompanied by multiple bone metastases, as shown by a needle biopsy and skeletal computed tomography scan. The patient was treated with hormonal therapy, but thereafter, specimens from a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) were found to be composed of three histologically distinct elements: ASC, SC and adenocarcinoma. The level of p53 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in detail, and it was found that this was significantly increased in the TURP samples compared with the needle biopsy samples. The abnormal level of p53 was likely associated with the prognosis of the patient; the patient succumbed to prostate carcinoma two months after the confirmation of the diagnosis. PMID:25295118

  6. Efficacy of platinum chemotherapy agents in the adjuvant setting for adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Fan, Katherine Y.; Kumar, Rachit; Moningi, Shalini; Rosati, Lauren M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Voong, Khinh R.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma (PASC) accounts for only 1-4% of all exocrine pancreatic cancers and carries a particularly poor prognosis. This retrospective study was performed to determine whether inclusion of a platinum agent as part of adjuvant therapy is associated with improved survival in patients with resected PASC. Methods Records of all patients who underwent pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1986 to 2012 were reviewed to identify those with PASC. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess for significant associations between patient characteristics and survival. Results In total, 62 patients (1.1%) with resected PASC were identified among 5,627 cases. Median age was 68 [interquartile range (IQR), 57-77] and 44% were female. Multivariate analysis revealed that, among all patients (n=62), the following factors were independently predictive of poor survival: lack of adjuvant therapy [hazard ratio (HR) =3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-7.0; P<0.001], margin-positive resection (HR =3.5; 95% CI, 1.8-6.8; P<0.001), lymph node involvement (HR =3.5; 95% CI, 1.5-8.2; P=0.004), and age (HR =1.0; 95% CI, 1.0-1.1; P=0.035). There were no significant differences between patients who did and did not receive adjuvant therapy following resection (all P>0.05). A second multivariable model included only those patients who received adjuvant therapy (n=39). Lack of inclusion of a platinum agent in the adjuvant regimen (HR =2.4; 95% CI, 1.0-5.8; P=0.040) and larger tumor diameter (HR =1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6; P=0.047) were independent predictors of inferior survival. Conclusions Addition of a platinum agent to adjuvant regimens for resected PASC may improve survival among these high-risk patients, though collaborative prospective investigation is needed. PMID:25830031

  7. Surgical resection of splenic metastasis from the adenosquamous gallbladder carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Utsumi, Masashi; Aoki, Hideki; Kunitomo, Tomoyoshi; Mushiake, Yutaka; Kanaya, Nobuhiko; Yasuhara, Isao; Arata, Takashi; Katsuda, Kou; Tanakaya, Kohji; Takeuchi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Splenic metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely rare. Specific anatomical, histological, and functional properties of spleen are believed to be responsible for the rarity of solitary splenic metastasis. Presentation of case We present the case of a 62-year-old female who developed metachronous splenic metastasis of adenosquamous carcinoma of the gallbladder. We performed central bisegmentectomy of the liver for gallbladder carcinoma. The patient subsequently presented 3 months later with isolated splenic metastasis and liver metastasis. Splenectomy and partial hepatectomy was performed at this time. Histological examination confirmed metastatic adenosquamous carcinoma of the gallbladder. No signs of recurrence were observed at 3 months after the second surgery. Discussion Although splenectomy provides a potential means of radical treatment in patients with isolated splenic metastases, it should be performed with caution as splenic metastatic lesions may represent the initial clinical manifestation of systemic metastases at multiple sites. In this case, radical surgery was performed following the confirmation of no new unresectable metastatic lesions or systemic dissemination. Conclusion This is the first report on the adenosquamous splenic metastasis from the gallbladder carcinoma. Curative resection may be the treatment of choice for prolonging survival in patients with the splenic metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26852359

  8. Adenosquamous carcinoma arising from a thyroglossal duct cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, YU-SUNG; SU, HSIN-HAO; HO, SZU-PEI

    2016-01-01

    The current study describes a case of adenosquamous carcinoma originating from a thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC). A 77-year-old man presented with an asymptomatic mass in the left mid-neck, which was soft and mobile on palpation. Fine-needle aspiration was performed, but cytology did not detect any malignant cells. Computed tomography demonstrated a single cystic lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid gland; therefore, surgery was performed on the suspected thyroid cyst. However, it was identified intraoperatively that the lesion was separated from the thyroid gland and instead adhered to an additional hyoid bone; therefore, the Sistrunk procedure was performed. Histopathological examination of the resected tumor confirmed the diagnosis of adenosquamous carcinoma originating from a TGDC. Carcinoma arising from a TGDC is rare, and accounts for 1% of all TGDC cases. The most common subtype of carcinoma associated with TGDC is papillary carcinoma, whilst adenosquamous carcinoma developing from a TGDC is extremely rare, with only one case currently reported in the literature. Although a consensus for the management of this disease has not yet been established, adequate surgical excision with long-term follow-up is currently the preferred treatment. PMID:27073536

  9. Tracking the Clonal Evolution of Adenosquamous Carcinoma, a Rare Variant of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Suguru; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Ogata, Munehiko; Oikawa, Kensuke; Tamakawa, Susumu; Chiba, Shin-Ichi; Muraki, Miho; Yokochi, Tomoki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo; Mizukami, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is an uncommon variant of pancreatic neoplasm. We sought to trace the mode of tumor progression using specimens of ASC associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. A resected specimen of the primary pancreatic ASC, developed in a 72-year-old man, was subjected to mutation profiling using amplicon-targeted sequencing and digital polymerase chain reaction. DNA was isolated from each histological compartment including noninvasive IPMN, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and adenocarcinoma (AC). Histologically, an IPMN with a large mural nodule was identified. The invasive tumor predominantly consisted of SCC, and a smaller AC was found around the lesion. Squamous metaplasias were sporadically distributed within benign IPMNs. Mutation alleles KRAS and GNAS were identified in all specimens of IPMN including the areas of squamous metaplasia. In addition, these mutations were found in SCC and AC. Clear transition from flat/low-papillary IPMN to SCC indicated a potent invasion front, and the SCC compartment was genetically unique, because the area has a higher frequency of mutation KRAS. The invasive tumors with distinct histological appearances shared the form of noninvasive IPMN as a common precursor, rather than de novo cancer, suggesting the significance of a genetic profiling scheme of tumors associated with IPMN. PMID:27295533

  10. Intraluminal superior vena cava metastasis from adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TAKAYOSHI, KOTOE; ARIYAMA, HIROSHI; TAMURA, SHINGO; YODA, SHUNSUKE; ARITA, TAKESHI; YAMAGUCHI, TOSHIHIRO; OZONO, KEIGO; YAMAMOTO, HIDETAKA; INADOMI, KYOKO; KUMAGAI, HOZUMI; TANAKA, MAMORU; OKUMURA, YUTA; SAGARA, KOSUKE; NIO, KENTA; NAKANO, MICHITAKA; ARITA, SHUJI; KUSABA, HITOSHI; ODASHIRO, KEITA; ODA, YOSHINAO; AKASHI, KOICHI; BABA, EISHI

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, a 76-year-old male with a cardiac pacemaker was diagnosed with adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum. Subsequently, a pancreatoduodenectomy and lymph node dissection were performed, and 12 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (modified FOLFOX6 regimen), which consisted of fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin, were administered via a central venous catheter. At 5 months after the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient experienced the sudden onset of severe pain at the back right of the ear, edema of the right side of the face and right jugular vein dilatation. Computed tomography (CT) revealed filling defects in the superior vena cava (SVC) and right brachiocephalic vein, indicating catheter-induced venous thrombosis. Although the catheter was removed and anti-coagulation therapy, aspiration of the thrombosis and ballooning dilatation were performed immediately, the patient's symptoms were not ameliorated. Notably, histological examination following thrombus aspiration revealed metastatic cancer cells, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT identified metabolically active nodules in the SVC at locations consistent with the initial duodenal tumors detected by CT and in the first thoracic vertebrae. The tumor thrombus rapidly increased in size and resulted in worsening dyspnea. Subsequently, radiotherapy was performed, followed by chemotherapy, which relieved the systemic symptoms and suppressed the tumor growth. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum is extremely rare, and to the best of our knowledge, intraluminal SVC metastasis as a result of adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum has not been reported previously. The placement of a cardiac pacemaker, central venous catheter and tumor cells possessing high metastatic potential are hypothesized to have contributed to this rare case of metastasis. PMID:26870254

  11. Low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast: A diagnostic and clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qing Ting; Chuwa, Esther Wee Lee; Chew, Sung Hock; Lim-Tan, Soo Kim; Lim, Swee Ho

    2015-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast (ASBC) is a rare variant of metaplastic breast cancer with both glandular as well as squamous differentiation. Their lack of distinct imaging characteristics, sometimes subtle histological characteristics and overlapping features with other benign lesions pose a diagnostic challenge. Unlike other forms of metaplastic breast cancer, low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma (LGAC) tends to follow an indolent course with favourable prognosis. We reviewed eight cases of LGAC in our institution from June 2005 to March 2014. In six cases, LGAC was only found after excisional biopsy. In our patients, LGAC frequently co-existed with other forms of breast pathology. Two patients had incidental findings of LGAC alongside their primary malignant tumour (adenoid cystic carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma in one, four foci between 0.5 and 4.0 mm within a radial sclerosing lesion adjacent to a malignant phyllodes tumour in the other). A further four patients had LGAC within a complex sclerosing lesion. One patient had a focus of LGAC within a fibroadenoma. One had a focus of LGAC within a benign phyllodes tumour. None of the patients had evidence of nodal involvement. A high degree of suspicion is recommended as such lesions tend to be incidental histological findings within benign tumours or within complex sclerosing lesions. Although the risk of nodal and distant metastasis is low, the potential for local recurrence necessitates aggressive local excision with margin clearance. The role of axillary dissection has yet to be defined and routine sentinel node biopsy and axillary clearance may not be necessary in view of rarity of nodal metastasis in literature. Benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy is not clearly defined. All eight patients in our study have shown no evidence of recurrence after definitive surgery but longer periods of surveillance is required. PMID:25986061

  12. Fever as a first manifestation of advanced gastric adenosquamous carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ajoodhea, Harsha; Zhang, Ren-Chao; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Jin, Wei-Wei; Chen, Ke; He, Yong-Tao; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Gastric adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is a rare type of gastric cancer. It is a mixed neoplasm, consisting of glandular cells and squamous cells. It is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, thus carrying a poor prognosis. We describe a case of a 73-year-old male, who presented with refractory fever and an intra-abdominal mass on imaging. He underwent a laparoscopic exploration followed by a successful totally laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Postoperative pathology revealed primary gastric ASC (T4aN0M0). The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy with S1 and is alive 20 mo after surgery without recurrence. This is the first case of advanced gastric ASC with fever as the initial presentation treated with totally laparoscopic total gastrectomy reported in the English literature. PMID:25110448

  13. Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma of the Rectum in a Girl: First Case Reported and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    García, Natalia Á; Hernando Cubero, Jorge; Alonso Orduña, Vicente; Torrecilla Idoipe, Nerea; Calvo Escribano, Carlota; Fernandez Atuán, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare colorectal tumor with few cases described in the literature; no children have been reported. A 12-year-old-girl presented tenesmus, diarrhea, and iron deficiency anemia. Intestinal bowel disease was suspected, colonoscopy and biopsy were performed and the diagnosis was a squamous cell carcinoma. Chemoradiation therapy based on last colorectal cancer guidelines was started. Complete regression of the primary tumor was observed with lymph node progression. The pathology report of the lymphadenectomy revealed metastasis of adenosquamous carcinoma, although there was not any adenomatous component in the first biopsy. The patient presented progression with liver metastases, despite stable local disease due to response to first-line treatment of the squamous component. PMID:26181422

  14. A case of adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the gallbladder with markedly elevated PTHrP and G-CSF levels.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kaoru; Kinoshita, Akiyoshi; Akasu, Takafumi; Hagiwara, Noriko; Yokota, Takeharu; Imai, Nami; Iwaku, Akira; Fushiya, Nao; Koike, Kazuhiko; Nishino, Hirokazu

    2016-09-01

    A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with anorexia. Computed tomography revealed a tumor lesion measuring 110mm in the liver at S4/5 with calcification and swelling of a paraaortic lymph node. The gallbladder was not visualized. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen from the liver tumor revealed squamous cell and undifferentiated carcinomas, and several tumor markers were elevated. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with gallbladder adenosquamous cell carcinoma T3N2M0 stage III. Because the serum parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were significantly elevated, we suspected that PTHrP and G-CSF production occurred because of adenosquamous cell carcinoma in the gallbladder. We initiated chemotherapy with S-1. PMID:27593366

  15. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    PubMed

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil-3/7, base of tongue-1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)-3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process. PMID:26411881

  16. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: Molecular characterization of 23 patients along with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Borazanci, Erkut; Millis, Sherri Z; Korn, Ron; Han, Haiyong; Whatcott, Clifford J; Gatalica, Zoran; Barrett, Michael T; Cridebring, Derek; Von Hoff, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCP) is a rare entity. Like adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, overall survival is poor. Characteristics of ASCP include central tumor necrosis, along with osteoclasts and hypercalcemia. Various theories exist as to why this histological subtype exists, as normal pancreas tissue has no benign squamous epithelium. Due to the rarity of this disease, limited molecular analysis has been performed, and those reports indicate unique molecular features of ASCP. In this paper, we characterize 23 patients diagnosed with ASCP through molecular profiling using immunohistochemistry staining, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromogenic in situ hybridization, and gene sequencing, Additionally, we provide a comprehensive literature review of what is known to date of ASCP. Molecular characterization revealed overexpression in MRP1 (80%), MGMT (79%), TOP2A (75), RRM1 (42%), TOPO1 (42%), PTEN (45%), CMET (40%), and C-KIT (10%) among others. One hundred percent of samples tested were positive for KRAS mutations. This analysis shows heretofore unsuspected leads to be considered for treatments of this rare type of exocrine pancreas cancer. Molecular profiling may be appropriate to provide maximum information regarding the patient’s tumor. Further work should be pursued to better characterize this disease. PMID:26380056

  17. Is cervical screening preventing adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix?

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Rebecca; Sasieni, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    While the incidence of squamous carcinoma of the cervix has declined in countries with organised screening, adenocarcinoma has become more common. Cervical screening by cytology often fails to prevent adenocarcinoma. Using prospectively recorded cervical screening data in England and Wales, we conducted a population‐based case–control study to examine whether cervical screening leads to early diagnosis and down‐staging of adenocarcinoma. Conditional logistic regression modelling was carried out to provide odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) on 12,418 women with cervical cancer diagnosed between ages 30 and 69 and 24,453 age‐matched controls. Of women with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, 44.3% were up to date with screening and 14.6% were non‐attenders. The overall OR comparing women up to date with screening with non‐attenders was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.39–0.55) for adenocarcinoma. The odds were significantly decreased (OR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.15–0.33) in up to date women with Stage 2 or worse adenocarcinoma, but not for women with Stage1A adenocarcinoma 0.71 (95% CI: 0.46–1.09). The odds of Stage 1A adenocarcinoma was double among lapsed attenders (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.52–3.62) compared to non‐attenders. Relative to women with no negative cytology within 7 years of diagnosis, women with Stage1A adenocarcinoma were very unlikely to be detected within 3 years of a negative cytology test (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.05–0.13); however, the odds doubled 3–5 years after a negative test (OR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.67–3.18). ORs associated with up to date screening were smaller for squamous and adenosquamous cervical carcinoma. Although cytology screening is inefficient at preventing adenocarcinomas, invasive adenocarcinomas are detected earlier than they would be in the absence of screening, substantially preventing Stage 2 and worse adenocarcinomas. PMID:27096255

  18. Is cervical screening preventing adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix?

    PubMed

    Castanon, Alejandra; Landy, Rebecca; Sasieni, Peter D

    2016-09-01

    While the incidence of squamous carcinoma of the cervix has declined in countries with organised screening, adenocarcinoma has become more common. Cervical screening by cytology often fails to prevent adenocarcinoma. Using prospectively recorded cervical screening data in England and Wales, we conducted a population-based case-control study to examine whether cervical screening leads to early diagnosis and down-staging of adenocarcinoma. Conditional logistic regression modelling was carried out to provide odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) on 12,418 women with cervical cancer diagnosed between ages 30 and 69 and 24,453 age-matched controls. Of women with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, 44.3% were up to date with screening and 14.6% were non-attenders. The overall OR comparing women up to date with screening with non-attenders was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.39-0.55) for adenocarcinoma. The odds were significantly decreased (OR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.15-0.33) in up to date women with Stage 2 or worse adenocarcinoma, but not for women with Stage1A adenocarcinoma 0.71 (95% CI: 0.46-1.09). The odds of Stage 1A adenocarcinoma was double among lapsed attenders (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.52-3.62) compared to non-attenders. Relative to women with no negative cytology within 7 years of diagnosis, women with Stage1A adenocarcinoma were very unlikely to be detected within 3 years of a negative cytology test (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.05-0.13); however, the odds doubled 3-5 years after a negative test (OR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.67-3.18). ORs associated with up to date screening were smaller for squamous and adenosquamous cervical carcinoma. Although cytology screening is inefficient at preventing adenocarcinomas, invasive adenocarcinomas are detected earlier than they would be in the absence of screening, substantially preventing Stage 2 and worse adenocarcinomas. PMID:27096255

  19. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  20. Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Béchade, Dominique; Desjardin, Marie; Salmon, Emma; Désolneux, Grégoire; Bécouarn, Yves; Evrard, Serge; Fonck, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that accounts for 1–2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Here we report two cases of ACC and describe their clinical features, the therapies used to treat them, and their prognosis. The first patient was a 65-year-old woman who had an abdominal CT scan for a urinary infection. Fortuitously, a rounded and well-delimited corporeal pancreatic tumor was discovered. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration revealed an ACC. During the puncture, a hypoechoic cavity appeared inside the lesion, corresponding to a probable necrotic area. Treatment consisted of a distal splenopancreatectomy. The second patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a cephalic pancreatic lesion and two hepatic metastases. An EUS-guided fine needle aspiration showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which enabled an objective response after 6 cycles.

  1. Clinical Behaviors and Outcomes for Adenocarcinoma or Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix Treated by Radical Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical behaviors and treatment outcomes between patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 318 Stage IB-IIB cervical cancer patients, 202 (63.5%) with SCC and 116 (36.5%) with AC/ASC, treated by RH and adjuvant RT/CCRT, were included. The indications for RT/CCRT were deep stromal invasion, positive resection margin, parametrial invasion, or lymph node (LN) metastasis. Postoperative CCRT was administered in 65 SCC patients (32%) and 80 AC/ASC patients (69%). Patients with presence of parametrial invasion or LN metastasis were stratified into a high-risk group, and the rest into an intermediate-risk group. The patterns of failure and factors influencing survival were evaluated. Results: The treatment failed in 39 SCC patients (19.3%) and 39 AC/ASC patients (33.6%). The 5-year relapse-free survival rates for SCC and AC/ASC patients were 83.4% and 66.5%, respectively (p = 0.000). Distant metastasis was the major failure pattern in both groups. After multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for local recurrence included younger age, parametrial invasion, AC/ASC histology, and positive resection margin; for distant recurrence they included parametrial invasion, LN metastasis, and AC/ASC histology. Compared with SCC patients, those with AC/ASC had higher local relapse rates for the intermediate-risk group but a higher distant metastasis rate for the high-risk group. Postoperative CCRT tended to improve survival for intermediate-risk but not for high-risk AC/ASC patients. Conclusions: Adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for cervical cancer patients treated by RH and postoperative RT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy could improve survival for intermediate-risk, but not necessarily high-risk, AC/ASC patients.

  2. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 regulates the proliferation of oral adenosquamous carcinoma CAL-27 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma is very poor due to local recurrence and metastasis. This study explores the molecular events involved in oral carcinoma with the goal of developing novel therapeutic strategies. The mitotic spindle is a complex mechanical apparatus required for the accurate segregation of sister chromosomes during mitosis. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is a microtubule-binding subcomplex of the outer kinetochore that is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In recent years, much attention has been focused on determining how SKA proteins interact with each other, as well as their biological role in cancer cells. However, the precise role of SKA1 in oral carcinoma remains unknown. Methods In order to investigate the role of SKA1 in oral cancer, we employed lentivirus-mediated shRNA to silence SKA1 expression in the CAL-27 human oral adenosquamous carcinoma cell line. Results Depletion of SKA1 in CAL-27 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation, as determined by MTT and colony formation assays. These results strongly demonstrate that reduced SKA1 protein levels may cause inhibition of tumor formation. The shRNA-mediated depletion of SKA1 also led to G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Conclusion This is the first report to show that SKA1 plays an important role in the progression of oral adenosqamous carcinoma. Thus, silencing of SKA1 by RNAi might be a potential therapy for this disease. PMID:23962337

  3. [A case of gastric adenosquamous carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination in which treatment with S-1 plus paclitaxel therapy resulted in improved long-term survival].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masamitsu; Ozamoto, Yuki; Ichinose, Masumi; Togawa, Takeshi; Takao, Nobuyuki; Mizumoto, Akiyoshi; Tatsuno, Manami; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2014-07-01

    Gastric adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. We recently performed palliative gastrectomy for a gastric adenosquamous carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination and provided a course of systemic chemotherapy with S-1 plus paclitaxel(PTX)after the surgery. No serious adverse events were observed, and treatment with S-1 plus PTX was continued for 1 year before being switched to adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 alone for another year. The tumor maker levels normalized within 2 months of the initial treatment, and the peritoneal dissemination could no longer be detected by abdominal computed tomography(CT). The patient remained in clinical remission and maintained long-term survival of over 8 years. PMID:25131877

  4. Long-Term Outcome and Prognostic Factors for Adenocarcinoma/Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hsueh, Swei; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To study the outcomes of patients with adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix primarily treated with radiotherapy (RT), identify the prognostic factors, and evaluate the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 148 patients with Stage I-IVA AC/ASC of cervix after full-course definitive RT were included. Of the 148 patients, 77% had advanced stage disease. Treatment failure was categorized as either distant or local failure. Local failure was further separated into persistent tumor or local relapse after complete remission. The effectiveness of CCRT with cisplatin and/or paclitaxel was examined, and the surgical salvage rate for local failure was reviewed. Results: The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 68%, 38%, 49%, 30%, and 0% for those with Stage IB/IIA nonbulky, IB/IIA bulky, IIB, III, and IVA disease, respectively, and appeared inferior to that of those with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated using the same RT protocol. Incomplete tumor regression after RT, a low hemoglobin level, and positive lymph node metastasis were independent poor prognostic factors for relapse-free survival. CCRT with weekly cisplatinum did not improve the outcome for our AC/ASC patients. Salvage surgery rescued 30% of patients with persistent disease. Conclusion: Patients with AC/ASC of the cervix primarily treated with RT had inferior outcomes compared to those with squamous cell carcinoma. Incomplete tumor regression after RT was the most important prognostic factor for local failure. Salvage surgery for patients with persistent tumor should be encouraged for selected patients. Our results did not demonstrate a benefit of CCRT with cisplatin for this disease.

  5. Screening for major driver oncogene alterations in adenosquamous lung carcinoma using PCR coupled with next-generation and Sanger sequencing methods

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaohua; Wu, Huanwen; Lu, Junliang; Duan, Huanli; Liu, Xuguang; Liang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the frequency of major driver oncogenes in lung adenosquamous cell carcinoma (ASC) cases. Frequency of EGFR, K-Ras, B-Raf, PIK3CA, DDR2, ALK, and PDGFRA gene mutations was examined in 56 patients using next-generation sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, and Sanger sequencing. Macrodissection or microdissection was performed in 37 cases to separate the adenomatous and squamous components of ASC. The overall mutation rate was 64.29%, including 55.36%, 7.14%, and 1.79% for EGFR, K-Ras, and B-Raf mutations, respectively. PIK3CA mutation was detected in three cases; all involved coexisting EGFR mutations. Of the 37 cases, 34 were convergent in two components, while three showed EGFR mutations in the glandular components and three showed PIK3CA mutations in the squamous components. With respect to EGFR mutations, the number of young female patients, nonsmokers, and those with positive pleural invasion was higher in the mutation-positive group than that in the mutation-negative. K-Ras mutation was significantly associated with smoking. Overall survival in the different EGFR mutation groups differed significantly. The frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of EGFR- and K-Ras-mutated adenosquamous lung carcinoma were similar to that noted in Asian adenocarcinomas patients. The high convergence mutation rate in both adenomatous and squamous components suggests monoclonality in ASC. PMID:26923333

  6. Thrombosis and Pancreatic Carcinoma Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Abraham; Haws, Claude C.; Thomas, Eapen

    1982-01-01

    A case of recurrent pulmonary embolism from thrombophlebitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma is reported. There is an increased incidence of thrombophlebitis with all tumors, but carcinoma of the pancreas is statistically more frequently responsible. The higher incidence of thrombophlebitis with tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas is probably due to the low trypsin levels associated with these tumors. Trypsin levels are directly related to plasma antithrombin levels and mucinous adenocarcinomas are more commonly associated with thrombus formation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7120446

  7. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  8. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cellini, Numa; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Trodella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    CTV definition in exclusive or adjuvant radiation therapy of pancreatic carcinoma is essentially based on the opinion of "expert" authors and on the knowledge of lymphatic pathways. The subject has been widely debated. Radiotherapy treatments of the entire upper abdomen (liver and pancreatic region), pancreas and lymph node stations, to volumes focused on macroscopic tumor only, have been proposed. Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is characterized by the frequent, early appearance of metastasis via the lymphatic route. Most commonly involved lymph node stations include those of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric, peripancreatic, lumboaortic lymph nodes, those of the hepatic portal (the latter in particular for pancreatic head tumors) and of the hilum of spleen (the latter in particular for pancreatic tail tumors). The possible multicentricity of pancreatic carcinoma, most likely due to intraductal spread, should lead to the inclusion in the CTV of the entire pancreatic parenchyma. This should be considered also for the frequent perineural intra- or extrapancreatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma present also in small tumors (T1). In extrapancreatic spread the retropancreatic adipose tissue should be included in the CTV at least at the GTV level. At the present state of knowledge, in the absence of pattern of failure analysis and of comparison of different treatment approaches, in terms of the definition of volumes of interest, CTV definitions which include lymphatic drainage stations, most part of pancreatic parenchyma and retropancreatic adipose tissue seem justified especially in treatments for cure. In palliation, the CTV may be limited to the GTV and the adipose tissue behind it. PMID:15018319

  9. A hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, D; Theilmann, L; Spiegelberg, C

    2016-12-01

    Hepatoid carcinoma (HC) is an extremely rare form of neoplasm. Its cellular structure resembles that of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, only 26 cases of hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas have been reported in the literature. We report the diagnosis of a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head in a 78-year-old male patient. The tumor was detected incidentally during routine abdominal ultrasound scanning. Laboratory tests did not show any abnormalities except for a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. After CT, MRI, and laparoscopic biopsy that failed to obtain the diagnosis, the patient underwent a Whipple procedure. The final pathology report described a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head (pathological T3, N0 (0/10), L0, V0, R0, M0). After the patient recovered, no further therapy was recommended by the tumor board and he was discharged. Regular follow-up was suggested; however, the patient suddenly died of acute coronary artery disease 2 months after surgery. PMID:27488314

  10. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Si-Biao; Qin, Shan-Yu; Chen, Wen; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: We searched the literature for studies reporting the sensitivity, specificity, and other accuracy measures of serum CA19-9 levels for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Pooled analysis was performed using random-effects models, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Study quality was assessed using Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy and Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy tools. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies involving 3125 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 2061 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. Pooled analysis of the ability of CA19-9 level to differentiate pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis showed the following effect estimates: sensitivity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83); specificity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.82); positive likelihood ratio, 4.08 (95%CI: 3.39-4.91); negative likelihood ratio, 0.24 (95%CI: 0.21-0.28); and diagnostic odds ratio, 19.31 (95%CI: 14.40-25.90). The area under the ROC curve was 0.88. No significant publication bias was detected. CONCLUSION: Elevated CA19-9 by itself is insufficient for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, however, it increases suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma and may complement other clinical findings to improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:25892884

  11. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27290644

  12. Pancreatic carcinoma: differences between patients with or without diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Reguzzoni, G; Limido, E; Savastano, A; Rocca, F

    1995-04-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and type of diabetes mellitus in patients with pancreatic carcinoma and if the risk factors for the cancer have a different distribution among diabetics and non-diabetics, we reviewed the charts of 127 histologically and/or cytologically proven pancreatic carcinomas consecutively diagnosed from 1977 to 1989 and referred to our Primary Care Hospital from the attending physician. 48 out of 127 (37.7%) subjects were found to be diabetic; 3 had long standing insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, 10 long standing non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 35 (73% of all diabetics) new onset diabetes mellitus. 5 out of 10 long standing non insulin dependent diabetics showed secondary failure to oral antidiabetic agents and weight loss in the last six months before the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. When compared to non-diabetics, all diabetics were older (p = 0.05), drank less alcohol (p = 0.047) and had a higher rate of previous neoplasms (p = 0.005). New onset diabetics had a less advanced cancer than those of long standing (p = 0.009). Our study calls for a careful search for pancreatic carcinoma in new onset diabetes of elderly and in long standing, weight losing, non insulin dependent diabetics on secondary failure to oral antidiabetic agents and support the hypothesis that diabetes associated pancreatic carcinoma may bear an its own etiopathogenesis. PMID:7617956

  13. Successful pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, HIROKO; TAMURA, TOMOHIRO; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; KAWAGUCHI, MIO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2016-01-01

    Pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, although adenosquamous cell lung cancer (ASCLC) is a type of NSCLC, the availability of studies investigating its response to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy is limited. A 66-year-old woman was referred to Mito Medical Center, University of Tsukuba with hemoptysis and a chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a large cavitary mass in the lower lobe of the left lung. The patient underwent left lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection. The tumor was staged as pT2bN2M0. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion was identified in the adenocarcinomatous as well as the squamous cell carcinomatous components. Despite gefitinib therapy for pulmonary metastases, the patient developed cavitary metastases in both lungs. Therefore, treatment with pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was initiated. A chest CT scan revealed significant regression of the metastatic lesions in both lungs, with thinning of the walls. The patient remains well and recurrence-free 19 months after the initiation of pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy. Therefore, the clinical response of EGFR mutation-positive ASCLC to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was promising, suggesting pemetrexed to be one of the key drugs for this subset of ASCLC patients. PMID:27073680

  14. [A case of pancreatic carcinoma presenting as pancreaticopleural fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Tanno, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Sasajima, Junpei; Koizumi, Kazuya; Mizukami, Yusuke; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kasai, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yukinori; Watanabe, Naomi; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2010-05-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted with left pleural effusion, and an amylase level of 30994IU/l. A diagnosis of pancreaticopleural fistula was made, based on the findings of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). After the placement of an endoscopic naso-pancreatic drainage tube, the pleural effusion markedly reduced. When ERP was performed for internal drainage, the main pancreatic duct and stricture were biopsied and showed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma histologically. CT revealed a mass in the head of the pancreas. He underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of pancreatic carcinoma presenting as pancreaticopleural fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion. Clinicians should pay attention to the possible presence of cancer and pancreaticopleural fistula in patients with pancreatic pleural effusion. PMID:20460853

  15. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  16. Pancreatic carcinoma masked as fever of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ning; Xing, Cheng; Chang, Xiaoyan; Dai, Menghua; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pancreatic carcinoma is a highly lethal malignancy. Common presenting features of pancreatic cancer include anorexia, asthenia, weight loss, pain, and obstructive jaundice. Nevertheless, fever as a symptom, or even primary manifestation of pancreatic cancer is rather rare. Methods: Here, we report a 63-year-old male patient presenting with daily fevers, night sweats, and fatigue of 2-month duration. Laboratory findings showed elevated white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP). A computed tomography scan demonstrated a tumor between the duodenum and pancreatic head. Chest radiograph was normal. Results: The patient underwent an uneventful tumor resection. Histological examination of a surgical specimen demonstrated an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma originated from pancreatic head. The tumor was compatible with TNM stage IIA (T3N0M0). Complete resolution of the fever was achieved on post-operative day 4 and no recurrence of the tumor or neoplastic fever happen during the 39-month follow-up. Conclusion: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma could manifest as neoplastic fever at the time of diagnosis. If the tumor is resectable, surgical resection is a safe and curative form of therapy not only for the fever but also for the original carcinoma. PMID:27583884

  17. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  18. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  19. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Correlation with Pathologic Findings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Kun; Fan, Zhihui; Sun, Li; Wu, Wei; Yang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We concluded that contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has clinical value in identifying the pathologic changes of pancreatic carcinomas. Forty-three patients diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoma through surgery were retrospectively investigated. CEUS examinations were performed on all patients before surgery. Enhancement patterns on CEUS were observed. Time-intensity curves of CEUS were generated for the regions of interest in the pancreas, and quantitative parameters were obtained. Resected cancer specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic analysis, and the microvascular density (MVD) of the specimens was determined by CD34 immunohistochemical staining. Enhancement patterns of CEUS were compared with histopathologic findings in pancreatic carcinomas. Correlations between time-intensity curve parameters and microvascular density were analyzed. Twenty cases manifested centripetal enhancement, and 23 cases, global enhancement. The amount of tumor necrosis or mucus in the centripetally enhanced pancreatic carcinomas was greater than that in the globally enhanced pancreatic carcinomas (p = 0.027). Thirty-eight of 43 (88.4%) pancreatic carcinomas manifested hypo-enhancement with a maximum intensity (IMAX) <90%. Contrast arrival time in pancreatic carcinoma was longer than that in adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). IMAX was positively correlated with microvascular density (r = 0.577, p < 0.05). We concluded that CEUS manifestations could reflect the histologic changes of pancreatic carcinomas and CEUS can be used to evaluate blood perfusion of tumors, as IMAX is positively correlated with microvascular density. PMID:26806440

  20. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  1. Unusual early-stage pancreatic sarcomatoid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chuan-Li; Jin, Ping; Han, Chong-Xu; Xiao, Qin; Wang, Dao-Rong; Shi, Lin; Wang, Da-Xin; Chen, Hui

    2013-11-21

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the pancreas (SCP) is a very rare pathological type of carcinoma that usually has a poor prognosis. Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated. We herein report a case of an early-stage SCP involving successful treatment and a good prognosis. The patient was a 48-year-old Chinese man with a 5-mo history of vague abdominal pain. Ultrasonography revealed a 93 mm × 94 mm × 75 mm mass of mixed echogenicity in the tail of the pancreas. Laboratory test results were within the normal range, with the exception of an obviously increased pretreatment neuron-specific enolase level. The plasma transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 and interleukin-11 levels were obviously increased according to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Microscopically, the excised tumor tissue comprised cancer cells and mesenchymal cells. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive for α-1-antichymotrypsin, pan-cytokeratin, cytokeratin 19, cytokeratin 8/18, and vimentin and negative for CD68 and lysozyme. The pathogenetic mechanism of this case shows that TGFβ1 may regulate the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in SCP. With early eradication of the tumor and systemic therapy, this patient has been alive for more than 3 years without tumor recurrence or distant metastasis. This case is also the first to show that TGFβ1 may regulate the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in early-stage SCP. PMID:24282372

  2. Pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    DU, YANG; WANG, YING; TANG, JIE; GE, JUN; QIN, QING; JIANG, LI; LIU, XIAOKE; ZHU, XIANGLAN; WANG, YONGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is a rare type of cancer. Unlike other thymic epithelial tumors and carcinoids originating in other locations, thymic NEC possesses a more aggressive biological behavior, including invasion to proximal structures, local recurrence and distant hematogenous metastasis. Distant metastasis is often observed in the bones, lungs, spleen, liver and adrenal glands. However, pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC is extremely uncommon, and only a few cases of patients with this disease have been reported. The current study presents the case of a patient with pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC. The patient was admitted to hospital with an anterior mediastinal neoplasm, which was identified using chest enhanced computed tomography. The patient underwent a monobloc excision of the tumor with resection of involved structures. Subsequently, a pathological diagnosis of atypical thymic carcinoid was provided, according to the morphological characteristics observed and the expression of neuroendocrine markers, as identified by immunohistochemistry. Following surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, ~2 years after surgery, metastasis at the pancreatic head was identified. The patient underwent a total pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and did not receive any post-operative therapies; however, the patient succumbed to the disease 9 months following surgery. Overall, the results from the present study demonstrate the clinical features of thymic NEC, which may aid with the diagnosis of this rare disease in other patients. PMID:26998098

  3. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic carcinoma in rat models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Hai-Lin; Li, Ya; Yuan, Ping

