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1

Clinicopathologic features and outcomes following surgery for pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is a rare pancreatic malignancy subtype. We investigated the clinicopathological features and outcome of pancreatic ASC patients after surgery. Methods The medical records of 12 patients with pancreatic ASC undergoing surgical treatment (1993 to 2006) were retrospectively reviewed. Survival data of patients with stage IIB pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ASC undergoing surgical resection were compared. Results Symptoms included abdominal pain (91.7%), body weight loss (83.3%), anorexia (41.7%) and jaundice (25.0%). Tumors were located at pancreatic head in 5 (41.7%) patients, tail in 5 (41.7%), and body in 4 (33.3%). Median tumor size was 6.3 cm. Surgical resection was performed on 7 patients, bypass surgery on 3, and exploratory laparotomy with biopsy on 2. No surgical mortality was identified. Seven (58.3%) and 11 (91.7%) patients died within 6 and 12 months of operation, respectively. Median survival of 12 patients was 4.41 months. Seven patients receiving surgical resection had median survival of 6.51 months. Patients with stage IIB pancreatic ASC had shorter median survival compared to those with adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Aggressive surgical management does not appear effective in treating pancreatic ASC patients. Strategies involving non-surgical treatment such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or target agents should be tested.

Hsu, Jun-Te; Chen, Han-Ming; Wu, Ren-Chin; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Jan, Yi-Yin; Chen, Miin-Fu

2008-01-01

2

Resected pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma: clinicopathologic review and evaluation of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in 38 patients  

PubMed Central

Summary Pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare morphological variant of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with an especially poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify clinicopathologic features associated with prognosis, assess whether the percentage of squamous differentiation in pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma is associated with an inferior prognosis, and examine the impact of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy on overall survival. Forty-five (1.2%) of 3651 patients who underwent pancreatic resection at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, between 1986 and 2007 were identified with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with any squamous differentiation. All pathologic specimens were re-reviewed. Statistical analyses were performed on the 38 patients amenable to adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for whom clinical outcome data could be obtained. Median age was 68 years (61% male). Sixty-one percent underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Median tumor size was 5.0 cm. Seventy-six percent of carcinomas were node positive, 37% were margin-positive resections, and 68% had 30% or more squamous differentiation. Median overall survival of the pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma cohort was 10.9 months (range, 2.1-140.6 months; 95% confidence interval, 8.2-12.5 months). Adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was associated with superior overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma (P = .005). Adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was associated with improved survival in patients with tumors 3 cm or larger and vascular or perineural invasion (P = .02, .03, .02, respectively). The proportion of squamous differentiation was not associated with median overall survival (<30% versus ?30%, P = .82). Survival after pancreatic resection of pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma is poor. Treatment with adjuvant chemoradiation therapy is associated with improved survival. The proportion of squamous differentiation in resected pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma specimens does not appear to impact overall survival.

Voong, K. Ranh; Davison, Jon; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Uy, Manuel O.; Hsu, Charles C.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Laheru, Daniel; Rudra, Sonali; Swartz, Michael J.; Nathan, Hari; Edil, Barish H.; Schulick, Richard; Cameron, John L.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

2013-01-01

3

Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Clear Cell and Rhabdoid Components. A Case Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context In as much as no such variant of this pancreatic tumour has been previously reported in the literature, we report an unusual case of an adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas characterized by clear cells and rhabdoid cells. Case report A 75-year-old man presented with upper abdominal distention, dyspepsia, jaundice, and significant weight loss over a period of 3 months.

Mina Jamali; Stefano Serra; Runjan Chetty

4

Adenosquamous carcinoma of the sigmoid colon: a case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Adenosquamous carcinoma of the colon consisting of both glandular and squamous histopathologic features is a rare colorectal neoplasm. Metastasis commonly occurs in right and transverse colon. A 71-year-old Caucasian man presented with a four-month history of intermittent rectal bleeding. Pathologic analysis of biopsy specimen revealed an adenosquamous carcinoma of sigmoid colon. Sigmoid resection with a proximal and distal resection was performed. Early detection and radical operation with other available therapeutic modalities may improve clinical outcome.

Shafaghi, Afshin; Askari, Kourosh; Ashoobi, Mohammad Taghi; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz

2013-01-01

5

Adenosquamous carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater - a rare disease at unusual location  

PubMed Central

Adenosquamous carcinoma is defined as a tumor in which both glandular and squamous elements are histologically malignant. Although some published studies have analyzed and discussed adenosquamous carcinomas, hybrid malignancy of the ampulla of Vater has rarely been discussed thus far in the literature. In this study, we report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with jaundice and intermittent abdominal dull pain that persisted for several weeks. The patient was diagnosed with adenosquamous carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. The final diagnosis was adenosquamous carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, T3N1M0, stage IIB. Although R0 resection was performed, he had multiple liver metastases 2 months after the operation; he died 4 months later. Upon reviewing the medical records of our institute, we identified 4 patients who were diagnosed with adenosquamous carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater in the past 2 decades. We also identified only five reported cases of this lesion in the English literature. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a rare disease with a dismal prognosis. Surgical intervention does not appear to prolong patient survival. Early recurrence and distal metastasis may be encountered after surgery.

2013-01-01

6

Primary gastric adenosquamous carcinoma in a Caucasian woman: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Most gastric tumors are adenocarcinomas. Primary gastric adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare malignancy, mostly associated with Asian populations. It constitutes less than one percent of all gastric carcinomas and its clinical presentation is the same as adenocarcinoma. It occurs more frequently in the proximal stomach, usually presents with muscular layer invasion and tends to be found in advanced stages

Gil R Faria; Catarina Eloy; John R Preto; Eduardo L Costa; Teresa Almeida; José Barbosa; Maria Emília Paiva; Joaquim Sousa-Rodrigues; Amadeu Pimenta

2010-01-01

7

Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast with transformation from adenosquamous carcinoma to osteosarcomatoid and spindle cell morphology  

PubMed Central

Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast refers to a heterogenous group of mammary carcinomas that contain a mixture of various cell types, including squamous cells, spindle cells and/or a mesenchymal component, such as bone or cartilage. To the best of our knowledge, the clinical course of a tumour that has undergone a transformation from one type of metaplastic carcinoma to another subtype has not previously been reported. The present study reports the five-year clinical and pathological course of a metaplastic breast carcinoma in a 55-year-old female, who was diagnosed with a sclerosing fibroadenomatous nodule with osseous metaplasia and focal atypia. A recurrent tumour was documented four years later, showing a predominant component of osteosarcoma with adenosquamous carcinoma. Upon pathological review of the initial mass, the diagnosis was changed to low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma. The patient was treated with breast conserving therapy. However, one year later, a recurrent metaplastic carcinoma with spindle cell morphology was documented and surgically removed by mastectomy. Subsequently, pulmonary invasion of the chest wall occurred and the patient eventually succumbed due to the invasive nature of the disease.

CHUTHAPISITH, SUEBWONG; WARNNISSORN, MALEE; AMORNPINYOKIAT, NATTAWUT; PRADNIWAT, KANAPON; ANGSUSINHA, TAMNIT

2013-01-01

8

Transition from Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Adenocarcinoma in Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Lung  

PubMed Central

The heterogeneity of tumor cells is frequently observed in lung cancer, but the clonality of these cells has not yet been established. The distinct components of 12 lung adenosquamous carcinomas were compared by genetic alterations of p53 and K-ras, chromosomal abnormalities at 9p21 and 9q31–32, and immunohistochemical reactions. The immunoreactivity of p53 was consistent in both adenocarcinomatous and squamous cell carcinomatous components as well as in the transitional areas, retaining the morphological characteristics of the distinct components. The same p53 mutation was found in both components of each tumor with p53 overexpression. No K-ras mutations were detected in any of the tumors examined. Three of the four tumors with chromosomal abnormalities detected, one at 9p21 and two at 9q31–32, had coincident abnormalities between the distinct components, whereas one tumor deleted homozygously at 9p21 (D9S259) in the adenocarcinomatous component with loss of heterozygosity in the other component. The expression of squamous cell carcinoma-related antigen in adenocarcinomatous components was significantly higher than that of lung adenocarcinomas (57 ± 5.8% vs. 1.0 ± 0.5%, P < 0.0001), whereas Mucin 1 expression is less in these components (9.0 ± 4.9% vs. 55 ± 8.2%, P = 0.003). These results suggest monoclonal transition from squamous cell carcinoma to adenocarcinoma in lung adenosquamous carcinoma.

Kanazawa, Hironobu; Ebina, Masahito; Ino-oka, Nozomu; Shimizukawa, Minoru; Takahashi, Toru; Fujimura, Shigefumi; Imai, Tadashi; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

2000-01-01

9

A matched study of surgically treated stage IB adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix.  

PubMed

Thirty-eight patients with surgically treated stage IB adenosquamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix (AS) have been matched with patients with other histologic subtypes of adenocarcinoma (A) for stage, lesion size, node status, grade of adenocarcinoma and age at diagnosis. An additional six patients with AS were unable to be matched. Overall 5-year survival and disease-free survival for the matched AS and A were not significantly different, 83 vs. 90%, and 78 vs. 81% nor were the number of recurrences, 8/38 AS vs. 6/38 A, but the mean time to recurrence was significantly shorter in the AS group: 11 vs. 32 months (P = 0.003). A subgroup of AS with a high risk of a poor outcome can be identified based on either lesion size >/= 4 cm, depth of invasion >/= 10 mm or plevic lymph node metastasis. These patients may be suitable candidates for adjuvant therapy before or after surgical treatment. PMID:11578353

Helm, C.W.; Kinney, W.K.; Keeney, G.; Lawrence, W.D.; Frank, T.S.; Gore, H.; Reynolds, R.K.; Soong, S-J.; Partridge, E.E.; Roberts, J.; Podratz, K.; Shingleton, H.M.

1993-07-01

10

Pancreatic uncinate carcinoma: sonographic findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic carcinoma arising from the uncinate process (pancreatic uncinate carcinoma) is relatively rare. We wished to define its clinical manifestations and sonographic findings. Methods: Clinical and sonographic data of eight cases were reviewed. Results: The common bile duct and the pancreatic duct were not dilated until a very late stage. The lesion mimicked a mesenteric tumor in two cases.

M. Sato; H. Ishida; K. Konno; Y. Hamashima; H. Naganuma; T. Komatsuda; M. Funaoka; J. Ishida; S. Watanabe

2001-01-01

11

Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

Pathy, Sushmita; Chander, Subhash

2009-01-01

12

Adenosquamous carcinoma of the uncinate process of the pancreas with synchronous gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach: Case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Recently, the coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with other neoplasms has been studied with increasing frequency. Coexistence of pancreatic cancer with GISTs remains a rarity; however, here, we report a very rare case of adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the uncinate process of the pancreas with synchronous GISTs of the stomach in a 62-year-old female. The patient presented with epigastric discomfort and vomiting. Radiographic imaging revealed two masses; one located at the body of the stomach and the other located at the uncinate process of the pancreas. Intraoperatively, a fine needle aspiration biopsy was conducted in the uncinate process of the pancreas, which revealed the malignancy of the masses. A pancreaticoduodenectomy and partial gastrectomy were then conducted, and subsequent pathological examinations identified an ASC of the pancreas and a GIST of the stomach. In our case, contrary to the majority of previous cases of synchronous GISTs and other malignancies, GIST was not an incidental finding. The initial suspicion on the GIST as the underlying cause of clinical symptoms led to the discovery of the ASC of the uncinate process of the pancreas. PMID:23197997

He, Jin-Jie; Ding, Ke-Feng; Zheng, Lei; Xu, Jing-Hong; Li, Jun; Wu, Yu-Lian; Sun, Li-Feng; Zhou, Dong-Er; Zheng, Shu

2012-09-07

13

Adenosquamous carcinoma of the uncinate process of the pancreas with synchronous gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach: Case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Recently, the coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with other neoplasms has been studied with increasing frequency. Coexistence of pancreatic cancer with GISTs remains a rarity; however, here, we report a very rare case of adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the uncinate process of the pancreas with synchronous GISTs of the stomach in a 62-year-old female. The patient presented with epigastric discomfort and vomiting. Radiographic imaging revealed two masses; one located at the body of the stomach and the other located at the uncinate process of the pancreas. Intraoperatively, a fine needle aspiration biopsy was conducted in the uncinate process of the pancreas, which revealed the malignancy of the masses. A pancreaticoduodenectomy and partial gastrectomy were then conducted, and subsequent pathological examinations identified an ASC of the pancreas and a GIST of the stomach. In our case, contrary to the majority of previous cases of synchronous GISTs and other malignancies, GIST was not an incidental finding. The initial suspicion on the GIST as the underlying cause of clinical symptoms led to the discovery of the ASC of the uncinate process of the pancreas.

HE, JIN-JIE; DING, KE-FENG; ZHENG, LEI; XU, JING-HONG; LI, JUN; WU, YU-LIAN; SUN, LI-FENG; ZHOU, DONG-ER; ZHENG, SHU

2012-01-01

14

Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 regulates the proliferation of oral adenosquamous carcinoma CAL-27 cells in vitro  

PubMed Central

Background The prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma is very poor due to local recurrence and metastasis. This study explores the molecular events involved in oral carcinoma with the goal of developing novel therapeutic strategies. The mitotic spindle is a complex mechanical apparatus required for the accurate segregation of sister chromosomes during mitosis. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is a microtubule-binding subcomplex of the outer kinetochore that is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In recent years, much attention has been focused on determining how SKA proteins interact with each other, as well as their biological role in cancer cells. However, the precise role of SKA1 in oral carcinoma remains unknown. Methods In order to investigate the role of SKA1 in oral cancer, we employed lentivirus-mediated shRNA to silence SKA1 expression in the CAL-27 human oral adenosquamous carcinoma cell line. Results Depletion of SKA1 in CAL-27 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation, as determined by MTT and colony formation assays. These results strongly demonstrate that reduced SKA1 protein levels may cause inhibition of tumor formation. The shRNA-mediated depletion of SKA1 also led to G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Conclusion This is the first report to show that SKA1 plays an important role in the progression of oral adenosqamous carcinoma. Thus, silencing of SKA1 by RNAi might be a potential therapy for this disease.

2013-01-01

15

Development of carcinoma in chronic calcific pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Development of carcinomas of the pancreas over an underlying chronic pancreatitis is a rare event. Diminution of pancreatic calcification, following the development of carcinoma, has been previously reported only once. We report another such case. PMID:2212748

Misra, S P; Thorat, V K; Vij, J C; Anand, B S

1990-06-01

16

Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7.

Lillemoe, K D

1995-01-01

17

[A case of pancreatic carcinoma coexist with pancreatic pseudocyst].  

PubMed

Report of Pancreatic carcinoma coexist with Pancreatic pseudocyst is rare. We have experienced a case of pancreatic carcinoma which was diagnosed and resected by coexisted pancreatic pseudocyst. The patient aged 53 years, complained of epigastric distension and visited our hospital. There was no past history of abdominal injuries and he didn't drink much. A cyst 7cm in diameter was found at pancreatic tail lesion by our examination. By blood chemistry tumor marker CA19.9 was 310 and he complicated diabetes mellitus. We suspected pancreatic carcinoma coexist with pancreatic pseudocyst, so distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. We found a solid tumor sized about 3cm in diameter at just proximal of pancreatic cyst. Since perioperative histological examination revealed adenocarcinoma, we performed lymph node dissection. The tumor was highly differentiated adenocarcinoma which invaded retroperitoneum in some lesion. The patient died 10 months later by recurrence. We concluded that we must take into account not only laboratory finding but their clinical course in such cases. PMID:2179708

Nagahama, T; Goseki, N; Inoue, Y; Taenaka, T; Nakamura, H; Habu, H; Endo, M

1990-01-01

18

Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

Itai, Y. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

1982-06-01

19

Asymptomatic curable pancreatic ductal carcinoma detected during the follow-up of pancreatic cysts distinct from carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have reported that pancreatic ductal carcinomas are frequently found during the follow-up of pancreatic cysts\\u000a distinct from carcinoma; however, the majority of them are detected in advanced stages. Therefore, the early detection of\\u000a metachronous ductal carcinomas is one of the issues in the management of pancreatic cysts. A 25-mm pancreatic cyst in the\\u000a pancreatic head was found during

Natsuko KawadaHiroyuki; Hiroyuki Uehara; Kazuhiro Katayama; Sachiko Tanaka; Rena Takakura; Yasuna Takano; Tatsuya Ioka; Miho Nakao; Kazuho Imanaka; Kazuyoshi Ohkawa; Akemi Takenaka; Yasuhiko Tomita; Osamu Ishikawa

2011-01-01

20

Etiology and oncogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. The factors that favor the development of pancreatic cancer can be divided into hereditary and acquired. Cancerogenesis is best explained by a "multi-hit" hypothesis, charcterized with the developmental sequence of cellular mutatitions, forcing mutant cell to inappropriate proliferation and preventing its repair and programmed cell death (apoptosis). The most common mutations involve K-ras gene, epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) and HER2 gene. Continuous stimulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances the permeability of blood vessels provides nutrient supply to tumor site through newly formed vascular channels. This phenomena is known as vasculogenic mimicry. Loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in pancreatic cancer, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. SDKN2A gene inactivation occurs in 95% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. As regards acquired factors, smoking is only confirmed risk factor that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes, alcohol consumption, central obesity in men, infection with Helicobacter pylori and chronic pancreatitis are suspected, but not proven risk factors. Consumption of fruits and vegetables does not protect, while the consumption of meat processed at high temperatures increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. According to some studies, lykopene and folate levels are reduced in pancreatic carcinoma patients, reduced folate intake increases the risk of pancreatic carcinoma (48%), and this risk can be diminished by introducing folate-rich foods to diet, not by using pharmaceutical products. Occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons, vinyl chloride, nickel, chromium, insecticides and acrylic amide minimally increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Exposure to cadmium (metal industry) associated with smoking result in the accumulation of cadmium in pancreatic tissue and the possible impact on carcinogenesis. PMID:23213974

Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Vanis, Nenad; Dintinjana, Marijan; Radi?, Mladen

2012-09-01

21

A comparative study of clinicopathological significance, FGFBP1, and WISP-2 expression between squamous cell/adenosquamous carcinomas and adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: The differences in clinical, pathological, and biological characteristics between adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous cell/adenosquamous carcinoma (SC/ASC) of gallbladder cancer have not been well documented. This study is to compare the clinicopathological characteristics and FGFBP1 and WISP-2 expression between AC and SC/ASC patients. METHODS: We examined FGFBP1 and WISP-2 expression in 46 SC/ASC and 80 AC samples using immunohistochemistry and analyzed their correlations with clinicopathological characteristics. RESULTS: SC/ASCs occur more frequently in older patients and often correspond to larger tumor masses than ACs. Positive FGFBP1 and negative WISP-2 expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and invasion of SC/ASCs and ACs. In addition, positive FGFBP1 and negative WISP-2 expression were significantly associated with differentiation and TMN stage in ACs. Univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that either elevated FGFBP1 (p < 0.001) or lowered WISP-2 (p < 0.001) expression was closely associated with decreased overall survival in both SC/ASC and AC patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that positive FGFBP1 expression (p = 0.001) or negative WISP-2 expression (p = 0.035 for SC/ASC and p = 0.009 for AC) is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in both SC/ASC and AC patients. We also revealed that differentiation, tumor size, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis, invasion, and surgical procedure were associated with survival of both SC/ASC and AC patients. CONCLUSION: Our study suggested that the overexpression of FGFBP1 or loss of WISP-2 expression is closely related to the metastasis, invasion and poor prognosis of gallbladder cancer. PMID:23592278

Yang, Zhulin; Yang, Zhi; Zou, Qiong; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Jinghe; Li, Daiqiang; Liang, Lufeng; Zeng, Guixiang; Chen, Senlin

2013-04-17

22

Spontaneous Adenosquamous Carcinoma with Rapid Growth and EMT-like Changes in the Mammary Gland of a Young Adult Female BALB/c Mouse  

PubMed Central

This study histopathologically and immunohistochemically investigated a spontaneously occurring single mass subcutaneously located in the left lower abdomen of a female BALB/cAJcl?nu/+ mouse at 10 weeks of age. The mass was about 20 × 15 × 10 mm in size after formalin fixation; nevertheless, it was not detected by clinical observations at 9 weeks of age. H&E staining revealed the tumor origin was epithelial and probably arose from the mammary gland, and the tumor cells demonstrated a squamous, acinar or polyhedral/basal pattern. A cell kinetics analysis revealed that many of the tumor cells of the squamous, acinar or polyhedral/basal component were positive for PCNA and cyclin D1, although there were a few of TUNEL-positive tumor cells in all of the components. An epithelial/mesenchymal analysis demonstrated that most of the tumor cells of the squamous and acinar components contained keratin and E-cadherin; however, most of the tumor cells of the polyhedral/basal component were less or very weakly positive for these markers. The tumor cells of the squamous component were negative for vimentin and SMA; however, many of the tumor cells of the polyhedral/basal component exhibited vimentin. In addition, expression of SMA was confirmed in some tumor cells of the acinar and basal components. Based on the microscopic and immunohistochemical characterizations, the tumor was diagnosed to be adenosquamous carcinoma that originated from the mammary gland with rapid growth, and the tumor cells demonstrated epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like changes.

Takaba, Katsumi; Imada, Teruyoshi; Katsumata, Shigehisa; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Sachiko; Suzuki, Yui; Imaizumi, Minami; Myojo, Kensuke; Takada, Chie; Kimoto, Naoya; Saeki, Koji; Yamaguchi, Itaru

2012-01-01

23

Spontaneous Adenosquamous Carcinoma with Rapid Growth and EMT-like Changes in the Mammary Gland of a Young Adult Female BALB/c Mouse.  

PubMed

This study histopathologically and immunohistochemically investigated a spontaneously occurring single mass subcutaneously located in the left lower abdomen of a female BALB/cAJcl-nu/+ mouse at 10 weeks of age. The mass was about 20 × 15 × 10 mm in size after formalin fixation; nevertheless, it was not detected by clinical observations at 9 weeks of age. H&E staining revealed the tumor origin was epithelial and probably arose from the mammary gland, and the tumor cells demonstrated a squamous, acinar or polyhedral/basal pattern. A cell kinetics analysis revealed that many of the tumor cells of the squamous, acinar or polyhedral/basal component were positive for PCNA and cyclin D1, although there were a few of TUNEL-positive tumor cells in all of the components. An epithelial/mesenchymal analysis demonstrated that most of the tumor cells of the squamous and acinar components contained keratin and E-cadherin; however, most of the tumor cells of the polyhedral/basal component were less or very weakly positive for these markers. The tumor cells of the squamous component were negative for vimentin and SMA; however, many of the tumor cells of the polyhedral/basal component exhibited vimentin. In addition, expression of SMA was confirmed in some tumor cells of the acinar and basal components. Based on the microscopic and immunohistochemical characterizations, the tumor was diagnosed to be adenosquamous carcinoma that originated from the mammary gland with rapid growth, and the tumor cells demonstrated epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like changes. PMID:23345929

Takaba, Katsumi; Imada, Teruyoshi; Katsumata, Shigehisa; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Sachiko; Suzuki, Yui; Imaizumi, Minami; Myojo, Kensuke; Takada, Chie; Kimoto, Naoya; Saeki, Koji; Yamaguchi, Itaru

2012-12-20

24

CT pancreatogram in carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis  

SciTech Connect

CT has made it possible to determine the contour of the pancreatic duct, to measure its caliber, and to detect dilatation of the duct. CT scans of 75 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and of 45 patients with chronic pancreatitis were obtained. Dilatation of the pancreatic duct was seen in 56% of patients with carcinoma, and in 70% of those with tumors confined to the pancreatic head and body. Smooth dilatation (43%) or beaded dilatation (40%) were most commonly associated with carcinoma. Ductal dilatation was present in 58% of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, and irregular dilatation was seen in 73% of the patients in this group. About half of the patients who had irregular dilatation had calculi within the ducts. Eight cases of dilatation of the duct with no detectible pancreatic mass were seen in a subgroup of 13 patients who had small carcinomas of the pancreas (tumor size of 3 cm or less). Our findings indicate that a dilated pancreatic duct with a smooth contour and a ratio of duct to total gland width of 0.50 or greater suggests carcinoma as the underlying pathology.

Karasawa, E.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; London, S.S.

1983-08-01

25

Intraoperative electron beam irradiation for patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1978 we have used electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) to deliver higher radiation doses to pancreatic tumors than are possible with external beam techniques while minimizing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues. Twenty-nine patients with localized, unresectable, pancreatic carcinoma were treated by electron beam IORT in combination with conventional external radiation therapy (XRT). The primary tumor was

W. U. Shipley; W. C. Wood; J. E. Tepper; A. L. Warshaw; E. L. Orlow; S. D. Kaufman; G. E. Battit; G. L. Nardi

1984-01-01

26

Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective  

PubMed Central

Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a rare cause of diabetes (<1%) of uncertain etiology associated with >100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively), all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm) encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm), with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L). Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD.

Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Dutta, Deep; Biswas, Kaushik; Sanyal, Triranjan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

2012-01-01

27

Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective.  

PubMed

Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a rare cause of diabetes (<1%) of uncertain etiology associated with >100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively), all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm) encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm), with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L). Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD. PMID:23565475

Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Dutta, Deep; Biswas, Kaushik; Sanyal, Triranjan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

2012-12-01

28

Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy in Pancreatic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States and represents a challenging chemotherapeutic problem. The treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine has only modest activity with a small survival benefit, and toxicity continues to be a major obstacle. New therapeutic strategies that notably lack cross resistance with established treatment regimens are much needed

Muhammad Wasif Saif

2006-01-01

29

Establishment and characterization of four human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

We characterized four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (designated SNU-213, SNU-324, SNU-410, and SNU-494) established from histopathologically varied primary or liver metastatic tumor samples of Korean patients. Three cell lines grew as adherent monolayers and one as adherent and floating cell clumps. All lines had: (1) relatively high viability; (2) an absence of mycoplasma or bacterial contamination; (3) genetic heterogeneity as

Ja-Lok Ku; Kyong-Ah Yoon; Woo-Ho Kim; Jin Jang; Kyung-Suk Suh; Sun-Whe Kim; Yong-Hyun Park; Jae-Gahb Park

2002-01-01

30

Tumor-associated focal chronic pancreatitis from invasion of the pancreatic duct by common bile duct carcinoma: radiologic–pathologic correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a case of tumor-associated focal chronic pancreatitis of the uncinate process of the pancreas. The chronic pancreatitis\\u000a was secondary to stenosis of the main pancreatic duct from invasion by a common bile duct carcinoma. A feature distinguishing\\u000a the chronic pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma was the localized dilatation of pancreatic duct branches evident in the\\u000a focal lesion of the

T. Gabata; J. Sanada; S. Kobayashi; N. Terayama; M. Kadoya; O. Matsui

2003-01-01

31

Surgery for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma: a Liverpool experience.  

PubMed Central

The development of a single-surgeon specialist referral practice for pancreatic surgery which evolved over an 8 year period is described. Source of referral, protocol for patient management, and operative strategy are outlined. Preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy, and stent placement where possible (85% of cases), high-resolution contrast-enhanced CT and standard pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with a unique reconstructive technique were employed. In 105 patients receiving curative resection for pancreatic or periampullary tumours, the overall operative mortality was 4.8% and overall morbidity 26%. Actuarial 5-year survival rates were 11% for pancreatic carcinoma and 34% for ampullary carcinoma. Resectability rate was 81% without the use of time-consuming and expensive imaging techniques for staging such as laparoscopy, intraoperative ultrasound or laparoscopic ultrasound. No specific regimen of perioperative chemoirradiation was utilised over the study period. To achieve comparable results it is recommended that patients should be referred to regional specialist surgeons in whose hands mortality and morbidity is low, costs reduced and training of pancreatic surgeons can be undertaken.

Kingsnorth, A. N.

1997-01-01

32

[One case of pancreatic mucinous carcinoma discovered due to acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

The patient was a woman, aged 69, diagnosed with acute pancreatitis by a local physician; simultaneously, with US, a low-echo tumor was indicated in the pancreas' uncinate process. Diagnosis was made of acute pancreatitis resulting from a pancreatic IPMN, and the patient was referred. Ultrasound showed hypoechoic tumor images accompanied by posterior echo enhancement. With radiography-CT, from the pancreas parenchymal phase, the peripheral portion was densely stained, while internally, images showed densely stained dendriforms towards the equilibrium phase. With MRI T1-weighted images, there was appearance at low intensity, and with T2-weighted images, there was appearance at high intensity; with MRCP, there was depiction at relatively high intensity. In the final pathological diagnosis, there was prominent formation of mucinous nodules, and mucinous carcinoma including large quantity of mucous. PMID:19194098

Urata, Takahiro; Hifumi, Michio; Takekuma, Yoshi; Hijioka, Susumu; Gushima, Ryosuke; Hashigo, Syunpei; Nagaoka, Katsuya; Yoshinaga, Syuya; Kitada, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Tetsu; Yamanaga, Shigeyoshi; Yokomizo, Hiroshi

2009-02-01

33

Lesser sac endoscopy and laparoscopy in pancreatic carcinoma definitive diagnosis, staging and palliation.  

PubMed

Laparoscopy with lesser sac endoscopy (LSE) were used in combination from 1987 to 1992 in 103 patients for differentiation between pancreatic carcinoma and other peripancreatic pathology, staging, and palliation. LSE identified pancreatic carcinoma in 38 patients; pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma in 2 patients; pancreatic cystadenoma in 3 patients; pancreatic adenoma in 1 patient; pancreatic metastases from liver in 2 patients; and pancreatic cysts in 5 patients. False negative diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma occurred in two cases. Nontumor pancreatic pathology was revealed in 10 patients. Specifically, acute pancreatitis was found in four patients, and chronic pancreatitis was found in six patients. Extrapancreatic cancers were identified in 15 patients: retroperitoneal extraorgan tumors were found in 2 patients; extrahepatic biliary tract cancer in 6 patients; gallbladder cancer in 1 patient; liver cancer in 3 patients; and stomach cancer in 1 patient. In five cases no pathology was found. Overall correct definitive diagnosis was established in 101 patients. Sensitivity of laparoscopy with LSE for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis proved to be 95 per cent (38 of 40 patients), for pancreatic tumors diagnosis 96.22 per cent (51 of 53 patients); specificity of the method 100 per cent; and accuracy of diagnosis 98 per cent (101 of 103 patients). Thus, the accuracy of the method was as high as the accuracy of combination of all known modalities. Criteria of unresectability were revealed with the combination of LSE and laparoscopy in 75 per cent (30 of 40 cases) of pancreatic carcinoma. Moreover, laparoscopy allowed palliation of pancreatic carcinoma. Laparoscopic cholecystostomy was performed in 10 patients, and laparoscopic cholecystojejunostomy with enteroenterostomy was performed in 6 patients. PMID:9731805

Charukhchyan, S A; Lucas, G W

1998-09-01

34

Necrotizing pancreatitis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.  

PubMed

A patient who developed necrotizing pancreatitis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is presented. A 55- year-old man had been followed for chronic hepatitis B infection for 10 years at another institution. He presented with multiple masses in the right lobe of the liver and a metastasis in the left adrenal gland. He was referred after a percutaneous liver biopsy which revealed a moderately differentiated HCC. He was treated by TACE. At the third session of TACE, the right hepatic artery was found to be thrombosed; however, angiography also demonstrated collateral feeder vessels (arising from the pancreaticoduodenal artery) which were used for treatment. He developed necrotizing pancreatitis, possibly due to regurgitation of the chemotherapeutic agents to the pancreas. He recovered without complications with imipenem-cilastatin prophylaxis. Acute pancreatitis is a rare but severe complication of TACE. Selective catheterization of the tumor vessels is the established standard in TACE. A careful risk-benefit analysis is mandatory in patients with abnormal collateral vessels. Treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) after TACE is the same as the accepted approach to ANP due to other causes. PMID:19263372

Ozçinar, Beyza; Güven, Koray; Poyanli, Arzu; Ozden, Ilgin

2009-03-01

35

CT and MR imaging patterns for pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus (Part II): Imaging of pancreatic carcinoma nerve invasion  

PubMed Central

Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities which have the ability to detect, depict and stage the nerve invasion associated with pancreatic carcinoma. The aim of this article is to review the CT and MR patterns of pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus and thus provide useful information which could help the choice of treatment methods. Pancreatic carcinoma is a common malignant neoplasm with a high mortality rate. There are many factors influencing the prognosis and treatment options for those patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma, such as lymphatic metastasis, adjacent organs or tissue invasion, etc. Among these factors, extrapancreatic neural plexus invasion is recognized as an important factor when considering the management of the patients.

Zuo, Hou-Dong; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Xiao, Bo

2012-01-01

36

Fibrolamellar carcinoma presenting as a pancreatic mass: case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Fibrolamellar carcinoma is a subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with distinct clinicopathologic features including presentation at a younger age. Although early studies suggested that fibrolamellar carcinoma had a better prognosis than conventional hepatocellular carcinoma, most later studies have found no difference. Patients often have lymph node metastases at presentation in addition to the hepatic primary. We describe an unusual case in a Thai boy who presented with a pancreatic mass that was clinically suspected to be a primary pancreatic tumor, but on biopsy was found to be metastatic fibrolamellar carcinoma. To our knowledge, this manner of presentation has not been previously reported for fibrolamellar carcinoma, nor has metastatic spread to the pancreas. PMID:19415023

Thirabanjasak, Duangpen; Sosothikul, Darintr; Mahayosnond, Atchara; Thorner, Paul S

2009-05-01

37

Pancreatic carcinoma, pancreatitis, and healthy controls: metabolite models in a three-class diagnostic dilemma.  

PubMed

Metabolomics as one of the most rapidly growing technologies in the "-omics" field denotes the comprehensive analysis of low molecular-weight compounds and their pathways. Cancer-specific alterations of the metabolome can be detected by high-throughput mass-spectrometric metabolite profiling and serve as a considerable source of new markers for the early differentiation of malignant diseases as well as their distinction from benign states. However, a comprehensive framework for the statistical evaluation of marker panels in a multi-class setting has not yet been established. We collected serum samples of 40 pancreatic carcinoma patients, 40 controls, and 23 pancreatitis patients according to standard protocols and generated amino acid profiles by routine mass-spectrometry. In an intrinsic three-class bioinformatic approach we compared these profiles, evaluated their selectivity and computed multi-marker panels combined with the conventional tumor marker CA 19-9. Additionally, we tested for non-inferiority and superiority to determine the diagnostic surplus value of our multi-metabolite marker panels. Compared to CA 19-9 alone, the combined amino acid-based metabolite panel had a superior selectivity for the discrimination of healthy controls, pancreatitis, and pancreatic carcinoma patients [Formula: see text] We combined highly standardized samples, a three-class study design, a high-throughput mass-spectrometric technique, and a comprehensive bioinformatic framework to identify metabolite panels selective for all three groups in a single approach. Our results suggest that metabolomic profiling necessitates appropriate evaluation strategies and-despite all its current limitations-can deliver marker panels with high selectivity even in multi-class settings. PMID:23678345

Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Ceglarek, Uta; Weinert, Peter; Nakas, Christos T; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Kase, Julia; Conrad, Tim; Witzigmann, Helmut; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin

2012-11-01

38

A Case of Pancreatic Cancer in the Setting of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Nondiagnostic Serum Markers  

PubMed Central

Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) often mimics pancreatic cancer. The diagnosis of both conditions is difficult preoperatively let alone when they coexist. Several reports have been published describing pancreatic cancer in the setting of AIP. Case Report. The case of a 53-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, and radiological features of autoimmune pancreatitis, with a “sausage-shaped” pancreas and bulky pancreatic head with portal vein impingement, is presented. He had a normal serum IgG4 and only mildly elevated Ca-19.9. Initial endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS-) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of the pancreas revealed an inflammatory sclerosing process only. A repeat EUS guided biopsy following biliary decompression demonstrated both malignancy and features of autoimmune pancreatitis. At laparotomy, a uniformly hard, bulky pancreas was found with no sonographically definable mass. A total pancreatectomy with portal vein resection and reconstruction was performed. Histology revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreatic head and autoimmune pancreatitis and squamous metaplasia in the remaining pancreas. Conclusion. This case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties in a patient with pancreatic cancer in the setting of serum IgG4-negative, Type 2 AIP.

Chandrasegaram, Manju D.; Chiam, Su C.; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Neo, Eu L.; Chen, John W.; Worthley, Christopher S.; Brooke-Smith, Mark E.

2013-01-01

39

Pancreatic cyst as a sentinel of in situ carcinoma of the pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary\\u000a Conclusion  We would like to recommend detailed examination of the pancreas including cytology of the pancreatic juice in patients with\\u000a pancreatic cyst to find possible concomitant early pancreatic carcinoma. Further study is necessary to determine whether there\\u000a is a rational relationship between mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background  Two cases ofin situ carcinoma of the pancreas first detected

Koji Yamaguchi; Katsuya Nakamura; Kazunori Yokohata; Shuji Shimizu; Kazuo Chijiiwa; Masao Tanaka

1997-01-01

40

Pancreatic intraglandular metastasis predicts poorer outcome in postoperative patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma.  

PubMed

Intraorgan metastasis of a primary cancer within the organ of origin, such as intrahepatic metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma, is one of the key features for clinicopathologic staging of the cancer. Pancreatic intraglandular metastasis (P-IM) of pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) is encountered occasionally but has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognostic value of P-IM in patients with PDC. The histopathologic features of 393 consecutive patients with PDC who had undergone pancreatic resection at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, between 2003 and 2010 were reviewed. For the purposes of the study, P-IM was defined as an independent tumor showing histopathologic features similar to those of the primary one. Twenty-six cases of P-IM were identified in 21 (5.3%) of the reviewed patients. The incidence of P-IM at each stage of the TNM classification was 0% (0/7) at stage IA, 17% (1/6) at stage IB, 5% (5/92) at stage IIA, 4% (11/252) at stage IIB, 0% (0/1) at stage III, and 11% (4/35) at stage IV. Univariate survival analysis showed that both overall survival and disease-free survival for patients with P-IM were significantly shorter than for those without P-IM (P<0.001 and P=0.019, respectively). Multivariate survival analysis showed that P-IM was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival (P=0.002; hazard ratio=2.239; 95% confidence interval: 1.328-3.773). Our findings suggest that the presence of P-IM in patients with PDC is an independent prognosticator and may represent aggressive tumor behavior. PMID:23648465

Oguro, Seiji; Shimada, Kazuaki; Ino, Yoshinori; Esaki, Minoru; Nara, Satoshi; Kishi, Yoji; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

2013-07-01

41

Incidence and pathology of pancreatic carcinoma among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1982  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little evidence that pancreatic carcinoma is radiogenic in humans. To further investigate this possibility, all follow-up sources at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation were utilized to identify 378 incident cases of pancreatic cancer which occurred between October 1, 1950 and December 31, 1982 among 91,231 members of the cohort of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

S. Davis; T. Yamamoto

1986-01-01

42

Pancreatic carcinoma: Palliative surgical and endoscopic treatment1  

PubMed Central

The majority of patients with pancreatic carcinoma (hepaticojejunostomy) unfortunately will have palliative treatment and palliation of symptoms is important to improve Quality of Life. The most common symptoms that require palliation are jaundice, gastric outlet obstruction and pain. Obstructive jaundice should be trated with a biliary bypass, the optimal palliation in relatively fit patients and endoscopic stenting is preferred in patients with short survival (3–6 months). To prevent gastric outlet obstruction a prophylactic gastroenterostomy should be performed routinely during bypass surgery. Symptomatic patients after earlier stenting of the bile duct can be treated nowadays by doudenal stenting. Pain management is according to the progressive analgesic ladder but a (percutaneous) neurolytic celiac plexus block may be indicated. Currently a R1 (palliative) resection is acceptable in high volume centres but so far there is a very limited role for planned R2 palliative resections.

Busch, O.R.C.; Van Gulik, T.M.

2006-01-01

43

Early lesions of pancreatic ductal carcinoma in the hamster model.  

PubMed Central

Syrian golden hamsters were treated weekly with 10 mg/kg body weight N-nitrosobis (2-oxopropyl) amine for life (Group 1) or 6 weeks and were sacrificed at biweekly intervals from 2 weeks (Group 1) and 8 weeks (Group 2) after initiation of the experiment. The pancreas was examined in step sections, and the sequential alterations noted for each interval were recorded. Lesions were found in intrapancreatic and extrapancreatic ducts. Equivalent alterations consisting of hyperplasia, metaplasia, atypia, and lesions characteristic of carcinoma in situ developed ubiquitously and simultaneously in pancreatic ducts of different sizes and in ductules, but not in acinar cells. Among the most significant findings were intrainsular ductular formations, their proliferation, and sequential malignant alteration comparable to the involved preexisting ductules. Differences between the two experimental groups were of a quantitative rather than qualitative nature. The incidence and multiplicity of neoplastic lesions at each interval according to group, sex, and anatomic locations of adenocarcinomas are outlined. Predilected areas for some lesions were found. Results indicate a common origin of all induced tumors from a pluripotent cell populating the pancreatic ductal system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22

Pour, P.; Althoff, J.; Takahashi, M.

1977-01-01

44

A case of necrotizing pancreatitis subsequent to transcatheter arterial chemoembolization in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma.  

PubMed

Necrotizing pancreatitis is one of the rare complications of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Necrotizing pancreatitis after TACE may result from the development of ischemia caused by regurgitation of embolic materials into the vessels supplying the pancreas. We report a case of post-TACE necrotizing pancreatitis with abscess formation in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma. The patient had suffered hepatic artery injury due to repetitive TACE; during his 25th TACE procedure he had submitted to selective catheterization of the feeding vessel from the dorsal pancreatic artery with a cytotoxic agent and Gelfoam particles. The patient complained of abdominal pain after the TACE procedure, and a CT scan led to a diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis with abscess formation. The pancreatic abscess progressed despite general management of the pancreatitis, including antibiotics. Percutaneous catheter drainage was performed, and the symptoms of the patient improved. PMID:23091814

Bae, Song-I; Yeon, Jong Eun; Lee, Jong Mee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sun Jae; Suh, Sang Jun; Yoon, Eileen L; Kim, Hae Rim; Byun, Kwan Soo; Seo, Tae-Seok

2012-09-25

45

Metachronous pancreatic head ductal carcinoma three years after resection of gallbladder cancer  

PubMed Central

We report a rare case of female patient with metachronous gallbladder cancer and pancreatic head ductal carcinoma. At the age of 53 years, the patient underwent a cholecystectomy and resection of the liver bed for gallbladder cancer. The post-operation diagnosis was a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma with serosa involvement(T3N0M0, stage IIA). Three years later, an irregular and enhanced 2.4 cm mass in the pancreatic head with obviously pancreatic duct dilated was found by abdominal imaging. We considered it as pancreatic head cancer and performed pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histological diagnosis was a pancreatic ductal carcinoma (T2N0M0, stage I). No recurrence was found after thirty-three months follow up.