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the proteomic variabilities of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rat models and to identify potential biomarkers. METHODS: Sixty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. The rats had DMBA implanted into their pancreas for one (n = 20) or two months (n = 20) or assigned to the normal group (n = 20). The rats were killed after one or two months, and were evaluated histopathologically. Three tissue samples from each group of rats with either normal pancreas, PanIN (PanIN-2) or PC were examined by 2D-DIGE. The different expression spot features were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of enolase 1, a differentially expressed protein, was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the proportions of neoplastic changes between the 1- and 2-mogroups (P = 0.0488). There was an increase in the frequency of adenocarcinomas in the 2-mo group compared with the 1-mo group (P = 0.0309). No neoplastic changes were observed in any of the animals in the normal group. Enolase 1, pancreatic ELA3B, necdin, Hbp23, CHD3, hnRNP A2/B1, Rap80, and Gnb2l1 were up-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues, and CEL, TPT1, NME2, PCK2, an unnamed protein product, and glycine C-acetyltransferase were down-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues. The immunohistochemical results showed that enolase 1 expression was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues of rats and humans. CONCLUSION: The pancreatic protein expression changes induced by DMBA suggest potential molecular targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of PC. PMID:21472101

  4. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  5. Pancreatic Metastasis from Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Chihiro; Naoe, Hideaki; Hashigo, Shunpei; Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Ishii, Shotaro; Konoe, Takeyasu; Watanabe, Takehisa; Shono, Takashi; Sakurai, Kouichi; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Ikuta, Yoshiaki; Chikamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Motohiko; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Baba, Hideo; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic cancers of the pancreas are rare, accounting for approximately 2–4% of all pancreatic malignancies. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common solid tumor that metastasizes to the pancreas. Here, we present a case of uterine cervical carcinoma metastasizing to the pancreas and review the literature regarding this rare event. A 44-year-old woman with a uterine cervical tumor had undergone radical hysterectomy and had been diagnosed pathologically with stage Ib mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma in 2004. She underwent concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy postoperatively. Pulmonary metastases subsequently appeared in 2008 and 2011, and she underwent complete resection of the lung tumors by video-assisted thoracic surgery. Although she was followed up without any treatment and with no other recurrences, positron emission tomography revealed an area of abnormal uptake within the pancreatic body in 2012. Enhanced computed tomography demonstrated a 20-mm lesion in the pancreatic body and upstream pancreatic duct dilatation. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration was performed and pathological examination suggested neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). On the basis of these results and the patient's oncological background, lesions in the pancreatic body were diagnosed as secondary metastasis from the cervical carcinoma that had been treated 8 years earlier. No other distant metastases were visualized, and the patient subsequently underwent middle pancreatectomy. Pathological examination showed NEC consistent with pancreatic metastasis from the uterine cervical carcinoma. The patient has survived 7 months since the middle pancreatectomy without any signs of local recurrence or other metastatic lesions. PMID:23741220

  6. A case of hyperfunctioning pancreatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Hostetler, Valerie; Dunn, Dell

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a hyperfunctioning mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver. To our knowledge, the imaging appearance of a MANEC in the liver has never been reported. Literature on MANEC and its imaging features, including its appearance on the MR hepatobiliary phase and differential considerations, are reviewed and discussed. PMID:27190559

  7. A case of hyperfunctioning pancreatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christopher J.; Hostetler, Valerie; Dunn, Dell

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a hyperfunctioning mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver. To our knowledge, the imaging appearance of a MANEC in the liver has never been reported. Literature on MANEC and its imaging features, including its appearance on the MR hepatobiliary phase and differential considerations, are reviewed and discussed. PMID:27190559

  8. Pancreatic metastases from ovarian carcinoma--diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hadzri, M Hasmoni; Rosemi, Salleh

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic metastases are very uncommon and originate most commonly from lung, colon, breast and kidney cancer. Ovarian adenocarcinoma has been reported as a primary site of pancreatic metastasis, but its diagnosis has rarely being reported by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We report a case of multiple metastases to the pancreas from ovarian carcinoma occurring four years after original resection of the primary tumour. Our patient presented with severe epigastric pain which was initially treated as acute pancreatitis. Further imaging modalities showed multiple large pseudocystic lesions in the pancreatic head and body. Subsequent EUS-FNA confirmed that the lesions were metastatic disease from an advanced ovarian carcinoma. She underwent palliative chemotherapy and the pancreatic lesion showed receding size. PMID:22822646

  9. Growth inhibitory effect of the ternary complex factor Net on human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiwen; Ni, Peihua; Zhu, Qi; Cao, Haixia; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Su; Au, Chris; Zhang, Yongping

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies and carries the most dismal prognoses of all cancers. A better understanding of the genes involving in tumor development may allow us to tackle this rapidly progressive disease. The Net gene belongs to the ternary complex transcription factor (TCF) family and is regulated by the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway. Under basal conditions, Net shows strong repressing function on transcription of proto-oncogene gene c-fos. Moreover, the lower expression of Net has been noted in some carcinoma cells, such as cervical cancer. To study the effect of Net on c-fos expression and its potential role in the growth of pancreatic carcinoma, we developed a recombinant plasmid, a pEGFP-N1-Net, which codes for Net-EGFP fusion proteins, and stably transfected it into BxPC-3 human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Using stable transformants, we were able to show that overexpression of Net decreased the expression of c-fos and inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that Net overexpression inhibited cell cycle progression. These findings suggested that loss of Net repression could augment c-fos expression and further trigger neoplastic cell proliferation, which was involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, Net might be a potential target for the treatment of c-fos-positive pancreatic cancer. PMID:18832796

  10. The monoclonal anti-BCL10 antibody (clone 331.1) is a sensitive and specific marker of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatic metaplasia.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Franzi, Francesca; Marchet, Silvia; Finzi, Giovanna; Clerici, Moira; Vigetti, Davide; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare pancreatic cancer which may be difficult to distinguish from other solid nonadenocarcinoma tumors. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of acinar differentiation, obtained with antibodies recognizing various pancreatic enzymes that, although specific, show different sensitivity. The C-terminal portion of the BCL10 protein shows homology with carboxyl ester hydrolase (CEH), an enzyme produced by pancreatic acinar cells. We investigated the usefulness of a C-terminal BCL10 monoclonal antibody in the diagnosis of ACCs. We examined normal pancreases and different pancreatic tumors including ACCs, mixed acinar-endocrine carcinomas, ductal adenocarcinomas, mucinous, serous, solid pseudopapillary, and endocrine neoplasms. In addition, various normal tissues and cases of pancreatic metaplasia of the gastroesophageal mucosa, cases of ectopic pancreas, gastrointestinal endocrine tumors, salivary and breast acinic cell carcinomas, gastric adenocarcinomas with and without acinar differentiation, and hepatocellular carcinomas were studied. BCL10 immunoreactivity paralleled that of CEH and was restricted to acinar cells of normal and ectopic pancreas, of pancreatic metaplasia, and of ACCs. The anti-BCL10 antibody was more sensitive in detecting ACCs and pancreatic metaplasia than antibodies directed against other pancreatic enzymes. We suggest using BCL10 antibody for diagnosing pancreatic tumors and whenever an acinar differentiation is suspected in gastrointestinal neoplastic and metaplastic lesions. PMID:19066953

  11. A malignant cause of hypoglycaemia: a metastatic insulin-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony; Pagsisihan, Daveric; Berberabe, A'Ericson; Palugod-Lopez, Elaine Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of insulinomas are benign. We report a case of a malignant form of insulinoma. A 46-year-old man presented with behavioural changes associated with hypoglycaemia. Diagnostic work up revealed high serum insulin, high C-peptide and low glucose levels, compatible with endogenous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed a pancreatic head mass and multiple liver masses. Biopsy of the pancreatic mass revealed a grade three pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. Histological analysis of a liver mass showed that it was identical to the pancreatic mass, confirming its metastatic nature. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy with en bloc splenectomy. There was persistence of hypoglycaemic symptoms after removal of the pancreatic mass, suggesting that the liver metastases were also functioning. Symptoms were controlled by diazoxide and octreotide long-acting release. The patient is already 1 year postsurgery with no recurrence of severe hypoglycaemia, and he has good functional capacity and has returned to his office job. PMID:26994053

  12. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, Roberto; Spaggiari, Mario; Cautero, Nicola; De Ruvo, Nicola; Montalti, Roberto; Longo, Cristina; Pecchi, Anna; Giacobazzi, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio

    2011-11-21

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, with a reported incidence varying from 1.6% to 11% in autopsy studies of patients with advanced malignancy. In clinical series, the frequency of pancreatic metastases ranges from 2% to 5% of all pancreatic malignant tumors. However, the pancreas is an elective site for metastases from carcinoma of the kidney and this peculiarity has been reported by several studies. The epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are known from single-institution case reports and literature reviews. There is currently very limited experience with the surgical resection of isolated pancreatic metastasis, and the role of surgery in the management of these patients has not been clearly defined. In fact, for many years pancreatic resections were associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and metastatic disease to the pancreas was considered to be a terminal-stage condition. More recently, a significant reduction in the operative risk following major pancreatic surgery has been demonstrated, thus extending the indication for these operations to patients with metastatic disease. PMID:22147975

  13. Stage IB2 adenosquamous cervical cancer diagnosed at 19-weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Peculis, Luiza D; Ius, Yvette; Campion, Michael; Friedlander, Michael; Hacker, Neville

    2015-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for advanced cervical cancer in pregnancy has been shown to increase operability and be effective against spread of disease. In all reported cases of advanced disease, residual tumour has been found at surgery following NACT. We present a case of a 27-year old diagnosed with stage IB2 adenosquamous cervical carcinoma at 19-weeks' gestation who was treated with NACT. Following caesarean section and radical hysterectomy, histopathology showed no evidence of residual tumour in the cervix and negative pelvic lymph nodes. PMID:25470742

  14. Omental acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic origin in a child: a clinicopathological rarity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shilpa; Agarwal, Shipra; Nagendla, Murali Krishna; Gupta, Devendra K

    2016-03-01

    A 6-year-old boy presented with a large subhepatic mass associated with pain abdomen. Exploration revealed a tumor in lesser omentum, completely separate from the normal pancreas that was excised completely. Histopathology suggested acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic origin in an ectopic location. The child is well at 5 months follow-up. PMID:26694824

  15. Pathology and Surgical Treatment of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: an Evolving Landscape.

    PubMed

    Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Verbeke, Caroline Sophie; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare, accounting for less than 5 % of all pancreatic tumors. High-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (hgPNECs) represent about 5 % of all PNENs. They show highly aggressive behavior with dismal prognosis. Throughout the last two decades, there has been a notable progress in basic and clinical research of PNENs and a therapeutic trend towards both more aggressive and minimally invasive surgery. Despite these advances, hgPNECs as a distinct clinical entity remains largely unexplored among surgeons. This review of current development in pathology reporting and surgical treatment of hgPNECs aims at increasing the awareness of an evolving field in pancreatic surgery. PMID:26984415

  16. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:24209713

  17. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kimura, Yuki; Masugi, Yohei; Ito, Homare; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:24209713

  18. Efficacy of Contrast-enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uekitani, Toshiyuki; Kaino, Seiji; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sen-yo, Manabu; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Distinguishing pancreatic ductal carcinoma (DC) from other pancreatic masses remains challenging. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CEH-EUS) in the diagnosis of DC. Patients and Methods: Forty-nine patients with solid pancreatic mass lesions underwent CEH-EUS. EUS (B-mode) was used to evaluate the inner echoes, distributions, and borders of the masses. The vascular patterns of the masses were evaluated with CEH-EUS at 30–50 s (early phase) and 70–90 s (late phase) after the administration of Sonazoid®. Results: The final diagnoses included DCs (37), mass-forming pancreatitis (6), endocrine neoplasms (3), a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (1), a metastatic carcinoma (1), and an acinar cell carcinoma (1). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the diagnoses of DC in hypoechoic masses using EUS (B-mode) were 89.2%, 16.7%, and 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of DC in hypovascular masses using CEH-EUS were 73.0%, 91.7%, and 77.6% in the early phase and 83.8%, 91.7%, and 85.7% in the late phase, respectively. Conclusions: CEH-EUS for the diagnosis of DC is superior to EUS. CEH-EUS in the late phase was particularly efficacious in the diagnosis of DC. PMID:27184637

  19. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats with pancreatic carcinoma (n = 6) in order to identify potential new biomarkers of feline pancreatic disease. After plasma protein separation by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein spots were detected by Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 staining and identified by mass spectrometry. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), and apolipoprotein-A1 precursor (Pre Apo-A1) appeared to be differentially expressed, which suggests the presence of a systemic acute-phase response and alteration of lipid metabolism in cats with pancreatic disease. Future studies involving greater case numbers are needed in order to assess the utility of these proteins as potential biomarkers. More sensitive proteomic techniques may also be helpful in detecting significant but low-abundance proteins. PMID:26130850

  20. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk

    2016-01-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important.

  1. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2016-05-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important. PMID:27212999

  2. Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  4. Percutaneous irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma using the dorsal approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Hester J; Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Vogel, Jantien A; van Tilborg, Aukje A J M; Nielsen, Karin; Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2015-06-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively. PMID:25288173

  5. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  6. Postmortem examination of 22 pancreatic carcinoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.; Tobias, C.A.; Walton, R.E.; Peters, T.C.

    1984-02-01

    Postmortem findings are available in this report in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; California. This represents the largest group evaluated histologically in the literature and is the first report evaluating effects of particle radiation in pancreatic tissue. Patient survival after therapy averaged 9 months. Most died of infection and/or pulmonary emboli. Local control was achieved in 27%. The pancreatic tumors had histologically more severe radiation changes than nontumor bearing pancreas. Irradiated bone marrow was severely hypocellular, and irradiated skin was atrophic. Five patients had radiation injury in the gastrointestinal tract. The spinal cord, liver, and kidneys showed no damage. This study demonstrates the safety of helium particle irradiation with present therapeutic planning. Injury to tumor was seen without excessive damage to adjacent tissues.

  7. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  8. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy in newly diagnosed pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bala, Asif; Ali, Butool; Khan, Husna; Bracamonte, Erika; Sussman, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy can occur due to primary hyperoxaluria and secondary hyperoxaluria. The primary hyperoxalurias are a group of autosomal recessive disorders of endogenous oxalate overproduction. Secondary hyperoxaluria may occur as a result of excess dietary intake, poisoning with oxalate precursors (ethylene glycol), or enteric hyperoxaluria. The differential diagnosis of enteric hyperoxaluria includes inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, bariatric surgery (with jejunoileal bypass or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), celiac disease, partial colectomy, and chronic pancreatitis. The common etiology in all these processes is fat malabsorption, steatorrhea, saponification of calcium, and absorption of free oxalate. Hyperoxaluria causes increased urinary oxalate excretion, urolithiasis (promoted by hypovolemia, decreased urinary pH caused by metabolic acidosis, and decreased citrate and magnesium concentrations in urine), tubulointerstitial oxalate deposits, and tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a rare case of acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy and exocrine insufficiency caused by newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:26614399

  9. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy in combination with gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yan, Tao; Wang, Guojin; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy combined with gemcitabine in treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods The 45 patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma were randomized into two groups. The patients in the experimental group (n=23) received HIFU in combination with gemcitabine and those in the control group (n=22) received gemcitabine alone. The effect and clinical benefit rates in the two groups were compared. The median survival time and 6-month and 12-month survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results The median survival time and 6-month survival rate were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (8.91 months vs 5.53 months, 73.9% vs 40.9%, respectively P<0.05), but 12-month survival rate was not statistically different between the two groups (13.0% vs 4.5%, P>0.05). The clinical benefit rates in the experimental group and the control group were 69.6% and 36.3%, respectively (P<0.05). The pain remission rate in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (65.2% vs 31.8%, P<0.05). Conclusion HIFU in combination with gemcitabine is better than gemcitabine alone. This combinatorial therapy may become a better and effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27194912

  10. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in pancreatic acinar carcinoma of rat.

    PubMed

    Taton, G; Delhaye, M; Swillens, S; Morisset, J; Larose, L; Longnecker, D S; Poirier, G G

    1985-04-15

    The active enantiomer of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H(-)QNB) was used as a ligand to evaluate the muscarinic receptors. The 3H(-)QNB binding characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained from normal and neoplastic tissues were studied to determine changes in receptor properties during neoplastic transformation. Saturable and stereospecific binding sites for 3H(-)QNB are present in homogenates of rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The proportions of high- and low-affinity agonist binding sites are similar for neoplastic and normal tissues. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in neoplastic (200 femtomoles/mg protein) than in normal pancreatic homogenates (80 femtomoles/mg protein). The muscarinic binding sites of the neoplastic and fetal pancreas show similar KD values which are higher than those observed for normal pancreas. PMID:2580801

  11. Characterization of 47D10, a glycoprotein associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.K.; Kato, K.P.; Murray, J.H.; Wolfe, H.; Rabin, H.; Carney, W.P.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), 47D10, was raised against a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549. 47D10 bound to lines derived from breast, colon, lung, and pancreatic tumors, but not to normal fibroblasts. Granulocytes also expressed 47D10 but red blood cells and lymphocytes were negative. Immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin-embedded tissues indicated that 47D10 was reactive with 36 out of 38 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but not with chronic pancreatitis, regenerative pancreas or normal pancreas. The 47D10 antigen was a group of surface glycoproteins ranging from 63-97Kd (average Mr 85Kd). The antigen could be labeled by /sup 35/S-methionine, /sup 125/I, tritiated glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. Pulse-chase labeling showed that the 63-97Kd mature antigens were derived from precursors of 63Kd and 65Kd. The mature antigen was sensitive to endoglycosidase F (endo F) whereas the precursors were susceptible to both endoglycosidase H and endo F. Endo F digestion resulted in a polypeptide of 38Kd. Therefore, the 47D10 antigen is composed of at least 55% N-linked carbohydrates. The 47D10 MAb seems to be distinct from previously identified MAb against pancreatic tumors and may be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  12. Inflammatory networks and immune surveillance of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vonderheide, Robert H.; Bayne, Lauren J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated inflammation plays an important role in restraining anti-tumor immunity, particularly in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) for which a massive infiltration of immunosuppressive leukocytes into the tumor stroma is an early and consistent event in oncogenesis. This pathophysiology is in contrast to many other solid tumors for which infiltration of effector T cells is often prominent, associated with improved clinical outcomes, and mechanistically contributes to tumor immunoediting that ultimately can mediate immune escape. In PDA, increasing evidence suggests that the ras oncogene drives an inflammatory program that establishes immune privilege in the tumor microenvironment. Indeed, PDA cells might remain intrinsically sensitive to T cell killing because they have never been exposed to T cell selective pressure in vivo. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies demonstrate that derailing immune suppressive pathways in the PDA microenvironment, such as tumor derived GM-CSF, facilitates T-cell mediated tumor rejection. These findings carry major implications for the development of novel, combination immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23422836

  13. Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Paolo; Doucet, Ludovic; Giglione, Palma; Grünwald, Viktor; Melichar, Bohuslav; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Ortega, Cinzia; Santoni, Matteo; Bamias, Aristotelis; Verzoni, Elena; Derosa, Lisa; Studentova, Hana; Pacifici, Monica; Coppa, Jorgelina; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo; Porta, Camillo; Escudier, Bernard; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox's proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54-142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10-14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61-86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78-204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36-11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94-2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43-5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30-0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and locoregional

  14. Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Paolo; Doucet, Ludovic; Giglione, Palma; Grünwald, Viktor; Melichar, Bohuslav; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Ortega, Cinzia; Santoni, Matteo; Bamias, Aristotelis; Verzoni, Elena; Derosa, Lisa; Studentova, Hana; Pacifici, Monica; Coppa, Jorgelina; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo; Porta, Camillo; Escudier, Bernard; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox’s proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54–142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10–14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61–86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78–204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36–11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94–2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43–5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30–0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and

  15. KLF4 is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Francesca; Morelli, Mariangela; Menicagli, Michele; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Zavaglia, Katia; Paolucci, Alessandra; Campani, Daniela; Aretini, Paolo; Boggi, Ugo; Mosca, Franco; Cavazzana, Andrea; Cartegni, Luca; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2011-01-01

    Ductal pancreatic carcinoma (DPC) is a deadly disease with an incidence of 9 cases in 100,000 people per year and a mortality rate close to 100%. Allelic losses in the long arm of chromosome 9 are commonly encountered in many human malignancies but no data are yet available about DPC. We screened 40 laser-microdissected DPC samples and 6 pre-invasive lesions for 9 microsatellite mapping markers of region 9q21.3 through 9q34.2. A small overlapping region of deletion, spanning 8 million base pairs, was identified between D9S127 and D9S105. Two genes, RSG3 and KLF4, mapped to 9q31.1 through 9q32, were further investigated. A highly significant association was found between KLF4 gene expression levels and genomic status. Similarly, absence of immunohistochemical expression of KLF4 protein was found in 86.8% cases of DPC (33/38). Overexpression of KLF4 in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line induced a significant decrease in the proliferation associated with up-regulation of p21 and the down-regulation of cyclin D1. In conclusion, we identified a novel oncosuppressor region located at the 9q 31.1-3 locus that is lost in DPC at high frequency. Loss of KLF4 expression is closely related to the genomic loss, and its restoration inhibits cancer cell proliferation, suggesting a key suppressor role in pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:21224073

  16. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  17. Endosonography and cytology in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma: Preliminary results of endosonographic guided puncture

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, T.L.; Sie, L.H.; Tytgat, G.N.J. Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam )

    1993-01-01

    Endosonography was performed in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma in two patients. In the first case endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomography were nondiagnostic in diagnosing the origin of submucosal gastric abnormalities. Endosonography diagnosed a pancreatic tail carcinoma with submucosal gastric involvement, and this was confirmed by endosonographic-guided cytology. Fundus varices due to segmented splenic vein involvement were found. Surgery was not recommended due to the advanced disease. In the second case pancreatic body carcinoma was diagnosed by ERCP and computed tomography. Transcutaneous ultrasonographic-guided cytological puncture confirmed the diagnosis. Endosonography revealed additional information of segmental portal hypertension with fundic varices due to splenic vein involvement. Autopsy confirmed the endosonographic diagnosis. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation

    PubMed Central

    Wiebelitz, Karl Rüdiger; Beer, André-Michael

    2012-01-01

    A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case. PMID:23097614

  19. Metronomic temozolomide as second line treatment for metastatic poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Divitiis, C; von Arx, C; Grimaldi, A M; Cicala, D; Tatangelo, F; Arcella, A; Romano, G M; Simeone, E; Iaffaioli, R V; Ascierto, P A; Tafuto, S

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) are a group of heterogeneous malignancies derived from neuroendocrine cell compartment, with different roles in both endocrine and nervous system. Most NETs have gastroentero-pancreatic (GEP) origin, arising in the foregut, midgut, or hindgut. The 2010 WHO classification divides GEP-NETs into two main subgroups, neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC), according with Ki-67 levels. NET are tumors with low (<20 %) Ki-67 value, and NECs, including small cell lung carcinomas and Merkel Cell carcinomas, are all NETs with high Ki-67 levels (>20 %-G3). Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) are usually treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here we present a case of a patient with pancreatic NEC progressing after cisplatin and etoposide, treated with temozolomide as palliative, second line treatment. According with the poor Performance Status (PS = 2) and to reduce the toxicity of the treatment was chosen an intermittent dosing regimen of metronomic temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day-one-week-on/on-week-off). MGMT resulted methylated. On July 2014 the patient started the treatment. On August 2014 the patient obtained a significant clinical benefit (PS = 0) and the total body CT scan performed on October 2014 showed a RECIST partial response on all the sites of disease. No drug-related side effects were reported by the patient. After 18 months of therapy the treatment continues without significant toxicity, and with further remission of the metastases. Treatment with metronomic "one-week-on/on-week-off" Temozolomide can be considered a good treatment option in patients with poor performance status, affected by pNEC with MGMT methylation. PMID:27142424

  20. Thickening of the celiac axis and/or superior mesenteric artery: a sign of pancreatic carcinoma on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Bosniak, M.A.; Ambos, M.A.; Beranbaum, E.R.

    1981-11-01

    Of 53 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas studied by computed tomography, 20 (37.7%) had apparent thickening of either the celiac axis or superior mesenteric artery. In 6 of them, the pancreatic mass was poorly defined. The frequency of this sign, correlation with angiographic findings, and pathogenesis are discussed.

  1. Spiclomazine Induces Apoptosis Associated with the Suppression of Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-01-01

    The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver (HL-7702) cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion. PMID:23840452

  2. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient’s clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  3. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient's clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  4. Repeated pancreatectomy for metachronous duodenal and pancreatic metastases of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hata, Tatsuo; Sakata, Naoaki; Aoki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kanno, Atsushi; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman had undergone left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma 13 years previously. Ten years later, a solitary metastatic tumor had been detected in the pancreatic tail and she had undergone subsequent resection of the pancreatic tail and spleen. Three years after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for severe anemia resulting from gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 3-cm solid tumor at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology of the bioptic duodenal tissue revealed inflammatory granulation without malignancy. Computed tomography showed a well-contrasted hypervascular tumor in the descending portion of the duodenum. We diagnosed the patient with metachronous duodenal metastasis of renal cell carcinoma and performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy. An ulcerated polypoid mass was detected at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology revealed clear cell carcinoma coated by granulation tissue across the surface of the tumor. Immunohistology demonstrated that the cells were positive for vimentin, CD10 and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for CK7. After a repeated pancreatectomy, the patient had no symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding and maintained good glucose tolerance without insulin therapy because the remnant pancreas functioned well. In conclusion, for the diagnosis of patients who have previously undergone nephrectomy and present with gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility of metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract, including the duodenum, should be considered. With respect to surgical treatment, the pancreas should be minimally resected to maintain a free surgical margin during the first surgery taking into account further metachronous metastasis to the duodenum and pancreas. PMID:24403883

  5. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  6. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  7. Combination of Recombinant Adenovirus-p53 with Radiochemotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-luan; Cai, Yong; Zhang, Shan-wen; Xiao, Shao-wen; Li, Xiao-fan; Duan, You-jia; Li, Yong-heng; Xu, Bo; Yan, Kun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of recombinant adenovirus-p53 (rAd-p53) with radiochemotherapy for treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods The eligible patients received concurrent rAd-p53 intratumoral injection and radiochemotherapy. Intratumoral injection of rAd-p53 was guided by B ultrasound. Radiochemotherapy consisted of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at two dose levels and intravenous gemcitabine (Gem). For radiotherapy, gross target volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were 55-60 Gy and 45-55 Gy in 25-30 fractions, respectively. Concurrent intravenous gemcitabine was administered at 350 mg/m2, weekly, for 6 weeks. The primary end points included toxicity, clinical benefit response (CBR) and disease control rate (DCR). The secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Fifteen eligible patients were enrolled. Eight patients (53.3%) were evaluated as CBR and 12 (80%) achieved DCR. The median PFS and OS were 6.7 and 13.8 months, respectively. One-year PFS and OS were 40.0% and 51.1%, respectively. There were 8 (53.3%) patients reported grade 3 toxicities including neutropenia (6 patients, 40%), fever (1 patient, 6.7%) and fatigue (1 patient, 6.7%). There was no grade 4 toxicity reported. Conclusion Combination of rAd-p53 in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma showed encouraging efficacious benefit and was well tolerated. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm the improvement of PFS and OS. PMID:23467436

  8. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Utility of ovarian biopsy in pancreatic metastasis of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KOHEI; NAKAYAMA, KENTARO; ISHIKAWA, MASAKO; ISHIKAWA, NORIYOSHI; NAGASE, MAMIKO; KATAGIRI, HIROSHI; ISHIBASHI, TOMOKA; SATO, EMI; IIDA, KOHJI; SULTANA, RAZIA; KYO, SATORU

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare that ovarian carcinoma metastasizes to the pancreas, and pathological diagnosis is required to confirm the primary site. The present study reported a 73-year-old woman with serous carcinoma of the ovary that metastasized to the tail of the pancreas. Metastasis was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination of a biopsy of the ovarian tumor, an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreatic tumor and computerized tomography-guided paraaortic lymph node biopsy. A biopsy of the ovarian tumor is useful to make a precise diagnosis and to determine proper treatment when ovarian and pancreatic tumors are identified at the same time and the primary neoplasm is uncertain. PMID:27330762

  10. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, O. Kusunoki, S.; Kudoh, K.; Takamori, H.; Tsuji, T.; Kanemitsu, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods. CTAI was performed in 17 patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer with (n = 11) or without (n = 6) liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The inferior pancreatic artery (IPA) was embolized to achieve delivery of the pancreatic blood supply through only the celiac artery. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the primary tumor size, liver metastasis, and survival time and factors such as tumor size, tumor location, and stage of pancreatic carcinoma; the embolized arteries were analyzed with respect to treatment effects and prognosis. Results. A catheter was fixed in the gastroduodenal artery and splenic artery in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Complete peripancreatic arterial occlusion was successful in 10 patients. CT showed a decrease in tumor size in 6 of 17 (35%) patients and a decrease in liver metastases in 6 of 11 (55%) patients. The survival time ranged from 4 to 18 months (mean {+-} SD, 8.8 {+-} 1.5 months). Complete embolization of arteries surrounding the pancreas was achieved in 10 patients; they manifested superior treatment effects and prognoses (p < 0.05). Conclusion. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, long-term CTAI with systemic chemotherapy appeared to be effective not only against the primary tumor but also against liver metastases. Patients with successfully occluded peripancreatic arteries tended to survive longer.

  11. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  12. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed. PMID:27446572

  13. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  14. Sensitivity of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells to Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Wu, M C; Arimura, G K; Holcenberg, J S; Yunis, A A

    1982-09-01

    Cultured human pancreatic carcinoma cells (MIA PaCa-2) have been shown previously to be very sensitive to E. coli L-asparaginase (EC II). The present studies have demonstrated that another enzyme, Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase (AGA) is much more effective in inhibiting cell growth. At the concentration of 0.0025 U/ml of AGA activity the enzyme totally inhibited cell growth, whereas the EC II with the same concentration did not show any effect. The inhibition of cell growth correlated well with inhibition of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 1 mM completely reversed the inhibition of protein synthesis. Similarly, the addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 3 mM daily on 3 successive days after adding AGA resulted in significant reversal of growth inhibition. The results of this study indicate that the action of AGA on MIA PaCa-2 is, to a great extent, exerted through its L-glutaminase activity. PMID:7173949

  15. Apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma cell-1 cells induced by Yin Chen Hao Decoction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bo; Chen, Jing-Ming; Shao, Li-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (PANC-1) cells apoptosis and Bcl-2 and Bax expression induced by Yin Chen Hao Decoction (YCHD). METHODS: The cell growth inhibitory rate was determined by MTT assay. Apoptosis of PANC-1 cells before and after treatment with YCHD was determined by TUNEL staining. Expression of the apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2 and Bax, was detected by immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcription -PCR. RESULTS: YCHD inhibited the growth of PANC-1 cells. Following treatment with YCHD for 24-96 h, the apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells increased with time. In addition, the positive rate of Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in a time-dependent manner, whereas the positive rate of Bax protein expression increased in a time-dependent manner. Following treatment of with YCHD for 24-96h, expression of BAX mRNA increased gradually and BCL-2 mRNA reduced gradually with time. CONCLUSION: YCHD induces apoptosis of PANC-1 cells mediated in part via up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. PMID:26217086

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pancreatic Metastases of a Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Waltraud; Fottner, Christian; Hansen, Torsten; Schad, Arno; Schadmand-Fischer, Simin; Weber, Matthias M.; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Lang, Hauke; Musholt, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Apart from regional lymph node metastases, systemic metastases occur sporadically in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC). The lung and bones are the most frequent localizations. Additionally known but extremely rare locations are metastases of the skeletal muscles, ovaries, submandibular gland, sphenoidal sinus, brain, adrenals, and, as shown in only two previously published cases to date, the pancreas. Summary In this article we report about two additional patients with pancreatic metastases from PTC. There is almost no prior experience about therapeutic approaches to this type of metastases. In both patients distant metastases within the pancreas were successfully removed. Postoperative histology confirmed the diagnoses. Supplemental genetic analysis did not demonstrate a BRAF V600E mutation or expression of a RET/PTC1 rearrangement in one case, but revealed a BRAF V600E mutation in the second case. Surgery avoided impending complications maintaining quality of life. One patient had a tumor-specific survival of 42 months. The other patient has occult disease. Conclusions Our two patients benefited of a calculated aggressive surgical action. Thus, if low perioperative mortality and morbidity can be warranted, surgical measures are justifiable in selected cases. PMID:20025539

  17. Pylorus-Preserving Versus Pylorus-Resecting Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Periampullary and Pancreatic Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong; Wu, He-Shui; Chen, Xing-Lin; Wang, Chun-You; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiao, Jun; He, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Qi-Jun; Li, Yong-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the long-term survival, mortality, morbidity and the operation-related events in patients with periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma undergoing pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and pylorus-resecting pancreaticoduodenectomy (PRPD). Method A systematic search of literature databases (Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science) was performed to identify studies. Outcome measures comparing PPPD versus PRPD for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma were long-term survival, mortality, morbidity (overall morbidity, delayed gastric emptying [DGE], pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage) and operation related events (hospital stays, operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions). Results Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 622 patients were identified and included in the analysis. Among these patients, it revealed no difference in long-term survival between the PPPD and PRPD groups (HR = 0.23, p = 0.11). There was a lower rate of DGE (RR = 2.35, p = 0.04, 95% CI, 1.06–5.21) with PRPD. Mortality, overall morbidity, pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage were not significantly different between the groups. PPPDs were performed more quickly than PRPDs (WMD = 53.25 minutes, p = 0.01, 95% CI, 12.53–93.97); and there was less estimated intraoperative blood loss (WMD = 365.21 ml, p = 0.006, 95% CI, 102.71–627.71) and fewer red blood cell transfusions (WMD = 0.29 U, p = 0.003, 95% CI, 0.10–0.48) in patients undergoing PPPD. The hospital stays showed no significant difference. Conclusions PPPD had advantages over PRPD in operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions, but had a significantly higher rate of DGE for periampullary and

  18. Bitter melon juice activates cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase causing apoptotic death of human pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, suggesting critical needs for additional drugs to improve disease outcome. In this study, we examined efficacy and associated mechanism of a novel agent bitter melon juice (BMJ) against pancreatic carcinoma cells both in culture and nude mice. BMJ anticancer efficacy was analyzed in human pancreatic carcinoma BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, AsPC-1 and Capan-2 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and annexin/propidium iodide assays. BMJ effect on apoptosis regulators was assessed by immunoblotting. In vivo BMJ efficacy was evaluated against MiaPaCa-2 tumors in nude mice, and xenograft was analyzed for biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results showed that BMJ (2–5% v/v) decreases cell viability in all four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing strong apoptotic death. At molecular level, BMJ caused caspases activation, altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and cytochrome-c release into the cytosol. Additionally, BMJ decreased survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein but increased p21, CHOP and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38) levels. Importantly, BMJ activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a biomarker for cellular energy status, and an AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) reversed BMJ-induced caspase-3 activation suggesting activated AMPK involvement in BMJ-induced apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of lyophilized BMJ (5mg in 100 µl water/day/mouse) for 6 weeks inhibited MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenograft growth by 60% (P < 0.01) without noticeable toxicity in nude mice. IHC analyses of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts showed that BMJ also inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and activates AMPK in vivo. Overall, BMJ exerts strong anticancer efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its clinical

  19. Neuroendocrine differentiation in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Savargaonkar, P R; Hale, R J; Mutton, A; Manning, V; Buckley, C H

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To examine neuroendocrine differentiation, as shown by chromogranin A (CGA) expression, in cervical carcinomas. METHODS: Sixty seven cervical carcinomas were studied and were classified as adenocarcinomas, adenosquamous carcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas based on the assessment of haematoxylin and eosin staining and stains for mucin. Where features of glandular differentiation were identified, sections were also stained for evidence of intestinal type mucin. CGA immunostaining was done and the results were graded on a three point scale: 0, + (1-5% of cells positive) and ++ (> 5% of cells positive). These findings were then analysed with respect to lymph node status, tumour differentiation and clinical outcome. RESULTS: There were 32 adenocarcinomas, 18 adenosquamous carcinomas and 17 squamous cell carcinomas. Positive staining was seen in 14 (20.9%) cases, of which four were strongly positive. All but one case were either adenocarcinomas or adenosquamous carcinomas. There was a trend for CGA positivity to be related to intestinal differentiation but this failed to reach statistical significance. No correlation could be demonstrated between CGA staining and lymph node status, tumour differentiation and clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Neuroendocrine differentiation is common in cervical carcinomas where there is evidence of glandular differentiation. Whilst the numbers in this study are relatively small, the presence of neuroendocrine cells in otherwise typical carcinomas does not seem to have any association with clinical behaviour. Images PMID:8655680

  20. Smad4 inhibits cell migration via suppression of JNK activity in human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XUEYING; CAO, JUNXIA; PEI, YUJUN; ZHANG, JIYAN; WANG, QINGYANG

    2016-01-01

    Smad4 is a common Smad and is a key downstream regulator of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway, in which Smad4 often acts as a potent tumor suppressor and functions in a highly context-dependent manner, particularly in pancreatic cancer. However, little is known regarding whether Smad4 regulates other signaling pathways involved in pancreatic cancer. The present study demonstrated that Smad4 downregulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity using a Smad4 loss-of-function or gain-of-function analysis. Additionally, stable overexpression of Smad4 clearly affected the migration of human pancreatic epithelioid carcinoma PANC-1 cells, but did not affect cell growth. In addition, the present study revealed that upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 is required for the reduction of JNK activity by Smad4, leading to a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibiting cell migration. Overall, the present findings indicate that Smad4 may suppress JNK activation and inhibit the tumor characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27123137

  1. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  2. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  3. Massive renal urothelial carcinoma with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and adrenal metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Gao, Liang; Wu, Weilu; Chen, Peng; Bu, Siyuan; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old female patient presented with a massive left renal tumor, recurrent left flank pain and gross hematuria. The tumor was accompanied by a renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. Radical nephrectomy, distal pancreatectomy, ipsilateral adrenalectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histopathological examination suggested high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC); however, tumor recurrence and multiple metastases were detected only 3 months after the surgery, and the patient succumbed during follow-up 1 month later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of renal UC of such advanced stage with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. PMID:27446406

  4. A case of long-term 24-month survival in pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) after S1 postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Toshikatsu; Fujii, Kensuke; Kataoka, Jun; Tominaga, Tomo; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 70-year-old female patient diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoma. An abdominal enhanced computed tomography scan revealed a poorly enhanced mass (17 mm × 15 mm in size) in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed stenosis of the main pancreatic and common bile ducts caused by a mass-neighboring cyst. Based on these findings, we performed subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The patient demonstrated a good postoperative course, and was discharged from our hospital in remission 49 days after the surgery. Pathological findings confirmed that it was anaplastic pancreas carcinoma (giant cell type). After the surgery, we performed S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy 100 mg/day for four weeks, repeated similarly every six weeks for a total of four courses. We have followed this case for over 2 years so far with adjuvant chemotherapy, and no recurrence or metastasis has been revealed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 in patients with resected anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas is also recommended as a result of Japan Adjuvant Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer 01(JASPAC-01) like the ordinary pancreatic ductal carcinomas. There is a possibility to achieve long-term survival in cases in which multidisciplinary treatment such as a curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy are performed. PMID:27111877

  5. Targeting of cancer stem cell marker EpCAM by bispecific antibody EpCAMxCD3 inhibits pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salnikov, Alexei V; Groth, Ariane; Apel, Anja; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Beckermann, Benjamin M; Khamidjanov, Akmal; Ryschich, Eduard; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor survival rate, and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), suggested as a marker for cancer stem cells, is over-expressed on most pancreatic tumour cells but not on normal cells and may be an ideal therapeutic target. We evaluated the anti-tumour efficiency of bispecific EpCAMxCD3 antibody linking tumour cells and T lymphocytes. In NOD SCID mice, EpCAMxCD3 had a long serum half-life (t1/2∼ 7 days). EpCAMxCD3 significantly retarded growth of BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. For mimicking a pancreatic cancer microenvironment in vitro, we used a three-dimensional tumour reconstruct system, in which lymphocytes were co-cultured with tumour cells and fibroblasts in a collagen matrix. In this in vivo–like system, EpCAMxCD3 potently stimulated production of the effector cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α by extracorporally pre-activated lymphocytes. Moreover, compared with a bivalent anti-CD3 antibody, EpCAMxCD3 more efficiently activated the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ by non-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Most excitingly, we demonstrate for the first time that EpCAMxCD3 induces prolonged contacts between lymphocytes and tumour cells, which may be the main reason for the observed anti-tumour effects. As an important prerequisite for future use in patients, EpCAMxCD3 did not alter lymphocyte migration as measured by time-lapse video microscopy. Our data may open a way to improve the immune response and treatment outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:20196789

  6. FDG-PET in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Lu; Qin, Xin-Gan; Huang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis predicting of pancreatic carcinoma (PC). METHODS: A systematic review of relevant literatures in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library was performed. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic and staging studies, and HRs for prognosis predicting studies were pooled. The bivariate model was used for diagnostic studies and the random-effect model for prognostic studies. Heterogeneity between included studies was tested using χ2 test, and subgroup analysis was performed to explain the heterogeneities. All of the calculations were performed using Stata version 11.0. RESULTS: A total of 39 studies were included. The pooled sensitivity of PET in diagnosing PC (30 studies, 1582 patients), evaluating N stating (4 studies, 101 patients) and liver metastasis (7 studies, 316 patients) were 0.91 (95%CI: 0.88-0.93), 0.64 (95%CI: 0.50-0.76), and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively; and the corresponding specificity was 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.85), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.25-0.85), and 0.96 (95%CI: 0.89-0.98), respectively. In prognosis analysis (6 studies, 198 patients), significant difference of overall survival was observed between high and low standardized uptake value groups (HR = 2.39, 95%CI: 1.57-3.63). Subgroup analysis showed that PET/CT was more sensitive than PET alone in evaluating liver metastasis of PC, 0.82 (95%CI: 0.48-0.98) and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively. CONCLUSION: PET can be used as a valuable diagnostic and predictive tool for PC, but its effect in the staging of PC remains indeterminate. PMID:23922481

  7. Increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and reduced tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 expression correlate with angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu-Lu; Wu, Yang; Huang, Da-Wei; Tang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)-2 are known to influence tumor angiogenesis and progression. This work aimed to describe the levels of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 expression associated with tumor angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Expression of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 in carcinoma tissues and paracarcinomatous tissues was assayed by immunostaining. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34 in tumor tissues was also assayed by immunostaining. The correlations of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 with VEGF, microvessel density (MVD), and early postoperative recurrence were analyzed. The results showed that MMP-2 expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05) and TFPI-2 expression was significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues compared with paracarcinomatous tissues. MMP-2 expression was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.594, P < 0.001) and MVD (r = 0.432, P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues. TFPI-2 expression was negatively correlated with VEGF (r = -0.654, P < 0.001) and MVD (r = -0.360, P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that up-regulated MMP-2 and down-regulated TFPI-2 were independent predictors of early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the combination of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 was a reliable predictive model of early recurrence. We conclude that increased MMP-2 expression and reduced TFPI-2 expression are closely linked to angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemical assay of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 may be useful for predicting early relapse of pancreatic carcinoma after surgery. PMID:26807187

  8. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Adenoviral p53 gene transfer and gemcitabine in three patients with liver metastases due to advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Haag, Cornelie

    2007-01-01

    Background. Current therapies for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas do not improve the life expectancy of patients. Methods. In a non-randomized pilot trail we tested whether a local therapy based upon an adenoviral gene transfer of wild type p53 in combination with gemcitabine administration would be safe in patients with liver metastases due to pancreatic carcinoma. We report on the clinical course of three patients with respect to safety, tolerability and tumor response. Results. Transient grade III toxicities occurred with fever, leucopenia, elevation of AP, ALT, AST, GGT, while grade IV toxicity occurred for bilirubin only. Laboratory tests suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation in all three patients, but fine needle biopsies of liver did not show any histological evidence of thrombus or clot formation. Progression of liver metastases was documented in one and stable disease in another patient two months after treatment. However, a major improvement with regression of the indexed lesion by 80% occurred in a third patient after a single administration of 7.5×1012 viral particles, and time to progression was extended to six months. Conclusion. The combination therapy of viral gene transfer and chemotherapy temporarily controls and diminishes tumor burden. Improvement of the toxicity profile is necessary. Further trials are warranted to improve treatment and life expectancy of patients suffering from fatal diseases such as pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18333108

  10. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  11. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 promotes cell invasion and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaochun; Han, Ye; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Wei; Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Pu; Wang, Yunliang; Li, Dechun; Zhou, Jin; Zhi, Qiaoming

    2016-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), also known as vascular endothelial stain, was firstly identified as a modulator of smooth muscle cell migration. Though the expression of EGFL7 was reported to be up-regulated during tumorigenesis, the clinical and biological functions of EGFL7 in pancreatic carcinoma (PC) were still not fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the serum EGFL7 level in PC tissues was statistically higher than that in normal subjects (p<0.001), and its level in non-resectable patients was also higher than that in resectable ones (p=0.013). Among these resectable PC patients, the postoperative EGFL7 expression was significantly down-regulated when tumors were resected (p=0.018). Using the immunohistochemistry method, our results demonstrated that the positive expression of EGFL7 was significantly associated with the TNM stage (p=0.024), lymph node metastasis (p=0.003) and local invasion (p=0.022), and the EGFL7 expression closely correlated to the micro-vessel density (MVD) in PC tissues by Spearman analysis (r=0.941, p=0.000). In vitro, EGFL7 was silenced by the small interference RNA in PC cells, and our data indicated that down-regulation of EGFL7 did not influence the cycle progression, proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of PC cells (p>0.05), whereas inhibition of EGFL7 expression could decrease PaCa-2 cell invasion (p<0.05). More interestingly, by tubular formation, Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and ELISA assays, our results revealed that silencing EGFL7 expression represented a strong inhibiting effect on tubular formation of micro-vessels through down-regulating the protein levels of VEGF and Ang-2 (p<0.05). Our results raised the possibility of using EGFL7as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapy target of PC, and down-regulation of EGFL7 might be considered to be a potentially important molecular treatment strategy for patients with PC. PMID:26796281

  12. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  13. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  14. Imaging Characteristics and Prevalence of Pancreatic Carcinoma in Kosovo During 2011-2015 - Diagnostic Method as Choice

    PubMed Central

    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hasbahta, Gazmed; Ramadani, Naser; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is the 10thmost common malignancy and the 4thlargest cancer killer in adults. Aim: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the number of cases presented with pancreatic carcinoma during the years 2011-2015, our experience of the imaging characteristics of pancreatic carcinoma. We evaluated prevalence of the pancreatic cancers, distant metastases and other local infiltration signs among the total cases of the pancreatic cancers diagnosed in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo, with the aim to compare these research findings to similar studies made in the developed countries. This is a retrospective research study done during the period of 2011-2015. Materials and Methodology: This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, examined in the period of 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The imaging diagnostics are performed with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens, MSCT Emotion 6 Siemens, and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens, biopsy guide with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK; while the histopathology diagnostics has been performed in Clinic of Pathology at UCCK and prevalence is taken from the number of cases Reported at the Institute of Oncology Institute of Statistics and NIPH (National Institute of Public Health of Kosovo). Results: Out of a total of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreas cancer, results is female 39.5% (n=143) and male 61.5% (n=219), report M: F (1: 1.6), 286 cases resulted in head and neck 79 % (n=286), 76 cases resulted in body and tail cancers (21%), distant metastases in first imaging modality were found in(n=155) patients 43 %, local infiltration was found in patients: gastric infiltration 15 % (n=54), duodenal and papilla infiltration 26% (n=94), local infiltration spleen 16% (n=57), local infiltration mesentery 43 % (n= 155), dilated biliary tree 34 % (n=123), regional lymph node infiltration 83 % (n= 300). Out of a total

  15. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis, and pancreatic polypeptide hypersecretion: a new association and clinical and hormonal responses to long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, T W; Sacks, H S; O'Dorisio, T M; Tuttle, S; Solomon, S S

    1987-06-01

    We describe a 63-yr-old man with disseminated medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis with pancreatic polypeptide (PP) hypersecretion. His major symptoms were watery diarrhea, flushing, and abdominal bloating; these and the elevated plasma PP levels did not change after resection of the distal two thirds of the pancreas, which contained a 2-cm mass of nesidioblastotic tissue. Postoperatively, a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/day), normalized PP secretion acutely and chronically (7 months) and ameliorated his symptoms. The analog had no side-effects and did not alter glucose tolerance, calcitonin hypersecretion, or growth of the medullary carcinoma, but it did inhibit GH secretion. After withdrawal from therapy for 1 month, PP hypersecretion and all symptoms except diarrhea recurred. The coexistence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and PP cell nesidioblastosis represents a new variant of the overlap syndromes between multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and II. Patients with medullary carcinoma and unexplained watery diarrhea should have fasting gastroenteropancreatic hormone assays done to screen for a potential gastrointestinal or pancreatic origin for the diarrhea. PMID:2883196

  16. A case of pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal wall, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor and intraepithelial neoplasm of pancreas, papillary carcinoma of kidney in a single patient.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Cinzia; Franciosi, Claudio; Degrate, Luca; Caprotti, Roberto; Romano, Fabrizio; Perego, Elisa; Trezzi, Rosangela; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Uggeri, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of the contemporaneous presence of two histologically different pancreatic neoplasms, one renal cancer and one embryogenic duodenal anomaly in a single patient. A 66-year-old man underwent ultrasound examination because of urinary disorders; a solid neoformation within the inferior pole of the left kidney was observed. Computed tomography confirmed the renal lesion, but also a heterogeneous mass within the pancreatic head appeared without bile ducts dilatation. Abdominal magnetic resonance revealed a multiloculated cystic component of the pancreatic mass. A second CT scan confirmed the renal and biliary findings, but it revealed a modest enlargement of the pancreatic asymptomatic mass. A resection of the left kidney inferior pole and a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy were performed. Histopathologic analysis of the surgical specimen revealed mild differentiated papillary renal carcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreatic head, foci of intraepithelial pancreatic neoplasm and pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal muscular and submucosal layers. The coexistence of several primaries and anomalies in one patient led us to suppose a genetic predisposition to different lesions, even in the absence of known familial genetic syndromes. The study of such cases may help to improve the investigation of molecular correlations and etiological factors of different solid tumors. Nowadays, surgery is the only effective cure. PMID:17168444

  17. Individual in-vitro sensitivities of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesta, K. T.; Dmytrijuk, Andrew; Schlag, Peter M.; Mang, Thomas S.

    1992-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in man, due to the low sensitivity of the normal pancreas to PDT as shown in preclinical studies. Investigations on four human pancreatic cancer lines (MIA PaCa-2, PaCa 1, PaCa 3, and CAPAN 2) in vitro demonstrated a considerable variety in PDT-sensitivity proportional to the degree of differentiation, which was related to photosensitizer-uptake (PhotofrinTM). The well differentiated pancreatic tumor line Capan 2 showed a close relationship between high cell density and increased PDT-resistance. The Photofrin uptake of Capan 2 at high cell densities could be increased by short trypsinization prior to photosensitizer exposure. The data supports the hypothesis that a complex intercellular organization reduces the cell surface available for photosensitizer uptake and may cause the relative PDT resistance of normal pancreatic tissues and highly differentiated tumors.

  18. The concept and controversy of retroperitoneal nerve dissection in pancreatic head carcinoma (Review).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Taihong; Lau, Wan Yee; Wang, Xin; Sun, Jingfeng; Yuan, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yewei

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic head cancer is a common but the most lethal cancer of the human digestive system. It is invasive, resulting in early infiltration of adjacent structures and lymph node and distant metastases. Its biological characteristics of neurotropic growth lead to early neural invasion (NI) which is an independent prognostic factor of survival for pancreatic cancer. Radical surgical resection remains the only form of curative treatment. The extent of surgical resection and whether extended resection results in better long-term survival have been controversial. Studies have reported that peripancreatic plexus invasion is a frequent cause of pancreatic cancer recurrence and death. The relationship between cancer microenvironment and nerve cells, and whether the peripancreatic nerve plexus nearby needs to be resected require further studies. The present review aims to discuss the role of peripancreatic nerve and its implications in pancreatic head cancer resection. PMID:26458369

  19. Experimental virotherapy of chemoresistant pancreatic carcinoma using infectivity-enhanced fiber-mosaic oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Curiel, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a significant clinical problem and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Recent advances in conditionally replicative adenovirus-based (CRAd) oncolytic virus design allow the application of CRAd vectors as a therapeutic strategy to efficiently target and eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cells thereby improving the efficacy of pancreatic cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to construct and validate the efficacy of an infectivity-enhanced, liver-untargeted, tumor-specific CRAd vector. A panel of CRAds has been derived which embody the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter for conditional replication, two fiber complex mosaicism for targeting expansion, and hexon hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) modification for liver untargeting. We evaluated CRAds for cancer virotherapy using a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. Employment of the fiber mosaic approach improved CRAd replication in pancreatic tumor xenografts. Substitution of the HVR7 of the Ad5 hexon for Ad serotype 3 hexon resulted in decreased liver tropism of systemically administrated CRAd. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of complex mosaicism increased efficacy of the combination of oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy in a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. PMID:24903014

  20. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:25036383

  1. [Incretin-based antidiabetic treatment and diseases of the pancreas (pancreatitis, pancreas carcinoma)].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years incretin-based antidiabetic drugs became increasingly popular and widely used for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. Immediately after launching, case reports and small case series were published on the potential side effects of the new drugs, with special attention to pancreatic disorders such as acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. As clinical observations accumulated, these side-effects were noted with nearly all drugs of this class. Although these side-effects proved to be rare, an intensive debate evolved in the literature. Opinion of diabetes specialists and representatives of pharmaceutical industry as well as position statements of different international scientific boards and health authorities were published. In addition, results of randomized clinical trials with incretin-based therapy and meta-analyses became available. Importantly, in everyday clinical practice, the label of the given drug should be followed. With regards to incretins, physicians should be cautious if pancreatitis in the patients' past medical history is documented. Early differential diagnosis of any abdominal pain during treatment of incretin-based therapy should be made and the drug should be discontinued if pancreatitis is verified. Continuous post-marketing surveillance and side-effect analysis are still justified with incretin-based antidiabetic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27017851

  2. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH. PMID:26683769

  3. An Investigation Of Photodynamic Therapy In The Treatment Of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Dihematoporphyrin Ether Uptake And Photobleaching Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1988-02-01

    Results of dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) uptake and fluorescence kinetics show that the concentration in the pancreas is on the order of 40-60 μg DHE/g of tissue at an injected dose of 40 mg/kg. Previously concentrations on this order have only been found in organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Two intrapancreatic carcinoma models, one of acinar origin (rat) and one of ductal orgin (hamster), were studied. Both showed equal or higher concentrations of DHE as compared to normal pancreas when fluorescence measurements and chemical extraction procedures were performed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment of the normal pancreas and pancreatic tumors yielded atypical results. When the normal pancreas with DHE present is exposed to 630 nm light from a dye laser (75 mW/cm2, 30 min), the normal photobleaching measurable by fluorescence decay does not occur. Yet, the pancreatic tumor responds with a relatively normal fluorescence decay pattern, with hemorrhaging and a resultant loss of measurable DHE concentration. These results represent the emergence of an entirely new modality, with substantial potential for the treatment of cancer of the pancreas.

  4. Overexpression of homeobox B-13 correlates with angiogenesis, aberrant expression of EMT markers, aggressive characteristics and poor prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu-Lu; Wu, Yang; Cai, Chong-Yang; Tang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression of homeobox B (Hoxb)-13 and analyze its relationship with tumor angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated markers (E-cadherin and vimentin), clinicopathologic data and prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was applied to determine the level of Hoxb-13 expression in tumor tissues and surrounding non-tumor tissues from 85 subjects with pancreatic carcinoma. Besides, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31, E-cadherin and vimentin were also detected in tumor tissues by immunostaining. We found that the level of Hoxb-13 expression was significantly higher in pancreatic carcinoma tissues than in paracarcinomatous tissues (P < 0.05). Hoxb-13 staining was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.429, P < 0.001) and microvessel density (MVD) (r = 0.454, P < 0.001). Likewise, Hoxb-13 staining was positively correlated with vimentin (r = 0.448, P < 0.001); while it was negatively correlated with E-cadherin (r = -0.405, P < 0.001). High Hoxb-13 expression was associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics, worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001) and worse overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that Hoxb-13 was an independent predictor for poor DFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.002). In conclusion, our data show that overexpressed Hoxb-13 is correlated with tumor angiogenesis, aberrant expression of EMT-associated markers and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics, and serves as a promising marker for unfavourable prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:26261579

  5. Pancreatic panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Iyasere, Isoken T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man presenting with polyarthritis, weight loss and multiple tender cutaneous nodules. Abnormal liver function tests prompted imaging of the liver which demonstrated liver metastases. Biopsy of the liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:25150233

  6. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  7. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties. PMID:23300736

  8. Combination of Two Targeted Medications (Bevacizumab Plus Cetuximab) Improve the Therapeutic Response of Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Huang, Ming-Te; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Wang, Chien-Kai; Tai, Chen-Jei; Chang, Chun-Chao; Hsieh, Cheng-I.; Chang, Yu-Jia; Wu, Chang-Jer; Kuo, Li-Jen; Wei, Po-Lei; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chiou, Hung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety profiles of the targeted medications, bevacizumab and cetuximab, in combination with cytostatic drugs in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. In this retrospective phase 2 study, a total of 59 patients with pancreatic cancer were recruited and received conventional (gemcitabine, cisplatin, and fluorouracil) or targeted regimen (conventional plus bevacizumab and cetuximab for the first cycle) in 2-week intervals for four cycles. The primary end-point for this study was the overall response rate. Secondary end-points were progression-free survival and the safety profiles of the combined therapy. The median time-to-progression and overall survival were 3 and 7 months, respectively, in the conventional treatment group as well as 11 and 13 months, respectively, in the targeted medications treatment group. The most common adverse events in both treatment groups were nausea and vomiting. Moderate (Grade 2) nausea and vomiting were more common in the conventional group than the targeted group but severe (Grade 3) nausea and vomiting were more common in the targeted group. Bevacizumab and cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine, cisplatin, and fluorouracil may help lengthen overall survival up to six months for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:27082562

  9. Targeting of XIAP combined with systemic mesenchymal stem cell-mediated delivery of sTRAIL ligand inhibits metastatic growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Andrea; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Deedigan, Laura; Yu, Rui; Reidy, Mairead; Fulda, Simone; Zwacka, Ralf Michael

    2010-11-01

    Disseminating tumors are one of the gravest medical problems. Here, we combine the tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing activity of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to infiltrate both tumor and lymphatic tissues to target primary tumors as well as disseminated cancer cells in a human pancreatic cancer mouse model. Furthermore, we targeted X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) by RNA interference (RNAi) inside the cancer cells to make use of the apoptosis sensitization as well the antimetastatic effect that is afforded by XIAP silencing. We generated MSCs, termed MSC.sTRAIL, that express and secrete a trimeric form of soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL). MSC.sTRAIL triggered limited apoptosis in human pancreatic carcinoma cells that were resistant to soluble recombinant TRAIL, which is most likely due to the enhanced effect of the direct, cell-mediated delivery of trimeric TRAIL. MSC.sTRAIL-mediated cell death was markedly increased by concomitant knockdown of XIAP by RNAi in the cancer cells. These findings were confirmed in xenograft models, in which tumors from the parental pancreatic carcinoma cells showed only growth retardation on treatment with MSC.sTRAIL, whereas tumors with silenced XIAP that were treated with MSC.sTRAIL went into remission. Moreover, animals with XIAP-negative xenografts treated with MSC.sTRAIL were almost free of lung metastasis, whereas animals treated with control MSCs showed substantial metastatic growth in the lungs. In summary, this is the first demonstration that a combined approach using systemic MSC-mediated delivery of sTRAIL together with XIAP inhibition suppresses metastatic growth of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:20882532

  10. Pancreatic-carcinoma-cell-derived pro-angiogenic factors can induce endothelial-cell differentiation of a subset of circulating CD34+ progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD34+ progenitor cells comprise both hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells. Recent studies suggest that circulating endothelial progenitor cells are recruited into the angiogenic vascular system of several cancers, including pancreatic carcinoma, and that they correlate with clinical progress. However, whether endothelial progenitor cell mobilization occurs in response to cytokine release by tumor cells is still unclear. Methods The chemotactic- and/or differentiating-activities of the poorly-differentiated pancreatic carcinoma cell line PT45, and of the immortal H6c7 cell line, a line of near-normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells, on endothelial progenitor cells were investigated in vitro using circulating CD34+ as model. Results The study showed that Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor produced by PT45 cells and, at lesser extent, by H6c7 cells, predominantly chemoattract peripheral blood CD34+ expressing the type 2 relative receptor. Addition of PT45-conditioned medium to CD34+ cells, cultured under conditions supporting myeloid cell development, diverted the differentiation of a subset of these progenitor cells into cells expressing endothelial cell markers, such as CD146, CD105, VE-cadherin and von Willebrand Factor-related antigen. Moreover, these endothelial-like cells formed capillary networks in vitro, chiefly through the release of Angiopoietin-1 by PT45 cells. Conclusions The results demonstrate that pancreatic-carcinoma cells potentially attract circulating endothelial progenitor cells to the tumor site, by releasing high levels of pro-angiogenic factors such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Angiopoietin-1, and may direct the differentiation of these cell subsets of the CD34+ cell population into endothelial cells; the latter cells may become a component of the newly-formed vessels, contributing to angiogenesis-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:24341512

  11. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-03

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  12. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  13. Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topkan, Erkan; Yavuz, Ali A; Aydin, Mehmet; Onal, Cem; Yapar, Fuat; Yavuz, Melek N

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). Methods Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We analyzed differences in treatment plans and doses of radiation to primary tumors and critical organs. Results Changes in GTV delineation were necessary in 5 patients based on PET-CT information. In these patients, the average increase in GTV was 29.7%, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the primary tumor beyond that defined by CT. For all patients, the GTVCT versus GTVPET-CT was 92.5 ± 32.3 cm3 versus 104.5 ± 32.6 cm3 (p = 0.009). Toxicity analysis revealed no clinically significant differences between two plans with regard to doses to critical organs. Conclusion Co-registration of PET and CT information in unresectable LAPC may improve the delineation of GTV and theoretically reduce the likelihood of geographic misses. PMID:18808725

  14. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC.

  15. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Sexton, Sandra; LeVea, Charles M.; Caraker, Susan M.; Hajduczok, George; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene while classically associated with expression in the kidney is also expressed in many other extra-renal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within renin specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon, furthermore an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to lymph nodes and liver, mimicking human disease and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides a unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying co-operating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease. PMID:24292676

  16. Anaplastic Carcinoma Arising in a Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Masquerading as Pancreatic Pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Aldaoud, Najla; Joudeh, Amani; Al-Momen, Sami; Alnahawi, Mamdouh; Al-Abbadi, Mousa A

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) of the pancreas can vary from benign to premalignant and malignant. Preoperative diagnosis is essential to offer the patient appropriate treatment. Occasionally these cases may harbor anaplastic carcinoma while clinically masquerade as a pseudocyst. Here in, we report an unusual case of a 37-year old female presented with recurrent abdominal pain that was suspected clinically and by imaging studies to have a pseudocyst. EUS-FNA with internal drainage of the cyst was performed. Cytological evaluation of the cyst fluid showed numerous inflammatory cells composed mainly of many neutrophils admixed with macrophages reminiscent of the usual pseudocyst content but there were scattered rare dyscohesive malignant cells which were highly pleomorphic with multinucleation. Immunostains on the cell block showed immunoreactivity of these cells including the multinucleated cells for Cam 5.2 and AE1/AE3 and focally for Ber-Ep4, Moc -31, and CA19-9. The subsequent resection confirmed the presence of anaplastic (undifferentiated) carcinoma (AC) arising in a MCN of the pancreas. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:538-542. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028547

  17. Soluble B7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Liu, Danqing; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Chong; Wang, Bo; Wu, Heshui

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a relationship between soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) and the poor prognosis of patients with malignant tumors, and increasing evidence has shown a connection between sB7-H3 and NF-κB in tumor progression. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that sB7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In this study, we observed that sB7-H3 was highly expressed in mB7-H3-positive pancreatic carcinoma (PCa) cells. Exogenous sB7-H3 significantly increased NF-κB activity and promoted the migration and invasion of PCa cells. Further studies proved that sB7-H3 first up-regulated TLR4 expression, then activated NF-κB signaling and finally promoted IL-8 and VEGF expression. In contrast, the silencing of TLR4 using a stable short hairpin RNA significantly decreased the sB7-H3-induced activity of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 and VEGF in PCa cells. In vivo animal experiments further demonstrated that TLR4-knock-down tumor cells displayed a decreased ability to metastasize compared with the control tumor cells after being induced by sB7-H3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sB7-H3 promotes invasion and metastasis through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway in pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:27273624

  18. Soluble B7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chao; Liu, Danqing; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Chong; Wang, Bo; Wu, Heshui

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a relationship between soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) and the poor prognosis of patients with malignant tumors, and increasing evidence has shown a connection between sB7-H3 and NF-κB in tumor progression. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that sB7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In this study, we observed that sB7-H3 was highly expressed in mB7-H3-positive pancreatic carcinoma (PCa) cells. Exogenous sB7-H3 significantly increased NF-κB activity and promoted the migration and invasion of PCa cells. Further studies proved that sB7-H3 first up-regulated TLR4 expression, then activated NF-κB signaling and finally promoted IL-8 and VEGF expression. In contrast, the silencing of TLR4 using a stable short hairpin RNA significantly decreased the sB7-H3-induced activity of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 and VEGF in PCa cells. In vivo animal experiments further demonstrated that TLR4-knock-down tumor cells displayed a decreased ability to metastasize compared with the control tumor cells after being induced by sB7-H3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sB7-H3 promotes invasion and metastasis through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway in pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:27273624

  19. Advances in diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic carcinoma: 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chakshu; Eltawil, Karim M; Renfrew, Paul D; Walsh, Mark J; Molinari, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Several advances in genetics, diagnosis and palliation of pancreatic cancer (PC) have occurred in the last decades. A multidisciplinary approach to this disease is therefore recommended. PC is relatively common as it is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Most patients present with obstructive jaundice, epigastric or back pain, weight loss and anorexia. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities, the majority of cases are still detected in advanced stages. The only curative treatment for PC remains surgical resection. No more than 20% of patients are candidates for surgery at the time of diagnosis and survival remains quite poor as adjuvant therapies are not very effective. A small percentage of patients with borderline non-resectable PC might benefit from neo-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy enabling them to undergo resection; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to prove the benefits of this strategy. Patients with unresectable PC benefit from palliative interventions such as biliary decompression and celiac plexus block. Further clinical trials to evaluate new chemo and radiation protocols as well as identification of genetic markers for PC are needed to improve the overall survival of patients affected by PC, as the current overall 5-year survival rate of patients affected by PC is still less than 5%. The aim of this article is to review the most recent high quality literature on this topic. PMID:21412497

  20. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  1. Smac mimetic triggers necroptosis in pancreatic carcinoma cells when caspase activation is blocked.

    PubMed

    Hannes, Sabine; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Fulda, Simone

    2016-09-28

    Evasion of apoptosis represents a key mechanism of treatment resistance of pancreatic cancer (PC) and contributes to the poor prognosis of this cancer type. Here, we report that induction of necroptosis is an alternative strategy to trigger programmed cell death in apoptosis-resistant PC cells. We show that the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic BV6 that antagonizes inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins induces necroptosis in PC cells in which apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk. Intriguingly, BV6 switches autocrine/paracrine production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α by PC cells into a death signal and also acts in concert with exogenously supplied TNFα to trigger necroptosis, when caspase activation is simultaneously blocked. BV6 stimulates TNFα production and formation of the receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1/RIP3-containing necrosome complex in PC cells. Knockdown of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) protects PC cells from BV6- or BV6/TNFα-mediated cell death, demonstrating that TNFα autocrine/paracrine signaling by PC cells contributes to BV6-induced necroptosis. Importantly, genetic silencing of receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) or mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) significantly rescues PC cells from BV6- or BV6/TNFα-induced cell death. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1, RIP3 or MLKL significantly reduces BV6- or BV6/TNFα-stimulated cell death. By demonstrating that Smac mimetics can bypass resistance to apoptosis by triggering necroptosis as an alternative form of programmed cell death, our findings have important implications for the design of new treatment concepts for PC. PMID:27267809

  2. N-methylnicotinamide and nicotinamide N-methyltransferase are associated with microRNA-1291-altered pancreatic carcinoma cell metabolome and suppressed tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hui-Chang; Pan, Yu-Zhuo; Qiu, Jing-Xin; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Fei; Johnson, Caroline H.; Jiang, Chang-Tao; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The cell metabolome comprises abundant information that may be predictive of cell functions in response to epigenetic or genetic changes at different stages of cell proliferation and metastasis. An unbiased ultra-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry-based metabolomics study revealed a significantly altered metabolome for human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells with gain-of-function non-coding microRNA-1291 (miR-1291), which led to a lower migration and invasion capacity as well as suppressed tumorigenesis in a xenograft tumor mouse model. A number of metabolites, including N-methylnicotinamide, involved in nicotinamide metabolism, and l-carnitine, isobutyryl-carnitine and isovaleryl-carnitine, involved in fatty acid metabolism, were elevated in miR-1291-expressing PANC-1. Notably, N-methylnicotinamide was elevated to the greatest extent, and this was associated with a sharp increase in nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) mRNA level in miR-1291-expressing PANC-1 cells. In addition, expression of NNMT mRNA was inversely correlated with pancreatic tumor size in the xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that miR-1291-altered PANC-1 cell function is associated with the increase in N-methylnicotinamide level and NNMT expression, and in turn NNMT may be indicative of the extent of pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:25115443

  3. A prospective, randomized trial of pancreatectomy combined with isolated hepatic perfusion via a dual route or conventional postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic head carcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaojun; Kong, Yalin; Wen, Dongqing; Liu, Chengli; Xiao, Mei; Zhao, Gang; Zhen, Yuying; Zhang, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of locally advanced pancreatic head carcinoma after Whipple remains poor. This study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of regional lymphadenectomy and chemotherapy of isolated hypoxic perfusion (IHP) via dual-route, and to analyze the effect for survival period. Consecutive patients subjected to our department from January 1, 2006 to December 31 2011 for locally advanced pancreatic head carcinoma were prospectively divided into two groups according to therapeutic modality, and clinical and follow-up data was recorded. In study group, operation duration and postoperative stay time were shorter, blood loss and blood transfusion were less, and incidence of complications was lower. The mean and median survival time was 17.4 ± 0.76 months and 18.0 months in study group, longer than control group of 14.1 ± 0.85 months and 17.6 months. Regional lymphadenectomy can be performed with low mortality and morbidity, and combined postoperative IHP via dual-route can improve survival time. PMID:26131274

  4. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Bean, A. G.; Bowles, M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years) and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship. PMID:9184877

  5. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D. PMID:26616050

  6. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  7. LTP-1, a novel antimitotic agent and Stat3 inhibitor, inhibits human pancreatic carcinomas in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Chen, Chung-Chun; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Chao-Feng; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide with a poor survival rate. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of a novel antimitotic and Stat3 inhibitor, LTP-1, on human pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. We found that LTP-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth and viability with significant G2/M arrest and disruption of microtubule dynamics. LTP-1 also caused G2/M arrest-independent Stat3 dephosphorylation along with ERK activation, which indicated the possible dual function of LTP-1. Long-term treatment of LTP-1 also induced polyploidy, activated caspases, induced subG1 cell population, and therefore, triggered pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis. Finally, we used an in vivo xenograft model to demonstrate that LTP-1 suppressed the growth of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In summary, our data suggest that LTP-1 may alter microtubule dynamics, which ultimately causes polyploidy and apoptosis, thereby inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. This study provides evidence that LTP-1 could be a potential therapeutic agent for further development of pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27278358

  8. LTP-1, a novel antimitotic agent and Stat3 inhibitor, inhibits human pancreatic carcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Chen, Chung-Chun; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Chao-Feng; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide with a poor survival rate. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of a novel antimitotic and Stat3 inhibitor, LTP-1, on human pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. We found that LTP-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth and viability with significant G2/M arrest and disruption of microtubule dynamics. LTP-1 also caused G2/M arrest-independent Stat3 dephosphorylation along with ERK activation, which indicated the possible dual function of LTP-1. Long-term treatment of LTP-1 also induced polyploidy, activated caspases, induced subG1 cell population, and therefore, triggered pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis. Finally, we used an in vivo xenograft model to demonstrate that LTP-1 suppressed the growth of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In summary, our data suggest that LTP-1 may alter microtubule dynamics, which ultimately causes polyploidy and apoptosis, thereby inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. This study provides evidence that LTP-1 could be a potential therapeutic agent for further development of pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27278358