Chen, Dingwei; Yan, Jiafei; Mou, Yiping

2013-01-01

46

Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose To present the techniques and preliminary outcomes of ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 41 patients treated between November 2000 and March 2005 with IG-IMRT to mean total doses of 55 Gy (range, 45–64 Gy). We analyzed the clinical feasibility of IG-IMRT, dosimetric parameters, and outcomes, including acute gastrointestinal toxicity (RTOG grading). Survival was assessed for adenocarcinoma (n = 35) and other histologies. Results Mean daily image-guidance corrective shifts were 4.8 ± 4.3 mm, 7.5 ± 7.2 mm, and 4.6 ± 5.9 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively (mean 3D correction vector, 11.7 ± 8.4 mm). Acute upper gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 22 patients (53.7%), grade 2 in 16 patients (39%), and grade 3 in 3 patients (7.3%). Lower gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 32 patients (78%), grade 2 in 7 patients (17.1%), and grade 4 in 2 patients (4.9%). Treatment was stopped early in 4 patients following administration of 30 to 54 Gy. Median survival for adenocarcinoma histology was 10.3 months (18.6 months in patients alive at analysis; n = 8) with actuarial 1- and 2-year survivals of 38% and 25%, respectively. Conclusion Daily image-guidance during delivery of IMRT for pancreatic carcinoma is clinically feasible. The data presented support the conclusion that safety margin reduction and moderate dose escalation afforded by implementation of these new radiotherapy technologies yields preliminary outcomes at least comparable with published survival data.

Fuss, Martin; Wong, Adrian; Fuller, Clifton D.; Salter, Bill J.; Fuss, Cristina; Thomas, Charles R.

2007-01-01

47

Metastases From Nested Variant Urothelial Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder in Pancreatic Allograft Mimicking Graft Rejection  

PubMed Central

While not an uncommon tumor, urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder is rare in bladders draining pancreatic allografts. A case of urothelial carcinoma directly involving a pancreatic allograft with metastasis that occurred in a 49-year-old pancreas and kidney transplant recipient is described. Her initial clinical presentation and findings of CT scan of the abdomen suggested pancreatitis with features worrisome for rejection. A biopsy of her pancreatic allograft contained poorly differentiated carcinoma and cystoscopic biopsy disclosed an invasive high grade urothelial carcinoma arising in the background of extensive urothelial carcinoma in situ. Exploratory laparotomy revealed that the tumor invaded the right ovary and fallopian tube, cecum, and allograft with extensive retroperitoneal involvement. She underwent en bloc resection of distal ileum and cecum, resection of transplant pancreas, partial cystectomy, ileocolostomy anastomosis, and right salpingo-oophorectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with four cycles of carboplatin and gemcitabine. She ultimately succumbed to her disease approximately 1 year after diagnosis. This case should alert physicians and radiologists to be aware of atypical presentation of urothelial carcinoma in bladder-drained pancreas grafts, the aggressiveness of such lesions, and the need for early biopsy to avoid diagnostic confusion with rejection. Keywords Bladder cancer; Nested variant of urothelial carcinoma; Pancreas and kidney transplantation

Wang, Jue; Talmon, Geoffrey; Kazmi, Syed A. Jaffar; Siref, Larry E.; Morris, Michael C.

2012-01-01

48

Analysis of gene expression profile of pancreatic carcinoma using cDNA microarray  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To identify new diagnostic markers and drug targets, the gene expression profiles of pancreatic cancer were compared with that of adjacent normal tissues utilizing cDNA microarray analysis. METHODS: cDNA probes were prepared by labeling mRNA from samples of six pancreatic carcinoma tissues with Cy5- dUTP and mRNA from adjacent normal tissues with Cy3- dUTP respectively through reverse transcription. The

Zhi-Jun Tan; Xian-Gui Hu; Gui-Song Cao; Yan Tang

49

Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and\\/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa

Jamie S. Barkin; Martin H. Kalser; Sharon Thomsen; Dorothy Redlhammer

1982-01-01

50

Spontaneous rupture of a pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma presenting as an acute abdomen  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma is a rare malignant pancreatic neoplasm. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report on spontaneous rupture of acinar cell carcinoma. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 39-year-old Azari male presented with a history of sudden onset, acute epigastric pain of 12-h duration. Eight hours later the patient's general condition rapidly deteriorated, blood pressure was decreased to 90/70 mm/Hg and heart rate was increased to 120 beat/min. Emergent abdominal computed tomography scan showed a well-defined hypo-dense, necrotic mass, measured 12 cm × 12 cm that was originating from the uncinate process of pancreas with marked free peritoneal fluid and extensive haziness of retroperitoneal and mesenteric fat compatible with marked bleeding. Emergent abdominal operation was performed and histopathology revealed acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. DISCUSSION Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) usually presents with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. To best of our knowledge, no report has been made of spontaneous rupture of ACC. CONCLUSION Pancreatic carcinoma may present as acute abdomen due to rupture of underlying neoplasm.

Mohammadi, Afshin; Porghasem, Jalal; Esmaeili, Arefeh; Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad

2012-01-01

51

Everolimus and Octreotide With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Beta Islet Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Islet Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic G-cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

2013-10-07

52

Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients. PMID:7127259

Barkin, J S; Kalser, M H; Thomsen, S; Redlhammer, D

1982-11-15

53

The growth pattern and microvasculature of pancreatic tumours induced with cultured carcinoma cells  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most frustrating problems in gastroenterological surgery, since there is little we can do to improve the survival of patients with current treatment strategies. If one is to elucidate factors related to carcinogenesis, tumour biology, diagnostics and new treatment modalities of this malignant disease, then it is essential to develop a suitable animal model. In the present study we investigated rat pancreatic tumour growth after intrapancreatic injection of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells (DSL-6A/C1), originally derived from an azaserine-induced tumour, as well as the features of tumour microcirculation using the microangiography technique. After intrapancreatic inoculation, tumours were detected in 64% of animals. A 1 cm3tumour volume was reached within 20 weeks after inoculation. The tumours were ductal adenocarcinomas. Larger tumours showed invasive growth and spreading into the surrounding tissues, mainly into spleen and peritoneum. Microangiography revealed that the pancreatic tumours had an irregular and scanty vessel network and there were avascular areas in the center of the tumour. The area between normal pancreas and the induced tumour had dense vascularization. Intrapancreatic tumour induction with cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells produced a solid and uniformly growing tumour in Lewis rats and it thus provides a possible model for pancreatic cancer studies. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign

Makinen, K; Loimas, S; Nuutinen, P; Eskelinen, M; Alhava, E

2000-01-01

54

Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients.

Barkin, J.S.; Kalser, M.H.; Thomsen, S.; Redlhammer, D.

1982-11-15

55

Caveolin-1 regulating the invasion and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) in pancreatic carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

The gelatinases B (MMP9) and A (MMP2) are two members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) family that are expressed in human cancer, and play a critical role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Caveolin-1 (Cav1) has recently been identified as a tumor metastasis modifier gene. However, the effect and mechanism of Cav1 in pancreatic carcinoma cell invasion remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of Cav1, MMP2, and MMP9 in several different pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. We transfected pcDNA3.0-Cav1 plasmid and Cav1 siRNA into SW1990 and Bxpc3 cells, respectively. Using cell invasion assay, we found that overexpression of Cav1 inhibited cell invasion, whereas the knockdown of Cav1 in Bxpc3 cells promoted cell invasion. Moreover, to explore the mechanisms underlying these observations, we further investigated the expression of MMP2, MMP9, phospho-Akt, and phospho-Erk by Western blot, and the activities of MMP2 and MMP9 by gelatin zymography. The results indicated that Cav1 gene could inhibit pancreatic carcinoma cell invasion, at least in part, probably through Erk-MMP signal pathway, suggesting that the endogenous expression or re-expression of Cav1 might help therapeutically reduce their invasive potential in pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:20031158

Han, Fei; Zhu, Hong-Guang

2009-05-03

56

Identification and characterization of differentially methylated CpG islands in pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

To identify CpG islands differentially methylated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we used methylated CpG island amplification (MCA) coupled with representational difference analysis. Of 42 CpG islands identified by MCA/representational difference analysis, 7 CpG islands [methylated in carcinoma of the pancreas (MICP)] were differentially methylated in a panel of eight pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with normal pancreas. In a larger panel of 75 pancreatic adenocarcinomas, these 7 MICPs (ppENK, Cyclin G, ZBP, MICP25, 27, 36, and 38) were methylated in 93, 3, 9, 15, 48, 19, and 41% of cancers, respectively, by methylation-specific PCR but not in any of 15 normal pancreata. In pancreatic cancer cell lines, methylation of ppENK, a gene with known growth suppressive properties, was associated with transcriptional silencing that was reversible with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment. Relationships between the methylation patterns of pancreatic adenocarcinomas and their clinicopathological features were also determined. Larger pancreatic cancers and those from older patients (P = 0.017) harbored more methylated loci than smaller tumors and those from younger patients (P = 0.017). ppENK, MICP25, and 27 were variably methylated in normal gastric, duodenal, and colonic mucosae. These data indicate that aberrant methylation of ppENK and its transcriptional repression is a common event in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:11731440

Ueki, T; Toyota, M; Skinner, H; Walter, K M; Yeo, C J; Issa, J P; Hruban, R H; Goggins, M

2001-12-01

57

Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients contained c-Ki-ras mutations, despite a high frequency of aneuploid tumors. In contrast, a higher percentage (16/20 = 80%) of pancreatic adenocarcinomas contained mutations in c-Ki-ras 2, despite a lower frequency of DNA aneuploidy in these neoplasms. Moreover, the spectrum of mutations differed between sporadic colon carcinoma, where the predominant mutation was a G to A transition, and pancreatic carcinomas, which predominantly contained G to C or T transversions. These results suggest that the etiology of ras mutations is different in these three human neoplasms.

Burmer, G.C.; Rabinovitch, P.S.; Loeb, L.A. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (United States))

1991-06-01

58

Zonal Heterogeneity for Gene Expression in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array and laser capture microdissection techniques,we determined whether different zones of the same pancreatic tumor exhibited differential expression of genes. Human L3.6pl pancreatic cancer cells were implanted into the pancreas of nude mice. Three weeks later when tumors were 7 to 9 mm in diameter,gene expression patterns in tumor cells within the central and peripheral

Toru Nakamura; Toshio Kuwai; Yasuhiko Kitadai; Takamitsu Sasaki; Dominic Fan; Kevin R. Coombes; Sun-Jin Kim; Isaiah J. Fidler

2007-01-01

59

Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37\\/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients

G. C. Burmer; P. S. Rabinovitch; L. A. Loeb

1991-01-01

60

Phase II Study of Cisplatin Combined with Weekly Gemcitabine in the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Combination therapy of gemcitabine and cisplatin has been reported as an effective regimen for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the toxicity and synergism are known to depend on the schedule of cisplatin. A phase II study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of a single dose of cisplatin in combination with weekly gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. Methods:

Seungmin Bang; Tae Joo Jeon; Myoung Hwan Kim; Jeong Youp Park; Seung Woo Park; Jae Bock Chung; Si Young Song

2006-01-01

61

Pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma of the liver: a clinicopathologic study of four patients.  

PubMed

Acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic type rarely occurs at extra-pancreatic sites. We report four primary liver tumors with features of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma. The patients were two males and two females with a mean age of 65 years (range, 49-72 years). They had upper abdominal pain, weight loss and/or an incidentally discovered liver mass. None had evidence of a primary pancreatic tumor. Grossly, the tumors were large (mean size, 12 cm), well circumscribed and showed a lobulated cut surface. Histologically, they showed a predominantly microacinar pattern, with occasional trabecular, solid and microcystic areas. Cellular atypia and mitotic activity varied within the same tumor and from tumor to tumor. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 18 and at least one acinar cell marker (ie, trypsin, amylase or lipase), but were negative for cytokeratins 7, 19 and 20, HepPar-1, AFP, CD10, carcinoembryonic antigen, CD56, Islet-1 and CDX2. Two tumors stained focally for synaptophysin and chromogranin A. Adjacent liver parenchyma displayed no evidence of cirrhosis. During a mean follow-up of 22 months (range, 3-38 months) no metastases occurred, but one patient developed local recurrence. Our study demonstrates that acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic type may also originate from the liver and can be readily distinguished from other primary liver neoplasms by its distinct histological and immunohistochemical features. Because our cases were observed within a rather short period, it is likely that this tumor type is so far underrecognized and has been mistaken as a variant of hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma or any other liver tumor. PMID:21841771

Agaimy, Abbas; Kaiser, Annette; Becker, Karen; Bräsen, Jan-Hinrich; Wünsch, Peter H; Adsay, N Volkan; Klöppel, Günter

2011-08-12

62

Long-term effect of tumor necrosis factor and gamma interferon in human pancreatic carcinoma cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The long-term cytotoxic\\/cytostatic effects of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha (rhTNF) and gamma interferon (rhIFN-7)\\u000a were studied in five human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. The pancreatic tumor cell lines were heterogenous in their response\\u000a to individual cytokines. During a 7-d incubation, MIA PaCa-2 cells were more sensitive to rhTNF than rhIFN-?, whereas ASPC-1,\\u000a T3M4, and COLO 357 cells were

Arthur B. Raitano; Philip Scuderi; Murray Korc

1990-01-01

63

Distinct claudin expression profiles of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic colorectal and pancreatic carcinomas.  

PubMed

Tight junction proteins, including claudins, are often dysregulated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Moreover, the claudin expression pattern usually varies between different tumor entities. We aimed to investigate claudin expression profiles of primary and metastatic liver malignancies. We analyzed claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, and -7 expression by quantitative immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Twenty hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and liver metastases of 20 colorectal adenocarcinomas (CRLMs) and 15 pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PLMs) were studied together with paired surrounding non-tumorous liver samples and 5 normal liver samples. Strong claudin-3 and -7 immunohistochemical positivities were detected in CRLM samples, each with significantly stronger staining when compared with HCC and PLM groups. Claudin-1 protein was found highly expressed in CRLM, in contrast to lower expression in PLM and HCC. CRLMs and PLMs also were strongly positive for claudin-4, while being virtually undetectable in HCC. Claudin-2 showed strong positivity in non-tumorous liver tissue, whereas significantly weaker positivity was observed in all tumors. Differences in mRNA expression were mostly similar to those found by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, HCC and both CRLM and PLM display distinct claudin expression profiles, which might provide better understanding of the pathobiology of these lesions and might be used for differential diagnosis. PMID:23385421

Holczbauer, Ágnes; Gyöngyösi, Benedek; Lotz, Gábor; Szijártó, Attila; Kupcsulik, Péter; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Kiss, András

2013-02-05

64

Increased Cyclooxygenase2 Expression in Human Pancreatic Carcinomas and Cell Lines: Growth Inhibition by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein expression were found to be frequently elevated in human pancreatic adenocarcinomas and cell lines derived from such tumors. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated cytoplasmic COX-2 expression in 14 of 21 (67%) pancreatic carcinomas. The level of COX-2 mRNA was found to be elevated in carcinomas, relative to histologically normal pancreas from a healthy individual, as assessed by reverse

Miguel A. Molina; Marta Sitja-Arnau; Michael G. Lemoine; Marsha L. Frazier; Frank A. Sinicrope

1999-01-01

65

Targeting Endogenous Transforming Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in SMAD4Deficient Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells Inhibits Their Invasive Phenotype1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transforming growth factor- (TGF-) suppresses tumor formation by blocking cell cycle progression and maintaining tissue homeostasis. In pancreatic carcinomas, this tumor suppressive activity is often lost by inactivation of the TGF--signaling mediator, Smad4. We found that human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines that have undergone deletion of MADH4 constitutively expressed high endogenous levels of phosphoryl- ated receptor-associated Smad proteins (pR-Smad2 and

Gayathri Subramanian; Roderich E. Schwarz; Linda Higgins; Glenn McEnroe; Sarvajit Chakravarty; Sundeep Dugar; Michael Reiss

2004-01-01

66

Effects of the selective cyclooxygenase- 2 inhibitor Celebrex on the expressions of PGE2 and VEGF in pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To investigate the effects of Celebrex, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on tumor growth and the ex- pression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and PGE2 in pancreatic carcinoma of xenografted nude mice induced by pancreatic carcinoma PC-3 cell lines. METHODS: The effects of Celebrex on tumor growth, and the expression of VEGF and PGE2 were assayed by using enzyme-linked

Chuan-Gao Xie; Xing-Peng Wang; Yu-Wei Dong; Qin Du; Jian-Ting Cai; Ke-Da Qian

67

Castleman disease mimicked pancreatic carcinoma: report of two cases  

PubMed Central

Castleman disease (CD) is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder, which usually presents as solitary or multiple masses in the mediastinum. Peripancreatic CD was rarely reported. Herein, we report two cases of unicentric peripancreatic CD from our center. A 43-year-old man and a 58-year-old woman were detected to have a pancreatic mass in the routine medical examinations. Both of them were asymptomatic. The computed tomography and ultrasonographic examination revealed a mild enhancing solitary mass at the pancreatic head/neck. No definite preoperative diagnosis was established and Whipple operations were originally planned. The intraoperative frozen section diagnosis of both patients revealed lymphoproliferation. Then the local excisions of mass were performed. Histological examination revealed features of CD of hyaline-vascular type. No recurrence was found during the follow-up period. CD should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Local excision is a suitable surgical choice.

2012-01-01

68

Monoclonal antibody to a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line recognizes gastrointestinal neoplasms.  

PubMed Central

A monoclonal antibody designated RWP1.1 was produced against a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line RWP1. This antibody was shown to recognize an epitope of carcinoembryonic antigen. The reactivity of the antibody was evaluated on formalin-fixed normal tissues, 86 malignant neoplasms, 10 colonic polyps, and 6 cases of chronic pancreatitis using the peroxidase anti-peroxidase technique. RWP1.1 did not react with normal tissues apart from weak staining of fetal pancreatic ducts. This antibody preferentially reacted with primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas of the colon, stomach, pancreas, and colonic polyps but not with most adenocarcinomas from other sites nor with other types of tumors or cases of chronic pancreatitis. It also reacted with colon adenocarcinomas on frozen sections. The restricted specificity of this antibody could be used in differentiating gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas from other types of tumors including adenocarcinomas from other sites and most pancreatic adenocarcinomas from chronic pancreatitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

Kahn, H. J.; Yeger, H.; Loftus, R.; Goldrosen, M. H.

1989-01-01

69

Tissue expression of the cancer-associated antigens ca 19-9 and ca-50 in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The expression of the gastrointestinal cancer-associated antigens CA 19-9 and CA-50 was studied in 43 ductal pancreatic carcinomas,\\u000a 1 mutinous cystadenoma, 1 signet-ring-cell carcinoma, 42 pancreata with chronic pancreatitis, and 10 normal fetal and adult\\u000a pancreata. The anti-CA-50 antibody gave a more intense and more uniformly distributed staining of the ductal epithelial cells\\u000a than the anti-CA 19-9 antibody. Both antigens,

J. Schwenk; J. Makovitzky

1989-01-01

70

Pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... as an ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) or MRCP (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) may be required. An ERCP consists ... How is pancreatitis diagnosed? How is pancreatitis treated? NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY, HEPATOLOGY AND NUTRITION ...

71

A Rare Case of Metastatic Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Treated with Sorafenib  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Hepatoid carcinoma (HC) is a rare histopathological tumor type with prominent features of hepatoid differentiation, and while\\u000a most of the reported cases are of gastric origin, ten cases of pancreatic HC have been reported to date. The majority of HC\\u000a cases are metastatic at presentation, mainly to the liver, lymph nodes, and lungs. They are aggressive, invading, and proliferating\\u000a in

Fausto Petrelli; Maria Ghilardi; Silvia Colombo; Enrico Stringhi; Cecilia Barbara; Mary Cabiddu; Stefano Elia; Daniela Corti; Sandro Barni

72

Prospective Study on Warfarin and Regional Chemotherapy in Patients with Pancreatic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The aim is to prospectively examine the effect of regional gemcitabine and mitomycin-C with systemic gemcitabine together with warfarin in patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma, and compare the effect to systemic gemcitabine alone. Methods: Seventeen patients received 1.25 mg of warfarin daily, gemcitabine 800 mg\\/m² on day 1 and mitomycin-C 8 mg\\/m² on day 2 regionally and gemcitabine 800

Wes Nakchbandi; Herwart Müller; Manfred V. Singer; J. Matthias Löhr; Inaam A. Nakchbandi

2008-01-01

73

Chemoradiation of Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Impact of Pretreatment Hemoglobin Level on Patterns of Failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To evaluate, in patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma undergoing concomitant chemoradiation, the impact of pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) concentration on the outcome in terms of clinical response, local control, metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Patients and Methods: 30 patients undergoing concomitant chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], 1,000 mg\\/m2\\/day, continuous i. v. infusion days 1-4 of radiotherapy) and external beam

Alessio G. Morganti; Franca Forni; Gabriella Macchia; Vincenzo Valentini; Daniela Smaniotto; Lucio Trodella; Mario Balducci; Numa Cellini

2003-01-01

74

Silencing of B7-H3 increases gemcitabine sensitivity by promoting apoptosis in pancreatic carcinoma  

PubMed Central

In numerous types of cancer, the expression of a novel member of the B7 ligand family, the B7-H3 immunoregulatory protein, has been correlated with a poor prognosis. In the present study, we investigated the role of B7-H3 in chemoresistance in pancreatic carcinoma. Silencing of B7-H3, through lentivirus-mediated delivery of stable short hairpin RNA, was observed to increase the sensitivity of the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line Patu8988 to gemcitabine as a result of enhanced drug-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of B7-H3 caused the cancer cells to be more resistant to the drug. Subsequently, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of B7-H3-mediated gemcitabine resistance, and found that the levels of survivin decreased in cells in which B7-H3 had been knocked down. In vivo animal experiments demonstrated that tumors in which B7-H3 had been knocked down displayed a slower growth rate compared with the control xenografts. Notably, gemcitabine treatment led to a strong antitumor activity in mice with tumors in which B7-H3 had been knocked down; however, this effect was only marginal in the control group. Furthermore, survivin expression was weak in gemcitabine-treated tumors in which B7-H3 had been knocked down and apoptosis was increased, as revealed by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. In summary, the present study demonstrated that B7-H3 induces gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic carcinoma cells, at least partially by downregulating survivin expression. These results provide novel insights into the function of B7-H3 and encourage the design and investigation of approaches targeting this protein in treating pancreatic carcinoma.

ZHAO, XIN; ZHANG, GUANG-BO; GAN, WEN-JUAN; XIONG, FENG; LI, ZHI; ZHAO, HUA; ZHU, DONG-MING; ZHANG, BIN; ZHANG, XUE-GUANG; LI, DE-CHUN

2013-01-01

75

CT and MR imaging patterns for pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus (Part I): Anatomy, imaging of the extrapancreatic nerve  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic carcinoma is an extremely high-grade malignant tumor with fast development and high mortality. The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma continues to increase. Peripancreatic invasion and metastasis are the main characteristics and important prognostic factors in pancreatic carcinoma, especially invasion into the nervous system; pancreatic nerve innervation includes the intrapancreatic and extrapancreatic nerves. A strong grasp of pancreatic nerve innervation may contribute to our understanding of pancreatic pain modalities and the metastatic routes for pancreatic carcinomas. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are helpful techniques for depicting the anatomy of extrapancreatic nerve innervation. The purpose of the present work is to show and describe the anatomy of the extrapancreatic neural plexus and to elucidate its characteristics using CT and MRI, drawing on our own previous work and the research findings of others.

Zuo, Hou-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Cheng-Jun; Cai, Chang-Ping; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Xie, Xing-Guo; Xiao, Bo; Tang, Wei

2012-01-01

76

Current Approaches and Future Strategies for Pancreatic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease characterized bylocal invasion and early dissemination. It isresistant to conventional surgical, radiotherapeutic,and chemotherapeutic modalities. These interventionshave had minimal impact on overall survival with veryfew patients enjoying long term survival. Over thepast few years, 2'difluoro-2'deoxycytidine(gemcitabine) has demonstrated modest activity in thisdisease and investigations are proceeding to expandits role in combination with radiotherapy and otherchemotherapeutic agents.

Robert A. Wolff; Paul Chiao; Renato Lenzi; Peter W. T. Pisters; Jeffrey E. Lee; Nora A. JanJan; Christopher H. Crane; Douglas B. Evans; James L. Abbruzzese

2000-01-01

77

Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Nonfunctioning Tumors\\/Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are defined by their histopathological differentiation. Neuroendocrine cells are characterized by the expression of marker molecules like neuron-specific enolase (NSE), an unspecific cytosolic marker or vesicle proteins like chromogranin A or synaptophysin, indicating large and dense hormone-storing core vesicles and neuropeptides- or small neurotransmitter-storing synaptic vesicles, respectively [1–4]. These proteins define the neuroendocrine origin of

Massimo Falconi; Ursula Plöckinger; Dik J. Kwekkeboom; Riccardo Manfredi; Meike Körner; Larry Kvols; Ulrich F. Pape; Jens Ricke; Peter E. Goretzki; Stefan Wildi; Thomas Steinmüller; Kjell Öberg; Jean-Yves Scoazec

2006-01-01

78

Stable transfection of a glypican-1 antisense construct decreases tumorigenicity in PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Glypican-1 belongs to a family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) that affect cell growth, invasion, and adhesion. Cell-surface HSPGs are believed to act as co-receptors for heparin-binding mitogenic growth factors. It was reported that glypican-1 is strongly expressed in human pancreatic cancer, and that it may play an essential role in regulating growth-factor responsiveness in pancreatic carcinoma cells. In this study we investigated the effects of decreased glypican-1 expression in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. To this end, PANC-1 cells were stable transfected with a full-length glypican-1 antisense construct. The glypican- antisense transfected clones displayed markedly reduced glypican- protein levels and a marked attenuation of the mitogenic responses to heparin-binding growth factors that are commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer: fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor (HB-EGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, glypican-1 antisense-expressing PANC-1 cells exhibited a significantly reduced ability to form tumors in nude mice in comparison with parental and sham-transfected PANC-1 cells. These data suggest that glypican-1 plays an important role in the responses of pancreatic cancer cells to heparin-binding growth factors, and documents for the first time that its expression may enhance tumorigenic potential in vivo. PMID:10505759

Kleeff, J; Wildi, S; Kumbasar, A; Friess, H; Lander, A D; Korc, M

1999-10-01

79

Tobacco, ethanol, coffee, pancreatitis, diabetes mellitus, and cholelithiasis as risk factors for pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hospital-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer was conducted in Athens in 1991–92. One hundred and eighty-one patients operated on for cancer of the exocrine pancreas in eight teaching hospitals formed the case series, whereas hospital patient controls and hospital visitor controls formed two independent comparison series. Cases and controls were matched by hospital, gender, and age in 1:1:1 ratio,

Victoria Kalapothaki; Anastasia Tzonou; Chung-cheng Hsieh; Nektaria Toupadaki; Anna Karakatsani; Dimitrios Trichopoulos

1993-01-01

80

RNA interference-mediated silencing of VEGF and bFGF suppresses endostatin secretion in pancreatic carcinoma cells  

PubMed Central

Pro-angiogenic factors [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)] and anti-angiogenic factors (endostatin) play important roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the knockdown effect by either VEGF or bFGF siRNA on the expression and secretion of endostatin in pancreatic carcinoma cells. Pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (sw1990, Panc-1 and PCT-3) were treated with VEGF and bFGF siRNA. The expression of VEGF, bFGF and endostatin in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Secretion of endostatin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). bFGF and VEGF siRNA significantly reduced the expression of bFGF and VEGF mRNA, respectively, but did not affect mRNA and protein expression of endostatin in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. However, secretion of endostatin in PCT-3, Panc-1 and sw1990 cells was significantly inhibited by bFGF and VEGF siRNA. This study demonstrated that pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF and bFGF) differentially modulate expression and secretion of anti-angiogenic factors (endostatin). This result may have important implications in the anti-angiogenesis therapy in pancreatic cancer.

YAN, CHANGQING; WANG, CHUAN; DONG, MEI; LIU, SANGUANG; QI, CHENG; ZHAO, YUPEI

2013-01-01

81

Late solitary pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: a case report.  

PubMed

We report a case of a 70-year-old man with renal cell carcinoma and metastasis to the pancreas. Symptomatic patients usually present with obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain, or GI bleeding. The diagnosis usually occurs in asymptomatic patients during followup for renal cell carcinoma. It usually befalls slowly from 2 to 18 years after the onset of the primary tumor of the kidney. A 70-year-old man presented in our department with weight loss, anorexia, and elevated blood glucose, having a large tumor on the head of the pancreas treated successfully by pancreatoduodenectomy. Three years after his treatment, the patient is doing well and without recurrence of the tumor. In conclusion, metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas is a rare neoplasm accounting for 0.25-3% of all pancreatic tumors. PMID:22792114

Katsourakis, Anastasios; Noussios, George; Hadjis, Iosif; Alatsakis, Michael; Chatzitheoklitos, Efthimios

2012-06-26

82

Clinical and genetic analysis of 18 pancreatic carcinoma/melanoma-prone families.  

PubMed

Families with both melanoma and pancreatic cancer are extremely rare and some are affected with the autosomal dominant inherited familial atypical multiple mole melanoma-pancreatic cancer (FAMMM-PC) syndrome. The phenotypic and genotypic expressions of such pancreatic cancer-melanoma prone families are not well defined. The National Case Collection of Familial Pancreatic Cancer of the Deutsche Krebshilfe includes 110 pancreatic cancer families, 18 of which (16%) show an association of pancreatic cancer and melanoma. These 18 families were analysed regarding their phenotype and the prevalence of germline mutations in the candidate genes CDKN2A, BRCA2, CHEK2, NOD2, ARL11 and Palladin (PALLD). There were two types of families: five families with the FAMMM-PC phenotype and 13 PC/melanoma families without the multiple mole phenotypes (PCMS). The prevalences of PC and melanoma in the two types of families were similar. The prevalence of other tumour types, especially breast carcinoma, was higher (11%) in PCMS- than in FAMMM-PC families (2.4%, p = 0.02). CDKN2A mutations were identified in 2 of 18 (11%) PCMS families. A cosegregating BRCA2 mutation was detected in one PCMS family without breast cancer. None of the reported germline mutations in the NOD2, Palladin, ARL11 or CHEK2 genes were detected in either type of family. In conclusion, families with an accumulation of PC and melanoma show a large variety of phenotypic expression, which is not always consistent with the FAMMM-PC phenotype. More PC/melanoma-prone families need to be analysed to clarify whether such families represent variations of the FAMMM-PC syndrome or two distinct hereditary cancer syndromes. PMID:20041885

Bartsch, D K; Langer, P; Habbe, N; Matthäi, E; Chaloupka, B; Sina, M; Hahn, S A; Slater, E P

2009-12-22

83

Iodine-125 implant and external beam irradiation in patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma. [Efficacy and complications  

SciTech Connect

Twelve patients with biopsy-proven clinically localized ductal pancreatic cancers (less than 7 cm in greatest diameter) judged unsuitable for resection were treated by bypass surgery, an Iodine-125 implant (20 to 39 mCi), and postoperative irradiation (4000 to 4500 rads). The potential problems of significant bleeding, pancreatic fistula, or pancreatitis were not experienced. A local recurrence developed in one patient and two recurred in regional lymph nodes. The projected median survival of the group is 11 months with four of the 12 patients still surviving. For purposes of comparison all patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma treated by radical resection during a similar time were evaluated. All ten have died with a median survival of six months. Twelve of 22 (55%) of the combined implanted and resected groups have developed distant metastasis. Further pursuit of intraoperative techniques of irradiation in combination with adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy seems indicated in an attempt to prolong patient survival which is now limited by hematogenous metastases.

Shipley, W.U.; Nardi, G.L.; Cohen, A.M.; Ling, C.C.

1980-02-15

84

Endosonography and cytology in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma: Preliminary results of endosonographic guided puncture  

SciTech Connect

Endosonography was performed in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma in two patients. In the first case endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomography were nondiagnostic in diagnosing the origin of submucosal gastric abnormalities. Endosonography diagnosed a pancreatic tail carcinoma with submucosal gastric involvement, and this was confirmed by endosonographic-guided cytology. Fundus varices due to segmented splenic vein involvement were found. Surgery was not recommended due to the advanced disease. In the second case pancreatic body carcinoma was diagnosed by ERCP and computed tomography. Transcutaneous ultrasonographic-guided cytological puncture confirmed the diagnosis. Endosonography revealed additional information of segmental portal hypertension with fundic varices due to splenic vein involvement. Autopsy confirmed the endosonographic diagnosis. 18 refs., 5 figs.

Tio, T.L.; Sie, L.H.; Tytgat, G.N.J. (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States) Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

1993-01-01

85

Metastatic pancreatic carcinoma and bronchioloalveolar adenomas in an Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus).  

PubMed

An adult female, intact Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) was presented for lethargy, anorexia, and markedly reduced flying activity. Physical and ultrasound examinations were suggestive of an abdominal mass with free fluid within the abdomen. Based on the poor and deteriorating clinical condition of the animal, euthanasia was elected. Gross necropsy revealed an irregular thickening at the root of the mesentery and a diffusely, dark-red liver with rounded hepatic margins. Histologic examination revealed extensive neoplastic effacement of the pancreas with invasion into the surrounding mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes and metastatic spread to the liver. Based on the morphology of the neoplastic cells, the involvement of the pancreas, and immunohistochemistry, a diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma was made. Additionally, two small neoplasms were identified in the lungs. These masses were distinct from the carcinoma, and their morphology was consistent with bronchioloalveolar adenomas. This is the first known report of either benign pulmonary lesions or pancreatic carcinomas in the order Chiroptera. PMID:24063117

Cushing, Andrew C; Ossiboff, Robert; Buckles, Elizabeth; Abou-Madi, Noha

2013-09-01

86

[A resected case of pleomorphic carcinoma of pancreatic head].  

PubMed

A 41-year-old man was admitted to the hospital complaining of back pain and progressive jaundice. Ultrasonography, CT and hypotonic duodenography revealed a large and well-defined tumor in the head of pancreas. The tumor was hypervascular on angiography. Total pancreatectomy was performed, and the examination of the resected specimen disclosed that the tumor was 50 X 45 mm in size and extrapancreatic tumor-forming type. Histopathologically, the tumor comprized mostly bizzare mono- and multinucleated giant cells with sarcomatous growth pattern. The patient died 6 months after operation due to liver metastasis and peritoneal dissemination. The pathological feature of the pleomophic carcinoma of the pancreas is well-known, but the clinical feature is vague because the resected cases are rare. The pathological finding of the specimen of this case is typical and it is considered that the clinical findings of this case, such as well-defined and hypervascular tumor, are characteristic of the pleomorphic carcinoma of the pancreas. PMID:3960021

Kamiya, J; Nimura, Y; Hayakawa, N; Shionoya, S; Sakakibara, M; Akiyama, S

1986-01-01

87

Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses  

PubMed Central

Background It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs) among dendritic cells (DCs) fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines. Methods Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated. Results The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1) was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs.

Andoh, Yoshiaki; Makino, Naohiko; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

2013-01-01

88

Extrapancreatic neural plexus invasion by carcinomas of the pancreatic head region: evaluation using thin-section helical CT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The aim of this study was to determine the computed tomographic (CT) criteria for diagnosing the second portion of the extrapancreatic\\u000a neural plexus (PLX-II) invasion by carcinoma of the pancreatic head region on thin-section helical CT.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A total of 41 patients with carcinoma of the pancreatic head region (17 in the pancreas, 24 in the lower common bile

Hui Tian; Hiromu Mori; Shunro Matsumoto; Yasunari Yamada; Hiro Kiyosue; Masayuki Ohta; Seigo Kitano

2007-01-01

89

Analysis of genes associated with lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic carcinoma using cDNA microarray  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify new markers for prediction of lymph node metastasis. Methods: cDNA probes were prepared by labeling\\u000a mRNA from samples of four pancreatic carcinoma tissues with Cy5-dUTP and mRNA from adjacent normal tissues with Cy3-dUTP respectively\\u000a through reverse transcription. The mixed probes of each sample were then hybridized with 4,096 cDNA arrays (4,000 unique human\\u000a cDNA sequences), and the

Zhi-jun Tan; Xian-gui Hu; Gui-song Cao; Yan Tang

2003-01-01

90

Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation.  

PubMed

A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case. PMID:23097614

Wiebelitz, Karl Rüdiger; Beer, André-Michael

2012-10-16

91

Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation  

PubMed Central

A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case.

Wiebelitz, Karl Rudiger; Beer, Andre-Michael

2012-01-01

92

CA19-9: A promising tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

In order to evaluate CA19-9 as a tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma (PC), serum levels of CA19-9 were compared with those of CEA and elastase-1 in 56 patients, consisted of 43 cases with histologically proven adenocarcinomas and 13 cases with chronic pancreatitis. Serum levels were determined by using RIA kit obtained from CIS, France (CA19-9 and CEA) and Abbot (elastase-1). CA19-9 gave the highest accuracy among tumor markers the authors have studied and serum levels were markedly elevated over 100U/ml in 30 (70%) cases with PC, whereas none in chronic pancreatitis. CA19-9 values were closely related to the tumor size and the presence or absence of metastsis on CT findings. Small tumors of less than 3cm in diameter, although the site of tumor was limited to the head of the pancreas, showed positive results in 2 out of 5 cases. Furthermore, CA19-9 was at a level of less than 22U/ml in 98 normal controls and was found to be elevated in only 4 (3%) out of 124 patients with benign diseases, including liver diseases, gastric ulcer, cholelithiasis, and so on. These results indicate that CA19-9 is much better in diagnosis and management of PC than is CEA.

Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hidaka, A.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Naito, A.; Suzuki, T.

1984-01-01

93

Specific Chromosomal Aberrations and Amplification of the AIB1 Nuclear Receptor Coactivator Gene in Pancreatic Carcinomas  

PubMed Central

To screen pancreatic carcinomas for chromosomal aberrations we have applied molecular cytogenetic techniques, including fluorescent in situ hybridization, comparative genomic hybridization, and spectral karyotyping to a series of nine established cell lines. Comparative genomic hybridization revealed recurring chromosomal gains on chromosome arms 3q, 5p, 7p, 8q, 12p, and 20q. Chromosome losses were mapped to chromosome arms 8p, 9p, 17p, 18q, 19p, and chromosome 21. The comparison with comparative genomic hybridization data from primary pancreatic tumors indicates that a specific pattern of chromosomal copy number changes is maintained in cell culture. Metaphase chromosomes from six cell lines were analyzed by spectral karyotyping, a technique that allows one to visualize all chromosomes simultaneously in different colors. Spectral karyotyping identified multiple chromosomal rearrangements, the majority of which were unbalanced. No recurring reciprocal translocation was detected. Cytogenetic aberrations were confirmed using fluorescent in situ hybridization with probes for the MDR gene and the tumor suppressor genes p16 and DCC. Copy number increases on chromosome 20q were validated with a probe specific for the nuclear receptor coactivator AIB1 that maps to chromosome 20q12. Amplification of this gene was identified in six of nine pancreatic cancer cell lines and correlated with increased expression.

Ghadimi, B. Michael; Schrock, Evelin; Walker, Robert L.; Wangsa, Danny; Jauho, Annukka; Meltzer, Paul S.; Ried, Thomas

1999-01-01

94

Laparoscopic left pancreatectomy for pancreatic sarcomatoid carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the pancreas is extremely rare. The current report presents a case of carcinosarcoma of the pancreas in a 48-year-old male. Pre-operative computed tomography scans revealed a large complex cystic and solid mass in the tail of the pancreas; the patient underwent a laparoscopic spleen-preserving left pancreatectomy. The tumor was shown to be made of cystic and solid components, with a grossly grey/ white appearance. A histological evaluation of the tumor revealed two elements separated from each other, one component was a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and the other component exhibited a sarcomatous growth pattern, composed of spindle cells and multinucleated giant cells. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial area was positive for cytokeratin (CK) and negative for vimentin, while the sarcomatoid area was negative for CK and positive for vimentin. These observations confirmed a diagnosis of pancreatic carcinosarcoma. Although the patient was treated by gemcitabine following surgery, the outcome was extremely poor and the patient succumbed to sarcomatoid carcinoma three months after the treatment.

YAO, JIE; QIAN, JIAN-JUN; ZHU, CHANG-REN; BAI, DOU-SHENG; MIAO, YI

2013-01-01

95

Targeted inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) enhances radiosensitivity in pancreatic carcinoma cells  

PubMed Central

The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that regulates protein translation, cell growth, and apoptosis. Rapamycin (RPM), a specific inhibitor of mTOR, exhibits potent and broad in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against leukemia, breast cancer, and melanoma. Recent studies showing that RPM sensitizes cancers to chemotherapy and radiation therapy have attracted considerable attention. This study aimed to examine the radiosensitizing effect of RPM in vitro, as well as its mechanism of action. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and colony formation assay showed that 10 nmol/L to 15 nmol/L of RPM had a radiosensitizing effects on pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, a low dose of RPM induced autophagy and reduced the number of S-phase cells. When radiation treatment was combined with RPM, the PC-2 cell cycle arrested in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that the expression of DDB1, RAD51, and XRCC5 were downregulated, whereas the expression of PCNA and ABCC4 were upregulated in PC-2 cells. The results demonstrated that RPM effectively enhanced the radiosensitivity of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

Dai, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Jie; Kang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Lu, Wang-Feng; Lin, Shuai; Ma, Hong-Bing; Wang, Xi-Jing; Wu, Wen-Ying

2013-01-01

96

EFEMP1 binds the EGF receptor and activates MAPK and Akt pathways in pancreatic carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

The EGF-related protein EFEMP1 (EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1) has been shown to promote tumor growth in human adenocarcinoma. To understand the mechanism of this action, the signal transduction activated upon treatment with this protein has been investigated. We show that EFEMP1 binds EGF receptor (EGFR) in a competitive manner relative to epidermal growth factor (EGF), implicating that EFEMP1 and EGF share the same or adjacent binding sites on the EGFR. Treatment of pancreatic carcinoma cells with purified EFEMP1 activates autophosphorylation of EGFR at the positions Tyr-992 and Tyr-1068, but not at the position Tyr-1048. This signal is further transduced to phosphorylation of Akt at position Thr-308 and p44/p42 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) at positions Thr-202 and Tyr-204. These downstream phosphorylation events can be inhibited by treatment with the EGFR kinase inhibitor PD 153035. The observed signal transduction upon treatment with EFEMP1 can contribute to the enhancement of tumor growth shown in pancreatic carcinoma cells overexpressing EFEMP1. PMID:19804359

Camaj, Peter; Seeliger, Hendrik; Ischenko, Ivan; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; De Toni, Enrico N; Faktorova, Dagmar; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J

2009-12-01

97

Spiclomazine Induces Apoptosis Associated with the Suppression of Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells  

PubMed Central

The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver (HL-7702) cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion.

Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

2013-01-01

98

Treatment of pancreatic carcinoma by adenoviral mediated gene transfer of vasostatin in mice  

PubMed Central

Background Tumour growth is angiogenesis dependent and antiangiogenesis therapy may represent a promising therapeutic option. Aims To evaluate the inhibitory effect of vasostatin gene mediated by a replication deficient recombinant adenovirus (Ad) on human pancreatic cancer in vivo and to investigate the mechanism of action of vasostatin. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelium derived ECV304 cells were infected with Ad?vasostatin and Ad?lacZ, and compared with phosphate buffered saline (PBS). MTT (3,?[4,5?dimethylthiazol?2?yl]?2,5?diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to estimate the proliferation of ECV304 cells; tube formation assay and choriallantoic membrane assay were used to evaluate angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Xenografted nude mice with pancreatic cancer were established to observe in vivo tumour growth suppression. Microvessel density revealed by CD31 immunohistochemical staining was measured. Results Growth and tube formation of ECV304 cells infected with Ad?vasostatin were suppressed significantly compared with cells infected with Ad?lacZ or cells treated with PBS. Neovascularisation in the Ad?vasostatin group was less than that in the PBS and Ad?lacZ groups, based on chorioallantoic membrane results. Volumes of pancreatic tumours in the Ad?vasostatin group were significantly smaller than those in the PBS and Ad?lacZ groups at the end of the treatment period. Microvessel density in the Ad?vasostatin group was significantly lower than that in the Ad?lacZ and PBS groups. Conclusion The vasostatin gene mediated by adenovirus is efficient for gene therapy for pancreatic carcinoma. Suppression of vasostatin on proliferation of vascular endothelium cells and angiogenesis may account for its effect.

Li, L; Yuan, Y-Z; Lu, J; Xia, L; Zhu, Y; Zhang, Y-P; Qiao, M-M

2006-01-01

99

Increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human pancreatic carcinomas and cell lines: growth inhibition by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.  

PubMed

Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein expression were found to be frequently elevated in human pancreatic adenocarcinomas and cell lines derived from such tumors. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated cytoplasmic COX-2 expression in 14 of 21 (67%) pancreatic carcinomas. The level of COX-2 mRNA was found to be elevated in carcinomas, relative to histologically normal pancreas from a healthy individual, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR. COX-2 protein expression was detected by the Western blot assay in three of five pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (BxPC-3, Capan-1, and MDAPanc-3), whereas COX-1 protein was detected in two of the five cell lines (BxPC-3 and Capan-1). Increased levels of COX-2 mRNA were found in four of five cell lines, and only in PANC-1 cells was the low level of transcript comparable to that in the normal pancreas. The level of COX-2 mRNA was positively correlated with the differentiation status of the tumor of origin for each cell line, COX-2 protein expression was up-regulated by epidermal growth factor when the cells were grown in absence of serum. Finally, two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sulindac sulfide and NS398, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in all pancreatic cell lines tested. No correlation was found between the level of COX-2 or COX-1 expression and the extent of growth inhibition. Treatment of BxPC-3 cells with sulindac sulfide and NS398 resulted in an induction of COX-2 expression. Our findings indicate that COX-2 up-regulation is a frequent event in pancreatic cancers and suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful in the chemoprevention and therapy of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:10485483

Molina, M A; Sitja-Arnau, M; Lemoine, M G; Frazier, M L; Sinicrope, F A

1999-09-01

100

Molecular and immunochemical analyses of RB1 and cyclin D1 in human ductal pancreatic carcinomas and cell lines.  

PubMed

Somatic mutations in the retinoblastoma-1 gene (RB1) and loss of RB1 protein function have been implicated in a number of human malignancies, but the role of RB1 gene and protein abnormalities in ductal pancreatic cancer (DPCA) is virtually unknown. We therefore analyzed expression of the RB1 protein immunohistochemically and/or by western blotting in a total of 54 sporadic and eight familial cases of archival and frozen DPCA and in 18 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by using the antibodies RB-WL-1, 84-B3-1, and PMG3-245. Mutations in the RB1 promotor region and exons 13-21 of the RB1 gene were likewise examined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses and DNA sequencing of genomic DNA from 30 microdissected primary pancreatic tumors and the pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Moreover, amplification and expression of a major regulatory component of RB1 function, cyclin D1, were assessed by southern and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. The DPCAs were heterogeneous in both the intensity of RB1 nuclear staining and the percentage of immunoreactive cells. The tumors often had areas where RB1 staining was weak or absent adjacent to normal pancreatic tissue; however, only two of 32 archival cases and one of 30 frozen cases of DPCA completely lacked RB1 nuclear staining. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of 18 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines demonstrated the absence of RB1 expression in only two cell lines, Capan-1 and QGP-1. Analyses of the RB1 gene and promotor region by SSCP and DNA sequencing largely confirmed the immunochemical findings. Three of 30 primary carcinomas had abnormalities revealed by SSCP analyses. In one case a single base-pair deletion was confirmed in exon 18 and resulted in premature termination and the absence of detectable RB1 protein. A second case had TAC-->TTC missense mutation in exon 13. The third primary carcinoma could not be reliably sequenced because it had a low percentage of epithelial cells. The cyclin D1 gene was not amplified in any of the primary pancreatic tumors or cell lines examined. These immunochemical and molecular analyses of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene and cyclin D1 proto-oncogene in a large series of human pancreatic cancers and cell lines indicate that RB1 and cyclin D1 alterations occur during the development of some human DPCAs. Nevertheless, it is probable that alterations in cell-cycle regulation in DPCAs more frequently involve pathways other than those involving RB1 and cyclin D1. PMID:8599583

Huang, L; Lang, D; Geradts, J; Obara, T; Klein-Szanto, A J; Lynch, H T; Ruggeri, B A

1996-02-01

101

The immunotherapeutic effect of dendritic cells vaccine modified with interleukin-18 gene and tumor cell lysate on mice with pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To estimate the effect of a therapeutic vaccine against pancreatic carcinoma based on dendritic cell (DC) vaccine modified with tumor lysate and Interleukin-18 gene. METHODS: The BALB\\/C mice model of pancreatic carcinoma was induced with DMBA. DC vaccine was constructed through pulsed with tumor lysate and transfected by the recombinant adenoviral vector encoding IL-18 gene.The immnotherapeutic effects of DC

Zhao-Hui Tang; Wen-Hong Qiu; Gao-Song Wu; Xiang-Ping Yang; Sheng-Quan Zou; Fa-Zu Qiu

2002-01-01

102

Establishment of a carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cell line from human pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

A human pancreatic carcinoma cell line of islet cell origin (QGP-1) has been established and maintained for over two years. The parent tumor and the cultured cell line produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and there is no evidence of hormone secretion from the tumor cells. The epithelioid cells, which had migrated from rounded, irregular cell aggregates, grow as a confluent monolayer with piling up of cells in some areas, and have a population doubling time of 3.5 days. The modal chromosome number was 50. Exponentially growing cultures produce 76.3 ng of CEA/10(6) cells after 7 days. CEA production was confirmed by immuno-peroxidase staining. PMID:7227711

Kaku, M; Nishiyama, T; Yagawa, K; Abe, M

1980-10-01

103

Patterns of EphA2 protein expression in primary and metastatic pancreatic carcinoma and correlation with genetic status  

PubMed Central

EphA2 is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that functions in the regulation of cell growth, survival, angiogenesis, and migration and EphA2 targeting has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for neoplasms that overexpress this protein. EphA2 overexpression has been correlated with increased invasive and metastatic ability in pancreatic cancer cell lines. However, the patterns of EphA2 expression in human pancreatic cancers and associated metastases is unknown, as are the genetics of EphA2 in this tumor type. We collected clinicopathologic data and paraffin-embedded materials from 98 patients with primary and/or metastatic pancreatic cancer and performed immunohistochemical labeling for EphA2 protein. EphA2 protein immunolabeling was found in 207 of 219 samples (95%). The expression was predominantly cytoplasmic, although predominant membranous staining was observed in a minority of cases. When evaluated specifically for labeling intensity, primary and metastatic carcinomas were more strongly positive compared to benign ducts and PanIN lesions (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively) and poorly differentiated carcinomas were more strongly positive for EphA2 than well and moderately differentiated tumors (P < 0.005). When primary carcinomas without metastatic disease were specifically compared to carcinomas with associated metastatic disease, the advanced carcinomas showed relatively less strong positive labeling for EphA2 (P < 0.008). Moreover, decreased EphA2 labeling was more commonly found in liver (P < 0.002), lung (P < 0.004) or peritoneal metastases (P < 0.01) as compared to distant lymph node metastases (P < 0.01). Genetic sequencing of the tyrosine kinase domain of EPHA2 in 22 samples of xenograft enriched pancreatic cancer did not reveal any inactivating mutations. However, EPHA2 amplification was found in 1 of 33 pancreatic cancers corresponding to a lymph node metastasis, indicating EPHA2 genomic amplification may underlie EphA2 overexpression in a minority of patients. Our data confirms that EphA2 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, but suggests a relative loss of EphA2 in co-existent pancreatic cancer metastases as well as a role for EPHA2 in organ specific metastasis.

Mudali, Shiyama V.; Fu, Baojin; Lakkur, Sindhu S.; Luo, Mingde; Embuscado, Erlinda E.

2009-01-01

104

Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). METHODS: Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We

Erkan Topkan; Ali A Yavuz; Mehmet Aydin; Cem Onal; Fuat Yapar; Melek N Yavuz

2008-01-01

105

Inhibition of NF-?B sensitizes human pancreatic carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by etoposide (VP16) or doxorubicin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transcription factor NF-?B has anti-apoptotic properties and may confer chemoresistance to cancer cells. Here, we describe human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines that differ in the responsiveness to the topoisomerase-2 inhibitors VP16 (20 ?M) and doxorubicin (0.3 ?M): Highly sensitive BxPC-3 and PT45-P1 cells, and Capan-1 and A818-4 cells that were almost resistant to both anti cancer drugs. VP16, but

Alexander Arlt; Jens Vorndamm; Maike Breitenbroich; Ulrich R Fölsch; Holger Kalthoff; Wolfgang E Schmidt; Heiner Schäfer

2001-01-01

106

Pancreatic Metastasis from Renal Carcinoma Managed by Whipple Resection. A Case Report and Literature Review of Metastatic Pattern, Surgical Management and Outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context Metastatic cancer to the pancreas is rare and accounts for less than 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, metastasis from renal cell carcinoma being predominant. While symptomatic patients present with obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain, or GI bleeding, the diagnosis is often made in asymptomatic patients during follow-up for renal cell carcinoma. Hence, a high index of clinical suspicion is required

Norman Oneil Machado; Pradeep Chopra

107

Pancreatic panniculitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatic panniculitis (PP) is a rare variant of panniculitis characterized by subcutaneous fat necrosis, that affects 0.3-3% of patients across a range of different pancreatic disorders. It presents with painful, tender, erythematous to violaceous nodules that may undergo spontaneous ulceration and discharge of an oily brown, viscous material, resulting from liquefactive necrosis of adipocytes. These lesions usually involve the lower extremities, although may also spread over the buttocks, trunk, arms and scalp. In addition to the skin, fat necrosis may involve periarticular, abdominal and intramedullary adipose tissue. In 40% of cases, skin manifestations can precede by 1 to 7 months the abdominal symptoms of pancreatic disease, which include mostly acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, more frequently of acinar cell type, and pancreatic abnormalities. Histopathologically, PP shows characteristic features of mostly lobular panniculitis with marked necrosis of adipocytes. The necrotic adipocytes with finely granular and basophilic material in the cytoplasm due to calcium deposits are known as "ghost adipocytes". The treatment of pancreatic panniculitis is directed to the underlying pancreatic disease. The prognosis is poor in cases associated with pancreatic carcinoma. When there is widespread and persistent disease, frequent relapses, or ulceration, the possibility of an occult carcinoma of the pancreas should be always considered. While describing three patients seen at the Dermatology Section of the University of Genova from 1990 to 2012, we highlight that, in addition to the rarity of the disease, the precise diagnosis requires adequate samples consisting in large-scalpel incisional biopsies of fully developed lesions. PMID:23900163

Rongioletti, F; Caputo, V

2013-08-01

108

Comparative study on the expression of the blood group antigens Le a, Le b, Le x, Le y and the carbohydrate antigens CA 19-9 and CA50 in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expression of the blood group antigens Le a, Le b, Le x, Le y and the carbohydrate antigens CA 19-9 and CA-50 was studied in 20 ductal pancreatic carcinomas, 24 pancreases with chronic pancreatitis and 10 normal fetal and adult pancreases. CA 19-9, CA-50 and Le a showed the strongest staining intensity, the highest percentage of labelled cells, and

Jutta Schwenk; Josef Makovitzky

1989-01-01

109

Pancreatic carcinomas deposit laminin-5, preferably adhere to laminin-5, and migrate on the newly deposited basement membrane.  

PubMed Central

We studied the adhesion mechanism of pancreatic carcinoma using in vitro adhesion and migration assays of stable cell lines and tumors grown from these cell lines in nude mice. We also compared the results with the expression profiles of laminins and their receptors in pancreatic carcinomas to evaluate the relevance of these mechanisms in vivo. All of the cell lines preferably adhered to laminin-5, irrespective of their capability to synthesize laminin-5. Cell migration was studied in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, as it increased the speed of migration manyfold. Herbimycin A treatment and antibodies against the beta 1 and alpha 3 integrin subunits and laminin alpha 3 chain almost entirely blocked cell migration of the BxPC-3 cell line, whereas migration was nearly unaffected by RGD peptide and only moderately inhibited by antibody against the alpha 6 integrin subunit. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of wounded BxPC-3 cells suggested a rapid endocytosis of alpha 3 integrin subunit in the cells at the margin of the wound and a rapid, polarized rearrangement of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin. Especially HGF-treated cultures showed a prominent cytoplasmic reaction for laminin-5 at the margin of the wound. Xenografted cells formed tumors that produced and deposited the same laminin chains as the in vitro cultures. Frozen sections of human pancreatic carcinomas showed reactivity for laminin chains suggestive for expression of laminin-1 and laminin-5. Both xenografted tumors and human pancreatic carcinomas also showed stromal reactivity for laminin-5. Electron microscopy of the human tumors suggested that this was due to an abundant reduplication the basement-membrane-like material around the nests of malignant cells. Our results suggest that pancreatic carcinomas synthesize and deposit laminin-5 in the basement membrane in an abnormal manner. Invading cells adhere to this newly produced basement membrane and migrate on it by using the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin receptor recognizing laminin-5. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10

Tani, T.; Lumme, A.; Linnala, A.; Kivilaakso, E.; Kiviluoto, T.; Burgeson, R. E.; Kangas, L.; Leivo, I.; Virtanen, I.

1997-01-01

110

Combined pancreatic resection and pancreatic duct-navigation surgery for multiple lesions of the pancreas: intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas concomitant with ductal carcinoma of the pancreas.  

PubMed

When a branch-type IPMN of the uncinate process is concomitant with ductal carcinoma of the body of the pancreas, total pancreatectomy may be recommended. However, a decrease in quality of life becomes a serious problem after total pancreatectomy because of the abolition of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function. We proposed the combined resection, which consists of resection of the uncinate process of the pancreas with distal pancreatectomy. This surgical procedure of combined resection is most suitable for preservation of the pancreatic functions. In addition, we recommend the pancreatic duct-navigation surgery to enable us to prevent injury to the main pancreatic duct, and to dissect at the optimal cutting point of the pancreatic branch duct. PMID:19102402

Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

111

Secretion of neurotensin from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N).  

PubMed

Effects of various secretagogues on secretion of neurotensin from a pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N) were examined. Carbachol stimulated secretion of neurotensin concentration-dependently in the range of 10(-6) - 10(-4) M. The neurotensin secretion stimulated with 10(-5) M carbachol was completely inhibited by atropine at 10(-5) M. Phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (A23187) stimulated secretion of neurotensin. The removal of extracellular Ca2+ suppressed the secretion through the stimulation with 10(-5) M carbachol. Fluoride, an activator of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein, stimulated secretion of neurotensin. Neurotensin released into culture medium through stimulation with carbachol coeluted with neurotensin 1-13 on a gel-chromatography. Our results suggest that secretion of neurotensin from QGP-1N cells is mainly regulated by acetylcholine through muscarinic receptors coupled to G protein and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and protein kinase C play an important role in stimulus-secretion coupling. PMID:8134614

Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

1993-12-10

112

Bitter melon juice activates cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase causing apoptotic death of human pancreatic carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, suggesting critical needs for additional drugs to improve disease outcome. In this study, we examined efficacy and associated mechanism of a novel agent bitter melon juice (BMJ) against pancreatic carcinoma cells both in culture and nude mice. BMJ anticancer efficacy was analyzed in human pancreatic carcinoma BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, AsPC-1 and Capan-2 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and annexin/propidium iodide assays. BMJ effect on apoptosis regulators was assessed by immunoblotting. In vivo BMJ efficacy was evaluated against MiaPaCa-2 tumors in nude mice, and xenograft was analyzed for biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results showed that BMJ (2-5% v/v) decreases cell viability in all four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing strong apoptotic death. At molecular level, BMJ caused caspases activation, altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and cytochrome-c release into the cytosol. Additionally, BMJ decreased survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein but increased p21, CHOP and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38) levels. Importantly, BMJ activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a biomarker for cellular energy status, and an AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) reversed BMJ-induced caspase-3 activation suggesting activated AMPK involvement in BMJ-induced apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of lyophilized BMJ (5mg in 100 µl water/day/mouse) for 6 weeks inhibited MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenograft growth by 60% (P < 0.01) without noticeable toxicity in nude mice. IHC analyses of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts showed that BMJ also inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and activates AMPK in vivo. Overall, BMJ exerts strong anticancer efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its clinical usefulness. PMID:23475945

Kaur, Manjinder; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Chapla; Wempe, Michael F; Agarwal, Rajesh

2013-03-08

113

Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.  

PubMed

We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:22969935

Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kyo, Bunso; Suzuki, Satoru; Matsudo, Takaaki; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya

2012-01-18

114

Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma  

PubMed Central

We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; SUZUKI, YOSHIAKI; KYO, BUNSO; SUZUKI, SATORU; MATSUDO, TAKAAKI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO; AOKI, TATSUYA

2012-01-01

115

Iodine-125 implant and external beam irradiation in patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma: a comparative study to surgical resection.  

PubMed

Twelve patients with biopsy-proven clinically localized ductal pancreatic cancers (less than 7 cm in greatest diameter) judged unsuitable for resection were treated by bypass surgery, an Iodine-125 implant (20-39 mCi), and postoperative irradiation (4000-4500 rads). The potential problems of significant bleeding, pancreatic fistula, or pancreatitis were not experienced. A local recurrence developed in one patient and two recurred in regional lymph nodes. The projected median survival of the group is 11 months with four of the 12 patients still surviving. For purposes of comparison all patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma treated by radical resection during a similar time were evaluated. All ten have died with a median survival of six months. Twelve of 22 (55%) of the combined implanted and resected groups have developed distant metastasis. Further pursuit of intraoperative techniques of irradiation in combination with adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy seems indicated in an attempt to prolong patient survival which is now limited by hematogenous metastases. PMID:6244074

Shipley, W U; Nardi, G L; Cohen, A M; Ling, C C

1980-02-15

116

[Role of serum markers and or various clinical parameters in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma].  

PubMed

This study was performed to ascertain the role of serum markers and simple clinical data in detecting pancreatic cancer and in distinguishing this malignancy from chronic pancreatitis and other gastrointestinal diseases. Serum CA 19-9, tissue polypeptide antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen were measured in 38 control subjects, 37 patients with pancreatic cancer, 39 with chronic pancreatitis and 44 with extra-pancreatic diseases mainly of gastrointestinal origin. Clinical data recorded included age, sex, presence of pancreatic calcifications, weight loss, pain, jaundice, alcohol abuse, diabetes mellitus. Serum markers gave a correct allocation of the subjects in 48.1% of the cases with pancreatic cancer patients correctly predicted in 62.2%. Clinical data correctly diagnosed 74.2% of subjects. Chronic pancreatitis was identified in 84.6% of the cases and pancreatic cancer in 64.9%. The first clinical variables selected were pain and age. The addition of serum markers to clinical data did not enhance accuracy of the results. We conclude that the diagnosis of chronic pancreatic diseases should first be suspected on the basis of accurately recorded simple clinical data; serum markers seem to be only occasionally useful. Since indicative clinical data and serum markers become positive in the advanced phases of pancreatic cancer, early diagnosis of this malignancy still remains an objective to reach. PMID:2487791

Meggiato, T; Basso, D; Piccoli, A; Del Favero, G; Fogar, P; Panozzo, M P; Scalon, P; Fabris, C; Angonese, C; Faggian, D

117

Establishment and long-term xenografting of human pancreatic carcinomas in immunosuppressed mice: changes and stability in morphology, DNA ploidy and proliferation activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma is grave, therefore the experimental model systems remain major tools for testing new\\u000a treatment modalities. We have developed human pancreatic cancer lines growing in immunosuppressed mice and characterized them\\u000a by morphological and flow-cytometric studies. Immunosuppression has been achieved in young (4-week-old) CBA\\/CA mice by thymectomy,\\u000a whole-body irradiation and bone marrow reconstruction. Twelve surgically removed human

József Bocsi; Attila Zalatnai

1999-01-01

118

Oncocytic-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)-derived invasive oncocytic pancreatic carcinoma with brain metastasis - a case report  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease without effective treatments at present. It ranks as s as 4th and 5th in cancer-related mortality in the western countries and worldwide. Locally advanced pancreatic duct carcinoma (PDAC) and metastatic PDAC, usually found the metastases over liver, peritoneum, or lung, have been shown to be with dismal prognosis. Brain metastasis is a rare entity and most cases reported before were found post-mortem. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMN) has been deemed as a precursor of PDAC with very slow progression rate. Here we reported a case diagnosed with IPMN-derived PDAC with brain metastasis. After surgeries for PDAC and brain metastasis, subsequent chemotherapy and radiotherapy were also given. One and half year after surgery, this patient is still living with good performance status, which may warrant individualization of therapeutic strategy for PDAC with only brain metastasis.

2012-01-01

119

Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas  

PubMed Central

The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas.

Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Severine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnolzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

2013-01-01

120

Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas.  

PubMed

The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas. PMID:24092664

Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

2013-09-17

121

Targeting of cancer stem cell marker EpCAM by bispecific antibody EpCAMxCD3 inhibits pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor survival rate, and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), suggested as a marker for cancer stem cells, is over-expressed on most pancreatic tumour cells but not on normal cells and may be an ideal therapeutic target. We evaluated the anti-tumour efficiency of bispecific EpCAMxCD3 antibody linking tumour cells and T lymphocytes. In NOD SCID mice, EpCAMxCD3 had a long serum half-life (t(1/2) approximately 7 days). EpCAMxCD3 significantly retarded growth of BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. For mimicking a pancreatic cancer microenvironment in vitro, we used a three-dimensional tumour reconstruct system, in which lymphocytes were co-cultured with tumour cells and fibroblasts in a collagen matrix. In this in vivo-like system, EpCAMxCD3 potently stimulated production of the effector cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha by extracorporally pre-activated lymphocytes. Moreover, compared with a bivalent anti-CD3 antibody, EpCAMxCD3 more efficiently activated the production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma by non-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Most excitingly, we demonstrate for the first time that EpCAMxCD3 induces prolonged contacts between lymphocytes and tumour cells, which may be the main reason for the observed anti-tumour effects. As an important prerequisite for future use in patients, EpCAMxCD3 did not alter lymphocyte migration as measured by time-lapse video microscopy. Our data may open a way to improve the immune response and treatment outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:20196789

Salnikov, Alexei V; Groth, Ariane; Apel, Anja; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Beckermann, Benjamin M; Khamidjanov, Akmal; Ryschich, Eduard; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

2009-09-01

122

Gene Expression Profiling of Microdissected Pancreatic Ductal Carcinomas Using High-Density DNA Microarrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer

Robert Grützmann; Christian Pilarsky; Ole Ammerpohl; Jutta Lüttges; Armin Böhme; Bence Sipos; Melanie Foerder; Ingo Alldinger; Beatrix Jahnke; Hans Konrad Schackert; Holger Kalthoff; Bernd Kremer; Günter Klöppel; Hans Detlev Saeger

2004-01-01

123

Iodine125 implant and external beam irradiation in patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma. [Efficacy and complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve patients with biopsy-proven clinically localized ductal pancreatic cancers (less than 7 cm in greatest diameter) judged unsuitable for resection were treated by bypass surgery, an Iodine-125 implant (20 to 39 mCi), and postoperative irradiation (4000 to 4500 rads). The potential problems of significant bleeding, pancreatic fistula, or pancreatitis were not experienced. A local recurrence developed in one patient and

W. U. Shipley; G. L. Nardi; A. M. Cohen; C. C. Ling

1980-01-01

124

Effects of integrin-targeted photodynamic therapy on pancreatic carcinoma cell  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the effects of photodynamic therapy with quantum dots-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) probe as photosensitizer on the proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. METHODS: Construction of quantum dots-RGD probe as photosensitizer for integrin-targeted photodynamic therapy was accomplished. After cells were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT), the proliferation of SW1990 cells were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Morphologic changes, cell cycle retardance and apoptosis were observed under fluoroscope and flow cytometry. The expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1), protein kinase B (Akt) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The amount of reactive oxygen species were also evaluated by fluorescence probe. RESULTS: The photodynamic therapy with quantum dots-RGD probe as photosensitizer significantly inhibited cell proliferation (P < 0.01). Apoptotic cells and morphologic changes could be found under optical microscope. The FCM revealed PDT group had more significant cell apoptosis rate compared to control cells (F = 130.617, P < 0.01) and cell cycle G0/G1 and S retardance (P < 0.05) compared to control cells. The expression of Mcl-1 and Akt mRNA were down-regulated, while expression of TRAIL mRNA was up-regulated after cells treated with PDT. PDT group had more significant number of cells producing reactive oxygen species compared to control cells (F = 3262.559, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The photodynamic therapy with quantum dots-RGD probe as photosensitizer significantly inhibits cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in SW1990 cells.

Zhou, Min; Ni, Qian-Wen; Yang, Shan-Ying; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhao, Peng-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Cheng; Xu, Lei-Ming

2013-01-01

125

Value of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our experience with laparoscopy in the diagnosis and staging of 23 cases of pancreatic cancer is reported. This endoscopic procedure has proved useful in the diagnosis of the disease, in the assessment of operability, and in the retrieval of material for histological and cytological confirmation of pancreatic cancer. An infra-gastric laparoscopic method for inspection of the body and tail of

A Cuschieri; A W Hall; J Clark

1978-01-01

126

Targeting pancreatic and ovarian carcinomas using the auristatin-based anti-CD70 antibody-drug conjugate SGN-75  

PubMed Central

Background: CD70 is an ideal target for antibody-based therapies because of its aberrant high expression in renal carcinomas and non-Hodgkin lymphomas and its highly restricted expression in normal tissues. The expression profiling of CD70 in carcinomas has been limited because of the lack of a CD70-specific reagent that works in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Methods: We generated murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for CD70 and validated their specificity by western blot analysis and developed a protocol for immunohistochemistry on FFPE tissues. CD70+ tumour cell lines were used for testing the anti-tumour activity of the anti-CD70 antibody–drug conjugate, SGN-75. Results: We report novel detection of CD70 expression in multiple cancers including pancreatic (25%), larynx/pharynx (22%), melanoma (16%), ovarian (15%), lung (10%), and colon (9%). Our results show that pancreatic and ovarian tumour cell lines, which express high levels of endogenous or transfected CD70, are sensitive to the anti-tumour activity of SGN-75 in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Development of murine mAbs for robust and extensive screening of FFPE samples coupled with the detection of anti-tumour activity in novel indications provide rationale for expanding the application of SGN-75 for the treatment of multiple CD70 expressing cancers.

Ryan, M C; Kostner, H; Gordon, K A; Duniho, S; Sutherland, M K; Yu, C; Kim, K M; Nesterova, A; Anderson, M; McEarchern, J A; Law, C-L; Smith, L M

2010-01-01

127

Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect  

PubMed Central

At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected.

KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; TANAKA, HIROAKI; OHTA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO

2011-01-01

128

Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect.  

PubMed

At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected. PMID:22977618

Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko

2011-09-01

129

Detection of Pancreatic Carcinomas by Imaging Lactose-Binding Protein Expression in Peritumoral Pancreas Using [18F]Fluoroethyl-Deoxylactose PET/CT  

PubMed Central

Background Early diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma with highly sensitive diagnostic imaging methods could save lives of many thousands of patients, because early detection increases resectability and survival rates. Current non-invasive diagnostic imaging techniques have inadequate resolution and sensitivity for detection of small size (?2–3 mm) early pancreatic carcinoma lesions. Therefore, we have assessed the efficacy of positron emission tomography and computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging with ?-O-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4?)-2?-deoxy-2?-[18F]fluoroethyl-D-glucopyranose ([18F]FEDL) for detection of less than 3 mm orthotopic xenografts of L3.6pl pancreatic carcinomas in mice. [18F]FEDL is a novel radioligand of hepatocarcinoma-intestine-pancreas/pancreatitis-associated protein (HIP/PAP), which is overexpressed in peritumoral pancreatic acinar cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Dynamic PET/CT imaging demonstrated rapid accumulation of [18F]FEDL in peritumoral pancreatic tissue (4.04±2.06%ID/g), bi-exponential blood clearance with half-lives of 1.65±0.50 min and 14.14±3.60 min, and rapid elimination from other organs and tissues, predominantly by renal clearance. Using model-independent graphical analysis of dynamic PET data, the average distribution volume ratio (DVR) for [18F]FEDL in peritumoral pancreatic tissue was estimated as 3.57±0.60 and 0.94±0.72 in sham-operated control pancreas. Comparative analysis of quantitative autoradiographic images and densitometry of immunohistochemically stained and co-registered adjacent tissue sections demonstrated a strong linear correlation between the magnitude of [18F]FEDL binding and HIP/PAP expression in corresponding regions (r?=?0.88). The in situ analysis demonstrated that at least a 2–4 fold apparent lesion size amplification was achieved for submillimeter tumors and to nearly half a murine pancreas for tumors larger than 3 mm. Conclusion/Significance We have demonstrated the feasibility of detection of early pancreatic tumors by non-invasive imaging with [18F]FEDL PET/CT of tumor biomarker HIP/PAP over-expressed in peritumoral pancreatic tissue. Non-invasive non-invasive detection of early pancreatic carcinomas with [18F]FEDL PET/CT imaging should aid the guidance of biopsies and additional imaging procedures, facilitate the resectability and improve the overall prognosis.

Flores, Leo Garcia; Bertolini, Susanna; Yeh, Hsin Hsin; Young, Daniel; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Pal, Ashutosh; Ying, Yunming; Volgin, Andrei; Shavrin, Aleksandr; Soghomonyan, Suren; Tong, William; Bornmann, William; Alauddin, Mian M.; Logsdon, Craig; Gelovani, Juri G.

2009-01-01

130

Annexin A1, A2, A4 and A5 play important roles in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer and laryngeal carcinoma, alone and/or synergistically  

PubMed Central

Annexins are associated with metastasis and infiltration of cancer cells. Proteomic analysis and immunohistochemical staining were used to understand whether several annexins play important roles in cancer alone and/or synergistically. Seven fresh breast cancer samples with 23 paraffin specimens, three fresh pancreatic samples and five fresh laryngeal carcinoma samples with 25 paraffin specimens were obtained from humans, as well as ten golden hamster pancreatic cancer tissue samples, and they were used to observe differential expression of annexins compared with normal tissues using proteomics and immunohistochemical staining. Annexin A2, A4 and A5 were overexpressed in human breast cancer and laryngeal carcinoma tissues and in golden hamster pancreatic cancer tissue samples, respectively, as shown by proteomics and immunohistochemical staining. In addition, annexin A4 and A5 were expressed in breast cancer tissues, while annexin A1 was not expressed. Annexin A1, A2 and A4 were expressed in human laryngeal carcinoma tissues as shown by immunohistochemical staining. Annexin A1, A2, A4 and A5 played important roles in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer and laryngeal carcinoma, alone and/or synergistically, and they may be targets of therapy for malignant tumors. The choice of which annexins to target should depend on their respective biological behaviors.

DENG, SHISHAN; WANG, JIANGUO; HOU, LINGMI; LI, JINSUI; CHEN, GUO; JING, BAOQIAN; ZHANG, XIAOMING; YANG, ZHENGWEI

2013-01-01

131

VEGF expression by mesenchymal stem cells contributes to angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the factors that enable the mobilisation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow into the blood stream and their recruitment to and retention in the tumour. We found specific migration of MSC towards growth factors present in pancreatic tumours, such as PDGF, EGF, VEGF and specific inhibitors Glivec, Erbitux and Avastin interfered with

B M Beckermann; G Kallifatidis; A Groth; D Frommhold; A Apel; J Mattern; A V Salnikov; G Moldenhauer; W Wagner; A Diehlmann; R Saffrich; M Schubert; A D Ho; N Giese; M W Büchler; H Friess; P Büchler; I Herr

2008-01-01

132

Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells Activate Maspin Expression Through Loss of Epigenetic Control1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The maspin gene is not expressed in normal human pancreas, but its expression is acquired during human pancreatic carcinogenesis. In other normal human cells and their malignant counterparts, maspin expression is controlled through the epigenetic state of its promoter. In studies presented herein, we used bisulfite genomic sequencing and chromatin immu- noprecipitation studies to show that maspin-negative pancreas cells have

Matthew Fitzgerald; Marc Oshiro; Nicholas Holtan; Kimberly Krager; Joseph J. Cullen; Bernard W. Futscher; Frederick E. Domann

133

The Role of Antioxidant Enzymes in the Growth of Pancreatic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Because of the poor therapeutic responsiveness of pancreatic cancer to surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, survival beyond five years is rare with median survival less than six months. K-ras mutations have been identified in up to 95% of pancre- atic cancers, implying their critical

Nazee Jabbari; Joseph J. Cullen

2007-01-01

134

Paraduodenal Pancreatitis: Clinical Performance of MR Imaging in Distinguishing from Carcinoma.  

PubMed

Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for distinguishing paraduodenal pancreatitis (PDP) from pancreatic head duct adenocarcinoma (CA) in patients with diagnoses confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and is HIPAA compliant. Between July 2007 and July 2010, 47 patients who underwent Whipple procedure and MR imaging less than 60 days before surgery were identified retrospectively. Two relatively inexperienced fellowship trainees with 9 months of body fellowship training were asked to record the presence or absence of three MR imaging features: focal thickening of the second portion of the duodenum; abnormal enhancement of the second portion of the duodenum; and cystic focus in the expected region of the accessory pancreatic duct. Strict criteria for diagnosis of PDP included presence of all three imaging features. Any case that did not fulfill the criteria was classified as CA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for characterization of PDP was calculated for each reader with 95% confidence intervals. A ? test assessed level of agreement between readers. Results: Each reader correctly categorized 15 of 17 (88.2%) PDP cases when all three imaging criteria were met. Alternatively, 26 of 30 (86.7%) pancreatic duct CA were correctly categorized as inconsistent with PDP. Four patients with histopathologic diagnosis of CA were incorrectly classified as PDP by each reader. Agreement between the two readers showed substantial ? agreement for the diagnosis of PDP and differentiation from pancreatic duct CA. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MR imaging may help accurately identify PDP and distinguish it from CA when strict diagnostic criteria are followed. © RSNA, 2013 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13112056/-/DC1. PMID:23847255

Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego R; Sarmiento, Juan M; Erickson, Sarah H; Gober, Daniel; Tapper, Elliot B; Chen, Zhengjia; Adsay, N Volkan

2013-07-11

135

[A case of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma found with acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis and liver abscess, and associated with a pancreatobiliary fistula].  

PubMed

We report a rare case of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC) with acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD), liver abscess, and pancreatobiliary fistula formation. A man in his sixties was admitted to our hospital with a chief complain of high grade fever and anorexia. CT and MRI revealed a multilocular cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, fistula formation between the common bile duct and this cystic lesion, and multiple liver abscess. We performed endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage for the AOSPD, endoscopic biliary drainage for the biliary flow obstruction, and percutaneous transhepatic drainage for the liver abscess. Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected in the culture of pancreatic juice and liver abscess, but not in the bile and blood culture. These culture studies revealed that the liver abscess was caused by AOSPD. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for the IPMC. The pathological diagnosis was IPMC. PMID:23831662

Nishie, Hirotada; Okumura, Fumihiro; Fukusada, Shigeki; Inoue, Tadahisa; Kachi, Kenta; Anbe, Kaiki; Natsume, Makoto; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshimura, Norihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Sano, Hitoshi; Kajikawa, Masaki; Harada, Akio; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Takahiro

2013-07-01

136

Pancreatic carcinoma cells are susceptible to non-invasive radiofrequency fields after treatment with targeted gold nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Background Gold and carbon nanoparticles absorb non-ionizing radiofrequency (RF) energy and release heat. Solid gold nanoparticles are delivered to cancer cells via conjugation with targeting antibodies. Here, 20 nm gold particles were conjugated to cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor recpetor-1 (EGFR-1) antibody. Methods A pancreatic carcinoma cell line that highly expresses EGFR-1, Panc-1, and a breast carcinoma cell line that minimally expresses EGFR-1, Cama-1, were treated with 100 nM cetuximab-conjugated gold nanoparticles for 3 hours (n = 4). Thirty-six hours later, the dishes were placed in an RF field with a generator power of 200 W for 5 minutes. After another 36 hours, cell injury and death were evaluated with flow cytometry. Results The targeted cell line, Panc-1, had a viability of 45.5% ± 11.7% while Cama-1 cell had a viability of 91.7% ± 1.6% after RF field exposure (p < 0.008). Transmission electron microscopy showed gold nanoparticle uptake in Panc-1 cells, but negligible uptake by Cama-1 cells. Non-targeted cells do not internalize a sufficient amount of antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles to induce injury in a noninvasive RF field. Conclusion This technique could be useful in cancer treatment provided a cancer-specific antibody is utilized to localize gold nanoparticles to malignant cells.

Glazer, E. S.; Massey, K. L.; Zhu, C.; Curley, S. A.

2010-01-01

137

Novel germline p16(INK4) allele (Asp145Cys) in a family with multiple pancreatic carcinomas. Mutations in brief no. 148. Online.  

PubMed

As part of a search for causative genes of familial pancreatic carcinoma, the p16 genes were sequenced in members of 21 families with a phenotype of familial pancreatic carcinoma (2 or more first degree relatives affected). One family was found in which members carried a novel p16 allele with a G to T transversion at position 451, creating a missense amino acid change at codon 145 (Asp to Cys) and possibly disrupting the donor splice site of the exon 2/3 boundary. This coding change is not a known polymorphism, and occurs at a codon position in which another missese/splicing change has been shown to be linked to familial melanoma/pancreas cancer. PMID:10627132

Moskaluk, C A; Hruban, H; Lietman, A; Smyrk, T; Fusaro, L; Fusaro, R; Lynch, J; Yeo, C J; Jackson, C E; Lynch, H T; Kern, S E

1998-01-01

138

Activation of PyMT in ? Cells Induces Irreversible Hyperplasia, but Oncogene-Dependent Acinar Cell Carcinomas When Activated in Pancreatic Progenitors  

PubMed Central

It is unclear whether the cellular origin of various forms of pancreatic cancer involves transformation or transdifferentiation of different target cells or whether tumors arise from common precursors, with tumor types determined by the specific genetic alterations. Previous studies suggested that pancreatic ductal carcinomas might be induced by polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in non-ductal cells. To ask whether PyMT transforms and transdifferentiates endocrine cells toward exocrine tumor phenotypes, we generated transgenic mice that carry tetracycline-inducible PyMT and a linked luciferase reporter. Induction of PyMT in ? cells causes ?-cell hyperplastic lesions that do not progress to malignant neoplasms. When PyMT is de-induced, ? cell proliferation and growth cease; however, regression does not occur, suggesting that continued production of PyMT is not required to maintain the viable expanded ? cell population. In contrast, induction of PyMT in early pancreatic progenitor cells under the control of Pdx1 produces acinar cell carcinomas and ?-cell hyperplasia. The survival of acinar tumor cells is dependent on continued expression of PyMT. Our findings indicate that PyMT can induce exocrine tumors from pancreatic progenitor cells, but cells in the ? cell lineage are not transdifferentiated toward exocrine cell types by PyMT; instead, they undergo oncogene-dependent hyperplastic growth, but do not require PyMT for survival.

Du, Yi-Chieh Nancy; Klimstra, David S.; Varmus, Harold

2009-01-01

139

Docetaxel plus gemcitabine or docetaxel plus cisplatin in advanced pancreatic carcinoma: randomized phase II study 40984 of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Gastrointestinal Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To define the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel plus gemcitabine or docetaxel plus cisplatin for advanced pancreatic carcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive patients with measurable disease and WHO performance status less than 2 were randomly assigned to receive 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 800 mg\\/m2 on days 1 and 8 plus docetaxel 85 mg\\/m2 on day 8 (arm A) or

M. P. Lutz; E. van Cutsem; T. Wagener; J. van Laethem; U. van Hoefer; J. A. Wils; E. Gamelin; C. H. Koehne; J. P. Arnaud; E. Mitry; F. Husseini; P. Reichardt; M. El-Serafi; P. L. Etienne; T. Lingenfelser; M. Praet; B. Genicot; M. Debois; B. Nordlinger; M. Ducreux

2005-01-01

140

18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in predicting survival of patients with pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prediction of survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is usually based on tumor staging and grading and on the level\\u000a of tumor markers. However, accurate tumor staging can be obtained only after resection, and still there is a great difference\\u000a in survival rates among patients with the same clinicopathologic parameters. Recently the uptake of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose\\u000a (FDG) by positron emission

Cosimo Sperti; Claudio Pasquali; Franca Chierichetti; Andrea Ferronato; Giandomenico Decet; Sergio Pedrazzoli

2003-01-01

141

Therapeutic strategies for advanced neuroendocrine carcinomas of jejunum\\/ileum and pancreatic origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multimodal treatment options for advanced gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET) of jejunum\\/ileum and of pancreatic origin are reviewed. Current topics being discussed are: European Neuroendocrine Tumour Society 2006\\/7, American Joint Cancer Committee\\/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer 2009 and WHO 2010 recommendations for grading and staging of NET; surgery of the primary tumour in distant metastasised disease; surgery of metastatic liver disease

Christoph J Auernhammer; Burkhard Göke

2011-01-01

142

VEGF expression by mesenchymal stem cells contributes to angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the factors that enable the mobilisation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow into the blood stream and their recruitment to and retention in the tumour. We found specific migration of MSC towards growth factors present in pancreatic tumours, such as PDGF, EGF, VEGF and specific inhibitors Glivec, Erbitux and Avastin interfered with migration. Within a few hours, MSC migrated into spheroids consisting of pancreatic cancer cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells as measured by time-lapse microscopy. Supernatant from subconfluent MSC increased sprouting of HUVEC due to VEGF production by MSC itself as demonstrated by RT-PCR and ELISA. Only few MSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells in vitro, whereas in vivo differentiation was not observed. Lentiviral GFP-marked MSCs, injected in nude mice xenografted with orthotopic pancreatic tumours, preferentially migrated into the tumours as observed by FACS analysis of green fluorescent cells. By immunofluorescence and intravital microscopic studies, we found the interaction of MSC with the endothelium of blood vessels. Mesenchymal stem cells supported tumour angiogenesis in vivo, that is CD31+ vessel density was increased after the transfer of MSC compared with siVEGF-MSC. Our data demonstrate the migration of MSC toward tumour vessels and suggest a supportive role in angiogenesis.