  9. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  10. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed. PMID:24212642

  11. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  12. Gene Expression Profiling of Microdissected Pancreatic Ductal Carcinomas Using High-Density DNA Microarrays1,3

    PubMed Central

    Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lüttges, Jutta; Böhme, Armin; Sipos, Bence; Foerder, Melanie; Alldinger, Ingo; Jahnke, Beatrix; Schackert, Hans Konrad; Kalthoff, Holger; Kremer, Bernd; Klöppel, Günter; Saeger, Hans Detlev

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer cell lines using the Affymetrix U133 GeneChip set. RNA was extracted from microdissected samples and cell lines, amplified, and labeled using a repetitive in vitro transcription protocol. Differentially expressed genes were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays program. We found 616 differentially expressed genes. Within these, 140 were also identified in PDAC by others, such as Galectin-1, Galectin-3, and MT-SP2. We validated the differential expression of several genes (e.g., CENPF, MCM2, MCM7, RAMP, IRAK1, and PTTG1) in PDAC by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We present a whole genome expression study of microdissected tissues from PDAC, from microdissected normal ductal pancreatic cells and pancreatic cancer cell lines using highdensity microarrays. Within the panel of genes, we identified novel differentially expressed genes, which have not been associated with the pathogenesis of PDAC before. PMID:15548371

  13. Heat-shock protein 90 inhibitors synergistically enhance melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7-mediated cell killing of human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Kawamura, K; Jiang, Y; Shingyoji, M; Ma, G; Li, Q; Hu, J; Qi, Y; Liu, H; Zhang, F; Kang, S; Shan, B; Wang, S; Chada, S; Tagawa, M

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the intractable diseases and an effective therapeutic strategy is required to improve the prognosis. We examined possible antitumor effects of adenoviruses expressing melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (Ad-mda-7) and a heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor to human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Ad-mda-7 and an Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA), produced cytotoxic effects, and a combinatory use of Ad-mda-7 and GA further achieved synergistic effects. Administration of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an inhibitor of reactive oxygen species, eliminated Ad-mda-7- and GA-mediated cytotoxicity. Ad-mda-7 augmented phosphorylated AKT levels but GA did not influence the phosphorylation. GA-treated cells showed cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase but not caspase-3, and upregulated Hsp70 and LC3A/B II levels, whereas Ad-mda-7-treated cells did not. GA treatments augmented ubiquitination and markedly increased melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (MDA-7) expression levels. These findings suggest that Ad-mda-7-mediated cytotoxicity is dependent on reactive oxygen species but independent of apoptosis or autophagy, and that GA-mediated cytotoxicity was linked with caspase-independent apoptosis and/or autophagy. A mechanism underlying the combinatory effects of Ad-mda-7 and GA remained complex and the synergism is attributable to multiple factors including increased MDA-7 protein stability by GA. PMID:24263157

  14. [A case of chronic pancreatitis occurring in gastric aberrant pancreas poorly distinguishable from gastric aberrant pancreas ductal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sayaka; Miyaoka, Youichi; Fujiwara, Aya; Tsukano, Kousuke; Kotani, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Ito, Satoko; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Nariaki; Onuma, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was referred to our hospital with abdominal pain. A gastric submucosal tumor (SMT) was diagnosed nine years previously, but the patient was lost to follow-up. Upon our evaluation, the SMT had enlarged, as demonstrated by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and abdominal computed tomography. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic and isoechoic mosaic mass, which primarily occupied the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Aspiration cytodiagnosis was performed, the results of which led to a suspicion of adenocarcinoma arising from gastric ectopic pancreas. Next, we conducted segmental gastrectomy. Pathological examination showed adiponecrosis, a pancreatic stone, chronic inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrosis. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis occurring in a gastric aberrant pancreas. PMID:26537325

  15. PEGylated gold nanoparticles conjugated to monoclonal F19 antibodies as targeted labeling agents for human pancreatic carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Eck, Wolfgang; Craig, Gary; Sigdel, Aruna; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Tang, Laura; Brennan, Murray F; Allen, Peter J; Mason, Michael D

    2008-11-25

    In this study, we describe optical detection of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to surgically resected human pancreatic cancer tissue. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared using approximately 15 nm spherical gold cores and covalently coupled to F19 monoclonal antibodies. The heterobifunctional PEG ligands contain a dithiol group for stable anchoring onto the gold surface and a terminal carboxy group for coupling of antibodies to the outside of the PEG shell. The nanoparticle-antibody bioconjugates form highly stable dispersions and exhibit long-term resistance to agglomeration. This has been demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticle bioconjugates were used to label tumor stroma in approximately 5 mum thick sections of resected human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. After rinsing away nonbound nanoparticles and fixation, the tissue samples were imaged by darkfield microscopy near the nanoparticle resonance scattering maximum (approximately 560 nm). The images display pronounced tissue features and suggest that this novel labeling method could provide for facile identification of cancer tissue. Tumor samples treated with gold nanoparticles conjugated to nonspecific control antibodies and noncancerous pancreatic tissue treated with mAb-F19-conjugated gold nanoparticles both exhibited correctly negative results and showed no tissue staining. PMID:19206392

  16. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of 29 Invasive Carcinomas Arising in 178 Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms With Ovarian-type Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee-Taek; Park, Sang Mo; Basturk, Olca; Bagci, Pelin; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Stelow, Edward B.; Walters, Dustin M.; Choi, Dong Wook; Choi, Seoung Ho; Heo, Jin Seok; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Reid, Michelle D.; Adsay, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Information on the clinicopathologic characteristics of invasive carcinomas arising from mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) is limited, because in many early studies they were lumped and analyzed together with noninvasive MCNs. Even more importantly, many of the largest prior studies did not require ovarian-type stroma (OTS) for diagnosis. We analyzed 178 MCNs, all strictly defined by the presence of OTS, 98% of which occurred in perimenopausal women (mean age, 47 y) and arose in the distal pancreas. Twenty-nine (16%) patients had associated invasive carcinoma, and all were female with a mean age of 53. Invasion was far more common in tumors with grossly visible intracystic papillary nodule formation ≥ 1.0 cm (79.3% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.000) as well as in larger tumors (mean cyst size: 9.4 vs. 5.4 cm, P = 0.006); only 4/29 (14%) invasive carcinomas occurred in tumors that were < 5 cm; however, none were < 3 cm. Increased serum CA19-9 level (> 37 U/L) was also more common in the invasive tumors (64% vs. 23%, P = 0.011). Most invasive carcinomas (79%) were of tubular type, and the remainder (5 cases) were mostly undifferentiated carcinoma (2, with osteoclast-like giant cells), except for 1 with papillary features. Interestingly, there were no colloid carcinomas; 2 patients had nodal metastasis at the time of diagnosis, and both died of disease at 10 and 35 months, respectively. While noninvasive MCNs had an excellent prognosis (100% at 5 y), tumors with invasion often had an aggressive clinical course with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44% and 26%, respectively (P = 0.000). The pT2 (> 2 cm) invasive tumors had a worse prognosis than pTl (≤ 2 cm) tumors (P = 0.000), albeit 3 patients with T1a (< 0.5 cm) disease also died of disease. In conclusion, invasive carcinomas are seen in 16% of MCNs and are mostly of tubular (pancreatobiliary) type; colloid carcinoma is not seen in MCNs. Serum CA19-9 is often higher in invasive carcinomas, and invasion is typically seen in OTS

  17. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  18. Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: A Phase I Single-Dose Escalation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Seza A.; Cohen, Steven J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Zuckier, Lionel S.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of 90Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan (90Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received 111In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before 90Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). Results 111In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before 90Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received 90Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m2 (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with 90Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m2 encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m2 as the maximal tolerated 90Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%–52% tumor diameter shrinkage). Conclusion 90Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated 90Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:21527562

  19. A case of primary pancreatic non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderloni, Andrea; Genco, Chiara; Ballarè, Marco; Carmagnola, Stefania; Battista, Serena; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphoma frequently involves the gastrointestinal tract, in particular the stomach and the small bowel. Rarely, it can also be a cause of pancreatic masses. Clinical presentation is often non-specific and may overlap with other pancreatic conditions such as carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumours and autoimmune pancreatitis. We report a case of primary pancreatic lymphoma in a young woman with jaundice, fever and abdominal pain mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis. Clinical evaluation included the abdominal Computed Tomography scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that revealed a large duodenal mass. Endoscopic biopsies were performed and eventually histological examination was coherent with a diagnosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma. PMID:26114186

  20. Calcitriol enhances gemcitabine antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo by promoting apoptosis in a human pancreatic carcinoma model system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Flynn, Geraldine; Muindi, Josephia R; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the standard care chemotherapeutic agent to treat pancreatic cancer. Previously we demonstrated that calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) has significant anti-proliferative effects in vitro and in vivo in multiple tumor models and enhances the activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. We therefore investigated whether calcitriol could potentiate the cytotoxic activity of gemcitabine in the human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 model system. Isobologram analysis revealed that calcitriol and gemcitabine had synergistic antiproliferative effect over a wide range of drug concentrations. Calcitriol did not reduce the cytidine deaminase activity in Capan-1 tumors nor in the livers of Capan-1 tumor bearing mice. Calcitriol and gemcitabine combination promoted apoptosis in Capan-1 cells compared with either agent alone. The combination treatment also increased the activation of caspases-8, -9, -6 and -3 in Capan-1 cells. This result was confirmed by substrate-based caspase activity assay. Akt phosphorylation was reduced by calcitriol and gemcitabine combination treatment compared to single agent treatment. However, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not modulated by either agent alone or by the combination. Tumor regrowth delay studies showed that calcitriol in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a significant reduction of Capan-1 tumor volume compared to single agent treatment. Our study suggests that calcitriol and gemcitabine in combination promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis, which may contribute to increased anti-tumor activity compared to either agent alone. PMID:20699664

  1. Tumor cell expression of MMP3 as a prognostic factor for poor survival in pancreatic, pulmonary, and mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehner, Christine; Miller, Erin; Nassar, Aziza; Bamlet, William R.; Radisky, Evette S.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers collectively represent one third of all diagnosed tumors and are responsible for almost 40% of overall cancer mortality. Despite improvements in current treatments, efforts to develop more specific therapeutic options are warranted. Here we identify matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) as a potential target within all three of these tumor types. MMP3 has previously been shown to induce expression of Rac1b, a tumorigenic splice isoform of Rac1. In this study we find that MMP3 and Rac1b proteins are both strongly expressed by the tumor cells of all three tumor types and that expression of MMP3 protein is prognostic of poor survival in pancreatic cancer patients. We also find that MMP3 gene expression can serve as a prognostic marker for patient survival in breast and lung cancer. These results suggest an oncogenic MMP3-Rac1b signaling axis as a driver of tumor progression in three common poor prognosis tumor types, further suggesting that new therapies to target these pathways could have substantial therapeutic benefit. PMID:26807201

  2. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  3. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  4. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of HDAC inhibitor Apicidin in pancreatic carcinoma cells subsequent time and dose dependent treatment.

    PubMed

    Bauden, Monika; Tassidis, Helena; Ansari, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Apicidin is a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that selectively binds to histone deacetylases (HDACs) class I and interferes with the deacetylation process, which results in modification of acetylation level of cellular proteins. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential time and dose dependent cytotoxicity of the test compound, Apicidin, in pancreatic cancer cells Capan-1 and Panc-1 as well as estimate maximal tolerable dose (MTD) of the test agent and determine EC50 using four complementary colorimetric cytotoxicity or viability assays. The cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Apicidin (0-5000nM) for 2, 4 and 6h (short term exposure) or 24, 48 and 72h (long term exposure) before conducting cytotoxic analyses with lactate dehydrogenase assay or viability analyses with sulforhodamine B (SRB), methyl tetrazolium (MTT) and crystal violet (CV) assays. In order to investigate whether Apicidin irreversibly affects the cells already during the short term exposure, the medium containing Apicidin was removed and replaced with fresh culturing medium after 6h of treatment. The cells were then incubated for additional 24, 48 or 72h before carrying out the analysis. The results obtained from cytotoxicity and viability assays indicated, that Apicidin was well tolerated by both cell lines at concentrations below 100nM at any given time point and at all applied concentrations during the short term (6h or less) treatment. Continuous prolonged term exposures (48h or greater) of the cells to Apicidin with concentration exceeding 100nM resulted in significantly increasing cytotoxicity and sustained significant loss of cell viability. Moreover, long term exposure of pancreatic cancer cells Capan-1 and Panc-1 to Apicidin concentrations exceeding 100nM showed an initial anti-proliferative effect before cytotoxicity onset. In summary, MTD was exposure time dependent and estimated to 100nM for long term treatment and to at least 5000nM for treatment

  5. RNA interference against MDM2 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in pancreatic carcinoma SW1990HM cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weidong; Meng, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhen; Hua, Yongqiang; Gao, Huifeng; Wang, Peng; Lin, Junhua; Zhou, Zhenhua; Luo, Jianmin; Liu, Luming

    2014-02-01

    In our previous study, the mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) was identified as one of the leading genes that promote the metastasis of pancreatic cancer (PC). However, the mechanism by which MDM2 promotes metastasis of PC is not understood. In this study, we show that down-regulation of MDM2 through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference could also suppress in vitro proliferation and in vivo tumor growth, and led to an obvious inhibition of both in vitro invasion and in vivo live metastases of SW1990HM cells which had an over-expression of MDM2 and a higher metastatic potential. Moreover, we also show that the down-regulation of MDM2 induced a significant decrease in MMP9, Ki-67 and increase in P53, E-Cadherin expression, and results in an altered expression of genes involved in metastasis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. Our results suggest that MDM2 plays an important role in metastasis as well as tumor growth of PC. MDM2 could be a hopeful target for the control of PC. PMID:22200978

  6. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  7. A phase I/II study of leucovorin, carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (LCF) in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, A.; Cunningham, D.; Gore, M.; Hill, M.; O'Brien, M.; Nicolson, M.; Chang, J.; Watson, M.; Norman, A.; Hill, A.; Oates, J.; Moore, H.; Ross, P.

    1997-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUPS) accounts for 5-10% of all malignancies. Forty patients with metastatic CUPS or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas were recruited. Eligibility included ECOG performance status 0-2, minimum life expectancy of 3 months and measurable disease. The regimen consisted of bolus intravenous 5 fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (20 mg m-2) days 1-5 and carboplatin (AUC5) on day 3. The leucovorin/carboplatin/5-FU (LCF) was repeated every 4 weeks. The starting dose of 5-FU was 350 mg m-2 day-1 with escalation to 370 and then 400 mg m-2 day -1 after the toxicity at the previous level had been assessed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the dosage of 5-FU that achieved 60% grade 3/4 toxicity. In addition, objective and symptomatic responses, quality of life and survival were assessed. The MTD of 5-FU in the LCF regimen was 370 mg m-2. The predominant toxicity was asymptomatic marrow toxicity. The 350 mg m-2 level was then expanded. There were two toxic deaths due to neutropenic sepsis, one at 370 mg m-2 after one course and one at 350 mg m-2 after four courses. The objective response rate was 25% with one complete response (CR) and nine partial responses (PRs). The median duration of response was 3.4 months (range 1-10). The CR and eight of the nine PRs were in CUPS patients. Twelve patients developed progressive disease on LCF. Median survival for all 40 patients was 7.8 months (10 months median survival for those treated at 350 mg m-2). The majority of patients described a symptomatic improvement with LCF chemotherapy. The recommended dose of 5-FU for future studies is 350 mg m-2 combined with leucovorin 20 mg m-2 and carboplatin (AUC5). PMID:9000605

  8. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  9. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  10. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  11. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  12. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  13. Small molecule inhibitor YM155-mediated activation of death receptor 5 is crucial for chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangxuan; Puszyk, William M; Lu, Zaiming; Ostrov, David A; George, Thomas J; Robertson, Keith D; Liu, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Despite much effort, pancreatic cancer survival rates are still dismally low. Novel therapeutics may hold the key to improving survival. YM155 is a small molecule inhibitor that has shown antitumor activity in a number of cancers by reducing the expression of survivin. The aim of our study is to understand the mechanisms by which YM155 functions in pancreatic cancer cells. We established the antitumor effect of YM155 with in vitro studies in cultured cells, and in vivo studies using a mouse xenograft model. Our data demonstrated that YM155 reduced the expression of survivin; however, downregulation of survivin itself is insufficient to induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. We showed for the first time that treatment with YM155 increased death receptor 5 (DR5) expression in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that YM155 induced apoptosis by broad-spectrum inhibition of IAP family member proteins (e.g., CIAP1/2 and FLIP) and induced proapoptotic Bak protein upregulation and activation; the antitumor effect of YM155 treatment with either the DR5 agonist lexatumumab or gemcitabine on pancreatic cancer cells was synergistic. Our data also revealed that YM155 inhibits tumor growth in vivo, without apparent toxicity to the noncancerous human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line. Together, these findings suggest that YM155 could be a novel therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25344582

  14. Orbital Cellulitis: A Rare Presentation of Metastatic Bronchial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Issing, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective. We report a rare and unusual case of bronchial carcinoma presenting with symptoms of complications of sinonasal disease. Case Report. A 66-year-old lady was referred with a 1-week history of progressive ocular pain, chemosis, and visual disturbance. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses revealed frontal and ethmoidal sinus opacification with orbital involvement consistent with a diagnosis of orbital cellulitis secondary to sinusitis. Surgical exploration revealed that the sinuses and right orbit were filled with soft tissue and subsequent histopathological examination of the biopsies indicating metastases from an adenosquamous bronchial carcinoma. Further imaging revealed a large, asymptomatic, bronchial primary with deposits in the brain and liver. The advanced presentation of the disease limited treatment to best supportive care. Conclusion. Orbital cellulitis and sinonasal malignancies have a similar pattern of clinical presentation, posing a potential diagnostic pitfall. There are only two previously reported cases of metastatic lung carcinoma in the frontal sinus with 15 cases of sinonasal tract involvement reported overall. There are no reported cases of adenosquamous carcinoma in the sinonasal tract. PMID:22937366

  15. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  16. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  17. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  18. Replication-competent adenoviruses with the type 35-derived fiber-knob region achieve reactive oxygen species-dependent cytotoxicity and produce greater toxicity than those with the type 5-derived region in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Suguru; Kawamura, Kiyoko; Okamoto, Shinya; Morinaga, Takao; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Shingyoji, Masato; Sekine, Ikuo; Kubo, Shuji; Tada, Yuji; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is relatively resistant to chemotherapy and cell death induced by replication of adenoviruses (Ad) can be one of the therapeutic options. Transduction efficacy of conventional type 5 Ad (Ad5) is however low and the cytotoxic mechanism by replication-competent Ad was not well understood. We constructed replication-competent Ad5 of which the E1A promoter region was replaced with a transcriptional regulatory region of the midkine, the survivin or the cyclooxygenase-2 gene, all of which were expressed at a high level in human tumors. We also prepared replication-competent Ad5 that were activated with the same region but had the type 35 Ad-derived fiber-knob region (AdF35) to convert the major cellular receptor for Ad infection from the coxsackie adenovirus receptor to CD46 molecules. Replication-competent AdF35 that were activated with the exogenous region produced cytotoxic effects on human pancreatic carcinoma cells greater than the corresponding Ad5 bearing with the same regulatory region. Cells infected with the AdF35 showed cytopathic effects and increased sub-G1 fractions. Caspase-9, less significantly caspase-8 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, but not caspase-3 was cleaved and expression of molecules involved in autophagy and caspase-independent cell death pathways remained unchanged. Nevertheless, H2A histone family member X molecules were phosphorylated, and N-acetyl-L-cystein, an inhibitor for reactive oxygen species, suppressed the AdF35-mediated cytotoxicity. These data indicated a novel mechanism of Ad-mediated cell death and suggest a possible clinical application of the fiber-knob modified Ad. PMID:26373551

  19. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  1. Simultaneous Inhibition of EGFR, VEGFR and PDGFR Signaling Combined with Gemcitabine Produces Therapy of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma and Prolongs Survival in an Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Bucana, Corazon D.; Fan, Dominic; Baker, Cheryl H.; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Kuwai, Toshio; Abbruzzese, James L.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2006-01-01

    Although gemcitabine has been approved as the first-line chemotherapeutic reagent for pancreatic cancer, its response rate is low and average survival duration is still only marginal. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) modulate tumor progression, we hypothesized that inhibition of phosphorylation of all three on tumor cells, tumor-associated endothelial cells, and stroma cells would improve the treatment efficacy of gemcitabine in an orthotopic pancreatic tumor model in nude mice and prolong survival. We implanted L3.6pl, a human pancreatic cancer cell, in the pancreas of nude mice. We found that tumor-associated endothelial cells in this model highly expressed phosphorylated EGFR, VEGFR, and PDGFR. Oral administration of AEE788, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against EGFR and VEGFR, decreased phosphorylation of EGFR and VEGFR. PDGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by STI571. Although intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine did not inhibit tumor growth, its combination with AEE788 and STI571 produced >80% inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival in parallel with increases in number of tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cell apoptosis, decreased microvascular density, decreased proliferation rate, and prolonged survival. STI571 treatment also decreased pericyte coverage on tumor-associated endothelial cells. Thus, inhibiting phosphorylation of EGFR, VEGFR, and PDGFR in combination with gemcitabine enhanced the efficacy of gemcitabine, resulting in inhibition of experimental human pancreatic cancer growth and significant prolongation of survival. PMID:16288027

  2. CD14/TLR4 priming potentially recalibrates and exerts anti-tumor efficacy in tumor associated macrophages in a mouse model of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Nadella, Vinod; Singh, Sandhya; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth major cause of cancer related deaths in the world and 5 year survival is below 5%. Among various tumor directed therapies, stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLR) has shown promising effects in various tumor models. However, pancreatic cancer cells frequently express these receptors themselves and their stimulation (TLR 2 and/or 4 particularly) within tumor microenvironment is known to potentially enhance tumor cell proliferation and cancer progression. Consistent stimulation of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs), in particular with tumor derived TLR ligand within the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer related inflammation, which is sterile, non-immunogenic and carcinogenic in nature. In view of this, recalibrating of TAM has the potential to induce immunogenic inflammation. Consistent with this, we provide experimental evidence for the first time in this study that priming of TAMs with TLR4 ligend (LPS) alone or in combination with IFN-γ not only recalibrates pancreatic tumor cells induced M2 polarization, but also confers anti-tumor potential in TAMs. Most interestingly, reduced tumor growth in macrophage depleted animals suggests that macrophage directed approaches are important for the management of pancreatic tumors. PMID:27511884

  3. CD14/TLR4 priming potentially recalibrates and exerts anti-tumor efficacy in tumor associated macrophages in a mouse model of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Nadella, Vinod; Singh, Sandhya; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth major cause of cancer related deaths in the world and 5 year survival is below 5%. Among various tumor directed therapies, stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLR) has shown promising effects in various tumor models. However, pancreatic cancer cells frequently express these receptors themselves and their stimulation (TLR 2 and/or 4 particularly) within tumor microenvironment is known to potentially enhance tumor cell proliferation and cancer progression. Consistent stimulation of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs), in particular with tumor derived TLR ligand within the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer related inflammation, which is sterile, non-immunogenic and carcinogenic in nature. In view of this, recalibrating of TAM has the potential to induce immunogenic inflammation. Consistent with this, we provide experimental evidence for the first time in this study that priming of TAMs with TLR4 ligend (LPS) alone or in combination with IFN-γ not only recalibrates pancreatic tumor cells induced M2 polarization, but also confers anti-tumor potential in TAMs. Most interestingly, reduced tumor growth in macrophage depleted animals suggests that macrophage directed approaches are important for the management of pancreatic tumors. PMID:27511884

  4. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  5. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  6. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  7. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  8. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  9. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  11. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  12. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  13. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure children receive vaccines to protect them against mumps and other childhood illnesses. Treat medical problems that ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Kawasaki disease Mumps Mycoplasma pneumonia Reye syndrome Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - discharge ...

  14. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the ...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  16. Clinical Impact of the KL-6 Concentration of Pancreatic Juice for Diagnosing Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Takeda, Yohei; Harada, Kenichi; Onoyama, Takumi; Kawata, Soichiro; Horie, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Ueki, Masaru; Miura, Norimasa; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Pancreatic juice cytology (PJC) is considered optimal for differentially diagnosing pancreatic masses, but the accuracy of PJC ranges from 46.7% to 93.0%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of measuring the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice for diagnosing pancreatic masses. Methods. PJC and the KL-6 concentration measurements of pancreatic juice were performed for 70 consecutive patients with pancreatic masses (39 malignancies and 31 benign). Results. The average KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was significantly higher for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) (167.7 ± 396.1 U/mL) and intraductal papillary mucinous carcinomas (IPMCs) (86.9 ± 21.1 U/mL) than for pancreatic inflammatory lesions (17.5 ± 15.7 U/mL, P = 0.034) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (14.4 ± 2.0 U/mL, P = 0.026), respectively. When the cut-off level of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was 16 U/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice alone were 79.5%, 64.5%, and 72.9%, respectively. Adding the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice to PJC when making a diagnosis caused the values of sensitivity and accuracy of PJC to increase by 15.3% (P = 0.025) and 8.5% (P = 0.048), respectively. Conclusions. The KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice may be as useful as PJC for diagnosing PDACs. PMID:26451373

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  20. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  1. Evaluation of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Intensity-Modulated and Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Techniques for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van der; Triest, Baukelien van; Verbakel, Wilko; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) planning techniques for pancreatic cancer. All target volumes were determined using four-dimensional computed tomography scans (4D CT). Methods and Materials: The pancreatic tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes were contoured on all 10 phases of a planning 4D CT scan for 10 patients, and the planning target volumes (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three consecutive respiratory phases for RGRT delivery in both inspiration and expiration were identified, and the corresponding PTVs (PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration}) and organ at risk volumes created. Treatment plans using CRT and IMRT, with and without RGRT, were created for each PTV. Results: Compared with the CRT plans, IMRT significantly reduced the mean volume of right kidney exposed to 20 Gy from 27.7% {+-} 17.7% to 16.0% {+-} 18.2% (standard deviation) (p < 0.01), but this was not achieved for the left kidney (11.1% {+-} 14.2% to 5.7% {+-} 6.5%; p = 0.1). The IMRT plans also reduced the mean gastric, hepatic, and small bowel doses (p < 0.01). No additional reductions in the dose to the kidneys or other organs at risk were seen when RGRT plans were combined with either CRT or IMRT, and the findings for RGRT in end-expiration and end-inspiration were similar. Conclusion: 4D CT-based IMRT plans for pancreatic tumors significantly reduced the radiation doses to the right kidney, liver, stomach, and small bowel compared with CRT plans. The additional dosimetric benefits from RGRT appear limited in this setting.

  2. Endoscopic diagnostic of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous inflammatory pancreatic disease, one characterized by irreversible morphological changes, often associates with pain and sometimes with the loss of endocrine and exocrine function. As a histological confirmation of chronic pancreatitis is often unavailable, the diagnosis is traditionally based on imaging methods such as computerized tomography (CT) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and recently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) as a noninvasive alternative to ERCP. Developments in the classification system of CP include the Marseille classification of 1963 which offered histopathologic criteria for CP, the Cambridge classification of 1984 which introduced imaging features of computed tomography (CT), transabdominal ultrasound (TUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for classification of CP as well as Rosemont classification system of 2007 which presented the endoscopic ultrasonography diagnosis of CP. Endoscopic ultra-sonography (EUS) was first introduced as a diagnostic method for evaluation of pancreatic disease in 1986. It has experienced significant improvements since then and allowed for an alternative approach in diagnosing patients with pancreatic diseases. In patients with suspected pancreatic masses EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the best method for obtaining tissue diagnosis and differentiating CP from pancreatic carcinoma. The recent studies indicate that EUS is the method of choice when compared with other imaging methods such as ERCP because it frequently provides more accurate diagnostics. The aim of this review is to discuss the findings in endoscopic diagnostics up to the present moment and to indicate advantages, limitations and possible complications along with the current recommendations in CP diagnostics. PMID:25842773

  3. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  4. Therapeutic designed poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) cylindrical oseltamivir phosphate-loaded implants impede tumor neovascularization, growth and metastasis in mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hrynyk, Michael; Ellis, Jordon P; Haxho, Fiona; Allison, Stephanie; Steele, Joseph AM; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2015-01-01

    Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) copolymers have been extensively used in cancer research. PLGA can be chemically engineered for conjugation or encapsulation of drugs in a particle formulation. We reported that oseltamivir phosphate (OP) treatment of human pancreatic tumor-bearing mice disrupted the tumor vasculature with daily injections. Here, the controlled release of OP from a biodegradable PLGA cylinder (PLGA-OP) implanted at tumor site was investigated for its role in limiting tumor neovascularization, growth, and metastasis. PLGA-OP cylinders over 30 days in vitro indicated 20%–25% release profiles within 48 hours followed by a continuous metronomic low dose release of 30%–50% OP for an additional 16 days. All OP was released by day 30. Surgically implanted PLGA-OP containing 20 mg OP and blank PLGA cylinders at the tumor site of heterotopic xenografts of human pancreatic PANC1 tumors in RAGxCγ double mutant mice impeded tumor neovascularization, growth rate, and spread to the liver and lungs compared with the untreated cohort. Xenograft tumors from PLGA and PLGA-OP-treated cohorts expressed significant higher levels of human E-cadherin with concomitant reduced N-cadherin and host CD31+ endothelial cells compared with the untreated cohort. These results clearly indicate that OP delivered from PLGA cylinders surgically implanted at the site of the solid tumor show promise as an effective treatment therapy for cancer. PMID:26309402

  5. Prognostic significance of Ki-67 antigen and p53 protein expression in pancreatic duct carcinoma: a study of the monoclonal antibodies MIB-1 and DO-7 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour material.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, S.; Parrado, C.; Falkmer, U. G.; Blåsjö, M.; Sundelin, P.; von Rosen, A.

    1997-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material from 57 patients in whom curative resection of pancreatic carcinoma had been attempted was analysed by an immunohistochemical procedure to estimate proliferation and p53 protein expression. Using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) MIB-1, which recognizes a Ki-67 epitope, the proliferating cell index (PCI, percentage of immunoreactive tumour nuclei) and proliferating cell area (PCA, percentage of immunoreactive tumour nuclear area) were calculated using an interactive image analysis system and were compared with semiquantitative scoring of stainability. MAb DO-7, which recognizes both wild- and mutant-type p53 protein, was used to assess p53 expression in the same material. MIB-1 stainings were of high quality in 53 tumours. The median PCI was 29.7% (range 0.5-82.1%) and the median PCA was 10.6% (range 0.0-36.5%). There was a close correlation between PCI and PCA (P < 0.0001). PCI and PCA values were in conformity with the semiquantitative scoring (P < 0.0001). The p53 immunohistochemical stainings were successful in 48 tumours and the protein was expressed in 22 (46%). High PCI values (> 45%, n = 14) correlated with shorter survival time (P < 0.01). PCA (P < 0.05) and the expression of p53 protein (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic variables. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9218733

  6. Identification of KCa3.1 Channel as a Novel Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in a Subset of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Ilya; Glasauer, Andrea; Schöckel, Laura; Sauter, Daniel R P; Ehrmann, Alexander; Sohler, Florian; Hägebarth, Andrea; Novak, Ivana; Christian, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents the most common form of pancreatic cancer with rising incidence in developing countries and overall 5-year survival rates of less than 5%. The most frequent mutations in PDAC are gain-of-function mutations in KRAS as well as loss-of-function mutations in p53. Both mutations have severe impacts on the metabolism of tumor cells. Many of these metabolic changes are mediated by transporters or channels that regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between the intracellular compartment and the tumor microenvironment. In the study presented here, our goal was to identify novel transporters or channels that regulate oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in PDAC in order to characterize novel potential drug targets for the treatment of these cancers. We set up a Seahorse Analyzer XF based siRNA screen and identified previously described as well as novel regulators of OxPhos. The siRNA that resulted in the greatest change in cellular oxygen consumption was targeting the KCNN4 gene, which encodes for the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel KCa3.1. This channel has not previously been reported to regulate OxPhos. Knock-down experiments as well as the use of a small molecule inhibitor confirmed its role in regulating oxygen consumption, ATP production and cellular proliferation. Furthermore, PDAC cell lines sensitive to KCa3.1 inhibition were shown to express the channel protein in the plasma membrane as well as in the mitochondria. These differences in the localization of KCa3.1 channels as well as differences in the regulation of cellular metabolism might offer opportunities for targeted therapy in subsets of PDAC. PMID:27494181

  7. Identification of KCa3.1 Channel as a Novel Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in a Subset of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Ilya; Glasauer, Andrea; Schöckel, Laura; Sauter, Daniel R. P.; Ehrmann, Alexander; Sohler, Florian; Hägebarth, Andrea; Novak, Ivana; Christian, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents the most common form of pancreatic cancer with rising incidence in developing countries and overall 5-year survival rates of less than 5%. The most frequent mutations in PDAC are gain-of-function mutations in KRAS as well as loss-of-function mutations in p53. Both mutations have severe impacts on the metabolism of tumor cells. Many of these metabolic changes are mediated by transporters or channels that regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between the intracellular compartment and the tumor microenvironment. In the study presented here, our goal was to identify novel transporters or channels that regulate oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in PDAC in order to characterize novel potential drug targets for the treatment of these cancers. We set up a Seahorse Analyzer XF based siRNA screen and identified previously described as well as novel regulators of OxPhos. The siRNA that resulted in the greatest change in cellular oxygen consumption was targeting the KCNN4 gene, which encodes for the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel KCa3.1. This channel has not previously been reported to regulate OxPhos. Knock-down experiments as well as the use of a small molecule inhibitor confirmed its role in regulating oxygen consumption, ATP production and cellular proliferation. Furthermore, PDAC cell lines sensitive to KCa3.1 inhibition were shown to express the channel protein in the plasma membrane as well as in the mitochondria. These differences in the localization of KCa3.1 channels as well as differences in the regulation of cellular metabolism might offer opportunities for targeted therapy in subsets of PDAC. PMID:27494181

  8. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  10. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  11. Challenges of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dimastromatteo, Julien; Houghton, Jacob L.; Lewis, Jason S.; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel molecular cancer imaging agents has considerably advanced in recent years. Numerous cancer imaging agents have demonstrated remarkable potential for aiding the diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning at the preclinical stage which in turn has led to a number of agents being approved for human trials. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is currently the most deadly common carcinoma with an overall 5-year survival rate of about 6%. As detection technologies progress, the need for molecular imaging tools that will allow the diagnosis at an early stage will be crucial to improving patient outcomes. In this review, we will highlight agents that illuminate various cell populations that comprise the tumor: epithelial, endothelial, and stromal tumor cells. PMID:26049698

  12. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-06-20

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  14. Carbon-Ion Irradiation Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells MIAPaCa-2 via Rac1 and RhoA Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Shoji, Yoshimi; Isozaki, Tetsurou; Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Imai, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of cancer cell migration and invasion by carbon (C)-ion irradiation. Methods and Materials: Human pancreatic cancer cells MIAPaCa-2, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3 were treated by x-ray (4 Gy) or C-ion (0.5, 1, 2, or 4 Gy) irradiation, and their migration and invasion were assessed 2 days later. The levels of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound Rac1 and RhoA were determined by the active GTPase pull-down assay with or without a proteasome inhibitor, and the binding of E3 ubiquitin ligase to GTP-bound Rac1 was examined by immunoprecipitation. Results: Carbon-ion irradiation reduced the levels of GTP-bound Rac1 and RhoA, 2 major regulators of cell motility, in MIAPaCa-2 cells and GTP-bound Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Proteasome inhibition reversed the effect, indicating that C-ion irradiation induced Rac1 and RhoA degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. E3 Ub ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), which directly targets Rac1, was selectively induced in C-ion–irradiated MIAPaCa-2 cells and coprecipitated with GTP-bound Rac1 in C-ion–irradiated cells, which was associated with Rac1 ubiquitination. Cell migration and invasion reduced by C-ion radiation were restored by short interfering RNA–mediated XIAP knockdown, indicating that XIAP is involved in C-ion–induced inhibition of cell motility. Conclusion: In contrast to x-ray irradiation, C-ion treatment inhibited the activity of Rac1 and RhoA in MIAPaCa-2 cells and Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via Ub-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby blocking the motility of these pancreatic cancer cells.

  15. External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiucci, Gian C.; Morganti, Alessio G.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Alfieri, Sergio; Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R.; Di Lullo, Liberato; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela; Doglietto, Gian B.; Cellini, Numa

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  17. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas. PMID:27232353

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  19. NUT midline carcinoma in a newborn with multiorgan disseminated tumor and a 2-year-old with a pancreatic/hepatic primary.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Bahig M; Steelman, Charlotte K; Abramowsky, Carlos R; Olson, Thomas A; French, Christopher A; Saxe, Debra F; Ricketts, Richard R; Katzenstein, Howard M

    2010-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare and aggressive malignant epithelial tumor defined by rearrangement of the NUT gene on chromosome 15. In two thirds of cases, NUT is involved in a balanced translocation with BDR4 on chromosome 19, while in the remaining cases, NUT is rearranged with variant fusion partners such as BRD3. These undifferentiated tumors primarily affect midline structures, usually in the upper aerodigestive tract and mediastinum. Most reported cases have followed a rapidly lethal clinical course. We report the clinical and pathological findings of NMC in the youngest patients identified so far. The 1st case involves a newborn who presented with a supraorbital mass and extensive multiorgan involvement, including the spine, lungs, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, and subcutaneous tissue. The 2nd patient was a 2-year-old male with an abdominal mass involving the liver and pancreas with pulmonary metastasis. Histopathological analysis of both tumors showed undifferentiated malignant neoplasms, and immunohistochemistry showed positivity for epithelial markers. Both tumors demonstrated t(15;19), and immunohistochemistry with NUT monoclonal antibodies and fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed NUT rearrangement. The patients died from disease at 1 and 2 months postpresentation. Thus far, 25 cases have been reported, including our 2 current cases. Presentation ages range from 0 to 78 years (mean, 23 years). Herein, we report the 2 youngest reported cases of NMC, including the 1st congenital case and the 1st case arising within the liver/pancreas. Increased awareness and further molecular studies are required for a better understanding of NMC pathobiology and improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:20017639

  20. The role of pancreatic islets in experimental pancreatic carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, O.; Ohigashi, H.; Imaoka, S.; Nakai, I.; Mitsuo, M.; Weide, L.; Pour, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the presence of intact islets is essential for the induction of pancreatic exocrine tumors in the Syrian hamster model. To validate this, we investigated the effect of the carcinogen, N-nitrosobis(2-oxo-propyl)amine (BOP) in hamsters, in which homologous isolated intact islets were transplanted into the submandibular gland (SMG). Freshly isolated pure islets from hamster donors were transplanted into the left SMG of 20 female host hamsters. Ten of these hamsters (group 1) received BOP (40 mg/kg) weekly for 3 weeks. Another 10 hamsters (group 2) were kept untreated. In groups 3 and 4 (10 hamsters each) the salt solution or isolated pancreatic ductal cells, respectively, was injected into the gland. In other groups (10 hamsters each) islets were transplanted into the peri-SMG connective tissue (group 5) or into the renal subcapsular space (group 6). Hamsters of group 1 (40 mg/kg, weekly for 3 weeks) as were group 7 hamsters, which served as BOP-treated controls. All BOP-treated hamsters developed pancreatic lesions. Similar hyperplastic and atypical ductal/ductular proliferation and in situ carcinoma were found in the SMG of many group 1 hamsters. No such lesions were found in the SMG, peri-SMG, or renal subcapsular space of the other groups. Islets appear to be involved in carcinogenicity of BOP. The mechanism is obscure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485408

  1. The surgical spectrum of hereditary pancreatitis in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A R; Nagorney, D M; Sarr, M G

    1992-01-01

    The role of operative intervention for hereditary pancreatitis, a rare form of chronic parenchymal destruction, is unclear. To determine whether surgical therapy is safe and provides prolonged symptomatic relief, the authors reviewed the management of 22 adults (11 men, 11 women) with hereditary pancreatitis treated surgically between 1950 and 1989. Hereditary pancreatitis was defined as a family history of two or more relatives with pancreatitis and clinical, biochemical, or radiologic evidence of pancreatitis. The mean ages at onset of symptoms and at operation were 15 years (range, 3 to 52 years) and 31 years (range, 18 to 54 years), respectively. Pain was the primary indication for operation in all patients. Additional symptoms included nausea, vomiting (73%), weight loss (55%), and diarrhea (41%). Ductal dilatation was present in 68%, pancreatic parenchymal calcifications in 73%, pseudocysts in 36%, and splenic vein thrombosis in 18%. Primary operations included ductal drainage in 10 patients, pancreatic resection alone in three, resection with drainage in three, cholecystectomy plus sphincteroplasty in two, cholecystectomy with or without common bile duct exploration in two, pancreatic abscess drainage in one, and pseudocyst drainage in one. There were no perioperative deaths, and the morbidity rate was 14% (intra-abdominal abscess, wound infection, and urinary tract infection). Symptoms recurred in nine patients. Severity prompted reoperation in five. Secondary operations included pancreatic resection in three, pseudocyst excision in one, and pancreaticolithotomy in one. Follow-up to date is complete and extends for a median of 85 months. Eighteen patients (82%) are clinically improved or asymptomatic. Symptoms have persisted in four patients, and two patients have died of pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients died of unrelated causes. Surgical therapy for patients with hereditary pancreatitis selected on the basis of the traditional indications for surgical

  2. Human papillomavirus-related carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Guo, Theresa W; Smith, David F; Wang, Hao; Ogawa, Takenori; Pai, Sara I; Westra, William H

    2013-02-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is an established cause of head and neck carcinomas arising in the oropharynx. The presence of HPV has also been reported in some carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract, but little is known about their overall incidence or their clinicopathologic profile. The surgical pathology archives of The Johns Hopkins Hospital were searched for all carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract from 1995 to 2011, and tissue microarrays were constructed. p16 immunohistochemical analysis and DNA in situ hybridization for high-risk types of HPV were performed. Demographic and clinical outcome data were extracted from patient medical records. Of 161 sinonasal carcinomas, 34 (21%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA, including type 16 (82%), type 31/33 (12%), and type 18 (6%). HPV-positive carcinomas consisted of 28 squamous cell carcinomas and variants (15 nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing, 4 papillary, 5 adenosquamous, 4 basaloid), 1 small cell carcinoma, 1 sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, and 4 carcinomas that were difficult to classify but exhibited adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was positive in 59/161 (37%) cases, and p16 expression strongly correlated with the presence of HPV DNA: 33 of 34 (97%) HPV-positive tumors exhibited high p16 expression, whereas only 26 of 127 (20%) HPV-negative tumors were p16 positive (P<0.0001). The HPV-related carcinomas occurred in 19 men and 15 women ranging in age from 33 to 87 years (mean, 54 y). A trend toward improved survival was observed in the HPV-positive group (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval [0.26, 1.28]). The presence of high-risk HPV in 21% of sinonasal carcinomas confirms HPV as an important oncologic agent of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. Although nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histologic type, there is a wide morphologic spectrum of HPV-related disease that includes a variant that resembles

  3. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  4. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Sala; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Kerwat, Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:27274876

  5. TPD52L1-ROS1, a new ROS1 fusion variant in lung adenosquamous cell carcinoma identified by comprehensive genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Viola Weijia; Upadhyay, Daya; Schrock, Alexa B; Gowen, Kyle; Ali, Siraj M; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-07-01

    Crizotinib was approved for the treatment of ROS1-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in the US on 11 March, 2016. Interestingly no one companion diagnostic test (CDx) has been approved simultaneously with this approval of crizotinib. Hence, an ideal and adequate CDx will have to be able to identify ROS1 fusions without the knowledge of the fusion partners to ROS1, and as to date there are 13 fusion partners reported for ROS1 in NSCLC. Here we report a novel TPD52L1-ROS1 fusion variant in NSCLC. This novel TPD52L1-ROS1 fusion variant is generated by the fusion of exons 1-3 of TPD52L1 on chromosome 6q22-23 to the exons 33-43 of ROS1 on chromosome 6q22, likely from an intra-chromosomal deletion and subsequent fusion event similar to the generation of EML4-ALK. The predicted TPD52L1-ROS1 protein product contains 655 amino acids comprising of the N-terminal amino acids 1-95 of TPD52L1 and C-terminal amino acids of 1789-2348 of ROS1. In summary, TPD52L1-ROS1 is a novel ROS1 fusion variant in NSCLC identified by comprehensive genomic profiling and should be included in any ROS1 detecting assays that depend on identifying the corresponding fusion partners, such as reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PMID:27237027

  6. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  7. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26464570

  8. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  9. Cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kecheng; Yang, Daming

    2013-01-01

    The procedure of pancreatic cryosurgery is performed with intraoperative or percutaneous approaches. Based on current data and our initial experience, cryoablation appears to be a feasible, potentially safe and promising option in patients with locally advanced and unresectable pancreatic cancer. It is suggested that there are almost no known contraindications to the use of cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer. For most patients with pancreatic cancer, cryosurgery can substitute conventional surgery. PMID:25083453

  10. Human pancreatic cancer fusion 2 (HPC2) 1-B3: a novel monoclonal antibody to screen for pancreatic ductal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Terry K; Hardiman, Karin; Corless, Christopher L; White, Sandra L; Bonnah, Robert; Van de Vrugt, Henry; Sheppard, Brett C; Grompe, Markus; Cosar, Ediz F; Streeter, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is rarely detected early enough for patients to be cured. The objective of the authors was to develop a monoclonal antibody to distinguish adenocarcinoma and precancerous intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) from benign epithelium. METHODS.: Mice were immunized with human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells and monoclonal antibodies were screened against a panel of archived pancreatic tissue sections, including pancreatitis (23 cases), grade 1 IPMN (16 cases), grade 2 IPMN (9 cases), grade 3 IPMN (13 cases), and various grades of adenocarcinoma (17 cases). One monoclonal antibody, human pancreatic cancer fusion 2 (HPC2) 1-B3, which specifically immunostained adenocarcinoma and all grades of IPMN, was isolated. Subsequently, HPC2 1-B3 was evaluated in a retrospective series of 31 fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from clinically suspicious pancreatic lesions that had long-term clinical follow-up. RESULTS.: HPC2 1-B3 was negative in all 31 cases of chronic pancreatitis that were tested. In contrast, HPC2 1-B3 immunostained the cytoplasm and luminal surface of all 16 well- to moderately differentiated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. It demonstrated only weak focal staining of poorly differentiated carcinomas. All high-grade IPMNs were found to be positive for HPC2 1-B3. The majority of low-grade to intermediate-grade IPMNs were positive (66% of cases). Immunostaining a separate series of pancreatic FNA cell blocks for HPC2 1-B3 demonstrated that the relative risk for detecting at least low-grade dysplasia (2.0 [95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.26]) was statistically significant (P = .002 by the Fisher exact test). CONCLUSIONS.: To reduce the mortality of pancreatic cancer, more effective early screening methods are necessary. The data from the current study indicate that a novel monoclonal antibody, HPC2 1-B3, may facilitate the diagnosis of early pancreatic dysplasia. PMID:22811080

  11. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body's immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli—like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells—and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. HP often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of HP patients to develop pancreatic cancer. PMID:24600409

  12. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  14. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  15. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas. PMID:26957034

  16. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  17. Vitamin D Receptor Signaling and Pancreatic Cancer Cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of human malignancies. Even in patients who undergo resection, long-term survival rates remain extremely low. A major contributor to the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a physiologic process of morphological and genetic changes in carcinoma cells from an epithelial phenotype to a mesenchymal phenotype, which is the basis of the high metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells. EMT is triggered by various tumor microenvironmental factors, including cytokines, growth factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. This review highlights the growing evidence of the effect of EMT on pancreatic cancer progression, focusing on the interaction of EMT with other pathways central to cancer progression, especially vitamin D receptor signaling. Studies of the signaling pathways that lead to the inactivation of EMT programs during these disease processes are providing new insights into the plasticity of cellular phenotypes and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25506892

  18. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  19. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  2. Changes in pancreatic morphology associated with aging

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, Louis; Sandin, Brenda

    1973-01-01

    Retrograde pancreatography has been carried out at necropsy in 120 cases and the results have been analysed in statistical detail. With increasing age, changes in pancreatic anatomy occur which must not be taken to indicate pathology. These changes are: (1) low or ptotic position of the pancreas so that the papilla of Vater is below the level of L3; (2) calcification of the splenic and superior mesenteric arteries which produce calcific densities around the pancreas; (3) increasing width of main pancreatic duct along its whole length at about 8% per decade; in the elderly, widths of 1 cm can occur in the main duct in the head of the pancreas without evidence of obstruction; (4) formation of ductular ectasia which affects mainly the interlobular ductules but also intralobular ductules; (5) some ectatic ducts reach the dimensions of cysts, ie, 1-2 cm in diameter. Other morphological changes which have been demonstrated and which may produce difficulties in radiological interpretation are: (a) narrowed ducts not due to stricture; (b) space-occupying lesions due to superior mesenteric artery, splenic artery, aorta, vertebral osteophytes, sympathetic ganglion, and lymph nodes; (c) metastases in the pancreas—these must be distinguished from primary pancreatic carcinoma. The implications of these findings for endoscopy and isotope pancreatic scanning will be mentioned. ImagesFig 3Fig 1Fig 4aFig 4bFig 5Fig 7 (a and b) PMID:4785285

  3. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  4. English language version of the S3-consensus guidelines on chronic pancreatitis: Definition, aetiology, diagnostic examinations, medical, endoscopic and surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, A; Mayerle, J; Beglinger, C; Büchler, M W; Bufler, P; Dathe, K; Fölsch, U R; Friess, H; Izbicki, J; Kahl, S; Klar, E; Keller, J; Knoefel, W T; Layer, P; Loehr, M; Meier, R; Riemann, J F; Rünzi, M; Schmid, R M; Schreyer, A; Tribl, B; Werner, J; Witt, H; Mössner, J; Lerch, M M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas in which recurrent inflammatory episodes result in replacement of pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous connective tissue. This fibrotic reorganization of the pancreas leads to a progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, characteristic complications arise, such as pseudocysts, pancreatic duct obstructions, duodenal obstruction, vascular complications, obstruction of the bile ducts, malnutrition and pain syndrome. Pain presents as the main symptom of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic carcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis significantly reduces the quality of life and the life expectancy of affected patients. These guidelines were researched and compiled by 74 representatives from 11 learned societies and their intention is to serve evidence-based professional training as well as continuing education. On this basis they shall improve the medical care of affected patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Chronic pancreatitis requires an adequate diagnostic workup and systematic management, given its severity, frequency, chronicity, and negative impact on the quality of life and life expectancy. PMID:26666283

  5. Pancreatic Schwannoma - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    R, Sathyalakshmi; K, Chandramouleeswari; Devi, Nalli R. Sumitra

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic schwannomas are rare neoplasms. Only 47 cases have been reported in literature as of date. Age group that is commonly involved varies between the range of 20-87 years, with an almost equal sex ratio. Tumour size ranges from 1-20 cm. Locations where schwannomas can be encountered in the pancreas are in the vast majority, the head and body, the incidence being: head-40 %, junction of head and body-6 %, body-21 %, body and tail-15 %, tail-4 % and uncinate process-13 %, 60 % of the tumours are cystic, the rest being solid tumours. We hereby report a case where in total gastrectomy with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was done for carcinoma stomach involving the stomach bed and pancreatic schwannoma was an incidental finding in this case. PMID:25177575

  6. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  7. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  8. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H.; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D.; Tuveson, David

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  9. Sclerosing cholecystitis associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tu, Yuyang; Nakajima, Hitoshi; Egawa, Naoto; Tsuruta, Kouji; Okamoto, Atsutake; Horiguchi, Shinichirou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histopathological and radiological findings of the gallbladder in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). METHODS: The radiological findings of the gallbladder of 19 AIP patients were retrospectively reviewed. Resected gallbladders of 8 AIP patients were examined histologically and were immunostained with anti-IgG4 antibody. Controls consisted of gallbladders resected for symptomatic gallstones (n = 10) and those removed during pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10), as well as extrahepatic bile ducts and pancreases removed by pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10). RESULTS: Thickening of the gallbladder wall was detected by ultrasound and/or computed tomography in 10 patients with AIP (3 severe and 7 moderate); in these patients severe stenosis of the extrahepatic bile duct was also noted. Histologically, thickening of the gallbladder was detected in 6 of 8 (75%) patients with AIP; 4 cases had transmural lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosis, and 2 cases had mucosal-based lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Considerable transmural thickening of the extrahepatic bile duct wall with dense fibrosis and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was detected in 7 patients. Immunohistochemically, severe or moderate infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in the gallbladder, bile duct, and pancreas of all 8 patients, but was not detected in controls. CONCLUSION: Gallbladder wall thickening with fibrosis and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is frequently detected in patients with AIP. We propose the use of a new term, sclerosing cholecystitis, for these cases that are induced by the same mechanism as sclerosing pancreatitis or sclerosing cholangitis in AIP. PMID:16773691

  10. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with small intestinal malignancy and cervical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Jie; Wang, Zhi-Qing; Wu, Bao-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of 30-year-old woman with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Because of small intestinal obstruction, she received the small intestinal polypectomy in 2001, and the pathological diagnosis was Peutz-Jeghers polyp canceration (mucinous adenocarcinoma, infiltrating full-thickness of the intestine). The patient did not feel uncomfortable after 6 mo of chemotherapy and other management. We kept a follow-up study on her and found that she suffered from cervical cancer in 2007, with a pathological diagnosis of cervical adenosquamous carcinoma.The patient presented with typical features of PJS, but without a family history. The PJS accompanied with both small intestinal and cervical malignancies has not been reported so far in the world. PMID:19109876

  11. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  12. Primary resection versus neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by resection for locally resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic carcinoma without distant metastasis. A multi-centre prospectively randomised phase II-study of the Interdisciplinary Working Group Gastrointestinal Tumours (AIO, ARO, and CAO)

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Thomas B; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Meyer, Thomas; Golcher, Henriette; Sauer, Rolf; Hohenberger, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Background The disappointing results of surgical therapy alone of ductal pancreatic cancer can only be improved using multimodal approaches. In contrast to adjuvant therapy, neoadjuvant chemoradiation is able to facilitate resectability with free margins and to lower lymphatic spread. Another advantage is better tolerability which consecutively allows applying multimodal treatment in a higher number of patients. Furthermore, the synopsis of the overall survival results of neoadjuvant trials suggests a higher rate compared to adjuvant trials. Methods/Design As there are no prospectively randomised studies for neoadjuvant therapy, the Interdisciplinary Study Group of Gastrointestinal Tumours of the German Cancer Aid has started such a trial. The study investigates the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally resectable or probably resectable cancer of the pancreatic head without distant metastasis on median overall survival time compared to primary surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is integrated into both arms. Discussion The protocol of the study is presented in condensed form after an introducing survey on adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:17338829

  13. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  16. Multimodality treatment of recurrent pancreatic cancer: Mith or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Sperti, Cosimo; Moletta, Lucia; Merigliano, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment, but most patients present at diagnosis with unresectable or metastatic disease. Moreover, even with an R0 resection, the majority of patients will die of disease recurrence. Most recurrences occur in the first 2-year after pancreatic resection, and are commonly located in the abdomen, even if distant metastases can occur. Recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains a significant therapeutic challenge, due to the limited role of surgery and radio-chemotherapy. Surgical management of recurrence is usually unreliable because tumor relapse typically presents as a technically unresectable, or as multifocal disease with an aggressive growth. Therefore, treatment of patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma has historically been limited to palliative chemotherapy or supportive care. Only few data are available in the Literature about this issue, even if in recent years more studies have been published to determine whether treatment after recurrence have any effect on patients outcome. Recent therapeutic advances have demonstrated the potential to improve survival in selected patients who had undergone resection for pancreatic cancer. Multimodality management of recurrent pancreatic carcinoma may lead to better survival and quality of life in a small but significant percentage of patients; however, more and larger studies are needed to clarify the role of the different therapeutic options and the optimal way to combine them. PMID:26689800

  17. Post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arata, Shinju; Takada, Tadahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Hirota, Morihisa; Yokoe, Masamichi; Hirota, Masahiko; Kiriyama, Seiki; Sekimoto, Miho; Amano, Hodaka; Wada, Keita; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Gabata, Toshifumi; Takeda, Kazunori; Kataoka, Keisho; Ito, Tetsuhide; Tanaka, Masao

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis remains the most common severe complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Detailed information about the findings of previous studies concerning post-ERCP pancreatitis has not been utilized sufficiently. The purpose of the present article was to present guidelines for the diagnostic criteria of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and its incidence, risk factors, and prophylactic procedures that are supported by evidence. To achieve this purpose, a critical examination was made of the articles on post-ERCP pancreatitis, based on the data obtained by research studies published up to 2009. At present, there are no standardized diagnostic criteria for post-ERCP pancreatitis. It is appropriate that post-ERCP pancreatitis is defined as acute pancreatitis that has developed following ERCP, and its diagnosis and severity assessment should be made according to the diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The incidence of acute pancreatitis associated with diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP is 0.4-1.5 and 1.6-5.4%, respectively. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation is associated with a high risk of acute pancreatitis compared with endoscopic sphincterotomy. It was made clear that important risk factors include dysfunction of the Oddi sphincter, being of the female sex, past history of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and performance of pancreaticography. Temporary prophylactic placement of pancreatic stents in the high-risk group is useful for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis [odds ratio (OR) 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-6.4, number needed to treat (NNT) 10]. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with a reduction in the development of post-ERCP pancreatitis (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.32-0.65). Single rectal administration of NSAIDs is useful for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis [relative risk (RR) 0.36, 95% CI 0.22-0.60, NNT 15] and decreases the

  18. Detection of Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in PET-CT in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Fendrich, Volker; Schneider, Ralph; Maitra, Anirban; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Opfermann, Thomas; Bartsch, Detlef K

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is among the most dismal of human malignancies. The 5-year survival rate is lower than 5%. The identification of precursor lesions would be the main step to improve this fatal outcome. One precursor lesions are called pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and are graduated in grade 1 to 3, whereas grade 3 is classified as carcinoma in situ. Currently, no reliable, noninvasive imaging technique (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnet resonance imaging) exists to verify PanINs. Methods Recently, a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer was established in which the tumor progression of human pancreatic carcinoma is reproduced. These so-called Pdx-1-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H/+mice develop PanINs, which transform to invasive growing pancreatic carcinoma. The pancreata of mice of different ages were immunohistochemically stained using α-GLUT-2 antibodies. Furthermore, mice underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to evaluate early detection of PanIN lesions. Results An expression of GLUT-2 in murine PanINs was found in PanINs of grade 1B and higher. This finding is associated with an elevated glucose metabolism, leading to the detection of precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer in the FDG PET-CT scan. In addition, immunohistochemical staining of GLUT-2 was detectable in 45 (75%) of 60 human PanINs, whereas PanINs of grade 1B and higher showed a very extensive expression. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that an elevated glucose metabolism occurs already in precursor lesions of murine and human pancreatic carcinoma. These findings are the basis for the detection of precursor lesions by PET-CT, thereby helping improving the prognosis of this devastating disease. PMID:21403843

  19. Expression and Diagnostic Value of HE4 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianhe; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Qin, Liangyi; Senkowski, Christopher; Lyle, Christian; Terry, Karen; Brower, Steven; Chen, Haibin; Glasgow, Wayne; Wei, Yongchang; Li, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a recognized biomarker in ovarian and endometrial cancer and over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The diagnostic value of HE4 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains unknown. Here we elucidate mRNA, protein and serum level of HE4 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. HE4 mRNA level in tumor adjacent tissues and pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues were tested by real time-PCR. Tissue microarray containing normal, adenocarcinoma, and adjacent pancreatic tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Serum level of HE4, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) were detected by ELISA assay in control and tumor patients. Further we compared the sensitivity and specificity of determining HE4, CA19-9, CA15-3, and CA125 for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and assessed the complementary diagnostic value of HE4, CA19-9, CA15-3 and CA125. Real time PCR showed significantly increased HE4 mRNA level in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with control. Result of IHC showed that HE4 significantly higher expressed in the human pancreatic carcinoma tissues than in both normal and adjacent non-tumorous pancreatic tissues, and the staining intensity is inversely correlated with the clinical stage. HE4 was highly expressed in early stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Serum HE4 level is higher in cases with pancreatic adenocarcinoma than in the controls. Serum HE4 levels could research to a sensitivity of 45.83% and specificity of 93.75% when the Cutoff was set at 4.59 ng/mL. The Combined HE4 and CA19-9 increased the sensitivity to 83.33%; and interestingly, the combination of HE4 with CA15-3 led to the most powerful sensitivity of 87.5%. Combined with CA19-9 and CA15-3, HE4 could be a potential biomarker to improve the diagnostic power for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:25642754

  20. The role of positron emission tomography in the detection of pancreatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrota, A.; Duquesnoy, N.; Paraf, A.; Kellershohn, C.

    1982-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess possible pancreatic disease in 100 patients. Following injection of 10-15 mCi (370-740 MBq) of /sup 11/C-L-methionine, 4-12 transverse sections 2 cm thick were obtained. In 85 patients with a definite diagnosis (45 normal, 9 acute pancreatitis, 18 chronic pancreatitis, and 13 cancer), PET showed a sensitivity of 85.0%, a specificity of 97.8%, and an accuracy of 91.8%, higher than with transmission computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography, despite relatively low spatial resolution; this can be explained by the fact that exocrine pancreatic function was altered prior to morphological change. In 22 normal subjects, 0.011 +/- 0.003% (mean +/- S.D.) of injected /sup 11/C was found in 1 ml of liver tissue and 0.015 +/- 0.005% in 1 ml of pancreatic tissue; the pancreas-to-liver concentration ratio was 1.3 +/- 0.4. Hepatic /sup 11/C concentration was identical in the four groups of patients. Pancreatic uptake of /sup 11/C-L-methionine was significantly lower in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 13) and pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10) (p <0.001); however, it was not possible to distinguish cancer from chronic pancreatitis because the same functional alteration occurred in both.

  1. The role of positron emission tomography in the detection of pancreatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrota, A.; Duquesnoy, N.; Paraf, A.; Kellershohn, C.

    1982-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess possible pancreatic disease in 100 patients. Following injection of 10-15 mCi (370-740 MBq) of 11C-L-methionine, 4-12 transverse sections 2 cm thick were obtained. In 85 patients with a definite diagnosis (45 normal, 9 acute pancreatitis, 18 chronic pancreatitis, and 13 cancer), PET showed a sensitivity of 85.0%, a specificity of 97.8%, and an accuracy of 91.8%, higher than with transmission computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography, despite relatively low spatial resolution; this can be explained by the fact that exocrine pancreatic function was altered prior to morphological change. In 22 normal subjects, 0.011 +/- 0.003% (mean +/- S.D). of injected 11C was found in 1 ml of liver tissue and 0.015 +/- 0.005% in 1 ml of pancreatic tissue; the pancreas-to-liver concentration ratio was 1.3 +/- 0.4. Hepatic 11C concentration was identical in the four groups of patients. Pancreatic uptake of 11C-L-methionine was significantly lower in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n . 13) and pancreatic carcinoma (n . 10) (p less than 0.001); however, it was not possible to distinguish cancer from chronic pancreatitis because the same functional alteration occurred in both.

  2. CAM 17.1--a new diagnostic marker in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gansauge, F.; Gansauge, S.; Parker, N.; Beger, M. I.; Poch, B.; Link, K. H.; Safi, F.; Beger, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    CAM 17.1-Ab is a recently described monoclonal antibody that detects a mucus glycoprotein with high specificity for intestinal mucus, particularly in the colon, small intestine, biliary tract and pancreas. We investigated the expression and release of CAM 17.1 in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and tissue specimens of normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. CAM 17.1 was weakly expressed on normal ductal cells and chronic pancreatitis, whereas it was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Serum analysis using a new enzyme-linked antibody sandwich assay (CAM 17.1/WGA) of patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer or other gastrointestinal cancer and of healthy blood donors revealed a high sensitivity (67%) and excellent specificity (90%) of CAM 17.1/WGA assay in pancreatic cancer. In comparison with the tumour marker CA19-9, the sensitivity of the CAM 17.1/WGA assay was similar to the sensitivity of CA 19-9 (67% and 76%, P = 0.22), whereas the specificity of CAM 17.1/WGA assay was higher than in CA 19-9 (90% compared with 78% in chronic pancreatitis, P > 0.05). Images Figure 2 PMID:8980403

  3. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  4. Acute pancreatitis associated with pegylated interferon-alpha-2a therapy in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Wook; Lee, June Sung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Jung Wook; Bae, Won Ki; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jung Gon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Combination therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) is a current standard treatment for chronic HCV infection in Korea, which has considerable adverse effects. Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of PEG-IFN-α administration. We report a case of a 62-year-old female who experienced acute pancreatitis after 4 weeks of PEG-IFN-α-2a and RBV combination therapy for chronic HCV infection. The main cause of the acute pancreatitis in this case was probably PEG-IFN-α rather than RBV for several reasons. A few cases have been reported in which acute pancreatitis occurred during treatment with PEG-IFN-α-2b. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis associated with PEG-IFN-α-2a in Korea. PMID:27044768

  5. Regulation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin expression by C/EBPβ in lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, PI-XIAN; CHANG, JING-XIA; XIE, JIAN-JUN; YUAN, HUA-MIN; DU, ZE-PENG; ZHANG, FA-REN; LÜ, ZHUO; XU, LI-YAN; LI1, EN-MIN

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a member of the lipocalin family, has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors, including lung adenocarcinomas. However, the mechanism by which NGAL expression is regulated in lung carcinoma needs further evaluation. In this study, immunohistochemistry was employed to analyze the expression of NGAL in lung carcinoma tissue samples, including lung squamous carcinomas, adenocarcinomas, adenosquamous carcinomas and bronchial alveolar cell carcinomas. The results showed that NGAL was expressed in 82.61% (19/23) of the samples. RT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that NGAL was localized to the cytoplasm in lung carcinoma cell lines. To explore the transcriptional regulation mechanism of NGAL basal expression in lung carcinoma, a 1515-bp fragment (−1431 to +84) of the NGAL promoter region was cloned and a series of deletion and mutation constructs were generated. These constructs were analyzed using the luciferase reporter assay. The results indicated that the cis-acting elements important for the basal activity of NGAL transcription were likely located between −152 and −141. Further analysis using site-directed mutagenesis and the luciferase reporter assay suggested that the C/EBP binding sites were responsible for the activity of the NGAL promoter. Finally, the binding ability and specificity of the transcription factors were determined by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). The results showed that C/EBPβ was able to bind to the −152 and −141 segments. Taken together, these findings suggest that NGAL is expressed in lung carcinomas and that NGAL expression is mediated by the binding of C/EBPβ to the −152 and −141 segment of the NGAL promoter. PMID:23162623

  6. Specific Antigen in Serum of Patients with Colon Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Herlyn, Meenhard; Steplewski, Zenon; Sears, Henry F.

    1981-04-01

    The binding of monoclonal antibody specific for colon carcinoma was inhibited by serum from patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon but not by serum from patients with other bowel diseases or from healthy volunteers. Of other malignancies studied, serum from two patients with gastric carcinoma and two patients with pancreatic carcinoma also inhibited the specific binding of monoclonal antibody. The levels of carcinoembryonic antigen in these serum samples were not correlated with their levels of binding inhibition. Such monoclonal antibodies may prove useful for the detection of colorectal carcinoma.

  7. Whole-exome sequencing of pancreatic cancer defines genetic diversity and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Balaji, Uthra; Baek, GuemHee; Lin, Wan-Chi; Mansour, John; Mollaee, Mehri; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Koduru, Prasad; Yopp, Adam; Choti, Michael A.; Yeo, Charles J.; McCue, Peter; White, Michael A.; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a dismal prognosis and insights into both disease etiology and targeted intervention are needed. A total of 109 micro-dissected PDA cases were subjected to whole-exome sequencing. Microdissection enriches tumour cellularity and enhances mutation calling. Here we show that environmental stress and alterations in DNA repair genes associate with distinct mutation spectra. Copy number alterations target multiple tumour suppressive/oncogenic loci; however, amplification of MYC is uniquely associated with poor outcome and adenosquamous subtype. We identify multiple novel mutated genes in PDA, with select genes harbouring prognostic significance. RBM10 mutations associate with longer survival in spite of histological features of aggressive disease. KRAS mutations are observed in >90% of cases, but codon Q61 alleles are selectively associated with improved survival. Oncogenic BRAF mutations are mutually exclusive with KRAS and define sensitivity to vemurafenib in PDA models. High-frequency alterations in Wnt signalling, chromatin remodelling, Hedgehog signalling, DNA repair and cell cycle processes are observed. Together, these data delineate new genetic diversity of PDA and provide insights into prognostic determinants and therapeutic targets. PMID:25855536

  8. CD10/NEP in non-small cell lung carcinomas. Relationship to cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, R K; Sunday, M; Tsarwhas, D G; Card, A; Shipp, M A

    1994-01-01

    The cell surface metalloproteinase CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) hydrolyzes a variety of peptide substrates and reduces cellular responses to specific peptide hormones. Because CD10/NEP modulates peptide-mediated proliferation of small cell carcinomas of the lung (SCLC) and normal fetal bronchial epithelium, we evaluated the enzyme's expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Bronchoalveolar and large cell carcinoma cell lines had low levels of CD10/NEP expression whereas squamous, adenosquamous, and adenocarcinoma cell lines had higher and more variable levels of the cell surface enzyme. Regional variations in CD10/NEP immunostaining in primary NSCLC specimens prompted us to correlate CD10/NEP expression with cell growth. In primary carcinomas of the lung, clonal NSCLC cell lines and SV40-transformed fetal airway epithelium, subsets of cells expressed primarily CD10/NEP or the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cultured airway epithelial cells had the lowest levels of CD10/NEP expression when the highest percentage of cells were actively dividing; in addition, these cells grew more rapidly when cell surface CD10/NEP was inhibited. NSCLC cell lines had receptors for a variety of mitogenic peptides known to be CD10/NEP substrates, underscoring the functional significance of growth-related variability in CD10/NEP expression. Images PMID:7962523

  9. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  10. Acute Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Werlin, Steven L.