Beckermann, B M; Kallifatidis, G; Groth, A; Frommhold, D; Apel, A; Mattern, J; Salnikov, A V; Moldenhauer, G; Wagner, W; Diehlmann, A; Saffrich, R; Schubert, M; Ho, A D; Giese, N; Buchler, M W; Friess, H; Buchler, P; Herr, I

2008-01-01

143

VEGF expression by mesenchymal stem cells contributes to angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Little is known about the factors that enable the mobilisation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow into the blood stream and their recruitment to and retention in the tumour. We found specific migration of MSC towards growth factors present in pancreatic tumours, such as PDGF, EGF, VEGF and specific inhibitors Glivec, Erbitux and Avastin interfered with migration. Within a few hours, MSC migrated into spheroids consisting of pancreatic cancer cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells as measured by time-lapse microscopy. Supernatant from subconfluent MSC increased sprouting of HUVEC due to VEGF production by MSC itself as demonstrated by RT-PCR and ELISA. Only few MSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells in vitro, whereas in vivo differentiation was not observed. Lentiviral GFP-marked MSCs, injected in nude mice xenografted with orthotopic pancreatic tumours, preferentially migrated into the tumours as observed by FACS analysis of green fluorescent cells. By immunofluorescence and intravital microscopic studies, we found the interaction of MSC with the endothelium of blood vessels. Mesenchymal stem cells supported tumour angiogenesis in vivo, that is CD31(+) vessel density was increased after the transfer of MSC compared with siVEGF-MSC. Our data demonstrate the migration of MSC toward tumour vessels and suggest a supportive role in angiogenesis. PMID:18665180

Beckermann, B M; Kallifatidis, G; Groth, A; Frommhold, D; Apel, A; Mattern, J; Salnikov, A V; Moldenhauer, G; Wagner, W; Diehlmann, A; Saffrich, R; Schubert, M; Ho, A D; Giese, N; Büchler, M W; Friess, H; Büchler, P; Herr, I

2008-07-29

144

Intervention of Mirtazapine on gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia in nude mice with pancreatic carcinoma xenografts  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the effect of Mirtazapine on tumor growth, food intake, body weight, and nutritional status in gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia. METHODS: Fourteen mice with subcutaneous xenografts of a pancreatic cancer cell line (SW1990) were randomly divided into Mirtazapine and control groups. Either Mirtazapine (10 mg/kg) or saline solution was orally fed to the mice every day after tumor implantation. A model of mild cachexia was then established in both groups by intraperitoneal injection of Gemcitabine (50 mg/kg) 10 d, 13 d, and 16 d after tumor implantation. Tumor size, food intake, body weight, and nutritional status were measured during the experiment. All mice were sacrificed at day 28. RESULTS: (1) After 7 d of gemcitabine administration, body-weight losses of 5%-7% which suggested mild cachexia were measured; (2) No significant difference in tumor size was detected between the Mirtazapine and control groups (P > 0.05); and (3) During the entire experimental period, food intake and body weight were slightly greater for the Mirtazapine group compared with controls (although these differences were not statistically significant). After 21 d, mice in the Mirtazapine group consumed significantly more food than control mice (3.95 ± 0.14 g vs 3.54 ± 0.10 g, P = 0.004). After 25 d, mice in the Mirtazapine group were also significantly heavier than control mice (17.24 ± 0.53 g vs 18.05 ± 0.68 g, P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: Mild cachexia model was successfully established by gemcitabine in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. Mirtazapine can improve gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. It was believed to provide a potential therapeutic perspective for further studies on cachexia.

Jiang, Shu-Man; Wu, Jian-Hua; Jia, Lin

2012-01-01

145

Suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 via RNA interference inhibits pancreatic carcinoma cell invasiveness and adhesion  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of RNA interference (RNAi) on expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene and invasiveness and adhesion of human pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC-3. METHODS: RNAi was performed using the vector (pGPU6)-based small interference RNA (siRNA) plasmid gene silence system to specifically knock down MMP-2 expression in pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC-3. Four groups of different specific target sequence in coding region of MMP-2 and one non-specific sequence were chosen to construct four experimental siRNA plasmids of pGPU6-1, pGPU6-2, pGPU6-3 and pGPU6-4, and one negative control siRNA plasmid of pGPU6 (-). MMP-2 expression was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometry, respectively. The abilities of adhesion and invasion were detected by cell adhesion assay and cell invasion assay using Transwell chambers. RESULTS: The expression of MMP-2 was inhibited and the inhibitory effects of different sequence varied. pGPU6-1 group had the most efficient inhibitory effect, followed by pGPU6-2 and pGPU6-3 groups. Invasiveness and adhesion were more significantly reduced in pGPU6-1, pGPU6-2 and pGPU6-3 groups as compared with pGPU6 (-) and blank control groups. However, no difference concerning cell proliferation and apoptosis was observed after transfection between experiment groups and control groups. CONCLUSION: RNAi against MMP-2 successfully inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of MMP-2 in the pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC-3, leading to a potent suppression of tumor cell adhesion and invasion without affecting cell proliferation and apoptosis. These findings suggest that the RNAi approach towards MMP-2 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of pancreatic tumor.

Zhi, Ying-Hui; Song, Mao-Min; Wang, Pi-Lin; Zhang, Tie; Yin, Zi-Yi

2009-01-01

146

Early experience of laparoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 7.5-MHz linear array ultrasound probe has been developed for the evaluation of solid organs at laparoscopy. Twelve patients with suspected carcinoma of the head of the pancreas, considered at initial investigation to have resectable disease, were submitted to laparoscopy. In 4 patients, diagnostic laparoscopy revealed hepatic metastases (4 patients), peritoneal dissemination of tumor (2), and malignant ascites (1). Laparoscopic

Mahadaven Murugiah; Simon Paterson-Brown; John A. Windsor; W. F. Anthony Miles; O. James Garden

1993-01-01

147

Liver metastases of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with marked nuclear atypia and pleomorphism diagnosed by EUS FNA cytology: a case report with emphasis on FNA cytological findings  

PubMed Central

Background Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare neoplasm. Although this tumor has been well characterized histologically, the morphological patterns in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology have not been well defined. Unlike ductal adenocarcinomas, endocrine tumors, and solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas with their characteristic FNA cytological features, acinar cell carcinomas pose a particular diagnostic challenge by sharing many cytomorphologic features with endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Case presentation A 37-year-old man presented with lower chest and left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a 7.8 × 7.3 cm irregular, partially cystic mass in the body and tail of the pancreas, and two lesions in the liver compatible with metastases. Subsequently, the patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration on one of the two metastatic liver masses. FNA cytology revealed abundant, loosely cohesive clusters of malignant epithelial cells with vaguely acinar and trabecular formations. The pleomorphic nuclei had fine granular chromatin and occasionally small nucleoli. There were scant to moderate amounts of cytoplasm. Scattered, strikingly large tumor cells with giant nuclei, prominent mitoses and associated necrosis were evident. A pancreatic endocrine tumor was suspected initially, but acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, cytochemical and ultrastructural studies. Conclusion We describe a case of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with unusual cytomorphologic features mimicking an endocrine tumor of pancreas, encountered in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of a metastatic liver mass and discuss the diagnostic approach for this unusual pancreatic tumor in fine needle aspiration cytology.

Peng, Hong Q; Darwin, Peter; Papadimitriou, John C; Drachenberg, Cinthia B

2006-01-01

148

MicroRNA-375 targets the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 gene in pancreatic carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic carcinoma (PC) is an aggressive malignancy with one of the poorest mortality rates. It is the sixth leading cause of mortality from malignant disease in China and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. The poor outcome reflects the requirement for an improved understanding of the transcriptional control of oncogenic signaling pathways. 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) is a potent oncogenic driver of PC. The present study aimed to elucidate the transcriptional regulation of microRNA (miR)-375-targeted PDK1. miR-375 is a putative target and, in the present study, was observed to be significantly downregulated in the tumor compared with non-tumor tissues from patients with PC (n=44). As determined by a luciferase reporter assay, the ectopic expression of miR-375 was identified to diminish the transcriptional activity of PDK1. Furthermore, immunoblotting revealed that miR-375 suppressed endogenous PDK1 protein levels. Functional assays showed that miR-375 was able to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of the PC cells. miR-375 is a significant regulator of the PDK1 oncogene, suggesting that it may have a potential therapeutic role in the treatment of PC.

SONG, SHI-DUO; ZHOU, JIAN; ZHOU, JIN; ZHAO, HUA; CEN, JIAN-NONG; LI, DE-CHUN

2013-01-01

149

A somatostatin-secreting cell line established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma (somatostatinoma): release experiment and immunohistochemical study.  

PubMed

Production and secretion of somatostatin (SRIF) were studied using a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing cell line (QGP-1) established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. High concentrations of SRIF (274 +/- 51 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) and CEA (3083 +/- 347 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) were present in QGP-1 cells, and the basal secretion rates of SRIF and CEA by the cells (n = 5) were 46.4 +/- 4.8 and 1690 +/- 78 pg/10(5) cells/h, respectively. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of SRIF in xenografts of QGP-1 cells and colocalization of SRIF and CEA. Secretion of SRIF by QGP-1 cells was stimulated in the presence of high K+ (50 mmol) and theophylline (10 mmol), but arginine (10 mmol) and glucose (300 mg/dl) had no effect on the SRIF secretion. The QGP-1 cell line may be useful for studying the regulation mechanism of SRIF secretion. PMID:1971195

Iguchi, H; Hayashi, I; Kono, A

1990-06-15

150

Pancreatitis - discharge  

MedlinePLUS

Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis, or swelling of the pancreas You may have ...

151

CD40 Agonists Alter Tumor Stroma and Show Efficacy Against Pancreatic Carcinoma in Mice and Humans  

PubMed Central

Immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments can restrain antitumor immunity, particularly in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Because CD40 activation can reverse immune suppression and drive antitumor T cell responses, we tested the combination of an agonist CD40 antibody with gemcitabine chemotherapy in a small cohort of patients with surgically incurable PDA and observed tumor regressions in some patients. We reproduced this treatment effect in a genetically engineered mouse model of PDA and found unexpectedly that tumor regression required macrophages but not T cells or gemcitabine. CD40-activated macrophages rapidly infiltrated tumors, became tumoricidal, and facilitated the depletion of tumor stroma. Thus, cancer immune surveillance does not necessarily depend on therapy-induced T cells; rather, our findings demonstrate a CD40-dependent mechanism for targeting tumor stroma in the treatment of cancer.

Beatty, Gregory L.; Chiorean, Elena G.; Fishman, Matthew P.; Saboury, Babak; Teitelbaum, Ursina R.; Sun, Weijing; Huhn, Richard D.; Song, Wenru; Li, Dongguang; Sharp, Leslie L.; Torigian, Drew A.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Vonderheide, Robert H.

2012-01-01

152

Cytogenetic and FISH analyses of pancreatic carcinoma reveal breaks in 18q11 with consistent loss of 18q12-qter and frequent gain of 18p.  

PubMed Central

Chromosome 18 was analysed using a banding technique and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 13 pancreatic carcinoma samples. The cytogenetic analysis revealed that chromosome 18 abnormalities were present in all cases and that several different rearrangements, such as translocations, deletions, dicentrics and ring chromosomes, were often found together. FISH mapping using 18q YAC probes showed that all tumours had lost at least one copy of 18q and that 18p was over-represented in 6 of the 13 cases. Furthermore, out of 13 identified deletion breakpoints on 18q, 11 were mapped to 18q11. The clustering of breaks close to the centromere indicates that loss of genes in bands 18q11 and 18q12, in addition to those located in 18q21, e.g. DPC4 and DCC, are important in the development of pancreatic tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4

HA?glund, M.; Gorunova, L.; Jonson, T.; Dawiskiba, S.; AndrA(C)n-Sandberg, A.; Stenman, G.; Johansson, B.

1998-01-01

153

Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation.

Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

2007-01-01

154

Prolonged Clinical Benefit of Everolimus Therapy in the Management of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Treatment options for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are limited, especially for those with progressive disease and for those who experience treatment failure. Everolimus, an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has been approved for the treatment of patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET. In the randomized phase III RADIANT-3 study in patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET, everolimus significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) and decreased the relative risk for disease progression by 65% over placebo. This case report describes a heavily pretreated patient with high-grade pNET and liver and peritoneal metastases who achieved prolonged PFS, clinically relevant partial radiologic tumor response, and resolution of constitutional symptoms with improvement in Karnofsky performance status while receiving a combination of everolimus and octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR). Radiologic and clinical responses were maintained for 19 months, with minimal toxicity over the course of treatment. This case supports the findings that the combination of everolimus plus octreotide LAR may be considered for use in patients with high-grade pNET and progressive disease. Although behavior and aggressiveness are different between low- or intermediate-grade and high-grade pNET, some high-grade pNET may express mTOR; hence, everolimus should be considered in a clinical trial.

Fonseca, Paula J.; Uriol, Esther; Galvan, Jose A.; Alvarez, Carlos; Perez, Quionia; Villanueva, Noemi; Berros, Jose P.; Izquierdo, Marta; Vieitez, Jose M.

2013-01-01

155

The cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan glypican-1 regulates growth factor action in pancreatic carcinoma cells and is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play diverse roles in cell recognition, growth, and adhesion. In vitro studies suggest that cell-surface HSPGs act as coreceptors for heparin-binding mitogenic growth factors. Here we show that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol- (GPI-) anchored HSPG glypican-1 is strongly expressed in human pancreatic cancer, both by the cancer cells and the adjacent fibroblasts, whereas expression of glypican-1 is low in the normal pancreas and in chronic pancreatitis. Treatment of two pancreatic cancer cell lines, which express glypican-1, with the enzyme phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) abrogated their mitogenic responses to two heparin-binding growth factors that are commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer: fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF). PI-PLC did not alter the response to the non-heparin-binding growth factors EGF and IGF-1. Stable expression of a form of glypican-1 engineered to possess a transmembrane domain instead of a GPI anchor conferred resistance to the inhibitory effects of PI-PLC on growth factor responsiveness. Furthermore, transfection of a glypican-1 antisense construct attenuated glypican-1 protein levels and the mitogenic response to FGF2 and HB-EGF. We propose that glypican-1 plays an essential role in the responses of pancreatic cancer cells to certain mitogenic stimuli, that it is relatively unique in relation to other HSPGs, and that its expression by pancreatic cancer cells may be of importance in the pathobiology of this disorder. PMID:9802880

Kleeff, J; Ishiwata, T; Kumbasar, A; Friess, H; Büchler, M W; Lander, A D; Korc, M

1998-11-01

156

The cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan glypican-1 regulates growth factor action in pancreatic carcinoma cells and is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed Central

Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play diverse roles in cell recognition, growth, and adhesion. In vitro studies suggest that cell-surface HSPGs act as coreceptors for heparin-binding mitogenic growth factors. Here we show that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol- (GPI-) anchored HSPG glypican-1 is strongly expressed in human pancreatic cancer, both by the cancer cells and the adjacent fibroblasts, whereas expression of glypican-1 is low in the normal pancreas and in chronic pancreatitis. Treatment of two pancreatic cancer cell lines, which express glypican-1, with the enzyme phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) abrogated their mitogenic responses to two heparin-binding growth factors that are commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer: fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF). PI-PLC did not alter the response to the non-heparin-binding growth factors EGF and IGF-1. Stable expression of a form of glypican-1 engineered to possess a transmembrane domain instead of a GPI anchor conferred resistance to the inhibitory effects of PI-PLC on growth factor responsiveness. Furthermore, transfection of a glypican-1 antisense construct attenuated glypican-1 protein levels and the mitogenic response to FGF2 and HB-EGF. We propose that glypican-1 plays an essential role in the responses of pancreatic cancer cells to certain mitogenic stimuli, that it is relatively unique in relation to other HSPGs, and that its expression by pancreatic cancer cells may be of importance in the pathobiology of this disorder.

Kleeff, J; Ishiwata, T; Kumbasar, A; Friess, H; Buchler, M W; Lander, A D; Korc, M

1998-01-01

157

Efficacy and safety of capecitabine in combination with docetaxel and mitomycin C in patients with pre-treated pancreatic, gallbladder, and bile duct carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Preclinical data indicate the improvement of the antitumor activity of capecitabine by mitomycin C and docetaxel through upregulation\\u000a of thymidine phosphorylase activity. Therefore, we have established a combination regimen of these drugs (DocMitoCape), which\\u000a demonstrated preliminary activity especially in bile duct and pancreatic carcinoma.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Here we report the safety and efficacy of the DocMitoCape regimen in pre-treated patients with gallbladder,

Jens KruthJohanna; Johanna Nissen; Thomas Ernst; Melanie Kripp; Nadine Lukan; Kirsten Merx; Wolf-Karsten Hofmann; Andreas Hochhaus; Ralf-Dieter Hofheinz

2010-01-01

158

A Phase II study of 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3AP) and gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic carcinoma. A trial of the Princess Margaret Hospital Phase II consortium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, Triapine®, Vion Pharmaceuticals, New Haven, CT) is an inhibitor\\u000a of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR). Preclinical testing demonstrates synergy between 3-AP and gemcitabine.\\u000a Phase I studies of the combination have suggested tolerability and some initial evidence of efficacy. Therefore, a phase II\\u000a study of gemcitabine plus 3-AP in advanced pancreatic carcinoma was undertaken.\\u000a \\u000a In this

M. J. Mackenzie; D. Saltman; H. Hirte; J. Low; C. Johnson; G. Pond; M. J. Moore

2007-01-01

159

Effective combination gene therapy using CEACAM6-shRNA and the fusion suicide gene yCDglyTK for pancreatic carcinoma in vitro  

PubMed Central

The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma, a gastrointestinal malignancy, is on the increase and effective therapeutic strategies are therefore required. This study aimed to construct a recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(-) shCEACAM6-yCDglyTK from CEACAM6 targeting shRNA and the fusion suicide gene yCDglyTK for inhibition of SW1990 human pancreatic carcinoma cell growth and invasion. A plasmid containing hU6 promoter and CEACAM6 targeting short hairpin RNA (CEACAM6-shRNA) frame was constructed. It was subcloned to a CEA promoter-driven fusion suicide gene pcDNA3.1(-)yCDglyTK. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(-) shCEACAM6-yCDglyTK was identified by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequencing. The recombinant plasmid was delivered into SW1990 human pancreatic carcinoma cells, the mRNA and protein expression of yCDglyTK and CEACAM6 was examined by RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. SW1990 cells were treated with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and the cell viability was evaluated using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The invasiveness and migration of SW1990 cells were evaluated by transwell migration assays. The restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequencing confirmed the construction of the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(-) shCEACAM6-yCDglyTK. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis outcomes showed that yCDglyTK was expressed in SW1990 cells and expression of CEACAM6 in SW1990 cells was significantly knocked down. MTT assay showed that the mean viability of SW1990 cells was significantly reduced after administration of the prodrug 5-FC in vitro. Transwell migration assays showed that invasion and migration action of SW1990 cells was significantly inhibited. In conclusion, recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(-) shCEACAM6-yCDglyTK was successfully constructed. The recombinant plasmid may therefore serve as a novel gene therapy approach for pancreatic carcinoma.

LONG, HONGYU; LI, QINGFU; WANG, YUAN; LI, QIAN; LIU, TING; PENG, JIE

2013-01-01

160

Effect of 1-(gamma)linolenyl-3-eicosapentaenoyl propane diol on the growth of human pancreatic carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.  

PubMed

Essential fatty acids such as (gamma)linolenic (GLA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) acids have been proposed as anticancer drugs. The aim of this study was to test the effect of a lipid emulsion containing both GLA and EPA in a novel chemical formulation of 1-(gamma)linolenyl-3-eicosapentaenoyl propane diol on the growth of human pancreatic carcinoma in vitro and in nude mice. This compound had a dose-dependent growth-inhibitory effect on human pancreatic cancer cell lines MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 in vitro. The concentration necessary for 50% growth inhibition was 25 micromol/l for MIA PaCa-2 and 68 micromol/l for Panc-1 (95% CI 20-29 and 59-77 micromol/l respectively). Nude mice bearing subcutaneous pancreatic tumours produced with the MIA PaCa-2 cell line were treated with the maximum tolerated dose (6.75 mg GLA and 7.3 mg EPA per g of body weight) administered over 10 days by daily intravenous (i.v.) bolus injections. No antitumour effect or major alteration in tumour lipid fatty acid composition was seen in comparison with control animals. Concurrent treatment with parenteral iron (iron saccharate, 5 microg/gram body weight daily) did not make a significant difference. Further improvements in fatty acid delivery mechanisms are necessary before they can become useful anticancer agents. PMID:10708945

Ravichandran, D; Cooper, A; Johnson, C D

2000-02-01

161

Targeting endogenous transforming growth factor beta receptor signaling in SMAD4-deficient human pancreatic carcinoma cells inhibits their invasive phenotype1.  

PubMed

Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) suppresses tumor formation by blocking cell cycle progression and maintaining tissue homeostasis. In pancreatic carcinomas, this tumor suppressive activity is often lost by inactivation of the TGF-beta-signaling mediator, Smad4. We found that human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines that have undergone deletion of MADH4 constitutively expressed high endogenous levels of phosphorylated receptor-associated Smad proteins (pR-Smad2 and pR-Smad3), whereas Smad4-positive lines did not. These elevated pR-Smad levels could not be attributed to a decreased dephosphorylation rate nor to increased expression of TGF-beta type I (TbetaR-I) or type II (TbetaR-II) receptors. Although minimal amounts of free bioactive TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2 were detected in conditioned medium, treatment with a pan-specific (but not a TGF-beta3 specific) TGF-beta-neutralizing antibody and with anti-alpha(V)beta(6) integrin antibody decreased steady-state pSmad2 levels and activation of a TGF-beta-inducible reporter gene in neighboring cells, respectively. Thus, activation of TGF-beta at the cell surface was responsible for the increased autocrine endogenous and paracrine signaling. Blocking TbetaR-I activity using a selective kinase inhibitor (SD-093) strongly decreased the in vitro motility and invasiveness of the pancreatic carcinoma cells without affecting their growth characteristics, morphology, or the subcellular distribution of E-cadherin and F-actin. Moreover, exogenous TGF-beta strongly stimulated in vitro invasiveness of BxPC-3 cells, an effect that could also be blocked by SD-093. Thus, the motile and invasive properties of Smad4-deficient pancreatic cancer cells are at least partly driven by activation of endogenous TGF-beta signaling. Therefore, targeting the TbetaR-I kinase represents a potentially powerful novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of this disease. PMID:15289325

Subramanian, Gayathri; Schwarz, Roderich E; Higgins, Linda; McEnroe, Glenn; Chakravarty, Sarvajit; Dugar, Sundeep; Reiss, Michael

2004-08-01

162

Pancreatic Exocrine Function in Maturity Onset Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Exocrine pancreatic function was studied in 14 inpatients with newly diagnosed maturity onset diabetes mellitus. Five patients had clinical and biochemical evidence of pancreatic disease (two carcinoma, three pancreatitis). The other nine patients had no clinical pancreatic disease but all except one had at least one abnormal result of pancreatic function tests. None of this group with idiopathic diabetes mellitus developed any clinical evidence of exocrine pancreatic disease over the next five years. Mild abnormalities of exocrine pancreatic function in newly diagnosed patients with diabetes but without clinical evidence of pancreatic disease do not usually develop into overt pancreatic disease, and are therefore probably clinically unimportant.

Baron, J. H.; Nabarro, J. D. N.

1973-01-01

163

Increased expression of the large GTPase dynamin 2 potentiates metastatic migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic ductal tumors invade local parenchyma and metastasize to distant organs. Src-mediated tyrosine kinase signaling pathways promote pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) metastasis, though the molecular mechanisms supporting this invasive process are poorly understood and represent important and novel therapeutic targets. The large GTPase Dynamin 2 (Dyn2), a Src-kinase substrate, regulates membrane–cytoskeletal dynamics although it is yet to be defined if

R D Eppinga; E W Krueger; S G Weller; L Zhang; H Cao; M A McNiven

2012-01-01

164

Expression of novel markers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in pancreatic nonductal neoplasms: additional evidence of different genetic pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid pseudopapillary tumor, pancreatoblastoma, undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclastic-like giant cells, and acinar cell carcinomas are rare pancreatic nonductal neoplasms. Compared to the significant advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas in the last decades, the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic nonductal neoplasms are poorly understood. In order to elucidate their molecular pathogenesis, we constructed tissue microarrays to

Dengfeng Cao; Anirban Maitra; Jorge-Albores Saavedra; David S Klimstra; N Volkan Adsay; Ralph H Hruban

2005-01-01

165

A Phase II study of 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP) and gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic carcinoma. A trial of the Princess Margaret hospital Phase II consortium.  

PubMed

3-Aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, Triapine, Vion Pharmaceuticals, New Haven, CT) is an inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR). Preclinical testing demonstrates synergy between 3-AP and gemcitabine. Phase I studies of the combination have suggested tolerability and some initial evidence of efficacy. Therefore, a phase II study of gemcitabine plus 3-AP in advanced pancreatic carcinoma was undertaken. In this two-step phase II trial, patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma who had not received prior chemotherapy for advanced disease were treated with 3-AP 105 mg/m(2) given over 2 h. Four hours after the 3-AP infusion was completed, gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) was given over 30 min. Both drugs were given on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle.Twenty-six patients were enrolled to the study. One patient withdrew consent prior to receiving any treatment and is excluded from all further analyses. Four patients discontinued treatment due to adverse effects. Grade 3/4 hematological adverse events included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, leukopenia and anemia and the most frequent non-hematological adverse events were fatigue and pain. No objective responses were observed. Eleven patients had stable disease (SD). In five of these eleven patients, SD lasted for more than 6 months. The median time to progression was 4.1 months and the 6 month progression-free survival rate was 29%. The median survival was 9.0 months with a 1-year survival of 28.0%. The combination of 3-AP and gemcitabine is associated with moderate toxicity in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. This two-stage trial was stopped after stage I due to lack of antitumour activity. On the basis of this clinical trial, the combination of gemcitabine and 3-AP at this dose and schedule does not warrant further study in this patient population. PMID:17585372

Mackenzie, M J; Saltman, D; Hirte, H; Low, J; Johnson, C; Pond, G; Moore, M J

2007-06-22

166

An Effective Personalized Approach to a Rare Tumor: Prolonged Survival in Metastatic Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma Based on Genetic Analysis and Cell Line Development  

PubMed Central

Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is an uncommon malignancy, accounting for less than 1% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Because of its rarity, only a few retrospective studies are available to help guide management. We report the case of a patient with metastatic ACC who achieved prolonged survival as a result of personalized treatment designed in part on the basis of molecular and in-vitro data collected on analysis of the tumor and a cell line developed from the liver metastasis. To our knowledge, this represents the first human cell line of ACC. The molecular findings on this case and this patient's cell line may be of use in the management of future cases of this rare tumor and allow the identification of potential novel targets for the effective treatment of this disease.

Armstrong, Matthew D.; Von Hoff, Daniel; Barber, Bruce; Marlow, Laura A.; von Roemeling, Christina; Cooper, Simon J.; Travis, Patrick; Campbell, Elizabeth; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; Copland, John A.; Colon-Otero, Gerardo

2011-01-01

167

Specific induction of migration and invasion of pancreatic carcinoma cells by RhoC, which differs from RhoA in its localisation and activity.  

PubMed

RhoA and RhoC are highly related Rho GTPases, but differentially control cellular behaviour. We combined molecular, cellular, and biochemical experiments to characterise differences between these highly similar GTPases. Our findings demonstrate that enhanced expression of RhoC results in a striking increase in the migration and invasion of pancreatic carcinoma cells, whereas forced expression of RhoA decreases these actions. These isoform-specific functions correlate with differences in the cellular activity of RhoA and RhoC in human cells, with RhoC being more active than RhoA in activity assays and serum-response factor-dependent gene transcription. Subcellular localisation studies revealed that RhoC is predominantly localised in the membrane-containing fraction, whereas RhoA is mainly localised in the cytoplasmic fraction. These differences are not mediated by a different interaction with RhoGDIs. In vitro GTP/GDP binding analyses demonstrate different affinity of RhoC for GTP[S] and faster intrinsic and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)-stimulated GDP/GTP exchange rates compared to RhoA. Moreover, the catalytic domains of SopE and Dbs are efficacious GEFs for RhoC. mRNA expression of RhoC is markedly enhanced in advanced pancreatic cancer stages, and thus the differences discovered between RhoA and RhoC might provide explanations for their different influences on cell migration and tumour invasion. PMID:19642867

Dietrich, Karin-Almut; Schwarz, Rene; Liska, Martina; Grass, Stefanie; Menke, Andre; Meister, Michael; Kierschke, Gesa; Längle, Claudia; Genze, Felicitas; Giehl, Klaudia

2009-10-01

168

Detection of point mutation in K-ras oncogene at codon 12 in pancreatic diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To investigate frequency and clinical significance of K- ras mutations in pancreatic diseases and to identify its diagnostic values in pancreatic carcinoma. METHODS: 117 ductal lesions were identified in the available sections from pancreatic resection specimens of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, comprising 24 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 19 peritumoral ductal atypical hyperplasia, 58 peritumoral ductal hyperplasia and 19 normal duct at

Yue-Xin Ren; Guo-Ming Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Yu-Gang Song

2004-01-01

169

Differential Expression of Human Spasmolytic Polypeptide (Trefoil Factor Family2) in Pancreatic Carcinomas, Ampullary Carcinomas, and Mucin-Producing Tumors of the Pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP) is a member of the trefoil peptide group, thought to be involved in mucin production and cell growth. It has been reported that hSP protein is expressed in digestive cancers but not in normal pancreas. The expression of hSP in pancreatic neoplasms has not been investigated in detail. The immunohistochemical expression of hSP protein was investigated

Gakuji Ohshio; Hirofumi Suwa; Yoshiya Kawaguchi; Masayuki Imamura; Yoshio Yamaoka; Hirohiko Yamabe; Masao Matsumoto; Hideyuki Yoshioka; Yosuke Hashimoto; Hiroshi Takeda

2000-01-01

170

Cervical carcinoma in Algiers, Algeria: human papillomavirus and lifestyle risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Algiers, Algeria. A total of 198 cervical carcinoma (CC) cases (including 15 adeno- and adenosquamous carcinomas) and 202 age-matched control women were included. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical cells was evaluated using a PCR assay. Odds ratios and corresponding confidence intervals were computed by means of unconditional multiple logistic regression models. HPV

Doudja Hammouda; N. Munoz; Rolando Herrero; Annie Arslan; Anissa Bouhadef; Malika Oublil; Belhout Djedeat; B Fontaniere; Peter Snijders; C. J. L. M. Meijer; Silvia Franceschi

2005-01-01

171

Retinoic acid receptor ? mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in rat pancreatic carcinoma DSL6A\\/C1 cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

During carcinogenesis, pancreatic acinar cells can dedifferentiate into ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. DSL-6A\\/C1 cells represent an in vitro model of this carcinogenic sequence. This study was designed to examine the effects of retinoids on cell growth in DSL-6A\\/C1 cells and to characterize further the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiproliferative actions of retinoids. Treatment of DSL-6A\\/C1 cells with retinoids results

FH Brembeck; A Kaiser; K Detjen; H Hotz; T Foitzik; HJ Buhr; E-O Riecken; S Rosewicz

1998-01-01

172

Oral metastases from carcinoma of cervix.  

PubMed

Metastatic tumours of the oral cavity are uncommon, they may occur in soft tissue as well as in bone in the oropharyngeal region. Owing to its rarity, metastatic tumours of the oral regions are a challenge to diagnose. We report a case of metastasis of the oral cavity, arising from uterine cervix mimicking as mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The metastatic lesions were noticed in the soft tissue of the lower buccal and gingival side of a oral cavity, in a 40-year-old woman with history of an adenosquamous carcinoma of uterine cervix treated by panhysterectomy. PMID:23771978

Ram, Hari; Kumar, Manoj; Bhatt, M L B; Shadab, Mohammad

2013-06-14

173

Small cell and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the pancreas are genetically similar and distinct from well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.  

PubMed

Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the pancreas are rare malignant neoplasms with a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the clinicopathologic and genetic features of poorly differentiated NECs and compare them with other types of pancreatic neoplasms. We investigated alterations of KRAS, CDKN2A/p16, TP53, SMAD4/DPC4, DAXX, ATRX, PTEN, Bcl2, and RB1 by immunohistochemistry and/or targeted exomic sequencing in surgically resected specimens of 9 small cell NECs, 10 large cell NECs, and 11 well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) of the pancreas. Abnormal immunolabeling patterns of p53 and Rb were frequent (p53, 18 of 19, 95%; Rb, 14 of 19, 74%) in both small cell and large cell NECs, whereas Smad4/Dpc4, DAXX, and ATRX labeling was intact in virtually all of these same carcinomas. Abnormal immunolabeling of p53 and Rb proteins correlated with intragenic mutations in the TP53 and RB1 genes. In contrast, DAXX and ATRX labeling was lost in 45% of PanNETs, whereas p53 and Rb immunolabeling was intact in these same cases. Overexpression of Bcl-2 protein was observed in all 9 small cell NECs (100%) and in 5 of 10 (50%) large cell NECs compared with only 2 of 11 (18%) PanNETs. Bcl-2 overexpression was significantly correlated with higher mitotic rate and Ki67 labeling index in neoplasms in which it was present. Small cell NECs are genetically similar to large cell NECs, and these genetic changes are distinct from those reported in PanNETs. The finding of Bcl-2 overexpression in poorly differentiated NECs, particularly small cell NEC, suggests that Bcl-2 antagonists/inhibitors may be a viable treatment option for these patients. PMID:22251937

Yachida, Shinichi; Vakiani, Efsevia; White, Catherine M; Zhong, Yi; Saunders, Tyler; Morgan, Richard; de Wilde, Roeland F; Maitra, Anirban; Hicks, Jessica; Demarzo, Angelo M; Shi, Chanjuan; Sharma, Rajni; Laheru, Daniel; Edil, Barish H; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Schulick, Richard D; Hruban, Ralph H; Tang, Laura H; Klimstra, David S; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A

2012-02-01

174

Analysis of K-ras gene mutation in hyperplastic duct cells of the pancreas without pancreatic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND & AIMS: We and others have previously shown that the mutation of K-ras codon 12 was found in the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The mutation has also been identified in the pancreatic duct with mucous cell hyperplasia in association with chronic pancreatitis. Ductal hyperplasia is also frequently found in the pancreas free from pancreatic carcinoma or chronic pancreatitis. The

M Tada; M Ohashi; Y Shiratori; T Okudaira; Y Komatsu; T Kawabe; H Yoshida; R Machinami; K Kishi; M Omata

1996-01-01

175

Quercetin as a potential modulator of P-glycoprotein expression and function in cells of human pancreatic carcinoma line resistant to daunorubicin.  

PubMed

P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the ABC transporters responsible for the resistance of several tumours to successful chemotherapy. Numerous agents are capable of interfering with the P-gp-mediated export of drugs but unfortunately most of them produce serious side effects. Some plant polyphenols, including the flavonol quercetin (Q), manifest anti-neoplastic activity mainly due to their influence on cell cycle control and apoptosis. Reports are also available which show that Q may intensify action of cytostatic drugs and suppress the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The study aimed at determination if Q sensitizes cells resistant to daunorubicin (DB) through its effect on P-gp expression and action. The experiments were conducted on two cell lines of human pancreatic carcinoma, resistant to DB EPP85-181RDB and sensitive EPP85-181P as a comparison. Cells of both lines were exposed to selected concentrations of Q and DB, and then membranous expression of P-gp and its transport function were examined. The influence on expression of gene for P-gp (ABCB1) was also investigated. Results of the studies confirmed that Q affects expression and function of P-gp in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover it decreased expression of ABCB1. Thus, Q may be considered as a potential modulator of P-gp. PMID:20335952

Borska, Sylwia; Sopel, Miroslaw; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

2010-02-09

176

Hedgehog-EGFR cooperation response genes determine the oncogenic phenotype of basal cell carcinoma and tumour-initiating pancreatic cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Inhibition of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signalling in cancer is a promising therapeutic approach. Interactions between HH/GLI and other oncogenic pathways affect the strength and tumourigenicity of HH/GLI. Cooperation of HH/GLI with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling promotes transformation and cancer cell proliferation in vitro. However, the in vivo relevance of HH-EGFR signal integration and the critical downstream mediators are largely undefined. In this report we show that genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR signalling reduces tumour growth in mouse models of HH/GLI driven basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We describe HH-EGFR cooperation response genes including SOX2, SOX9, JUN, CXCR4 and FGF19 that are synergistically activated by HH-EGFR signal integration and required for in vivo growth of BCC cells and tumour-initiating pancreatic cancer cells. The data validate EGFR signalling as drug target in HH/GLI driven cancers and shed light on the molecular processes controlled by HH-EGFR signal cooperation, providing new therapeutic strategies based on combined targeting of HH-EGFR signalling and selected downstream target genes.

Eberl, Markus; Klingler, Stefan; Mangelberger, Doris; Loipetzberger, Andrea; Damhofer, Helene; Zoidl, Kerstin; Schnidar, Harald; Hache, Hendrik; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Solca, Flavio; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Ermilov, Alexandre N; Verhaegen, Monique E; Bichakjian, Christopher K; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Sibilia, Maria; Lehrach, Hans; Wierling, Christoph; Aberger, Fritz

2012-01-01

177

Autoimmune pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis is becoming a more widely recognized form of pancreatitis that can mimic pancreatic or biliary malignancy. The combination of serological, histological and radiographic findings makes it unique among pancreatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies, IgG4 and a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate reflect its autoimmune etiology. The dramatic response to steroids is also a distinguishing feature and differentiates it from other pancreatic diseases. PMID:20477698

Barth, Erin; Savides, Thomas J

2009-11-01

178

3D pancreatic carcinoma spheroids induce a matrix-rich, chemoresistant phenotype offering a better model for drug testing  

PubMed Central

Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death. It is lethal in nearly all patients, due to an almost complete chemoresistance. Most if not all drugs that pass preclinical tests successfully, fail miserably in the patient. This raises the question whether traditional 2D cell culture is the correct tool for drug screening. The objective of this study is to develop a simple, high-throughput 3D model of human PDAC cell lines, and to explore mechanisms underlying the transition from 2D to 3D that might be responsible for chemoresistance. Methods Several established human PDAC and a KPC mouse cell lines were tested, whereby Panc-1 was studied in more detail. 3D spheroid formation was facilitated with methylcellulose. Spheroids were studied morphologically, electron microscopically and by qRT-PCR for selected matrix genes, related factors and miRNA. Metabolic studies were performed, and a panel of novel drugs was tested against gemcitabine. Results Comparing 3D to 2D cell culture, matrix proteins were significantly increased as were lumican, SNED1, DARP32, and miR-146a. Cell metabolism in 3D was shifted towards glycolysis. All drugs tested were less effective in 3D, except for allicin, MT100 and AX, which demonstrated effect. Conclusions We developed a high-throughput 3D cell culture drug screening system for pancreatic cancer, which displays a strongly increased chemoresistance. Features associated to the 3D cell model are increased expression of matrix proteins and miRNA as well as stromal markers such as PPP1R1B and SNED1. This is supporting the concept of cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

2013-01-01

179

Genesis of Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pancreatic cancer is the fourth overall leading cause of cancer death in both genders, even though it is not among the most\\u000a frequent. Early detection and targeted therapeutic options, which can be obtained through a better understanding of the cellular\\u000a and molecular processes which lead to the development of pancreatic carcinoma, are key to improving the outcome of this highly

Barbara A. Centeno; Gregory M. Springett

180

Differing molecular pathology of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Egyptian and United States patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variations in genetic mutations in pancreatic carcinoma between different populations have not been studied extensively, especially in developing countries where pancreatic cancer is rare. We stud- ied the molecular pathology of 44 pancreatic carcinomas from patients residing in a heavily polluted region in the Nile River delta and compared the findings with tumors from 44 United States (US) patients. We

Amr S. Soliman; Melissa Bondy; Charity Renee Webb; David Schottenfeld; Joseph Bonner; Nabih El-Ghawalby; Ahmed Soultan; Mohamed Abdel-Wahab; Omar Fathy; Gamal Ebidi; Qing Zhang; Joel K. Greenson; James L. Abbruzzese

2006-01-01

181

Lack of host SPARC enhances vascular function and tumor spread in an orthotopic murine model of pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Utilizing subcutaneous tumor models, we previously validated SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) as a key component of the stromal response, where it regulated tumor size, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix deposition. In the present study, we demonstrate that pancreatic tumors grown orthotopically in Sparc-null (Sparc(-/-)) mice are more metastatic than tumors grown in wild-type (Sparc(+/+)) littermates. Tumors grown in Sparc(-/-) mice display reduced deposition of fibrillar collagens I and III, basement membrane collagen IV and the collagen-associated proteoglycan decorin. In addition, microvessel density and pericyte recruitment are reduced in tumors grown in the absence of host SPARC. However, tumors from Sparc(-/-) mice display increased permeability and perfusion, and a subsequent decrease in hypoxia. Finally, we found that tumors grown in the absence of host SPARC exhibit an increase in alternatively activated macrophages. These results suggest that increased tumor burden in the absence of host SPARC is a consequence of reduced collagen deposition, a disrupted vascular basement membrane, enhanced vascular function and an immune-tolerant, pro-metastatic microenvironment. PMID:20007485

Arnold, Shanna A; Rivera, Lee B; Miller, Andrew F; Carbon, Juliet G; Dineen, Sean P; Xie, Yang; Castrillon, Diego H; Sage, E Helene; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Bradshaw, Amy D; Brekken, Rolf A

2009-12-09

182

Co-expression of tumor antigens and their modulation by pleiotrophic modifiers enhance targeting of human monoclonal antibodies to pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Cocktails of human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) have been used to increase the likelihood of identifying heterogeneous cancer cells. We utilized 3 HuMAbs termed SK-1, GM4, and GMA1, which recognized a 42-46 kDa two chain structure, a 57 kDa antigen, and the ganglioside GD3, respectively. An estimated two dozen cell lines were tested for the coexpression of these antigens and this was found to be present only on pancreatic carcinoma cell line, PANC-1; A 24 hr treatment of PANC-1 cells with interferon gamma (IFN gamma; 100 units), interferon beta (IFN beta; 1000 units), as well as interferon alpha (IFN alpha; 1000 units) resulted in roughly a four fold increase in the co-expression of the 42-46 kDa/GD3 antigens as well as the 42-46 kDa/57 kDa antigens. After a 4 day incubation the co-expression of these antigens progressed and IFN alpha treatment had the most pronounced effect, which was 8 fold higher than background for the 42-46 kDa/57 kDa antigens, whereas IFN beta resulted in a five fold antigen upregulation. The pronounced effect of vinblastine on the co-expression of the 42-46 kDa/GD3 antigens (4 fold on day 1 and, 10 fold on day 4) and 42-46 kDa/57 kDa antigens on PANC-1 (5 fold on day 1 and 7 fold over background on day 4) cells can be seen at concentrations as low as 10(-7)M. Colchicine and vincristine dramatically enhanced co-expression of these tumor antigens on day 4 but not on day 1 PANC-1 cells. The expression of these antigens was also found to be cell cycle dependent. PMID:10331182

Mukerjee, S; McKnight, M E; Nasoff, M; Glassy, M C

1999-01-01

183

Predictive value of metabolic 18FDG-PET response on outcomes in patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Background We aimed to study the predictive value of combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography and computerized tomography (FDG-PET-CT), on outcomes in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT). Methods Thirty-two unresectable LAPC patients received 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) of RT and concurrent 5-FU followed by 4 to 6 cycles of gemcitabine consolidation. Response was evaluated by FDG-PET-CT at post-C-CRT 12-week. Patients were stratified into two groups according to the median difference between pre- and post-treatment maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) as an indicator of response for comparative analysis. Results At a median follow-up of 16.1 months, 16 (50.0%) patients experienced local/regional failures, 6 of which were detected on the first follow-up FDG-PET-CT. There were no marginal or isolated regional failures. Median pre- and post-treatment SUVmax and median difference were 14.5, 3.9, and -63.7%, respectively. Median overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) were 14.5, 7.3, and 10.3 months, respectively. Median OS, PFS, and LRPFS for those with greater (N = 16) versus lesser (N = 16) SUVmax change were 17.0 versus 9.8 (p = 0.001), 8.4 versus 3.8 (p = 0.005), and 12.3 versus 6.9 months (p = 0.02), respectively. On multivariate analysis, SUVmax difference was predictive of OS, PFS, and LRPFS, independent of existing covariates. Conclusions Significantly higher OS, PFS, and LRPFS in patients with greater SUVmax difference suggest that FDG-PET-CT-based metabolic response assessment is an independent predictor of clinical outcomes in LAPC patients treated with definitive C-CRT.