    2001-10-01

    There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain, and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone extraction in patients with biliary pancreatitis. Surgery is rarely required. The aims of treatment for patients with severe disease includes treatment of local, systemic, and septic complications in addition to those for mild and moderate disease. Homeostasis is maintained by the correction of hypocalcemia, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalances, and hypoxemia. A large number of medications have been used unsuccessfully in an attempt to halt the progression of the autodigestive process within the pancreas and to reduce pancreatic secretions. Nutritional support with either enteral or parenteral feeding is given. Intravenous antibiotics or selective bowel decontamination decrease mortality in patients with severe episodes of pancreatitis. The treatment for these individuals is often prolonged. Surgical treatment of traumatic pancreatitis with ductal rupture includes repair or resection. At times, simple drainage is performed and definitive surgery is deferred until later. Surgical treatment of severe pancreatitis includes debridement of necrotic and infected tissue. The emerging consensus appears to be that necrosectomy and local lavage or open management with planned re-exploration offers better survival than the conventional therapy of resection plus drainage alone. PMID:11560787

  11. Minnelide, a novel drug for pancreatic and liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Saluja, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 10th leading cause of all new cancer cases for men and the fourth leading cause of death across genders, having very poor prognosis and survival rates. The current standard of care Gemcitabine fails to add any survival benefit for this disease (www.cancer.gov). Though the incidence of pancreatic cancer is found to be higher in developed countries, the aggressive biology of the cancer, its high rate of recurrence and chemo-resistance make it a formidable disease in all parts of the globe. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver cancer, on the other hand affects almost 750,000 people world wide with 84% of the cases coming from underdeveloped or developing countries. Our studies show that Minnelide, a water soluble pro-drug of triptolide (active compound from a chinese herb) is very effective against a number of malignant diseases. The current study discusses the efficacy of this compound in pancreatic and liver cancer. PMID:26122306

  12. Apoptosis pathways and their therapeutic exploitation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2009-07-01

    Resistance to apoptosis (programmed cell death) is a characteristic feature of human malignancies including pancreatic cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world. Defects in this intrinsic cell death program can contribute to the multistep process of tumorigenesis, because too little cell death can disturb tissue homeostasis. Further, blockade of apoptosis pathways can cause treatment failure, because intact apoptosis signalling cascades largely mediate therapy-induced cytotoxicity. The elucidation of apoptosis pathways in pancreatic carcinoma over the last decade has resulted in the identification of various molecular defects. How apoptosis pathways can be exploited for the treatment of pancreatic cancer will be discussed in this review. PMID:19382915

  13. Apoptosis pathways and their therapeutic exploitation in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis (programmed cell death) is a characteristic feature of human malignancies including pancreatic cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world. Defects in this intrinsic cell death program can contribute to the multistep process of tumorigenesis, because too little cell death can disturb tissue homeostasis. Further, blockade of apoptosis pathways can cause treatment failure, because intact apoptosis signalling cascades largely mediate therapy-induced cytotoxicity. The elucidation of apoptosis pathways in pancreatic carcinoma over the last decade has resulted in the identification of various molecular defects. How apoptosis pathways can be exploited for the treatment of pancreatic cancer will be discussed in this review. PMID:19382915

  14. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  15. Distribution of HPV Genotype in Invasive Cervical Carcinoma and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Xian; Zhou, Jian-Song; Yuan, Shu-Hui; Yu, Hua; Lou, Han-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) are firmly established as the principal causative agent for cervical carcinoma. Current vaccines may provide some protection for women from cervical carcinoma linked to HPV genotype 16 and 18. This may be the best vaccine for Western women, but the geographical variation in HPV distributions may not make it the most appropriate vaccine for China or Asia. This study provided an observational, retrospective, hospital-based cross-sectional study on the distribution of HPV genotypes among 5410 women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Overall, the positive rates of the four HPV types included in current prophylactic vaccines were counted, the two high-risk types (HPV-16 and -18) covered by current vaccines represented 66.9% of women with squamous cancer, 55.0% with adenocarcinoma, 64.9% with adenosquamous carcinoma and 77.4% of other type ICC, as well as 59.5% of CIN III, 45.0% of CIN II and 38.1% of CIN I cases. As expected, two low-risk types (HPV-6 and -11) included in the quadrivalent vaccine did not show good coverage data. Particularly worth mentioning is the fact that the addition of HPV-52 and -58 to the vaccine cocktail would increase cancer protection in our population, potentially preventing up to beyond 16% of squamous/adenosquamous carcinoma and other type of cervical cancers, and 7.75% of adenocarcinomas. It might also potentially reduce the rate of CIN III by a further 28.6% and CIN II and I by a third. This study established the baseline for surveillance in Zhejiang Province, and provides data for further vaccine designs: a quadrivalent HPV vaccine covering HPV-16/-58/-18/-52, would be more welcome in our region in the forthcoming year compared to the currently available vaccine. PMID:26404339

  16. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology, Detection, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiubo; Zeng, Linjuan; Chen, Yinting; Lian, Guoda; Qian, Chenchen; Chen, Shaojie; Li, Jiajia; Huang, Kaihong

    2016-01-01

    PC (pancreatic cancer) is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer worldwide. The incidence and mortality rates have been increasing year by year worldwide, and this review has analyzed the most recent incidence and mortality data for pancreatic cancer occurrence in China. Several possible risk factors have been discussed here, involving known established risk factors and novel possible risk factors. The development of this cancer is a stepwise progression through intraepithelial neoplasia to carcinoma. Though early and accurate diagnosis is promising based on a combination of recent techniques including tumor markers and imaging modalities, lacking early clinical symptoms makes the diagnosis late. Correct staging is critical because treatment is generally based on this parameter. Treatment options have improved throughout the last decades. However, surgical excision remains the primary therapy and efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy for PC is limited. Recently, some novel new therapies have been developed and will be applied in clinics soon. This review will provide an overview of pancreatic cancer, including an understanding of the developments and controversies. PMID:26941789

  18. Surgical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Tezuka, Koji; Hirai, Ichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study outlines the surgical management and clinicopathological findings of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). There are various surgical options, such as enucleation of the tumor, spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, and duodenum-preserving pancreas head resection. Lymph node dissection is performed for malignant cases. New guidelines and classifications have been proposed and are now being used in clinical practice. However, there are still no clear indications for organ-preserving pancreatic resection or lymph node dissection. Hepatectomy is the first choice for liver metastases of well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma without extrahepatic metastases. On the other hand, cisplatin-based combination therapy is performed as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Other treatment options are radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolization/embolization, and liver transplantation. Systematic chemotherapy and biotherapy, such as that with somatostatin analogue and interferon-α, are used for recurrence after surgery. The precise surgical techniques for enucleation of the tumor and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy are described. PMID:21922354

  19. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  20. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  1. Prognostic significance of angiogenesis in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, N; Adachi, M; Taki, T; Huang, C; Hashida, H; Takabayashi, A; Sho, M; Nakajima, Y; Kanehiro, H; Hisanaga, M; Nakano, H; Miyake, M

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate whether angiogenic factors are of clinical relevance to actual human pancreatic cancers, we studied the intratumoral microvessel density (IMD), and PD-ECGF, VEGF protein expression in 40 pancreatic cancers using immunohistochemistry. We also investigated PD-ECGF and VEGF gene expression using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Of the 40 pancreatic cancers studied, 30 carcinomas (75.0%) were evaluated to be PD-ECGF-positive and 10 carcinomas (25.0%) were determined to be PD-ECGF-negative. In contrast, 27 carcinomas (67.5%) were evaluated to be VEGF-positive, whereas 13 carcinomas (32.5%) were VEGF-negative. VEGF gene expression was moderately associated with an increase in the IMD (r2 = 0.181, P = 0.006), but no significant relationship was found between PD-ECGF gene expression and the IMD (r2 = 0.093, P = 0.059). However, tumours with positive expression for both PD-ECGF and VEGF had a higher IMD (P = 0.027). The results of the immunohistochemistry agreed well with the results of the quantitative RT-PCR. The median survival time of the hypervascular group was significantly shorter than that of the hypovascular group (P < 0.0001). In comparing the survival according to PD-ECGF and VEGF gene expression, the median survival time of the patients with positive PD-ECGF expression was significantly shorter than those with negative PD-ECGF expression (P = 0.040). Furthermore, the median survival time of the patients with positive VEGF expression was significantly shorter than those with negative VEGF expression (P = 0.048). However, the Cox multivariate analysis indicated that the IMD and VEGF expression were independent prognostic factors of the various clinicopathologic variables in pancreatic cancer patients (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.0443, respectively). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188906

  2. GATA-3 and FOXA1 expression is useful to differentiate breast carcinoma from other carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew G; Siddiqui, Momin T; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Stevens, Keith; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Cohen, Cynthia; Li, Xiaoxian Bill

    2016-01-01

    GATA-3, a member of the GATA family of zinc-finger DNA binding proteins, and FOXA1, a member of the forkhead transcription factor family, are both associated with estrogen receptor expression. Both GATA-3 and FOXA1 are useful markers for breast carcinoma, but their expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and other neoplasms has not been thoroughly evaluated. We examined the expression of GATA-3 and FOXA1 in estrogen receptor-positive, Her2/neu-positive, and triple-negative breast carcinomas as well as in 10 other common carcinomas, including hepatocellular, colonic, pancreatic, gastric, endometrial (endometrioid), lung, prostatic, renal cell, urothelial, and ovarian serous carcinomas. Primary and metastatic melanomas and mesotheliomas were also evaluated. GATA-3 and FOXA1 staining of estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinomas was seen in 96.6% and 96.2%, respectively. In triple-negative breast carcinomas, GATA-3 and FOXA1 staining was seen in 21.6% and 15.9%, respectively. Among the other tumors, GATA-3 staining was only seen in urothelial carcinoma (70.9%) and FOXA1 staining was only seen in prostatic (87.5%), urothelial (5.1%) carcinomas, and mesotheliomas (40.0%). In conclusion, GATA-3 and FOXA1 are excellent breast carcinoma markers; however, their utility is limited in the triple-negative subtype. The utility of FOXA1 in diagnosing prostatic carcinoma and mesothelioma warrants further investigation. PMID:26527523

  3. Adrenocortical carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Adrenocortical carcinoma is a cancer of the adrenal glands . Causes Adrenocortical carcinoma is most common in children ... tumor. Symptoms Symptoms of increased cortisol or other adrenal gland hormones: Fatty, rounded hump high on the back ...

  4. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  5. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  7. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of immunosuppressive medications?" [ Top ] Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry Data In its 2010 annual report, 1 the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo- ...

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  10. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  11. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  12. What Is Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other types of cancer, such as adenosquamous carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, small cell carcinomas, and sarcomas, can ... Treatment What`s New in Gallbladder Cancer Research? Other Resources ...

  13. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  14. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  15. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S.; Rigopoulou, Eirini I.; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L.; Kriese, Stephen; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:22844291

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  18. Nutrition in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rémy F; Beglinger, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The pancreas plays a major role in nutrient digestion. Therefore, in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop, impairing digestive and absorptive processes. These changes can lead to malnutrition over time. In parallel to these changes, decreased caloric intake and increased metabolic activity are often present. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. In severe acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition with a naso-jejunal feeding tube and a low molecular diet displays clear advantages compared to parenteral nutrition. Infectious complications, length of hospital stay and the need for surgery are reduced. Furthermore, enteral nutrition is less costly than parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is reserved for patients who do not tolerate enteral nutrition. Abstinence from alcohol, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation is sufficient in over 80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. In addition, oral supplements are helpful. Enteral nutrition can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:16782526

  19. Histogenesis of pancreatic carcinogenesis in the hamster: ultrastructural evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Flaks, B

    1984-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinogenesis in the Syrian hamster, induced by beta-oxidized derivatives of N-nitroso-di-n-propylamine, constitutes a valuable model of human cancer of the exocrine pancreas. In both species the majority of tumors are adenocarcinomas: superficially, on the basis of their histological appearance, these appear to be ductal in origin. However, sequential analysis, by electron microscopy, of the development of pancreatic neoplasia in the hamster model indicates that acinar cells may participate in the histogenesis of "ductal" adenomas and carcinomas. Acinar cells appear to undergo changes in differentiation, including pseudoductular transformation, giving rise to a new population of cells that resemble ductular or centroacinar types. This new population may then proliferate to form, first, cystic foci and subsequently cystadenomas and adenocarcinomas. Mucous metaplasia appears to develop at late stages of tumor development. Although the participation of ductular and centroacinar cells in pancreatic carcinogenesis cannot be excluded, very few tumors arise from the ductal epithelium. It is possible that some human pancreatic adenocarcinomas may also have their origin from dysplastic acinar cells, by analogy with the hamster model: focal acinar dysplasia being common in human pancreatic cancer patients. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. PMID:6383797

  20. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic findings in three dogs with pancreatic insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Lim, Sue-Yee; Ochiai, Kenji; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Morishita, Keitaro; Takagi, Satoshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal ultrasonography is one of the most common diagnostic imaging modalities used for dogs with suspected insulinoma; however, pancreatic masses are clearly identified in fewer than half of affected dogs and benign pancreatic nodules can be difficult to differentiate from malignant ones. The purpose of this prospective study was to describe contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) characteristics of confirmed pancreatic insulinoma in a group of dogs. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) repeated hypoglycemia (blood glucose levels <60 mg/dl, twice or more); (2) elevated blood insulin levels with hypoglycemia; (3) pancreatic nodules detected with conventional ultrasonography; and (4) histological confirmation of pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. Immediately following conventional ultrasonography of the entire abdomen, CEUS of the pancreatic nodule and adjacent parenchyma was performed using contrast-specific technology pulse inversion imaging and perflubutane microbubble contrast agent. Three dogs met inclusion criteria. Pancreatic nodules in all the three dogs became more clearly demarcated after injection of the contrast agent. Each nodule showed different enhancement patterns: markedly hyperechoic for 5 s, slightly hyperechoic for 1 s, and clearly hypoechoic for over 30 s. These results were not in complete agreement with previously reported CEUS findings in human patients with insulinoma. All nodules were surgically resected and histopathologically confirmed as malignant insulinomas. Findings from the current study indicated that contrast-enhanced ultrasound may help to increase conspicuity of pancreatic insulinomas in dogs and that enhancement characteristics may be more variable in dogs than in humans. PMID:24846763

  1. Downregulation of lncRNA-ATB correlates with clinical progression and unfavorable prognosis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shibin; Yang, Xisheng; Song, Wenjie; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaolei; Wang, Jianlin; Zhong, Yue; Shang, Runze; Ruan, Bai; Zhang, Zhuochao; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Haimin

    2016-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical roles in the development and progression of diseases. lncRNA activated by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) (lncRNA-ATB) was discovered as a prognostic factor in hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer. However, little is known about the role of lncRNA-ATB in pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess lncRNA-ATB expression in pancreatic cancer and explore its role in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect lncRNA-ATB expression in 150 pancreatic cancer tissues and five pancreatic cancer cell lines compared to paired adjacent normal tissues and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line HPDE6c-7. The correlations between lncRNA-ATB expression and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were also analyzed. We found that lncRNA-ATB expression was decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Low lncRNA-ATB expression levels were significantly correlated with lymph node metastases (yes vs. no, P = 0.009), neural invasion (positive vs. negative, P = 0.049), and clinical stage (early stage vs. advanced stage, P = 0.014). Moreover, patients with low lncRNA-ATB expression levels exhibited markedly worse overall survival prognoses (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that decreased lncRNA-ATB expression was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer patients (P = 0.005). In conclusion, lncRNA-ATB may play a critical role in pancreatic cancer progression and prognosis and may serve as a potential prognostic biomarker in pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26482611

  2. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  4. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  5. Hypovolemic shock, pancreatic blood flow, and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Robert, J H; Toledano, A E; Toth, L S; Premus, G; Dreiling, D A

    1988-05-01

    Electromagnetic blood flow determinations were carried out on the superior pancreatic duodena (SPDA), the splenic (SA) and the superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries and compared to cardiac output (CO, thermodilution technique) in 12 anesthetized dogs submitted to hypovolemic shock of various duration: 5 dogs underwent a one-hour and 7 a three-hour period of shock. A 50 mm Hg level of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was maintained throughout hypovolemia. Dogs were then reinfused. Control preshock values were 4.12 l/min for CO, 38.0 ml/min for SPDA, 405.9 ml/min for SA, and 963.6 ml/min for SMA. SPDA, SA and SMA flows expressed as % of CO amounted to 0.9, 9.8 and 23.4% respectively. No significant changes in SPDA and SMA flows were noted within the first hour of shock. However, from the end of the second hour on, both flows differed significantly (P less than 0.01), SMA increasing from -75.6% of its control value at the end of bleeding to -61.0%, and SPDA decreasing from -75.6 to -86.9%. Similar observations were made when respective flows were considered as % of CO. The SA behaved somewhat in an intermediate fashion. This relative spoliation in pancreatic blood supply as hypovolemia proceeds supports an ischemic etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), which could account for some of the so-called idiopathic cases of AP. PMID:3385221

  6. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  7. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  8. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  9. Genetic aspects of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis are complex inflammatory disorders of the pancreas with unpredictable severity, complications, and clinical courses. Growing evidence for genetic risk and modifying factors, plus strong evidence that only a minority of patients with these disorders are heavy alcohol drinkers, has revolutionized our concept of these diseases. Once considered a self-inflicted injury, pancreatitis is now recognized as a complex inflammatory condition like inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic linkage and candidate gene studies have identified six pancreas-targeting factors that are associated with changes in susceptibility to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, including cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), serine protease inhibitor Kazal 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC) and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR). Patients with mutations in these genes are at increased risk of pancreatitis caused by a variety of stresses including hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Multiple studies are reporting new polymorphisms, as well as complex gene x gene and gene x environmental interactions. PMID:20059346

  10. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  11. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  12. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  13. Amplification of FGFR1 gene and expression of FGFR1 protein is found in different histological types of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vitor; Reis, Diana; Silva, Maria; Alarcão, Ana Maria; Ladeirinha, Ana Filipa; d'Aguiar, Maria João; Ferreira, Teresa; Caramujo-Balseiro, Sandra; Carvalho, Lina

    2016-08-01

    Although lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer-related death, accurate diagnosis followed by personalized treatment is expected to raise the 5-year survival rate. Targeted therapies are now in routine clinical use, in particular for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) has recently emerged as a molecular target, especially in squamous cell/epidermoid carcinoma (SQC) of the lung. This paper evaluates FGFR1 expression and gene copy number in adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, pleomorphic carcinomas (PLEOMC) and adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQC) of the lung and also explores the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. We studied 76 lung carcinomas: 34 ADC, 24 SQC, 10 PLEOMC and 8 ADSQC. FGFR1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Higher FGFR1 protein expression was observed in all tumour types compared to non-tumour tissue. FGFR1 expression was higher in ADC and PLEOMC than in SQC. We found a tendency to higher expression in ADC than in SQC and significantly higher expression in PLEOMC than in other histological subtypes. FISH-based amplification of FGFR1 was identified in 15 (20 %) lung carcinomas: 5 (15 %) ADC, 5 (21 %) SQC, 3 (30 %) PLEOMC and 2 (25 %) ADSQC. Amplification was more frequent in SQC without significant differences. FGFR1 protein is expressed in the majority of lung carcinomas, though it is higher in ADC and PLEOMC (the latter may reflect the importance of FGFR1 control of the EMT pathway). FGFR1 amplification was identified in all types of lung carcinoma. Although FGFR1 is most frequently amplified in SQC, other histological types merit assessment of FGFR1 amplification, in order to select patients that might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:27194548

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab Followed by Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma

  15. Stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion with invasive carcinoma: 12 cases with immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Junji; Sato, Yuichiro; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yamashita, Atsushi; Maekawa, Kazunari; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Asada, Yujiro

    2016-09-01

    Stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE) is considered to be a variant of adenocarcinoma in situ (defined as intraepithelial malignant glandular epithelium without invasion) or adenosquamous carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix. However, recent study suggested that SMILE is more similar to high-grade squamous epithelial lesion by their immunohistochemical findings. An invasive form of SMILE "invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (ISMC)" has been also proposed, but immunohistochemical features are not well documented. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the immunohistochemical characteristics of SMILE and ISMC. Twelve cases of SMILE were found among 445 patients (2.7%) with high-grade intraepithelial lesions or invasive carcinomas, 3 of whom had solely intraepithelial disease with SMILE component (mean age, 37 years; range, 30-48 years) and 9 with invasive carcinomas (mean age, 47 years; range, 37-66 years; including ISMC). Immunohistochemically, SMILE and ISMC were diffusely positive for p16 and CAM5.2, focally for IMP3, and almost negative or only focally positive for p63. Nuclear signals in SMILE and invasive carcinomas were detected by human papillomavirus (HPV) in situ hybridization; 5 cases showed HPV16 and/or HPV18 polymerase chain reaction products. The ultrastructural study of 1 case showed surface microvilli and small vacuolar structure in SMILE; ISMC had mucous-like vacuoles, many mitochondria and intracytoplasmic lumen but lacked tonofilament. These findings were more similar to adenocarcinoma in situ or adenocarcinoma than squamous intraepithelial lesion or squamous cell carcinoma. We suggest that SMILE is an intraepithelial neoplasm and ISMC is an invasive form of SMILE. PMID:27237368

  16. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Pancreas: Mystery and Facts.

    PubMed

    Raghavapuram, Saikiran; Vaid, Arjun; Rego, Rayburn F

    2015-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is very rare as pancreas does not have any squamous cells. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. We describe such a case where in the patient presented with painless jaundice. CT and EUS confirmed the pancreatic mass biopsy of which showed squamous cell cancer. PMID:26376556

  17. Pancreatitis activates pancreatic apelin-APJ axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song; Englander, Ella W.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Aronson, Judith F.; Rastellini, Cristiana; Garofalo, R. P.; Kolli, Deepthi; Quertermous, Thomas; Kundu, Ramendra

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatitis is classified into acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Apelin, a small regulatory peptide, is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin and APJ are expressed in the pancreas. The aims of this study were to examine whether apelin influences the inflammatory and fibrosis responses to pancreatitis in mice and to identify mechanisms behind apelin's activities. Supramaximal cerulein induction of AP or CP caused significant (P < 0.05) elevations in pancreatic apelin and APJ expression. Levels declined during the recovery phases. In apelin gene-knockout mice with pancreatitis, pancreatic neutrophil invasion and myeloperoxidase activity were enhanced significantly, and apelin treatment suppressed both. Apelin exposure reduced CP-induced elevations of extracellular matrix-associated proteins. Apelin inhibited PDGF-simulated connective tissue growth factor production and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte cytokine levels were higher in apelin gene-knockout than wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Apelin reduced AP- and CP-induced elevations in pancreatic NF-κB activation. Together, these findings imply that the pancreatic apelin-APJ system functions to curb the inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. Furthermore, findings suggest that apelin reduces inflammation and fibrosis by reducing neutrophil recruitment and PSC activity. Inhibition of neutrophil invasion may be mediated by reduced keratinocyte cytokine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor secretion. Apelin-induced reductions in PSC proliferation and connective tissue growth factor production are putative mechanisms underlying apelin's inhibition of extracellular matrix production. The apelin-associated changes in NF-κB binding may be linked to apelin's regulation of pancreatic inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. PMID:23681476

  18. Pancreatitis activates pancreatic apelin-APJ axis in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Gomez, Guillermo A; Aronson, Judith F; Rastellini, Cristiana; Garofalo, R P; Kolli, Deepthi; Quertermous, Thomas; Kundu, Ramendra; Greeley, George H

    2013-07-15

    Pancreatitis is classified into acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Apelin, a small regulatory peptide, is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin and APJ are expressed in the pancreas. The aims of this study were to examine whether apelin influences the inflammatory and fibrosis responses to pancreatitis in mice and to identify mechanisms behind apelin's activities. Supramaximal cerulein induction of AP or CP caused significant (P < 0.05) elevations in pancreatic apelin and APJ expression. Levels declined during the recovery phases. In apelin gene-knockout mice with pancreatitis, pancreatic neutrophil invasion and myeloperoxidase activity were enhanced significantly, and apelin treatment suppressed both. Apelin exposure reduced CP-induced elevations of extracellular matrix-associated proteins. Apelin inhibited PDGF-simulated connective tissue growth factor production and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte cytokine levels were higher in apelin gene-knockout than wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Apelin reduced AP- and CP-induced elevations in pancreatic NF-κB activation. Together, these findings imply that the pancreatic apelin-APJ system functions to curb the inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. Furthermore, findings suggest that apelin reduces inflammation and fibrosis by reducing neutrophil recruitment and PSC activity. Inhibition of neutrophil invasion may be mediated by reduced keratinocyte cytokine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor secretion. Apelin-induced reductions in PSC proliferation and connective tissue growth factor production are putative mechanisms underlying apelin's inhibition of extracellular matrix production. The apelin-associated changes in NF-κB binding may be linked to apelin's regulation of pancreatic inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. PMID:23681476

  19. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs. PMID:22314811

  20. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  1. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  2. Pathogenic Microorganisms and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunsaier; Li, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Accumulating reports have demonstrated that there is an association between pathogenic microorganisms and pancreatic cancer. Summary A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that microbiota are likely to influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the literature on studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer. Key Message Helicobacter pylori infection may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer; chronic hepatitis virus and oral microbiota may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Practical Implications Considering the worldwide burden of the disease, the association between microbiota and pancreatic cancer in this review may provide new ideas to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies in this direction are urgently needed. PMID:26673459

  3. Enzymatic Debridement in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat; Tekin, Ahmet; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Vatansev, Husamettin; Kartal, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ failure and pancreatic necrosis are the factors that determine prognosis in acute pancreatitis attacks. We investigated the effects of collagenase on the debridement of experimental pancreatic necrosis. The study covered 4 groups; each group had 10 rats. Group I was the necrotizing pancreatitis group. Group II was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge by isotonic irrigation following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group III was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group IV was the intraperitoneal collagenase group following necrotizing pancreatitis. The progress of the groups was compared hematologically and histopathologically. There was no difference among the groups regarding the levels of leukocyte, hemogram, and urea. The differences in AST levels between Group I and II; and differences in glucose, calcium, LDH, AST, and amylase between Group II and III; between Group II and IV; between Group I and III; and between Group I and IV were statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between Group II and III, and Group II and IV regarding edema, acinar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the collagenase preparation used in this experimental pancreatitis model was found to be effective in the debridement of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:26011212

  4. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  5. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-08-15

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  6. Pancreatic lipoma with a solid nodule mimicking invasion from adjoining intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Yoko; Maeda, Eriko; Gonoi, Wataru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ikemura, Masako; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-06-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital for a mass in the pancreatic head found during screening chest computed tomography. Contrast computed tomography showed a 5-cm multicystic mass with an irregular border containing a solid component showing contrast enhancement. Caudal to this mass, a 5-cm solid mass of fat density with a nodular soft-tissue component was found. Cytology of the aspirated pancreatic fluid revealed malignant cells, and surgery was performed for suspected intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma. Pathologic analysis of the resected specimen revealed a collision tumor of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia and pancreatic lipoma. The soft-tissue component within the lipoma was a nodule consisting of pancreatic tissue with inflammatory infiltration and hyalinization and was not associated with IPMN invasion. PMID:27257448

  7. Imaging of surgical margin in pancreatic metastasis using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, has become a powerful tool for imaging unstained tissue samples at subcellular level in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without H-E staining can be used to identify the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The typical features such as the significant increase of cancerous nests, the absence of pancreatic ductal, the appearance of cancer cells were observed to present the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from RCC. These results correlated well with the corresponding histological outcomes. With the advent of clinically miniaturized TPEF microscopy and integrative endoscopy, TPEF microscopy has the potential application on surgical location of pancreatic metastasis from RCC in the near future.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  9. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390

  10. Heat shock protein 70 increases tumorigenicity and inhibits apoptosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Ali; Phillips, Phoebe; Dudeja, Vikas; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara; Sharif, Rifat; Dawra, Rajinder; Lerch, Markus M; Saluja, Ashok

    2007-01-15

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a malignant disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy because of its resistance to apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are not only cytoprotective but also interfere with the apoptotic cascade. Here, we investigated the role of Hsp70 in regulating apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Hsp70 expression was increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal pancreatic ductal cells. This was confirmed by increased mRNA levels for Hsp70 in human pancreatic cancer tissue compared with neighboring normal tissue from the same patient. Depletion of Hsp70 by quercetin decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal pancreatic ductal cells. To show that this is a specific effect of Hsp70 on apoptosis, levels of Hsp70 were knocked down by short interfering RNA treatment, which also induced apoptosis in cancer cells as indicated by Annexin V staining and caspase activation. Daily administration of quercetin to nude mice decreased tumor size as well as Hsp70 levels in tumor tissue. These findings indicate that Hsp70 plays an important role in apoptosis and that selective Hsp70 knockdown can be used to induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:17234771

  11. Chinese herb derived-Rocaglamide A is a potent inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baochun; Li, Yixiong; Tan, Fengbo; Xiao, Zhanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks No.1 in mortality rate worldwide. This study aims to identify the novel anti-pancreatic cancer drugs. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines were purchased from ATCC. CPE-based screening assay was used to examine the cell viability. Patient derived tumor xenografts in SCID mice was established. The Caspase-3 and 7 activities were measured using the Caspase Glo 3/7 Assay kit. Soft agar colony formation assay was used to evaluate the colony formation. Wound healing assay was employed to determine the cell migration. We screened a Chinese herbal product library and found three “hits” that kill cancer cells at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. One of these compounds, rocaglamide, was found to be potent inhibitors of a wide spectrum of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Rocaglamide reduced the tumor size in a patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model without noticeable toxicity in vivo. Rocaglamide also inhibits pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these data support that Rocaglamide may be a promising anti-pancreatic cancer drug. PMID:27158390

  12. GSH2 promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer analyzed by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    GAO, FEI; HUANG, HAO-JIE; GAO, JUN; LI, ZHAO-SHEN; MA, SHU-REN

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene silencing via promoter hypermethylation is an important event in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation events are highly tumor specific, and may provide a diagnostic tool for pancreatic cancer patients. The objective of the current study was to identify novel methylation-related genes that may potentially be used to establish novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies against pancreatic cancer. The methylation status of the GS homeobox 2 (GSH2) gene was analyzed using the sodium bisulfite sequencing method. The GSH2 methylation ratio was examined in primary carcinomas and corresponding normal tissues derived from 47 patients with pancreatic cancer, using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Methylation ratios were found to be associated with the patient's clinicopathological features. GSH2 gene methylation was detected in 26 (55.3%) of the 47 pancreatic cancer patients, indicating that it occurs frequently in pancreatic cancer. A significant association with methylation was observed for tumor-node-metastasis stage (P=0.031). GSH2 may be a novel methylation-sensitive tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer and may be a tumor-specific biomarker of the disease. PMID:26171036

  13. A case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN).

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yuichi; Nakamichi, Rei; Kamata, Noriko; Miyake, Hideo; Fujino, Masahiko; Itoh, Shigeki

    2015-03-01

    We report here a rare case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. In an 80-year-old woman, an approximately 8-mm papillary mass was incidentally detected at the downstream edge of a dilatated main pancreatic duct lumen on CT and MRI. Main pancreatic duct dilatation in the pancreatic body and tail and parenchymal atrophy were observed in the upstream of the mass. Histopathologically, the tumor protruded into the downstream edge of the dilatated main pancreatic duct lumen in the pancreatic body. The tumor cells had highly atypical nuclei and abundant polymorphic structures, and showed positive staining for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which led to the diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma. A total of 13 cases of undifferentiated carcinoma with intraductal tumor growth have been reported to date. The case report by Bergmann et al. has been the smallest in histopathological specimen, and the present case is the smallest in size detected by radiological images. Since early undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas can resemble those of main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in cross-sectional images, we have to consider undifferentiated carcinoma in the differential diagnosis of the solitary and papillary mass with low contrast enhancement in early phase in the main pancreatic duct. PMID:25526684

  14. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis—as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  15. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  16. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  17. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938

  18. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  19. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  20. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  2. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Breast Carcinoma With Unrecognized Neuroendocrine Differentiation Metastasizing to the Pancreas: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lene; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-08-01

    The current World Health Organization classification recognizes 3 subtypes of breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. Their reported prevalence is highly variable, ranging from <1% to up to 20% of all breast carcinomas. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who underwent lumpectomy with a postoperative diagnosis of invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Six weeks after lumpectomy, pancreatic biopsies showed tumor cells with neuroendocrine features. The first immunohistochemical panel showed positivity for synaptophysin and cytokeratins, raising suspicion of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. However, a second panel revealed positivity for estrogen receptors and GATA3. On review of the lumpectomy specimen, a significant neuroendocrine component was found, leading to the final diagnosis of breast carcinoma with neuroendocrine features metastasizing to the pancreas. Neuroendocrine markers are not routinely analyzed in breast tumors. Hence, metastases from breast carcinomas with unrecognized neuroendocrine features may lead to false diagnoses of primary neuroendocrine tumors at different metastatic sites, such as the pancreas. PMID:26912472

  4. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  5. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  6. Periampullary and Pancreatic Incidentaloma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jordan M.; Cameron, John L.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Chang, David; Riall, Taylor S.; Coleman, JoAnn; Sauter, Patricia K.; Canto, Marcia; Hruban, Ralph H.; Schulick, Richard D.; Choti, Michael A.; Yeo, Charles J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: While incidental masses in certain organs have received particular attention, periampullary and pancreatic incidentalomas (PIs) remain poorly characterized. Methods: We reviewed 1944 consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies (PD) over an 8-year period (April 1997 to October 2005). A total of 118 patients (6% of all PDs) presented with an incidental finding of a periampullary or pancreatic mass. The PI patients were analyzed and compared with the rest of the cohort (NI, nonincidentaloma group, n = 1826). Results: Thirty-one percent of the PI patients (n = 37) had malignant disease (versus 76% of the NI patients, P < 0.001), 47% (n = 55) had premalignant disease, and the remaining 22% (n = 26) had little or no risk for malignant progression. The 3 most common diagnoses in the PI group were IPMN without invasive cancer (30%), cystadenoma (17%), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (10%). The PI group had a higher overall complication rate (55% versus 43%, P = 0.02), due in part to a significantly increased rate of pancreatic fistulas (18.4% PI versus 8.5% NI, P < 0.001). Patients in the PI group with malignant disease had a superior long-term survival (median, 30 months, P = 0.01) compared with patients in the NI group with malignant disease (median, 21 months). Conclusions: Incidentally discovered periampullary and pancreatic masses comprise a substantial proportion of patients undergoing PD. Roughly three fourths of these lesions are malignant or premalignant, and amenable to curative resection. Resected malignant PIs have favorable pathologic features as compared with resected malignant NIs, and resection of these early lesions in asymptomatic individuals is associated with improved survival, compared with patients with symptomatic disease. PMID:16633003

  7. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  8. Enhancing effect of partial gastrectomy on pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanapa, P.; Flaks, B.; Oztas, H.; Deprez, P. H.; Calam, J.; Williamson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The controversial issue of enhanced pancreatic carcinogenesis following partial gastrectomy has been explored in male Wistar rats (n = 40) weighing 250-300 g. Animals were randomised to receive either 60% distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction or gastrotomy and resuture (control). Immediately after operation each group was further divided into two subgroups, receiving i.p. injections of either saline or azaserine (30 mg kg-1 wk-1 for 3 weeks). At 15 months blood was obtained at 0, 5, 15 and 30 min after a fatty meal for cholecystokinin (CCK) assay; rats were then killed. Pancreatic wet weight was measured, and histological sections were examined for atypical acinar cell foci (AACF), the putative precursor lesion of carcinoma. There were no significant differences in body weight or pancreatic weight between controls and rats with gastrectomy. Only azaserine-treated rats had acidophilic AACF. Partial gastrectomy substantially increased the number of acidophilic AACF per pancreas (median 26.05 vs 2.09; P less than 0.005), with a 9-fold increase in their volume (P less than 0.005). Basal and postprandial plasma CCK concentrations were higher after gastrectomy than in controls (P less than 0.05). Partial gastrectomy has an enhancing effect on azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis, probably by means of increased CCK release. PMID:1558791

  9. [Nab-Paclitaxel plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer].

    PubMed

    Katsura, Yoshiteru; Takeda, Yutaka; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Motoyama, Yurina; Ishida, Tomo; Morimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsushita, Katsunori; Naito, Atsushi; Murakami, Kohei; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Takeno, Atsushi; Egawa, Chiyomi; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a highly aggressive cancer, with one of the highest mortality rates among gastrointestinal cancers. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (GEM) significantly improved overall survival, progression-free survival, and response rate in a phase Ⅲ trial in 151 community and academic centers in 11 countries. As a result, nab-paclitaxel plus GEM was approved for use in December 2014 in Japan. We report a case of a patient with pancreatic cancer who underwent this chemotherapy. A 47-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of pancreatic lesions. Computed tomography revealed a hypoattenuating tumor in the body of the pancreas. After the patient underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy under the diagnosis of cStage Ⅳa cancer, we planned to perform distal pancreatectomy. However, this case was inoperable because we found 3 liver metastases during surgery. On postoperative day 14, we treated the patient with nab-paclitaxel plus GEM. Grade 2 toxicities included neutropenia, diarrhea, and peripheral neuropathy, but serious adverse events did not occur. The progression-free survival was 5 months. He remained alive for 7 months after the chemotherapy. In patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, nab-paclitaxel plus GEM can be considered as the standard treatment. PMID:26805366

  10. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis in different animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, D.G.; Rao, M.S.; Reddy, J.K.

    1984-06-01

    Pancreatic carcinomas can be induced in rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters by a variety of carcinogens. The types of neoplasms which arise vary with the species of rodent. In the rat, they consist exclusively of acinar cells, in the other species the lesions are adenocarcinomas resembling those derived from pancreatic ductules and ducts, those in hamster more so than in guinea pigs. Careful sequential studies in the guinea pig and hamster suggest that acinar cells together with ductular and duct cells are involved in the genesis of duct adenocarcinomas. In each rodent model, the acinar cell appears to be quite sensitive to continued exposure to carcinogen. In each instance, acini undergo modulation, and in the guinea pig and hamster, permanent metaplastic transformation to ductlike structures. Such cells assume an enhanced capacity for cell proliferation which persists following cessation of carcinogen treatment. Other studies suggest that adult pancreatic acinar cells possess a surprising degree of plasticity. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of neoplasms resembling pancreatic ducts is not unlike other carcinogenic sequences where extensive cell modulation and metaplasia precede and are an integral part of the neoplastic transformation. 55 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Minimally invasive retroperitoneal pancreatic necrosectomy in necrotising pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shelat, V G; Diddapur, R K

    2007-08-01

    With the marriage of surgery and technology, applications of minimal access surgery are increasing exponentially. Pancreatic diseases are no exception. Minimally invasive retroperitoneal pancreatic necrosectomy (MIRP), or percutaneous video-assisted necrosectomy, is a new technique to debride the necrotic pancreas. We report a 51- year-old male patient who successfully underwent MIRP for infected pancreatic necrosis, and briefly review of literature. PMID:17657370

  12. Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

  13. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, κ and λ light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  14. Laminin-5 and modulation of keratin cytoskeleton arrangement in FG pancreatic carcinoma cells: involvement of IFAP300 and evidence that laminin-5/cell interactions correlate with a dephosphorylation of alpha 6A integrin.

    PubMed

    Baker, S E; Skalli, O; Goldman, R D; Jones, J C

    1997-01-01

    Under normal culture conditions, epithelial cells of the FG line, derived from a pancreatic tumor, characteristically grow in mounds and fail to flatten efficiently onto their substrate. In such cells, keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are concentrated in the perinuclear region. Furthermore, the IF associated protein, IFAP300, primarily localizes along these keratin bundles. Additionally, alpha 6 beta 4 integrin heterodimers localize in streaks or spots towards the edges of cells while alpha 3 beta 1 integrin is predominantly at cell-cell surfaces. Neither show any obvious interaction with IF. Remarkably, upon plating FG cells into medium containing soluble rat laminin-5, FG cells rapidly adhere and spread onto their substrate. Moreover, FG cells "capture" rat laminin-5 and place it basally in circles or arcs at areas of cell-substrate interaction. Double label immunofluorescence microscopy reveals colocalization of IFAP300 as well as alpha 6 beta 4 and alpha 3 beta 1 integrin with the polarized laminin-5. Concomitantly, alpha 6 integrin undergoes dephosphorylation on serine residue 1041. Laminin-5-induced rapid adhesion can be blocked by antibodies against the alpha 3 integrin subunit. In contrast, while alpha 6 integrin antibodies do not block laminin-5-induced rapid adhesion, they prevent FG cells from assuming an epithelial-like morphology. Keratin IF bundles associate with IFAP300-alpha 6 beta 4/alpha 3 beta 1 integrin complexes along the cell-substratum-attached surface of FG cells coincubated in laminin-5-containing medium. Coprecipitation results suggest that in these complexes, IFAP300 may associate with the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin heterodimer. Based on our results and published evidence that IFAP300 binds keratin in vitro [Skalli et al., 1994; J. Cell Biol. 125:159-170], we propose that laminin-5/FG cell interaction results in a novel integrin dephosphorylation event, which subsequently induces IFAP300 association with alpha 6 beta 4 integrin. IFAP300

  15. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  16. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  17. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

  18. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  19. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  20. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Ibáñez de Cáceres, Immaculada; Barriuso, Jorge; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; González Barón, Manuel; Feliú, Jaime

    2008-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. This devastating disease has the horrible honour of close to equal incidence and mortality rates. Late diagnosis and a constitutive resistance to every chemotherapy approach are responsible for this scenario. However, molecular biology tools in cooperation with translational efforts have dissected several secrets that underlie pancreatic cancer. Progressive acquisition of malignant, invasive phenotypes from pre-malignant lesions, recent revelations on core signalling pathways and new targeted designed trials offer a better future for pancreatic cancer patients. This review will summarise recent advances in the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer. PMID:18796369

  1. [New model of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Cherkezova-Kinova, E; Lateva, E

    1981-01-01

    The authors propose a new model of acute pancreatitis by infusing duodenal content, obtained both from animals with experimental pancreatitis and from patients with pancreatitis, hepatitis and cholecystitis, into the duodenum of experimental animals without pressure for a period of several days. Pancreatitis was established functionally and histomorphologically. The control group of animals did not reveal deviations from the norm after infusion of duodenal content. The authors suggested the presence of pathogenic substances in the duodenal content of animals and sick persons, and these components damaged the pancreas, liver and kidneys by means of blood and lymph ways. PMID:7227280

  2. Early detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a low-incident but highly mortal disease. It accounts for only 3% of estimated new cancer cases each year but is currently the fourth common cause of cancer mortality. By 2030, it is expected to be the 2nd leading cause of cancer death. There is a clear need to diagnose and classify pancreatic cancer at earlier stages in order to give patients the best chance at a definitive cure through surgery. Three precursor lesions that distinctly lead to pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, and we have increasing understanding the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for the disease. With increased understanding about the risk factors, the familial patters, and associated accumulation of genetic mutations involved in pancreatic cancer, we know that there are mutations that occur early in the development of pancreatic cancer and that improved genetic risk-based strategies in screening for pancreatic cancer may be possible and successful at saving or prolonging lives. The remaining challenge is that current standards for diagnosing pancreatic cancer remain too invasive and too costly for widespread screening for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the promises of noninvasive methods of detection such as blood, saliva, and stool remain underdeveloped or lack robust testing. However, significant progress has been made, and we are drawing closer to a strategy for the screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26361402

  3. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  4. Sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas: A mimicker of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scudiere, Jennifer R.; Shi, Chanjuan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Herman, Joseph; Fishman, Elliot K.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Makary, Martin A.; Thornton, Katherine; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Horton, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM), also known as mesenteric lipodystrophy, rarely involves the parenchyma of the pancreas. When sclerosing mesenteritis does involve the pancreas, it can mimic pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically with pain, obstructive jaundice, a mass lesion and even the appearance of vascular invasion. We report 6 patients with sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas (mean age 43.2 years, 5 female), and review their clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathology, and outcome. Five of these 6 patients were originally thought to have a primary pancreatic neoplasm. Initial presenting clinical information was available for each patient: all 6 reported abdominal or epigastric pain, 3 reported weight loss, and 2 reported one or more of the following: back pain, fever, abdominal bloating/distention, nausea with/without vomiting, and anorexia. The lesions formed masses with an infiltrative pattern, and all had three key histologic features: fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and fat necrosis—without a known etiology. The inflammatory infiltrate was composed of a mixture of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered eosinophils. Of the five patients with post-treatment clinical information available, four had at least a partial response to treatment with steroids, tamoxifen, azathioprine, resection, or a combination of these, and 1 did not respond. A dramatic response to immunosuppressive therapy is illustrated by the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with the presumptive diagnosis of an unresectable pancreatic cancer. Distinguishing sclerosing mesenteritis from pancreatic carcinoma is crucial to appropriate management, as patients with sclerosing mesenteritis may benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:20351487

  5. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  6. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  8. Trebananib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  9. Primary Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma of the Prostate Gland: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the prostate gland (PLELCP) is rare with hardly any information on its diagnostic features and biological behaviour. Aim. To review the literature. Method. Various Internet data bases were searched. Literature Review. PLELCP is extremely rare and there are hardly any pictures of the tumour involving the prostate; hence it would appear that clinicians would need to use their knowledge of the microscopic and immunohistochemical characteristics of the tumour in the nasopharynx and urinary bladder as diagnostic aid. PLELCP on microscopy mimics nasopharyngeal LELC. The LELC component of the tumour is characterized by indistinct cytoplasmic borders and a syncytial growth pattern. The stroma may be densely infiltrated by lymphoid cells admixed with some plasma cells and neutrophils and at times prominent infiltration of eosinophils. PLELCPs tend to have adenocarcinoma, either as the only pattern or with additional ductal components or adenosquamous carcinoma. PLELCPs stain positively with PSA, PSAP, AMACR/P504S, EMA, and cytokeratins AE1/AE3, 7, 8, and 20. There is no consensus on treatment of PLECP. The reported prognosis has been poor. Conclusions. PLELCPs should be entered into a multicenter trial to determine the biological behaviour and to find the best treatment option that would improve the prognosis. PMID:26881187

  10. Antibiosis of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Alexander; Erhart, Wiebke; Schafmayer, Clemens; Held, Hanns-Christoph; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Necrotizing pancreatitis is a life-threatening presentation of acute pancreatitis. The mortality of 20-80% initially depends on the persistence of organ failure and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and, in the later course of the disease, on secondary infection of the necrosis. The questions whether prophylactic antibiotics aiming to prevent this infection should be administered and which antibiotic is the best to use, as well as the problem of fungal infection under antibiotic treatment are still intriguing and insufficiently solved. Methods A search of the literature using PubMed was carried out, supplemented by a review of the programmes of the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) and the United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW). Results Despite the widely practised prophylactic antibiotic administration in severe pancreatitis, no evidence for the benefit of this strategy exists. One of the drawbacks might be a tendency for disastrous fungal infection under prophylactic antibiotics. Bacterial translocation from the gut in the second week after the onset of symptoms is the major source for infection of pancreatic necrosis and provides a clear indication for antibiotic treatment. However, routine fine-needle aspiration for a calculated antibiotic therapy cannot be recommended, and all other tests offer only indirect signs. Important factors such as enteral versus parenteral feeding and the method of necrosectomy are mostly neglected in the trials but seem to be essential for the outcome of the patient. Conclusions Even though most meta-analyses including the newer double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on prophylactic antibiotics showed no beneficial effects in the prevention of infection of necrosis and/or outcome of the patients, this strategy is still widely used in clinical routine. Since nearly all trials published so far show systematic problems (i.e. inaccurate definition of the severity of the disease, poor statistical testing

  11. Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibody–antigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

  12. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  13. Resection of Late Pulmonary Metastases from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Is Surgery an Option?

    PubMed

    Brieau, Bertrand; Barret, Maximilien; Rouquette, Alexandre; Dréanic, Johann; Brezault, Catherine; Regnard, Jean François; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurrences from pancreas adenocarcinoma have a poor survival rate despite new chemotherapy treatment options. Recurrences are mainly hepatic metastases or peritoneal dissemination and surgical treatment is not recommended. Late and single metachronous pulmonary recurrences are uncommon and may mimic primary lung carcinoma. We report two patients with late and unique pulmonary metastasis from pancreatic cancer. These two patients underwent surgical resection; three and five years later, they did not experience recurrences. Cases called for a surgical approach in late and unique pulmonary metastases from pancreatic cancer, and paved the way for a prolonged chemotherapy free period. PMID:26461032

  14. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. Conclusion: PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced. PMID:26288527

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Kraft, Matthias; Sielenkämper, Andreas W; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are a well-known complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis, with a higher incidence in the latter. Diagnosis is accomplished most often by computed tomographic scanning, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or by ultrasound, and a rapid progress in the improvement of diagnostic tools enables detection with high sensitivity and specificity. Different strategies contribute to the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts: endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. The feasibility of endoscopic drainage is highly dependent on the anatomy and topography of the pseudocyst, but provides high success and low complication rates. Percutaneous drainage is used for infected pseudocysts. However, its usefulness in chronic pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts is questionable. Internal drainage and pseudocyst resection are frequently used as surgical approaches with a good overall outcome, but a somewhat higher morbidity and mortality compared with endoscopic intervention. We therefore conclude that pseudocyst treatment in chronic pancreatitis can be effectively achieved by both endoscopic and surgical means. This review entails publications referring to the classification of pancreatic pseudocysts, epidemiology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic options for pancreatic pseudocysts. Only full articles were considered for the review. Based on a search in PubMed, the MeSH terms "pancreatic pseudocysts and classification," "diagnosis," and "endoscopic, percutaneous, and surgical treatment" were used either alone or in combination. PMID:18376299

  16. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  17. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  18. Genomic Loss of DUSP4 Contributes to the Progression of Intraepithelial Neoplasm of Pancreas to Invasive Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hijiya, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakada, Chisato; Tung Nguyen, Lam; Kai, Tomoki; Matsuura, Keiko; Shibata, Kohei; Inomata, Masafumi; Uchida, Tomohisa; Tokunaga, Akinori; Amada, Kohei; Shirao, Kuniaki; Yamada, Yasunari; Mori, Hiromu; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Seto, Masao; Aoki, Masahiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2016-05-01

    The progression from precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), to invasive disease is characterized by stepwise accumulation of genetic alterations. However, it remains unclear whether additional alterations are required for the progression of high-grade neoplasms to invasive pancreatic carcinoma. We compared the genomic profiles of paired noninvasive and invasive carcinoma tissues collected from patients with IPMN. We demonstrate that the frequency of genomic copy-number aberrations significantly increased during the course of invasion, and the loss of 8p11.22-ter was more often associated with invasive tissues. Expression profiling in pancreatic cancer cell lines with and without 8p11.22-ter revealed that DUSP4, an MAPK phosphatase, was significantly downregulated in cells lacking 8p11.22-ter as well as in invasive carcinomas due to genomic loss. Restoration of DUSP4 expression in pancreatic cancer cells significantly suppressed invasiveness and anoikis resistance via ERK inactivation. Accordingly, we found that blockade of ERK signaling by MEK inhibition was effective in an orthotopic xenograft model and significantly extended survival. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a genetic mechanism by which pancreatic precursor lesions progress to invasive carcinomas and highlight DUSP4 as a novel invasion suppressor that can be therapeutically exploited through manipulation of ERK signaling. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2612-25. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26941286

  19. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and

  20. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed. PMID:26722211

  1. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26610570

  2. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  3. Surgery for pancreatic cancer -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Pancreatic surgery is done to treat cancer of the pancreas gland. When You Are in the Hospital All ... Claudius C, Lillemoe KD. Palliative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. In: Cameron ... Vickers SM. Exocrine Pancreas. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  4. Serum CA 242 in pancreatic cancer. Comparison with CA 19-9 and CEA.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, R; Billi, P; Plate, L; Laudadio, M A; Sprovieri, G

    1995-01-01

    Serum CA 242, CA 19-9 and CEA concentrations were determined in 94 subjects divided into 5 groups: Group 1 consisted of 22 healthy subjects; Group 2 consisted of 40 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; according to Cubilla and Fitzgerald's classification, 11 tumours were Stage I, 4 were Stage II, and 25 were Stage III. Group 3 consisted of 10 chronic pancreatitis patients, group 4 of 10 acute pancreatitis patients, group 5 of 12 patients with nonpancreatic digestive carcinomas. Ten of these 12 patients had distant metastases. The sensitivity of CA 19-9 in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was higher than that of CEA and CA 242 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.005, respectively). In Stage I cancer patients the sensitivity of the markers studied was less than 50% (45% for CA 19-9, 18% for CEA, and 9% for CA 242) whereas most of the 25 patients with metastatic tumours of the pancreas had elevated serum levels of all 3 markers. The various combinations of the three markers did not significantly improve the sensitivity in diagnosing pancreatic cancer. No relationship was found between the localization of the tumour and the serum levels of the 3 markers studied. Similarly, no differences were found between patients with cholestasis and those without. The specificity of the 3 markers, evaluated in patients with benign pancreatic diseases, was 100% for CA 242, 90% for CA 199 and 70% for CEA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562994

  5. Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

  6. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  8. [A new classification of pancreatic cancer to guide operative decisions and the comparison with the TNM stage].

    PubMed

    Qin, Renyi

    2015-07-01

    Despite the worldwide application of various terminological and classification systems used for pancreatic cancer, such as UICC classification and JPS classification based on the TNM system, however, little information on their use in operative decision-making is available. A new classification system according to the relationship with the tumor and key vasculature around the pancreas is described, and the pancreatic carcinomas are divided into eight types to provide operative decisions for different types of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the relationship between the classification system and TNM system is discussed. The new classification is the first time to discuss the classification for the operative decisions for the pancreatic cancer and this formalized type of approach may provide the best chance of achieving R0 resection and providing improved safety results. PMID:26359069

  9. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Raposo do Amaral, Alexandre S

    2009-01-01

    Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR) from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of severe hypoglycemic episodes

  10. [Thymic carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Ströbel, P; Weis, C-A; Marx, A

    2016-09-01

    Thymic carcinomas (TC) are approximately 10 times less prevalent than thymomas but of high clinical relevance because they are more aggressive, less frequently resectable than thymomas and usually refractory to classical and targeted long-term treatment approaches. Furthermore, in children and adolescents TC are more frequent than thymomas and particularly in this age group, germ cell tumors need to be a differential diagnostic consideration. In diagnostic terms pathologists face two challenges: a), the distinction between thymic carcinomas and thymomas with a similar appearance and b), the distinction between TC and histologically similar metastases and tumor extensions from other primary tumors. Overcoming these diagnostic challenges is the focus of the new WHO classification of thymic epithelial tumors. The objectives of this review are to highlight novel aspects of the WHO classification of thymic carcinomas and to address therapeutically relevant diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:27538748

  11. Parathyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Butt, Waqas Tariq; Azim, Asad; Abbas, Ansab; Gauhar, Tooba Mahmud; Afzal, Ameer; Azim, Khawaja Muhammad

    2012-09-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare endocrine malignancy accounting for less than 1% of all cases of hyperparathyroidism. We present a case of a middle-aged woman who was undiagnosed for 3 years before presenting with renal stones and advanced musculoskeletal disease. Investigations revealed primary hyperparathyroidism. Focused cervical exploration and left inferior parathyroidectomy was carried out based on the pre-operative localization studies. Parathyroid carcinoma was diagnosed on histopathology postoperatively. Subsequent en bloc resection was not performed and the patient is being monitored with serial parathyroid hormone levels which have not shown any increase in 6 months of follow-up. Only two previous cases of parathyroid carcinoma have been reported from Pakistan. PMID:22980615

  12. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devaraju, Ramaraju; Gantala, Ramlal; Aitha, Harisha; Gotoor, Srikanth Goud

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland tumours comprise almost 5% of head and neck malignancies. Minor salivary gland tumours account for 10–15% of all salivary gland neoplasms and are usually malignant. The second most common minor salivary gland tumour (12–40% globally) is mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is more frequent in females, occurs in the fifth decade of life and is usually found in the parotid gland. However, the palate is a frequent site when it occurs in the minor glands. We report a case of a high-grade variant of mucoepidermoid carcinoma in the right retromolar trigone of a 21-year man which was treated with wide excision of the tumour with a 1.5 cm margin. Reconstruction was done with a buccal fat pad posteriorly with a pedicled lateral tongue flap. Temporal stripping and right coronoidectomy was carried out in case of post-surgical wound contraction. The patient is currently under periodic review. PMID:25085946

  13. Pancreatic small cell cancer.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Assi, Tarek; Chebib, Ralph; Farhat, Fadi; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly associated with lung cancer. Extra-pulmonary SCC can originate in virtually any organ system, with the gastrointestinal tract being the most common site of involvement. We review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, imaging modalities and optimal therapeutic management of PSCC in light of available evidence. PMID:26566245

  14. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Savio G; Neale, Rachel E

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is projected that within the next two decades it will become the second most common cause of death due to cancer. Few patients are diagnosed when surgical resection is feasible and the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutic agents for advanced/metastatic cancer is limited. Thus, there is a need to identify agents that can prevent pancreatic cancer or improve survival in those affected. Vitamin D and its analogues, with their ability to regulate cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and angiogenesis, may be promising agents. This review explores the published literature about the potential role of vitamin D and its analogues in preventing or treating pancreatic cancer. The vitamin D system is altered in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer tissue expresses vitamin D receptors, but the calcitriol analogues may affect pancreatic cancer tissue by mechanisms that do not involve interaction with its receptors. Experimental evidence postulates multiple potential mechanisms by which calcitriol analogues may exert their anti-cancer effect, the most common being by action on cyclin-dependent kinases p21 and p27. Use of calcitriol analogues in pancreatic cancer remains largely underexplored and warrants further clinical trials. PMID:26276715

  15. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  16. Clinical studies in the second line setting of advanced pancreatic cancer: are we making any progress?

    PubMed

    Ramfidis, Vassilios S; Strimpakos, Alexios S; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad W

    2012-07-01

    Despite the enormous advances in clinical research in oncology, the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma remains poor. The therapeutic options in this type of cancer are very limited, with modest results at present. In the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, four interesting trials on the second line treatment of pancreatic cancer were presented. The first study (Abstract #4017) with a phase II design suggested that maintenance therapy with sunitinib, after a complete course of standard first line treatment, was feasible and effective while the second phase I/II study (Abstract #4034) evaluated the role of trabedersen, an agent that inhibits TGF-β2 expression. Finally, the efficacy and toxicity of lapatinib combined with either FOLFOX (Abstract #e14533) or capecitabine (Abstract #e14569) were examined in the second line setting of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22797389

  17. What Are the Key Statistics about Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? Next Topic Pancreatic cancer risk factors Key statistics for pancreatic cancer How common is pancreatic cancer? ... can be affected by certain risk factors . For statistics related to survival, see Pancreatic cancer survival rates ...

  18. Fucosylated haptoglobin is a novel marker for pancreatic cancer: a detailed analysis of the oligosaccharide structure and a possible mechanism for fucosylation.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Noriko; Ide, Yoshihito; Nakano, Miyako; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Kanako; Moriwaki, Kenta; Murata, Kohei; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Ito, Toshifumi; Kato, Michio; Kasahara, Akinori; Kawano, Sunao; Gu, Jianguo; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2006-06-01

    Changes in oligosaccharide structures have been reported in certain types of malignant transformations and, thus, could be used for tumor markers in certain types of cancer. In the case of pancreatic cancer cell lines, a variety of fucosylated proteins are secreted into their conditioned media. To identify fucosylated proteins in the serum of patients with pancreatic cancer, we performed western blot analyses using Aleuria Aurantica Lectin (AAL), which is specific for fucosylated structures. An approximately 40 kD protein was found to be highly fucosylated in pancreatic cancer and an N-terminal analysis revealed that it was the beta chain of haptoglobin. While the appearance of fucosylated haptoglobin has been reported in other diseases such as hepatocellular carcinoma, liver cirrhosis, gastric cancer and colon cancer, the incidence was significantly higher in the case of pancreatic cancer. Fucosylated haptoglobin was observed more frequently at the advanced stage of pancreatic cancer and disappeared after an operation. A mass spectrometry analysis of haptoglobin purified from the serum of patients with pancreatic cancer and the medium from a pancreatic cancer cell line, PSN-1, showed that the alpha 1-3/alpha 1-4/alpha 1-6 fucosylation of haptoglobin was increased in pancreatic cancer. When a hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, was cultured with the conditioned media from pancreatic cancer cells, haptoglobin secretion was dramatically increased. These findings suggest that fucosylated haptoglobin could serve as a novel marker for pancreatic cancer. Two possibilities were considered in terms of the fucosylation of haptoglobin. One is that pancreatic cancer cells, themselves, produce fucosylated haptoglobin; the other is that pancreatic cancer produces a factor, which induces the production of fucosylated haptoglobin in the liver. PMID:16385567

  19. Pancreatic insulinomas: Laparoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Antonakis, Pantelis T; Ashrafian, Hutan; Martinez-Isla, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly benign, solitary, and intrapancreatic. Uncontrolled insulin overproduction from the tumor produces neurological and adrenergic symptoms of hypoglycemia. Biochemical diagnosis is confirmed by the presence of Whipple’s triad, along with corroborating measurements of blood glucose, insulin, proinsulin, C-peptide, β-hydroxybutyrate, and negative tests for hypoglycemic agents during a supervised fasting period. This is accompanied by accurate preoperative localization using both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities. Following this, careful preoperative planning is required, with the ensuing procedure being preferably carried out laparoscopically. An integral part of the laparoscopic approach is the application of laparoscopic intraoperative ultrasound, which is indispensable for accurate intraoperative localization of the lesion in the pancreatic region. The extent of laparoscopic resection is dependent on preoperative and intraoperative findings, but most commonly involves tumor enucleation or distal pancreatectomy. When performed in an experienced surgical unit, laparoscopic resection is associated with minimal mortality and excellent long-term cure rates. Furthermore, this approach confers equivalent safety and efficacy rates to open resection, while improving cosmesis and reducing hospital stay. As such, laparoscopic resection should be considered in all cases of benign insulinoma where adequate surgical expertise is available. PMID:26566426

  20. Chronic pancreatitis: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Sinead N; Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Lawal, Oladapo; O’Connor, Donal B; Conlon, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Typical clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are vague and non-specific and therefore diagnostic tests are required, none of which provide absolute diagnostic certainly, especially in the early stages of disease. Recently-published guidelines bring much needed structure to the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. In addition, novel diagnostic modalities bring promise for the future. The assessment and diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency remains challenging and this review contests the accepted perspective that steatorrhea only occurs with > 90% destruction of the gland. PMID:26900292

  1. Pancreatic pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the earliest, and most commonly affected, organs in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Studying the pathogenesis of pancreatic disease is limited in CF patients, due to its early clinical onset, co-morbidities and lack of tissue samples from the early phases of disease. In recent years, several new CF animal models have been developed that have advanced our understanding of both CF exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease. Additionally, these models have helped us to better define the influence of pancreatic lesions on CF disease progression in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. PMID:26365583

  2. Liraglutide-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraj, Santhosh; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Kumar, Champat Raj Roopesh; Nanditha, Arun; Krishnamoorthy, Satheesh; Raghavan, Arun; Raghavan, K; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2014-01-01

    An obese lady of 51 year with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for 13 years was prescribed Liraglutide, a glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogue (Victoza) for glycaemic control and reduction of weight. She was on gliclazide and Insulin prior to initiation of Liraglutide. Eight weeks after initiation of GLP -1 analogue, she developed severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She was admitted to a private hospital and evaluated. Biochemical tests and CT scan revealed presence of pancreatitis and she was treated for acute pancreatitis. Liraglutide was withdrawn and symptoms subsided. Subsequent follow-up showed that pancreatic enzyme levels were normal. PMID:25327099

  3. Acute pancreatitis caused by bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Solakoglu, Tevfik; Akyol, Pinar; Guney, Tekin; Dilek, Imdat; Atalay, Roni; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Akin, Ebru; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis has been reported rarely. Bortezomib is a selective and reversible proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, one case report about acute pancreatitis (AP) caused by bortezomib was published in the international literature. Herein we report a case of AP in a 67-year-old male on bortezomib therapy. On the fourth day after the first administration of bortezomib, the patient admitted to the hospital with symptoms of AP. The common etiological factors for AP were all excluded. Than the patient was diagnosed as bortezomib-induced pancreatitis. PMID:23561979

  4. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  5. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  6. Current and emerging treatments for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Regine, W F; John, W J; Mohiuddin, M

    1997-10-01

    different therapeutic modalities, along with continued advances in surgery, radiation and systemic therapy, should lead to the increased use of modern multimodality interventions. In turn, this will lead us towards further improvements in outcomes for patients with pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:9342558

  7. Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

    2014-01-01

    Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

  8. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis as primary manifestation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Victoria T; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Chohan, Muhammad O

    2016-08-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is a rare complication of cancer that often presents at an advanced stage after obvious metastasis of a primary cancer or locally advanced disease. We present an uncommon case of LMC secondary to pancreatic carcinoma presenting with headache, unilateral VII nerve palsy, and lower extremity weakness. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies were concerning for chronic aseptic meningitis but negative for malignant cells; the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis was erroneously evoked. Three lumbar punctures were required to capture malignant cells. The diagnosis of LMC was based on CSF examination with cytology/immunohistochemistry and leptomeningeal enhancement on MRI. Post mortem autopsy revealed advanced and diffusely metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This patient demonstrates that solid tumors can present with leptomeningeal spread that often confuses the treating physician. Fungal or tuberculous meningitis can mimic LMC in the absence of neoplastic signs and negative CSF cytology. This event is exceedingly rare in pancreatic cancer. If the index of suspicion is high, repeat CSF sampling can increase the sensitivity of detection of malignant cells and thus result in the correct diagnosis. PMID:26972704

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  10. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  12. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Influence of Interferon-Alpha Combined with Chemo (Radio) Therapy on Immunological Parameters in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakhanova, Svetlana; Mosl, Beate; Harig, Sabine; von Ahn, Katharina; Fritz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Jan; Jäger, Dirk; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V.

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio) therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer) cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:24608924

  14. Influence of interferon-alpha combined with chemo (radio) therapy on immunological parameters in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karakhanova, Svetlana; Mosl, Beate; Harig, Sabine; von Ahn, Katharina; Fritz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Jan; Jäger, Dirk; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio) therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer) cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:24608924

  15. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Disappointing Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Carolin; Folprecht, Gunnar; Zips, Daniel; Pilarsky, Christian; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grutzmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Germany. The incidence in 2003/2004 was 16 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Of all carcinomas, pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate, with one- and five-year survival rates of 25% and less than 5%, respectively, regardless of the stage at diagnosis. These low survival rates demonstrate the poor prognosis of this carcinoma. Previous therapeutic approaches including surgical resection combined with adjuvant therapy or palliative chemoradiation have not achieved satisfactory results with respect to overall survival. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Neoadjuvant therapy is an interesting therapeutic option for patients with pancreatic cancer. For selected patients with borderline or unresectable disease, neoadjuvant therapy offers the potential for tumor downstaging, increasing the probability of a margin-negative resection and decreasing the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Currently, there is no universally accepted approach for treating patients with pancreatic cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. In this review, the most common neoadjuvant strategies will be described, compared and discussed. PMID:24212810

  16. Vaccine therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Bulent; Zhou, Donger; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Edil, Barish H; Zheng, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease and currently available therapies have significant limitations. Pancreatic cancer is thus an ideal setting for the development of novel treatment modalities such as immunotherapy. However, relevant obstacles must be overcome for immunotherapeutic regimens against pancreatic cancer to be successful. Vaccine therapy relies on the administration of biological preparations that include an antigen that (at least ideally) is specifically expressed by malignant cells, boosting the natural ability of the immune system to react against neoplastic cells. There are a number of ways to deliver anticancer vaccines. Potent vaccines stimulate antigen presentation by dendritic cells, hence driving the expansion of antigen-specific effector and memory T cells. Unlike vaccines given as a prophylaxis against infectious diseases, anticancer vaccines require the concurrent administration of agents that interfere with the natural predisposition of tumors to drive immunosuppression. The safety and efficacy of vaccines against pancreatic cancer are nowadays being tested in early phase clinical trials. PMID:24498551

  17. Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun R

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differences in physiology is essential to understand the underlying pathobiology of pancreatic disease in animal models and its relevance to human disease. This review will mainly focus on understanding the morphology and physiology of the pancreas, unique islet-exocrine interactions, and pancreatitis. PMID:24190915

  18. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of this condition usually begin in late childhood with an episode of acute pancreatitis. A sudden (acute) attack can cause abdominal pain, fever, nausea, or vomiting. An episode typically lasts ...

  1. Surgery for pancreatic cancer - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Claudius C, Lillemoe KD. Palliative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2014: 481-487. Jensen EH, Borja-Cacho D, ...

  2. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  3. Use of a human endometrial carcinoma cell line (RL-95) for in vitro testing of chemotherapeutic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Deppe, G.; Saunders, D.; Malviya, V.

    1987-09-01

    RL-95, a moderately well-differentiated adenosquamous endometrial carcinoma cell line, can be used as a model for testing chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Cells are grown in T-75 flasks, transferred to scintillation vials, and grown for 24 hr. Following this, medium is removed and new medium containing Adriamycin (Adr) and cis-platinum (CP) is added. Effects of the two drugs are measured by cell counts and DNA synthesis. To measure DNA synthesis, cells are incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine (/sup 3/H-THY) for up to 24 hr. Decreased DNA synthesis is reflected in decreased /sup 3/H-THY uptake. Cell kill is obtained with levels of drugs that are clinically achievable. Evidence is presented for increased cytotoxicity with concomitant, rather than sequential, chemotherapy. Results are also confirmed by testing the agent on MCF-7, a well-known breast cancer cell line. The results indicate that (1) endometrial carcinoma responds to Adriamycin and cis-platinum chemotherapeutic agents in vitro, and (2) RL-95 can be used as a model for testing varying concentrations, time of exposure, and combinations of chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Sunamura, Makoto; Horii, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies. Intensive investigation of molecular pathogenesis might lead to identifying useful molecules for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma harbors complicated aberrations of alleles including losses of 1p, 6q, 9p, 12q, 17p, 18q, and 21q, and gains of 8q and 20q. Pancreatic cancer is usually initiated by mutation of KRAS and aberrant expression of SHH. Overexpression of AURKA mapping on 20q13.2 may significantly enhance overt tumorigenesity. Aberrations of tumor suppressor genes synergistically accelerate progression of the carcinogenic pathway through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. Abrogation of CDKN2A occurs in low-grade/early PanIN, whereas aberrations of TP53 and SMAD4 occur in high-grade/late PanIN. SMAD4 may play suppressive roles in tumorigenesis by inhibition of angiogenesis. Loss of 18q precedes SMAD4 inactivation, and restoration of chromosome 18 in pancreatic cancer cells results in tumor suppressive phenotypes regardless of SMAD4 status, indicating the possible existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) other than SMAD4 on 18q. DUSP6 at 12q21-q22 is frequently abrogated by loss of expression in invasive ductal adenocarcinomas despite fairly preserved expression in PanIN, which suggests that DUSP6 works as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Restoration of chromosome 12 also suppresses growths of pancreatic cancer cells despite the recovery of expression of DUSP6; the existence of yet another tumor suppressor gene on 12q is strongly suggested. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis will likely provide novel clues for preventing, detecting, and ultimately curing this life-threatening disease. PMID:16367914

  5. Genomic Landscapes of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal prognosis. However, recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology have led to the systematic characterization of the genomes of all major tumor types in the pancreas. This characterization has revealed the unique genomic landscape of each tumor type. This knowledge will pave the way for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic tumors that take advantage of the genetic alterations in these neoplasms. PMID:25812653

  6. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Ramia, J M; de la Plaza, R; Quiñones-Sampedro, J E; Ramiro, C; Veguillas, P; García-Parreño, J

    2012-05-01

    Acute severe pancreatitits may be complicated by the development of 'walled-off pancreatic necrosis' (WOPN), which is characterised by a mixture of solid components and fluids on imaging studies as a consequence of organised pancreatic tissue necrosis. We present here an overview of the definition, clinical features, and diagnostic and therapeutic management of this clinical condition, which is mostly based on consensus as adequate clinical trials are lacking. PMID:22641624

  7. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  8. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  9. Radiographic findings in recurrent parathyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, A.G.; Doppman, J.L.; Marx, S.J.; Brennan, M.F.; Spiegel, A.; Aurback, G.D.