2011-01-01

184

Intratumoral ?-SMA Enhances the Prognostic Potency of CD34 Associated with Maintenance of Microvessel Integrity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Microvessel density (MVD) as an angiogenesis predictor is inefficient per se in cancer prognosis. We evaluated prognostic values of combining intratumoral alpha-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA)-positive stromal cell density and MVD after curative resection in hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hypovascular pancreatic cancer (PC). Tissue microarrays were constructed from tumors of 305 HCC and 57 PC patients who underwent curative resection and analyzed for ?-SMA and CD34 expression by immunostaining. Prognostic values of these two proteins and other clinicopathological features were examined. Both low ?-SMA density and high MVD-CD34 were associated in HCC with the presence of intrahepatic metastasis and microvascular invasion, and they were related to lymph node involvement and microvascular invasion in PC (p<0.05). Although CD34 alone, but not ?-SMA, was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival and recurrence-free survival, the combination of low ?-SMA and high CD34 was a predictor of worst prognosis for both types of tumors and had a better power to predict patient death and early recurrence (p<0.01). Furthermore, the results show that distribution of most of the ?-SMA-positive cells and vascular endothelial cells overlap, showing major colocalization on vascular walls. Poor microvessel integrity, as indicated by high MVD, together with low perivascular ?-SMA-positive cell coverage is associated with early recurrence, unfavorable metastasis, and short survival after tumor resection. This finding highlights the significance of vascular quality in tumor progression, which provides an optimized complement to vascular quantity in prognosis of postoperative patients.

Chen, Tao; Wu, Chun-Tao; Xu, Yong-Feng; Xu, Jin; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Bo; Long, Jiang; Tang, Zhao-You; Yu, Xian-Jun

2013-01-01

185

Pilot Study of Huachansu in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Huachansu, a Chinese medicine that comes from dried toad venom from the skin glands of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor or B.melanotictus Schneider, has been used in the treatment of various cancers in China. We conducted a pilot study, using a phase I trial design, of Huachansu in patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Huachansu was administered intravenously for 14 days followed by 7 days off (1 cycle). Without significant adverse events or progressive disease, treatment continued beyond 2 cycles. The dose of Huachansu (in mL/ m2) was escalated as follows with three patients per cohort: 10 (level 1), 20 (level 2), 40 (level 3), 60 (level 4), and 90 (level 5) mL/m2. Results Fifteen patients (hepatocellular cancer, N = 11; non-small cell lung cancer, N = 2; pancreatic cancer, N = 2) were enrolled in the trial and no dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were found. Eleven patients had no drug-related toxicity greater than grade I. Six (40%) had stable disease (median duration = 6.0 months; range 3.5 to 11.1 months). One of these patients (with hepatocellular cancer) had 20% regression (duration = 11 months) (dose level 1). Quality of life improved for patients with stable disease. Plasma bufalin concentration reached maximal levels at the end of the 2-hr infusion and was propotional to the amount of drug being administered (0.81-3.38, ng/mL). Conclusions No DLT was observed with the use of Huachansu at doses up to eight times higher than typically used in China. Six patients had prolonged stable disease or minor tumor shrinkage.

Meng, Zhiqiang; Yang, Peiying; Shen, Yehua; Bei, Wenying; Zhang, Ying; Ge, Yongqian; Newman, Robert A; Cohen, Lorenzo; Liu, Luming; Thornton, Bob; Chang, David Z.; Liao, Zongxing; Kurzrock, Razelle

2010-01-01

186

Pancreatic Carcinogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is an almost universally lethal disease. Research over the last two decades has shown that pancreatic cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, caused by inherited germline and acquired somatic mutations in cancer-associated genes. Multiple alterations in genes that are important in pancreatic cancer progression have been identified, including tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genome maintenance genes. Furthermore, the

Jan-Bart M. Koorstra; Steven R. Hustinx; G. Johan A. Offerhaus; Anirban Maitra

2008-01-01

187

Characterization of a new human endometrial carcinoma (RL95-2) established in tissue culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A new human endometrial cell line, RL95-2, derived from a Grade 2 moderately differentiated adenosquamous carcinoma of the\\u000a endometrium has been passaged successfully in cell culture for more than 2 yr. The cells are characteristically epithelioid\\u000a with well-defined junctional complexes, tonofilaments, filopodialike extensions, and surface microvilli. Nuclei are large,\\u000a irregular, and invaginated frequently with multiple, prominent, lamellar nucleoli. The cells

David S. Grosso; John R. Davis; Earl A. Surwit; C. D. Christian

1983-01-01

188

Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.  

PubMed

Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

2004-04-01

189

[Anal squamous cell carcinoma synchronous with rectal adenocarcinoma].  

PubMed

Most often colorectal carcinoma occurs single; synchronous multiple carcinomas usually develop at widely disparate sites. We report the case of a 75-year-old male, accusing rectal bleeding, disturbances in bowel transit and weight loss. The rectoscopy examination revealed a fungating, bleeding tumor located 5 cm from anal verge. Pathological diagnostic of the endo-biopsy was ulcerated moderate differentiated adenocarcinoma. Patient underwent surgical amputation of the rectum with lymphadenectomy. Microscopical examination of the surgical specimens confirmed the presence of the adenocarcinoma adjacent to a squamous cell carcinoma, moderate differentiated, with reduced keratinization, infiltrative. Also, 2 from the 7 lymph nodes presented squamous cell carcinoma metastases. The most important differential diagnostic is a rectal adenosquamous carcinoma. Prognostic depends on stage of the disease, generally being worse than of the corresponding adenocarcinoma, and can be improved by radio- and chemotherapy. PMID:16004220

Danciu, M; Ferariu, D; Teleman, S; Mihailovici, Maria-Sultana

190

Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies clearly indicate that the risk of pancreatic cancer (PC) is increased in diabetic patients, but most studies focus on overall diabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and there are few studies on the risks of type 1 and type 3c (secondary) diabetes. Possible mechanisms for increased cancer risk in diabetes include cellular proliferative effects of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and abnormalities in insulin/IGF receptor pathways. Recently, insulin and insulin secretagogues have been observed to increase the PC risk, while metformin treatment reduces the cancer risk in diabetic subjects. In addition, anticancer drugs used to treat PC may either cause diabetes or worsen coexisting diabetes. T3cDM has emerged as a major subset of diabetes and may have the highest risk of pancreatic carcinoma especially in patients with chronic pancreatitis. T3cDM is also a consequence of PC in at least 30% of patients. Distinguishing T3cDM from the more prevalent T2DM among new-onset diabetic patients can be aided by an assessment of clinical features and confirmed by finding a deficiency in postprandial pancreatic polypeptide release. In conclusion, diabetes and PC have a complex relationship that requires more clinical attention. The risk of developing PC can be reduced by aggressive prevention and treatment of T2DM and obesity and the prompt diagnosis of T3cDM may allow detection of a tumor at a potentially curable stage. PMID:22843556

Cui, YunFeng; Andersen, Dana K

2012-09-05

191

Obesity, Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history\\u000a of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology\\u000a literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on\\u000a the contribution of

Andrew A. Gumbs

2008-01-01

192

Pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in higher-income countries, with 5-year survival only 10% even in people presenting with early-stage cancer. Risk factors include smoking, high alcohol intake, and dietary factors, while diabetes mellitus and previous pancreatitis may also increase the risk. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of surgical treatments in people with pancreatic cancer considered suitable for complete tumour resection? What are the effects of interventions to prevent pancreatic leak after pancreaticoduodenectomy in people with pancreatic cancer considered suitable for complete tumour resection? What are the effects of adjuvant treatments in people with completely resected pancreatic cancer? What are the effects of interventions in people with non-resectable (locally advanced or advanced) pancreatic cancer? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 46 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: chemoradiotherapy; chemoradiotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; chemoradiotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer; fibrin glue; fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (adjuvant) for resected pancreatic cancer (with or without surgery); fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (systemic); fluorouracil-based combination chemotherapy; fluorouracil-based monotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (adjuvant) for resected pancreatic cancer; gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (systemic); gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy; gemcitabine-based monotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; lymphadenectomy (extended [radical], or standard) in people having pancreaticoduodenectomy; pancreatic duct occlusion; pancreaticoduodenectomy (pylorus-preserving); pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure); pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction; pancreaticojejunostomy; and somatostatin and somatostatin analogues.

2010-01-01

193

Histological variants of prostatic carcinoma and their significance.  

PubMed

The vast majority of prostatic cancers are acinar adenocarcinomas. Histological variants of prostatic carcinoma have been variably defined. One approach is to consider two groups of variants. The first group comprises histological variants of acinar adenocarcinoma and the second group non-acinar carcinoma variants or types. Variants of usual acinar adenocarcinoma defined in 2004 by the World Health Organization (WHO) include atrophic, pseudohyperplastic, foamy, colloid, signet ring, oncocytic and lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas. The second group of non-acinar carcinoma histological variants or types of prostatic carcinoma accounts for about 5-10% of carcinomas that originate in the prostate. These include sarcomatoid carcinoma, ductal adenocarcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, squamous and adenosquamous carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and neuroendocrine tumours, specifically small-cell carcinoma. Recently characterized variants not present in the 2004 WHO classification, including microcystic adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like adenocarcinoma, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, and pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma, are also described. The aims of this review are to present the essential histomorphological diagnostic attributes of these variants, and to emphasize the clinical signficance of the variants, when different from usual acinar adenocarcinoma, including clinical presentation and outcome. PMID:22212078

Humphrey, Peter A

2012-01-01

194

Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess.

Geokas, Michael C.

1972-01-01

195

[Pancreatic ascites].  

PubMed

Two cases of pancreatic ascites have been presented. 1. A 29 year old man, heavy alcoholic, with fast growing ascites presented since long biochemic features of pancreatitis. The diagnosis of the pancreatic origin of ascites was made on the ground of the high level of amylase in the ascitic fluid. Conservative treatment was effectless. The patients refused surgical therapy. Then he died in septic shock. Autopsy confirmed the pancreatic origin of ascites. 2. A 43 year old man heavy alcoholic as well admitted because of fast growing ascites. As in the first case examination of the fluid confirmed the diagnosis of pancreatic origin of ascites. Again a high level of amylase and protein was found. After clinical treatment and parenteral nutrition the condition of the patient improved and he was dismissed 4 weeks later. PMID:7479248

Jasi?ski, A; Suchanek, W; Mitlener, S; Kryszewski, A

1995-03-01

196

Resistance of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells Is Reversed by Coculturing NK-like T Cells with Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Tumor-Derived RNA and CA 19-9  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immunization with defined tumor antigens is limited to the small number of cancers in which specific tumor antigens have been defined but insufficient tumor material is available to produce an antitumor vaccine. In this study, we investigated whether pulsing dendritic cells (DC) using a liposomal transfer technique with a pancreatic tumor cell line-derived RNA can effectively activate NK-like T cells

Carsten Ziske; Angela Märten; Björn Schöttker; Peter Buttgereit; Frank Schakowski; Markus Gorschlüter; Alexander von Rücker; Christian Scheffold; Nelson Chao; Tilman Sauerbruch; Ingo G. H. Schmidt-Wolf

2001-01-01

197

Focal fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in inflammatory pancreatic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Focal 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET) in a pancreatic mass has been reported as a specific finding for\\u000a pancreatic carcinoma. Inflammatory conditions of the pancreas and associated clinical circumstances yielding similar findings\\u000a have not yet been fully defined. Among 42 patients studied by attenuation-corrected FDG PET for pancreatic disease, 12 with\\u000a focal FDG uptake in the

Paul D. Shreve

1998-01-01

198

Atorvastatin delays progression of pancreatic lesions to carcinoma by regulating PI3/AKT signaling in p48Cre/+ LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the one of most common causes of cancer deaths and has the worst prognosis. Clinical observational studies suggest that statins may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. The chemopreventive efficacy of the statin atorvastatin (Lipitor(®)) and the role of the phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3/AKT) signaling pathway were evaluated for the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in conditional p48(Cre/+) -LSL-Kras(G12D/+) transgenic mice. Six-week-old male p48(Cre/+) -LSL-Kras(G12D/+) (20/group) mice were fed AIN-76A diets containing 0, 200 and 400 ppm atorvastatin for 35 weeks. At termination, pancreata were evaluated histopathologically for PanINs and PDAC, and for various PI3/AKT signaling markers, and inflammatory cytokines, by immunohistochemistry/immunohistoflourscence, ELISA, Western blotting and/or reverse transcription-PCR methods. Control diet-fed mice showed 85% incidence of PDAC; whereas, mice fed with atorvastatin showed PDAC incidence of 65 and 35%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Similarly, significant suppression of PanIN-3 (22.6%) was observed in mice fed 400 ppm atorvastatin. Importantly, pancreata from atorvastatin-treated mice were ?68% free from ductal lesions. Furthermore, pancreas of mice administered with atorvastatin had significantly reduced expressions levels of PCNA, p2X7, p-ERK, RhoA, cyclin D1, survivin, Akt, pAKT, ?-catenin, cyclin E, cdK2 and caveolin-1. Also, atorvastatin-treated mice had shown dose-dependent suppression of inflammatory cytokines and a significant increase in tunnel-positive cells, p21 and PARP expression levels in pancreas. Atorvastatin significantly delays the progression of PanIN-1 and -2 lesions to PanIN-3 and PDAC by modulating PI3/AKT signal molecules in a preclinical model, suggesting potential clinical benefits of statins for high-risk pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:22287227

Mohammed, Altaf; Qian, Li; Janakiram, Naveena B; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

2012-03-14

199

Pancreatic Carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is an almost universally lethal disease. Research over the last two decades has shown that pancreatic cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, caused by inherited germline and acquired somatic mutations in cancer-associated genes. Multiple alterations in genes that are important in pancreatic cancer progression have been identified, including tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genome maintenance genes. Furthermore, the identification of noninvasive precursor lesions of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has led to the formulation of a multi-step progression model of pancreatic cancer and the subsequent identification of early and late genetic alterations culminating in invasive cancer. In addition, an increased understanding of the molecular basis of the disease has facilitated the identification of new drug targets enabling rational drug design. The elucidation of genetic alterations in combination with the development of high-throughput sensitive techniques should lead to the discovery of effective biomarkers for early detection of this malignancy. This review focuses mainly on the current knowledge about the molecular insights of the pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Koorstra, Jan-Bart M.; Hustinx, Steven R.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Maitra, Anirban

2008-01-01

200

Pancreatic cancer and fibrinogen storage disease.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common type of pancreatic carcinoma while squamous, carcinosarcoma, sarcoma, giant cell carcinoma, and clear cell types are all rare. Hepatocellular fibrinogen storage disease is also an uncommon disorder which may be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Two cases of pancreatic carcinoma were encountered in a family with fibrinogen storage disease, further raising the possibility of a predilection to malignancy in this unusual disorder. The tumour in one case was of the rare clear cell type. These two cases are the basis for this report. METHODS: Sections were cut from retrieved paraffin embedded tissue and stained for routine histology. Immunohistochemistry using the avidin-biotin technique was applied for the expression of the markers p53 (D07), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), c-erbB-2, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). RESULTS: Both cases were adenocarcinoma of pancreatic ductal origin. The tumour in one case showed features of a clear cell carcinoma. The tumour cells expressed p53, CEA, and EMA immunoreactivity and were negative for c-erbB-2 and AFP. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatocellular fibrinogen storage disease is rare and has been described in association with chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and rarely with hepatocellular carcinoma. This represents the first report of its association with carcinoma outside of the liver. Images

Radhi, J M; Lukie, B E

1998-01-01

201

Hepatic Arterial Therapy with Drug-Eluting Beads in the Management of Metastatic Pancreatic Carcinoma to the Liver: A Multi-Institutional Registry  

PubMed Central

Introduction. There has been limited reporting on the use of hepatic-directed therapy in liver dominant hepatic metastases arising from pancreatic cancer. Methods. An IRB-approved prospective multi-institutional treatment registry of 885 patients undergoing 1458 treatments for primary or secondary cancers in the liver was evaluated from January 2007 to January 2011. Results. Ten patients underwent a total of 17 treatment sessions with drug-eluting beads (DEBs). Six patients received concurrent chemotherapy while undergoing DEB with no severe adverse events. After a median followup of 16 months, the 6- and 12-month response rates were 80% and 75%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 9.3 months. Conclusion. Hepatic arterial therapy with DEB can be safely and effectively used in selected patients with liver predominant metastatic disease from pancreatic cancer. This therapy should be considered in combination with systemic chemotherapy as a possible second therapy given the limited response rates of second-line chemotherapy.

Kotoyan, Raffi; Metzger, Tiffany; Tatum, Cliff; Robbins, Ken; Martin, Robert C. G.

2012-01-01

202

External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg\\/m²) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine

Gian C. Mattiucci; Alessio G. Morganti; Vincenzo Valentini; Edy Ippolito; Sergio Alfieri; Armando Antinori; Antonio Crucitti; Giuseppe R. D'Agostino; Liberato Di Lullo; Stefano Luzi; Giovanna Mantini; Daniela Smaniotto; Gian B. Doglietto; Numa Cellini

2010-01-01

203

Epicatechin-rich cocoa polyphenol inhibits Kras-activated pancreatic ductal carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in a mouse model.  

PubMed

Activated Kras gene coupled with activation of Akt and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) triggers the development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, the precursor lesion for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in humans. Therefore, intervention at premalignant stage of disease is considered as an ideal strategy to delay the tumor development. Pancreatic malignant tumor cell lines are widely used; however, there are not relevant cell-based models representing premalignant stages of PDAC to test intervention agents. By employing a novel Kras-driven cell-based model representing premalignant and malignant stages of PDAC, we investigated the efficacy of ACTICOA-grade cocoa polyphenol (CP) as a potent chemopreventive agent under in vitro and in vivo conditions. It is noteworthy that several human intervention/clinical trials have successfully established the pharmacological benefits of cocoa-based foods. The liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS data confirmed epicatechin as the major polyphenol of CP. Normal, nontumorigenic and tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial (PDE) cells (exhibiting varying Kras activity) were treated with CP and epicatechin. CP and epicatechin treatments induced no effect on normal PDE cells, however, caused a decrease in the (i) proliferation, (ii) guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound Ras protein, (iii) Akt phosphorylation and (iv) NF-?B transcriptional activity of premalignant and malignant Kras-activated PDE cells. Further, oral administration of CP (25 mg/kg) inhibited the growth of Kras-PDE cell-originated tumors in a xenograft mouse model. LC-MS/MS analysis of the blood showed epicatechin to be bioavailable to mice after CP consumption. We suggest that (i) Kras-driven cell-based model is an excellent model for testing intervention agents and (ii) CP is a promising chemopreventive agent for inhibiting PDAC development. PMID:22190076

Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Liao, D Joshua; Mishra, Shrawan Kumar; Schuster, Todd; Wang, Lei; Matter, Brock; Campbell, Paul M; Villalta, Peter; Nanda, Sanjeev; Deng, Yibin; Saleem, Mohammad

2012-02-18

204

A novel adhesion factor produced by hamster pancreatic cancer cell line is effective on normal and carcinoma cell lines of different species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  An adhesion factor, produced by the hamster pancreatic cancer cell line PC-1.0, was tested for its efficiency in promoting\\u000a the in vitro adhesion of normal and tumor cells (pancreas, lung, kidney, colon, breast, skin, prostate, neuroblast, melanocyte)\\u000a derived from human, monkey, bovine, hamster, and rat sources. Using a modification of the dimethylthyazol diphenyl tetrazolium\\u000a (MTT) assay, the factor was found

Ilia A. Toshkov; William G. Chaney; David M. Colcher; Michael A. Hollingsworth; Troitza K. Bratanova; Fulvio Perini; Parviz M. Pour

1995-01-01

205

IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune pancreatitis typically produces an enlarged pancreas with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, and can mimic carcinoma. Autoimmune pancreatitis usually responds to corticosteroid treatment, making it important to differentiate from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Affected patients often have an elevated serum IgG4. It has been proposed that increased numbers of IgG4-positive plasma cells in tissue might be a marker for the

Lizhi Zhang; Kenji Notohara; Michael J Levy; Suresh T Chari; Thomas C Smyrk

2007-01-01

206

Primary sebaceous gland carcinoma of the bulbar conjunctiva without involvement of eyelid: A clinical dilemma  

PubMed Central

Sebaceous gland carcinoma usually arises from the meibomian or Zeis glands within the eyelid, but tumor arising primarily from the conjunctiva, especially bulbar conjunctiva, is a rarity. We hereby report a case of a 50-year-old female who presented with a painless mass in the inferior limbus, encroaching the cornea and hanging over the lower eyelid without involving it. Imprint cytology was suggestive of adenosquamous carcinoma. Management consisted of wide local excision, cryotherapy to tumor bed, and topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1% preoperatively and postoperatively. Histopathologic analysis was in favor of sebaceous gland carcinoma. This case suggests that although sebaceous gland carcinoma commonly originates as a lid tumor, it can present as a bulbar conjunctival mass. Topical 5-FU is a viable and efficient cost-effective alternative for neo-adjuvant and adjuvant treatment of sebaceous gland carcinoma.

Pandey, Kalpana; Singh, Parul; Singh, Abhishek; Pandey, Harishanker

2011-01-01

207

Primary sebaceous gland carcinoma of the bulbar conjunctiva without involvement of eyelid: A clinical dilemma.  

PubMed

Sebaceous gland carcinoma usually arises from the meibomian or Zeis glands within the eyelid, but tumor arising primarily from the conjunctiva, especially bulbar conjunctiva, is a rarity. We hereby report a case of a 50-year-old female who presented with a painless mass in the inferior limbus, encroaching the cornea and hanging over the lower eyelid without involving it. Imprint cytology was suggestive of adenosquamous carcinoma. Management consisted of wide local excision, cryotherapy to tumor bed, and topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1% preoperatively and postoperatively. Histopathologic analysis was in favor of sebaceous gland carcinoma. This case suggests that although sebaceous gland carcinoma commonly originates as a lid tumor, it can present as a bulbar conjunctival mass. Topical 5-FU is a viable and efficient cost-effective alternative for neo-adjuvant and adjuvant treatment of sebaceous gland carcinoma. PMID:21897630

Pandey, Kalpana; Singh, Parul; Singh, Abhishek; Pandey, Harishanker

2011-05-01

208

Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Important advances in the understanding of pancreatic diseases have taken place through the application of molecular methods in the study of the inherited form of pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene have been found to be causative for hereditary pancreatitis with important implications for the molecular pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis. A variety of cancer

Margaret D. Finch; Nathan Howes; Ian Ellis; Roger Mountford; Robert Sutton; Michael Raraty; John P. Neoptolemos

1997-01-01

209

Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, heterogeneous, fibroinflammatory disorder of the pancreas. It has gained increasing recognition due to a presentation that can mimic difficult to treat disorders such as pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In contrast, autoimmune pancreatitis is a benign disease that is very responsive to therapy with corticosteroids. There are two types of AIP. Type 1 disease is the most common worldwide and is associated with extrapancreatic manifestations and elevated levels of IgG4-positive cells. Type 2 AIP is characterized by a paucity of IgG4-positive cells, and is more difficult to diagnose. This review provides an update on the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of AIP, with special emphasis on the two subtypes.

Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash A; Sheth, Sunil

2013-01-01

210

Hsp90 stabilizes Cdc25A and counteracts heat shock-mediated Cdc25A degradation and cell-cycle attenuation in pancreatic carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Pancreas cancer cells escape most treatment options. Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 is frequently over-expressed in pancreas carcinomas and protects a number of cell-cycle regulators such as the proto-oncogene Cdc25A. We show that inhibition of Hsp90 with geldanamycin (GD) destabilizes Cdc25A independent of Chk1/2, whereas the standard drug for pancreas carcinoma treatment, gemcitabine (GEM), causes Cdc25A degradation through the activation of Chk2. Both agents applied together additively inhibit the expression of Cdc25A and the proliferation of pancreas carcinoma cells thereby demonstrating that both Cdc25A-destabilizing/degrading pathways are separated. The role of Hsp90 as stabilizer of Cdc25A in pancreas carcinoma cells is further supported by two novel synthetic inhibitors 4-tosylcyclonovobiocic acid and 7-tosylcyclonovobiocic acid and specific Hsp90AB1 (Hsp90?) shRNA. Our data show that targeting Hsp90 reduced the resistance of pancreas carcinoma cells to treatment with GEM. PMID:22843495

Giessrigl, Benedikt; Krieger, Sigurd; Rosner, Margit; Huttary, Nicole; Saiko, Philipp; Alami, Mouad; Messaoudi, Samir; Peyrat, Jean-François; Maciuk, Alexandre; Gollinger, Michaela; Kopf, Sabine; Kazlauskas, Egidijus; Mazal, Peter; Szekeres, Thomas; Hengstschläger, Markus; Matulis, Daumantas; Jäger, Walter; Krupitza, Georg

2012-07-25

211

The diagnostic value of plasma carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in pancreatic disease. Medical Research Council Tumour Products Committee: Clinical Subgroup.  

PubMed Central

Whilst the plasma CEA levels in pancreatic carcinoma tend to be higher than in pancreatitis, knowledge of the plasma CEA level is of little additional value in the differential diagnosis of malignant and non-malignant pancreatic disease, and contributes little to the clinical management of such disorders.

1980-01-01

212

Mutational Profiling of Kinases in Human Tumours of Pancreatic Origin Identifies Candidate Cancer Genes in Ductal and Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas  

PubMed Central

Background Protein kinases are key regulators of cellular processes (such as proliferation, apoptosis and invasion) that are often deregulated in human cancers. Accordingly, kinase genes have been the first to be systematically analyzed in human tumors leading to the discovery that many oncogenes correspond to mutated kinases. In most cases the genetic alterations translate in constitutively active kinase proteins, which are amenable of therapeutic targeting. Tumours of the pancreas are aggressive neoplasms for which no effective therapeutic strategy is currently available. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a DNA-sequence analysis of a selected set of 35 kinase genes in a panel of 52 pancreatic exocrine neoplasms, including 36 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and 16 ampulla of Vater cancer. Among other changes we found somatic mutations in ATM, EGFR, EPHA3, EPHB2, and KIT, none of which was previously described in cancers. Conclusions/Significance Although the alterations identified require further experimental evaluation, the localization within defined protein domains indicates functional relevance for most of them. Some of the mutated genes, including the tyrosine kinases EPHA3 and EPHB2, are clearly amenable to pharmacological intervention and could represent novel therapeutic targets for these incurable cancers.

Corbo, Vincenzo; Ritelli, Rossana; Barbi, Stefano; Funel, Niccola; Campani, Daniela; Bardelli, Alberto; Scarpa, Aldo

2010-01-01

213

Autoimmune pancreatitis: a guide for the histopathologist.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of pancreatitis with a characteristic histological appearance. Clinically and radiologically, many of these patients show enlargement of pancreas and pancreatic duct/bile duct strictures, thus mimicking pancreatic carcinoma. There are 2 forms of the disease: (1) type 1 AIP characterized by storiform type fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, and elevated numbers of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) positive plasma cells, typically >50 per high-power field, and, (2) type 2 AIP characterized by granulocytic epithelial lesions and only occasional IgG4-bearing plasma cells, typically <10 per high-power field. The type 1 variant of AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of IgG4-related disease, thus both pancreatic and extrapancreatic recurrences are common. The type 2 variant is unrelated to IgG4-related disease, and disease recurrence is uncommon. Both forms of the disease show a swift response to immunosuppressive therapy. This review highlights the clinical and pathological differences between the 2 forms of AIP. We also review guidelines that assist in distinguishing AIP from its closest mimic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:23068298

Shinagare, Shweta; Shinagare, Atul B; Deshpande, Vikram

2012-11-01

214

Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Gluteal Region with Ipsilateral Metastasis into the Pancreatic Graft of a Patient after Combined Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare tumour of the skin that predominantly affects elderly or immunocompromised patients. The malignant transformation of Merkel cells is currently considered to be related to an infection with Merkel cell polyomavirus. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old man who developed a Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive MCC in a non-UV-exposed part of

Tomáš Tichý; Pavel Horák; Hana Ciferská; Marián Hajdúch; Josef Srovnal; Radek Trojanec; Michaela Zezulová; Miloslava Zlevorová; Lucie Kalinová

2010-01-01

215

[Pancreatic cancer].  

PubMed

About 7200 new cases of pancreatic adenocarcinomas are diagnosed each year in France. At the time of diagnosis, an efficient carcinologic surgery will not be possible for nearly 80% of patients, in relation to loco-regional extension or metastatic dissemination. After surgical resection, the median survival of resected patients ranges from 12 to 20 months, with a high rate of relapses. Currently, the use of radiotherapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversial. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is six months of chemotherapy with FUFOL or gemcitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This must be validated in a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment but always under evaluation. For the treatment of patients with locally advanced tumors, there is not a standart treatment. A strategy of initial chemotherapy followed by CRT for non progressive patients is under evaluation. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the current trend is to reduce the treated volumes to improve tolerance. The delineation of target volumes has been improved by the use of simulation CT. The aims of this work are to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of pancreatic cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. PMID:21129675

Huguet, F; Orthuon, A; Touboul, E; Marseguerra, R; Mornex, F

2010-11-01

216

Pancreatic ascites in childhood.  

PubMed

A case is reported of pancreatic ascites in a 14-year-old girl who had acute and chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreatic duct stones and a ruptured pancreatic duct. Abdominal erythema ab igne was considered to be an important physical sign of genuine severe abdominal pain. PMID:2144996

Mucklow, E S; Freeman, N V

1990-06-01

217

Treatment of Alcoholic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function. The majority of cases in the Western world are related to alcohol consumption. Treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis has been difficult, since the mechanisms of disease progression and the causes of pain are poorly understood. The conservative management of chronic pancreatitis focuses on (a) avoidance

Roland H. Pfützer; Alexander Schneider

2005-01-01

218

Primary pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as a pancreatic tumor leading to Whipple's pancreaticoduodenectomy. A case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

A 45-year-old female presented with upper abdominal pain. Ultrasound and CECT both showed a mass in the pancreatic head and uncinate process suggestive of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. A Whipple's pancreaticoduodenectomy was carried out. Microscopic examination showed numerous epithelioid cell granulomas in the pancreas infiltrating the duodenal mucosa. No evidence of malignancy was seen. Acid fast bacilli were positive. The patient was started on anti-tubercular therapy. Cases of isolated pancreatic tuberculosis are very rare and can mimic pancreatic carcinoma clinically and radiologically. A differential diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis must be made in a patient presenting with a pancreatic mass and the patient must be thoroughly investigated to confirm or rule out malignancy or tuberculosis. We herein present a case of primary pancreatic tuberculosis and discuss the clinicopathological features of this condition. We have also proposed an algorithm for the management of patients presenting with a pancreatic mass and a clinical suspicion of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:19581756

Singh, Deepak Kumar; Haider, Aiman; Tatke, Medha; Kumar, Pankaj; Mishra, Pramod Kumar

2009-07-06

219

Pancreatic choriocarcinoma presenting as inflammatory pseudocyst.  

PubMed

A primary pancreatic choriocarcinoma was discovered at surgery in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory pseudocyst. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an extragonadal choriocarcinoma reported as a primary at this site. We consider this neoplasm to be another example of a visceral choriocarcinoma arising from a primary carcinoma through a process of metaplasia. This case illustrates the inherent difficulties in the preoperative evaluation of cystic lesions of the pancreas, and the importance of recognizing endocrinologic manifestations of malignant disease. PMID:3891498

Childs, C C; Korsten, M A; Choi, H S; Schwarz, R; Fisse, R D

1985-08-01

220

Production and secretion of chromogranin A and pancreastatin by the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line QGP-1N on stimulation with carbachol.  

PubMed

Chromogranin A (CGA) is thought to be a precursor of pancreastatin (PST). Carbachol (Cch) stimulated the secretion of CGA and PST from QGP-1N cells derived from a human pancreatic islet cell tumor. Atropine inhibited the secretion of both. Sodium fluoride, phorbol ester, and calcium ionophore also stimulated the secretion of both. Cch (10(-5) M) stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in QGP-1N cells. Stimulation with Cch increased the total amount of PST in the cells and the medium 1.7-fold and decreased the amount of CGA in the cells and medium. QGP-1N cells were labelled with [35S]methionine, and then CGA and PST in the cells and medium were immunoprecipitated with specific antisera, and separated by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. Stimulation with Cch resulted in an increase in the intensity of PST-immunoreactive bands and a decrease in those of CGA-immunoreactive bands. Cch did not increase the cellular level of CGA messenger RNA. These results suggested that (1) the secretion of CGA and PST from QGP-1N cells is regulated mainly through muscarinic receptors coupled with activation of polyphosphoinositide breakdown by a G protein, with intracellular calcium ion and protein kinase C playing a role in the stimulus-secretion coupling and that (2) Cch may induce the secretion of PST and CGA and processing from CGA to PST. PMID:7800852

Kitayama, N; Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kono, A; Matsuoka, Y

1994-08-01

221

Pancreatic choledochal fistula complicating acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Summary Background: Biliary tract involvement in acute necrotizing pancreatitis is rare. Case Report: We report a case of a 53-year-old man who had a pancreatic choledochal fistula complicating acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The fistula was suspected at computed tomography and confirmed at surgery. The patient underwent necrosectomy, cholecystectomy and proximal biliary diversion. He is well at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Simultaneous presence of air in the biliary tree and pancreatic collection is highly suggestive of a pancreaticobiliary fistula. Pancreatic necrosectomy and proximal biliary diversion resulted in closure of the fistula.

Brar, Rahat; Singh, Iqbal; Brar, Preetinder; Prasad, Abhishek; Doley, Rudra Prasad; Wig, Jai Dev

2012-01-01

222

Is alcoholic pancreatitis associated with enteroviral infection?  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate whether enteroviral infection might trigger acute pancreatitis in patients made susceptible due to high alcohol consumption. METHODS: Patients with alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis were analyzed for signs of simultaneous or preceding enteroviral infection. We studied the serum samples of 40 patients hospitalized for alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis and 40 controls recruited from an alcohol detoxification center. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect enterovirus RNA and diagnose acute viremia. Immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) enteroviral antibodies were measured using enzyme immunoassay to detect subacute and previous infections. The samples were considered positive when the antibody titers were ? 15 IU. Furthermore, using RT-PCR, we studied pancreatic biopsy samples obtained during surgery from nine patients with chronic pancreatitis, one patient with acute pancreatitis and ten control patients with pancreatic carcinoma for evidence of persisting enteroviral RNA in the pancreatic tissue. RESULTS: No enterovirus RNA indicating acute viremia was detected by RT-PCR in the serum samples of any patient or control. A high incidence of positive antibody titers was observed in both study groups: IgM antibodies had positive titers in 5/40 (13%) vs 4/40 (10%), P = 0.723; IgG in 15/40 (38%) vs 19/40 (48%), P = 0.366; and IgA in 25/40 (63%) vs 33/40 (83%), P = 0.045, patients and controls, respectively. Ten (25%) patients had severe pancreatitis and two (5%) required treatment in intensive care. The median length of hospitalization was 7 d (range: 3-47 d). The severity of acute pancreatitis or the length of hospitalization was not associated with enteroviral IgM, IgG or IgA antibodies. Five pancreatic biopsy samples tested positive with RT-PCR, three (8%) in the control group and two (5%) in the patient group (P = 0.64). CONCLUSION: The rate of enteroviral infection is not increased in patients with alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis when compared to alcoholics with similar high alcohol use.

Khan, Jahangir; Nordback, Isto; Seppanen, Hanna; Lappalainen-Lehto, Riitta; Jarvinen, Satu; Oikarinen, Sami; Tauriainen, Sisko; Raty, Sari; Hyoty, Heikki; Sand, Juhani

2013-01-01

223

IMP3, NESP55, TTF-1 and CDX2 serve as an immunohistochemical panel in the distinction among small-cell carcinoma, gastrointestinal carcinoid, and pancreatic endocrine tumor metastasized to the liver.  

PubMed

Histopathologic distinction among small-cell carcinoma (SCC), pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET), and gastrointestinal carcinoids metastasized to the liver in needle core biopsies can be extremely challenging because of limited material, crush artifact, and lack of detailed clinical history. In this study, a total of 61 surgically resected or biopsied specimens, including 27 SCCs (lung, 17; colon, 1; gallbladder, 2; stomach, 1; and unknown primary, 6), 18 gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors (GICTs) (stomach, 2; small intestine, 14; colon, 2), and 16 PETs were immunohistochemically examined for the expression of IMP3, TTF-1, CDX2, and NESP55 to evaluate their diagnostic value. The results showed that 24 (89%) of 27 SCCs exhibited strong cytoplasmic staining for IMP3 in 60% to 100% of the tumor cells. Eighteen (67%) SCCs were strongly and diffusely positive for TTF-1. In the remaining 9 TTF-1-negative SCCs (including 4 extrapulmonary cases), 7 showed strong and diffuse IMP3 expression. All SCCs were negative for CDX2 except for 1 case of colonic origin that showed strong CDX2 immunoreactivity. All 16 metastatic PETs were positively stained for IMP3 with 12 cases (75%) showing a diffuse and moderate-to-strong staining pattern while they were negative for TTF-1. Six PETs exhibited moderate-to-strong positivity for CDX2 with nuclear staining in 5% to 40% of tumor cells, and 5 showed a varying degree of positivity for NESP55. Three (17%) of 18 metastatic GICTs showed moderate IMP3 staining in 50% to 90% of the tumor cells, whereas CDX2 was expressed in 17 (94%) cases with moderate-to-strong staining in 50% to 100% of tumor cells. No NESP55 immunoreactivity was detected in metastatic SCCs and GICTs. In conclusion, a panel of these 4 markers is useful in segregating among SCC, PET, and GICT to help determine the primary site of hepatic metastasis. PMID:22495359

Denby, Kristopher S; Briones, Alice J; Bourne, Patricual A; Spaulding, Betsy O; Lu, Dongsi; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Qu, Zhenhong; Wang, Hanlin L; Xu, Haodong

2012-12-01

224

A rare case of a pancreatic tumor in association with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.  

PubMed

The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is a well-known complication in malignancy, especially small cell carcinoma of the lung. However its association with pancreatic carcinoma is rare. To the best of our knowledge, only 9 cases have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 90 year-old woman with pancreatic carcinoma who developed SIADH. PMID:17621863

Sean, Hirota; Nishida, Katsufumi; Tokeshi, Jinichi

2007-06-01

225

External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

Mattiucci, Gian C. [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, John Paul II Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Ippolito, Edy, E-mail: edypo@hotmail.i [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Alfieri, Sergio [Department of Digestive Surgery, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio [Department of Surgery, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); D'Agostino, Giuseppe R. [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Di Lullo, Liberato [Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital, Isernia (Italy); Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Doglietto, Gian B. [Department of Digestive Surgery, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy)

2010-03-01

226

Erythema ab igne in chronic pancreatic pain: a diagnostic sign.  

PubMed Central

Two patients with severe chronic pain of pancreatic origin are described. In both there was severe back pain and an area of erythema ab igne lay directly over the portion of the pancreas giving rise to the pain. In both patients therapy directed at these areas of diseased pancreas resulted in relief of symptoms. The presence of erythema ab igne on a patient's back at the level of T12-L2 should arouse suspicion of underlying pancreatic pathology, and this may be valuable in a disease with remarkably little to find on clinical examination. In one patient early obstruction of the pancreatic duct by pancreatic carcinoma caused distal chronic pancreatitis and back pain many months before the onset of obstructive jaundice. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. A Figure 2. B

Mok, D W; Blumgart, L H

1984-01-01

227

Acinar cell carcinoma with fatty change arising from the pancreas  

PubMed Central

Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant tumour developing from acinar cells, accounting for approximately 1% of pancreatic exocrine tumours. We experienced a case of an acinar cell carcinoma with fatty change. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of an acinar cell carcinoma with fatty change in the clinical literature.

Chung, W-S; Park, M-S; Kim, D W; Kim, K W

2011-01-01

228

Natural course of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial\\u000a edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and\\u000a pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the\\u000a natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis,

H. G. Beger; B. Rau; J. Mayer; U. Pralle

1997-01-01

229

Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma and Regulations by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal forms of human cancer. Although progress in oncology has improved outcomes in many forms of cancer, little progress has been made in pancreatic carcinoma and the prognosis of this malignancy remains grim. Several molecular abnormalities often present in pancreatic cancer have been defined and include mutations in K-ras, p53, p16, and DPC4 genes. Nuclear receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPAR?) has a role in many carcinomas and has been found to be overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. It plays generally a tumor suppressor role antagonizing proteins promoting carcinogenesis such as NF-?B and TGF?. Regulation of pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis is effectuated by the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS). This paper will examine PPAR? in pancreatic cancer, the regulation of this nuclear receptor by the UPS, and their relationship to other pathways important in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

Stravodimou, Athina; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Voutsadakis, Ioannis A.

2012-01-01

230

The surgical spectrum of hereditary pancreatitis in adults.  

PubMed Central

The role of operative intervention for hereditary pancreatitis, a rare form of chronic parenchymal destruction, is unclear. To determine whether surgical therapy is safe and provides prolonged symptomatic relief, the authors reviewed the management of 22 adults (11 men, 11 women) with hereditary pancreatitis treated surgically between 1950 and 1989. Hereditary pancreatitis was defined as a family history of two or more relatives with pancreatitis and clinical, biochemical, or radiologic evidence of pancreatitis. The mean ages at onset of symptoms and at operation were 15 years (range, 3 to 52 years) and 31 years (range, 18 to 54 years), respectively. Pain was the primary indication for operation in all patients. Additional symptoms included nausea, vomiting (73%), weight loss (55%), and diarrhea (41%). Ductal dilatation was present in 68%, pancreatic parenchymal calcifications in 73%, pseudocysts in 36%, and splenic vein thrombosis in 18%. Primary operations included ductal drainage in 10 patients, pancreatic resection alone in three, resection with drainage in three, cholecystectomy plus sphincteroplasty in two, cholecystectomy with or without common bile duct exploration in two, pancreatic abscess drainage in one, and pseudocyst drainage in one. There were no perioperative deaths, and the morbidity rate was 14% (intra-abdominal abscess, wound infection, and urinary tract infection). Symptoms recurred in nine patients. Severity prompted reoperation in five. Secondary operations included pancreatic resection in three, pseudocyst excision in one, and pancreaticolithotomy in one. Follow-up to date is complete and extends for a median of 85 months. Eighteen patients (82%) are clinically improved or asymptomatic. Symptoms have persisted in four patients, and two patients have died of pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients died of unrelated causes. Surgical therapy for patients with hereditary pancreatitis selected on the basis of the traditional indications for surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis is safe and efficacious.

Miller, A R; Nagorney, D M; Sarr, M G

1992-01-01

231

Metastasis-induced pancreatitis: case report.  

PubMed

This report aims to highlight the importance of malignancy exclusion in the absence of common aetiology in acute pancreatitis. An 83-year-old woman presented acutely with pancreatitis. There had been no history suggestive of gallstones disease and she rarely consumed alcohol. Subsequent ultrasound scan revealed no gallstones but multiple liver metastatic lesions. Further carcinomatosis involving the pancreas, right ovary, pelvic lymphatics and nodular disease of the lungs was demonstrated on computed tomography. Immuno-histochemistry of liver biopsy showed positivity for markers suggestive of metastasis arising from lung small cell carcinoma. The case was discussed at the lung multidisciplinary meeting and the patient was referred for community palliative care. Early diagnosis of metastasis induced pancreatitis allows immediate institution of palliative care, if not suitable for aggressive pharmaco-surgical intervention. PMID:23547725

Leung, E; Prasher, A; Francombe, J; Brocklebank, A; Joy, H

2013-01-01

232

Mesothelin and GPR30 Staining Among a Spectrum of Pancreatic Epithelial Neoplasms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Our study attempts to characterize mesothelin and GPR30 \\/ estrogen receptor (ER) staining in pancreatic pathology. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for mesothelin, GPR30, and ER was performed on a variety of pancreatic lesions. Results: 24 of 42 (57%) adenocarcinomas stained for mesothelin, while 0 of 16 non-carcinomas (0%) stained (p = 0.0000784). 35 of 39 (90%) adenocarcinomas stained

Joseph P. Glass; Gulshan Parasher; Hugo Arias-Pulido; Rachel Donohue; Lisa A. Cerilli; Eric R. Prossnitz

2011-01-01

233

Squamous cell carcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: field effect versus metastasis  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition with an increased risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Risk factors for EAC overlap with those for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but ESCC is surprisingly rare in BE. We report two cases of ESCC directly surrounded by BE. Both patients had a previous medical history of cancers, i.e., head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, and were using alcohol and smoking tobacco. Using immunohistochemistry for p63, CK5, CK7, and CDX2, it was confirmed that these carcinomas were pure squamous cell carcinomas, and not EACs or esophageal adenosquamous carcinomas arising from BE. Using TP53 mutation and loss of heterozygosity analysis, we established that the ESCCs in BE were not metastases of the previously diagnosed head and neck squamous cell carcinomas but de novo primary ESCCs. This study shows the strength of molecular analysis as an adjunct to the histopathologic diagnosis for distinguishing between metastases of prior cancers and primary cancers. Furthermore, these cases imply that presence of BE is not protective with regards to developing ESCC in the lower one third of the esophagus. We suggest that their ESCCs arose from islets of squamous epithelium in BE.

Streppel, M. M.; Siersema, P. D.; de Leng, W. W.; Morsink, F. H.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Maitra, A.; Montgomery, E. A.; Offerhaus, G. J.

2013-01-01

234

Squamous cell carcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: field effect versus metastasis.  

PubMed

Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition with an increased risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Risk factors for EAC overlap with those for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but ESCC is surprisingly rare in BE. We report two cases of ESCC directly surrounded by BE. Both patients had a previous medical history of cancers, i.e., head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, and were using alcohol and smoking tobacco. Using immunohistochemistry for p63, CK5, CK7, and CDX2, it was confirmed that these carcinomas were pure squamous cell carcinomas, and not EACs or esophageal adenosquamous carcinomas arising from BE. Using TP53 mutation and loss of heterozygosity analysis, we established that the ESCCs in BE were not metastases of the previously diagnosed head and neck squamous cell carcinomas but de novo primary ESCCs. This study shows the strength of molecular analysis as an adjunct to the histopathologic diagnosis for distinguishing between metastases of prior cancers and primary cancers. Furthermore, these cases imply that presence of BE is not protective with regards to developing ESCC in the lower one third of the esophagus. We suggest that their ESCCs arose from islets of squamous epithelium in BE. PMID:22221671

Streppel, M M; Siersema, P D; de Leng, W W; Morsink, F H; Vleggaar, F P; Maitra, A; Montgomery, E A; Offerhaus, G J

2012-01-03

235

Treatment of non-resectable pancreatic cancer with intraperitoneal 5FU and leucovorin IV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To explore the feasibility of intraperitoneal (IP) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and (IV) leucovorin for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Method: Thirty patients (11 men), median age 65 (range 36–74 years), with a non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma in stage III (n=2) and IV (n=28) were treated with IP 5-FU 750–1000 mg\\/m2and leucovorin IV 100 mg\\/m2for 2 days every 3rd week.

M Öman; P. J Blind; P Naredi; B Gustavsson; L. O Hafström

2001-01-01

236

Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

2012-04-04

237

Pancreatic Neoplasms in Carnivorae.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 18 cases of pancreatic neoplasms isolated in over 5,000 dissected dog and cat corpses, it was observed that the malignant pancreatic neoplasm, regardless of its histologic structure, had vast lymphogenic and hematogenic metastases. Histologically, the ...

S. M. Morozova I. V. Skorodumova

1975-01-01

238

[Computed tomography of pancreatic tumors].  

PubMed

Computed tomography (CT) and in particular multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), also known as multislice CT (MSCT), is ideally suited for detecting pancreatic tumors because of the high spatial resolution.The method of choice is hydro-CT which involves distension of the stomach and duodenum by administration of 1-1.5 l water as a negative contrast medium under medically induced hypotension by administration of buscopan. The patient is laid on the right side at an angle of 30-45 degrees in order to obtain an artefact-free image of the close anatomical relationship around the pancreas head. In addition, curved MPRs or in rare cases 3D reconstructions could be very helpful in identifying the critical anatomic tumor site in the neighbourhood of the visceral vessel system. After the correct diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma has been made only 20% of all patients are shown to have a surgically resectable disease, but the overall survival rate is significantly higher after resection in combination with a multimodal tumor therapy strategy. The reason is that the correct diagnosis of the resectability of the tumor is one of the main criteria for overall survival of these patients. Currently practically all pancreatic tumors can be detected using MDCT and the detection rate varies between 70% and 100% (most recent literature references give a sensitivity of 89% and specificity up to 99%). In some rare cases the differentiation between focal necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma can be difficult even with sophisticated protocols. Resectability can be correctly diagnosed with MDCT with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 89%. MDCT is an ideal tool for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors, metastases and for the differentiation of cystic pancreatic lesions such as pseudocysts, microcystic adenomas or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Particularly, the differentiation of the latter into benign, borderline or malignant transformation is not always possible, but indirect signs, such as small nodules adjacent to the ductal wall, the diameter of the pancreatic duct, or a direct communication between cystic lesions and duct can be detected because of the high spatial resolution and is comparable to the findings in MRI. Moreover MD-CT is an ideal procedure for the differentiation of local tumor stages in patients under neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:19137277

Grenacher, L; Klauss, M

2009-02-01

239

Problems of pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatitis is not one disease but several and perhaps many. Diagnosis is imperfect in all forms and the usual lack of histologic\\u000a material has hampered attempts to understand the pathogenesis and possible interrelationships of the different forms of pancreatic\\u000a inflammation. Acute pancreatitis does not as a rule evolve into chronic pancreatitis, even after multiple recurrences. Recurrent\\u000a acute attacks can be

Andrew L. Warshaw

1986-01-01

240

MRI of pancreatic metastases from renal cancer  

SciTech Connect

Our goal was to describe the MR features of pancreatic metastases from renal cancer. Five patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cancer were imaged with MR. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T MR imager using excitation-spoiled fat-suppressed T1-weighted SE images (all patients), T1-weighted spoiled GE images (all patients), T2-weighted fast SE (one patient) and excitation-spoiled fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast SE (one patient) images, serial postgadolinium spoiled GE images (all patients), and postcontrast excitation-spoiled fat-suppressed T1-weighted SE images (two patients). Multiple pancreatic lesions (n = 6) were present in two patients, solitary tumors in two patients, and diffuse micronodular pancreatic enlargement in one patient. All lesions were hypointense compared to normal pancreas on T1-weighted fat-suppressed SE images. Lesions were high in ST on T2-weighted images in two of two patients. All lesions demonstrated enhancement on the immediate postgadolinium spoiled GE images with the smaller tumors (<1.5 cm, three individual and the micronodular tumors) showing diffuse enhancement and the larger tumors (>1.5 cm, five tumors) showing pre-dominantly rim enhancement. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma have distinctive MR features that include diffuse enhancement in small lesions and rim enhancement in large lesions on immediate postgadolinium images and high SI on T2-weighted images. 20 refs., 4 figs.

Kelekis, N.L.; Semelka, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Siegelman, E.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-03-01

241

Spontaneous regression of pancreatic cancer: Real or a misdiagnosis?  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous tumor regression has been subject of numerous studies and speculations for many years. This phenomenon is exceptional, but well reported, in some types of tumors, but not in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer has the worst five-year survival rate of any cancer. Despite numerous molecular studies and clinical approaches, using several mouse models, this cancer responds poorly to the existing chemotherapeutic agents and progress on treatment remains elusive. Although pancreatic cancer tumors seldom undergo spontaneous regression, and some authors take that with skepticism, there are some cases reported in the literature. However, the variability in the description of the reports and technical details could make this process susceptible to misdiagnosis. Distinguishing between different types of pancreatic carcinoma should be taken with caution as they have wide differences in malignant potential. Diseases such as pancreatic benign tumors, insulinomas, or autoimmune pancreatitis could be responsible for this misdiagnosis as a pancreatic cancer. Here we review different cases reported, their clinical characteristics, and possible mechanisms leading to spontaneous regression of pancreatic cancer. We also discuss the possibilities of misdiagnosis.

Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

2012-01-01

242

Pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis; aetiology, incidence, and early detection.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are responsible for most of the burden of exocrine pancreatic disease. Glandular damage from recurrent bouts of acute pancreatitis can lead to irreversible changes characteristic of chronic pancreatitis. In recent decades accumulating evidence has defined longstanding pre-existing chronic pancreatitis as a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The lag period between diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is usually one or two decades: pancreatitis appearing a year or two before the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is often the result of tumour-related ductal obstruction. The risk of developing pancreatic cancer appears to be highest in rare types of pancreatitis with an early onset, such as hereditary pancreatitis and tropical pancreatitis. Even though there is a strong link between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, over a 20 year period only around five percent of patients with chronic pancreatitis will develop pancreatic cancer. Until the development of more sophisticated screening procedures, screening is not recommended for patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:20510834

Raimondi, Sara; Lowenfels, Albert B; Morselli-Labate, Antonio M; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Pezzilli, Raffaele

2010-06-01

243

Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine the cause and describe the natural history of acute pancreatitis complicating pregnancy and its effect on maternal and perinatal outcomes.STUDY DESIGN: Over the last decade we admitted 43 pregnant women with acute pancreatitis to our hospital. We reviewed presentation, diagnosis, management, and maternal and perinatal outcomes.RESULTS: The incidence of acute pancreatitis was one in

Kirk D. Ramin; Susan M. Ramin; Sherrie D. Richey; F. Gary Cunningham

1995-01-01

244

Classification of pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An international group of doctors interested in pancreatic disease met in Cambridge in March 1983, under the auspices of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to discuss the classification of pancreatitis in the light of developments that have taken place in the 20 years since the crucial conference in Marseille.

M Sarner; P B Cotton

1984-01-01

245

Do Pancreatic Duct Stents Cause or Prevent Pancreatic Sepsis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPancreatic sepsis can occur after contrast injection into an obstructed or disrupted pancreatic duct. Whether stents cause or prevent pancreatic sepsis is unknown. Accordingly, the pancreatic duct bacteriology in patients with pancreatic duct stents was retrospectively reviewed and contrasted with biliary cultures taken from patients at the time of bile duct stent retrieval and\\/or exchange.

Richard Kozarek; Oistein Hovde; Fouad Attia; Renee France

2003-01-01

246

Prospective risk of pancreatic cancer in familial pancreatic cancer kindreds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer have an in- creased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Quantification of this risk provides a rational basis for cancer risk counseling and for screening for early pancreatic cancer. In a prospective registry-based study, we esti- mated the risk of pancreatic cancer in individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer. Standardized incidence

Alison P. Klein; Kieran A. Brune; Gloria M. Petersen; Michael Goggins; Anne C. Tersmette; G. J. A. Offerhaus; C. Griffin; J. L. Cameron; C. H. J. Yeo; S. Kern; R. H. Hruban

2004-01-01

247

Receptor strategies in pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

A variety of receptors on pancreatic acinar and duct cells regulate both pancreatic exocrine secretion and intracellular processes. These receptors are potential sites of action for therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatitis. Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists, which may reduce the level of metabolic "stress" on acinar cells, have been shown to mitigate the severity of acute pancreatitis in a number of models. Not all studies have shown a benefit, however, and differences may exist between different structural classes of antagonists. Because increased pancreatic stimulation due to loss of feedback inhibition of CCK has been proposed to contribute to the pain of some patients with chronic pancreatitis, CCK receptor antagonists could also be of benefit in this setting. Somatostatin and its analogs diminish pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes and have been effective in treating pancreatic fistulas and pseudocysts. These agents are also being evaluated for their ability to reduce pain in chronic pancreatitis (perhaps by reducing ductal pressure by diminishing secretory volume) and mitigating the severity of acute pancreatitis (possibly by reducing the metabolic load on acinar cells). Recently described secretin receptor antagonists may also have therapeutic value as a means of selectively inhibiting pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes.

Grendell, J. H.

1992-01-01

248

Therapeutic pancreatic endoscopy.  

PubMed

The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuing to evolve. This article reviews recent publications spanning a wide range of topics related to therapeutic pancreatic endoscopy: Over the last 12 months, several case series have added to the literature on the short-term and long-term effectiveness of endoscopic therapy of pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and fistulas. Identification of a communication between pancreatic duct and a pseudocyst has been suggested to predict response to percutaneous drainage. The importance of identifying pancreatic leaks in patients with severe pancreatitis has been stressed. In addition, endotherapy has been reported to be effective in patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic removal of pancreatic stones after extracorporeal lithotripsy has been shown to result in long-term improvement in clinical outcomes in patients with chronic calcific pancreatitis. Other interesting publications addressed new techniques and tricks to achieve access to the difficult pancreatic duct. Finally, no review of pancreatic endotherapy would be complete without a reminder--as recently stated by a National Institutes of Health consensus panel--that there is considerable need for higher-quality and controlled trials in this and other areas of interventional endoscopy. PMID:12510226

Mergener, K; Kozarek, R A

2003-01-01

249

The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

To date, there is no consensus on the evolution of chronic pancreatitis. Comfort's initial proposal of acute pancreatitis progressing to chronic pancreatitis was discarded by protagonists of the 'separate' theory. Sarles thus stresses the de novo evolution of chronic pancreatitis-acinar protein hypersecretion associated with an imbalance of pancreatic stone promoting and inhibiting factors. However, the 'necrosis-fibrosis sequence' hypothesis of Kloppel and Mallet resurrects the probability of acute pancreatitis leading to chronic pancreatitis. Dimagno offers a unifying concept that the degree of acinar injury determines the natural history of pancreatitis. Uninhibited release of toxic free radicals could be a common end point for various aetiologies resulting in acute or chronic pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of chronic calcifying pancreatitis of the tropics is possibly no different from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Neurocrine and paracrine mechanisms have been offered to explain pain out of proportion to radiological and histological pancreatic abnormalities in minimal change chronic pancreatitis.

Sidhu, S. S.; Tandon, R. K.

1995-01-01

250

Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported. PMID:23187834

Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

251

[Advances in the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis].  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis is a permanent diagnostic and therapeutic problem. There is no method diagnosing early stages of the disease. Contemporary diagnosis is based on morphological methods. The gold standard is ERCP, but similar results are provided also by non-invasive NMR cholangiopancreatography. Ultrasound examination provides reliable information on the presence of cystoids and major solid formations. Spiral CT is the method which by visualizing the pancreatic duct and structural changes is indispensible. Functional tests are in the diagnostic algorithm only marginal. Treatment of the disease involves dietetic provisions, prohibition of alcohol, supplementation with pancreatic enzymes and administration of analgetics. If this treatment fails, endoscopic or surgical solutions are indicated. Chronic pancreatitis is associated with the risk of development of carcinoma of the pancreas and this is another reason why it calls for permanent and systematic dispensarization. PMID:16737119

Dít?, P

2002-09-01

252

Primary Pancreatic Tuberculosis Masquerading as a Pancreatic Tumor Leading to Whipple's Pancreaticoduodenectomy. A Case Report and Review of the Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A 45-year-old female presented with upper abdominal pain. Ultrasound and CECT both showed a mass in the pancreatic head and uncinate process suggestive of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. A Whipple's pancreaticoduodenectomy was carried out. Microscopic examination showed numerous epithelioid cell granulomas in the pancreas infiltrating the duodenal mucosa. No evidence of malignancy was seen. Acid fast

Deepak Kumar Singh; Aiman Haider; Medha Tatke; Pankaj Kumar; Pramod Kumar Mishra

253

Pancreolauryl test in chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The pancreolauryl test was performed in 30 subjects with chronic pancreatitis, in order to evaluate its behavior in relation to the duration of the clinical history and the presence of pancreatic calcifications, diabetes mellitus, jaundice, and pancreatic pseudocysts.

A. Panucci; C. Angonese; G. Del Favero; C. Fabris; L. Marchioro; D. Basso; F. Di Mario; R. Naccarato

1986-01-01

254

Trp53 Deletion Stimulates the Formation of Metastatic Pancreatic Tumors  

PubMed Central

The presence of distant metastases is a common finding on diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; however, the mechanisms underlying the dissemination of this tumor type remain poorly understood. Loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein has been associated with tumor progression and metastasis in several tumor types including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Here, we describe the generation of a progressive and metastatic pancreatic cancer mouse model after the somatic and sporadic delivery of avian retroviruses encoding the mouse polyoma virus middle T antigen to elastase-tv-a transgenic mice with a pancreas-specific deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor locus. In this model, the tumors metastasize most frequently to the liver, consistent with human pancreatic carcinomas. Analysis of metastatic lesions demonstrated that concomitant loss of the Ink4a/Arf locus was not required for metastasis; however, pancreas-specific deletion of a single Ink4a/Arf allele cooperated with Trp53 deletion in a haploinsufficient manner to accelerate tumor development. Thus, our findings illustrate the potential role of p53 loss of function in pancreatic tumor progression, demonstrate the feasibility of modeling pancreatic cancer metastasis after somatic and sporadic oncogene activation, and indicate that our model may provide a useful experimental system for investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer progression and metastasis.

Morton, Jennifer P.; Klimstra, David S.; Mongeau, Michelle E.; Lewis, Brian C.

2008-01-01

255

Comparison of Secretory Protein and Membrane Composition of Secretory Granules Isolated from Normal and Neoplastic Pancreatic Acinar Cells of Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diversity of cytodifferentiation in a transplantable rat pancreatic acinar carcinoma provides a biological model system for the study of regulatory molecular events that differ from those in normal acinar cells. Secretory (zymogen) granule proteins and granule membranes of neoplastic and normal pancreatic acinar cells were compared to determine the differences in gene expression between apparently well-differentiated secretory granule-containing neoplastic

Linnea J. Hansen; M. Kumudavalli Reddy; Janardan K. Reddy

1983-01-01

256

[Chronic tropical pancreatitis: a case report].  

PubMed

The purpose of this report is to describe a case of tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP). This disease is specific to tropical regions and constitutes the main cause of chronic pancreatitis in children worldwide. It can also be observed in young adults (2nd and 3rd decade). Shortage of dietary lipids during childhood has been implicated in the development of TCP and mutation of the SPINK1 gene has been cited as a predisposing genetic factor. The underlying pathophysiology of TCP is the same as chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) due to alcohol abuse. The main features are a sex ratio of 1, absence of alcohol consumption, occurrence of childhood diabetes in one third of cases, low incidence of acidoketosis, and presence of macro-calcifications especially in ducts. In 10% of cases TCP is complicated by pancreatic carcinoma occurring at an early age, located mainly in the body and tail of the pancreas, and having a less favorable prognosis than primary cancer. Treatment of patients with TCP is the same as for patients with CCP due to alcohol abuse. Prevention depends on improvement of nutritional status of the population. PMID:12910661

Coton, T; Carre, D; Guisset, M; Touze, J-E; Delpy, R; Barea, D

2003-01-01

257

Dissolution of pancreatic stones.  

PubMed

Chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is the most clear-cut form of chronic pancreatitis. Till date, the common treatment of CCP has been directed toward discontinuation of alcohol consumption if the disease is associated closely with alcohol abuse, relief of pain, enzyme replacement, and the management of some complications like diabetes mellitus, cyst or abscess of the pancreas, malnutrition etc. In 1979, the research group for chronic pancreatitis in Japan proposed the therapeutic policy for this disease as illustrated in Fig. 1. A plausible new treatment is the dissolution of protein precipitates or calcified stones in pancreatic ducts by oral or intravenous administration of drugs. PMID:2219444

Noda, A

258

Complications of pancreatic surgery  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic resection is the only treatment option that can lead to a meaningful prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and, in some instances, perhaps a potential chance for cure. With the advent of organ and function preserving procedures, its use in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and other less common benign diseases of the pancreas is increasing. Furthermore, over the past two decades, with technical advances and centralization of care, pancreatic surgery has evolved into a safe procedure with mortality rates of <5%. However, postoperative morbidity rates are still substantial. This article reviews the more common procedure-related complications, their prevention and their treatment.

Ho, Choon-Kiat; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

2005-01-01

259

Pancreatic diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus caused by pancreatic exocrine disease is a unique clinical and metabolic form of diabetes. The diagnosis of pancreatic diabetes caused by chronic pancreatitis may be elusive because it is occasionally painless and often not accompanied by clinical malabsorption until after hyperglycemia occurs. Diabetic patients with pancreatic calcification or clinically demonstrable pancreatic exocrine dysfunction will manifest the unique aspects of pancreatic diabetes described herein. Like other forms of diabetes, the primary hormonal abnormality in pancreatic diabetes is decreased insulin secretion. Patients with this disorder are unique in that they have low glucagon levels that respond abnormally to several physiological stimuli, blunted epinephrine responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and malabsorption. In addition, they often have concomitant alcohol abuse with hepatic disease and poor nutrition. These characteristics result in increased levels of circulating gluconeogenic amino acids, decreased insulin requirements, a resistance to ketosis, low cholesterol levels, an increased risk of hypoglycemia while on insulin therapy, and the clinical impression of brittle diabetes. Retinopathy occurs at a rate equal to that of insulin-dependent diabetes but may be less severe in degree. Other complications of pancreatic diabetes have been less well studied but may be expected to be seen more frequently as these patients survive longer. The characteristics of pancreatic diabetes suggest that a conservative approach be taken in regard to intensive insulin therapy and tight blood glucose control. PMID:2693011

Sjoberg, R J; Kidd, G S

260

[A case report of total remnant pancreatectomy for ductal carcinoma after distal pancreatectomy for invasive intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma].  

PubMed

Recently, the number of case reports detailing cancer recurrence in the pancreatic remnants, following surgical resection of intraductal papillary-mucinous carcinoma (IPMC) of the pancreas has increased. We report the case of a 74-year-old woman who underwent pancreatic resection twice in a 3-year period for primary IPMC and remnant pancreatic ductal carcinoma. We first performed distal pancreatectomy for branched IPMC in the pancreatic tail. Histopathological examination revealed invasive IPMC and the negative margin of the pancreatic duct. The expression of tumor markers gradually increased in the 2 years and 4 months after the initial surgery, and a tumor was detected in the remnant pancreas. We performed total remnant pancreatectomy. The recurrent tumor consisted of moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Currently, the patient is alive without recurrence for a year since the second resection. This experience suggests that careful surveillance is necessary for IPMC. PMID:23268003

Okubo, Keita; Hama, Naoki; Kobayashi, Shogo; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Akita, Hirofumi; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Koichi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Tanemura, Masahiro; Umeshita, Koji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Nagano, Hiroaki

2012-11-01

261

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary.

Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

2012-01-01

262

Autoimmune Pancreatitis – Recent Advances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1 – lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2 – duct centric

I. Novotný; J. Lata; H. Nechutová

2010-01-01

263

Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis, once thought to be almost exclusively a disease of adults, is increasingly being found as the cause of abdominal pain in adolescents. The authors review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, managment, and complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, noting that a high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose and provide optimal care to these patients. PMID:10358323

Berenson; Wyllie

1995-10-01

264

Pancreatitis in cats.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:23148855

Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

2012-08-01

265

Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?  

PubMed

An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

2013-10-16

266

Laparoscopic pancreatic resections.  

PubMed

The last decade has seen an increase in the application of minimally invasive surgical procedures to the management of pancreatic disease. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery is an advanced laparoscopic procedure with a significant learning curve. It should be considered only by surgeons with extensive experience in open pancreatic surgery who possess advanced laparoscopic 'skills. Early reports suggest that laparoscopic pancreatic surgery can be accomplished with acceptable morbidity and mortality for the resection of small benign and low-grade malignant lesions in the body and tail of the pancreas and for the internal drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts. Its role in the management of lesions in the head, neck, and uncinate process of the pancreas is yet to be determined. PMID:19845171

Nakeeb, Attila

2009-01-01

267

What the EWSR1-ATF1 fusion has taught us about hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is a unique low-grade tumor composed of cords and nests of clear cells in a hyalinized stroma that was first reported by Milchgrub et al. It was recognized as a separate entity from clear cell variants of epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, myoepithelial carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. HCCC is included in a long list of clear cell-containing tumors of salivary gland, as well as odontogenic tumors and metastases (renal cell carcinoma). Up until now, it has been considered a diagnosis of exclusion, despite its very distinctive appearance, and labeled as "not otherwise specified" by the World Health Organization. The emergence of molecular data in salivary gland tumors, including HCCC now allow for a more rigorous appraisal of its spectrum. The EWSR1-ATF1 fusion has proven the concept of a "mucinous HCCC" and removes mucin as an exclusion criterion for this tumor. It has also proven a genetic link between clear cell odontogenic carcinoma and HCCC. Molecularly-proven cases have also highlighted variant morphologies and shown that cases with overt squamous differentiation are true HCCC. This gives further weight to the classification of this tumor as squamous or adenosquamous in differentiation and as a specific entity rather than an "NOS" tumor. PMID:23459838

Tanguay, Jeff; Weinreb, Ilan

2013-03-05

268

Vimentin expression predicts the occurrence of metastases in non small cell lung carcinomas.  

PubMed

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is believed to contribute to tumour invasion. Vimentin expression by carcinoma cells is a largely recognized marker of EMT. This study aimed at examining vimentin expression in non small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) by immunohistochemistry to evaluate potential correlations between vimentin expression and the differentiation status, the TNM stage and the outcome of the patients. 295 NSCLC including 164 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 108 adenocarcinomas (AC) and 23 other NSCLC carcinomas have been examined by immunohistochemistry. Vimentin was indeed detected in 145 cases (49.2%). It was principally present in isolated tumour cells and invasive clusters, particularly in cells at the tumour/stroma interface. Vimentin expression was significantly more expressed in large cell neuroendocrine, adeno-squamous and sarcomatoid carcinomas than in SCC and AC and was significantly associated with the differentiation status of carcinomas. The follow-up of 193 patients further demonstrated that an extensive expression of vimentin (>50% of tumour cells) was associated with the occurrence of metastases. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that vimentin expression is a frequent event in NSCLC and that its expression can be associated with a lack of differentiation and the occurrence of metastases. PMID:23562674

Dauphin, Maryline; Barbe, Coralie; Lemaire, Sarah; Nawrocki-Raby, Béatrice; Lagonotte, Eymeric; Delepine, Gonzague; Birembaut, Philippe; Gilles, Christine; Polette, Myriam

2013-04-04

269

The HMGA1-COX-2 axis: A key molecular pathway and potential target in pancreatic adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Context Although pancreatic cancer is a common, highly lethal malignancy, the molecular events that enable precursor lesions to become invasive carcinoma remain unclear. We previously reported that the high-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein is overexpressed in >90% of primary pancreatic cancers, with absent or low levels in early precursor lesions. Methods Here, we investigate the role of HMGA1 in reprogramming pancreatic epithelium into invasive cancer cells. We assessed oncogenic properties induced by HMGA1 in non-transformed pancreatic epithelial cells expressing activated K-RAS. We also explored the HMGA1-cyclooxygenase (COX-2) pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells and the therapeutic effects of COX-2 inhibitors in xenograft tumorigenesis. Results HMGA1 cooperates with activated K-RAS to induce migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent cell growth in a cell line derived from normal human pancreatic epithelium. Moreover, HMGA1 and COX-2 expression are positively correlated in pancreatic cancer cell lines (r2=0.93; p<0.001). HMGA1 binds directly to the COX-2 promoter at an AT-rich region in vivo in three pancreatic cancer cell lines. In addition, HMGA1 induces COX-2 expression in pancreatic epithelial cells, while knock-down of HMGA1 results in repression of COX-2 in pancreatic cancer cells. Strikingly, we also discovered that Sulindac (a COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor) or Celecoxib (a more specific COX-2 inhibitor) block xenograft tumorigenesis from pancreatic cancer cells expressing high levels of HMGA1. Conclusions Our studies identify for the first time an important role for the HMGA1-COX-2 pathway in pancreatic cancer and suggest that targeting this pathway could be effective to treat, or even prevent, pancreatic cancer.

Hillion, Joelle; Smail, Shamayra S.; Di Cello, Francescopaolo; Belton, Amy; Shah, Sandeep; Huso, Tait; Schuldenfrei, Andrew; Nelson, Dwella Moton; Cope, Leslie; Campbell, Nathaniel; Karikari, Collins; Aderinto, Abimbola; Maitra, Anirban; Huso, David L.; Resar, Linda M. S.

2012-01-01

270

Outcome differences after endoscopic drainage of pancreatic necrosis, acute pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Comparative outcomes after endoscopic drainage of specific types of symptomatic pancreatic fluid collections, defined by using standardized nomenclature, have not been described. This study sought to determine outcome differences after attempted endoscopic drainage of pancreatic fluid collections classified as pancreatic necrosis, acute pseudocyst, and chronic pseudocyst. Methods: Outcomes were retrospectively analyzed for consecutive patients with symptoms caused by pancreatic

Todd H. Baron; Gavin C. Harewood; Desiree E. Morgan; Munford Radford Yates

2002-01-01

271

Hereditary pancreatitis presenting with ascites.  

PubMed Central

We report a case of an adolescent girl who presented with painless massive ascites secondary to chronic pancreatitis and a ductal fistula. The diagnosis was delayed and an unnecessary laparotomy was performed, as initial evaluation of ascites did not include measurement of serum and ascitic amylase. Evidence of pancreatic abnormalities in asymptomatic relatives suggested an underlying hereditary pancreatitis. Hereditary pancreatitis presenting as pancreatic ascites, to our knowledge, has not been described previously.

Rao, S. S.; Riley, S. A.; Foster, P. N.; Losowsky, M. S.; Stone, W. D.

1986-01-01

272

CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

1984-11-01

273

MyD88 inhibition amplifies dendritic cell capacity to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via Th2 cells  

PubMed Central

The transition of chronic pancreatic fibroinflammatory disease to neoplasia is a primary example of the paradigm linking inflammation to carcinogenesis. However, the cellular and molecular mediators bridging these entities are not well understood. Because TLR4 ligation can exacerbate pancreatic inflammation, we postulated that TLR4 activation drives pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide accelerates pancreatic tumorigenesis, whereas TLR4 inhibition is protective. Furthermore, blockade of the MyD88-independent TRIF pathway is protective against pancreatic cancer, whereas blockade of the MyD88-dependent pathway surprisingly exacerbates pancreatic inflammation and malignant progression. The protumorigenic and fibroinflammatory effects of MyD88 inhibition are mediated by dendritic cells (DCs), which induce pancreatic antigen–restricted Th2-deviated CD4+ T cells and promote the transition from pancreatitis to carcinoma. Our data implicate a primary role for DCs in pancreatic carcinogenesis and illustrate divergent pathways in which blockade of TLR4 signaling via TRIF is protective against pancreatic cancer and, conversely, MyD88 inhibition exacerbates pancreatic inflammation and neoplastic transformation by augmenting the DC–Th2 axis.

Ochi, Atsuo; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Mushlin, Harry M.; Zarbakhsh, Saman; Barilla, Rocky; Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Fallon, Nina C.; Rehman, Adeel; Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Badar, Sana; Hajdu, Cristina H.; Frey, Alan B.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

2012-01-01

274

d-Limonene inhibits N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine induced hamster pancreatic carcinogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of d-limonene on pancreatic carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) was investigated in Syrian golden hamsters. During and after 5 weekly injections of BOP, each hamster was fed diet containing d-limonene. In week 26, quantitative histological analysis showed that prolonged treatment with d-limonene significantly reduced the number of pancreatic carcinomas. Administration of d-limonene did not cause a significant increase

Akihiko Nakaizumi; Miyako Baba; Hiroyuki Uehara; Hiroyasu Iishi; Masaharu Tatsuta

1997-01-01

275

Nm23/nucleoside diphosphate kinase-A as a potent prognostic marker in invasive pancreatic ductal carcinoma identified by proteomic analysis of laser micro-dissected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue  

PubMed Central

Background Pancreatic cancer is among the most lethal malignancies worldwide. This study aimed to identify a novel prognostic biomarker, facilitating treatment selection, using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Results The two groups with poor prognosis (n?=?4) and with better prognosis (n?=?4) had been carefully chosen among 96 resected cases of pancreatic cancer during 1998 to 2007 in Tohoku University Hospital. Although those 2 groups had adjusted background (UICC-Stage IIB, Grade2, R0, gemcitabine adjuvant), there was a significant difference in postoperative mean survival time (poor 21.0?months, better 58.1?months, P?=?0.0067). Cancerous epithelial cells collected from FFPE tissue sections by laser micro-dissection (LMD) were processed for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 1099 unique proteins were identified and 6 proteins showed different expressions in the 2 groups by semi-quantitative comparison. Among these 6 proteins, we focused on Nm23/Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase A (NDPK-A) and immunohistochemically confirmed its expression in the cohort of 96 cases. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed high Nm23/NDPK-A expression to correlate with significantly worse overall survival (P?=?0.0103). Moreover, in the multivariate Cox regression model, Nm23/NDPK-A over-expression remained an independent predictor of poor survival with a hazard ratio of 1.97 (95% CI 1.16-3.56, P?=?0.0110). Conclusions We identified 6 candidate prognostic markers for postoperative pancreatic cancer using FFPE tissues and immunohistochemically demonstrated high Nm23/NDPK-A expression to be a useful prognostic marker for pancreatic cancer.

2012-01-01

276

Imaging acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is a common condition (thought to be increasing in incidence worldwide), which has a highly variable clinical course. The radiologist plays a key role in the management of such patients, from diagnosis and staging to identification and treatment of complications, as well as in determining the underlying aetiology. The aim of this article is (i) to familiarise the reader with the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis, the appearances of the various stages of pancreatitis, the evidence for the use of staging classifications and the associated complications and (ii) to review current thoughts on optimising therapy.

Koo, B C; Chinogureyi, A; Shaw, A S

2010-01-01

277

Therapeutic intervention and surgery of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical course of acute pancreatitis varies from mild to severe. Assessment of severity and etiology of acute pancreatitis\\u000a is important to determine the strategy of management for acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis is classified according to\\u000a its morphology into edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis. Edematous pancreatitis accounts for 80–90% of acute\\u000a pancreatitis and remission can be achieved in most of

Hodaka Amano; Tadahiro Takada; Shuji Isaji; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Koichi Hirata; Masahiro Yoshida; Toshihiko Mayumi; Eigoro Yamanouchi; Toshifumi Gabata; Masumi Kadoya; Takayuki Hattori; Masahiko Hirota; Yasutoshi Kimura; Kazunori Takeda; Keita Wada; Miho Sekimoto; Seiki Kiriyama; Masamichi Yokoe; Morihisa Hirota; Shinju Arata

2010-01-01

278

Current concepts in feline pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in cats and is clinically important in this species. Despite that fact, the pathophysiology of feline pancreatitis is poorly understood, and its etiology remains unknown in the majority of cases. Arriving at a clinical diagnosis of feline pancreatitis remains challenging because cats with pancreatitis exhibit mild and nonspecific clinical signs, which account for the low level of suspicion for this disease by veterinary clinicians. In addition, sensitive and specific tests for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis were, until recently, not available. Suspicion of pancreatitis should be based on a detailed history and physical examination, hematologic, clinicopathologic, and imaging findings. A diagnosis of feline pancreatitis should be confirmed by measurement of feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity, abdominal ultrasound, pancreatic cytology, and/or pancreatic histopathology. Serum amylase and lipase concentrations are of no value, whereas feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentrations are of limited value for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound may be useful but requires experience, and normal findings do not exclude pancreatitis. Management of pancreatitis is based on supportive therapy and dietary measures. Finally, management of complications and/or concurrent diseases is also crucial in cats with pancreatitis. PMID:19081552

Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Steiner, Jörg M

2008-11-01

279

Simultaneous EUS-FNA Diagnosis and TNM Staging of a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in a Patient with an Unrecognized MEN Type 1  

PubMed Central

We report the case of a woman who, during oncological followup for bronchial carcinoid (diagnosed in 2005), papillary thyroid carcinoma, and bilateral parathyroid adenoma (simultaneously diagnosed in 2007), performed a pancreatic endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle agobiopsy (EUS-FNA) for a positron emission tomography (PET) suspicion of pancreatic and hepatic lesions; during the procedure, the pancreatic and liver lesions were confirmed, and a peripancreatic lymph node involvement was found, allowing a complete pTNM staging during the same procedure.

Ferrara, Francesco; Luigiano, Carmelo; Maimone, Antonella; Bassi, Marco; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Baccarini, Paola; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Cremonini, Nadia; Fabbri, Carlo

2012-01-01

280

Effects of selective COX2 and 5LOX inhibition on prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis in ductal pancreatic cancer in Syrian hamster  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selective inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis seems to decrease carcinogenesis, however, the effect on liver metastasis in pancreatic cancer is still unknown.Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma was chemically induced by weekly injection of N-nitrosobis-2-oxopropylamine (BOP) in Syrian hamster. Animals received selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (Celebrex) and 5-lipoxygenase (Zyflo). In week 33, hamsters were sacrificed and incidence of pancreatic carcinomas as well as liver

J. I. Gregor; M. Kilian; I. Heukamp; C. Kiewert; G. Kristiansen; I. Schimke; M. K. Walz; C. A. Jacobi; F. A. Wenger

2005-01-01

281

Common and unusual CT and MRI manifestations of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a pictorial review  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most common malignancy of the pancreas with high death rate. Preoperative imaging is crucial for the assessment of the disease and the planning of treatment. In this review, we discussed the common and unusual findings of pancreatic carcinoma. The common CT and MR findings include hypovascular mass, dilataion of upstream biliary and pancreatic ducts, invasion to adjacent structures and metastasis. The uncommon CT and MR findings include: a cystic mass, a mass without dilataion of upstream ducts, multiple masses or a lesion diffusively infiltrating most parts of the pancreas without distorting its configuration.