    1982-03-01

    Seven cases of recurrent parathyroid carcinoma were reviewed. Subperiosteal resorption was seen in 6, pulmonary nodules in 4, renal calculi in 5, brown tumors in 5, and pancreatic calcifications in 1. Angiography was performed in 5 patients, showing 1 definite and 2 probable cervical recurrences, 1 mediastinal lesion, and 1 case of possible bone metastases. Venous sampling for parathyroid hormone was carried out in 4 patients and suggested residual disease in 2; in addition, there were 1 false and 1 true negative. CT was performed in 4 patients and was useful in delineating metastatic pulmonary nodules, cervical recurrence, and hepatic metastases. The radiographic approach to recurrent parathryoid carcinoma and the use of CT and angiography are discussed.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer, Inflammation and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past two decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations into the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention in order to both prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies towards this direction are urgently needed. PMID:24855007

  11. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Lavrentieva, Athina; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    In the majority (80%) of patients with acute pancreatitis, the disease is self limiting and, after a few days of withholding feeding and intravenous administration of fluids, patients can again be normally fed orally. In a small percentage of patients, the disease progresses to severe necrotic pancreatitis, with an intense systemic inflammatory response and often with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. As mortality is high in patients with severe disease and as mortality and morbidity rates are directly related to the failure of establishing a positive nitrogen balance, it is assumed that feeding will improve survival in patients with severe disease. The aim of nutritional support is to cover the elevated metabolic demands as much as possible, without stimulating pancreatic secretion and maximizing self-digestion. The administration of either total parenteral nutrition or jejunal nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic secretion. Recently, a series of controlled clinical studies has been conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutrition with jejunal administration of the nutritional solution. The results have shown that enteral nutrition, as compared to total parenteral nutrition, was cheaper, safer and more effective as regards the suppression of the immunoinflammatory response, the decrease of septic complications, the need for surgery for the management of the complications of acute pancreatitis and the reduction of the total hospitalization period. It did not seem to affect mortality or the rate of non-septic complications. In conclusion, enteral nutrition should be the preferred route of nutritional support in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:18648127

  12. Mimics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Ravi K.; Azar, Shadi F.; Ruma, Julie A.; Francis, Isaac R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Several uncommon primary pancreatic tumors, inflammatory conditions, metastasis to the pancreas and peripancreatic masses can mimic the appearance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Differentiation between these lesions and PDA can be challenging, due to the overlap in imaging features; however, familiarity with their typical imaging features and clinical presentation may be helpful in their differentiation, as in some cases, invasive diagnostic tests or unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The different pathologies that can mimic PDA include inflammatory conditions such as the various forms of pancreatitis (chronic-focal mass-forming, autoimmune and groove pancreatitis), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, metastasis (solid non-lymphomatous and hematologic), congenital variants (annular pancreas), as well as peripancreatic lesions (accessory spleen, adrenal masses, duodenal masses, lymph nodes and vascular lesions), and certain rare pancreatic tumors (e.g., acinar cell tumors, solid serous tumors, hamartoma and solitary fibrous tumors). The clinical presentation and imaging features of the most commonly encountered mimics of PDA are discussed in this presentation with representative illustrations. PMID:24060833

  13. Management of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Nilesh; Agarwal, Pravin; Gandhi, Vidhyachandra

    2012-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Risk factors independently determining the outcome of SAP are early multiorgan failure (MOF), infection of necrosis, and extended necrosis (>50%). Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week it is strongly related to systemic inflammatory response syndrome while, sepsis due to infected pancreatic necrosis leading to MOF syndrome occurs in the later course after the first week. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or are at risk for developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis are candidates for intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased to below 20% in high-volume centers. PMID:23372306

  14. Gallbladder carcinoma: An attempt of WHO histological classification on fine needle aspiration material

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajni; Jain, Deepali; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Sharma, Atul; Iyer, Venkateswaran K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Carcinoma of the gallbladder (CaGB) is common in India and its prognosis depends primarily on the extent of the disease and histological type. We aim to study the role of guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) for diagnosis of CaGB and to evaluate the feasibility of applying world health organization (WHO) classification on fine needle aspiration (FNA) material to predict the outcome of the tumor. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cytomorphologic analysis was performed in all cases of CaGB diagnosed by ultrasound (US) guided FNAC over a period of 2 years. A specific subtype was assigned according to WHO classification based on characteristic cytologic features. These included papillary or acinar arrangement, intra and extracellular mucin, keratin, rosettes and columnar, signet ring, atypical squamous, small, clear, spindle and giant cells. Correlation with histopathology was performed when available. Results: A total of 541 aspirations with clinical or radiological suspicion of primary CaGB were studied. Of these, 54 aspirates were unsatisfactory. Fifty cases were negative for malignancy. Remaining 437 aspirates were positive for carcinoma. Histopathologic diagnosis was available in 32 cases. Adenocarcinoma was the most frequent diagnosis in 86.7% of cases. Mucinous, signet ring, adenosquamous, squamous, small cell, mixed adenoneuroendocrine and undifferentiated carcinoma including spindle and giant cell subtypes were diagnosed identifying specific features on FNAC. Correlation with histopathology was present in all, but one case giving rise to sensitivity of 96.8%. No post-FNA complications were recorded. Conclusions: US guided FNAC is a safe and effective method to diagnose CaGB. Although, rare, clinically and prognostically significant variants described in WHO classification can be detected on cytology. PMID:23858322

  15. Precise Classification of Cervical Carcinomas Combined with Somatic Mutation Profiling Contributes to Predicting Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Spaans, Vivian M.; Trietsch, Marjolijn D.; Peters, Alexander A. W.; Osse, Michelle; ter Haar, Natalja; Fleuren, Gert J.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) are the most common histological subtypes of cervical cancer. Differences in the somatic mutation profiles of these subtypes have been suggested. We investigated the prevalence of somatic hot-spot mutations in three well-defined cohorts of SCC, AC, and ASC and determined the additional value of mutation profiling in predicting disease outcome relative to well-established prognostic parameters. Materials and Methods Clinicopathological data were collected for 301 cervical tumors classified as SCC (n=166), AC (n=55), or ASC (n=80). Mass spectrometry was used to analyze 171 somatic hot-spot mutations in 13 relevant genes. Results In 103 (34%) tumors, 123 mutations were detected (36% in SCC, 38% in AC, and 28% in ASC), mostly in PIK3CA (20%) and KRAS (7%). PIK3CA mutations occurred more frequently in SCC than AC (25% vs. 11%, P=0.025), whereas KRAS mutations occurred more frequently in AC than SCC (24% vs. 3%, P<0.001) and ASC (24% vs. 3%, P<0.001). A positive mutation status correlated with worse disease-free survival (HR 1.57, P=0.043). In multivariate analysis, tumor diameter, parametrial infiltration, and lymph node metastasis, but not the presence of a somatic mutation, were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion Potentially targetable somatic mutations occurred in 34% of cervical tumors with different distributions among histological subtypes. Precise classification of cervical carcinomas in combination with mutation profiling is valuable for predicting disease outcome and may guide the development and selection of tumor-specific treatment approaches. PMID:26197069

  16. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. ... and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less ...

  17. Medullary carcinoma of thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by radiation therapy to the neck given ...

  18. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive than other types of basal ... to treat them early and with slightly more aggressive techniques. Excision – The basal cell carcinoma is cut ...

  19. Ampullary carcinoma in a patient with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jitendra H; Yadav, Amitabh; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-04-01

    The most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas is pancreatic divisum (Tadokoro et al. in Anat Res Int 2011:1-7, 2011). Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is extremely rare (Schnedl et al. in World J Gastroenterol 15(3):376-377, 2009). We are reporting a case of agenesis of dorsal pancreas presented with ampullary carcinoma. PMID:25972636

  20. Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Xenoulis, P G

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. PMID:25586803

  1. Clear cell carcinoma of exocrine pancreas: a rare tumor with an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Ray, Biswajit; New, Norman E; Wedgwood, Kevin R

    2005-03-01

    Metastatic clear cell carcinomas are relatively common from primary tumors arising in the kidney, female genital tract, adrenal cortex, and lung, but they rarely occur from primary tumors of the pancreas. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic tumor with marked clear cell changes in a 46-year-old white man presenting with a pseudocyst of the pancreas. At laparotomy, there was a hard area in the head of the pancreas and another hard nodule was present in the omentum. The histologic and immunohistochemical test of the excised omental nodule exhibited features consistent with clear cell carcinoma from pancreatic primary. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a metastatic clear cell pancreatic tumor with such an unusual presentation. PMID:15714142

  2. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis. PMID:25915425

  3. Oral bacteria in pancreatic cancer: mutagenesis of the p53 tumour suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    Öğrendik, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, worldwide. The prevalence of this disease is very high in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Orodigestive cancers are frequently seen in patients with periodontitis. These findings suggest that this type of cancer may have some bacterial origins. This study hypothesizes that the peptidyl arginine deaminase (PAD) enzymes found in oral bacteria may be responsible for the p53 point mutations that occur in patients with pancreatic cancer. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola possess the PAD enzyme, and p53 arginine mutations have been detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the Pro allele p53Arg72-Pro is a risk factor for the development of this cancer. Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers have been found to be higher in patients with pancreatic cancer as compared to healthy controls. The hypothesis in question can be tested if the DNA of P. gingivalis or the antibodies against P. gingivalis can be detected in patients with the p53 arginine mutation.If this hypothesis is true, it could reveal the real cause of pancreatic cancer, which is a fatal disease. Further studies are necessary in order to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26617937

  4. Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alex C.; Sabolch, Aaron; Raymond, Victoria M.; Kandathil, Asha; Caoili, Elaine M.; Jolly, Shruti; Miller, Barbra S.; Giordano, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare endocrine malignancy, often with an unfavorable prognosis. Here we summarize the knowledge about diagnosis, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and therapy of ACC. Over recent years, multidisciplinary clinics have formed and the first international treatment trials have been conducted. This review focuses on evidence gained from recent basic science and clinical research and provides perspectives from the experience of a large multidisciplinary clinic dedicated to the care of patients with ACC. PMID:24423978

  5. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Pancreatic abscess Symptoms: Jaundice • fatigue • anorexia • subjective weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration • biliary stenting • endoscopic cholangiopancreatography Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare coexistance of disease or pathology Background: Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. Case Report: A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient’s symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. Conclusions: EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this

  6. Lysates of S. pyogenes serotype M49 induce pancreatic tumor growth delay by specific and unspecific antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Linnebacher, Michael; Maletzki, Claudia; Emmrich, Jörg; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2008-10-01

    Treatment of pancreatic cancer by active unspecific bacterial immunotherapy is a promising new strategy. Recently, we showed that a single intratumoral injection of wildtype Streptococcus pyogenes M49 results in complete regression of pancreatic carcinoma in mice mediated both by unspecific cytotoxicity and by specific immune reactions against tumor cells. As for potential clinical use, conditioning and especially inactivation of bacteria would abolish the risk of systemic bacterial infections; we here explored the potential of a streptococcal lysate prepared by bacteriophage lysine to affect pancreatic carcinoma growth in vivo. Application of the lysate into established Panc02 tumors resulted in pronounced growth cessation accompanied by raises in levels of circulating monocytes, granulocytes, and natural killer cells. Detailed analysis of splenocyte subsets revealed lysate-induced transient increases in pre-B cells followed by raised levels of activated T cells. Moreover, blood levels of proinflammatory, T helper-1-type cytokines were significantly elevated. These systemic immunologic effects were accompanied by massive infiltrations of cytotoxic T cells into the tumors. Concomitantly, lymphocytes obtained from treated mice specifically recognized Panc02 tumor cells in IFN-gamma-enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot and in cellular cytotoxicity assays. In rechallenge experiments, these immunologic effector cells were found to delay, but not completely prevent growth of secondary tumors. However, when considering the notoriously depressed immune status of individuals suffering from pancreatic carcinoma, the orchestrated antitumoral immune responses we analyzed here in detail significantly strengthen the potential usefulness of microbial compounds as active unspecific immunotherapeutic agent for treatment of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18779749

  7. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  8. Lipolysis of Visceral Adipocyte Triglyceride by Pancreatic Lipases Converts Mild Acute Pancreatitis to Severe Pancreatitis Independent of Necrosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A.; DeLany, James P.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. Ureteral Metastasis as the Presenting Manifestation of Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arvind, Nand Kishore; Singh, Onkar; Gupta, Shilpi; Ali, Qutub

    2013-01-01

    We recently cared for a patient with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who presented with ureteral metastasis followed by hydroureteronephrosis long before the appearance of any symptoms related to the primary lesion. The entity is extremely rare; only seven similar cases are on record in the scientific literature. No recent review exists on this topic. This encouraged us to present our case along with the previous cases of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with ureteral metastasis that have been reported. PMID:24223025

  12. Transgastric Pancreatic Necrosectomy: How I Do It.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Nakeeb, Attila; House, Michael G; Jester, Andrea L

    2016-02-01

    Necrotizing pancreatitis is a serious medical problem that often requires intervention to debride necrotic pancreatic and peripancreatic tissue. Recently, minimally invasive approaches have been applied to pancreatic necrosectomy. The purpose of this report is to review the history of transgastric pancreatic debridement, identify appropriate patient selection criteria, and highlight technical "pearls." We present this subject matter in the context of our own clinical experience, with a primary focus on a "How I Do It" type of technical description. PMID:26691148

  13. Stromal expression of SPARC in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Hammel, Pascal; Raymond, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) stands as the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive tract, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Therapeutic options for unresectable PDAC are extremely limited and there is a pressing need for expanded therapeutic approaches to improve current options available with gemcitabine-based regimens. With PDAC displaying one of the most prominent desmoplastic stromal reactions of all carcinomas, recent research has focused on the microenvironment surrounding PDAC cells. Secreted protein acid and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which is overexpressed in PDAC, may display tumor suppressor functions in several cancers (e.g., in colorectal, ovarian, prostate cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia) but also appears to be overexpressed in other tumor types (e.g., breast cancer, melanoma, and glioblastoma). The apparent contradictory functions of SPARC may yield inhibition of angiogenesis via inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor, while promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion through matrix metalloprotease expression. This feature is of particular interest in PDAC where SPARC overexpression in the stroma stands along with inhibition of angiogenesis and promotion of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Several therapeutic strategies to deplete stromal tissue have been developed. In this review, we focused on key preclinical and clinical data describing the role of SPARC in PDAC biology, the properties, and mechanisms of delivery of drugs that interact with SPARC and discuss the proof-of-concept clinical trials using nab-paclitaxel. PMID:23690170

  14. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  15. Acute pancreatitis induced by anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ben Kridis, W; Khanfir, A; Frikha, M

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is rare (1.4-2%). This report describes a 20-year-old female patient who developed acute pancreatitis while being treated for neurosarcoma of abdominal wall with the ifosfamide and doxorubicin regimen. Although it is unusual, it is important to consider chemotherapeutic agents as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:24455804

  16. Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

  17. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-02-28

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  18. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan CSPG4 as a Novel Hypoxia-Sensitive Marker in Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Gaida, Matthias M.; Bauer, Andrea S.; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissuehigh/seralow-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct epithelial

  19. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. CASE REPORT A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. CONCLUSIONS EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this practice may be associated with an inherently significant risk of misdiagnosis and subsequent unnecessary surgery, as illustrated by this case. Malignancy was initially suspected in our patient and surgical resection was recommended. Endoscopic measures were only pursued to complete staging. We propose that EUS-guided biopsy may be a crucial diagnostic step in the management algorithm

  1. Pancreatic Lymphangioma as a Rare Pancreatic Mass: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Talaiezadeh, Abdolhasan; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Bakhtiari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystic lymphangiomas of abdomen has mostly involved mesentery and retro peritoneum that should be considered as a differential diagnosis of abdominal masses. Pancreatic lymphangiomas were extremely rare that should be differentiated from neoplastic pancreatic cysts. Patients have commonly presented with epigastric pain and a relevant palpable epigastric mass. Case Presentation A 65-year-old lady who has presented with epigastric pain, then during investigations, a cystic tumor which located in the tail of pancreas, has found. Whereas definite diagnosis of tumor with routine procedures was impossible, the tumor has completely resected by distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. Pathology and IHC was suggestive of benign lymphangioma. Conclusions According to this presentation diagnosis of cystic lymphangioma of the tail of pancreas should be considered as a differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions and complete excision has been the treatment of choice. PMID:27366308

  2. Management of acute pancreatitis (AP) – Polish Pancreatic Club recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rosołowski, Mariusz; Lipiński, Michał; Dobosz, Marek; Durlik, Marek; Głuszek, Stanisław; Kuśnierz, Katarzyna; Lampe, Paweł; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Nowak-Niezgoda, Magdalena; Radomańska, Barbara; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Wereszczyńska-Siemiątkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    The presented recommendations concern the current management of acute pancreatitis. The recommendations relate to the diagnostics and treatment of early and late phases of acute pancreatitis and complications of the disease taking into consideration surgical and endoscopic methods. All the recommendations were subjected to voting by the members of the Working Group of the Polish Pancreatic Club, who evaluated them every single time on a five-point scale, where A means full acceptance, B means acceptance with a certain reservation, C means acceptance with a serious reservation, D means rejection with a certain reservation and E means full rejection. The results of the vote, together with commentary, are provided for each recommendation. PMID:27350832

  3. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  4. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  5. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  6. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  7. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  8. Role of Neurogenic Inflammation in Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Westlund, Karin N.

    2009-01-01

    Pain arising from pancreatic diseases can become chronic and difficult to treat. There is a paucity of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that sensitize neural pathways that transmit noxious information from visceral organs. In this review, neurogenic inflammation is presented as a possible amplifier of the noxious signal from peripheral organs including the pancreas. The nerve pathways that transmit pancreatic pain are also reviewed as a conduit of the amplified signals. It is likely that components of these visceral pain pathways can also be sensitized after neurogenic inflammation. PMID:16215298

  9. Noninvasive Radiofrequency Field Destruction of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts Treated with Targeted Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Zhu, Cihui; Massey, Katheryn L.; Thompson, C. Shea; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Hamir, Amir N.; Curley, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with few effective treatments. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are potentially therapeutic because of the safety demonstrated thus far and their physio-chemical characteristics. We utilized the astounding heating rates of AuNPs in nonionizing radiofrequency (RF) radiation to investigate human pancreatic xenograft destruction in a murine model. Experimental Design Weekly, Panc-1 and Capan-1 human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in immunocompromised mice were exposed to an RF field 36 hours after treatment (intraperitoneal) with cetuximab or PAM4 antibody conjugated AuNPs, respectively. Tumor sizes were measured weekly while necrosis and cleaved caspase-3 were investigated with H&E staining and immunofluorescence, respectively. In addition, AuNP internalization and cytotoxicity were investigated in vitro with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. Results Panc-1 cells demonstrated increased apoptosis with decreased viability after treatment with cetuximab conjugated AuNPs and RF field exposure (p = 0.00005). Differences in xenograft volumes were observed within 2 weeks of initiating therapy. Cetuximab-conjugated and PAM4-conjugated AuNPs demonstrated RF field-induced destruction of Panc-1 and Capan-1 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts after six weeks of weekly treatment (p = 0.004 and p = 0.035, respectively). There was no evidence of injury to murine organs. Cleaved caspase-3 and necrosis were both increased in treated tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates a potentially novel cancer therapy by non-invasively inducing intracellular hyperthermia with targeted AuNPs in an RF field. While the therapy is dependent on the specificity of the targeting antibody, normal tissues were without toxicity despite systemic therapy and whole body RF field exposure. PMID:21138869

  10. Thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Skolnik, E.M.; Baim, H.M.; Becker, S.P.; Katz, A.H.; Mantravadi, R.V.

    1980-12-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma was studied with regard to mode of presentation, initial findings, treatment and survival. The classic signs, symptoms, physical and scan findings were found to be present in approximately 70% of the patients. Prognosis was found to be dependent on age of presentation more than any other factor. Patients with prior exposure to radiation were found to have more extensive disease and require more extensive surgery but ultimately had the same prognosis for 15-year cure. Treatment for distant metastatic disease by surgery, radioactive iodine and external radiation all resulted in long-term survival in certain cases.

  11. Adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) include diagnostic and prognostic risk stratification algorithms, increasing evidence of the impact of historical therapies on overall survival, and emerging targets from integrated epigenomic and genomic analyses. Advances include proper clinical and molecular characterization of all patients with ACC, standardization of proliferative index analyses, referral of these patients to large cancer referral centers at the time of first surgery, and development of new trials in patients with well-characterized ACC. Networking and progress in the molecular characterization of ACC constitute the basis for significant future therapeutic breakthroughs. PMID:26038209

  12. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  13. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas. PMID:2434670

  14. Ascariasis of the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Klimovskij, Michail; Dulskas, Audrius; Kraulyte, Zita; Mikalauskas, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    Ascariasis is a common helminthic disease worldwide, although Lithuania and other European countries are not considered endemic areas. The presence of the Ascaris worm in the biliary tree causes choledocholithiasis-like symptoms. We report a case of pancreatic duct ascariasis causing such symptoms. A 73-year-old Lithuanian woman underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suspecting choledocholithiasis. Contrast injection into the common bile duct demonstrated a slightly dilated biliary tree without any filling defects, and the tail of an Ascaris worm protruding from the opening of the papilla Vater. The worm was captured by a snare but escaped deep into the duct. After a small wirsungotomy the worm was retrieved from the pancreatic duct. The patient received a 150 mg dose of levamisole orally repeated 7 days later and was discharged after complete resolution of symptoms. This first reported sporadic case of pancreatic duct ascariasis in Lithuania was successfully treated with ERCP and Levamisole. PMID:26374772

  15. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  16. Optogenetic Control of Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Reinbothe, Thomas M; Mollet, Inês G

    2016-01-01

    In light of the emerging diabetes epidemic, new experimental approaches in islet research are needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind pancreatic islet dysfunction and to facilitate the development of more effective therapies. Optogenetics has created numerous new experimental tools enabling us to gain insights into processes little was known about before. The spatial and temporal precision that it can achieve is also attractive for studying the cells of the pancreatic islet and we set out to explore the possibilities of this technology for our purposes. We here describe how to use the islets of an "optogenetic beta-cell" mouse line in islet batch incubations and Ca(2+) imaging experiments. This protocol enables light-induced insulin release and provides an all-optical solution to control and measure intracellular Ca(2+) levels in pancreatic beta-cells. The technique is easy to set up and provides a useful tool for controlling the activity of distinct islet cell populations. PMID:26965119

  17. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing “landscape”

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  18. Prediction of pancreatic necrosis by dynamic pancreatography.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, E L; Murphy, F; Ferguson, C

    1989-01-01

    Parenchymal necrosis has recently been recognized as the principal determinant of the incidence of secondary infection in acute pancreatitis. Because secondary infection of pancreatic necrosis accounts for more than 80% of all deaths from acute pancreatitis, a method for determining the presence or absence of parenchymal necrosis would offer considerable prognostic and therapeutic information. Thirty seven patients with unequivocal acute pancreatitis and five normal controls were prospectively studied with intravenous bolus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (dynamic pancreatography). In the absence of pancreatic necrosis, there were no significant differences in parenchymal enhancement between any of the following patient groups: controls (5), uncomplicated pancreatitis (20), pancreatic abscess (7), or peripancreatic necrosis (4)(p less than 0.05). On the other hand, pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was significantly reduced or absent in all six patients with segmental or diffuse pancreatic necrosis (p less than 0.05). Postcontrast pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was also found to be inversely correlated with the number of Ranson signs (p less than 0.001). Dynamic pancreatography offers prognostic information and is a safe and reliable technique for predicting the presence or absence of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis. Images Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Fig. 5. Figs. 6A and B. Fig. 7. PMID:2802834

  19. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  20. Parathyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Givi, B.; Shah, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare endocrine malignancy. The reported incidence is from 0.5 to 5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases in various series. The cause is unknown, but clinical correlations with different genetic syndromes exist. Mutations in the HPRT2 gene seem to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Men and women are equally affected, usually in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Most patients will present with signs and symptoms of hypercalcaemia. Cases of non-functioning carcinoma are exceedingly rare. Surgical resection is the most effective method of treatment and palliation. A significant proportion of patients will experience recurrence, and will need further surgical and, eventually, medical management of hypercalcaemia. The disease is progressive but slow growing. Most patients will require multiple operations to resect recurrent disease. The main cause of morbidity and mortality is the sequela of uncontrolled chronic hypercalcaemia rather than tumour burden. The current paper will review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and diagnostic work-up of this disease. Surgical management in different scenarios is reviewed in detail, followed by other types of treatment and management of incurable disease. PMID:20510594

  1. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  2. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Matsusue, Eiji; Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-06-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  3. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  4. EUS - Fine- Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kalogeraki, Alexandra; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Tamiolakis, Dimitrios; Karvela-Kalogeraki, Iliana; Karvelas-Kalogerakis, Mihailos; Segredakis, John; Papadakis, Michael; Moustou, Eleni; Datseri, Galateia; Tzardi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Solid masses of the pancreas represent a variety of benign and malignant neoplasms of the exocrine and endocrine tissues of the pancreas. A tissue diagnosis is often required to direct therapy in the face of uncertain diagnosis or if the patient is not a surgical candidate either due to advanced disease or comorbidities. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a relatively new technology that employs endoscopy and high-frequency ultrasound (US). EUS involves imaging of the pancreatic head and the uncinate from the duodenum and imaging of the body and tail from the stomach. It has been shown to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of pancreatic masses. It is superior to extracorporeal US and computed tomographic (CT) scans, especially when the pancreatic tumor is smaller than 2-3 cm. Although EUS is highly sensitive in detecting pancreatic solid masses, its ability to differentiate between inflammatory masses and malignant disease is limited. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) brushing, CT-guided biopsies, and transabdominal ultrasound (US) have been the standard nonsurgical methods for obtaining a tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions, but a substantial false-negative rate has been reported. Transabdominal US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) has been used for tissue diagnosis in patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. It has been shown to be highly specific, with no false-positive diagnoses. With the advent of curvilinear echoendoscopes, transgastric and transduodenal EUS-FNAB of the pancreas have become a reality EUS with FNAB has revolutionized the ability to diagnose and stage cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and assess the pancreas. Gastrointestinal cancers can be looked at with EUS and their depth of penetration into the intestinal wall can be determined. Any suspicious appearing lymph nodes can be biopsied using EUS/FNAB. The pancreas is another organ that is well visualized with EUS. Abnormalities such as tumors

  5. Comparison of Two Combination Chemotherapy Regimens Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-30

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. Expression of dynamin immunoreactivity in experimental pancreatic tumors induced in rat by mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea.

    PubMed

    Valentich, M A; Cook, T; Urrutia, R

    1996-04-19

    Dynamins are GTPases which support receptor-mediated endocytosis and bind to several tyrosine kinase receptor-associated proteins known to mediate cell proliferation and differentiation. We have recently established that dynamin expression correlates with normal neuronal (Torre et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 32411-32417) and acinar pancreatic cell differentiation (Cook et al., Mol. Biol. Cell, 6 (1995) 405a). To begin to understand the role of dynamin in neoplastic pancreatic cell differentiation, we have followed the expression of this protein by immunohistochemistry during the development of pancreatic tumors in a mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-based carcinogenesis model recently developed in our laboratory (Monis and Valentich, Carcinogenesis, 14 (1993) 929-933). After a single intraperitoneal injection (50 mg/g body wt) of this carcinogen, rats fed with mancozeb develop pancreatic focal acinar hyperplasia (FACH), dysplastic foci (DYF) displaying acinar-like and ductular-like structures, and ductular-like carcinoma in situ (CIS). After histochemical staining using a monoclonal anti-dynamin antibody, high levels of this protein are consistently observed in well-differentiated acinar tumors (FACH). In contrast, dynamin immunoreactivity is almost undetectable in more advanced lesions showing a ductular-like phenotype (ductular-like DYF and CIS). This change in the expression pattern of dynamin during the progression of acinar into ductular-like DYF and CIS lesions correlates with recent findings from our laboratory showing a differential expression pattern for dynamin in pancreatic cells during embryonic development, with ductular-like precursor cells expressing low levels of this protein. Based upon these results, we conclude that more advanced ductular-like neoplastic cells induced by the carcinogen NMU in rat pancreas behave phenotypically like pancreatic precursor cells in their pattern of expression for dynamin. PMID:8603375

  7. Eflornithine (DFMO) Prevents Progression of Pancreatic Cancer by Modulating Ornithine Decarboxylase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Madka, Venkateshwar; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Sadeghi, Michael; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the key rate limiting enzyme in the polyamine synthesis pathway and it is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. We found that polyamine synthesis and modulation of ODC signaling occurs at early stages of pancreatic precursor lesions and increases as the tumor progresses in Kras activated p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. Interest in use of the ODC inhibitor Eflornithine (DFMO) as a cancer chemopreventive agent has increased in recent years since ODC was shown to be transactivated by the c-myc oncogene and to cooperate with the ras oncogene in malignant transformation of epithelial tissues. We tested the effects of DFMO on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in genetically engineered Kras mice. The KrasG12D/+ mice fed DFMO at 0.1 and 0.2 % in the diet showed a significant inhibition (p<0.0001) of PDAC incidence compared with mice fed control diet. Pancreatic tumor weights were decreased by 31–43% (p<0.03–0.001) with both doses of DFMO. DFMO at 0.1 and 0.2 % caused a significant suppression (27 and 31%, P<0.02–0.004) of PanIN 3 lesions (carcinoma in situ). DFMO-treated pancreas exhibited modulated ODC pathway components along with decreased proliferation and increased expression of p21/p27 as compared with pancreatic tissues derived from mice fed control diet. In summary, our preclinical data indicate that DFMO has potential for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer and should be evaluated in other PDAC models and in combination with other drugs in anticipation of future clinical trials. PMID:25248858

  8. Cervical carcinoma in Algiers, Algeria: human papillomavirus and lifestyle risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Doudja; Muñoz, Nubia; Herrero, Rolando; Arslan, Annie; Bouhadef, Anissa; Oublil, Malika; Djedeat, Belhout; Fontanière, Bernard; Snijders, Peter; Meijer, Chris; Franceschi, Silvia

    2005-01-20

    We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Algiers, Algeria. A total of 198 cervical carcinoma (CC) cases (including 15 adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas) and 202 age-matched control women were included. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical cells was evaluated using a PCR assay. Odds ratios and corresponding confidence intervals were computed by means of unconditional multiple logistic regression models. HPV infection was detected in 97.7% of CC cases and 12.4% of control women (OR = 635). Nineteen different HPV types were found. HPV 16 was the most common type in both CC cases and control women, followed by HPV 18 and 45. Twelve types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 66 and 73) were found as single infections in CC cases. Multiple HPV infections did not show a higher odds ratio for CC than single infections. In addition to HPV infection, husband's extramarital sexual relationships with other women (OR = 4.8) or prostitutes (OR = 3.2), residing in a rural environment for most of one's life (OR = 4.9) and indicators of poor sanitation or poor hygiene were the strongest risk factors for CC. Oral contraceptive use was unrelated to CC risk, while multiparity emerged as a significant risk factor after adjustment for sexual habits. Intrauterine device users showed a lower CC risk than nonusers. The role of major risk factors, except inside toilet, was confirmed in the analysis restricted to HPV-positive women. The distribution of HPV types in CC cases and control women in Algeria is more similar to the one found in Europe than the one in sub-Saharan Africa, where HPV 16 is less prevalent. A vaccine against HPV 16 and 18 may be effective in more than 3/4 of CCs in Algeria. PMID:15455386

  9. Colloid (mucinous non-cystic) carcinoma of the pancreas: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YANG; ZHU, YA-YUN; YUAN, ZHOU

    2015-01-01

    Colloid carcinoma (CC) of the pancreas, also known as mucinous non-cystic carcinoma, is a rare histological variant of pancreatic cancer. The present study reports the case of a 65-year-old male with a pancreatic head tumor 4.6×3.1 cm in size. The tumor had not invaded the superior mesenteric or celiac arteries. Laboratory data showed elevated alkaline phosphatase, γ-gluytamyl transpeptidase and cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels. The patient underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), and the pathology revealed CC extending to the submucosa of the duodenum, with mild atypical hyperplasia of the pancreatic duct. The patient was negative for circulating tumor cells, indicating a good prognosis. The CA19-9 concentration decreased to within the normal range following surgery. The present study reports a rare case of CC of the pancreas presenting with obstructive jaundice, in which a PD procedure was performed. Primary surgical treatment with curative intent is the optimal management and this subtype of pancreatic cancer is associated with a better prognosis compared with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26722311

  10. Hexon Modification to Improve the Activity of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors against Neoplastic and Stromal Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q. Andreas; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety. PMID:25692292

  11. Solid adenoma with exclusive hepatocellular differentiation: a new variant among pancreatic benign neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Cuilliere, Peggy; Lazure, Thierry; Bui, Matthieu; Fabre, Monique; Buffet, Catherine; Gayral, François; Bedossa, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    We report a unique, previously unreported pancreatic tumor with hepatoid differentiation associated with serous microcystic adenoma in a 70-year-old man. These two lesions localized, respectively, at the body and the tail of the pancreas, were found incidentally on abdominal ultrasonography. Serum alpha-fetoprotein was not increased and no hepatic lesion was displayed on computed tomography. A subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. The patient is alive and well 12 months after resection. Pathological examination showed a very unusual encapsulated solid tumor with hepatocytic differentiation, bile production and immunoreactivity for hepatocyte paraffin-1 antibody. The tumor cells were negative for endocrine (neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin) and acinar (amylase, trypsin) markers. Ultrastructurally, zymogen and neurosecretory granules were absent. The features of the tumor were almost indistinguishable from those of hepatocellular adenoma; therefore, we believe that this solid hepatoid tumor may represent a variant of pancreatic adenoma. Recognition of this entity is important because the only reported pancreatic hepatoid tumors to date have been malignant. The main differential diagnoses include hepatoid ductal adenocarcinoma, hepatoid acinar cell carcinoma, primitive hepatoid endocrine tumor, and metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:12447684

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Marie-Annick; Neuveut, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a widespread human pathogen that causes liver inflammation, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent sequencing technologies have refined our knowledge of the genomic landscape and pathogenesis of HCC, but the mechanisms by which HBV exerts its oncogenic role remain controversial. In a prevailing view, inflammation, liver damage, and regeneration may foster the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic defects leading to cancer onset. However, a more direct and specific contribution of the virus is supported by clinical and biological observations. Among genetically heterogeneous HCCs, HBV-related tumors display high genomic instability, which may be attributed to the ability of HBV to integrate its DNA into the host cell genome, provoking chromosomal alterations and insertional mutagenesis of cancer genes. The viral transactivator HBx may also participate in transformation by deregulating diverse cellular machineries. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms linking HBV to HCC will improve prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25646384

  13. [Parathyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Poissonnet, Gilles; Castillo, Laurent; Bozec, Alexandre; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Ettore, Francette; Santini, José; Demard, François; Dassonville, Olivier

    2006-03-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare disease accounting for 1 to 5% of parathyroid neoplasms. This malignant tumour must be suspected when a severe primary hyperparathyroidism occurs with high hypercalcemia and elevated parathormon levels. At this time, a cervical mass is often palpable. Both head and neck ultrasonography and 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy are the best preoperative imaging tests to suspect and localize the tumour. Surgical approach with simultaneous tumorectomy and hemithyroidectomy, completed by selective neck dissection (level VI) is the treatment of choice. An elective lateral neck dissection should be performed if necessary. Tumour control should be monitored by regular measurement of calcium and parathormon levels. Local recurrence or metastasis risk is 30 to 70% and the 5 year overall survival about 50 to 80%. In case of recurrence, aggressive surgical management should be applied and adjuvant radiation therapy may be discussed. PMID:16567315

  14. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. Nutritional support for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pisters, P W; Ranson, J H

    1992-09-01

    The current review has summarized current data relevant to the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis. Selection of the most appropriate form of nutritional support for patients with acute pancreatitis is intimately linked to a thorough understanding of the effects of various forms of enteral and parenteral nutrition on physiologic exocrine secretory mechanisms. Two basic concepts have emerged from the multiple studies that have addressed these issues to date: 1, enteral feeds should have low fat composition and be delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz to minimize exocrine pancreatic secretion and 2, parenteral substrate infusions, alone or in combinations similar to those administered during TPN, do not stimulate exocrine pancreatic secretion. From a practical standpoint, most patients with acute pancreatitis are diagnosed by nonoperative means and will manifest some degree of paralytic ileus during the early phase of the disease. Therefore, jejunal feeds are usually not a therapeutic option early in the course of this disease. On the basis of the clinical studies reviewed herein we propose general guidelines for the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis: 1, most patients with mild uncomplicated pancreatitis (one to two prognostic signs) do not benefit from nutritional support; 2, nutritional support should begin early in the course of patients with moderate to severe disease (as soon as hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory stability permit); 3, initial nutritional support should be through the parenteral route and include fat emulsion in amounts sufficient to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency (no objective data exist to recommend specific amino acid formulations); 4, patients requiring operation for diagnosis or complications of the disease should have a feeding jejunostomy placed at the time of operation for subsequent enteral nutrition using a low fat formula, such as Precision HN (Sandoz, 1.3 percent calories as fat

  17. Differential roles of inflammatory cells in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Dummer, Annegret; Sendler, Mathias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; van den Brandt, Cindy; Teller, Steffen; Aghdassi, Ali; Nitsche, Claudia; Lerch, Markus M

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis per 100,000 of population ranges from 5 to 80. Patients suffering from hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis die in 10-24% of cases. 80% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease immoderate alcohol consumption. As of today no specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Elevated C-reactive protein levels above 130,mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis or other infectious complications. However, as premature intracellular protease activation is known to be the primary event in acute pancreatitis. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by an early inflammatory immune response syndrome (SIRS) and a subsequent compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) contributing to severity as much as protease activation does. CARS suppresses the immune system and facilitates nosocomial infections including infected pancreatic necrosis, one of the most feared complications of the disease. A number of attempts have been made to suppress the early systemic inflammatory response but even if these mechanisms have been found to be beneficial in animal models they failed in daily clinical practice. PMID:22320916

  18. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  19. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  20. The omega-hydroxy palmitic acid induced apoptosis in human lung carcinoma cell lines H596 and A549.

    PubMed

    Abe, Akihisa; Yamane, Mototeru; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Isamu

    2002-02-01

    We have found that omega-hydroxy palmitic acid (16-hydroxy palmitic acid, omega-HPA) has both cell growth inhibiting and cell death inducing actions on human lung adenosquamous carcinoma cell line H596 and adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Further, these effects were dose- and time-dependent in both cell lines. However, in squamous carcinoma cell line H226, omega-HPA had no cytotoxic effect. On the other hand, in the human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell line H128, this compound showed weak cytotoxicity. The sensitivity toward omega-HPA was higher in H596 cells than in A549 cells. In both H596 and A549 cells, cell growth was inhibited to 24.4 and 9.4%, respectively, by treatment with 100 microM omega-HPA for 12 h. In the 24 h treatment cells, growth inhibition was increased to 100 and 38.1%, respectively. In cytotoxicity experiments, the number of dead cells increased with incubation times in the presence of omega-HPA: on three days incubation with 100 microM omega-HPA, viability was 0 and 13.5%, respectively, in H596 and A549 cells. Further, the fragmentation of DNA to oligonucleosomal-sized ladder fragments, which is an index of apoptosis, was observed in both cell lines on treatment with omega-HPA. Therefore, it is assumed that these cell deaths induced by omega-HPA, were apoptosis in these cell lines. Since the number of dead cells following treatment with omega-HPA decreased by treatment with omega-HPA in combination with Z-VAD-fmk, a caspase family inhibitor, it is thought that apoptotic cell death was related to caspase activity. PMID:12186781