Yang, Min-Jie; Li, Su; Liu, Yong-Guang; Jiao, Na

2013-01-01

282

Pancreatic cancer with liver metastases in a pregnant patient: case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

In this case report, the authors discuss clinical presentation, surgical procedure and early results of chemotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma with liver metastases diagnosed a few days after delivery. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma occurs infrequently in pregnant and childbearing women: only ten cases have been reported in the literature. The early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is difficult because symptoms appear when cancer is about to reach an advanced stage. In pregnancy, it is even more difficult because symptoms like dyspepsia, vomiting and epigastric pain may result confusing. The authors outline the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of this kind of disease during pregnancy. PMID:22675973

Marci, R; Pansini, G; Zavatta, C; Mossuto, E; Giugliano, E; Marzola, M; Patella, A

2012-01-01

283

Pancreatitis - series (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... that is most commonly caused by either alcohol toxicity or gallstones. Gallstones can lodge in the common ... pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis due to alcohol toxicity is most often seen in chronic alcoholic patients. ...

284

Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Hanover, NH. He graduated from ... Medical School. He did his residency at Dartmouth-Hitchcock and his fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in ...

285

Radioimmunoassay of Pancreatic Glucagon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for dimi...

W. J. Nooijen

1979-01-01

286

Dietary modulation of azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in the rat.  

PubMed

Because diet has been shown to modulate the incidence of a wide variety of chemically induced cancers in experimental animals, various dietary constituents were evaluated for their ability to modulate the incidence of pancreatic exocrine cancer in male Wistar/Lewis rats given injections of the pancreatic carcinogen, azaserine. Ten different diet regimens were fed. The incidence of pancreatic cancers in rats fed a control diet was compared to that in groups fed diets formulated to evaluate the effect of caloric restriction, high protein, low protein, low fat, cyclopropenoid fatty acids, lipotrope deficiency, high unsaturated fat, and high saturated fat. The incidence of pancreatic adenomas and carcinomas was evaluated by light microscopy. The number of pancreatic neoplasms was reduced in carcinogen-treated groups which were underfed the control diet or fed the diet high in protein. Pancreatic carcinogenesis appeared to be enhanced in two groups which were fed diets containing 20% corn oil, i.e., high in unsaturated fat; whereas, the group fed a diet high in saturated fat had the same incidence of neoplasms as did the group fed the control diet. The pancreatic neoplasms from groups in which the incidence was enhanced by diet showed less evidence of acinar cell differentiation and displayed diverse histological types. In the lipotrope-deficient group, there was a significantly increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma; however, a low incidence of liver tumors was encountered in all other dietary groups. PMID:7459874

Roebuck, B D; Yager, J D; Longnecker, D S

1981-03-01

287

Chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a number of solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer, efforts aimed at disease prevention may be more successful than\\u000a currently available anticancer treatments. While specific interventions are emerging to prevent breast, prostate, lung, and\\u000a colorectal cancer, no trials of chemoprevention are being conducted in pancreatic cancer. Importantly, there are significant\\u000a obstacles to the conduct of such research. However, preclinical and

Robert A. Wolff

2003-01-01

288

Hereditary Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary pancreatic cancer (PC) appears to be exceedingly heterogeneous, as evidenced by its association with a variety of integrally associated diverse cancers and\\/or differing mendelian inherited cancer syndromes, which include the Lynch syndrome II variant of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome in families with the BRCA2 mutation, hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers polyposis and the familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma

Henry T. Lynch; Randall E. Brand; Carolyn A. Deters; Trudy G. Shaw; Jane F. Lynch

2001-01-01

289

Familial Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In 2008, 37,680 individuals in the United States will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (1) and approximately 5–10% of these cases will have a familial basis (2). Because of the location of the pancreas deep in the abdominal cavity, detection of this disease in its early stages is\\u000a difficult such that over 80% of pancreatic cancers have metastasized prior to

Kieran A. Brune; Alison P. Klein

290

Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML.

Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

2011-01-01

291

Locally advanced pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer is palliative, based on chemotherapy and according to response, chemoradiotherapy can be applied. The authors summarize three abstracts (#LBA146, #256 and #303) presented on the 2013 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, which were focused on treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A discussion is presented about the different chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy regimens, that move away from gemcitabine-based treatment, and the effort to find less toxic, but efficient therapeutic combinations. PMID:23474552

Oikonomopoulos, Georgios M; Huber, Kathryn E; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2013-03-10

292

Autoimmune pancreatitis: current concepts.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct type of chronic pancreatitis with unique clinical, pathological, serological, and imaging features. AIP usually presents with obstructive jaundice. Imaging studies often reveal enlargement of the pancreas with a pancreatic mass and strictures of the main pancreatic duct. Two subtypes of AIP have recently been identified. Type I AIP is more prevalent in elderly Asian males and is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis, obliterative phlebitis, and infiltration of large numbers of IgG4-positive plasma cells. Type II AIP is more prevalent in Caucasians and is characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions. Most patients with type I AIP have a significantly elevated serum IgG4 concentration, which is an important feature for diagnosis and for differentiating between AIP and other conditions such as pancreatic cancer. Extrapancreatic complications are common, such as sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing sialadenitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis in type I AIP, and ulcerative colitis in type II AIP. A rapid response to glucocorticoids treatment is suggestive of AIP, but the relapse rate is high, warranting the use of immunosuppressant treatment. B-cell depletion with rituximab may be a promising therapy. The prognosis of AIP is generally benign if treated promptly, and spontaneous remission occurs in a proportion of patients. PMID:23526391

Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fengchun

2013-03-23

293

Tropical chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients.

Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

2003-01-01

294

Genetics of pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome characterized by chronic inflammation of the pancreas, with variable pain, calcifications, necrosis, fatty replacement, fibrosis and scarring and other complications. Disease susceptibility, severity, progression and pain patterns vary widely and do not necessarily parallel one another. Much of the variability in susceptibility to recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis is now clearly shown to be related to genetic differences between patients. This review highlights recent advances and future directions in genetic research. Recent findings The strongest risk factors are associated with genetic variations in PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, and to a lesser extent, CTRC and CASR. The latest research suggest that a single factor rarely causes pancreatitis, and the majority of patients with recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis have multiple variants in a gene, or epistatic interactions between multiple genes, coupled with environmental stressors. Summary Pancreatic diseases have a strong genetic component. Rather than a classic Mendelian disorder, recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis represents truly complex diseases with the interaction and synergism of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The future will require new predictive models to guide prevention and therapy.

LaRusch, Jessica; Whitcomb, David C.

2013-01-01

295

Sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas: A mimicker of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM), also known as mesenteric lipodystrophy, rarely involves the parenchyma of the pancreas. When sclerosing mesenteritis does involve the pancreas, it can mimic pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically with pain, obstructive jaundice, a mass lesion and even the appearance of vascular invasion. We report 6 patients with sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas (mean age 43.2 years, 5 female), and review their clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathology, and outcome. Five of these 6 patients were originally thought to have a primary pancreatic neoplasm. Initial presenting clinical information was available for each patient: all 6 reported abdominal or epigastric pain, 3 reported weight loss, and 2 reported one or more of the following: back pain, fever, abdominal bloating/distention, nausea with/without vomiting, and anorexia. The lesions formed masses with an infiltrative pattern, and all had three key histologic features: fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and fat necrosis—without a known etiology. The inflammatory infiltrate was composed of a mixture of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered eosinophils. Of the five patients with post-treatment clinical information available, four had at least a partial response to treatment with steroids, tamoxifen, azathioprine, resection, or a combination of these, and 1 did not respond. A dramatic response to immunosuppressive therapy is illustrated by the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with the presumptive diagnosis of an unresectable pancreatic cancer. Distinguishing sclerosing mesenteritis from pancreatic carcinoma is crucial to appropriate management, as patients with sclerosing mesenteritis may benefit from immunosuppressive therapy.

Scudiere, Jennifer R.; Shi, Chanjuan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Herman, Joseph; Fishman, Elliot K.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Makary, Martin A.; Thornton, Katherine; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Horton, Karen M.

2010-01-01

296

Prognostic significance of angiogenesis in human pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

To evaluate whether angiogenic factors are of clinical relevance to actual human pancreatic cancers, we studied the intratumoral microvessel density (IMD), and PD-ECGF, VEGF protein expression in 40 pancreatic cancers using immunohistochemistry. We also investigated PD-ECGF and VEGF gene expression using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Of the 40 pancreatic cancers studied, 30 carcinomas (75.0%) were evaluated to be PD-ECGF-positive and 10 carcinomas (25.0%) were determined to be PD-ECGF-negative. In contrast, 27 carcinomas (67.5%) were evaluated to be VEGF-positive, whereas 13 carcinomas (32.5%) were VEGF-negative. VEGF gene expression was moderately associated with an increase in the IMD (r2 = 0.181, P = 0.006), but no significant relationship was found between PD-ECGF gene expression and the IMD (r2 = 0.093, P = 0.059). However, tumours with positive expression for both PD-ECGF and VEGF had a higher IMD (P = 0.027). The results of the immunohistochemistry agreed well with the results of the quantitative RT-PCR. The median survival time of the hypervascular group was significantly shorter than that of the hypovascular group (P < 0.0001). In comparing the survival according to PD-ECGF and VEGF gene expression, the median survival time of the patients with positive PD-ECGF expression was significantly shorter than those with negative PD-ECGF expression (P = 0.040). Furthermore, the median survival time of the patients with positive VEGF expression was significantly shorter than those with negative VEGF expression (P = 0.048). However, the Cox multivariate analysis indicated that the IMD and VEGF expression were independent prognostic factors of the various clinicopathologic variables in pancreatic cancer patients (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.0443, respectively). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

Ikeda, N; Adachi, M; Taki, T; Huang, C; Hashida, H; Takabayashi, A; Sho, M; Nakajima, Y; Kanehiro, H; Hisanaga, M; Nakano, H; Miyake, M

1999-01-01

297

[Endoscopic therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer. Minimally invasive surgery].  

PubMed

We report a 70 years old male with an advanced pancreatic carcinoma who was admitted to the hospital due to vomiting, progressive jaundice and severe itching. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed an extrinsic duodenal compression and the abdominal ultrasound, a dilated biliary tract. During an endoscopic retrograde pancreatography a papilotomy was performed and a 7 F biliary stent was installed. Also, an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy was done, installing a jejunostomy. These procedures allowed a better quality of life in this patient. PMID:9334486

Rodríguez, J

1996-12-01

298

Hypermethylation of Multiple Genes in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypermethylation of CpG islands is a common mechanism by which tumor suppressor genes are inactivated. We studied 45 pancreatic carcino- mas and 14 normal pancreata for aberrant DNA methylation of CpG islands of multiple genes and clones using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite-modified sequencing. Using MSP, we detected aberrant methylation of at least one locus in 60% of carcinomas. The

Takashi Ueki; Minoru Toyota; Taylor Sohn; Charles J. Yeo; Jean-Pierre J. Issa; Ralph H. Hruban; Michael Goggins

2000-01-01

299

Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed to be involved in the underlying immune reaction. IgG4 antibodies have two unique biological functions, Fab-arm exchange and a rheumatoid factor-like activity, both of which may play immune-defensive roles. However, the exact role of IgG4 in this disease still remains to be clarified. It seems important to recognize this unique entity given that the disease is treatable with steroids.

2011-01-01

300

Recurrent Attacks of Autoimmune Pancreatitis Result in Pancreatic Stone Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:Autoimmune pancreatitis has been characterized by irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and sonolucent swelling of the parenchyma, both of which are due to lymphoplasmacytic inflammation at the active stage of the disease, and by the absence of pancreatic stone formation. The aim of the present study was to confirm or deny whether or not this disease is progressive

Mari Takayama; Hideaki Hamano; Yasuhide Ochi; Hisanobu Saegusa; Kenichi Komatsu; Takashi Muraki; Norikazu Arakura; Yasuharu Imai; Osamu Hasebe; Shigeyuki Kawa

2004-01-01

301

Environmental Risk Factors for Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ?10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits

Claudia Nitsche; Peter Simon; F. Ulrich Weiss; Gabriele Fluhr; Eckhard Weber; Simone Gärtner; Claas O. Behn; Matthias Kraft; Jörg Ringel; Ali Aghdassi; Julia Mayerle; Markus M. Lerch

2011-01-01

302

Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

2013-01-01

303

[The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:20961843

Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

2010-10-31

304

[Positron emission tomography of gastrointestinal carcinomas].  

PubMed

We evaluated positon emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in 120 patients with intestinal malignancies, focusing on its diagnostic yield and influence on the surgical strategy. PET had a sensitivity of 67% and a specificity of 100% for metastases in 28 patients with cardio-esophageal carcinoma. PET detected 64% of 22 primary pancreatic carcinomas, and had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 83% for metastases. In two cases, PET showed false-positive signs of peritoneal metastasis (not found at laparotomy). Among 70 patients with recurrent or metastatic colorectal carcinoma, eight had signs of local recurrence of rectal carcinoma treated by abdominoperineal resection; PET gave four true-positive, one false-negative, and three false-positive results. PET was better than computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of peritoneal metastasis, but its sensitivity was only 58%. The diagnostic value of PET for hepatic metastases (87%) was similar to that of CT (77%) and sonography (87%). The diagnostic sensitivity of PET for pulmonary metastases (82%) was similar to that of CT (84%). PET modified the surgical strategy in two (7%) of 28 patients with cardio-esophageal carcinoma, one (5%) of 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma, and 22 (33%) of 70 patients with colorectal carcinoma (appropriately in 11 cases, inappropriately in 11 cases). These disappointing results suggest that PET must be thoroughly evaluated in this setting before being widely adopted. PMID:16878447

Huguier, Michel; Barrier, Alain; Zacharias, Thomas; Valinas, Roberto

2006-01-01

305

Imaging of blunt pancreatic trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blunt pancreatic trauma is an exceedingly rare but life-threatening injury with significant mortality. Computed tomography\\u000a (CT) is commonly employed as the initial imaging modality in blunt trauma patients and affords a timely diagnosis of pancreatic\\u000a trauma. The CT findings of pancreatic trauma can be broadly categorized as direct signs, such as a pancreatic laceration,\\u000a which tend to be specific but

Satinder Rekhi; Stephan W. Anderson; James T. Rhea; Jorge A. Soto

2010-01-01

306

The challenge of pancreatic anastomosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aims  Significant progress in surgical technique and perioperative management has substantially reduced the mortality rate of pancreatic\\u000a surgery. However, morbidity remains considerably high, even in expert hands and leakage from the pancreatic stump still accounts\\u000a for the majority of surgical complications after pancreatic head resection. For that reason, management of the pancreatic\\u000a remnant after partial pancreatoduodenectomy remains a challenge.

Axel Kleespies; Markus Albertsmeier; Firas Obeidat; Hendrik Seeliger; Karl-Walter Jauch; Christiane J. Bruns

2008-01-01

307

Gene therapy for pancreatitis pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis are clinical syndromes associated with severe pain that is difficult to manage. Thus, seeking additional pain reduction therapies is warranted. Excessive alcohol consumption over an extended period of time is the primary causal agent in pancreatitis. The efficacy of a replication defective Herpes (HSV-1, DPE) viral vector construct encoding the human preproenkephalin gene (HSV-Enk), used

K N Westlund

2009-01-01

308

Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis and treatment.  

PubMed Central

Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is currently the most exciting new imaging technique for chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopy-assisted duodenal intubation during the secretin-cholecystokinin test reduces intubation time in difficult cases. The NBT-para-amino benzoic acid test has been refined to enhance its discriminant power. The cholesteryl-[C13]octanoate breath test and the faecal elastase test are newer highly sensitive and specific tubeless tests. Pain in chronic pancreatitis continues to be a vexing therapeutic issue. Enzyme treatment continues despite criticism. Neurotensin is the new suspected mediator of the feedback mechanism, which is downregulated by enzyme therapy. Steroid ganglion block is an exciting therapeutic tool for pain relief. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy, Dormia basketing and pancreatic stenting in conjunction with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy should be performed early in chronic pancreatitis to prevent parenchymal atrophy with ensuing exocrine and endocrine pancreatic dysfunction. The modified Puestow's procedure preserves endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions besides relieving pain. Closed loop insulin infusion allows superior management of pancreatic diabetes following near total pancreatectomy. The standardised incidence rate of pancreatic cancer is 16.5 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and 100 for tropical chronic pancreatitis. Aggressive treatment protocols combining neo-adjuvant chemoradiation and intra-operative radiation with surgery are being used to improve the prognosis in this dismal complication of chronic pancreatitis.

Sidhu, S.; Tandon, R. K.

1996-01-01

309

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: epidemiology and genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an important cause of death from cancer throughout the developed world. There are few established environmental risk factors, but a previous history of pancreatitis and exposure to tobacco and salted food appear to be the most important. A family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not common in patients with this disease, but recent research has shown that

T Y Flanders; W D Foulkes

1996-01-01

310

Clinical pancreatic disorder I: Acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The Annual American Pancreas Club is an important event for communicating around clinical pancreatic disorders, just as the European, Japanese, Indian, and the International Pancreatic association. Even though the meeting is only 1½ day there were 169 different abstracts and a “How do I do it session.” Among all these abstracts on the pancreas there are some real pearls, but they are almost always well hidden, never highlighted – all abstracts are similarly presented – and will too soon be forgotten. The present filing of the abstracts is one way (not the way) to get the pancreatic abstracts a little more read and a little more remembered – and perhaps a little more cited. It should also be understood that most of the abstracts are short summaries of hundreds of working hours (evenings, nights, weekends, holidays, you name them …) in the laboratory or in the clinic, often combined with blood, sweat and tears. The authors should be shown at least some respect, and their abstracts should not only be thought of as “just another little abstract” – and the best respect they can be shown are that they will be remembered to be another brick in our scientific wall. Now the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011 are gathered and filed with the aim to give them a larger audience than they have had in their original abstract book. However, it is obvious that most of clinical fellows do not have time to read all the abstracts. For them I have made a “clinical highlight section” of 10 percent of all the pancreatic abstracts. If someone else should have done some collection of abstract, there should probably have been other selections, but as this is not the case, the editor's choices are the highlighted ones. The article as series I of clinical highlight section is present, and more series will be present in the following issues. If readers will remember some of the abstracts better after reading this “abstract of abstracts”, it was worth the efforts – and without efforts there will be little progress.

Andren-Sandberg, Ake

2011-01-01

311

Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.  

PubMed

The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

2009-01-01

312

Pancreatic Ductal and Acinar Cell Neoplasms in Carney Complex: A Possible New Association  

PubMed Central

Context: Carney complex (CNC) is a rare disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, associated with various tumors, and caused most frequently by inactivation of the PRKAR1A gene. Objectives: In our recent investigation of a large cohort of CNC patients, we identified several cases of pancreatic neoplasms. This possible association and PRKAR1A's possible involvement in pancreatic tumor have not been reported previously. Patients and Methods: Nine patients (2.5%) with CNC and pancreatic neoplasms in an international cohort of 354 CNC patients were identified; we studied six of them. Immunohistochemistry and PRKAR1A sequencing were obtained. Results: Three men and three women with a mean age of 49 yr (range 34–75 yr) had acinar cell carcinoma (n = 2), adenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm (n = 3). Five patients had a germline PRKAR1A mutation, including two patients with acinar cell carcinoma, for whom mutations were found in a hemizygous state in the tumor, suggesting loss of heterozygosity. PRKAR1A expression was not detected in five of the six pancreatic neoplasms from CNC patients, whereas the protein was amply expressed on other sporadic pancreatic tumors and normal tissue. Conclusion: An unexpectedly high prevalence of rare pancreatic tumors was found among CNC patients. Immunohistochemistry and loss-of-heterozygosity studies suggest that PRKAR1A could function as a tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic tissue, at least in the context of CNC. Clinicians taking care of CNC patients should be aware of the possible association of CNC with a potentially aggressive pancreatic neoplasm.

Gaujoux, Sebastien; Tissier, Frederique; Ragazzon, Bruno; Rebours, Vinciane; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Perlemoine, Karine; Vincent-Dejean, Caroline; Meurette, Guillaume; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Dousset, Bertrand; Bertagna, Xavier; Horvath, Anelia; Terris, Benoit; Carney, J. Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A.

2011-01-01

313

Histopathologically proven autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking neuroendocrine tumor or pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

2012-01-20

314

A Pancreatic Polypeptide-Producing Pancreatic Tumor Causing WDHA Syndrome.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 46-year-old female patient with WDHA (watery diarrhea/hypokalemia/achlorhydria) syndrome caused by a pancreatic polypeptide-producing tumor in the head of the pancreas. Whereas VIP and other pancreatic endocrine hormones were in the normal range, only serum levels of pancreatic polypeptide were elevated. Imaging studies identified a pancreatic tumor in the head of the gland. After laparotomy, the tumor of 3 cm in size was enucleated. Final pathology documented a pancreatic endocrine tumor with immunohistochemical staining demonstrating the presence of pancreatic polypeptide. The patient remained cured after a follow-up of more than three years. The present case illustrates that, although rare, WDHA syndrome may be associated with a pancreatic polypeptide-secreting endocrine tumor of the pancreas. PMID:21490894

Amrilleva, Vera; Slater, Emily P; Waldmann, Jens; Bonorden, Dorothee; Fendrich, Volker

2008-07-09

315

Cannabis-induced acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a common disease. Despite the frequent use of cannabis worldwide, only six reports have described cases of acute pancreatitis secondary to the use of tetrahydrocannabinoid (THC). Here we describe two cases of THC-induced pancreatitis. The first case occurred in a 38-year-old man with multiple admissions for THC-induced pancreatitis; the second case involved a 22-year-old man with no previous medical history. In both cases, other possible causes of acute pancreatitis were ruled out. Key words: common disease, tetrahydrocannabinoid, etiology. PMID:23892868

Mikolaševi?, Ivana; Mili?, Sandra; Mijandruši?-Sin?i?, Brankica; Licul, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

2013-08-01

316

Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention.

Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

317

Regulation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin expression by C/EBP? in lung carcinoma cells  

PubMed Central

Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a member of the lipocalin family, has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors, including lung adenocarcinomas. However, the mechanism by which NGAL expression is regulated in lung carcinoma needs further evaluation. In this study, immunohistochemistry was employed to analyze the expression of NGAL in lung carcinoma tissue samples, including lung squamous carcinomas, adenocarcinomas, adenosquamous carcinomas and bronchial alveolar cell carcinomas. The results showed that NGAL was expressed in 82.61% (19/23) of the samples. RT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that NGAL was localized to the cytoplasm in lung carcinoma cell lines. To explore the transcriptional regulation mechanism of NGAL basal expression in lung carcinoma, a 1515-bp fragment (?1431 to +84) of the NGAL promoter region was cloned and a series of deletion and mutation constructs were generated. These constructs were analyzed using the luciferase reporter assay. The results indicated that the cis-acting elements important for the basal activity of NGAL transcription were likely located between ?152 and ?141. Further analysis using site-directed mutagenesis and the luciferase reporter assay suggested that the C/EBP binding sites were responsible for the activity of the NGAL promoter. Finally, the binding ability and specificity of the transcription factors were determined by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). The results showed that C/EBP? was able to bind to the ?152 and ?141 segments. Taken together, these findings suggest that NGAL is expressed in lung carcinomas and that NGAL expression is mediated by the binding of C/EBP? to the ?152 and ?141 segment of the NGAL promoter.

ZHANG, PI-XIAN; CHANG, JING-XIA; XIE, JIAN-JUN; YUAN, HUA-MIN; DU, ZE-PENG; ZHANG, FA-REN; LU, ZHUO; XU, LI-YAN; LI1, EN-MIN

2012-01-01

318

CD10/NEP in non-small cell lung carcinomas. Relationship to cellular proliferation.  

PubMed Central

The cell surface metalloproteinase CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) hydrolyzes a variety of peptide substrates and reduces cellular responses to specific peptide hormones. Because CD10/NEP modulates peptide-mediated proliferation of small cell carcinomas of the lung (SCLC) and normal fetal bronchial epithelium, we evaluated the enzyme's expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Bronchoalveolar and large cell carcinoma cell lines had low levels of CD10/NEP expression whereas squamous, adenosquamous, and adenocarcinoma cell lines had higher and more variable levels of the cell surface enzyme. Regional variations in CD10/NEP immunostaining in primary NSCLC specimens prompted us to correlate CD10/NEP expression with cell growth. In primary carcinomas of the lung, clonal NSCLC cell lines and SV40-transformed fetal airway epithelium, subsets of cells expressed primarily CD10/NEP or the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cultured airway epithelial cells had the lowest levels of CD10/NEP expression when the highest percentage of cells were actively dividing; in addition, these cells grew more rapidly when cell surface CD10/NEP was inhibited. NSCLC cell lines had receptors for a variety of mitogenic peptides known to be CD10/NEP substrates, underscoring the functional significance of growth-related variability in CD10/NEP expression. Images

Ganju, R K; Sunday, M; Tsarwhas, D G; Card, A; Shipp, M A

1994-01-01

319

CD10/NEP in non-small cell lung carcinomas. Relationship to cellular proliferation.  

PubMed

The cell surface metalloproteinase CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) hydrolyzes a variety of peptide substrates and reduces cellular responses to specific peptide hormones. Because CD10/NEP modulates peptide-mediated proliferation of small cell carcinomas of the lung (SCLC) and normal fetal bronchial epithelium, we evaluated the enzyme's expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Bronchoalveolar and large cell carcinoma cell lines had low levels of CD10/NEP expression whereas squamous, adenosquamous, and adenocarcinoma cell lines had higher and more variable levels of the cell surface enzyme. Regional variations in CD10/NEP immunostaining in primary NSCLC specimens prompted us to correlate CD10/NEP expression with cell growth. In primary carcinomas of the lung, clonal NSCLC cell lines and SV40-transformed fetal airway epithelium, subsets of cells expressed primarily CD10/NEP or the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cultured airway epithelial cells had the lowest levels of CD10/NEP expression when the highest percentage of cells were actively dividing; in addition, these cells grew more rapidly when cell surface CD10/NEP was inhibited. NSCLC cell lines had receptors for a variety of mitogenic peptides known to be CD10/NEP substrates, underscoring the functional significance of growth-related variability in CD10/NEP expression. PMID:7962523

Ganju, R K; Sunday, M; Tsarwhas, D G; Card, A; Shipp, M A

1994-11-01

320

Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is still mainly based on the clinical signs and symptoms of the patients. Systemic organ failure, peritonitis and/or shock indicate severe disease, but to obtain optimal results of treatment the diagnosis of individual patients at high risk should be done before the development of systemic manifestations. A number of laboratory tests are valuable in the follow-up of the patients, but immediate onset of intensive therapy cannot be based on these tests. At present, contrast enhanced CT seems to be the most accurate method for the early detection of hemorrhagic/necrotizing forms of acute pancreatitis. PMID:2424764

Lempinen, M; Schröder, T

1986-01-01

321

Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma  

PubMed Central

Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively.

Gures, Nazim; Gurluler, Ercument; Alim, Altan; Berber, Ibrahim; Gurkan, Alihan

2012-01-01

322

Incidental Pancreatic Cystic Lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Incidental pancreatic cystic lesions (IPCL) are becoming an increasingly frequent clinical entity. Within this review, the\\u000a differential diagnosis, investigation, and management are discussed.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A MEDLINE search was performed for IPCL.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Incidence of IPCL varies from 0.2–0.7%, and 30–47% are premalignant or malignant. Pancreatic pseudocysts (PC), serous cystic\\u000a neoplasms (SCN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) are

Senarath Edirimanne; Saxon J. Connor

2008-01-01

323

Acute pancreatitis in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis\\u000a (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain,\\u000a and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone\\u000a extraction in patients

Steven L. Werlin

2001-01-01

324

Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

Klein, Alison P

2012-01-01

325

Urinary Kallikrein Excretion in Chronic Pancreatic Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variations in urinary kallikrein in pancreatic diseases were ascertained, and possible influencing factors were investigated. Serum amylase and urinary excretion of glandular kallikrein, pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase),?-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and amylase were measured in 24 control subjects, 39 patients with pancreatic cancer, 49 with pancreatitis and 63 with extra-pancreatic diseases. Urinary kallikrein was found to be elevated in a substantial number of

Carlo Fabris; Maria Piera Panozzo; Daniela Basso; Giuseppe Del Favero; Mario Plebani; Martina Zaninotto; Paola Fogar; Tamara Meggiato; Paola Scalon; Chiara Ferrara; Remo Naccarato

1991-01-01

326

Endoscopic therapy for organized pancreatic necrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The treatment of patients with extensive pancreatic necrosis remains controversial; a subpopulation of patients with extensive acute pancreatic necrosis develop complex, organized collections. This study examined the feasibility of endoscopic drainage in patients with extensive organized pancreatic necrosis. METHODS: Eleven patients with organized pancreatic necrosis (8 sterile and 3 infected) after severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis underwent attempted

TH Baron; WG Thaggard; DE Morgan

1996-01-01

327

Endoscopic management of acute biliary pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis represents numerous unique challenges to the practicing digestive disease specialist. Clinical presentations of acute pancreatitis vary from trivial pain to severe acute illness with a significant risk of death. Urgent endoscopic treatment of acute pancreatitis is considered when there is causal evidence of biliary pancreatitis. This article focuses on the diagnosis and endoscopic treatment of acute biliary pancreatitis. PMID:24079788

Kuo, Vincent C; Tarnasky, Paul R

2013-10-01

328

Autoimmune Pancreatitis Accompanied by Cholecystitis, Periaortitis and Pseudotumors of the Liver  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of extrapancreatic lesions have been associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), and these lesions can be difficult to diagnose. We report a patient referred to Shizuoka Cancer Center with the diagnosis of a possible biliary carcinoma with liver metastasis who was shown to have AIP accompanied by pseudotumors of liver. Clinical imaging revealed diffuse enlargement of the head of

Hiroyuki Matsubayashi; Hiroyoshi Furukawa; Katsuhiko Uesaka; Keiko Sasaki; Hiroyuki Ono; Ralph H. Hruban

2008-01-01

329

Enhancement of the cytotoxicity of cisplatin by the cholecystokinin antagonist MK-329 in a human pancreatic cancer cell line  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cholecystokinin (CCK) is an important trophic hormone for the pancreas, and CCK receptors are present on pancreatic carcinoma cells. We sought to determine whether either CCK itself or an antogonist of CCK could modulate the sensitivity of the human pancreatic cell line MIA-PaCa2 to cisplatin (DDP). The IC50 for a 1-h exposure to DDP was 35.3±3.2(SD) µM. Exposure to CCK8

Ramin Jamshidipour; Eudes B. Pinho; Doreen K. Hom; Stephen B. Howell

1994-01-01

330

Chronic Pancreatitis in Children  

MedlinePLUS

... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

331

Pancreatic pseudocysts in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) is an uncommon condition in childhood and is almost always associated with blunt abdominal trauma. Additional disease within the pancreas is rare, unlike adult experience. Prior to the advent of ultrasonography (US) assessment of the cyst was difficult. Subsequently, it has become apparent that PPC may develop but still undergo spontaneous regression. We have reviewed eight children

Susan M. Sawyer; Patricia M. Davidson; N. McMullin; K. B. Stokes

1989-01-01

332

Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local parenchymal damage in acute pancreatitis has been well recognized for many years. This damage leads to a considerable leak of extracellular fluid and so to gross hypovolemia. It also produces the pain that is a major clinical feature of the disease. More recently, the autodigestive process has been recognized to generate, within and around the gland, a “broth” of

John E. Trapnell

1981-01-01

333

[A quite usual pancreatitis?].  

PubMed

History and clinical findings: A 55-year-old man suffered from severe acute abdominal pain. 10 years previously he had been diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. On palpation, there was pronounced abdominal tenderness and guarding.Investigations: Emergency CT revealed signs of intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis and biliar sludge; serum-lipase was increased.Treatment and course: Acute biliary pancreatitis was diagnosed. After admission the patient's condition deteriorated; acute renal failure and respiratory insufficiency developed. After 4 weeks of intensive care he was discharged to a rehabilitation facility via normal ward. At that time pancreatic sonography showed a walled-off necrosis. 7 weeks later colicky abdominal pain occurred again. Altough there were no signs of infection, suction-irrigation drainage was administered. This led to a secondary infection of the necrotic cavity, and 20 sessions of endoscopic necrosectomy were performed for 3 month. Then the patient was discharged to follow-up treatment in a stable condition.Conclusion: Even in supposedly "usual" acute pancreatitis complications can lead to a prolonged course. Sterile necroses should be managed very cautiously. PMID:24002875

Feisthammel, J; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

2013-09-03

334

Study on chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer using MRS and pancreatic juice samples  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the markers of pancreatic diseases and provide basic data and experimental methods for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. METHODS: There were 15 patients in the present study, among whom 10 had pancreatic cancer and 5, chronic pancreatitis. In all patients, pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis was located on the head of the pancreas. Pathology data of all patients was confirmed by biopsy and surgery. Among the 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 3 people had a medical history of long-term alcohol consumption. Of 5 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 men suffered from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic juice samples were obtained from patients by endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopyn was performed on an 11.7-T scanner (Bruker DRX-500) using Call-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. The parameters were as follows: spectral width, 15 KHz; time domain, 64 K; number of scans, 512; and acquisition time, 2.128 s. RESULTS: The main component of pancreatic juice included leucine, iso-leucine, valine, lactate, alanine, acetate, aspartate, lysine, glycine, threonine, tyrosine, histidine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine. On performing 1D 1H and 2D total correlation spectroscopy, we found a triplet peak at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm, which only appeared in the spectra of pancreatic juice obtained from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. This triplet peak was considered the resonance of the methyl of ethoxy group, which may be associated with the metabolism of alcohol in the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The triplet peak, at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm is likely to be the characteristic metabolite of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

Wang, Jian; Ma, Chao; Liao, Zhuan; Tian, Bing; Lu, Jian-Ping

2011-01-01

335

Evidence for the efficacy of Iniparib, a PARP-1 inhibitor, in BRCA2-associated pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive, frequently fatal malignancy that strikes 37,000 patients annually in the U.S.A. It is poorly responsive to standard chemotherapies such as gemcitabine. Approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer occurs in the setting of a BRCA2 mutation. Breast and ovarian carcinomas that harbor BRCA2 mutations are susceptible to the effects of an emerging class of targeted agents, namely, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This report describes the case of a patient with a germline BRCA2 mutation and an associated pancreatic cancer treated with iniparib (BSI-201), a PARP inhibitor, who demonstrated a complete pathologic response to this agent. This case highlights the potential benefit for PARP inhibition in BRCA2-related pancreatic cancer. PMID:21508395

Fogelman, David R; Wolff, Robert A; Kopetz, Scott; Javle, Milind; Bradley, Charles; Mok, Isabel; Cabanillas, Fernando; Abbruzzese, James L

2011-04-01

336

[Chronic pancreatitis and primary hyperparathyroidism].  

PubMed

The frequency of acute or chronic pancreatitis in primary hyperparathyroidism has decreased from the former 5-10% to 1-2% thanks to earlier diagnosis and operative treatment. Chronic pancreatitis, which occurs only in prolonged primary hyperparathyroidism, should therefore virtually disappear. We investigated this topic in a prospective long term study of chronic pancreatitis (1963-1992). Over the last three decades 336 patients with chronic pancreatitis have been studied at regular intervals. 245 suffered from alcohol-induced (84% with calcifications) and 91 from non-alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis (77% with calcifications). The average period of observation in the group with non-alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis was 10.6 years. Primary hyperparathyroidism was found in 6 patients (4 male, 2 female), i.e. 6.6% of non-alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis (100% with calcifications). They were evenly distributed over the 30 years' study period. 3 patients had acute attacks of pancreatitis prior to the diagnosis of chronic calcific pancreatitis (2 months, 3 + 8 years). In 3 patients with primary painless chronic calcific pancreatitis the condition was diagnosed twice incidentally and once because of diabetes mellitus. Chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed 3 times before primary hyperparathyroidism (8.3 +/- 2.1 years), once simultaneously and twice afterwards (2 + 14 years). In three patients chronic pancreatitis was initially misinterpreted as alcohol-induced. Severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was present in 4 of 5 patients (no data in one), and diabetes mellitus in 3 of 6 patients. At the time of diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, mean serum calcium was 3.08 +/- 0.43 mmol/l.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8073234

Bauer, S; Ammann, R

1994-07-30

337

Exocrine pancreatic enzyme and calcium secretion in health and pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Calcium, enzyme, and total protein secretion were measured in secretin stimulated pancreatic juice in health, "early" chronic pancreatitis, and in chronic calcific pancreatitis. Increased concentrations of trypsin, total protein, and calcium, and increased outputs of calcium and protein were shown to be present in the "early" stages of the disease, indicating that an environment conducive to the formation of protein plugs and possibly later calcification already exists.

Clain, J E; Barbezat, G O; Marks, I N

1981-01-01

338

Early pancreatic panniculitis associated with HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy.  

PubMed

Pancreatic panniculitis represents a rare cutaneous disorder most commonly associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic carcinoma. We describe a case of a 17-year-old woman who presented with a 2-day history of erythematous patches involving her bilateral knees and tender, scattered red-brown nodules involving her bilateral anterior shins. She was seen during a hospitalization for emergent cesarean section and her hospital course was complicated by HELLP syndrome (defined by the presence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count), acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis. The characteristic histopathologic findings, including ghost cells, fat necrosis and granular basophilic material with dystrophic calcification, appear in later lesions. In early lesions, as was shown in this case, a neutrophilic subcutaneous infiltrate raises a differential diagnosis including infection, subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome or atypical erythema nodosum. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of pancreatic panniculitis in association with HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Early recognition is critical, as skin lesions may precede the development of pancreatitis. Often, as in our case, the effects of pancreatitis may be life threatening. PMID:21752052

Kirkland, Eugene B; Sachdev, Reena; Kim, Jinah; Peng, David

2011-07-14

339

Pancreatic islet autotransplantation with total pancreatectomy for chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Achieving pain relief and improving the quality of life are the main targets of treatment for patients with chronic pancreatitis. The use of total pancreatectomy to treat chronic pancreatitis is a radical and in some ways ideal strategy. However, total pancreatectomy is associated with severe diabetic control problems. Total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation can relieve severe pain and prevent the development of postsurgical diabetes. With islet autotransplantation, patients with chronic pancreatitis receive their own islet cells and therefore do not require immunosuppressive therapy. In the future, total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation may be considered a treatment option for chronic pancreatitis patients. PMID:23073847

Kuroki, Tamotsu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kitasato, Amane; Eguchi, Susumu

2012-10-17

340

Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6?months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Goncalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

2012-01-01

341

Staging of carcinoma of the pancreas and ampulla of Vater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Between 1984 and 1987, 472 Norwegian patients with histologically or cytologically verified carcinoma of the pancreas (N=442) and ampulla of Vater (N=30) were accrued and TNM staged according to UICC. The influence of the T, N, and M categories on long-term survival was\\u000a evaluated. The T1a and T1b tumors of stage I pancreatic carcinoma had a comparable survival (p=0.68–0.95). A

Kåre E. Bakkevold; Brit Kambestad

1995-01-01

342

New Developments in Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presents in an advanced stage and has a dismal prognosis. Extensive recent research efforts have\\u000a provided us with greater insight into the etiology of pancreatic cancer and have also improved our means of prognostication.\\u000a Molecular analysis demonstrated that specific pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis are perhaps more valuable to\\u000a study than single genetic aberrations. Previous risk factors, including

Julia B. Greer; Randall E. Brand

2011-01-01

343

Exocrine Pancreatic Function in Dyspepsia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of pancreatic diseases as the cause for dyspepsia differs in clinical materials between 0 and 25–30%. In parallel, the incidence rate of chronic pancreatitis varies between 0.7 and 10 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The correct figures are unsettled. The main reason for the great variability in figures for frequency of chronic pancreatitis is probably the different clinical

H. Worning

1987-01-01

344

Molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Currently there is no early diagnostic\\u000a test and no effective treatment options for this deadly disease. Prevention of pancreatic cancer is difficult because little\\u000a is known about its etiology. The main modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer include cigarette smoking and dietary\\u000a factors. Information from molecular

Donghui Li; Li Jiao

2003-01-01

345

Identification of a Novel Kindred with Familial Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Hereditary pancreatic cancer comprises about 10% of pancreatic cancer cases. Multiple causative mutations have been identified. Here we describe a pancreatitis\\/pancreatic cancer (P\\/PC) family, which demonstrates pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer resulting from an uncharacterized mutation. Methods: Family members completed evaluations to determine signs of mutation status. Select patients were screened for mutations associated with hereditary pancreatic diseases. Results: In

Jennifer LaFemina; Penelope A. Roberts; Yin P. Hung; James F. Gusella; Dushyant Sahani; Carlos Fernández-del Castillo; Andrew L. Warshaw; Sarah P. Thayer

2009-01-01

346

Update on Endoscopic Management of Main Pancreatic Duct Stones in Chronic Calcific Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis and often contribute to additional pain and pancreatitis. Abdominal pain, one of the major symptoms of chronic pancreatitis, is believed to be caused in part by obstruction of the pancreatic duct system (by stones or strictures) resulting in increasing intraductal pressure and parenchymal ischemia. Pancreatic stones can be managed by surgery, endoscopy, or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In this review, updated management of pancreatic duct stones is discussed.

Choi, Eun Kwang

2012-01-01

347

The CXCR5 Chemokine Receptor Is Expressed by Carcinoma Cells and Promotes Growth of Colon Carcinoma in the Liver  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chemokine receptor CXCR5 is expressed by B cells and certain T cells and controls their migration into and within lymph nodes. Its ligand BCA-1\\/CXCL13 is present in lymph nodes and spleen and also in the liver. Surprisingly, we detected CXCR5 in several mouse and human carcinoma cell lines. CXCR5 was particularly prominent in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and was

Joost Meijer; Ingrid S. Zeelenberg; Bence Sipos; E. Roos

2006-01-01

348

Early management of acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis. PMID:24160930

Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

2013-09-06

349

Update on experimental acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a disease still not fully understood. Early pathophysiologic event escape clinical observation because patients typically present only some time after the acute onset of the disease. Also, many ethiologic factors can lead to acute pancreatitis and the clinical course can range from mild, self-limiting to severe and life- threatening. Therefore, experimental models are necessary for any research into early acute pancreatitis. In accordance with the varying clinical picture of acute pancreatitis, many different model exist. In this article, we describe the most commonly used models and show their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23207612

Kahl, S; Mayer, J M

2012-12-01

350

Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreatic cancer were identified. In three patients brain metastases were the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. All other patients developed brain metastases during their clinical course. In most cases, the disease progressed rapidly and the patients died within weeks or months. However, two patients showed long-term survival. Of note, both patients received resection of the pancreatic cancer as well as curative resection of the metachronous brain metastases. Brain metastases in pancreatic cancer are a rare condition and usually predict a very poor prognosis. However, there is evidence that resection of brain metastases of pancreatic cancer can be immensely beneficial to patient’s survival, even with the chance for cure. Therefore, a surgical approach in metastatic pancreatic cancer should be considered in selective cases.

Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

2013-01-01

351

Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead.

Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

2010-01-01

352

Anaplastic Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is often rapidly growing and therefore large when diagnosed. The frequently elderly patient,\\u000a therefore, has different symptoms [6,7]. At the time of presentation anaplastic carcinoma is often infiltrating and inoperable.\\u000a The tumors are often derived from papillary or follicular carcinomas, and may contain both papillary and anaplastic carcinoma\\u000a cells [6]. Therefore, it may be impossible to distinguish

Arne Heilo; Eva Sigstad; Krystyna Grøholt

353

Population-Based Stomach Cancer Registry  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Primary Stomach Carcinoma:; Adenocarcinoma; Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Tubular Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Signet-ring Cell Carcinoma; Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Small Cell Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Other (Specify); Or Primary:; Esophagogastric Junction Carcinoma; Neuroendocrine Tumors; GiST; LNH

2012-09-12

354

Thymic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Among 54 mediastinal tumours we examined in the past 20 years, there were 5 cases of primary thymic carcinomas, each with widespread metastases. Histological features in three cases were consistent with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma. One case showed an epidermoid pattern with keratotic pearls resembling Hassall bodies. One undifferentiated carcinoma developed from a cortical thymoma. Epstein-Barr virus could not be detected

C.-A. Hartmann; Chr Roth; C. Minck; G. Niedobitek

1990-01-01

355

Complications After Pancreatic Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pancreatic cancer is the fourth-leading cause of death from malignant disease; each year about 33,000 individuals in the United\\u000a States are diagnosed with this condition and more than 60,000 in Europe [1]. It is a devastating disease with a very poor prognosis and has a death rate roughly equal to its incidence rate. Contributing\\u000a to the high death rate is

F. Francesco Mola; Giuseppe Mascetta; Antonio Bonis; Pierluigi Sebastiano

356

Management of pancreatic abscesses.  

PubMed Central

The records of twenty-one patients treated for pancreatic abscesses were reviewed. Pancreatitis developed following alcohol ingestion, operative procedures, biliary tract disease, ulcers, and undetermined causes. The clinical findings included abdominal pain in 19 patients (90%); fever in 18 (86%); tenderness in 18 (86%); and leukocytosis in 18 (86%). Ultrasonographic examination aided the diagnosis in seven of 11 patients. Computerized tomography was useful in diagnosing eight of ten cases. There were twenty-nine hospital admissions, with a mean length of hospitalization of 76 days per patient. The operative findings varied with extent and duration of underlying pancreatitis. The surgical approach depended on clinical presentation and prior localization of the abscess. Eleven additional operations were performed. Complications included respiratory failure (three patients); fistula formation (five patients); hemorrhage (two patients); renal failure (one patient); and splenic vein thrombosis (one patient). Thirteen patients were treated with hyperalimentation and nine patients had gastrostomy and jejunostomy placed for decompression and feeding. Of 15 patients in whom microbial studies were reviewed, nine patients had polymicrobial infections. Three patients had Candida albicans. There was one death. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6.

Saxon, A; Reynolds, J T; Doolas, A

1981-01-01

357

Proteomic analysis of pancreatic juice for the identification of biomarkers of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Protein profiles of endoscopically collected pancreatic juice from normal, chronic pancreatitis patients and pancreatic cancer\\u000a patients were compared to identify diagnostic biomarkers of pancreatic cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Secretin was injected intravenously and pancreatic juice was collected via selective cannulation of the pancreatic duct during\\u000a endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Pancreatic juices consisting of three pooled samples for normal control, chronic\\u000a pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer

Jeong Youp Park; Sun-A Kim; Joo Won Chung; Seungmin Bang; Seung Woo Park; Young-Ki Paik; Si Young Song

2011-01-01

358

Metastases of esophageal carcinoma to skeletal muscle: single center experience.  

PubMed

Metastases of esophageal carcinoma to the skeletal muscle are rare, but the incidence may be increasing because of better diagnosis resulting from widespread use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). A cohort of 205 patients with esophageal carcinoma treated at our center who had PET/CT between 2006 and 2010 was retrospectively evaluated for the presence of skeletal muscle metastases. Four patients had skeletal muscle metastases of esophageal carcinoma, including two patients with squamous cell carcinoma. In another patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and synchronous skeletal muscle metastases, muscle metastases were subsequently shown to be related to second primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In all cases, skeletal muscle metastases were the first manifestation of systemic disease. In three patients palliation was obtained with the combination of external beam radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy or surgical resection. Skeletal muscle metastases are a rare complication of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:23002370

Cincibuch, Jan; Myslive?ek, Miroslav; Melichar, Bohuslav; Neoral, Cestmír; Metelková, Iva; Zezulová, Michaela; Procházková-Študentová, Hana; Flodr, Patrik; Zlevorová, Miloslava; Aujeský, René; Cwiertka, Karel

2012-09-21

359

Distant Metastasis Occurs Late during the Genetic Evolution of Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Summary Metastasis, the dissemination and growth of neoplastic cells in an organ distinct from that in which they originated 12, is the most common cause of death in cancer patients. This is particularly true for pancreatic cancers, where most patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease and few show a sustained response to chemo- or radiation therapy 3. Whether the dismal prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer compared to patients with other types of cancer is a result of late diagnosis or early dissemination of disease to distant organs is not known. Here we rely on data generated by sequencing the genomes of seven pancreatic cancer metastases to evaluate the clonal relationships among primary and metastatic cancers. We find that clonal populations that give rise to distant metastases are represented within the primary carcinoma, but these clones are genetically evolved from the original parental, non-metastatic clone. Thus, genetic heterogeneity of metastases reflects that within the primary carcinoma. A quantitative analysis of the timing of the genetic evolution of pancreatic cancer was performed, indicating at least a decade between the occurrence of the initiating mutation and the birth of the parental, non-metastatic founder cell. At least five more years are required for the acquisition of metastatic ability and patients die an average of two years thereafter. These data provide novel insights into the genetic features underlying pancreatic cancer progression and define a broad time window of opportunity for early detection to prevent deaths from metastatic disease.

Yachida, Shinichi; Jones, Sian; Bozic, Ivana; Antal, Tibor; Leary, Rebecca; Fu, Baojin; Kamiyama, Mihoko; Hruban, Ralph H.; Eshleman, James R.; Nowak, Martin A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.

2011-01-01

360

Deleted in liver cancer-1 inhibits cell growth and tumorigenicity in human pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC-1) has been isolated from primary hepatocellular carcinoma and demonstrated to be a potential tumor suppressor gene. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of the DLC-1 gene on pancreatic cancer cell growth and evaluate the feasibility of using the DLC-1 gene in gene therapy for pancreatic cancer. A recombinant plasmid (pcDNA3.1/DLC-1) was transfected into PANC-1 cells by liposomes and then the pre-established human PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cells were injected into athymic nude mice via the tail vein. The results showed that the overexpression of DLC-1 in the PANC-1 cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro, while the act of introducing DLC-1 reduced tumorigenicity in the nude mice. The findings suggest that DLC-1 may have an effect on the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. The DLC-1 gene may be a promising target in gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.

ZHENG, ZHENJIANG; TAN, CHUNLU; XIANG, GUANGMING; MAI, GANG; LIU, XUBAO

2013-01-01

361

Variants of bcl-2 specific siRNA for silencing antiapoptotic bcl-2 in pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Background and aims: Pancreatic cancer remains a devastating diagnosis with only limited therapeutic options. Specific inhibition of expression of target genes has become possible using small interfering (si) RNAs. We therefore investigated how far siRNA specific for bcl-2 may serve as a therapeutic option for pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. Methods: siRNAs targeting two different regions in the bcl-2 gene were transfected to YAP C and DAN G pancreatic carcinoma cells and human foreskin fibroblasts. Permutations were generated by changing 3? and 5? overhangs and varying the length of the paired RNA duplex. Transfection efficacy was determined using FITC labelled siRNAs and fluorescence microscopy. Cell survival and apoptosis were quantified at 24–120 hours. Pancreatic cancer xenografts in male nude mice were treated intraperitoneally with siRNAs daily for 24 days. siRNA pharmacokinetics in vivo were assessed using radioactively labelled siRNAs. Total protein and RNA were extracted for western Blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results and conclusions: bcl-2 specific siRNAs specifically inhibited expression of the target gene in vitro and in vivo. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects were observed in tumour cells but not in fibroblasts or non-malignant tissues. siRNA permutations and diverse overhangs influenced gene silencing efficacy. siRNA was quickly distributed to all organs and excreted via the kidney and liver. bcl-2 specific siRNA is a promising adjunctive treatment for pancreatic carcinoma.

Ocker, M; Neureiter, D; Lueders, M; Zopf, S; Ganslmayer, M; Hahn, E G; Herold, C; Schuppan, D

2005-01-01

362

19q13 Amplification is Associated with High Grade and Stage in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with an extremely poor prognosis and thus there is a great need for better diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The 19q13 chromosomal locus is amplified in several cancer types, including pancreatic cancer, but the possible clinical significance of this aberration remains unclear. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on tissue microarrays (TMA) containing 357 primary pancreatic tumors, 151 metastases, and 24 local recurrences as well as 120 cancer cell lines from various tissues to establish the frequency of the 19q13 amplification and to find potential correlations to clinical parameters including patient survival. Copy number increases were found in 12.2% of the primary pancreatic tumors and 9.3% of the cell lines, including those derived from bladder, colorectal, ovarian, and thyroid carcinomas. Copy number changes were linked to high grade (P = 0.044) and stage (P = 0.025) tumors and the average survival time of patients with 19q13 amplification was shorter than of those without this aberration. Our findings revealed recurrent 19q13 amplification in pancreatic cancer and involvement of the same locus as in bladder, colorectal, ovarian, and thyroid carcinomas. More importantly, the 19q13 amplifications were associated with poor tumor phenotype and showed a trend towards shorter survival.

Kuuselo, Riina; Simon, Ronald; Karhu, Ritva; Tennstedt, Pierre; Marx, Andreas H.; Izbicki, Jakob R.; Yekebas, Emre; Sauter, Guido; Kallioniemi, Anne

2010-01-01

363

Distant metastasis occurs late during the genetic evolution of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Metastasis, the dissemination and growth of neoplastic cells in an organ distinct from that in which they originated, is the most common cause of death in cancer patients. This is particularly true for pancreatic cancers, where most patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease and few show a sustained response to chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Whether the dismal prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer compared to patients with other types of cancer is a result of late diagnosis or early dissemination of disease to distant organs is not known. Here we rely on data generated by sequencing the genomes of seven pancreatic cancer metastases to evaluate the clonal relationships among primary and metastatic cancers. We find that clonal populations that give rise to distant metastases are represented within the primary carcinoma, but these clones are genetically evolved from the original parental, non-metastatic clone. Thus, genetic heterogeneity of metastases reflects that within the primary carcinoma. A quantitative analysis of the timing of the genetic evolution of pancreatic cancer was performed, indicating at least a decade between the occurrence of the initiating mutation and the birth of the parental, non-metastatic founder cell. At least five more years are required for the acquisition of metastatic ability and patients die an average of two years thereafter. These data provide novel insights into the genetic features underlying pancreatic cancer progression and define a broad time window of opportunity for early detection to prevent deaths from metastatic disease. PMID:20981102

Yachida, Shinichi; Jones, Siân; Bozic, Ivana; Antal, Tibor; Leary, Rebecca; Fu, Baojin; Kamiyama, Mihoko; Hruban, Ralph H; Eshleman, James R; Nowak, Martin A; Velculescu, Victor E; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A

2010-10-28

364

Carcinoma of the head and neck in the HPV era.  

PubMed

This review encompasses the most salient advances in the understanding of the biopathology of head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma (HNSCC) accomplished over the last decade, emphasizing the significant role played by high-risk HPV genotypes. This has led to a new and meaningful subdivision of conventional HNSCC in two main prognostic and therapeutic groups: 1) keratinizing HNSCC, mainly occurring in elderly men that are heavy smokers and drinkers, TP53 mutated and/or p53-positive, HPV16-negative, being associated with an aggressive course; and 2) non-keratinizing HNSCC, occurring in younger men between 40 and 60 years that are non-smokers and non-drinkers, HPV16- positive, p16-positive, and p53- negative, being associated with improved prognosis. The main risk factors are number of sexual partners, oral-genital sex, oral-anal sex, and marijuana use. Among the unusual variants of HNSCC, papillary and lymphoepithelial-like are mostly related to HPV-16 infection, whereas the spindle and acantholytic types are mainly associated with tobacco and alcohol. The basaloid, adenosquamous, and verrucous variants may be related to both types of risk factors. Spindle cell carcinoma has been shown to be a prototype of epithelial mesenchymal transition. The hallmark of the novel and aggressive entity "undifferentiated midline carcinoma" is the rearrangement of the Nuclear Protein in Testis (NUT) gene at t[15; 19]. In the HPV era we are proposing the Ljubljana Classification (LC) as the recommended system for grading precursor lesions in heavy cigarette smokers and alcohol drinkers and the dysplasia and SIN systems for grading intraepithelial precursor lesions related to the increasingly detected epidemic of HNSCC associated with high-risk HPV infections. PMID:22131117

Cardesa, Antonio; Nadal, Alfons

2011-09-01

365

Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

1998-01-01

366

Anatomy-Specific Pancreatic Stump Management to Reduce the Risk of Pancreatic Fistula After Pancreatic Head Resection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The anatomical status of the pancreatic remnant after a pancreatic head resection varies greatly among patients. The aim of\\u000a the present study was to improve management of the pancreatic remnant for reducing pancreatic fistula after pancreatic head\\u000a resection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Ninety-five consecutive patients who underwent an end-to-side, duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy after pancreatic head\\u000a resection were included in the study. To approximate the pancreatic

Yoshitsugu Tajima; Tamotsu Kuroki; Noritsugu Tsuneoka; Tomohiko Adachi; Taiichiro Kosaka; Tatsuya Okamoto; Mitsuhisa Takatsuki; Susumu Eguchi; Takashi Kanematsu

2009-01-01

367

Telomerase activity in pure pancreatic juice for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer may be complementary to K-ras mutation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The usefulness of K-ras mutation in pancreatic juice for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is questionable. Telomerase is positive in pancreatic cancer but rarely in benign pancreatic diseases. We conducted this study to determine the usefulness of K-ras mutation and telomerase activity in pancreatic juice for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Methods: Pancreatic juice collected during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

Seung-Jae Myung; Myung-Hwan Kim; Yeon-Suk Kim; Hong-Ja Kim; Eun-Taek Park; Kyo-Sang Yoo; Byeung-Cheol Lim; Dong Wan Seo; Sung Koo Lee; Young Il Min; Ji Yeon Kim

2000-01-01

368

[Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].  

PubMed

The most important advances in chronic pancreatitis concern its etiopathogenesis, nutritional aspects, and improvements in diagnostic techniques and some treatment options. In the etiopathogenesis of this disease, the importance of smoking and its association with alcohol have been confirmed. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) secondary to chronic pancreatitis is associated with bone metabolism alterations (osteopenia and osteoporosis), a reduction in liposoluble vitamins and alterations in essential amino acid levels. Endoscopic ultrasound has been confirmed as the most highly developed technique for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, especially due to new image optimization technologies. Breath tests for the diagnosis of EPI continue to be developed (optimization of the C-13 mixed triglyceride test and the development of a new test based on C-13-labelled bicarbonate determination). Modest results in pain treatment have been achieved with the use of antioxidants, pancreatic enzymes and/or intravenous secretin. The association of chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic cancer requires strict follow-up, especially in patients with inflammatory masses in the context of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:23018013

Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique; Iglesias-García, Julio

2012-09-01

369

Texture patterns in pancreatic sonograms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a retrospective study of 163 pancreatic sonograms, five internal echo patterns were correlated with the ultimate clinical diagnoses. Attention to the internal echo patterns of the pancreas can provide useful information in diagnosing pancreatic disease, including identification of abnormalities in glands of normal size and contour.

Axel Kunzmann; James D. Bowie; David Rochester

1979-01-01

370

Practical Guidelines for Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: The following is a summary of the official guidelines of the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas regarding the medical, endoscopic and surgical management of acute pancreatitis. Statements: Clinical features together with elevation of the plasma concentrations of pancreatic enzymes are the cornerstones of diagnosis (recommendation A). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) provides good evidence for the presence

R. Pezzilli; A. Zerbi; V. Di Carlo; C. Bassi; G. F. Delle Fave

2010-01-01

371

Pancreatic anastomotic failure after pancreaticoduodenectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic anastomotic failure has historically been regarded as one of the most feared complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy.Methods: We reviewed our recent experience (59 cases), March 1994 to December 1998, with pancreaticoduodenectomy and compared preoperative and intraoperative characteristics as well as outcomes in those patients who experienced (n = 10) versus those who did not experience a postoperative pancreatic leak (n

Stephen R Grobmyer; David E Rivadeneira; Clayton A Goodman; Peter Mackrell; Michael D Lieberman; John M Daly

2000-01-01

372

Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer.

Andren-Sandberg, Ake

2011-01-01

373

Prognostic factors in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prognostic factor scoring systems provide one method of predicting severity of acute pancreatitis. This paper reports the prospective assessment of a system using nine factors available within 48 hours of admission. This assessment does not include patient data used to compile the system. Of 405 episodes of acute pancreatitis occurring in a seven year period, 72% had severity correctly predicted

S L Blamey; C W Imrie; J ONeill; W H Gilmour; D C Carter

1984-01-01

374

Molecular Advances in Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our understanding of the molecular genetics of pancreatic cancer has advanced spectacularly over the last 5 years so that this tumour type is now one of the best characterised of all malignancies. A small proportion of cases results from inherited predisposition due to germline transmission of a mutated CDKN2 or BRCA2 gene, while patients with familial pancreatitis due to a

Nicholas R. Lemoine

1997-01-01

375

Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, which makes it difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points towards an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and also early detection of this disease. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk

Shivendra V. Singh; Randall E. Brand; Silvia D. Stan

2010-01-01

376

Walled-off pancreatic necrosis  

PubMed Central

Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN), formerly known as pancreatic abscess is a late complication of acute pancreatitis. It can be lethal, even though it is rare. This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding knowledge about WOPN, by review of current data from references identified in Medline and PubMed, to September 2009, using key words, such as WOPN, infected pseudocyst, severe pancreatitis, pancreatic abscess, acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), pancreas, inflammation and alcoholism. WOPN comprises a later and local complication of ANP, occurring more than 4 wk after the initial attack, usually following development of pseudocysts and other pancreatic fluid collections. The mortality rate associated with WOPN is generally less than that of infected pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention had been the mainstay of treatment for infected peripancreatic fluid collection and abscesses for decades. Increasingly, percutaneous catheter drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography have been used, and encouraging results have recently been reported in the medical literature, rendering these techniques invaluable in the treatment of WOPN. Applying the recommended therapeutic strategy, which comprises early treatment with antibiotics combined with restricted surgical intervention, fewer patients with ANP undergo surgery and interventions are ideally performed later in the course of the disease, when necrosis has become well demarcated.

Stamatakos, Michael; Stefanaki, Charikleia; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos; Stergiopoulos, Spyros; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Safioleas, Michael

2010-01-01

377

Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and\\/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop

Hans G Beger; Bettina M Rau

378

Pharmacological management of pain in chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain is the major presenting symptom of chronic pancreatitis. Patients with chronic pancreatitis experience substantial impairments in health-related quality of life. Pain may be considered as the most important factor affecting the quality of life. The pathogenesis of pancreatic pain is poorly understood. The cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis is probably multifactorial. This article discusses the various hypotheses that

A. A. J. van Esch; O. H. G. Wilder-Smith; J. B. M. J. Jansen; H. van Goor; J. P. H. Drenth

2006-01-01

379

Chronic Pancreatitis in Late Childhood and Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis is unusual in pediatric patients, and chronic pancreatitis is even less common. Between 1983 and 1988, we diagnosed 24 patients in late childhood and adolescence with chronic pancreatitis. Our review revealed that chronic pancreatitis presents as recurrent abdominal pain in late childhood and adolescence. Individual laboratory and radiological investigations may be normal during acute exacerbations of pain, but

Prasad Mathew; Robert Wyllie; Maureen Caulfield; Rita Steffen; Marsha Kay

1994-01-01

380

Alcohol Abuse, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alcohol abuse is a common cause of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. There is a wide spectrum of pancreatic manifestations in heavy drinkers from no apparent disease in most individuals to acute inflammatory and necrotizing pancreatitis in a minority of individuals with some progressing to chronic pancreatitis characterized by replacement of the gland by fibrosis and chronic inflammation. Both smoking

Stephen J. Pandol; Fred S. Gorelick; Andreas Gerloff; Aurelia Lugea

2010-01-01

381

Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

2012-12-01

382

Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM)

Robert Jaster

2004-01-01

383

Proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with 4% survival 5 years after diagnosis. Biomarkers are desperately needed to improve earlier, more curable cancer diagnosis and to develop new effective therapeutic targets. The development of quantitative proteomics technologies in recent years offers great promise for understanding the complex molecular events of tumorigenesis at the protein level, and has stimulated great interest in applying the technology for pancreatic cancer studies. Proteomic studies of pancreatic tissues, juice, serum/plasma, and cell lines have recently attempted to identify differentially expressed proteins in pancreatic cancer to dissect the abnormal signaling pathways underlying oncogenesis, and to detect new biomarkers. It can be expected that the continuing evolution of proteomics technology with better resolution and sensitivity will greatly enhance our capability in combating pancreatic cancer.

Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

2008-01-01

384

Acute pancreatitis following paracetamol overdose.  

PubMed

A 17-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting 3 h after she attempted to commit suicide by ingesting 30×500 mg paracetamol tablets. The woman was found to have a raised amylase level, and a CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, it is likely that the pancreatitis was induced by the paracetamol ingestion. A literature search reported 36 cases of pancreatitis following excessive doses of paracetamol, however this possible drug reaction is not widely recognised and not documented in the British National Formulary (BNF) list of possible adverse reactions from paracetamol. Being aware of the possibility that abdominal pain following paracetamol overdose may be a manifestation of pancreatitis can help the early detection and initiation of treatment for pancreatitis. PMID:22096469

Fernandes, Roland

2009-11-18

385

New developments in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presents in an advanced stage and has a dismal prognosis. Extensive recent research efforts have provided us with greater insight into the etiology of pancreatic cancer and have also improved our means of prognostication. Molecular analysis demonstrated that specific pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis are perhaps more valuable to study than single genetic aberrations. Previous risk factors, including family history, body mass index, and current cigarette smoking, were validated and novel risks, such as ABO blood group alleles, were identified. Similar to other illnesses, combinations of healthful habits, such as not smoking, adhering to a Mediterranean dietary pattern, and engaging in physical activity, may decrease pancreatic cancer risk. Finally, CA 19-9 levels, the presence of diabetes mellitus, and a six-gene signature provided critical information regarding survival that could help guide treatment of individuals diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:21258973

Greer, Julia B; Brand, Randall E

2011-04-01

386

Pancreatic hamartoma diagnosed after surgical resection  

PubMed Central

A pancreatic hamartoma is a rare benign lesion that may be mistaken for malignancy. A pancreatic hamartoma can present with vague, non-specific symptoms, which can be difficult to diagnose despite modern diagnostic tools. We report here a pancreatic hamartoma diagnosed after surgical resection. A 52-year-old female presented with postprandial abdominal discomfort. Abdominal computed tomography and pancreatic magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 2.2 × 2.5-cm cystic mass in the pancreatic head. The patient underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathological and immunohistochemical studies helped make the diagnosis of pancreatic hamartoma. Here, we report a case of pancreatic hamartoma and review the relevant medical literature.

Kim, Ho-Hyun; Hur, Young-Hoe; Koh, Yang-Seok; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Jin-Woong; Kim, Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk

2012-01-01

387

[Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

2008-04-02

388

Mouse models of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States, and potent therapeutic options are lacking. Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer, currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed. In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes. In the last few years, several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed. These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas, or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53, INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice. These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes, from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system. These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches, chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments. Here, we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments. PMID:22493542

Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

2012-03-28

389

ISL1 expression is not restricted to pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms, but is also commonly found in well and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms of extrapancreatic origin.  

PubMed

The human insulin gene enhancer-binding protein islet-1 (ISL1) is a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of the neuroendocrine pancreatic cells. Recent studies identified ISL1 as a marker for pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms. However, little is known about ISL1 expression in pancreatic poorly differentiated and in extrapancreatic well and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of ISL1 in 124 neuroendocrine neoplasms. Among pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, 12/13 with poor differentiation were negative, whereas 5/7 with good differentiation but a Ki67 >20% were positive. In extrapancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, strong positivity was found in Merkel cell carcinomas (25/25), pulmonary small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (21/23), medullary thyroid carcinomas (9/9), paragangliomas/pheochromocytomas (6/6), adrenal neuroblastomas (8/8) and head and neck neuroendocrine carcinomas (4/5), whereas no or only weak staining was recorded in pulmonary carcinoids (3/15), olfactory neuroblastomas (1/4) and basaloid head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (0/15). ISL1 stained the neuroendocrine carcinoma component of 5/8 composite carcinomas and also normal neuroendocrine cells in the thyroid, adrenal medulla, stomach and colorectum. Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms, regardless of their ISL1 expression, were usually TP53 positive. Our results show the almost ubiquitous expression of ISL1 in extrapancreatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms and neuroblastic malignancies and its common loss in pancreatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms. These findings modify the role of ISL1 as a marker for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms and suggest that ISL1 has a broader involvement in differentiation and growth of neuroendocrine neoplasms than has so far been assumed. PMID:23503646

Agaimy, Abbas; Erlenbach-Wünsch, Katharina; Konukiewitz, Björn; Schmitt, Anja M; Rieker, Ralf J; Vieth, Michael; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Hartmann, Arndt; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Perren, Aurel; Klöppel, Günter

2013-03-15

390

Pancreatic surgery, not pancreatitis, is the primary cause of diabetes after acute fulminant pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute fulminant pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To examine the outcome of conservative and surgical treatment of this disorder, 36 patients who survived an initial episode were restudied after a mean of six years. Fifty three per cent had developed diabetes mellitus, half of whom required insulin therapy. Pancreatic resection was associated with a 100% frequency of

J Eriksson; M Doepel; E Widén; L Halme; A Ekstrand; L Groop; K Höckerstedt

1992-01-01

391

Long-Term Survival in a Patient with Acinar Cell Carcinoma of Pancreas. A Case Report and Review of Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignancy that may have acinar and endocrine differentiation. Clinical practice guidelines exist for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, treatment protocols for acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas have not been standardized. Case report We describe a case of a 44-year- old woman presenting with low grade fever and mid-abdominal tenderness secondary

Monique Antoine; Marina Khitrik-Palchuk; Muhammad Wasif Saif

392

Serum elastase 1 in chronic pancreatic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Elastase 1 and immunoreactive trypsin were assessed by a RIA technique in the sera of 29 control subjects, 24 pancreatic cancer patients, 22 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 31 with extra-pancreatic diseases to ascertain and compare their usefulness in chronic pancreatic disease diagnosis. Increased levels of elastase 1 were detected in 60.9% of pancreatic cancer and in 61.1% of

G. Del Favero; C. Fabris; M. Plebani; A. Panucci; A. Piccoli; L. Perobelli; A. Burlina; R. Naccarato

1985-01-01

393

Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

MedlinePLUS

... Diseases and treatments Q - T Squamous cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma : This man's skin has been ... treatment, SCC is highly curable. Learn more about squamous cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma: Signs and symptoms Squamous cell ...

394

Recurrent stage I endometrial carcinoma: results of treatment and prognostic factors.  

PubMed

Recurrences of clinical Stage I endometrial carcinoma after initial treatment are rare. They are nonetheless a serious complication, uniformly associated with poor survival outcome. Between 1969-1980, 20 patients with clinical Stage I endometrial carcinoma were treated for recurrent tumor at the time of first relapse. Nonpapillary adenocarcinoma represented 70% of the primary tumors (pure adenocarcinoma, 50%; adenosquamous, 15%, clear cell, 5%) and papillary adenocarcinoma, 30%. The most common presenting symptom was vaginal bleeding, occurring in 95% of patients. The median time to recurrence after completion of primary treatment was 9.5 mo: Adenocarcinoma relapsed at a median time of 33 mo, adenosquamous, 6 mo and papillary adenocarcinoma, 4 mo. The vagina was the site of relapse in 65% of patients, the abdomen in 20%, the pelvis in 10% and the lung in 5%. Ninety-five percent of recurrences were treated with curative intent. Complications were seen in three patients, small bowel obstruction (2 pts) and vaginal vault necrosis (1 pt); however, these patients responded effectively to conservative treatment. Minimum follow-up of 4 years was available in 18 pts (90%). Actuarial 4 yr overall and NED survival was 50%, respectively, with a median survival of 39 mo to date. There have been no deaths from further recurrence of endometrial cancer beyond 39 mo. Significant prognostic factors for 4 year survival were 1) recurrence site--vagina, 82% (9/11 pts) vs extravagina, 0% (0/7 pts; median survival: 8 mo) [p = .0001]; and 2) histologic cell type--non-papillary carcinoma, 75% (9/12 pts) vs papillary adenocarcinoma, 0% (0/6 pts; median survival: 8 mo) [p = .002]. Our review suggests that: (1) Histology and site of relapse are important prognosticators of treatment outcome; (2) Long term survival may be achieved in vaginal recurrences with aggressive local treatment; and (3) There may be a role for multimodality ovarian type treatment in overall management of recurrent papillary adenocarcinoma, a cell type that appears to exhibit a tendency towards extrapelvic spread refractory to definitive loco-regional treatment. PMID:3997592

Mandell, L R; Nori, D; Hilaris, B

1985-06-01

395

Surgical Treatment of Necrotizing Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Surgical treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis is still a controversial subject, ranging from sole conservative to an aggressive approach. This article gives an overview of the literature with regard to indications for surgery, timing and techniques of operative treatment concepts in severe acute pancreatitis with special attention to the recommended necrosectomy and closed continuous lavage of the involved retroperitoneum. Taking into account recent findings from microbiological data we have developed a new algorithm in patients with acute pancreatitis. All patients with proven acute necrotizing pancreatitis receive an antibiotic therapy for 2 weeks beside the intensive care measures. So far only one third (33 percent) had infected pancreatic necroses in the 3rd week of the onset of the disease and were managed surgically. The delay resulted in optimal surgical conditions for necrosectomy and a mortality rate of 9 percent. This new concept and therapeutic approach with the early suitable antibiotic therapy in patients with proven necrotizing pancreatitis is recommended to (1) decrease the infection rate and (2) delay surgical intervention to the 3rd week of the disease with optimal surgical conditions. It seems that only patients with proven infected pancreatic necroses are candidates for surgical intervention.

Uhl, W.; Buchler, M.W.

1997-01-01

396

Carbohydrate in pancreatic ribonucleases.  

PubMed

A survey of the presence and compositions of carbohydrate chains attached to pancreatic ribonucleases is given. Carbohydrate chains may occur at asparagine residues in Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences at four exposed sites of the molecule (positions 21, 34, 62 and 76). These sites form part of highly variant sequences in pancreatic ribonucleases with the consequence that the enzymes from very closely related species may differ in the presence or absence of carbohydrate. In a number of ribonucleases Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences occur which carry carbohydrate in only a part of the molecules. The occurrence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences entirely without any carbohydrate also has been demonstrated. Compositions of the carbohydrate moieties of ribonucleases from cow, sheep, pig, whales, giraffe, okapi, moose, horse, coypu, chinchilla, and guinea-pig are presented. Striking differences in complexity have been found, both between chains attached to the same site in different species (cow and giraffe), between chains attached to different sites of the same enzyme in one-species (pig) and even between chains attached to the same site in a single species (chinchilla). PMID:1261555

Beintema, J J; Gaastra, W; Scheffer, A J; Welling, G W

1976-04-01

397

What's New in Pancreatic Cancer Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Additional resources for pancreatic cancer What`s new in pancreatic cancer research and treatment? Research into ... area of research in many types of cancer. New treatments for pancreatic neuroendocrine cancers Many pancreatic neuroendocrine ...

398

Quality metrics in pancreatic surgery.  

PubMed

As the practice of pancreatic surgery evolves to encompass a wider array of clinical indications, incorporate increasingly complex technologies, and provide care to an aging population with many comorbid conditions, systematic assessment of quality and outcomes in an effort to improve the quality of care is imperative. This article discusses the volume-outcomes relationship that exists in pancreatic surgery, trends in centralization of practice within the field, common outcomes measures, and the complexity of assessing quality metrics. It also highlights surgical outcomes from several high-volume institutions and recent developments in quality metrics within pancreatic surgery. PMID:23632153

Mohammed, Somala; Fisher, William E

2013-04-11

399

Acute haemorrhage associated with pancreatic pseudocyst and chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The present study reports 18 patients operated on for chronic pancreatitis complicated by bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneal cavity or the retroperitoneal space. Damage to the splenic artery by a pancreatic pseudocyst was the most common reason for the bleeding (10 patients, 56%) and the most common site was the duodenum (10 patients, 56%). Eleven patients were treated by transcystic multiple suture ligations combined with external drainage of the pseudocyst, and seven by pancreatic resection or total pancreatectomy. Hospital mortality was 33% (6 patients); two patients had undergone transcystic suture ligation, and four pancreatic resection. Five patients needed a reoperation because of further bleeding, four of them having been treated initially by transcystic suture ligation. Our results suggest that haemostasis by suture ligation is a method to be recommended if the patient's condition has been exacerbated by severe haemorrhage. PMID:6334475

Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Kivilaakso, E; Lempinen, M

1984-01-01

400

[Pancreatic cancer or autoimmune pancreatitis: endosonography as a diagnostic reviser].  

PubMed

Conventional radiologic imaging (abdominal ultrasound, computer tomography) used in the differential diagnosis of post-hepatic jaundice can frequently provide inaccurate diagnosis. Inflammatory lesions may mimic neoplastic processes and malignancy may be accompanied by perifocal inflammation resulting in histological misdiagnosis. Furthermore, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis are associated with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer. Radial endosonography has become a markedly important method in the imaging of the pancreas. It has a crucial role in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. The authors present three cases where the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer determined by conventional imaging techniques (abdominal ultrasound, computer tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) was excluded or confirmed by the radial endosonography. The authors conclude that radial endosonography is an essential complementary method among imaging techniques of the pancreas and in tumor staging. Application of that may prevent unnecessary surgeries, which is obviously useful for patients and cost effective for health care providers. PMID:23291204

Szepes, Zoltán; Dobra, Mariann; Góg, Csaba; Zábrák, Edit; Makula, Éva; Tiszlavicz, László; Kiss, Tamás; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Czakó, László; Terzin, Viktória; Wittmann, Tibor

2013-01-13

401

Powerful Inhibition of Experimental Human Pancreatic Cancers by Receptor Targeted Cytotoxic LH-RH analog AEZS-108  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the cancers with the worse prognosis, thus any therapeutic improvement is imperative. Cytotoxic LH-RH analog, AN-152 (proprietary designation, AEZS-108), consisting of doxorubicin (DOX) conjugated to D-Lys6LH-RH, is now in clinical trials for targeted therapy of several sex hormone-dependent tumors that express LH-RH receptors. We investigated LH-RH receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma and the effects of AN-152 (AEZS-108) on experimental pancreatic cancers. We determined LH-RH receptor presence in human pancreatic cancer samples by immunohistochemistry and, in three human pancreatic cancer lines (SW-1990, Panc-1 and CFPAC-1), by binding assays and Western blotting. The effects of the cytotoxic LH-RH analog were investigated on growth of these same cancer lines xenografted into nude mice. We also analyzed differences between the antitumor effects of the cytotoxic analog and its cytotoxic radical alone, doxorubicin (DOX), on the expression of cancer-related genes by PCR arrays. LH-RH receptors were expressed in two randomly selected surgically removed human pancreatic cancer samples and in all three cancer lines. Cytotoxic LH-RH analogs powerfully inhibited growth of all three tumor lines in nude mice; AN-152 was significantly stronger than DOX on Panc-1 and CFPAC-1 cancers. PCR array showed that cytotoxic LH-RH analog AN-152 affected the expression of genes associated with cellular migration, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis more favorably than DOX, however the changes in gene expression varied considerably among the three cancer lines. Cytotoxic LH-RH analog, AEZS-108, may be a useful agent for the treatment of LH-RH receptor positive advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

Szepeshazi, Karoly; Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L.; Halmos, Gabor; Nadji, Mehrdad; Szalontay, Luca; Vidaurre, Irving; Abi-Chaker, Andrew; Rick, Ferenc G.

2013-01-01

402

Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Management of a Case of Autoimmune Pancreatitis With Extrapancreatic Manifestations.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share many clinical features like advanced age, painless jaundice, weight loss, and elevated serum levels of CA 19-9. The authors report a 58-year-old male patient provisionally diagnosed with periampullary carcinoma on the basis of ultrasonography and serological markers and planned for Whipple resection. F-FDG PET/CT findings were suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, subsequently confirmed on cytological diagnosis. The follow-up PET/CT scan after 1 week of steroid therapy showed regression of FDG uptake in most of the lesions with appearance of salivary gland uptake. PMID:23510878

Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natarajan Balasubramanian; Kochhar, Rakesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

2013-11-01

403

Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

2013-01-14

404

Hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis: presentation and management.  

PubMed

Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is reported to cause 1-4% of acute pancreatitis (AP) episodes. HTG is also implicated in more than half of gestational pancreatitis cases. Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism are conventionally divided into primary (genetic) and secondary causes, including diabetes, hypothyroidism, and obesity. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels above 1,000 mg/dl are usually considered necessary to ascribe causation for AP. The mechanism for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP) is postulated to involve hydrolysis of TG by pancreatic lipase and release of free fatty acids that induce free radical damage. Multiple small studies on HTGP management have evaluated the use of insulin, heparin, or both. Many series have also reported use of apheresis to reduce TG levels. Subsequent control of HTG with dietary restrictions, antihyperlipidemic agents, and even regular apheresis has been shown anecdotally in case series to prevent future episodes of AP. However, large multicenter studies are needed to optimize future management guidelines for patients with HTGP. PMID:19293788

Tsuang, Wayne; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Ruiz, Luis; Palascak, Joseph B; Gelrud, Andres

2009-03-17

405

Acute Pancreatitis (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... patient might have about a given condition. These articles are best for patients who want a general overview and who prefer short, easy-to-read materials. Patient information: Pancreatitis (The ...

406

Basic Principles of Pancreatic Scanning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role and value of pancreatic scanning in the diagnosis of malignant disease were evaluated. It was found that, by employing the Anger scintillation camera and by utilizing dynamic visualization techniques, adequate pictures of the pancreas could be ob...

J. S. Stevenson C. D. Maynard

1973-01-01

407

Liprotamase Capsules Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... that are given orally with each meal or snack.2,3,4 The objective of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is to deliver the enzymes with food to ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

408

Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis  

PubMed Central

Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets.

Witt, H

2003-01-01

409

Transcatheter embolization of celiac artery pseudoaneurysm following pancreatico-duodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. A case report.  

PubMed

A case of transcatheter embolization of a celiac artery pseudoaneurysm in a 70-year-old man is reported. The pseudoaneurysm was considered to be the result of pancreatic anastomotic leakage and an intra-abdominal abscess following pancreaticoduodenectomy with irradiation of 66 Gy for pancreatic carcinoma. To avoid recanalization of the pseudoaneurysm due to retrograde blood flow, first all branches of the celiac artery were embolized with metallic coils, and then the celiac trunk was also occluded. Hepatic arterial flow was preserved by the right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. After the procedure, the patient had no noticeable complications associated with the embolization nor any recurrence of the pancreatic cancer, and he achieved a 2-year survival. PMID:9817043

Mori, K; Murata, S; Yoshioka, H; Michishita, N; Kuramochi, M; Oda, T; Saida, Y; Itai, Y

1998-11-01

410

Cytokine storm in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Efforts to unravel the events in the evolution of tissue damage in acute pancreatitis have shown a number of inflammatory\\u000a mediators to be involved. The pathways of damage are similar, whatever the etiology of pancreatitis, with three phases of\\u000a progression: local acinar injury, systemic response, and generalized sepsis. The proinflammatory response is countered by\\u000a an anti-inflammatory response, and an

Rohit Makhija; Andrew N. Kingsnorth

2002-01-01

411

Total pancreatectomy for chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Ten instances of total pancreatectomy performed for chronic alcohol induced pancreatitis are reported. There was no hospital mortality, and all of the patients were free of pain. The most difficult problem was labile insulin sensitive diabetes in these patients who were chronic alcoholics. In addition, steatorrhea with weight loss, bleeding marginal ulcers and general weakness diminished working ability. The present data suggest that this procedure should be considered as the last resort in the treatment of severe instances of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:3883550

Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Lempinen, M

1985-03-01

412

Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis: Presentation and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is reported to cause 1–4% of acute pancreatitis (AP) episodes. HTG is also implicated in more than half of gestational pancreatitis cases. Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism are conventionally divided into primary (genetic) and secondary causes, including diabetes, hypothyroidism, and obesity. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels above 1,000 mg\\/dl are usually considered necessary to ascribe causation for AP. The mechanism

Wayne Tsuang; Udayakumar Navaneethan; Luis Ruiz; Joseph B Palascak; Andres Gelrud

2009-01-01

413

Xenobiotics and tropical chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in tropical zones is far higher than in temperate zones, but there is no explanation\\u000a for this difference. Detailed social, occupational, and dietary histories were taken from 79 patients attending two hospitals\\u000a in Madras, South India. There were 53 apparently sporadic cases with both pancreatic calculi and diabetes; six apparently\\u000a sporadic cases with noncalcific disease,

J. M. Braganza; S. John; I. Padmalayam; V. Mohanfl; M. Viswanathan; S. Chari; M. Madanagopalan

1990-01-01

414

BRCA2 and pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many factors, including a family history of cancer, have been implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer. Among these\\u000a factors, germline BRCA2 mutations have been clearly associated with the development of this disease, while mutations in BRCA1 appear to have a limited role. Patients with pancreatic cancer and germline BRCA2 mutations tend to be Ashkenazi Jewish, have a younger than

Ali Naderi; Fergus J. Couch

2002-01-01

415

Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. This devastating disease has the horrible honour of close to equal incidence\\u000a and mortality rates. Late diagnosis and a constitutive resistance to every chemotherapy approach are responsible for this\\u000a scenario. However, molecular biology tools in cooperation with translational efforts have dissected several secrets that underlie\\u000a pancreatic cancer. Progressive acquisition of malignant,